Science.gov

Sample records for related interaction phenomena

  1. 10.1142/9781911299660_fmatter years Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena (lirpp Vol. 13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2016-10-01

    When these proceedings of 13th international conference LASER INTERACTION AND RELATED PLASMA PHENOMENA (LIRPP) will be circulated in 1998, it is just 30 years that this conference series began. Professor Miley asked me to present some thoughts at this occasion since I am involved from the beginning to 1991 a director and then as emeritus director. The conferences were in the following years 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1979, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1995 and 1997 and reference to each of the conferences is simply given by the year in brackets...

  2. Fermi-edge singularity and related interaction induced phenomena in multilevel quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goremykina, A. S.; Sukhorukov, E. V.

    2017-04-01

    We study the manifestation of the nonperturbative effects of interaction in sequential tunneling between a quasi-one-dimensional system of chiral quantum Hall edge channels and a multilevel quantum dot (QD). We use the formal scattering theory approach to the bosonization technique to present an alternative derivation of the Fermi-edge singularity effect and demonstrate the origin of its universality. This approach allows us to address, within the same framework, plasmon-assisted sequential tunneling to relatively large dots and investigate the interaction-induced level broadening. The results are generalized by taking into account the dispersion in the spectrum of plasmons in the QD. We then discuss their modification in the presence of neutral modes, which can be realized either in a QD with two chiral strongly interacting edge channels or in a three-dimensional QD in the Coulomb blockade regime. In the former case a universal behavior of the tunneling rate is discovered.

  3. Understanding empathy and related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Shamasundar, C

    1999-01-01

    Over a period of time, the author arrived at a few tentative postulates concerning empathy and related processes based on some of his experiences and observations. The central theme of these postulates is, firstly, that interpersonal interaction is an interaction of the personal-space fields. Secondly, empathy, therapeutic benefit, and the professional stress are all related to the same process of interpersonal interaction. This interaction takes place as an enmeshment of personal spaces of the interacting individuals, and involves transfer of a wide range of information in the affective, cognitive, and other areas. This is because the personal spaces have fieldlike qualities analogous to what Kurt Lewin described. Thus, such phenomena as empathy, therapeutic benefit, professional stress are all consequences of the same process. It is possible to substantiate these postulates by diverse evidences in the published literature. The natural consequences of such an interpersonal interaction are empathic understanding, transfer of mood states (like hope, distress or expectancy), affective states (like anxiety, sadness, anger or hostility), ideas, images and even attitudes and values, etc. This phenomenon of transfer can explain such processes as therapeutic benefit in individual and group settings, professional stress, shared delusions, and even experimenter bias. Whether one becomes aware of such transferred information or not depends upon the intent and sensitivity of the participants.

  4. Results of literature search on dielectric properties and electron interaction phenomena related to spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, J. A.; Burke, E. A.; Frederickson, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the literature search was to determine the required material properties and electron interaction parameters needed for modeling charge buildup and breakdown in insulators. A brief overview of the results of the literature search is given. A partial list of the references covered is included in a bibliography. Although inorganic insulators were also considered in the search, coverage is limited to the organics, primarily Kapton and Teflon.

  5. Studies of cell pellets: II. Osmotic properties, electroporation, and related phenomena: membrane interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Abidor, I G; Li, L H; Hui, S W

    1994-01-01

    Using the relations between pellet structure and electric properties derived from the preceding paper, the responses of rabbit erythrocyte pellets to osmotic or colloidal-osmotic effects from exchanged supernatants and from electroporation were investigated. Changing the ionic strength of the supernatant, or replacing it with dextran or poly(ethylene glycol) solutions, caused changes of Rp according to the osmotic behavior of the pellet. Rp was high and ohmic before electroporation, but dropped abruptly in the first few microseconds once the transmembrane voltage exceeded the membrane breakdown potential. After the initial drop, Rp increased as a result of the reduction of intercellular space. Rp increased regardless of whether the pellets were formed before or immediately after the pulse, indicating that porated cells experienced a slow colloidal-osmotic swelling. The intercellular or intermembrane distances between cells in a pellet, as a function of osmotic, colloidal-osmotic, and centrifugal pressures used to compress rabbit erythrocyte pellets, were deduced from the Rp measurement. This offered a unique opportunity to measure the intermembrane repulsive force in a disordered system including living cells. Electrohemolysis of pelleted cells was reduced because of limited swelling by the compactness of the pellet. Electrofusion was observed when the applied voltage per pellet membrane exceeded the breakdown voltage. The fusion yield was independent of pulse length greater than 10 microseconds, because after the breakdown of membrane resistance, voltage drop across the pellet became insignificant. Replacing the supernatant with poly(ethylene glycol) or dextran solutions, or coating pellets with unporated cell layers reduced the colloidal-osmotic swelling and hemolysis, but also reduced the electrofusion yield. These manipulations can be explored to increase electroloading and electrofusion efficiencies. PMID:7522598

  6. Astrophysical phenomena related to supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, Jörg-Uwe

    2006-12-01

    reactions in stars. In the most active galaxies known, the radiating accretion disc of the central SMBH engine easily outshines the stellar light of the entire galaxy (Blandford 1995). In addition to the light, plasma streams can emerge from the innermost regions at relativistic velocities, returning energy to the host galaxy (host) and creating jets and lobes with strong observational signatures, especially at radio and X-ray wavelengths (Wilson 2003). New insights in the wide field of SMBH/host interaction are often related to the development of new, more sensitive instruments and telescopes. For example the idea, that a high luminosity AGN may result from a merger event between two galaxies, could only develop with the upcoming high resolution and sensitive imaging capabilities needed to detect the highly distorted host galaxy morphologies of (post-)merger galaxies (Heckman et al. 1986). Furthermore multi-wavelength approaches, which combine the results of measurements at different wavelengths, often lead to new conclusions or confirm unsecured hypotheses. Thus developing a new instrument can be as valuable as combining different datasets. I follow both approaches and developed projects which (i) deal with new instrumentation and telescope technology, (ii) combine datasets from different wavelengths and resolutions, and (iii) incorporate recent theoretical models and predictions, which can be verified empirically. While some projects are more focused on investigating the power of new observational techniques, others incorporate acknowledged instruments to probe predictions based on previous observations and models and trace special phenomena of SMBH/host interaction. But in most cases aspects of all three items appear. The SMBH/host interaction results in phenomena at all linear size scales of the system, from the direct accretion of matter onto the central black hole up to radio jets crossing the entire galaxy. Thus interaction effects do not simply concentrate on the

  7. Deep Inelastic Scattering and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Nigro, A.

    1997-03-01

    Inelastic Scattering * Instantons and Forward Jets at HERA * Forward Jets at HERA and at the Tevatron * Distinguishing the DGLAP and BFKL Evolutions with Transverse Momentum Spectra * The Properties of Hadrons in Neutrino-Neon Interactions * Transverse Energy Flow Distributions in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA * WORKING GROUP 5: Polarized Structure Functions * A New Measurement of the Spin Dependent Structure Functions gp1 and gd1 * Spin Asymmetry in Muon-deuteron Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized Target * Polarization of Valence and Light Sea Quarks in the Nucleon * Results from SLAC * Inclusive Spin-Dependent DIS from the Nucleon with HERMES * Semi-Inclusive Data from HERMES * Future Measurements of the g1 Spin Structure function with Polarized e - p Collisions and Determination of Δg * A Future Measurement of ΔG at CERN * The Polarized Two-Loop Splitting Functions * Polarized Parton Distributions from a Global NLO-QCD Analysis * Polarized Partons at Next-to-leading Order * Small-x Behaviour of the Structure Function g1 * On Small-x Resummations for the Evolution of Unpolarized and Polarized Non-Singlet and singlet Structure Functions * Parton Model Prediction for g2 * On the Twist-2 Contributions to Polarized Structure Functions and New Sum Rules * Some Aspects of the Polarized Structure Functions * Inclusive Production of Hadrons in l↑p↑ → h↑X and Spin Measurements * Polarized Structure Functions and QPMSR * Polarization Phenomena and Photon Dissociation in Deep-Inelastic Lepton-Nucleon Scattering * Prospects for Measuring Δg from Jets at HERA with Polarized Protons * On the Q2 Dependence of Asymmetry A1 * WORKING GROUP 6: Special Theoretical Topics * Coherence and Final States in DIS at Small x * Unitarity and Saturation in the Dipole Formulation * Radiative Corrections to the Leading log(1/x) Approximation for Structure Functions * Effective Action Approach for Small-x Physics in QCD * Unitarization of BFKL Pomeron * The Role of the

  8. Relating Macroscopic Thermal Phenomena with Molecular Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2002-03-01

    A series of observations and activities have been developed to help students enrich their understanding of how physicists can use model building to construct self-consistent models of physical reality.* This talk will describe the instructional use of integrated microcomputer-based laboratory measurements of macroscopic phenomena and digital video analysis of simulated microscopic events to help students understand the ideal gas law, the first law of thermodynamics, and heat engines. *Workshop Physics Activity Guide (Module 3), P. Laws, (John Wiley and Sons, Inc., NY, 1997).

  9. Bulk Rashba Semiconductors and Related Quantum Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Ogawa, Naoki

    2017-03-29

    Bithmuth tellurohalides BiTeX (X = Cl, Br and I) are model examples of bulk Rashba semiconductors, exhibiting a giant Rashba-type spin splitting among their both valence and conduction bands. Extensive spectroscopic and transport experiments combined with the state-of-the-art first-principles calculations have revealed many unique quantum phenomena emerging from the bulk Rashba effect in these systems. The novel features such as the exotic inter- and intra-band optical transitions, enhanced magneto-optical response, divergent orbital dia-/para-magnetic susceptibility and helical spin textures with a nontrivial Berry's phase in the momentum space are among the salient discoveries, all arising from this effect. Also, it is theoretically proposed and indications have been experimentally reported that bulk Rashba semiconductors such as BiTeI have the capability of becoming a topological insulator under the application of a hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overview these studies and show that BiTeX are an ideal platform to explore the next aspects of quantum matter, which could ultimately be utilized to create spintronic devices with novel functionalities.

  10. Gamma-ray bursts and related phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piran, T.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in the 1960s. The BATSE detector on the Compton-GRO satellite has been detecting one burst per day for the last six years. Its findings have revolutionized our ideas about the nature of these objects. They have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances. This idea was accepted with difficulties at first. However, the recent discovery of an X-ray afterglow by the Italian/Dutch satellite BeppoSAX led to a detection of high red-shift absorption lines in the optical afterglow of GRB 970508 and to a confirmation of its cosmological origin. The simplest and practically inevitable interpretation of these observations is that GRBs result from the conversion of the kinetic energy of ultra-relativistic particles flux to radiation in an optically thin region. Recent studies suggest the "internal-external" model: internal shocks that take place within the relativistic flow produce the GRB while the subsequent interaction of the flow with the external medium produces the afterglow. The "inner engine" that produces the flow is, however, hidden from direct observations. The author reviews this model with a specific emphasis on its implications to underground physics.

  11. Phenomena related to CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola

    2010-02-10

    We report recent CDF results on CP violation in B{sup -}->DK{sup -} modes, where D goes to Cabibbo suppressed (pipi, KK) or doubly cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}pi{sup -}) modes, which are related to CKM angle gamma. We also describe direct CP violation measurements in charmless two-body decays of B{sub s}{sup 0}->Kpi and LAMBDA{sub b}{sup 0}->pK, ppi modes, which are unique to the CDF experiment. We also report on CP violation measurements in D{sup 0}->h{sup +}h{sup -} modes.

  12. Phenomena related to CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola; /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-10-01

    We report recent CDF results on CP violation in B{sup -} {yields} DK{sup -} modes, where D goes to Cabibbo suppressed ({pi}{pi}, KK) or doubly cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) modes, which are related to CKM angle gamma. We also describe direct CP violation measurements in charmless two-body decays of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK, p{pi} modes, which are unique to the CDF experiment. We also report on CP violation measurements in D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} modes.

  13. [Problems of psychiatrization, medicalization and related social phenomena].

    PubMed

    Opalić, Petar

    2009-01-01

    The introduction contains definitions of the terms psychiatrization, medicalization, psychotherapeutization and psychologization of the society, i.e. social problems. Different aspects of the above phenomena are analyzed, their origin, relation with the professions they originate from, and, finally, their social significance, i.e. social function. In conclusion, the article points to different possibilities to prevent the above phenomena, undesirable both for the society and the objectives and activities of the professions they originate from.

  14. Solid-state flow, mechanical alloying, and melt-related phenomena for [001] single-crystal tungsten ballistic rod penetrators interacting with steel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizana, Carlos

    This research program consists of a detailed microstructural investigation of in-target, single-crystal [001], clad (with Inconel 718) and unclad, W long-rod, ballistic penetrators. The rods were shot into rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) steel targets approximately 76 mm in thickness at impact velocities ranging from 1100 m/s to 1350 m/s. A comprehensive microstructural overview of the penetration process was obtained from this investigation. Solid-state flow/erosion, solid-state target/rod mixing as well as influencing factors such as strain rate, penetration performance, cladding interference and the interaction between target and projectile were emphasized. Some of the microstructural features observed, including deformation twins, cleaving, adiabatic shear bands and DRX support an overall solid-state penetration process. Furthermore they provide for a unifying perspective for the applicability of the hydrodynamic paradigm (DOP ≈ l∘rp/rt ) and earlier mechanistic erosion approaches. DRX and grain growth within adiabatic shear bands observed at specific high strain/strain-rate zones within the rods suggest that the projectile erodes by means of these microstructures in a solid-state form. This erosion process contributes to the performance of the rod by either allowing optimum flow of rod material which would increase penetration depth, or by maximizing rod material consumption which would reduce it. Since flow and/or erosion are also necessary in the target for perforation to occur, it is not surprising that the erosion process in the target was observed to mirror the one in the projectile. That is both target and projectile developed erosion zones with DRX facilitating the extreme deformation via dense overlapping shear band formation. Mechanical alloying and/or mixing of the target (steel) and rod (W, or W-Inconel 718) was also observed and investigated. Selective etching techniques as well as energy-dispersive x-ray mapping revealed unambiguous evidence of

  15. The emergence of collective phenomena in systems with random interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramkina, Volha

    Emergent phenomena are one of the most profound topics in modern science, addressing the ways that collectivities and complex patterns appear due to multiplicity of components and simple interactions. Ensembles of random Hamiltonians allow one to explore emergent phenomena in a statistical way. In this work we adopt a shell model approach with a two-body interaction Hamiltonian. The sets of the two-body interaction strengths are selected at random, resulting in the two-body random ensemble (TBRE). Symmetries such as angular momentum, isospin, and parity entangled with complex many-body dynamics result in surprising order discovered in the spectrum of low-lying excitations. The statistical patterns exhibited in the TBRE are remarkably similar to those observed in real nuclei. Signs of almost every collective feature seen in nuclei, namely, pairing superconductivity, deformation, and vibration, have been observed in random ensembles [3, 4, 5, 6]. In what follows a systematic investigation of nuclear shape collectivities in random ensembles is conducted. The development of the mean field, its geometry, multipole collectivities and their dependence on the underlying two-body interaction are explored. Apart from the role of static symmetries such as SU(2) angular momentum and isospin groups, the emergence of dynamical symmetries including the seniority SU(2), rotational symmetry, as well as the Elliot SU(3) is shown to be an important precursor for the existence of geometric collectivities.

  16. Symposium Entitled: Particle Lung Interactions: ’Overload’ Related Phenomena. A Journal of Aerosol Medicine - Deposition, Clearance, and Effects in the Lung. Volume 3, Supplement 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    results sugest that alveolar overload greatly enhances particle translocation to the interstitium where secretion of any macrophage-derived factors is...very small alumino-silicates, particularly in coal miners. Particle analysis is a useful technique to evaluate type and amount of exposure, to evaluate...release and a persistent increase in AM fibronectin secretion . S-$ Ristopathology demonstrated dose-related interstitial inflammation with fibrosis

  17. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-02-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to gain an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in material removal by fluidjet machining processes. Experiments were performed to determine conditions under which the liquid jet impacting a solid material will cause material removal and also to delineate possible physical mechanisms of mass removal at optimum jet-cutting conditions. We have also carried out numerical simulations of jet-induced surface pressure rises and of the material deformation and spallation behavior due to multiple droplet impacts. Results obtained from the experiments and theoretical calculations and their physical implications are also discussed.

  18. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials [preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S-W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  19. Seasonality of alcohol-related phenomena in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silm, Siiri; Ahas, Rein

    2005-03-01

    We studied alcohol consumption and its consequences as a seasonal phenomenon in Estonia and analysed the social and environmental factors that may cause its seasonal rhythm. There are two important questions when researching the seasonality of human activities: (1) whether it is caused by natural or social factors, and (2) whether the impact of the factors is direct or indirect. Often the seasonality of social phenomena is caused by social factors, but the triggering mechanisms are related to environmental factors like temperature, precipitation, and radiation via the circannual calendar. The indicators of alcohol consumption in the current paper are grouped as: (1) pre-consumption phenomena, i.e. production, tax and excise, sales (beer, wine and vodka are analysed separately), and (2) post-consumption phenomena, i.e. alcohol-related crime and traffic accidents and the number of people detained in lockups and admitted to alcohol treatment clinics. In addition, seasonal variability in the amount of alcohol advertising has been studied, and a survey has been carried out among 87 students of Tartu University. The analysis shows that different phenomena related to alcohol have a clear seasonal rhythm in Estonia. The peak period of phenomena related to beer is in the summer, from June to August and the low point is during the first months of the year. Beer consumption correlates well with air temperature. The consumption of vodka increases sharply at the end of the year and in June; the production of vodka does not have a significant correlation with negative temperatures. The consumption of wine increases during summer and in December. The consequences of alcohol consumption, expressed as the rate of traffic accidents or the frequency of medical treatment, also show seasonal variability. Seasonal variability of alcohol consumption in Estonia is influenced by natural factors (temperature, humidity, etc.) and by social factors (celebrations, vacations, etc.). However

  20. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of depression-related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Armey, Michael F; Schatten, Heather T; Haradhvala, Natasha; Miller, Ivan W

    2015-08-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is one research method increasingly employed to better understand the processes that underpin depression and related phenomena. In particular, EMA is well suited to the study of affect (e.g., positive and negative affect), affective responses to stress (e.g., emotion reactivity), and behaviors (e.g., activity level, sleep) that are associated with depression. Additionally, EMA can provide insights into self-harm behavior (i.e. suicide and non-suicidal self-injury), and other mood disorders (e.g. bipolar disorder) commonly associated with depressive episodes. Given the increasing availability and affordability of handheld computing devices such as smartphones, EMA is likely to play an increasingly important role in the study of depression and related phenomena in the future.

  1. Theoretical and experimental studies of the nature and characteristics of space related plasma resonance phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of space related plasma wave propagation and resonance phenomena cover whistler emissions and instabilities, low frequency plasma instabilities, nonlinear wave interactions and scattering from plasma column, and the resonance come of dipole antenna immersed in cold overdense magnetoplasma.

  2. Scaling relations and multicritical phenomena from functional renormalization.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Igor

    2015-06-01

    We investigate multicritical phenomena in O(N)+O(M) models by means of nonperturbative renormalization group equations. This constitutes an elementary building block for the study of competing orders in a variety of physical systems. To identify possible multicritical points in phase diagrams with two ordered phases, we compute the stability of isotropic and decoupled fixed point solutions from scaling potentials of single-field models. We verify the validity of Aharony's scaling relation within the scale-dependent derivative expansion of the effective average action. We discuss implications for the analysis of multicritical phenomena with truncated flow equations. These findings are an important step towards studies of competing orders and multicritical quantum phase transitions within the framework of functional renormalization.

  3. DEMETER Observations of Equatorial Plasma Depletions and Related Ionospheric Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelier, J.; Malingre, M.; Pfaff, R.; Jasperse, J.; Parrot, M.

    2008-12-01

    DEMETER, the first micro-satellite of the CNES MYRIAD program, was launched from Baikonour on June 29, 2004 on a nearly circular, quasi helio-synchronous polar orbit at ~ 715 km altitude. The DEMETER mission focuses primarily on the search for a possible coupling between seismic activity and ionospheric disturbances as well as on the effects of natural phenomena such as tropospheric thunderstorms and man-made activities on the ionosphere. The scientific payload provides fairly complete measurements of the ionospheric plasma, energetic particles above ~ 70 keV, and plasma waves, up to 20 kHz for the magnetic and 3.3 MHz for the electric components. Several studies related to space weather and ionospheric physics have been conducted over the past years. Following a brief description of the payload and the satellite modes of operation, this presentation will focus on a set of results that provide a new insight into the physics of instabilities in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. The observations were performed during the major magnetic storm of November 2004. Deep plasma depletions were observed on several night-time passes at low latitudes characterized by the decrease of the plasma density by nearly 3 orders of magnitude relative to the undisturbed plasma, and a significant abundance of molecular ions. These features can be best interpreted as resulting from the rise of the F-layer above the satellite altitude over an extended region of the ionosphere. In one of the passes, DEMETER was operated in the Burst mode and the corresponding high resolution data allowed for the discovery of two unexpected phenomena. The first one is the existence of high intensity monochromatic wave packets at the LH frequency that develop during the decay phase of intense bursts of broadband LH turbulence. The broadband LH turbulence is triggered by whistlers emitted by lightning from atmospheric thunderstorms beneath the satellite. The second unexpected feature is the detection of a

  4. Scaling of Quench Front and Entrainment-Related Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Aumiller, D. L.; Hourser, R. J.; Holowach, M. J.; Hochreiter, L. E.; Cheung, F-B.

    2002-04-01

    The scaling of thermal hydraulic systems is of great importance in the development of experiments in laboratory-scale test facilities that are used to replicate the response of full-size prototypical designs. One particular phenomenon that is of interest in experimental modeling is the quench front that develops during the reflood phase in a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) following a large-break LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The purpose of this study is to develop a scaling methodology such that the prototypical quench front related phenomena can be preserved in a laboratory-scale test facility which may have material, geometrical, fluid, and flow differences as compared to the prototypical case. A mass and energy balance on a Lagrangian quench front control volume along with temporal scaling methods are utilized in developing the quench front scaling groups for a phenomena-specific second-tier scaling analysis. A sample calculation is presented comparing the quench front scaling groups calculated for a prototypical Westinghouse 17 x 17 PWR fuel design and that of the geometry and material configuration used in the FLECHT SEASET series of experiments.

  5. Interfacial Phenomena in Noble Metal-C{sub 60} Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hai-Ping Cheng

    2008-06-15

    We have accomplished major tasks concerning fundamental physical processes during particle-surface interaction, including structure and electronic structure of surfaces patterned with nanoarrays, dynamics and energy distribution of energetic particle-surface interaction, properties of nano-aggregates, as well as properties of high T{sub c} cuprates.

  6. Interaction phenomena in graphene seen through quantum capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, G. L.; Jalil, R.; Belle, Branson; Mayorov, Alexander S.; Blake, Peter; Schedin, Frederick; Morozov, Sergey V.; Ponomarenko, Leonid A.; Chiappini, F.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, Uli; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Elias, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Capacitance measurements provide a powerful means of probing the density of states. The technique has proved particularly successful in studying 2D electron systems, revealing a number of interesting many-body effects. Here, we use large-area high-quality graphene capacitors to study behavior of the density of states in this material in zero and high magnetic fields. Clear renormalization of the linear spectrum due to electron–electron interactions is observed in zero field. Quantizing fields lead to splitting of the spin- and valley-degenerate Landau levels into quartets separated by interaction-enhanced energy gaps. These many-body states exhibit negative compressibility but the compressibility returns to positive in ultrahigh B. The reentrant behavior is attributed to a competition between field-enhanced interactions and nascent fractional states. PMID:23401538

  7. Hypersonic shock-interaction phenomena applicable to space shuttle configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Graumann, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    The convective heat transfer distribution for space shuttle configurations is discussed. The viscous/inviscid interactions associated with the complex three dimensional flow fields are examined. Two basic conditions are considered as follows: (1) models consisting of basic elemental combinations and (2) models of specific flight vehicles. The test facilities and test programs used to obtain data on the fuselage flow field and the wing flow field are described.

  8. Non-perturbative phenomena in resonantly interacting quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederix, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we present an inhomogeneous theory for the low-temperature properties of a resonantly interacting Fermi mixture in a trap that goes beyond the local-density approximation. We compare a Bogoliubov-de Gennes and a Landau-Ginzburg approach that both include mean-field-like self-energy effects to account for the strong interactions at unitarity. We conclude that the Landau-Ginzburg approach is more appropriate when dealing with a first-order phase transition. We show diagrammatically how these self-energy effects arise from fluctuations in the superfluid order parameter. Gradient terms of the order parameter are included to account for inhomogeneities. This approach incorporates the state-of-the-art knowledge of the homogeneous mixture with a population imbalance exactly and gives good agreement with the experimental density profiles of Shin et al. [Nature 451, 689 (2008)]. We calculate the universal surface tension due to the observed interface between the equal-density superfluid and the partially polarized normal state of the mixture. We find that the exotic and gapless superfluid Sarma phase can be stabilized at this interface, even when this phase is unstable in the bulk of the gas. We also discuss the possibility of a metastable state to explain the deformation of the superfluid core that is seen in the experiment of Partridge et al. [Science 311, 503 (2006)]. In the second part, we show that a two-channel mean-field theory for a Bose gas near a Feshbach resonance allows for an analytic computation of the chemical potential, and therefore the universal constant β, at unitarity. To improve on this mean-field theory, which physically neglects condensate depletion, we study a variational Jastrow ansatz for the ground-state wavefunction and use the hypernetted-chain (HNC/0) approximation to minimize the energy for all positive values of the scattering length. We also show that other important physical quantities such as Tan

  9. Integrated Physics Advances in Simulation of Wave Interactions with Extended MHD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, R; Breslau, J.; Chance, M.; Chen, J.; Choi, M.; Elwasif, Wael R; Fu, GuoYong; Harvey, R. W.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott; Ku, Long-Poe; McCune, Douglas; Schissel, D.; Schnack, D.; Wright, J. C.

    2007-06-01

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are: (A) To improve our understanding of interactions that both RF wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (B) To develop an integrated computational system for treating multi-physics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project (FSP).

  10. RELATION BETWEEN METAMORPHOSIS AND OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL PHENOMENA IN AMPHIBIANS

    PubMed Central

    Uhlenhuth, Eduard

    1919-01-01

    1. The difference in time existing between the first shedding of the skin and the reduction of the gills to mere stubs without fringes is constant and unchangeable, which indicates that the fundamental cause for both is a common one. 2. This common cause is the action of iodine, and consequently both phenomena constitute, or at least are part of, the metamorphosis of the salamanders. 3. The development of the adult skin coloration and of the legs may take place either before or after metamorphosis. Iodine cannot enforce either of these phenomena. 4. The same is true of the development of the sex organs. 5. Development of the tongue and palatal teeth can be checked even in animals in which metamorphosis takes place. 6. Consequently development of the skin coloration, as well as development of the legs, sex organs, tongue, and palatal teeth are all caused by substances not identical with the substances causing metamorphosis and, since they are also all independent of each other in their development, it is probable that special chemical mechanisms exist for the development of each one of these six groups of organs. 7. This assumption is also supported by the fact that the order of development in several of these organ pairs can be changed by a difference in temperature, which would indicate that the development of each of these groups of organs is caused by chemical reactions with different temperature coefficients. 8. That the germ cells can develop in amphibians either before or after metamorphosis does not mean that the germ plasma is opposed as a unit to the somatic plasma, since other organs which are believed to be part of the somatic plasma behave in this respect like the germ cells. 9. The noteworthy feature of the amphibian metamorphosis is that instead of being controlled and kept in harmony by the organic individual the development of at least six groups of organs is controlled separately by the action of probably six different chemical mechanisms, each of

  11. Hydrogen-methane separation processes and related phenomena. [112 references

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.T.; Wang, S.S.; Yang, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A thorough and up-dated literature survey has been conducted on processes for separating hydrogen and methane. This was done in conjunction with our work of developing a more energy-efficient and lower-cost process based on cyclic, fixed-bed processes using coal chars as the sorbents. Although the review has covered all hydrocarbon separation processes, the focuses were on physical adsorption phenomena and theories (for both single and mixed gases), surface and pore characteristics of coals and heat-treated coals, and the continuous or semi-continuous chromatographic separation methods. There has been a sharply increasing interest in the past 10 to 15 years in developing processes for hydrocarbon separation based on adsorption/desorption; this is particularly true since the energy costs became increasingly higher recently. The rigorous work on competitive adsorption and on the cyclic (including parametric pumping) processes has all been done in the past 13 years. On the other hand, it is disappointing to find the absence of knowledge on adsorption on coal chars and the lack of it on adsorption on raw coals as well.

  12. Interactive phenomena in supersonic jet mixing problems. I Phenomenology and numerical modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The interactive phenomena that occur in supersonic jet mixing flowfields, and numerical modeling techniques developed to analyze such phenomena are discussed. A spatial marching procedure based on solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes jet mixing equations is presented. This procedure combines shock-capturing methodology for the analysis of supersonic mixing regions with pressure-split methodology for the analysis of subsonic mixing regions. The two regions are coupled at viscous sonic lines utilizing a viscous-characteristic coupling procedure. Specialized techniques for the treatment of jet boundary growth, strong discontinuties (Mach disks), and small embedded subsonic zones (behind Mach disks) are presented. Turbulent processes are represented by two-equation turbulence model formulations. In Part II of this article, numerical studies are presented for a variety of supersonic jet interactive phenomena.

  13. Using Linguistic Phenomena to Motivate a Set of Coherence Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Alistair; Dale, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Explains rhetorical structure theory's conception of relations and why it has appeal in the domain of text generation. Outlines problems resulting from the widespread adoption of the relational concept. Surveys suggestions about how a standard set of relations could be motivated. Presents a new methodology consisting of gathering and classifying a…

  14. Modeling some two-dimensional relativistic phenomena using an educational interactive graphics software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, G. P.; Ravuri, Tushar R.

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes several relativistic phenomena in two spatial dimensions that can be modeled using the collision program of Spacetime Software. These include the familiar aberration, the Doppler effect, the headlight effect, and the invariance of the speed of light in vacuum, in addition to the rather unfamiliar effects like the dragging of light in a moving medium, reflection at moving mirrors, Wigner rotation of noncommuting boosts, and relativistic rotation of shrinking and expanding rods. All these phenomena are exhibited by tracings of composite computer printouts of the collision movie. It is concluded that an interactive educational graphics software with pleasing visuals can have considerable investigative power packed within it.

  15. Study of shock waves and related phenomena motivated by astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; ...

    2016-04-01

    This study discusses the recent research in High-Energy-Density Physics at our Center. Our work in complex hydrodynamics is now focused on mode coupling in the Richtmyer-Meshkov process and on the supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These processes are believed to occur in a wide range of astrophysical circumstances. In radiation hydrodynamics, we are studying radiative reverse shocks relevant to cataclysmic variable stars. Our work on magnetized flows seeks to produce magnetized jets and study their interactions. We build the targets for all these experiments, and simulate them using our CRASH code. We also conduct diagnostic research, focused primarily on imaging x-ray spectroscopymore » and its applications to scattering and fluorescence.« less

  16. Study of shock waves and related phenomena motivated by astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Malamud, G.; Manuel, M.; Stefano, C. A. Di; Gamboa, E. J.; Krauland, C. M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Wan, W. C.; Young, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-01

    This study discusses the recent research in High-Energy-Density Physics at our Center. Our work in complex hydrodynamics is now focused on mode coupling in the Richtmyer-Meshkov process and on the supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These processes are believed to occur in a wide range of astrophysical circumstances. In radiation hydrodynamics, we are studying radiative reverse shocks relevant to cataclysmic variable stars. Our work on magnetized flows seeks to produce magnetized jets and study their interactions. We build the targets for all these experiments, and simulate them using our CRASH code. We also conduct diagnostic research, focused primarily on imaging x-ray spectroscopy and its applications to scattering and fluorescence.

  17. Study of shock waves and related phenomena motivated by astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Malamud, G.; Manuel, M.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Gamboa, E. J.; Krauland, C. M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Wan, W. C.; Young, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the recent research in High-Energy-Density Physics at our Center. Our work in complex hydrodynamics is now focused on mode coupling in the Richtmyer- Meshkov process and on the supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These processes are believed to occur in a wide range of astrophysical circumstances. In radiation hydrodynamics, we are studying radiative reverse shocks relevant to cataclysmic variable stars. Our work on magnetized flows seeks to produce magnetized jets and study their interactions. We build the targets for all these experiments, and simulate them using our CRASH code. We also conduct diagnostic research, focused primarily on imaging x-ray spectroscopy and its applications to scattering and fluorescence.

  18. The Relation between Cognitive Development and Anxiety Phenomena in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broeren, Suzanne; Muris, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relation between cognitive development and fear, anxiety, and behavioral inhibition in a non-clinical sample of 226 Dutch children aged 4-9 years. To assess cognitive development, children were tested with Piagetian conservation tasks and a Theory-of-Mind (TOM) test. Fears were measured by means of a self-report scale completed by…

  19. The relation between the phenomena of disease, illness, and suffering.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Elisabeth; Nåden, Dagfinn; Lindström, Unni Å

    2014-01-01

    Persons experiencing disease and illness experience suffering as well. How nurses assess patients' problems holistically has been debated a lot. This article suggests one possible way of assessing patients' situation as a whole by seeing patients' diseases in relation to suffering.

  20. Relationality and social interaction.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Wendy

    2009-06-01

    This paper explores Bourdieu's account of a relational social space, and his relative neglect of social interaction within this framework. Bourdieu includes social capital as one of the key relational elements of his social space, but says much less about it than economic or cultural capital, and levels of social capital are rarely measured in his work. Bourdieu is reluctant to focus on the content of social networks as part of his rejection of substantialist thinking. The neglect of substantive networks creates problems for Bourdieu's framework, because many of Bourdieu's core concepts rest upon assumptions about their interactional properties (in particular, the prevalence of homophilous differential association) which are left unexamined. It is argued here that Bourdieu's neglect of the substance of social networks is related to the criticisms that Bourdieu's framework often encounters, and that this neglect bears re-examination, since it is helpful to think of the ways in which differentiated social networks contribute to the development of habitus, help form fields, and so constitute the intersubjective social relations within which sociality, and practice more generally, occur.

  1. Physical phenomena related to crystal growth in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth which may be affected by the space environment was studied. Conclusions as to the relative technical and scientific advantages of crystal growth in space over earth bound growth, without regard to economic advantage, were deduced. It was concluded that the crucibleless technique will most directly demonstrate the unique effects of the greatly reduced gravity in the space environment. Several experiments, including crucibleless crystal growth using solar energy and determination of diffusion coefficients of common dopants in liquid silicon were recommended.

  2. Correlated electrons in coupled quantum dots and related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugajin, Ryuichi

    1998-01-01

    Three topics related to correlated electrons in coupled quantum dots are discussed. The first is quasi-resonance between multi-electron states, which causes hitherto unremarked types of resonant absorption in coupled quantum dots. The second is electron tunneling through a Hubbard gap, which is induced by an increase in the density of electrons in a quantum-dot chain under an overall confining potential. The third is Mott transition in a two-dimensional quantum-dot array induced by an external electric field. In this system, the metal-insulator transition goes through a heavy electron phase in which the density of correlated electrons fluctuates.

  3. BiSb and spin-related thermoelectric phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jin, Hyungyu; Zheng, Yuanhua; Watzman, Sarah J.; Prakash, Arati

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the factors limiting the figure of merit zT of conventional thermoelectrics especially at cryogenic temperatures and then highlights modern approaches used to increase zT below 200 K. Two type of materials are discussed. The first are BiSb alloys, relatively conventional thermoelectrics in which the zT is enhanced by using resonant levels. The second is the spin- Seebeck effect (SSE), a new solid-state energy conversion technology. Classical thermoelectric and SSE physics are combined to provide new concepts, like magnon-drag, in which we hope to increase the performance of solid-state coolers by exploiting the spin degree of freedom.

  4. Role of spin dependent f- d interaction (Hund coupling) in mixed-valence phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, N. K.; Mukherjee, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of spin dependent f- d interaction (Hund coupling) in mixed-valence phenomena has been investigated within Falicov-Kimball model extended by the spin interaction. Calculations have been performed both at zero and at finite temperatures using exact diagonalization method. It is observed that spin dependent f- d interaction (1) shifts the d-level energy and increases the width of valence transition, (2) increases disorder in the system, (3) causes both single peak and double peak structures to appear in specific heat curves, (4) increases the growth of antiferromagnetic correlations.

  5. Migraine aura and related phenomena: beyond scotomata and scintillations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, MB; Hadjikhani, N

    2013-01-01

    Migraine affects the cortical physiology and may induce dysfunction both ictally and interictally. Although visual symptoms predominate during aura, other contiguous cortical areas related to less impressive symptoms are also impaired in migraine. Answers from 72.2% migraine with aura and 48.6% of migraine without aura patients on human faces and objects recognition, colour perception, proper names recalling and memory in general showed dysfunctions suggestive of prosopagnosia, dyschromatopsia, ideational apraxia, alien hand syndrome, proper name anomia or aphasia, varying in duration and severity. Symptoms frequently occurred in a successively building-up pattern fitting with the geographical distribution of the various cortical functions. When specifically inquired, migraineurs reveal less evident symptoms that are not usually considered during routine examination. Spreading depression most likely underlies the aura symptoms progression. Interictal involvement indicates that MWA and MWoA are not completely silent outside attacks, and that both subforms of migraine may share common mechanisms. PMID:17944958

  6. Lightning and related phenomena in thunderstorms and squall lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Taylor, W. L.; Macgorman, D. R.; Brandes, E.; Mazur, V.; Arnold, R.; Marshall, T.; Christian, H.; Goodman, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    During the past few years, cooperative research on storm electricity has yielded the following results of both basic and applied interest: (1) the intracloud to cloud-to-ground flashing ratio can be as great as 40:1; (2) as storm cells in a squall line dissipate, longer flashes become predominant; (3) there are two centers of lightning activity maxima that are vertically separated, the lower maximum at about 5 km and the upper at about 12 km. In addition, (4) storms produce lightning in their upper regions at a high rate; (5) lightning appears to be related in time to convective motions; (6) positive cloud-to-ground flashes occur in the severe stage of storms and in the later, well-developed stage of squall line storms; (7) mesoscale convective complexes have been observed to have cloud-to-ground flashing rates of more than 48/min; and (8) the electric field in anvils well away from the main storm core (more than 60 km) can be very high, more than 94 kV/m.

  7. Groundwater flow pattern and related environmental phenomena in complex geologic setting based on integrated model construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ádám; Havril, Tímea; Simon, Szilvia; Galsa, Attila; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Müller, Imre; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater flow, driven, controlled and determined by topography, geology and climate, is responsible for several natural surface manifestations and affected by anthropogenic processes. Therefore, flowing groundwater can be regarded as an environmental agent. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow could reveal the flow pattern and explain the observed features. In complex geologic framework, where the geologic-hydrogeologic knowledge is limited, the groundwater flow model could not be constructed based solely on borehole data, but geophysical information could aid the model building. The integrated model construction was presented via the case study of the Tihany Peninsula, Hungary, with the aims of understanding the background and occurrence of groundwater-related environmental phenomena, such as wetlands, surface water-groundwater interaction, slope instability, and revealing the potential effect of anthropogenic activity and climate change. The hydrogeologic model was prepared on the basis of the compiled archive geophysical database and the results of recently performed geophysical measurements complemented with geologic-hydrogeologic data. Derivation of different electrostratigraphic units, revealing fracturing and detecting tectonic elements was achieved by systematically combined electromagnetic geophysical methods. The deduced information can be used as model input for groundwater flow simulation concerning hydrostratigraphy, geometry and boundary conditions. The results of numerical modelling were interpreted on the basis of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and validated by field mapping of groundwater-related phenomena. The 3D model clarified the hydraulic behaviour of the formations, revealed the subsurface hydraulic connection between groundwater and wetlands and displayed the groundwater discharge pattern, as well. The position of wetlands, their vegetation type, discharge features and induced landslides were explained as

  8. Sensory phenomena related to tics, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and global functioning in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kano, Yukiko; Matsuda, Natsumi; Nonaka, Maiko; Fujio, Miyuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kono, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    Sensory phenomena, including premonitory urges, are experienced by patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The goal of the present study was to investigate such phenomena related to tics, obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS), and global functioning in Japanese patients with TS. Forty-one patients with TS were assessed using the University of São Paulo Sensory Phenomena Scale (USP-SPS), the Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale (PUTS), the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS), the Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DY-BOCS), and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale. USP-SPS and PUTS total scores were significantly correlated with YGTSS total and vocal tics scores. Additionally, both sensory phenomena severity scores were significantly correlated with DY-BOCS total OCS scores. Of the six dimensional OCS scores, the USP-SPS scores were significantly correlated with measures of aggression and sexual/religious dimensions. Finally, the PUTS total scores were significantly and negatively correlated with GAF scores. By assessing premonitory urges and broader sensory phenomena, and by viewing OCS from a dimensional approach, this study provides significant insight into sensory phenomena related to tics, OCS, and global functioning in patients with TS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Apparatus and method for interaction phenomena with world modules in data-flow-based simulation

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.; Gottlieb, Eric J.; McDonald, Michael J.; Oppel, III, Fred J.

    2006-08-01

    A method and apparatus accommodate interaction phenomenon in a data-flow-based simulation of a system of elements, by establishing meta-modules to simulate system elements and by establishing world modules associated with interaction phenomena. World modules are associated with proxy modules from a group of meta-modules associated with one of the interaction phenomenon. The world modules include a communication world, a sensor world, a mobility world, and a contact world. World modules can be further associated with other world modules if necessary. Interaction phenomenon are simulated in corresponding world modules by accessing member functions in the associated group of proxy modules. Proxy modules can be dynamically allocated at a desired point in the simulation to accommodate the addition of elements in the system of elements such as a system of robots, a system of communication terminals, or a system of vehicles, being simulated.

  10. Reconsideration of inviscid shock interactions and transition phenomena on double-wedge geometries in a M ∞ = 9 hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. M.; Myong, R. S.; Yang, Y. R.; Cho, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    Shock polar analysis as well as 2-D numerical computation technique are used to illustrate a diverse flow topology induced by shock/shock interaction in a M ∞ = 9 hypersonic flow. New flow features associated with inviscid shock wave interaction on double-wedge-like geometries are reported in this study. Transition of shock interaction, unsteady oscillation, and hysteresis phenomena in the RR ↔ MR transition, and the physical mechanisms behind these phenomena are numerically studied and analyzed.

  11. The Use of the Principle of Relativity in the Interpretation of Phenomena by Undergraduate Physics Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietrocola, Mauricio; Zylbersztajn, Arden

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the extent to which the Principle of Relativity was employed by students when dealing with various phenomena. Concludes that the Principle of Relativity is not used as an heuristic tool in students' answers, and that the situations presented were not regarded as "problematic" by the students, who primarily used interpretive…

  12. The Use of the Principle of Relativity in the Interpretation of Phenomena by Undergraduate Physics Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietrocola, Mauricio; Zylbersztajn, Arden

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the extent to which the Principle of Relativity was employed by students when dealing with various phenomena. Concludes that the Principle of Relativity is not used as an heuristic tool in students' answers, and that the situations presented were not regarded as "problematic" by the students, who primarily used interpretive…

  13. Hyperfine Interactions of 57Fe Nuclei in the Study of Interdiffusion Phenomena and Phase Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbucicchio, M.; Palombarini, G.; Rateo, M.

    1998-07-01

    The effects of interdiffusion phenomena and reactions occurring in the early stages of the interaction at 1273 K between iron and chromium monoborides were studied by transmission Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction techniques, and modifications occurring in Fe/Al multilayers during both deposition and subsequent thermal aging at 400 K in vacuum or air were studied by conversion electron Mössbauer and Auger electron depth profiling techniques. In both cases the main objective of the work was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of modification of the materials under examination with a view towards improving the properties of materials and coatings for specific applications.

  14. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal, and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  15. A generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations including ionization, dissociation and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; De Jager, C.; Cuntz, M.; Lobel, A.; Achmad, L.

    1993-01-01

    For purposes of computing shocks in stellars atmospheres and winds we have developed a generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations including ionization, dissociation, radiation and related phenomena such as excitation, rotation and vibration of molecules. The new equations are given in analytical form. They are valid as long as the internal energy E, the total pressure P, and the first adiabatic coefficient gamma(sub 1) can be evaluated. However, we have not treated shock structures. In the case of non-LTE we have to employ an approximation for gamma(sub 1) because in that case no definition exists. Our new version of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations can easily be used for many purposes including ab-initio modeling. In our derivation we introduce a parameter gamma(sub H), which is definded as the ratio of the enthalpy H (sometimes called heat function w) to the internal energy E (sometimes called U). Using this parameter we solve the equations for changing mu and (d(natural log P)/d(natural log rho))(sub ad) identically equal to gamma(sub 1) on both sides of the shock. Both gamma(sub H) and gamma(sub 1), and also mu are functions of pressure P and temperature T. We present: (1) the derivation, (2) examples of gamma(sub 1) (P,T) and gamma(sub H) (P,T) which include/exclude ionization and radiation, and (3) as an example the differences in post-shock parameters as function of the pre-shock temperature for the case with ionization and without radiation.

  16. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  17. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  18. Why does gaze enhance mimicry? Placing gaze-mimicry effects in relation to other gaze phenomena.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2014-01-01

    Eye gaze is a powerful signal, which exerts a mixture of arousal, attentional, and social effects on the observer. We recently found a behavioural interaction between eye contact and mimicry where direct gaze rapidly enhanced mimicry of hand movements ). Here, we report two detailed investigations of this effect. In Experiment 1, we compared the effects of "direct gaze", "averted gaze", and "gaze to the acting hand" on mimicry and manipulated the sequence of gaze events within a trial. Only direct gaze immediately before the hand action enhanced mimicry. In Experiment 2, we examined the enhancement of mimicry when direct gaze is followed by a "blink" or by "shut eyes", or by "occluded eyes". Enhanced mimicry relative to baseline was seen only in the blink condition. Together, these results suggest that ongoing social engagement is necessary for enhanced mimicry. These findings allow us to place the gaze-enhancement effect in the context of other reported gaze phenomena. We suggest that this effect is similar to previously reported audience effects, but is less similar to ostensive cueing effects. This has important implications for our theories of the relationships between social cues and imitation.

  19. New Phenomena in Physics Related with Single-Atom Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamine, Yuta; Fujiwara, Kazuto; Cho, Bokulae; Oshima, Chuhei

    We have reviewed new phenomena in physics related with development of single-atom electron sources. A collimated electron beam was emitted from the single-atom situated at the top of the nano-pyramids. The following three topics have been discussed. (1) High brightness of electron beam: High-density electrons come out of the source, and overlapping of wave functions presumably produces new phenomena including anti-bunching of electrons in vacuum. Energy spectra showed characteristic features of single-atom electron sources; additional shoulders appeared in the normal spectra. 3) Stable electron emission originates from the field evaporation.

  20. Collective Phenomena Emerging from the Interactions between Dynamical Processes in Multiplex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex; Latora, Vito

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a framework to intertwine dynamical processes of different nature, each with its own distinct network topology, using a multilayer network approach. As an example of collective phenomena emerging from the interactions of multiple dynamical processes, we study a model where neural dynamics and nutrient transport are bidirectionally coupled in such a way that the allocation of the transport process at one layer depends on the degree of synchronization at the other layer, and vice versa. We show numerically, and we prove analytically, that the multilayer coupling induces a spontaneous explosive synchronization and a heterogeneous distribution of allocations, otherwise not present in the two systems considered separately. Our framework can find application to other cases where two or more dynamical processes such as synchronization, opinion formation, information diffusion, or disease spreading, are interacting with each other.

  1. Visualizing Advective and Diffusive Phenomena in Fluid-Rock Interaction using Thermochromic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinle, B.; Cardiff, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of fractures plays an essential role in hydrogeologic transport, as well as geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in host rocks. Transport through these features is often highly non-Fickian, due to the combination of both heterogeneous advection and matrix diffusion. Fracture aperture distributions and contact areas control the ability of fluids to flow through a fracture, and to interact with host rock. The heterogeneous nature of these fracture apertures often lead to preferential fluid pathways that control the prevalence of advective and diffusive processes within the fracture network. To understand how preferential fluid pathways affect these transport processes in detail, an innovative approach is introduced for visualizing advective and diffusive phenomena through the use of thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs). An artificial fracture with the ability to have its surface roughness altered is constructed and heterogeneous flow and diffusion of heat is observed directly using these TLCs. The surfaces are digitized and simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics where particle tracing is used to determine arrival time curves in the absence of host rock diffusion. The resulting combination of the visual results from lab experiments and particle statistics from the computer model provide a unique method for assessing the impact of both heterogeneous advection and matrix-diffusion on tracer breakthrough in fractures, across a variety of fracture geometries. Figure 1. Image of advective (left) and diffusive (right) phenomena occurring simultaneously as fluid flows through the artificial fracture.

  2. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  3. Numerical studies of wall–plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Huang, Yuping; Tang, Haibin; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-15

    Wall–plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall–plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall–plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of space-related plasma wave propagation and resonance phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    A ten year summary was given of university research on the nature and characteristics of space related plasma resonance phenomena, whistler propagation in laboratory plasmas, and theoretical and experimental studies of plasma wave propagation. Data are also given on long delayed echoes, low frequency instabilities, ionospheric heating, and backscatter, and pulse propagation. A list is included of all conference papers, publications, and reports resulting from the study.

  5. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    Parallel Velocity Shear Instability (Invited) * Low-Frequency Instabilities under a Cross-Field Electric Field in a K+-C60- Plasma * 3.3 Vortex Formation * Vortex Dynamics in Low Frequency Electrostatic Turbulence * Development of Spiral-Vortex Structures of the Plasma During Rotation in a Neutral Gas * Vortex Formation of Particles in Magnetized Dusty Plasmas (Invited) * CHAPTER 4: SOLITONS, SHOCKS, WAVES AND INSTABILITIES, AND RELATED NONLINEAR PHENOMENA * 4.1 Solitons and Shocks * Refraction and Reflection of Ion Acoustic Solitons by Space Charge Sheath * 2D and 3D Solitons in Plasma: Structure, Stability, Dynamics * Solitary Waves in an Ion-Beam Multi-Component Plasma System * Shock Formation in a Q-Machine Plasma with Negative Ions * 4.2 Waves and Instabilities * Single-Ended Q-Machine as a Source of Oscillations (Invited) * Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Period Doubling of the Potential Relaxation Instability in an Electron-Rich Q-Machine Plasma * Large Amplitude Electrostatic Ion Waves in an e- - e+ - p Plasma * Measurements of Alfvén Waves around the CRIT Releases-Implications for Current Limitation in Alfvén Wings * 4.3 Nonlinear Phenomena * Self-Organization Phenomena in a Q-Machine Plasma * Nonlinearity Related to Self-Organization in a Thermionic Vacuum Arc Discharge * Spontaneous Formation of Ordered Spatio-Temporal Structures in Laboratory and Nature * Nonlinear Evolution and Stabilization of Linearly Unstable Waves in an Electron-Beam Plasma * Disruption of an Electron Hole Due to its Interaction with Ion Acoustic Waves in a Plasma * Expanding Plasma Clouds with Dust Particles (Invited) * LIST OF PARTICIPANTS * AUTHOR INDEX

  6. Primate empathy: three factors and their combinations for empathy-related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shinya

    2017-05-01

    Empathy as a research topic is receiving increasing attention, although there seems some confusion on the definition of empathy across different fields. Frans de Waal (de Waal FBM. Putting the altruism back into altruism: the evolution of empathy. Annu Rev Psychol 2008, 59:279-300. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.59.103006.093625) used empathy as an umbrella term and proposed a comprehensive model for the evolution of empathy with some of its basic elements in nonhuman animals. In de Waal's model, empathy consists of several layers distinguished by required cognitive levels; the perception-action mechanism plays the core role for connecting ourself and others. Then, human-like empathy such as perspective-taking develops in outer layers according to cognitive sophistication, leading to prosocial acts such as targeted helping. I agree that animals demonstrate many empathy-related phenomena; however, the species differences and the level of cognitive sophistication of the phenomena might be interpreted in another way than this simple linearly developing model. Our recent studies with chimpanzees showed that their perspective-taking ability does not necessarily lead to proactive helping behavior. Herein, as a springboard for further studies, I reorganize the empathy-related phenomena by proposing a combination model instead of the linear development model. This combination model is composed of three organizing factors: matching with others, understanding of others, and prosociality. With these three factors and their combinations, most empathy-related matters can be categorized and mapped to appropriate context; this may be a good first step to discuss the evolution of empathy in relation to the neural connections in human and nonhuman animal brains. I would like to propose further comparative studies, especially from the viewpoint of Homo-Pan (chimpanzee and bonobo) comparison. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1431. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1431 For further resources related to this article

  7. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  8. Solitary wave interaction phenomena in a strut buckling model incorporating restabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadee, M. Khurram; Coman, Ciprian D.; Bassom, Andrew P.

    2002-03-01

    The archetypal model of the buckling of a compressed long elastic strut resting on a nonlinear elastic foundation is studied. Localised buckling is investigated when the foundation has both quadratic and cubic terms which initially destabilise but subsequently restabilise the structure. The primary solution can be detected by a double-scale perturbation procedure and is reminiscent of a solitary wave: essentially, it consists of a fast periodic oscillation which is slowly modulated and decays exponentially in both directions. Particular interest is paid to the process of adapting the procedure to account for the post-buckling behaviour of two-packet or double-humped solitary waves in this model. We employ the methods of beyond-all-orders asymptotics to reveal terms formally exponentially small in the perturbation parameter which have macroscopic effects on the post-buckling behaviour of the system including the interaction phenomenon of interest. The analysis is reinforced by direct numerical computations which reveal the so-called snaking behaviour in the subsidiary homoclinic orbits as is observed in the case of primary solutions. However, additional phenomena arise for these subsidiary forms including the formation of bridges linking solution paths and the appearance of a multitude of closed isolated loops disconnected from other features of the bifurcation diagram.

  9. Study of Starburst/Activity/Interaction Phenomena based on the Multiple Byurakan-IRAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Gohar S.; Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2014-07-01

    The Byurakan-IRAS Galaxy (BIG) sample is the result of optical identifications of IRAS PSC sources at high-galactic latitudes using the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-dispersion spectra. Among the 1178 objects most are spiral galaxies and many have been proved to be AGN and starburst by spectroscopic observations, as well as there is a number of ULIRGs among these objects. BIG objects contain galaxy pairs, multiples, and small groups that are subject for study on the matter of the real IR-emitter in these systems. Given that these objects are powerful IR sources, they are considered as young systems indicating high rate of evolution and starburst activity exceeding 100 M o /yr. Spectroscopic observations show that all these systems are physical ones and we were able to measure the mutual distances and sizes for all components. Cross-correlations with the recent more accurate IR catalogues, such as 2MASS and WISE, as well as radio ones (NVSS, FIRST), provided accurate coordinates of the IR source and possibility to find the individual galaxy responsible for the IR. However, in almost half of the cases, IR position indicates the intermediate region between the components, which means that it comes from the system as a whole. Some more MW data have been matched to IR and radio to have an overall understanding on these systems. Given that these systems are mostly interacting/merging ones often containing AGN and most of them may be considered as powerful starbursts, it is possible to study starburst/activity/interaction phenomena and their interrelationship.

  10. Dynamic cross correlation studies of wave particle interactions in ULF phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic field observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetic field reveal a wide variety of ULF waves. These waves interact with the ambient particle populations in complex ways, causing modulation of the observed particle fluxes. This modulation is found to be a function of species, pitch angle, energy and time. The characteristics of this modulation provide information concerning the wave mode and interaction process. One important characteristic of wave-particle interactions is the phase of the particle flux modulation relative to the magnetic field variations. To display this phase as a function of time a dynamic cross spectrum program has been developed. The program produces contour maps in the frequency time plane of the cross correlation coefficient between any particle flux time series and the magnetic field vector. This program has been utilized in several studies of ULF wave-particle interactions at synchronous orbit.

  11. Dynamic cross correlation studies of wave particle interactions in ULF phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic field observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetic field reveal a wide variety of ULF waves. These waves interact with the ambient particle populations in complex ways, causing modulation of the observed particle fluxes. This modulation is found to be a function of species, pitch angle, energy and time. The characteristics of this modulation provide information concerning the wave mode and interaction process. One important characteristic of wave-particle interactions is the phase of the particle flux modulation relative to the magnetic field variations. To display this phase as a function of time a dynamic cross spectrum program has been developed. The program produces contour maps in the frequency time plane of the cross correlation coefficient between any particle flux time series and the magnetic field vector. This program has been utilized in several studies of ULF wave-particle interactions at synchronous orbit.

  12. Believing in paranormal phenomena: relations to asymmetry of body and brain.

    PubMed

    Schulter, Günter; Papousek, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between established measures of body and brain asymmetries and individual differences in paranormal beliefs. In addition to behavioural measures of cerebral laterality, measures of facial features and finger length were taken to calculate body asymmetry scores and indicators of fluctuating asymmetry (average absolute differences between left and right body features). Both the direction and degree of laterality measures were used. In addition to that, quantitative measures of inconsistency of cerebral lateralization were obtained. Results indicated that a stronger belief in paranormal phenomena was associated with fluctuating asymmetry of finger length, and that this aspect of body asymmetry may be related to greater intraindividual variability in the degree of 'atypical' functional lateralization. This intraindividual variability index, in turn, significantly predicted strength of belief in the paranormal. Belief in the paranormal was also higher in women than men and it was negatively correlated with the education level. In sum, these findings suggest that a part of the variance of strength of belief in paranormal phenomena can be explained by patterns of functional hemispheric asymmetry that may be related to perturbations during fetal development.

  13. Haldane relation for interacting dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Vieri; Lucio Toninelli, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    We consider a model of weakly interacting close-packed dimers on the two-dimensional square lattice. In a previous paper, we computed both the multi-point dimer correlations, which display non-trivial critical exponents, continuously varying with the interaction strength; and the height fluctuations, which, after proper coarse graining and rescaling, converge to a massless Gaussian field with a suitable interaction-dependent pre-factor (‘amplitude’). In this paper, we prove the identity between the critical exponent of the two-point dimer correlation and the amplitude of this massless Gaussian field. This identity is the restatement, in the context of interacting dimers, of one of the Haldane universality relations, part of his Luttinger-liquid conjecture, originally formulated in the context of one-dimensional interacting Fermi systems. Its validity is a strong confirmation of the effective massless Gaussian field description of the interacting dimer model, which was proposed on the basis of formal bosonization arguments. We also conjecture that a certain discrete curve defined at the lattice level via the Temperley bijection converges in the scaling limit to an SLE κ process, with κ depending non-trivially on the interaction and related in a simple way to the amplitude of the limiting Gaussian field.

  14. Phytoplankton and bacterial community structures and their interaction during red-tide phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mona Mohamed; Ibrahim, Hassan Abd Allah

    2017-07-01

    Phytoplankton and bacteria diversity were studied before, during and after red tide phenomena during spring season 2015 in the Eastern Harbour (E.H.) of Alexandria, Egypt. Fifty five species of phytoplankton were identified and represented different distinct classes "Bacillariophyceae; Dinophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae and Eugelenophyceae". Also, Diatom formed the most dominant group. The average number of the phytoplankton density varied from 4.8 × 104 to 1.1 × 106 cell l-1 during the study period and Skeletonema costatum was the agent causing the red tide. The existence percentages of bacteria ranged from 2.6 to 17.9% on all media tested. The bacterial isolates on the nutrient agar medium represented the highest existence with a total percentage of 43.6%, followed by MSA medium (25.7%), while the lowest percentage was for the AA medium at 7.8%. However, twelve isolates were selected as representative for bacterial community during study interval. Based on the morphological, biochemical, physiological and enzymatic characteristics, the bacterial strains were described. Depending on the 16S rDNA gene sequence, three common antagonists were aligned as: Vibrio toranzoniae strain Vb 10.8, Ruegeria pelagia strain NBRC 102038 and Psychrobacter adeliensis strain DSM 15333. The interaction between these bacteria and S. costatum was studied. The growth of S. costatum was significantly lower whenever each bacterium was present as compared to axenic culture. More specifically, 30% (v/v) of the all tested bacteria showed the strongest algicidal activities, as all S. costatum cells were killed after two days. 10% of R. pelagia and P. adeliensis also showed significant algicidal activities within six days.

  15. Trichotillomania and Non-Epileptic Seizures as Sleep-Related Dissociative Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Franco, Melina; Bush-Martínez, Alejandra; Nenclares-Portocarrero, Alejandro; Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of non-epileptic seizures (NES) and trichotillomania during sleep is rare. We describe the case of an adult woman with a personal history of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric morbidity (major depression, trichotillomania, and conversion disorder), who was referred to the sleep unit because of nocturnal hair-pulling and psychomotor agitation during sleep. An all-night PSG recording with audiovisual monitoring documented seven episodes of trichotillomania and one NES, all of which arose from unequivocal wakefulness. Improvement of nocturnal behaviors was observed after long-term psychotherapy. This case illustrates that nocturnal trichotillomania and NES may be symptoms of a sleep-related dissociative disorder. Citation: Angulo-Franco M, Bush-Martínez A, Nenclares-Portocarrero A, Jiménez-Genchi A. Trichotillomania and non-epileptic seizures as sleep-related dissociative phenomena. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):271–273. PMID:25515284

  16. SMALL-SCALE LOCAL PHENOMENA RELATED TO THE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND TURBULENCE IN THE PROXIMITY OF THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Czechowski, A.; Grzedzielski, S.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2013-08-20

    We study processes related to magnetic reconnection and plasma turbulence occurring in the presence of the heliopause (HP) and the heliospheric current sheet. It is shown that the interaction of plasmoids initiated by magnetic reconnection may provide connections between the inner and outer heliosheath and lead to an exchange of particles between the interstellar medium and the solar wind plasma shocked at the heliospheric termination shock. The magnetic reconnection may also cause plasma density and magnetic field compressions in the proximity of the HP. We argue that these phenomena could possibly be detected by the Voyager spacecraft approaching and crossing the HP. These results could clarify the concepts of the ''magnetic highway'' and the ''heliosheath depletion region'' recently proposed to explain recent Voyager 1 observations.

  17. Simulation of the Fluid Flow-Related Phenomena in the Electrolyte of an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Lifeng; Zuo, Xiangjun

    2011-10-01

    A full-scale water model and mathematical simulation were used to study the fluid flow-related phenomena in a water model of an aluminum electrolysis cell. The time-dependent, multiphase fluid flow model was developed to represent the complex transient flow in the electrolysis bath. The accuracy of the mathematical model was validated by the ink dispersion and laser doppler velocimetry measurements in the water model. The shape, motion, release frequency of large-size bubbles, the fluid flow pattern, and the electrolyte-metal interface were predicted by the mathematical simulation. The design and operation of the anode were discussed, including the effect of the anode edge corner shape, the presence of a tilted bottom angle, and the magnitude of applied current density. The results indicated that coupling using a curved corner, with slot and with tilted angle at the anode, is effective for the release of bubbles and for the stability of the electrolyte-metal interface.

  18. Numerical simulation of fluid/structure interaction phenomena in viscous dominated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hai Duong

    2001-12-01

    The accurate prediction of buffet boundaries is essential in modern military aircraft and suspension bridge design in order to avoid the potentially disastrous consequences of unsteady loads. The design of lightweight structures and thermal protection systems for supersonic and hypersonic vehicles depends on the accurate prediction of the aerothermal loads, the structural temperatures and their gradients, and the structural deformations and stresses. Despite their bounded nature, limit-cycle oscillations can exhibit important amplitudes which affect the fatigue life of aircraft structures. Therefore, the main objective of this thesis is to develop and design an integrated multidisciplinary computational methodology for the analyses of the coupled responses exhibited by these phenomena. To simulate fluid/structure interaction problems in turbulent flows, we formulate the k--epsilon turbulence model and Reichardt's wall law in ALE form for dynamic meshes. This law is used with the generalized boundary conditions on k and epsilon of Jaeger and Dhatt and allows a closer integration to the wall compared to standard logarithmic laws and boundary conditions on k and epsilon. In order to apply the methodology to buffeting problems dominated by vortex shedding, we validate our solution approach on the square cylinder benchmark problem. There, we stress the minimization of numerical dissipation induced by an upwinding scheme, and apply our methodology to the aeroelastic stability analysis of a sectional dynamic model of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Then, we extend the three field formulation of aeroelasticity to a four-field formulation of aerothermoelasticity for the analysis of aerodynamic heating on structures. With a k--epsilon model, the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated up to a distance delta from the real wall. This gap creates a problem for the transmission of the structural temperature to the fluid system. To resolve this problem, we exchange the

  19. Some recent developments in the prediction of shock interaction phenomena at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The shock strengths for which either Edney type I or type II shock interference patterns can occur when two oblique shocks of opposite families intersect were determined graphically at Mach 10 by using logarithmic shock polar diagrams. The theoretical region of overlap for the two types of interaction was investigated by observing in the Schlieren system of the Langley 15-inch hypersonic flow apparatus the intersection of oblique shocks generated by two sharp 10 degree wedges as the wedge angles of attack and their relative positions were altered. A range of shock strengths for which either of the two interference patterns can exist was demonstrated.

  20. Cell adhesion and urothelial bladder cancer: the role of cadherin switching and related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Richard T

    2015-02-05

    Cadherins are mediators of cell-cell adhesion in epithelial tissues. E-cadherin is a known tumour suppressor and plays a central role in suppressing the invasive phenotype of cancer cells. However, the abnormal expression of N- and P-cadherin ('cadherin switching', CS) has been shown to promote a more invasive and m̀alignant phenotype of cancer, with P-cadherin possibly acting as a key mediator of invasion and metastasis in bladder cancer. Cadherins are also implicated in numerous signalling events related to embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. It is these wide ranging effects and the serious implications of CS that make the cadherin cell adhesion molecules and their related pathways strong candidate targets for the inhibition of cancer progression, including bladder cancer. This review focuses on CS in the context of bladder cancer and in particular the switch to P-cadherin expression, and discusses other related molecules and phenomena, including EpCAM and the development of the cancer stem cell phenotype. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. The value of positive psychology for health psychology: progress and pitfalls in examining the relation of positive phenomena to health.

    PubMed

    Aspinwall, Lisa G; Tedeschi, Richard G

    2010-02-01

    The growth of the "positive psychology" movement reflects increased scientific and lay interest in the relation of positive phenomena to mental and physical health and the corresponding potential for interventions that promote positive feelings, thoughts, and experiences to improve health and well-being. In this article, we (1) consider research on optimism, sense of coherence, and posttraumatic growth that predates the contemporary emphasis on positive psychology, but has clear and increasingly well-supported connections to health psychology, (2) examine several potential mechanisms through which such positive phenomena may influence the etiology, progression, and management of illness, (3) identify four pervasive but misleading assumptions about positive phenomena that may limit both scientific research and practical application, and (4) caution against serious pitfalls of popular views of positive thinking, such as its promotion as a cure for cancer and other diseases. We conclude with recommendations for the balanced scientific investigation and application of positive phenomena.

  2. Current Transport and Onset-Related Phenomena in an MPD Thruster Modified by Applied Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Robert Carlos

    field lowered terminal voltages below 10.7 kA. These significant reductions in onset-related behaviors should lead to improved thruster lifetime and increased efficiency. These results suggest a distinctive and more effective approach to influencing the near-anode phenomena and mitigating the effects of onset with appropriately designed applied magnetic fields that differ from those used in the vast majority of conventional, so-called "applied-field MPD thrusters."

  3. A Next-Generation Experiment To Study Magnetic Reconnection and Related Explosive Phenomena in Large and Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2009-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a topological change in magnetic field in plasmas, often occurs explosively leading to rapid conversion of magnetic energy to plasma particle energy in space, astrophysical and laboratory fusion plasmas. The Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX, http://mrx.pppl.gov) is a primary dedicated experiment to study reconnection in a controlled environment. However, further critical understanding and contributions to space and astrophysical plasmas are limited by the parameters achievable in MRX and other dedicated experiments. The MRX plasmas are relatively collisional (Lundquist numbers S ˜10^3) and effectively small (plasma size normalized by ion skin depth or ion sound radius ˜10). In this paper, we discuss plans for a next-generation reconnection experiment based on MRX. By a combination of larger physical size, stronger magnetic field, and higher heating power, we aim to increase S by a factor of 100 and effective size by a factor of 10, representing a very large jump in the laboratory capabilities. Kinetic simulations in realistic boundaries will be used to guide the experimental design. Research topics include: (1) transition of collisional to collisionless reconnection and its scaling with collisionality and size, (2) interacting multiple reconnections as a possible cause of explosive phenomena, (3) particle energization by reconnection, (4) relation between local reconnection and global magnetic self-organization in 3D realistic geometry and boundary.

  4. Electric field-induced acoustic emission phenomena in ferroelectric and related ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburatani, Hideaki

    Field induced AE phenomena in bulk ferroelectric and related ceramics as well as multilayer ceramic actuators were investigated in this work. Concerning the field induced AE measurement technique, it was shown that commonly used voltage application units can excite sample vibrations electromechanically through their voltage stabilization processes and generate extrinsic AE signals. In order to detect intrinsic AE signals from within piezoelectric samples, a modified voltage application unit with a long time constant tau was proposed. For the study of origins of field induced AE, a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5A), an electrostrictive lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (0.9PMN-0.1PT) and a field-enhanced ferroelectric type lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT(9/65/35)) ceramics were selected. Pre-applied maximum field dependence on the AE generation were observed for ferroelectric PZT-5A and electrostrictive 0.9PMN-0.1PT ceramics. The study showed that there are two origins for the field induced AE of the ferroelectric PZT-5A: deformation related to domain reorientation processes and piezoelectric deformation unrelated to domain reorientation processes. The stress induction/relaxation process simply caused by the electrostrictive deformation was found to be the origin of AE in the electrostrictive 0.9PMN-0.1PT ceramics. The electric field induced non-ferroelectric to ferroelectric transition, reorientation process of the induced ferroelectric domains and induced internal stress were found to be the origins of AE in the field-enhanced ferroelectric PLZT (9/65/35). The potential use of the AE method in production was explored using a Multilayer Ceramic Actuator (MCA) fabricated by a tape casting method.

  5. Macroscopic quantum phenomena in interacting bosonic systems: Josephson flow in liquid 4He and multimode Schrodinger cat states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkoff, Tyler James

    In this dissertation, I analyze certain problems in the following areas: 1) quantum dynamical phenomena in macroscopic systems of interacting, degenerate bosons (Parts II, III, and V), and 2) measures of macroscopicity for a large class of two-branch superposition states in separable Hilbert space (Part IV). Part I serves as an introduction to important concepts recurring in the later Parts. In Part II, a microscopic derivation of the effective action for the relative phase of driven, aperture-coupled reservoirs of weakly-interacting condensed bosons from a (3 + 1)D microscopic model with local U(1) gauge symmetry is presented. The effective theory is applied to the transition from linear to sinusoidal current vs. phase behavior observed in recent experiments on liquid 4He driven through nanoaperture arrays. Part III discusses path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) numerical simulations of quantum hydrodynamic properties of reservoirs of He II communicating through simple nanoaperture arrays. In addition to calculating the local superfluid density in these systems, new estimators for hydrodynamic observables and novel methods for extracting the length scale characterizing the decay of superfluidity at the system boundary from PIMC data are introduced with the aim of exploring the mechanism of superfluid weak-link formation in nanoscale containers. Part IV consists of an analysis of macroscopicity measures for a large class of Schrodinger cat states of N-mode photonic systems. For cat states of this class, it is shown that a well-known measure of superposition size based on the optimal distinguishability of the branches and another based on metrological usefulness of the superposition relative to its branches agree (i.e., designate the same superpositions as macroscopic) when the inner product of the branches of the superposition is sufficiently small. For certain superpositions in this class, a technique is presented for deriving a state-specific metrological

  6. Characterization of Side Load Phenomena Using Measurement of Fluid/Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ruf, Joseph; Reed, Darren; DAgostino, Mark; Keanini, Russell; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During ground-tests of most production rocket engines over the last 30 years, large asymmetric transient side loads coming from the nozzle and related steady-state vibrational loads within the nozzle have been measured. The widely varying magnitude of these loads has been large enough to fail interfacing components as well as nozzles in these engines. This paper will discuss a comprehensive test and analysis program that has been undertaken to develop a methodology to accurately predict the character and magnitude of this loading. The project to-date has incorporated analytical modeling of both the fluid flow and the nozzle structure and testing of both full-scale and sub-scale rocket nodes. Examination of the test data indicates that one of the two-nodal diameter structural modes may be interacting with flow separation from the nozzle inside-wall in a self-excited or aeroelastic vibration phenomenon. If verified, this observation will be used to develop a methodology for design and analysis. A fuller understanding of the characteristics of this vibration will provide an increase in the accuracy and confidence of side load predictions, which will be critical for the successful construction of the next generation of low-cost, reliable rocket engines.

  7. Interaction between fluid-dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena in a cryogenic upper stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, G. D.; Navickas, J.

    1993-07-01

    A generic cryogenic upper stage is analyzed using the FLOW-3D finite-difference program. The analysis is conducted to illustrate that coupled fluid-dynamic-thermodynamic numerical modeling is feasible with existing computational technology. A long-duration simulation of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank in a cryogenic upper stage is completed with no major computational difficulties. The numerical tank is exposed to external heating and dynamic disturbances typical for such a stage including high-gravity boost, stage separation, upper-stage initial burn, low-gravity orbital coast, and engine restart. Results show that propellant sloshing and temperature distribution are highly coupled indicating that fluid-dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena cannot be modeled independently for such a system.

  8. A Bayesian explanation of the ‘Uncanny Valley’ effect and related psychological phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Roger K.

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of psychological phenomena in which dramatic emotional responses are evoked by seemingly innocuous perceptual stimuli. A well known example is the ‘uncanny valley’ effect whereby a near human-looking artifact can trigger feelings of eeriness and repulsion. Although such phenomena are reasonably well documented, there is no quantitative explanation for the findings and no mathematical model that is capable of predicting such behavior. Here I show (using a Bayesian model of categorical perception) that differential perceptual distortion arising from stimuli containing conflicting cues can give rise to a perceptual tension at category boundaries that could account for these phenomena. The model is not only the first quantitative explanation of the uncanny valley effect, but it may also provide a mathematical explanation for a range of social situations in which conflicting cues give rise to negative, fearful or even violent reactions. PMID:23162690

  9. A Bayesian explanation of the 'Uncanny Valley' effect and related psychological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Moore, Roger K

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of psychological phenomena in which dramatic emotional responses are evoked by seemingly innocuous perceptual stimuli. A well known example is the 'uncanny valley' effect whereby a near human-looking artifact can trigger feelings of eeriness and repulsion. Although such phenomena are reasonably well documented, there is no quantitative explanation for the findings and no mathematical model that is capable of predicting such behavior. Here I show (using a Bayesian model of categorical perception) that differential perceptual distortion arising from stimuli containing conflicting cues can give rise to a perceptual tension at category boundaries that could account for these phenomena. The model is not only the first quantitative explanation of the uncanny valley effect, but it may also provide a mathematical explanation for a range of social situations in which conflicting cues give rise to negative, fearful or even violent reactions.

  10. A Bayesian explanation of the "Uncanny Valley" effect and related psychological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Roger K.

    2012-11-01

    There are a number of psychological phenomena in which dramatic emotional responses are evoked by seemingly innocuous perceptual stimuli. A well known example is the `uncanny valley' effect whereby a near human-looking artifact can trigger feelings of eeriness and repulsion. Although such phenomena are reasonably well documented, there is no quantitative explanation for the findings and no mathematical model that is capable of predicting such behavior. Here I show (using a Bayesian model of categorical perception) that differential perceptual distortion arising from stimuli containing conflicting cues can give rise to a perceptual tension at category boundaries that could account for these phenomena. The model is not only the first quantitative explanation of the uncanny valley effect, but it may also provide a mathematical explanation for a range of social situations in which conflicting cues give rise to negative, fearful or even violent reactions.

  11. Analysis of Unsteady Flow Phenomena: Shock - Vortex and Shock - Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of shock waves with vortices has received much attention in the past, mainly because shock-vortex interaction closely models the interaction of a shock wave with the coherent structures of a turbulent flow-field, and is a key feature in the broad-band shock noise for supersonic jets in off-project conditions. Chu and Kovasznay have shown that a weak disturbance in a viscous heat conducting fluid can be decomposed as the sum of three basic modes, namely acoustic, vortical and entropy mode; the interaction of any of these modes with a shock wave gives rise to all three disturbance modes downstream of the shock. The vortical mode is important since it constitutes the basis of the coherent structures that have been observed to dominate turbulence for low- to moderate-flow speed. Hollingsworth et al. have experimentally investigated the interaction of a cylindrical shock-induced starting vortex with a plane normal shock, and have shown that the interaction generates a cylindrical acoustic pulse that exhibits a quadrupolar structure consisting of four alternate compression and expansion regions centered around the transmitted vortex. The investigations of Hollingsworth and Richards have been extended by Dosanjh and Weeks that have analyzed the interaction of a columnar spiral vortex with a normal shock wave, thus obtaining quantitative measurements and confirming the generation of a progressive cylindrical wavefront of alternate compression-expansion nature. Naumann and Hermanns' have experimentally addressed the non-linear aspects of shock-vortex interaction, and have shown that the interaction causes both a diffraction and a reflection of the shock with a pattern consisting of either a regular-or a Mach-reflection depending on the shock and the vortex strengths. An attempt to theoretically explain the production of sound from the shock-vortex interaction was carried out by Ribner. Pao and Salas have numerically studied two-dimensional shock

  12. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  13. Interactive Discovery of New Phenomena in Martian Point Spectra and Hyperspectral Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, K.; Lanza, N.; Thompson, D. R.; Blaney, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    In sifting through large martian data sets to find observations of particular scientific interest, there is always a lingering question of "what are we missing?" Targeted searches for materials such as phyllosilicates or carbonates might successfully identify key observations of each, but given limited analysis time we might inadvertently pass over other equally interesting compositions. Data sets with high dimensionality pose an additional challenge for efficient analysis and interpretation. Two prime examples are point spectra such as those collected by LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instruments like ChemCam on the Mars Science Laboratory and hyperspectral data such as that collected by CRISM on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. We have developed DEMUD (Discovery through Eigenbasis Modeling of Uninteresting Data), a method that quickly scans through large data sets to identify observations that stand out as unusual or anomalous. It focuses attention on new or unexpected observations, accelerating the discovery of new phenomena. Further, DEMUD learns from feedback. Each item it selects can be designated 'interesting' or 'uninteresting'. DEMUD learns to ignore items deemed uninteresting even if they are otherwise anomalous (e.g., observations that contain noise, bad pixels, or even just novelties that are now well understood). DEMUD progressively peels back layers of anomalies in the data set, without specializing on one particular science goal. It therefore remains open to discovering new phenomena that may not have been anticipated by the mission prior to data collection. This data-driven analysis based on statistical properties can complement model-based interpretations of the observations. In addition to highlighting items of interest, DEMUD also provides explanations for individual decisions, e.g., highlighting specific wavelengths where the chosen sample has unusually high, or low, intensity. It therefore can greatly accelerate not just the discovery

  14. Strong commitment to traditional Protestant religious beliefs is negatively related to beliefs in paranormal phenomena.

    PubMed

    Hillstrom, E L; Strachan, M

    2000-02-01

    Numerous studies have yielded small, negative correlations between measures of paranormal and "traditional religious beliefs". This may partly reflect opinions of Christians in the samples who take biblical sanctions against many "paranormal" activities seriously. To test this, 391 college students (270 women and 121 men) rated their beliefs in various paranormal phenomena and were classified as Believers, Nominal Believers, and Nonbelievers on the strength of their self-rated commitment to key biblical (particularly Protestant) doctrines. As predicted, Believers were significantly less likely than Nominal Believers or Nonbelievers to endorse reincarnation, contact with the dead, UFOs, telepathy, prophecy, psychokinesis, or healing, while the beliefs of Nominal Believers were similar to those of Nonbelievers. Substantial percentages of Nominal and Nonbelievers (30-50%) indicated at least moderate acceptance of the paranormal phenomena surveyed.

  15. Experimental modelling of lightning interaction phenomena with a free potential conducting objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, E. N.; Lupeiko, A. V.; Petrov, N. I.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the physical processes of the development of air discharge and its interaction with free potential conducting objects. The space-time development of lightning in gaps was recorded by a motion picture camera and an optoelectronic transducer. The electric field at different points in the gap was measured using a Pockels device both in the leader stage and in the stage of the return stroke. Experimental results of the streamer zone length measurements in the gaps with lengths up to 65 meters are presented. The physical processes occurring during the interaction of positive and negative long sparks with isolated objects were investigated. The striking probability of isolated conducting spheres with different diameters and the dependence of the strike on the location of the gap are investigated.

  16. No aging phenomena in ferrofluids: the influence of coating on interparticle interactions of maghemite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rabias, Ioannis; Fardis, Michael; Devlin, Eamonn; Boukos, Nikos; Tsitrouli, Danai; Papavassiliou, George

    2008-05-01

    The influence of coating on interparticle interactions in ferrofluids has been investigated using various techniques such as Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, and resonance micro-Raman spectroscopy. Aging and spin-glass-like behavior was investigated in frozen ferrofluids of various concentrations from dense, initial value of 40 mg of coated nanoparticles per 1 mL of water, to dilute 1:10 (4 mg/mL). The as-prepared nanoparticles, core size 7-8 nm, were subsequently coated with a gummic acid corona of 20 nm thickness, which was observed to prevent agglomeration and to delay aggregation even in dense ferrofluids. The resulting separation of magnetic cores due to the coating eliminated all magnetic interparticle interaction mechanisms, such as exchange and dipoledipole, thus ensuring no aging effects of the magnetic particle system, as manifested in particle agglomeration and precipitation.

  17. Understanding of assembly phenomena by aromatic-aromatic interactions: benzene dimer and the substituted systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Cheol; Kim, Dongwook; Jurecka, Petr; Tarakeshwar, P; Hobza, Pavel; Kim, Kwang S

    2007-05-10

    Interactions involving aromatic rings are important in molecular/biomolecular assembly and engineering. As a consequence, there have been a number of investigations on dimers involving benzene or other substituted pi systems. In this Feature Article, we examine the relevance of the magnitudes of their attractive and repulsive interaction energy components in governing the geometries of several pi-pi systems. The geometries and the associated binding energies were evaluated at the complete basis set (CBS) limit of coupled cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples excitations [CCSD(T)] using a least biased scheme for the given data set. The results for the benzene dimer indicate that the floppy T-shaped structure (center-to-center distance: 4.96 A, with an axial benzene off-centered above the facial benzene) is isoenergetic in zero-point-energy (ZPE) corrected binding energy (D0) to the displaced-stacked structure (vertical interplanar distance: 3.54 A). However, the T-shaped structure is likely to be slightly more stable (D0 approximately equal to 2.4-2.5 kcal/mol) if quadruple excitations are included in the coupled cluster calculations. The presence of substituents on the aromatic ring, irrespective of their electron withdrawing or donating nature, leads to an increase in the binding energy, and the displaced-stacked conformations are more stabilized than the T-shaped conformers. This explains the wide prevalence of displaced stacked structures in organic crystals. Despite that the dispersion energy is dominating, the substituent as well as the conformational effects are correlated to the electrostatic interaction. This electrostatic origin implies that the substituent effect would be reduced in polar solution, but important in apolar media, in particular, for assembling processes.

  18. A study on flash sintering and related phenomena in titania and its composite with alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhar

    In 2010, Cologna et. al. [1] reported that with a help of small electric field 120 Vcm-1, the sintering temperature of 3 mol % yittria stabilized zirconia could be brought down to 850°C from 1450°C. On top of reducing the temperature requirements, the green sample could be sintered from starting density of 50% to near full density in mere 5 seconds, a sintering rate three orders of magnitude higher than conventional methods. This discovery led to the emergence of a new field of enhanced sintering with electric field, named "Flash Sintering". The objective of this thesis is to understand the phenomenological behavior of flash-sintering and related phenomena on titania and its composites with alumina at elevated temperature. The possible mechanisms to explain flash sintering are discussed: Joule heating and the avalanche of defect generation [2], both induced by the rapid rise in conductivity just before the onset of the flash. Apparently, both mechanisms play a role. The thesis covers the response of pure titania and composites of titania-alumina under flash and compared with conventional sintering. We start with the sintering behavior of pure titania and observe lowering of sintering temperature requirements with higher applied electric field. The conductivity of titania during flash is also measured, and compared with the nominal conductivity of titania at equivalent temperatures. The conductivity during flash is determined to be have a different activation energy. For the composites of titania-alumina, effect of flash on the constrained sintering was studied. It is a known fact that sintering of one component of composite slows down when the other component of a different densification rate is added to it, called constrained sintering. In our case, large inclusions of alumina particles were added to nano-grained titania green compact that hindered its densification. Flash sintering was found to be overcoming this problem and near full densification was achieved

  19. Interactions of chlorosulfonated polyethylene geomembranes with aliphatic esters: Sorption and diffusion phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Aminabhavi, T.M.; Munnolli, R.S.; Ortego, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    The resistance of chlorosulfonated polyethylene geomembranes to nine aliphatic esters viz., methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, methyl acetoacetate, n-butyl acetate, diethyl oxalate, iso-amyl acetate, diethyl malonate, and diethyl succinate was investigated in the temperature interval 25--60 C by measuring the liquid sorption using a gravimetric method. A Fickian diffusion equation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficients, and these data were dependent on the type of ester molecules and their interactions with the geomembrane in additions to temperature and solvent concentration. The activation energy values for the diffusion process were in the range 18--41 kJ/mole and the heat of sorption varied from 0.61 to 18.50 kJ/mole. the sorption/swelling results were found to follow the first order kinetics. Solvent front velocities were calculated from the sorption data. The statistical error analysis has been presented in order to judge the reliability of the technique used. The experimental data and calculated parameters were used to discuss transport results in terms of membrane-solvent interactions. None of the esters showed any degradative effects on the geomembrane used.

  20. Investigation of Phenomena Related to D2O Electrolysis at a Palladium Cathode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-30

    calorimetry, cold fusion 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Measurements have been carried out on the phenomena...reported enhancement of tritium concentration in the electrolyte as one evidence for a cold fusion of deuterium. The enhancement factor (see Eq. 4...produced in a cold fusion reaction per 1 cm3 of Pd the correspondino number of T atoms would be 10-3 W/(6.46 x 10-13 W s/reaction) - 1.55 x 10 reactions/s

  1. Effect of wake structure on blade-vortex interaction phenomena: Acoustic prediction and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Schultz, Klaus J.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Buchholz, Heino

    1995-01-01

    During the Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test, extensive measurements of the rotor aerodynamics, the far-field acoustics, the wake geometry, and the blade motion for powered, descent, flight conditions were made. These measurements have been used to validate and improve the prediction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The improvements made to the BVI modeling after the evaluation of the test data are discussed. The effects of these improvements on the acoustic-pressure predictions are shown. These improvements include restructuring the wake, modifying the core size, incorporating the measured blade motion into the calculations, and attempting to improve the dynamic blade response. A comparison of four different implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is presented. A common set of aerodynamic input has been used for this comparison.

  2. Effect of wake structure on blade-vortex interaction phenomena: Acoustic prediction and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Schultz, Klaus J.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Buchholz, Heino

    1995-01-01

    During the Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test, extensive measurements of the rotor aerodynamics, the far-field acoustics, the wake geometry, and the blade motion for powered, descent, flight conditions were made. These measurements have been used to validate and improve the prediction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The improvements made to the BVI modeling after the evaluation of the test data are discussed. The effects of these improvements on the acoustic-pressure predictions are shown. These improvements include restructuring the wake, modifying the core size, incorporating the measured blade motion into the calculations, and attempting to improve the dynamic blade response. A comparison of four different implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is presented. A common set of aerodynamic input has been used for this comparison.

  3. Macroscopic nucleation phenomena in continuum media with long-range interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Masamichi; Enachescu, Cristian; Miyashita, Seiji; Rikvold, Per Arne; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Varret, François

    2011-01-01

    Nucleation, commonly associated with discontinuous transformations between metastable and stable phases, is crucial in fields as diverse as atmospheric science and nanoscale electronics. Traditionally, it is considered a microscopic process (at most nano-meter), implying the formation of a microscopic nucleus of the stable phase. Here we show for the first time, that considering long-range interactions mediated by elastic distortions, nucleation can be a macroscopic process, with the size of the critical nucleus proportional to the total system size. This provides a new concept of “macroscopic barrier-crossing nucleation”. We demonstrate the effect in molecular dynamics simulations of a model spin-crossover system with two molecular states of different sizes, causing elastic distortions. PMID:22355677

  4. Paranormal phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  5. Investigation of interaction phenomena between crural fascia and muscles by using a three-dimensional numerical model.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Forestiero, Antonella; Natali, Arturo N

    2017-02-10

    The focus of this work is the numerical modeling of the anterior compartment of the human leg with particular attention to crural fascia. Interaction phenomena between fascia and muscles are of clinical interest to explain some pathologies, as the compartment syndrome. A first step to enhance knowledge on this topic consists in the investigation of fascia biomechanical role and its interaction with muscles in physiological conditions. A three-dimensional finite element model of the anterior compartment is developed based on anatomical data, detailing the structural conformation of crural fascia, composed of three layers, and modeling the muscles as a unique structure. Different constitutive models are implemented to describe the mechanical response of tissues. Crural fascia is modeled as a hyperelastic fiber-reinforced material, while muscle tissue via a three-element Hill's model. The numerical analysis of isotonic contraction of muscles is performed, allowing the evaluation of pressure induced within muscles and consequent stress and strain fields arising on the crural fascia. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements of the compartment radial deformation and intracompartmental pressure during concentric contraction, to validate the model. The numerical model provides a suitable description of muscles contraction of the anterior compartment and the consequent mechanical interaction with the crural fascia.

  6. Dissipation, interaction, and relative entropy.

    PubMed

    Gaveau, B; Granger, L; Moreau, M; Schulman, L S

    2014-03-01

    Many thermodynamic relations involve inequalities, with equality if a process does not involve dissipation. In this article we provide equalities in which the dissipative contribution is shown to involve the relative entropy (also called the Kullback-Leibler divergence). The processes considered are general time evolutions in both classical and quantum mechanics, and the initial state is sometimes thermal, sometimes partially so. As an application, the relative entropy is related to transport coefficients.

  7. Dense-Spray Structure and Phenomena. Part 1. Turbulence/Dispersed-Phase Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-15

    extended version of the SSF analysis accounted for this effect following Clift et al. (1978) and Lopes & Dukler (1986). The expression for the drag...study. Lopes & Dukler (1986) * also find enhanced drag effects, at high relative turbulence intensities, in annular two-phase 2.4.6 Particle Number...124. * Lopes, J. C. & Dukler , A. E. (1986) Droplet dynamics in vertical gas-liquid flow. A.ICh.E. ",, submitted. Modarress, D., Tan, H. & Elghobashi, S

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of multi-phase phenomena related to fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhgar, A.; Khalili, B.; Moa, B.; Rahnama, M.; Djilali, N.

    2017-07-01

    Fuel cells are devices that allow conversion of the chemical potential of a fuel and oxidant to produce electricity. A key component of a fuel cell is the catalyst layer, which facilitates the electrochemical reaction and where transport of reactants, charge, and byproduct heat and water take place. The structure and morphology of the catalyst layer determine its effectiveness and, in turn, strongly impact the overall performance and cost of a fuel cell. This paper discusses two central issue related to catalyst layers involving two-phase flow: liquid water transport in the catalyst layer during fuel cell operation, and fabrication of the catalyst layer from colloidal inks where a process of particle agglomeration takes place and eventually determines the final catalyst layer structure. Insight into these two issues are obtained using lattice-Botzmann based multi-phase simulations with formulations tailored to deal with features including high density ratio gas-liquid flow in complex porous media, and particle-particle and particle-hydrodynamic interactions.

  9. A Study of Aircraft Fire Hazards Related to Natural Electrical Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Frank L.; Gerstein, Melvin; Plumer, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    The problems of natural electrical phenomena as a fire hazard to aircraft are evaluated. Assessment of the hazard is made over the range of low level electrical discharges, such as static sparks, to high level discharges, such as lightning strikes to aircraft. In addition, some fundamental work is presented on the problem of flame propagation in aircraft fuel vent systems. This study consists of a laboratory investigation in five parts: (1) a study of the ignition energies and flame propagation rates of kerosene-air and JP-6-air foams, (2) a study of the rate of flame propagation of n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, and n-decane in aircraft vent ducts, (3) a study of the damage to aluminum, titanium, and stainless steel aircraft skin materials by lightning strikes, (4) a study of fuel ignition by lightning strikes to aircraft skins, and (5) a study of lightning induced flame propagation in an aircraft vent system.

  10. Severe wind flow of small spatial and temporal scales: The microburst and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Rita D.; Mccarthy, John

    1985-01-01

    Low-altitude winds on the meso- and microscale are the primary focus of study for the Research Applications Program (RAP) of NCAR. Local weather features such as microbursts, microburst lines, gust fronts, and convergent wind boundaries have been observed and documented extensively. A microburst is a strong, small-scale convective storm outflow which diverges horizontally in all directions upon impact with the ground (Fujita, 1981). A microburst line is composed of two or more microbursts which occur either simultaneously or consecutively, and subsequently form a diverging line of outflow. The temporal and spatial scales of these phenomena are shown. Microbursts and microburst lines generally occur on both the meso- and microscale, while gust fronts and convergent wind boundaries overlap into the mesoscale. Microbursts, in particular, not only are small spatially but are also a short-lived phenomenon. Clearly, some of these features are on a much smaller spatial and temporal scale than can be resolved by a global wind measurement. During the past three years, three experiments were held in the Denver, CO, area to observe boundary-layer winds. Their main objectives were observation and documentation of those weather features discussed above. The Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project, which ran in the summer of 1982, was set up to study microbursts. The Convective Initiation Project (1984) was designed to document clear-air convergent wind boundaries, including gust fronts, and their role in convective storm initiation. This project was immediately followed by the Classify, Locate, and Avoid Wind Shear experiment that expanded upon the work done in JAWS. Details on the scales of these weather features are presented. The wind sensors used to detect these phenomena are also discussed. Concluding comments address the usefulness of a global wind measurement system as it pertains to our local scale of interest.

  11. Temperature-dependence of stress-related phenomena at confined dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptono, Rahmat

    Efforts have been made to develop a simple but physically sound model. The model was specifically proposed to capture, explain, and estimate the temperature sensitivity and strengthening mechanism phenomena in small volume material with particular reference to the roles grain boundary and surface. Model-inspired phenomenology approach was applied to reveal the key mechanisms and find directions for a more complete constitutive model. The model was developed in the limited space where diffusion is insignificant. It was assumed that the plastic flow was predominantly governed by the thermally-activated process of dislocation glide overcoming barriers. Simple mathematical functions were formulated and evaluated to model the behavior. The figures of merit functions were fitted into the experimental data to evaluate physical parameters. Normalization was performed prior to the regression analysis to extract real variables and allow global evaluation. Behavior of the small volume materials subjected to temperature variation within the range of argument can be generally condensed, described and predicted by an exponential decay model. In particular, the models are able to explain the responsible mechanism behind the observed phenomena. Important findings had been concluded through the model application along with simplified observation and analysis. Surface is not a part of main strengthening mechanism. Thin film exhibits atypical high flow stress because of high density grain boundary and dislocation density, which is a true effect of confinement. Grain boundary strengthening becomes weaker and mechanism becomes short-range in thin films with small grains. Exponential decay model explains the temperature-dependence of flow stress behavior in small volume metallic materials with physical validity. The validity is proven by finding a direct connection of the model to the established physical mechanistic model in the field. Despite of quite a few limitations, it provides

  12. Severe wind flow of small spatial and temporal scales: The microburst and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Rita D.; Mccarthy, John

    1985-01-01

    Low-altitude winds on the meso- and microscale are the primary focus of study for the Research Applications Program (RAP) of NCAR. Local weather features such as microbursts, microburst lines, gust fronts, and convergent wind boundaries have been observed and documented extensively. A microburst is a strong, small-scale convective storm outflow which diverges horizontally in all directions upon impact with the ground (Fujita, 1981). A microburst line is composed of two or more microbursts which occur either simultaneously or consecutively, and subsequently form a diverging line of outflow. The temporal and spatial scales of these phenomena are shown. Microbursts and microburst lines generally occur on both the meso- and microscale, while gust fronts and convergent wind boundaries overlap into the mesoscale. Microbursts, in particular, not only are small spatially but are also a short-lived phenomenon. Clearly, some of these features are on a much smaller spatial and temporal scale than can be resolved by a global wind measurement. During the past three years, three experiments were held in the Denver, CO, area to observe boundary-layer winds. Their main objectives were observation and documentation of those weather features discussed above. The Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project, which ran in the summer of 1982, was set up to study microbursts. The Convective Initiation Project (1984) was designed to document clear-air convergent wind boundaries, including gust fronts, and their role in convective storm initiation. This project was immediately followed by the Classify, Locate, and Avoid Wind Shear experiment that expanded upon the work done in JAWS. Details on the scales of these weather features are presented. The wind sensors used to detect these phenomena are also discussed. Concluding comments address the usefulness of a global wind measurement system as it pertains to our local scale of interest.

  13. Relation between methane hydrate-bearing formations and geological phenomena on the seafloor in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Inamori, T.; Saeki, T.; Shimoda, N.; Fujii, T.; Morita, S.; Tanahashi, M.

    2007-12-01

    In 2002, a series of high-resolution 3D seismic surveys was conducted in the Tokai-Oki, the Daini-Atsumi Knoll, the Kumano-nada in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21) conducted resource assessment of methane hydrate in the eastern Nankai Trough by various seismic data analyses combining results of the exploratory wells conducted in 2005. By these analyses, occurrence of methane hydrate in the eastern Nankai Trough is coming to light. The MH21 has also interpreted the relation between methane hydrate-bearing formations and various geological phenomena on the seafloor, such as pockmarks and carbonate outcrops, using the 3D seismic data in the three survey areas. Bathymetric maps and seafloor amplitude maps constructed by the high-resolution 3D data provided lots of information on the seafloor. Some areas show very high intensity on the seafloor amplitude maps. It is expected that the areas showing strong amplitude correspond to the distribution of carbonate outcrops which are likely precipitated by methane seep activities. By checking the seafloor amplitude maps, seismic sections and methane seep sites observed by the previous submersible dives, some significant correlations are recognized between methane hydrate-bearing formations and various phenomena on the seafloor. It may be likely that the occurrence of methane hydrate and the geological phenomena on the seafloor have a strong implication with some typical geologic structures, e.g. shallow fault, highly-permeable sediments and hydraulic fractures, which may control the fluid migration. Besides, in this study we learnt that bathymetric map and seafloor amplitude map constructed by the high- resolution 3D seismic data are very useful not only for interpretation of relation between methane hydrate-bearing formation and various phenomena on the seafloor but also for designing the following seafloor investigations. This study is conducted by the MH21.

  14. Exploring high temperature phenomena related to post-detonation using an electric arc

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Z. R. Crowhurst, J. C.; Grant, C. D.; Knight, K. B.; Tang, V.; Chernov, A. A.; Cook, E. G.; Lotscher, J. P.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2013-11-28

    We report a study of materials recovered from a uranium-containing plasma generated by an electric arc. The device used to generate the arc is capable of sustaining temperatures of an eV or higher for up to 100 μs. Samples took the form of a 4 μm-thick film deposited onto 8 pairs of 17 μm-thick Cu electrodes supported on a 25 μm-thick Kapton backing and sandwiched between glass plates. Materials recovered from the glass plates and around the electrode tips after passage of an arc were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Recovered materials included a variety of crystalline compounds (e.g., UO{sub 2}, UC{sub 2}, UCu{sub 5},) as well as mixtures of uranium and amorphous glass. Most of the materials collected on the glass plates took the form of spherules having a wide range of diameters from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers. The composition and size of the spherules depended on location, indicating different chemical and physical environments. A theoretical analysis we have carried out suggests that the submicron spherules presumably formed by deposition during the arc discharge, while at the same time the glass plates were strongly heated due to absorption of plasma radiation mainly by islands of deposited metals (Cu, U). The surface temperature of the glass plates is expected to have risen to ∼2300 K thus producing a liquefied glass layer, likely diffusions of the deposited metals on the hot glass surface and into this layer were accompanied by chemical reactions that gave rise to the observed materials. These results, together with the compact scale and relatively low cost, suggest that the experimental technique provides a practical approach to investigate the complex physical and chemical processes that occur when actinide-containing material interacts with the environment at high temperature, for example, during fallout formation following a nuclear detonation.

  15. Exploring high temperature phenomena related to post-detonation using an electric arc

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Z. R.; Crowhurst, J. C.; Grant, C. D.; Knight, K. B.; Tang, V.; Chernov, A. A.; Cook, E. G.; Lotscher, J. P.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2013-11-22

    Here, we report a study of materials recovered from a uranium-containing plasma generated by an electric arc. The device used to generate the arc is capable of sustaining temperatures of an eV or higher for up to . Samples took the form of a -thick film deposited onto 8 pairs of -thick Cu electrodes supported on a -thick Kapton backing and sandwiched between glass plates. Materials recovered from the glass plates and around the electrode tips after passage of an arc were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Recovered materials included a variety of crystalline compounds (e.g., UO2, UC2, UCu5,) as well as mixtures of uranium and amorphous glass. Most of the materials collected on the glass plates took the form of spherules having a wide range of diameters from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers. The composition and size of the spherules depended on location, indicating different chemical and physical environments. A theoretical analysis we have carried out suggests that the submicron spherules presumably formed by deposition during the arc discharge, while at the same time the glass plates were strongly heated due to absorption of plasma radiation mainly by islands of deposited metals (Cu, U). The surface temperature of the glass plates is expected to have risen to ~2300 K thus producing a liquefied glass layer, likely diffusions of the deposited metals on the hot glass surface and into this layer were accompanied by chemical reactions that gave rise to the observed materials. These results, together with the compact scale and relatively low cost, suggest that the experimental technique provides a practical approach to investigate the complex physical and chemical processes that occur when actinide-containing material interacts with the environment at high temperature, for example, during fallout formation following a nuclear detonation.

  16. Exploring high temperature phenomena related to post-detonation using an electric arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Crowhurst, J. C.; Grant, C. D.; Knight, K. B.; Tang, V.; Chernov, A. A.; Cook, E. G.; Lotscher, J. P.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2013-11-01

    We report a study of materials recovered from a uranium-containing plasma generated by an electric arc. The device used to generate the arc is capable of sustaining temperatures of an eV or higher for up to 100 μs. Samples took the form of a 4 μm-thick U238 film deposited onto 8 pairs of 17 μm-thick Cu electrodes supported on a 25 μm-thick Kapton backing and sandwiched between glass plates. Materials recovered from the glass plates and around the electrode tips after passage of an arc were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Recovered materials included a variety of crystalline compounds (e.g., UO2, UC2, UCu5,) as well as mixtures of uranium and amorphous glass. Most of the materials collected on the glass plates took the form of spherules having a wide range of diameters from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers. The composition and size of the spherules depended on location, indicating different chemical and physical environments. A theoretical analysis we have carried out suggests that the submicron spherules presumably formed by deposition during the arc discharge, while at the same time the glass plates were strongly heated due to absorption of plasma radiation mainly by islands of deposited metals (Cu, U). The surface temperature of the glass plates is expected to have risen to ˜2300 K thus producing a liquefied glass layer, likely diffusions of the deposited metals on the hot glass surface and into this layer were accompanied by chemical reactions that gave rise to the observed materials. These results, together with the compact scale and relatively low cost, suggest that the experimental technique provides a practical approach to investigate the complex physical and chemical processes that occur when actinide-containing material interacts with the environment at high temperature, for example, during fallout formation following a nuclear detonation.

  17. Structural variation along the southwestern Nankai seismogenic zone related to various earthquake phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, A.; Shimomura, N.; Kodaira, S.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sato, T.; Kashiwase, K.; Fujimori, H.; Kaneda, Y.; Mochizuki, K.; Kato, A.; Iidaka, T.; Kurashimo, E.; Shinohara, M.; Takeda, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2011-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough subduction seismogenic zone, the Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes had often occurred simultaneously, and caused a great event. In order to reduce a great deal of damage to coastal area from both strong ground motion and tsunami generation, it is necessary to understand rupture synchronization and segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake. For a precise estimate of the rupture area of the Nankai megathrust event, it is important to know the geometry of the subducting Philippine Sea plate and deep subduction structure along the Nankai Trough. To obtain the deep subduction structure of the coseismic rupture area of the Nankai earthquake in 1946 off Shikoku area, the large-scale high-resolution wide-angle seismic study was conducted in 2009 and 2010. In this study, 201 and 200 ocean bottom seismographs were deployed off the Shikoku Island and the Kii channel respectively. A tuned airgun system (7800 cu. in.) shot every 200m along 13 profiles. Airgun shots were also recorded along an onshore seismic profile (prepared by ERI, univ. of Tokyo and NIED) prolonged from the offshore profile off the Kii Peninsula. Long-term observation was conducted for ~9 months by 21 OBSs off the Shikoku area and 20 OBSs off the Kii channel.This research is part of 'Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes' funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Structural images of the overriding plate indicate the old accreted sediments (the Cretaceous-Tertiary accretionary prism) with the velocity greater than 6km/s extend seaward from off the Shikoku to the Hyuga-nada. Moreover, the young accreted sediments become relatively thinner eastward from off the cape Ashizuri to Muroto. These structural variations might be related to the different rupture pattern of the Nankai event. Structural image of the deep low frequency earthquakes and tremors is shown by using the airgun shots recorded at onshore

  18. The relevance of structural features of cellulose and its interactions to dissolution, regeneration, gelation and plasticization phenomena.

    PubMed

    Lindman, Björn; Medronho, Bruno; Alves, Luis; Costa, Carolina; Edlund, Håkan; Norgren, Magnus

    2017-09-13

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer and a very important renewable resource. Since cellulose cannot be shaped by melting, a major route for its use for novel materials, new chemical compounds and renewable energy must go via the solution state. Investigations during several decades have led to the identification of several solvents of notably different character. The mechanisms of dissolution in terms of intermolecular interactions have been discussed from early work but, even on fundamental aspects, conflicting and opposite views appear. In view of this, strategies for developing new solvent systems for various applications have remained obscure. There is for example a strong need for using forest products for higher value materials and for environmental and cost reasons to use water-based solvents. Several new water-based solvents have been developed recently but there is no consensus regarding the underlying mechanisms. Here we wish to address the most important mechanisms described in the literature and confront them with experimental observations. A broadened view is helpful for improving the current picture and thus cellulose derivatives and phenomena such as fiber dissolution, swelling, regeneration, plasticization and dispersion are considered. In addition to the matter of hydrogen bonding versus hydrophobic interactions, the role of ionization as well as some applications of new knowledge gained are highlighted.

  19. Children's Explanations for Phenomena Related to Manned Space - Orbit, and Weightlessness: an Interview Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Donald James

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to elicit the explanations held by sixth grade students concerning gravity, orbit, and weightlessness within the context of manned space exploration. This study was descriptive and qualitative and utilized an anthropological perspective. Each student was interviewed individually using a multistage interview approach. During these sessions videotape segments and auxiliary models focusing on the Space Shuttle were utilized to elicit the students' explanations. Each student's explanations were recorded, transcribed and summarized into statements or explanatory categories. Forty explanatory categories, concerning gravity, orbit, and weightlessness, were developed from these students individual explanations. These categories were then evaluated for accuracy by the interviewed students. Nine general explanatory frameworks, three each for the phenomena of interest were formulated from the explanatory categories. Gravity. (1) Gravity holds people and objects on the earth. (2) Air and the atmosphere influence gravity. (3) Gravity is a geocentric phenomenon. Orbit. (1) Orbiting objects move in space. (2) Force is required to maintain an object in orbit. (3) People and objects "float" when in orbit. Weightlessness. (1) Weightlessness occurs in the absence of gravity. (2) Objects "float up" as a result of weightlessness. (3) When weightless, people undergo physical and behavioral changes. This study explored the merits of two methodological approaches, the multistage interview approach and the use of videotape as an auxiliary interview material. The multistage interview approach allowed a wider range of topics to be addressed in greater depth and provided an opportunity for the subjects to clarify, or elaborate on, their previous remarks. The videotape provided an internal organization and coherence to the interviews. While tape did enhance student interest, for some students it appeared to be a significant learning experience rather than the

  20. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  1. Incurable Adler relation for soft neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovicha, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Iván; Siddikov, M.

    2014-04-01

    The Adler relation (AR), which bridges soft interactions of neutrinos and pions, might look as a manifestation of pion dominance. However neutrino cannot fluctuate to a pion because of lepton current conservation, instead it interacts via much heavier hadronic components. This fact leads to nontrivial relations between interaction amplitudes of different hadronic species, in particular, it links diagonal and off-diagonal diffractive interactions of pions. Absorptive corrections break these relations making the AR impossible to hold universally, i.e. for any target and at any energy. We predict a dramatic breakdown of the AR for coherent neutrino-production of pions on nuclei at all energies.

  2. Transient absorption phenomena and related structural transformations in femtosecond laser-excited Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.

    2004-09-01

    Analysis of processes affecting transient optical absorption and photogeneration of electron-hole plasma in silicon pumped by an intense NIR or visible femtosecond laser pulse has been performed taking into account the most important electron-photon, electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions and, as a result, two main regimes of such laser-matter interaction have been revealed. The first regime is concerned with indirect interband optical absorption in Si, enhanced by a coherent shrinkage of its smallest indirect bandgap due to dynamic Franz-Keldysh effect (DFKE). The second regime takes place due to the critical renormalization of the Si direct bandgap along Λ-axis of its first Brillouin zone because of DFKE and the deformation potential electron-phonon interaction and occurs as intense direct single-photon excitation of electrons into one of the quadruplet of equivalent Λ-valleys in the lowest conduction band, which is split down due to the electron-phonon interaction.

  3. Observation of genetic relation among new phenomena Geminion, Chiron and mini-Centauro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The threshold energy problem of exotic type interactions is discussed on the basis of available information from the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. The genetic hypothesis is proposed as a working hypothesis to explain the discrepancy seen in cosmic ray study and CERN p bar -p collider experiments.

  4. Nonlinear quantum phenomena and biophysical aspects of complexity related to health and disease.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, L; Foletti, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss living systems as a non-linear self-interacting phenomenon, stabilized by the non-linear interaction between matter and self-created electromagnetic field. Such electromagnetic field can arise, in particular, as the radiation from electrosolitons which mediate the charge transport along macromolecules in metabolic redox processes. The non-linear nature of solitons results in an effective mechanism and leads to the synchronization of redox processes. It allows intra- and intercellular communication and long-range coherence in the system. One peculiar property of solitons is the resonant effect of external weak stimuli on their dynamics, which can explain the mechanism of low-intensity (non-thermal) electromagnetic therapies. We also discuss the stabilizing role of noise and spatial symmetry breaking in living organisms as open dissipative structures far from equilibrium, and health/disease states as the corresponding attractors of the system in the multi-parametric phase diagram. The essential role of electromagnetic potentials in self-regulation and self-healing processes is analyzed, based on the long-range matter-field interaction and fast information transfer, provided by the electromagnetic potentials.

  5. Images of gravitational and magnetic phenomena derived from two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography of interacting binary stars

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Cocking, Alexander S.; Fisher, John G.; Conover, Marshall J. E-mail: asc5097@psu.edu

    2014-11-10

    We have used two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography as a tool to examine the influence of gravitational and magnetic phenomena in interacting binaries that undergo mass transfer from a magnetically active star onto a non-magnetic main-sequence star. This multitiered study of over 1300 time-resolved spectra of 13 Algol binaries involved calculations of the predicted dynamical behavior of the gravitational flow and the dynamics at the impact site, analysis of the velocity images constructed from tomography, and the influence on the tomograms of orbital inclination, systemic velocity, orbital coverage, and shadowing. The Hα tomograms revealed eight sources: chromospheric emission, a gas stream along the gravitational trajectory, a star-stream impact region, a bulge of absorption or emission around the mass-gaining star, a Keplerian accretion disk, an absorption zone associated with hotter gas, a disk-stream impact region, and a hot spot where the stream strikes the edge of a disk. We described several methods used to extract the physical properties of the emission sources directly from the velocity images, including S-wave analysis, the creation of simulated velocity tomograms from hydrodynamic simulations, and the use of synthetic spectra with tomography to sequentially extract the separate sources of emission from the velocity image. In summary, the tomography images have revealed results that cannot be explained solely by gravitational effects: chromospheric emission moving with the mass-losing star, a gas stream deflected from the gravitational trajectory, and alternating behavior between stream state and disk state. Our results demonstrate that magnetic effects cannot be ignored in these interacting binaries.

  6. A new South American network to study the atmospheric electric field and its variations related to geophysical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacza, J.; Raulin, J.-P.; Macotela, E.; Norabuena, E.; Fernandez, G.; Correia, E.; Rycroft, M. J.; Harrison, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present the capability of a new network of field mill sensors to monitor the atmospheric electric field at various locations in South America; we also show some early results. The main objective of the new network is to obtain the characteristic Universal Time diurnal curve of the atmospheric electric field in fair weather, known as the Carnegie curve. The Carnegie curve is closely related to the current sources flowing in the Global Atmospheric Electric Circuit so that another goal is the study of this relationship on various time scales (transient/monthly/seasonal/annual). Also, by operating this new network, we may also study departures of the Carnegie curve from its long term average value related to various solar, geophysical and atmospheric phenomena such as the solar cycle, solar flares and energetic charged particles, galactic cosmic rays, seismic activity and specific meteorological events. We then expect to have a better understanding of the influence of these phenomena on the Global Atmospheric Electric Circuit and its time-varying behavior.

  7. Fundamental relation between the main parameters of the thermally activated transport phenomena in complex oxide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasik, M. M.; Gasik, M. I.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Dashevskii, V. Ya.; Griogorovich, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    The relation between the activation energy and the preexponential factor in the Arrhenius equation that describes the viscosity and electrical conductivity of oxide (slag) melts is systematically analyzed over wide composition and temperature ranges for the first time. When deriving this relation, we do not use any model concepts and assumptions concerning the structure of slag melts or the character of electric charge transfer in them. The fundamental applicability of the Meyer-Neldel rule for this relation is shown and grounded. The application of this algorithm in practice can give information on the structure of experimental data, nonobvious correlations, and possible relations of a higher order and can quantitatively predict the behavior of parameters, including the range outside experimentally determined data.

  8. Temporal variability of exospheric-related plasma phenomena at Mars: lessons from Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, C.; Mazelle, C. X.; Romanelli, N. J.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Gomez, D. O.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.

    2016-12-01

    Contrary to Venus, the exosphere seems to play an important role in the Solar Wind interaction with Mars. Two important plasma features associated with the presence of the extended Martian exosphere are the waves at the proton cyclotron frequency upstream from the bow shock, and the magnetic pileup boundary (MPB). In this work we revisit Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) pre-mapping (up to 15 Martian radii distance) magnetometer and electron reflectometer data (MAG/ER) to characterize the variability in the occurrence of waves at the local proton cyclotron frequency outside the Martian bow shock. These observations reveal the waves are more abundant around perihelion/ southern summer solstice than around the spring and autumn equinoxes, accompanying predicted exospheric density profiles. With the MPB position also showing seasonal changes according to MGS MAG/ER data, we discuss the possibility that the Martian exosphere and thermosphere exert an apparent control of these collisionless, nonlinear, plasma features at these and other timescales.

  9. Relating Precipitation Phenomena with MODIS Detected Hot Spots in the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, E. M.; Reid, J. S.; Xian, P.; Hyer, E.; Turk, J.; Flatau, M.; Zhang, C.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies of land use practices in SE Asia’s Maritime Continent (MC) have raised questions over potential meteorological implications including smoke-cloud interaction and changes in the regional radiation budget. Land management practices on Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Borneo, and the Malay Peninsula include biomass burning to clear primary forest as well as to maintain oil palm plantations. Burning is also employed for clearing unwanted remains from previous crops, rice stubble for example. However, burning activity is often dictated by weather, in particular precipitation. We studied 5 years of MODIS active fire hot spot and satellite precipitation data to investigate how observed burning activity correlated with precipitation features at four major scales: 1) Intraseasonal El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOP); 2) Seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ); 3) the 30-90 day Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO); and 4) regional convection from localized weather phenomenon (e.g., orographic, isolated thermal convection, sea breeze, etc…). It was found that observed burn patterns from each of the islands of the MC had differing responses to these four forcings. Observed burning activity on the islands of Borneo and Sulawesi correlated strongly with the ENSO and ITCZ indicies, whereas Sumatra was more influenced by the phase and strength of the MJO. Java, showing a mix of influence, exhibited strong fire activity in the morning rather than afternoon which is unusual for most burning regions. We hypothesize that these observed relationships reflect both physical land use differences and contextual bias/observability issues associated with the region’s heavy cloud cover. For further studies on smoke-meteorology interaction, our findings point to the need for a clear understanding of the meteorological context of satellite observations.

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Nonlinear Phenomena Related to the Double Layer Dynamics in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, O.; Dimitriu, D. G.

    2010-08-04

    The periodic current bursts observed in the dynamic current-voltage characteristic of a probe in the presence of a plasma fireball in dynamic state were modeled in the frame of the scale relativity model, based on both the fractal space-time concept and the generalization of Einstein's principle of relativity to scale transformations. The double layer dynamics is described by a set of time-dependent Schroedinger-type equations and the self-structuring is given by means of the negative differential resistance. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are proven to be in very good agreement.

  11. Neurophysiological Considerations Related to Interactive Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews literature from neuroscience and mass communications regarding how media affects learning and memory and relates research findings to interactive multimedia. Topics discussed include knowledge and media; neurological conceptions of memory; media and memory; and interactive multimedia and memory. (Contains 24 references.) (LRW)

  12. Hemorrhagic urethritis in female-to-male transsexual. Possible androgen-related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; Sanchez, R L

    1987-12-01

    This article describes a case of hematuria and urethritis related to androgen stimulation in a female-to-male transsexual receiving testosterone cypionate. Biopsy of the affected urethral tissue revealed periurethral glands which demonstrated a strong positive reaction with immunoperoxidase staining for prostatic specific antigen. When the androgen stimulus was reduced, the patient's symptoms resolved. This report gives evidence for possible androgen-induced pathology in the female urethra.

  13. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  14. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  15. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  16. Plasma flow interaction with ITER divertor related surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojčinović, Ivan P.

    2010-11-01

    It has been found that the plasma flow generated by quasistationary plasma accelerators can be used for simulation of high energy plasma interaction with different materials of interest for fusion experiments. It is especially important for the studies of the processes such as ELMs (edge localized modes), plasma disruptions and VDEs (vertical displacement events), during which a significant part of the confined hot plasma is lost from the core to the SOL (scrape off layer) enveloping the core region. Experiments using plasma guns have been used to assess erosion from disruptions and ELMs. Namely, in this experiment modification of different targets, like tungsten, molybdenum, CFC and silicon single crystal surface by the action of hydrogen and nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow (CPF) generated by magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) has been studied. MPC plasma flow with standard parameters (1 MJ/m2 in 0.1 ms) can be used for simulation of transient peak thermal loads during Type I ELMs and disruptions. Analysis of the targets erosion, brittle destruction, melting processes, and dust formation has been performed. These surface phenomena are results of specific conditions during CPF interaction with target surface. The investigations are related to the fundamental aspects of high energy plasma flow interaction with different material of interest for fusion. One of the purposes is a study of competition between melting and cleavage of treated solid surface. The other is investigation of plasma interaction with first wall and divertor component materials related to the ITER experiment.

  17. Fluid mechanic phenomena relating to flow control in conduits and pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayazit, Yilmaz

    first time, thereby contradicting the prior limitation to inertial laminar flow. The Taguchi method was applied to pinpoint the most important among the independent variables with respect to the dimensionless pressure drop, highlighting the importance of the porosity. Control of the liquid flow produced by a pump was analyzed as a problem of fluid-structural interaction.

  18. Observations of solar X-ray and EUV jets and their related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Bučík, R.; Guo, L.-J.; Nitta, N.

    2016-11-01

    Solar jets are fast-moving, elongated brightenings related to ejections seen in both images and spectra on all scales from barely visible chromospheric jets to coronal jets extending up to a few solar radii. The largest, most powerful jets are the source of type III radio bursts, energetic electrons and ions with greatly enhanced 3He and heavy element abundances. The frequent coronal jets from polar and equatorial coronal holes may contribute to the solar wind. The primary acceleration mechanism for all jets is believed to be release of magnetic stress via reconnection; however the energy buildup depends on the jets' source environment. In this review, we discuss how certain features of X-ray and EUV jets, such as their repetition rate and association with radio emission, depends on their underlying photospheric field configurations (active regions, polar and equatorial coronal holes, and quiet Sun).

  19. Electromagnetic emission memory phenomena related to LiF ionic crystal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatou, C.; Tombras, G. S.; Ninos, D.; Hadjicontis, V.

    2008-04-01

    During the uniaxial compression of LiF ionic monocrystals, acoustic and electromagnetic emissions (EME) are detected. We observed that when the compression is performed in successive loading, unloading cycles and these emissions are being monitored, no new emissions will occur unless the maximum stress of the previous cycle is exceeded, meaning that the material presents memory characteristics. This is observed not only for the acoustic emission (AE), which is the well known Kaiser effect, but for the EME as well. In other words, the material appears to memorize and reveal the previously maximum stress it suffered while being deformed. The importance of an electromagnetic memory feature of a material can be related to various applications in material science, especially when the detection of AE is not feasible or gives false alert. Such cases may very well be earthquakes' predictive indications, monitoring of mines' stability, imminent landslides, etc.

  20. Prevention of unpredictable chronic stress-related phenomena in zebrafish exposed to bromazepam, fluoxetine and nortriptyline.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Matheus; Herrmann, Ana P; Mocelin, Ricieri; Rambo, Cassiano L; Koakoski, Gessi; Abreu, Murilo S; Conterato, Greicy M M; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Maurício R; Zanatta, Leila; Barcellos, Leonardo J G; Piato, Angelo L

    2016-10-01

    Several model organisms have been employed to study the impacts of stress on biological systems. Different models of unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) have been established in rodents; however, these protocols are expensive, long-lasting, and require a large physical structure. Our group has recently reported an UCS protocol in zebrafish with several advantages compared to rodent models. We observed that UCS induced behavioral, biochemical, and molecular changes similar to those observed in depressed patients, supporting the translational relevance of the protocol. Considering that a pharmacological assessment is lacking in this zebrafish model, our aim was to evaluate the effects of anxiolytic (bromazepam) and antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine and nortriptyline) on behavioral (novel tank test), biochemical (whole-body cortisol), and molecular parameters (cox-2, tnf-α, il-6, and il-10 gene expression) in zebrafish subjected to UCS. We replicated previous data showing that UCS induces behavioral and neuroendocrine alterations in zebrafish, and we show for the first time that anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs are able to prevent such effects. Furthermore, we extended the molecular characterization of the model, revealing that UCS increases expression of the pro-inflammatory markers cox-2 and il-6, which was also prevented by the drugs tested. This study reinforces the use of zebrafish as a model organism to study the behavioral and physiological effects of stress. The UCS protocol may also serve as a screening tool for evaluating new drugs that can be used to treat psychiatric disorders with stress-related etiologies.

  1. Switching VO₂ Single Crystals and Related Phenomena: Sliding Domains and Crack Formation.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Bertina; Patlagan, Larisa

    2017-05-19

    VO₂ is the prototype material for insulator-metal transition (IMT). Its transition at TIMT = 340 K is fast and consists of a large resistance jump (up to approximately five orders of magnitude), a large change in its optical properties in the visible range, and symmetry change from monoclinic to tetragonal (expansion by 1% along the tetragonal c-axis and 0.5% contraction in the perpendicular direction). It is a candidate for potential applications such as smart windows, fast optoelectronic switches, and field-effect transistors. The change in optical properties at the IMT allows distinguishing between the insulating and the metallic phases in the mixed state. Static or dynamic domain patterns in the mixed-state of self-heated single crystals during electric-field induced switching are in strong contrast with the percolative nature of the mixed state in switching VO₂ films. The most impressive effect-so far unique to VO₂-is the sliding of narrow semiconducting domains within a metallic background in the positive sense of the electric current. Here we show images from videos obtained using optical microscopy for sliding domains along VO₂ needles and confirm a relation suggested in the past for their velocity. We also show images for the disturbing damage induced by the structural changes in switching VO₂ crystals obtained for only a few current-voltage cycles.

  2. Physiological ischemia/reperfusion phenomena and their relation to endogenous melatonin production: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C; Sainz, Rosa M; Mayo, Juan C; León, Josefa; Reiter, Russel J

    2005-07-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion is a frequently encountered phenomenon in organisms. Prolonged ischemia followed then by reperfusion results in severe oxidative injury in tissues and organs; however, some species can tolerate such events better than others. In nature, arousal from hibernation and resurfacing from diving causes animals to experience classic ischemia/reperfusion and, somehow, these animals cope well with the potential oxidative stress. It has been documented that during these physiological ischemia/reperfusion events, the activities of several antioxidant enzymes and the levels of some small-molecular-weight antioxidants become elevated. For example, the potent small-molecular-weight antioxidant melatonin often attains especially high levels during these physiological ischemia/reperfusion events including during arousal from hibernation or in the newborns during delivery. Highly elevated melatonin production during these physiological ischemia/reperfusion episodes exhibits several features. First, this high melatonin production is transient and fits well with the time schedule of the physiological ischemia/reperfusion period; therefore, it is not related to the normal endogenous melatonin rhythm. Yet, this transient peak protects the animals from destructive oxidative processes that occur during these transition periods. Second, these high levels of melatonin seem to derive from several organs since pinealectomy does not totally reduce circulating levels of this agent. Third, high melatonin production present at arousal from hibernation or in the newborns at birth does not appear to be controlled by light, i.e., it occurs both during the day and at night, and the amplitudes of elevated melatonin levels are equivalent at these times. The significance of these findings is discussed herein. Based on currently available data, we hypothesize that melatonin plays an important role in the physiological ischemia/reperfusion, i.e., as a member of antioxidant defense

  3. Phenomena of pulsation tectonics related to the breakup of the eastern north American continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Robert E.

    1983-05-01

    New data from the recent IPOD drilling of DSDP Site 534 in the Blake-Bahama Basin give a definite age for the spreading-center shift involved in the breakup of the North American Atlantic margin. A basal Callovian age (~ 155 m.y.) is determined for the Blake Spur magnetic anomaly marking this spreadingcenter shift that signals the birth of the modern North Atlantic Ocean. This is some 20 m.y. younger than previously thought. An implication of this younger age for the Blake Spur event is that very high spreading rates are now required for the Jurassic outer magnetic quiet zone along the North American margin. This association of a relatively high spreading rate with a magnetic quiet zone is similar to that for the mid-Cretaceous and implies a link between the processes controlling plate spreading, which are in the upper mantle, and the processes controlling the magnetic field, which are in the outer core. A theory of pulsation tectonics involving the cyclic eruption of plumes of hot mantle material from the lowermost mantle could explain the correlation. Plumes carry heat away from the core-mantle boundary and later reach the asthenosphere and lithosphere to induce faster spreading. The pulse of fast spreading in the Jurassic apparently followed the breakup of continents bordering the North Atlantic Ocean. Other pulses of fast spreading appear to correlate with major ocean openings on various parts of the globe, implying that this might be a prevalent process. Rifting of passive margins may be controlled by the more fundamental global processes described by the theory of pulsation tectonics.

  4. Very intense geomagnetic storms and their relation to interplanetary and solar active phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajko, N. S.; Cristiani, G.; Mandrini, C. H.; Dal Lago, A.

    2013-05-01

    We revisit previous studies in which the characteristics of the solar and interplanetary sources of intense geomagnetic storms have been discussed. In this particular analysis, using the Dst time series, we consider the very intense geomagnetic storms that occurred during Solar Cycle 23 by setting a value of Dstmin⩽-200nT as threshold. After carefully examining the set of available solar and in situ observations from instruments aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), complemented with data from the ground, we have identified and characterized the solar and interplanetary sources of each storm. That is to say, we determine the time, angular width, plane-of-the-sky, lateral expansion, and radial velocities of the source coronal mass ejection (CME), the type and heliographic location of the CME solar source region (including the characteristics of the sunspot groups), and the time duration of the associated flare. After this, we investigate the overall characteristics of the interplanetary (IP) main-phase storm driver, including the time arrival of the shock/disturbance at 1 AU, the type of associated IP structure/ejecta, the origin of a prolonged and enhanced southward component (Bs) of the IP field, and other characteristics related to the energy injected into the magnetosphere during the storm (i.e. the solar wind maximum convected electric field, Ey). The analyzed set consists of 20 events, some of these are complex and present two or more Dst minima that are, in general, due to consecutive solar events. The 20 storms are distributed along Solar Cycle 23 (which is a double-peak cycle) in such a way that 15% occurs during the rising phase of the cycle, 45% during both cycle maxima, and, surprisingly, 40% during the cycle descending phase. This latter set includes half of the superstorms and the only cycle extreme event. 85% of the storms are associated to full halo CMEs and 10% to partial halo events. One

  5. Investigation of the structure of the electromagnetic field and related phenomena, generated by the active satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, Yakov L.

    1992-01-01

    A short review is given for the general frequency and angle distribution of the electric field radiated by an electric dipole E = E(sub 0)cos(omega)t, in a magnetoplasma. Detailed results of numerical calculations of (E) were made in the Very Low Frequency (VLF) and the Low Frequency (LF) bands 0.02f(sub b) is less than or equal to F is less than or equal to 0.5f(sub b) (F is approximately (4-500) kHz) in the ionosphere and magnetosphere in the altitude region Z = (800-6000) km; f(sub b) is the electron gyro-frequency of the plasmas in the discussed region f(sub b) is approximately equal to (1.1 to 0.2) MHz. The amplitudes of the electric field have large maxima in four regions: close to the direction of the Earth's magnetic field line (B(sub 0)), it is the so called Axis field (E(sub 0)) and in the Storey (E(sub St)), Reversed Storey (E(sub RevSt)), and Resonance (E(sub Res)) Cones. The maximal values of E(sub 0), E(sub Res), and E(sub RevSt) are very pronounced close to the low hybrid frequency, F approximately F(sub L). The flux of the electric field is concentrated in very narrow regions, the apex angles of the cones delta(beta) is approximately equal to (0.1 - 1) degree. The enhancement and focusing of the electric field is growing up, especially quickly at Z greater than 800 km. At Z is greater than 1000 up to 6000 km, the relative value of (E), in comparison with its value at Z = 800 km is about (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4)) times larger. Thus, the flux of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves in the Earth magnetoplasma produces and is guided by very narrow pencil beams, similar, let us say, to laser beams.

  6. Ancient sandstone condition assessment in relation to degradation, cleaning and consolidation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdácký, Miloš; Frankeová, Dita; Slížková, Zuzana

    2015-04-01

    of cubes for non-destructive US tests and micro drilling. Then the cubes were cut into thin plates and they were tested for volumetric change due to hydric and temperature variations. That procedure allowed a comparison of results of the US tests on cubes and destructive bending tests on thin plates. The remains of these plates were used for porosity measurements. The overall test procedure was planned and carried out in a way which ensured testing of appropriately corresponding specimens. The results supplied data for studying efficiency of the consolidation treatment with silicic acid ester products in relation to three pre-treatment stone conditions, as well as to the type of sandstone cementation (the tested stones had mostly a kaolin or silica, rarely a goethit cementation). The tested stone types were documented by macroscopic and microscopic (thin section) descriptions. The results further indicate capacity of individual testing and assessment methods, and help to select methods suitable for in situ diagnostics.

  7. LUNAR OUTGASSING, TRANSIENT PHENOMENA, AND THE RETURN TO THE MOON. II. PREDICTIONS AND TESTS FOR OUTGASSING/REGOLITH INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.; Hummels, Cameron

    2009-12-20

    We follow Paper I with predictions of how gas leaking through the lunar surface could influence the regolith, as might be observed via optical transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) and related effects. We touch on several processes, but concentrate on low and high flow rate extremes, which are perhaps the most likely. We model explosive outgassing for the smallest gas overpressure at the regolith base that releases the regolith plug above it. This disturbance's timescale and affected area are consistent with observed TLPs; we also discuss other effects. For slow flow, escape through the regolith is prolonged by low diffusivity. Water, found recently in deep magma samples, is unique among candidate volatiles, capable of freezing between the regolith base and surface, especially near the lunar poles. For major outgassing sites, we consider the possible accumulation of water ice. Over geological time, ice accumulation can evolve downward through the regolith. Depending on gases additional to water, regolith diffusivity might be suppressed chemically, blocking seepage and forcing the ice zone to expand to larger areas, up to km{sup 2} scales, again, particularly at high latitudes. We propose an empirical path forward, wherein current and forthcoming technologies provide controlled, sensitive probes of outgassing. The optical transient/outgassing connection, addressed via Earth-based remote sensing, suggests imaging and/or spectroscopy, but aspects of lunar outgassing might be more covert, as indicated above. TLPs betray some outgassing, but does outgassing necessarily produce TLPs? We also suggest more intrusive techniques from radar to in situ probes. Understanding lunar volatiles seems promising in terms of resource exploitation for human exploration of the Moon and beyond, and offers interesting scientific goals in its own right. Many of these approaches should be practiced in a pristine lunar atmosphere, before significant confusing signals likely to be produced upon

  8. Triplet exciton state and related phenomena in the β -phase of poly(9,9-dioctyl)fluorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, C.; King, S. M.; Dias, F.; Monkman, A. P.

    2004-11-01

    Using both time-resolved emission and cw photoinduced absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature, the aggregation phenomena ( β -phase formation) observed in poly(9,9-dioctyl)fluorene is studied. All spectra of the β phase, including absorption, prompt and delayed fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoinduced triplet absorption feature very narrow linewidths, which are unique within the class of conjugated polymers. From the comparison of the latter data with amorphous polyfluorene, poly(9,9-diethylhexyl)fluorene, as well as with the fully planar ladder-type poly(paraphenylene), we conclude that the origin of the β phase cannot simply be an extended intrachain conjugation, but interchain interactions are involved. Furthermore, the β phase acts as an energetic trap for both singlet and triplet excitons initially created on amorphous chain segments. The delayed fluorescence kinetics of the β phase were measured at different temperatures. From the analysis of these decays within the framework of dispersive triplet migration in a Gaussian density of states distribution, further evidence is provided that the delayed fluorescence originates from triplet-triplet annihilation. At room temperature, it is clear that triplet excitons migrate over large distances, exceeding that of singlet excitons. Also, the segregation time between dispersive triplet migration and classical thermally activated hopping, is in the case of β -phase containing samples, dependent on the separation of the β -phase domains.

  9. DISLOCATION BARRIER INTERACTIONS IN CUBIC CRYSTALS. VOLUME I. THE INTERACTION OF DISLOCATIONS IN ANISOTROPIC FACE-CENTERED CUBIC CRYSTALS. (STUDY OF THE THEORY OF FRACTURE PHENOMENA).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    cubic structure . Both long-range and short-range interactions have been considered in a series of fcc elements; the stability of each configuration resulting from a short-range attraction has been determined. The widths of the possible barriers in the various fcc elements have been computed, and the relative strength and importance of each barrier discussed. The most important barriers are those associated with the long-range interaction of two dislocations whose Burgers vectors are orthogonal. The Lomer-Cottrell barrier, although relatively weak, does exist in the

  10. Objects, Entities, Behaviors, and Interactions: A Typology of Student-Constructed Computer-Based Models of Physical Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louca, Loucas T.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Michael, Michalis; Constantinou, Constantinos P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for analyzing and evaluating student-constructed models of physical phenomena and monitoring the progress of these models. Moreover, we aimed to examine whether this framework could capture differences between models created using different computer-based modeling tools; namely, computer-based…

  11. Fluctuation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Montroll, E.W.; Lebowitz, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject.

  12. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  13. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  14. Nonstationary phenomena in the region of shock-wave interaction with a boundary layer at transonic flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, A. A.; Budovskii, A. D.; Polivanov, P. A.; Vishnyakov, O. I.

    2017-06-01

    Nonstationary characteristics of detached flow have been experimentally studied during interaction of the boundary layer with a shock wave that appears on a profiled bump in transonic flow. The experiments were performed with variable shock-wave intensity and position in a T-325 wind tunnel. The flow was studied using methods of schlieren imaging, measuring average pressure and its pulsations on the surface of a model, and determining velocity fields by particle image velocimetry. Analysis of the experimental data showed that the observed shock-wave oscillations and flow pulsations in the detachment zone were related to disturbances present in the oncoming boundary layer.

  15. Influence of Tailored Applied Magnetic Fields on High-Power MPD Thruster Current Transport and Onset-Related Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Robert C.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    magnetic field configurations enabled significant reductions in onset-related behaviors relative to self-field operation. These improvements should lead to reduced anode erosion, i.e., improved thruster lifetime, and increased thruster efficiency with the applied fields. The applied fields used in this study differ from both the topologies and relative field strengths typically used in the vast majority of conventional, so-called "applied-field MPD thrusters" (AF-MPDTs). These results suggest a distinctive and more effective approach to influencing the near-anode phenomena and mitigating the deleterious effects of onset with appropriately designed applied magnetic fields.

  16. Influence of Tailored Applied Magnetic Fields on High-Power MPD Thruster Current Transport and Onset-Related Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Robert C.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    magnetic field configurations enabled significant reductions in onset-related behaviors relative to self-field operation. These improvements should lead to reduced anode erosion, i.e., improved thruster lifetime, and increased thruster efficiency with the applied fields. The applied fields used in this study differ from both the topologies and relative field strengths typically used in the vast majority of conventional, so-called "applied-field MPD thrusters" (AF-MPDTs). These results suggest a distinctive and more effective approach to influencing the near-anode phenomena and mitigating the deleterious effects of onset with appropriately designed applied magnetic fields.

  17. Flow phenomena in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creitzer, E. M.; Epstein, A. H.; Giles, M. B.; McCune, J. E.; Tan, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT during the period 10/20/89 - 10/19/92, as part of our multi-investigator effort on basic unsteady flow phenomena in turbomachines. Within the overall project four separate tasks are specified. These are, in brief: (1) The Influence of Inlet Temperature Nonuniformities on Turbine Heat Transfer and Dynamics; (2) Assessment of Unsteady Losses in Stator/ Rotor Interactions; (3) Unsteady Phenomena and Flowfield instabilities in Multistage Axial Compressors; (4) Vortex Wake-Compressor Blade Interaction in Cascades - A New Rapid Method for Unsteady Separation and Vorticity Flux Calculations.

  18. Occasional Addresses by Edward Teller at Conferences of Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena (LIRPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Futurology of High Intensity Lasers (LIRPP Vol. 3A) * Lecture in Connection with the Edward Teller Medal Award (LIRPP Vol. 10) * Photo of the First Recipients of the Edward Teller Medal in 1991 * Photos from the Edward Teller Medal Celebration in 1997 * Photo with Participants of the LIRPP No. 12 Conference, 1995 * Photo with Edward Teller Medalists at IFSA01, Kyoto, 2001 * Keynote Address: The Edward Teller Lecture (LIRPP Vol. 11) * Keynote Address: Dr. Edward Teller (LIRPP Vol. 12) * Teller Award Presentation and Keynote Address (LIRPP Vol. 13) * Laudations of Awardees 1991-1995 (LIRPP Vol. 13) * Laudations of Awardees 1999-2003

  19. [Chemistry approach for therapeutic education of children with hemophilia and their parents: Representation of complex phenomena related to treatment].

    PubMed

    Novais, T; Meunier, S; Trossaërt, M; Salmon, D; Chamouard, V

    2016-08-01

    The therapeutic management of hemophilia is based on replacement therapy by clotting factor concentrates and may require several injections per week. In teenagers, non-compliance with treatment may be responsible for major orthopedic complications. The aim of this study was to develop and assess an educational intervention for children with hemophilia and their parents, thus illustrating the complex phenomena related to treatment and its adhesion. The construction of the educational workshop and tools was based on the concrete, visual, and playful representation of the following concepts: pathophysiology, the replacement therapy's mechanism of action, drug elimination requiring repeated administrations, and inhibitor development. The procedure was then assessed by a sample of children and parents using a questionnaire. A 60- to 90-min workshop was developed. The different tools used to illustrate the severity of the disease, the effect of the injected drug, drug elimination, and the inhibitor effect were: a blue-to-transparent colorimetric scale in bottles, a weekly timeline, Muppets, and a slow redox reaction. Five children and eight parents assessed this educational intervention with a rating of 3.75/4 (±0.10) and 3.60/4 (±0.45), respectively. The intervention developed could be transposed to other chronic diseases with similar therapeutic characteristics (including replacement mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics). Understanding the transmitted pharmacological concepts in a playful way is a major challenge to encourage treatment adhesion during adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Examining classroom interactions related to difference in students' science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zady, Madelon F.; Portes, Pedro R.; Ochs, V. Dan

    2003-01-01

    The current study examines the cognitive supports that underlie achievement in science by using a cultural historical framework (L. S. Vygotsky (1934/1986), Thought and Language, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.) and the activity setting (AS) construct (R. G. Tharp & R. Gallimore (1988), Rousing minds to life: Teaching, learning and schooling in social context, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, MA.) with its five features: personnel, motivations, scripts, task demands, and beliefs. Observations were made of the classrooms of seventh-grade science students, 32 of whom had participated in a prior achievement-related parent-child interaction or home study (P. R. Portes, M. F. Zady, & R. M. Dunham (1998), Journal of Genetic Psychology, 159, 163-178). The results of a quantitative analysis of classroom interaction showed two features of the AS: personnel and scripts. The qualitative field analysis generated four emergent phenomena related to the features of the AS that appeared to influence student opportunity for conceptual development. The emergent phenomenon were science activities, the building of learning, meaning in lessons, and the conflict over control. Lastly, the results of the two-part classroom study were compared to those of the home science AS of high and low achievers. Mismatches in the AS features in the science classroom may constrain the opportunity to learn. Educational implications are discussed.

  1. Plasma Flow Interaction With Iter Divertor Related Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojcinovic, I. P.

    2010-07-01

    It has been found that the plasma flow generated by quasistationary plasma accelerators can be used for simulation of high energy plasma interaction with different materials of interest for fusion experiments (Arkhipov et al. 2000, Federici et al. 2005). It is especially important for the studies of the processes such as ELMs (edge localized modes), plasma disruptions and VDEs (vertical displacement events), during which a significant part of the confined hot plasma is lost from the core to the SOL (scrape off layer) enveloping the core region. Experiments using plasma guns have been used to assess erosion from disruptions and ELMs. Namely, in this experiment modification of different targets, like molybdenum, CFC and silicon single crystal surface by the action of hydrogen and nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow (CPF) generated by magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) has been studied. MPC plasma flow with standard parameters (1 MJ/m^2 in 0.1 ms) can be used for simulation of transient peak thermal loads during Type I ELMs and disruptions (Dojcinovic et al. 2007). Analysis of the targets erosion, brittle destruction, melting processes, and dust formation has been performed (Dojcinovic et al. 2006). These surface phenomena are results of specific conditions during CPF interaction with target surface. The investigations are related to the fundamental aspects of high energy plasma flow interaction with different material of interest for fusion. One of the purposes is a study of competition between melting and cleavage of treated solid surface. The other is investigation of plasma interaction with first wall and divertor component materials related to the ITER experiment.

  2. Ultra Sensitive Monitoring of the Geomagnetic Field Combined with Radon Emanation as a Tool for Studying Earthquake Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafrir, H.; Ginzburg, B.; Hrvoic, I.; Shirman, B.; Gazit-Yaari, N.; Steinitz, G.; Wilson, M.

    2003-12-01

    An ultra sensitive magnetic gradiometric system and a very sensitive, continuous radon monitoring system are located with an existing seismic array, at the Amram Geophysical Observatory near Eilat, Israel. The purpose of setting these independent technologies together was to assess their applicability as a combined tool for studying earthquake related phenomena in the Dead Sea Rift (DSR) - a geodynamically active region (seismogenic). The magnetic system consists of three GEM Systems SuperGrad magnetometers, spaced several tens of meters apart, having a sensitivity of 0.05 pT/√ {Hz}, bandwidth ranging from DC to 10 Hz and featuring very high long-term stability. Several months of on-site operation shows that the magnetic gradiometric system demonstrates: a) a new capability of ultra-high precise geomagnetic field observations at sub-pT resolution; b) enables the suppression of diurnal variations and pulsations, thus enhancing the resolution of residual shallow crustal contributions; c) the registration bandwidth provides an opportunity to analyze field variation in a wide frequency domain, which was not attainable so far. The initiative of including radon monitoring is based on the combination of: a) large multi-day temporal radon variations are recorded at the Amram site; b) part of the variation is correlated to radon signatures at other locations in the same tectonic segment; c) some of the signals are similar to the multi-day signals, from another part of the DSR, which are significantly related to weak earthquakes in the DSR (Geology, v. 31, 505-508). The operated radon system consists of alpha and gamma ray detectors, integrating at a rate of 15 minutes and having a sensitivity of below 0.1 pCi/l in the geogas. The combined geophysical system is in continuous operation since 2002. It is expected that joint analysis of long-term multi-sensor data series will reveal subtle geophysical signals that precede or follow earthquakes in the region.

  3. Experiences of possession and paranormal phenomena among women in the general population: are they related to traumatic stress and dissociation?

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Alioğlu, Firdevs; Akyüz, Gamze

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of experiences of possession and paranormal phenomena (PNP) in the general population and their possible relations to each other and to traumatic stress and dissociation. The study was conducted on a representative female sample recruited from a town in central eastern Turkey. The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder sections of the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV Axis-I and Personality Disorders, and the Childhood Abuse and Neglect Questionnaire were administered to 628 women. Of these, 127 (20.2%) women reported at least 1 type of PNP and 13 (2.1%) women reported possession. Women with a dissociative disorder reported all types of possession and PNP (except telepathy) more frequently than those without. Whereas women with a trauma history in childhood and adulthood or PTSD reported possession more frequently than those without, PNP were associated with childhood trauma only. Factor analysis yielded 4 dimensions: possession by and/or contact with nonhuman entities, extrasensory communications, possession by a human entity, and precognition. These factors correlated with number of secondary features of dissociative identity disorder and Schneiderian symptoms. Latent class analysis identified 3 groups. The most traumatized group, with predominantly dissociative and trauma-related disorders, had the highest scores on all factors. Notwithstanding their presence in healthy individuals, possession and PNP were associated with trauma and dissociation in a subgroup of affected participants. Both types of experience seem to be normal human capacities of experiencing that may be involved in response to traumatic stress. Given the small numbers, this study should be considered preliminary.

  4. Interaction of deep levels and potential fluctuations in scattering and recombination phenomena in semi-insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kažukauskas, V.; Storasta, J.; Vaitkus, J.-V.

    1996-08-01

    The complex influence of recombination centers and potential fluctuations of the band gap on the scattering and recombination phenomena in n-type semiinsulating liquid- encapsulated-Czochralski-grown GaAs were investigated by using the transient photoconductivity and photo-Hall effects. The inhomogeneities cause a hyperbolic decrease of nonequilibrium carrier concentration and the saturation of Hall mobility, while the exponential parts of the decay appear due to the recharge of deep levels. The mean recombination barrier heights of potential fluctuations were evaluated. We propose a complex ``island'' model of scattering and recombination centers, consisting of defect clusters and their associations around dislocations, surrounded by potential barriers. At low light intensities and at the temperatures below 330 K they are insulating for majority charge carriers, thus reducing an effective crystal volume and causing percolation transport effects. At the temperature higher than 330-360 K the main barrier of the island can be recharged or screened by nonequilibrium carriers and its fine barrier structure appears as an effective scatterer, causing a sharp decrease of the nonequilibrium Hall mobility. It was demonstrated that although doping with Sb reduce dislocation density, it can intensify the effect of smaller defects on transport phenomena.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction analysis applied to thermal barrier coated cooled rocket thrust chambers with subsequent local investigation of delamination phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowollik, D. S. C.; Horst, P.; Haupt, M. C.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate numerically thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems applied to realistic rocket thrust chamber conditions. A global full parametric three-dimensional (3D) modeling approach for cooled rocket thrust chambers is presented to be able to simulate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena involved. In a subsequent analysis step, realistic mechanical and thermal boundary conditions are extracted from critical design regions of the global model and applied to a local finite element model (FEM) to analyze possible TBC delaminations by means of a Fracture Mechanics (FM) approach.

  6. Prospective Teachers' Difficulties in Interpreting Elementary Phenomena of Electrostatic Interactions: Indicators of the Status of Their Intuitive Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criado, Ana Maria; Garcia-Carmona, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Student teachers were tested before and after a teaching unit on electrostatic interactions in an attempt to consider their intuitive ideas and concept development. A study was made of students' explanations of basic interactions: those between two charged bodies, and those between a charged body and a neutral body. Two indicators of the cognitive…

  7. Prospective Teachers' Difficulties in Interpreting Elementary Phenomena of Electrostatic Interactions: Indicators of the Status of Their Intuitive Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criado, Ana Maria; Garcia-Carmona, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Student teachers were tested before and after a teaching unit on electrostatic interactions in an attempt to consider their intuitive ideas and concept development. A study was made of students' explanations of basic interactions: those between two charged bodies, and those between a charged body and a neutral body. Two indicators of the cognitive…

  8. Salt-induced counterion condensation and related phenomena in sodium carboxymethylcellulose-sodium halide-methanol-water quaternary systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Bijan; Chatterjee, Amritendu

    2015-05-28

    Polyion-counterion interactions in sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) in methanol-water media have been investigated conductometrically with reference to their variations with polyelectrolyte concentration, relative permittivity and the type and concentration of added electrolytes. The specific conductance data in polyelectrolyte-salt solutions were analyzed using an equation recently developed by us following the scaling description for the configuration of a polyion chain according to Dobrynin et al. Excellent quantitative agreement between the experimental results and those obtained with the new equation developed was observed. The results demonstrate that approximately 43-59% of the counterions remain free and that there has been a suppression of counterion dissociation in the presence of a salt in any given mixed solvent medium, the extent of which increases with increasing salt concentration. NaCl was found to be slightly more efficient than NaBr in suppressing the counterion-condensation in NaCMC-methanol-water systems. An increase in the amount of methanol in the media causes a reduction in the fraction of free counterions. The results further demonstrate that the monomer units experience more frictional resistance as the methanol content of the mixture increases or as the concentration of the added electrolytes increases. The results were discussed in terms of various interactions prevailing in these systems.

  9. Soluto-inertial phenomena: Designing long-range, long-lasting, surface-specific interactions in suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Anirudha; Williams, Ian; Nery Azevedo, Rodrigo; Helgeson, Matthew E.; Squires, Todd M.

    2016-08-01

    Equilibrium interactions between particles in aqueous suspensions are limited to distances less than 1 μm. Here, we describe a versatile concept to design and engineer nonequilibrium interactions whose magnitude and direction depends on the surface chemistry of the suspended particles, and whose range may extend over hundreds of microns and last thousands of seconds. The mechanism described here relies on diffusiophoresis, in which suspended particles migrate in response to gradients in solution. Three ingredients are involved: a soluto-inertial “beacon” designed to emit a steady flux of solute over long time scales; suspended particles that migrate in response to the solute flux; and the solute itself, which mediates the interaction. We demonstrate soluto-inertial interactions that extend for nearly half a millimeter and last for tens of minutes, and which are attractive or repulsive, depending on the surface chemistry of the suspended particles. Experiments agree quantitatively with scaling arguments and numerical computations, confirming the basic phenomenon, revealing design strategies, and suggesting a broad set of new possibilities for the manipulation and control of suspended particles.

  10. Soluto-inertial phenomena: Designing long-range, long-lasting, surface-specific interactions in suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anirudha; Williams, Ian; Azevedo, Rodrigo Nery; Squires, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium interactions between particles in aqueous suspensions are limited to distances less than 1 μm. Here, we describe a versatile concept to design and engineer nonequilibrium interactions whose magnitude and direction depends on the surface chemistry of the suspended particles, and whose range may extend over hundreds of microns and last thousands of seconds. The mechanism described here relies on diffusiophoresis, in which suspended particles migrate in response to gradients in solution. Three ingredients are involved: a soluto-inertial “beacon” designed to emit a steady flux of solute over long time scales; suspended particles that migrate in response to the solute flux; and the solute itself, which mediates the interaction. We demonstrate soluto-inertial interactions that extend for nearly half a millimeter and last for tens of minutes, and which are attractive or repulsive, depending on the surface chemistry of the suspended particles. Experiments agree quantitatively with scaling arguments and numerical computations, confirming the basic phenomenon, revealing design strategies, and suggesting a broad set of new possibilities for the manipulation and control of suspended particles. PMID:27410044

  11. Electron Scattering and Related Phenomena in Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron Lithography (SCALPEL\\footnote{SCALPEL is a trademark of Lucent Technologies.})

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Masis M.

    2000-12-01

    Scattering with angular limitation projection electron lithography (SCALPEL) is a unique charged-particle projection imaging technique that employs a scattering mask with the pattern segmented between supporting struts. An aperture installed in the back-focal plane of the projection lens filters out the electrons scattered at large angles in the patterned area of the mask producing a high contrast aerial image. Various scattering phenomena involved with the energetic (100 keV) electrons carrying the mask pattern information to the wafer through the projection optics are responsible for the aerial image formation in SCALPEL@. These phenomena can be grouped into three major categories: (i) electron elastic scattering in the mask responsible for the aerial image intensity and contrast; (ii) electron inelastic scattering in the mask-membrane that might have negative effects, such as membrane charging, beam chromatic blur generation, mask heating, etc.; (iii) Coulomb interactions of electrons in the beam (space charge effect) generating a beam blur that links the system throughput and resolution. Analytical models developed to describe and quantitatively evaluate these phenomena are briefly reviewed. The implication of these models to the design and optimization of the electron projection lithography systems are discussed.

  12. “Entropics”: Science and engineering of caloric phenomena related to itinerant-electron magnetism and spin fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Asaya; Takenaka, Koshi

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between giant caloric phenomena and itinerant-electron magnetism is examined in order to construct of a newly proposed concept “Entropics”, which is a fusion of science and technology with the objective of solving and controlling entropic phenomena. An anomalous hall resistivity is present in the paramagnetic state of the La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 magnetocaloric compound. Further, its coefficient exhibits a Curie-Weiss type temperature dependence, indicating the existence of disordered local moment, even though the Rhodes-Wohlfarth (RW) ratio reveals that the magnetic feature in the system is an itinerant-electron type. In addition, the correlation between the magnitude of the transition entropy change of the itinerant-electron metamagnetic transition and the RW ratio was observed. In the Mn3GaN barocaloric compound, the transition entropy of the first-order antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition marginally depends on the external pressure, in contrast to the data for Gd5Ge2Si2. The origin of this tendency is phase stability against the pressure, as opposed to large volume change at the transition temperature, which results in an enhancement of the barocaloric effect. The influence of topological frustration is also distinguished by comparing it with that of other Mn-based antiperovskite compounds.

  13. Work Related and "Private" Social Interactions at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K.; Inversin, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-four young professionals in their first job after apprenticeship described their task-related and private interactions at work during five days, using a variant of the Rochester Interaction Records self-observation method (Reis and Wheeler, 1991). Results showed that more task-related interactions were reported than private interactions at…

  14. Work Related and "Private" Social Interactions at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K.; Inversin, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-four young professionals in their first job after apprenticeship described their task-related and private interactions at work during five days, using a variant of the Rochester Interaction Records self-observation method (Reis and Wheeler, 1991). Results showed that more task-related interactions were reported than private interactions at…

  15. Theory of coherence in Bose-Einstein condensation phenomena in a microwave-driven interacting magnon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2009-05-01

    Strong experimental evidences of the formation of quasiequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons at room temperature in a film of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) excited by microwave radiation have been recently reported. Here we present a theory for the dynamics of the magnon gas driven by a microwave field far out of equilibrium that provides rigorous support for the formation of a BEC of magnons in a YIG film magnetized in the plane. We show that if the microwave driving power exceeds a threshold value the nonlinear magnetic interactions create cooperative mechanisms for the onset of a phase transition leading to the spontaneous generation of quantum coherence and magnetic dynamic order in a macroscopic scale. The theoretical results agree with the experimental data for the intensity and the decay rate of the Brillouin light scattering from the BEC as a function of power and for the microwave emission from the uniform mode generated by the confluence of BEC magnon pairs.

  16. Premature capacity loss in lead/acid batteries: a discussion of the antimony-free effect and related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenkamp, A. F.

    Instances of severe capacity loss in apparently healthy lead/acid batteries have been reported over a period of many years, and are still common today. In most cases, these phenomena are linked to the use of antimony-free positive grids and are invoked by repetitive deep-discharge duties. This situation represents probably the greatest barrier to the expansion of markets for lead/acid batteries. To date, research has focused on several possible explanations for capacity loss; notably, degradation of the positive active mass (e.g., relaxable insufficient mass utilization) and the development of electrical barriers around the grid. Although much of the evidence gathered is circumstantial, it does point to the key issues that must be addressed in future work.

  17. Tidal interaction: A possible explanation for geysers and other fluid phenomena in the Neptune-Triton system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. D.; Wood, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Discovery of geyser-like plumes on the surface of Triton was a highlight of Voyager 2's passage through the Neptune planetary system. Remarkable as these observations were, they were not entirely without precedent. Considering the confirmed predictions for the 1979 Voyager Jovian passage, it was logical to consider other solar system bodies beside Io where tidal effects could be a significant factor in surface processes. It was our intuition that the Neptune-Triton gravitational bond acting at high inclination to the Neptune equator and the fact that Neptune was a fluid body was significant oblateness would produce tidal and mechanical forces that could be transformed into thermal energy vented on Triton's surface. Prior to the Voyager flyby, others have noted that capture and evolution of Triton's orbit from extreme eccentricity to near circular state today would have resulted in significant tidal heating, but these analysts disregard current day forces. Our calculations indicate that the time varying forces between Neptune-Triton fall midway between those exerted in the Earth-Moon and Jupiter-Io systems, and considering the low level of other energy inputs, this source of internal energy should not be ignored when seeking an explanation for surface activity. In each planet-satellite case, residual or steady-state eccentricity causes time-varying stresses on internal satellite strata. In the case of Jupiter the residual eccentricity is due largely to Galilean satellite interactions, particularly Io-Europa, but in the case of Neptune-Triton, it is the effect of Triton's inclined orbit about an oblate primary.

  18. Hallucinations, sleep fragmentation, and altered dream phenomena in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pappert, E J; Goetz, C G; Niederman, F G; Raman, R; Leurgans, S

    1999-01-01

    In a series of consecutively randomized outpatients who had Parkinson's disease (PD), we examined the association of three behaviors: sleep fragmentation, altered dream phenomena, and hallucinations/illusions. Using a log-linear model methodology, we tested the independence of each behavior. Sixty-two percent of the subjects had sleep fragmentation, 48% had altered dream phenomena, and 26% had hallucinations/illusions. Eighty-two percent of the patients with hallucinations/illusions experienced some form of sleep disorder. The three phenomena were not independent. The interaction between sleep fragmentation and altered dream phenomena was strongly statistically significant. Likewise, a significant interaction existed between altered dream phenomena and hallucinations/illusions. No interaction occurred between sleep fragmentation and hallucinations/illusions. Sleep fragmentation, altered dream phenomena, and hallucinations/illusions in PD should be considered distinct but often overlapping behaviors. The close association between altered dream phenomena and hallucinations suggests that therapeutic interventions aimed at diminishing dream-related activities may have a specific positive impact on hallucinatory behavior.

  19. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  20. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  1. Factors controlling erosion/deposition phenomena related to lahars at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Rosario; Capra, Lucia; Coviello, Velio

    2016-08-01

    One of the most common phenomena at Volcán de Colima is the annual development of lahars that runs mainly through the southern ravines of the edifice. Since 2011 the study and the monitoring of these flows and of the associated rainfall has been achieved by means of an instrumented station located along the Montegrande ravine, together with the systematic surveying of cross-topographic profiles of the main channel. From these, we present the comparison of the morphological changes experimented by this ravine during the 2013, 2014 and 2015 rainy seasons. The erosion/deposition effects of 11 lahars that occurred during this period of time were quantified by means of the topographic profiles taken at the beginning and at the end of the rainy seasons and before and after the major lahar event of 11 June 2013. We identified (i) an erosive zone between 2100 and 1950 m a.s.l., 8° in slope, with an annual erosional rate of 10.3 % mainly due to the narrowness of the channel and to its high slope angle and (ii) an erosive-depositional zone, between 1900 and 1700 m a.s.l., ( ˜ 8 % erosion and ˜ 16 % deposition), characterized by a wider channel that decreases in slope angle (4°). Based on these observations, the major factors controlling the erosion/deposition rates in the Montegrande ravine are the morphology of the gully (i.e., channel bed slope and the cross section width) and the joint effect of sediment availability and accumulated rainfall. On the distal reach of the ravine, the erosion/deposition processes tend to be promoted preferentially one over the other, mostly depending on the width of the active channel. Only for extraordinary rainfall events are the largest lahars mostly erosive all along the ravine up to the distal fan where the deposition takes place. In addition, as well as the morphological characteristics of the ravine, the flow depth is a critical factor in controlling erosion, as deeper flows will promote erosion against deposition. Finally, by

  2. Anomalous laser deflection phenomena based on the interaction of electro-optic and graded refractivity effect in Cu:KTN crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuping; Liu, Bing; Yang, Yuguo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xianshun; Hong, Guanglie; Shu, Rong; Yu, Haohai; Wang, Jiyang

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report an abnormal laser deflection phenomena based on quadratic electro-optic effect in copper doped KTN crystal. Cu:KTa0.62Nb0.38O3 block with size a×b×c = 2.8mm×2.6mm×12.5mm was used as beam deflection element. 75mrad beam deflection angle were observed under 1KV voltage when the laser beam across the c direction of the sample at room temperature. The special features of our experiment are that the direction of laser beam deflect perpendicular to the electric field direction, and the angular size and direction of the deflection beam remain unchanged when the electric field direction reverse. We believe that the interaction of graded refractivity and electro-optic effect leads to these special features. Besides of the special deflection mode, the deflection efficiency of our experiment also reached the world advanced level.

  3. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, F; Müller-Staub, M; Needham, I; Van Achterberg, T

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric inpatient nursing care and to compare these phenomena with the labels and the definitions of the nursing diagnoses to elucidate how well this classification covers these phenomena. A search of journal articles took place in the databases MedLine, PsychInfo, Cochrane and CINAHL. A qualitative content analysis approach was used to identify nursing phenomena in the articles. Various phenomena were found in the articles. The study demonstrated that NANDA-I describes essential phenomena for the adult inpatient psychiatry on the level of labels and definitions. However, some apparently important nursing phenomena are not covered by the labels or definitions of NANDA-I. Other phenomena are assigned as defining characteristics or as related factors to construct nursing diagnoses. The further development of the classification NANDA-I will strengthen the application in the daily work of psychiatric nurses and enhance the quality of nursing care in the inpatient setting. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  4. An experimental and numerical investigation of thermocapillary driven phenomena for evaporating menisci in capillary tubes related to microelectronics cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffone, Cosimo

    temperature revealed clearly the effect of the asymmetrical flow pattern on temperature field. The direction of the induced convection rolls can be reversed by applying a temperature gradient along the capillary wall. With the tubes plunged in a pool of liquid, it is interesting to note that providing external heating to the system can substantially change the convection patterns. In particular is was revealed that the flow is enhanced when the heating element lies below the meniscus; on the contrary, when the heating element is above the meniscus and sufficient power is provided, the flow pattern is reversed with respect to the unheated situation. This important result confirms the fact that the phenomena being studied are strongly dominated by the action of surface tension. The numerical code used is a FVM with coordinate transformation in order to take into account the curved meniscus. The code was used to first reproduce some of the results obtained experimentally and successively was used to investigate those cases not easily accessible to experiment. Good quantitative (when possible) and qualitative agreement was found between experimental and numerical results. Results gained, both of velocity and flow map, meniscus temperature and finally numerical confirmation clearly lead to the conclusion that the heat and mass transfer in such small systems is strongly affected by the mechanism taking place in the meniscus contact line region. In this work, two cases of practical interest were also examined. The first concerns a heat pipe module for micro-electronic cooling where the effect of surface coating on the fin stack unit was experimentally investigated. The second is an extension of existing heat pipe technology to cool a heavily thermally loaded nozzle of future spacecraft vehicles of high specific impulse. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence and related phenomena for 1D shallow-water waves in a finite basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ruban, V. P.

    2012-02-15

    Different regimes of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) recurrence are simulated numerically for fully nonlinear 'one-dimensional' potential water waves in a finite-depth flume between two vertical walls. In such systems, the FPU recurrence is closely related to the dynamics of coherent structures approximately corresponding to solitons of the integrable Boussinesq system. A simplest periodic solution of the Boussinesq model, describing a single soliton between the walls, is presented in analytic form in terms of the elliptic Jacobi functions. In the numerical experiments, it is observed that depending on the number of solitons in the flume and their parameters, the FPU recurrence can occur in a simple or complicated manner, or be practically absent. For comparison, the nonlinear dynamics of potential water waves over nonuniform beds is simulated, with initial states taken in the form of several pairs of colliding solitons. With a mild-slope bed profile, a typical phenomenon in the course of evolution is the appearance of relatively high (rogue) waves, while for random, relatively short-correlated bed profiles it is either the appearance of tall waves or the formation of sharp crests at moderate-height waves.

  6. Misconceptions of Emergent Semiconductor Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Katherine G.

    The semiconductor field of Photovoltaics (PV) has experienced tremendous growth, requiring curricula to consider ways to promote student success. One major barrier to success students may face when learning PV is the development of misconceptions. The purpose of this work was to determine the presence and prevalence of misconceptions students may have for three PV semiconductor phenomena; Diffusion, Drift and Excitation. These phenomena are emergent, a class of phenomena that have certain characteristics. In emergent phenomena, the individual entities in the phenomena interact and aggregate to form a self-organizing pattern that can be observed at a higher level. Learners develop a different type of misconception for these phenomena, an emergent misconception. Participants (N=41) completed a written protocol. The pilot study utilized half of these protocols (n = 20) to determine the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions for the three phenomena. Once the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions was confirmed, all protocols (N=41) were analyzed to determine the presence and prevalence of general and emergent misconceptions, and to note any relationships among these misconceptions (full study). Through written protocol analysis of participants' responses, numerous codes emerged from the data for both general and emergent misconceptions. General and emergent misconceptions were found in 80% and 55% of participants' responses, respectively. General misconceptions indicated limited understandings of chemical bonding, electricity and magnetism, energy, and the nature of science. Participants also described the phenomena using teleological, predictable, and causal traits, indicating participants had misconceptions regarding the emergent aspects of the phenomena. For both general and emergent misconceptions, relationships were observed between similar misconceptions within and across the three phenomena, and differences in misconceptions were

  7. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-09-29

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

  8. Stress-related phenomena and detoxification mechanisms induced by common pharmaceuticals in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Christou, Anastasis; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Christodoulou, Charalampia; Hapeshi, Evroula; Stavrou, Ioannis; Michael, Costas; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-07-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) have been recently shown to exert phytotoxic effects. The present study explores the uptake, systemic translocation, and abiotic stress responses and detoxification mechanisms induced by the exposure of alfalfa plants grown in sand under greenhouse conditions to four common, individually applied PhACs (10μgL(-1)) (diclofenac, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, 17a-ethinylestradiol) and their mixture. Stress physiology markers (lipid peroxidation, proline, H2O2 and NO content, antioxidant activity assays) and gene expression levels of key plant detoxification components (including glutathione S-transferases, GST7, GST17; superoxide dismutases, CuZnSOD, FeSOD; proton pump, H(+)-ATP, and cytochrome c oxidase, CytcOx), were evaluated. PhACs were detected in significantly higher concentrations in roots compared with leaves. Stress related effects, manifested via membrane lipid peroxidation and oxidative burst, were local (roots) rather than systemic (leaves), and exacerbated when the tested PhACs were applied in mixture. Systemic accumulation of H2O2 in leaves suggests its involvement in signal transduction and detoxification responses. Increased antioxidant enzymatic activities, as well as upregulated transcript levels of GST7, GST17, H(+)-ATPase and CytcOx, propose their role in the detoxification of the selected PhACs in plants. The current findings provide novel biochemical and molecular evidence highlighting the studied PhACs as an emerging abiotic stress factor, and point the need for further research on wastewater flows under natural agricultural environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discovery potential for new phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, S.; Hewett, J.L.; Price, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examine the ability of future facilities to discover and interpret non-supersymmetric new phenomena. The authors first explore explicit manifestations of new physics, including extended gauge sectors, leptoquarks, exotic fermions, and technicolor models. They then take a more general approach where new physics only reveals itself through the existence of effective interactions at lower energy scales.

  10. Interaction of unsteady separated flow over multi-bodies moving relatively in the same flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zheng, Xin-qian; Hou, An-ping; Lu, Ya-jun

    2005-12-01

    Unsteady separated flow is one of research frontiers in current aerodynamic. Great accomplishments have been acquired; however, most studies are on single body in a stream, such as studies on unsteady separated flows over airfoils. There are typical cases in the nature and engineering applications, in which several interacting bodies with relative motions are within the same flow field. These interacting unsteady separated flow fields not only are closely related to the phenomena of noise and flutter induced by flows, but also have strong influences on aerodynamic performances. With axial flow compressors as background, the present paper carried out studies on 'interaction of unsteady separated flow over multi-bodies moving relatively in the same flow field'. Experiment investigations carried out in the stationary annular cascade wind tunnel and the single-stage low-speed axial flow compressor experimental facility as well as relevant CFD simulations demonstrate that under properly organized interactions between all unsteady components, the time-space structure of unsteady separated flow field can be remarkably improved and the time-averaged aerodynamic performances be significantly enhanced accordingly. The maximum reduction of the loss coefficient reached 27.4% and 76.5% in the stationary annular cascade wind tunnel and the CFD simulation for single-stage axial flow compressor, respectively.

  11. Relational interaction in occupational therapy: Conversation analysis of positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Weiste, Elina

    2017-01-31

    The therapeutic relationship is an important factor for good therapy outcomes. The primary mediator of a beneficial therapy relationship is clinician-client interaction. However, few studies identify the observable interactional attributes of good quality relational interactions, e.g. offering the client positive feedback. The present paper aims to expand current understanding of relational interaction by analyzing the real-time interactional practices therapists use for offering positive feedback, an important value in occupational therapy. The analysis is based on the conversation analysis of 15 video-recorded occupational therapy encounters in psychiatric outpatient clinics. Two types of positive feedback were identified. In aligning feedback, therapists encouraged and complimented clients' positive perspectives on their own achievements in adopting certain behaviour, encouraging and supporting their progress. In redirecting feedback, therapists shifted the perspective from clients' negative experiences to their positive experiences. This shift was interactionally successful if they laid the foundation for the shift in perspective and attuned their expressions to the clients' emotional states. Occupational therapists routinely provide their clients with positive feedback. Awareness of the interactional attributes related to positive feedback is critically important for successful relational interaction.

  12. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene–environment interaction in tobacco-related cancers

    PubMed Central

    Taioli, Emanuela

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the carcinogenic effects of tobacco smoke and the basis for interaction between tobacco smoke and genetic factors. Examples of published papers on gene–tobacco interaction and cancer risk are presented. The assessment of gene–environment interaction in tobacco-related cancers has been more complex than originally expected for several reasons, including the multiplicity of genes involved in tobacco metabolism, the numerous substrates metabolized by the relevant genes and the interaction of smoking with other metabolic pathways. Future studies on gene–environment interaction and cancer risk should include biomarkers of smoking dose, along with markers of quantitative historical exposure to tobacco. Epigenetic studies should be added to classic genetic analyses, in order to better understand gene–environmental interaction and individual susceptibility. Other metabolic pathways in competition with tobacco genetic metabolism/repair should be incorporated in epidemiological studies to generate a more complete picture of individual cancer risk associated with environmental exposure to carcinogens. PMID:18550573

  14. Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

  15. Contributions of Domain-Related Phenomena on Dielectric Constant of Lead-Based Ferroelectric Ceramics Under Uniaxial Compressive Pre-Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yimnirun, Rattikorn

    The dielectric constant of lead-based ferroelectric ceramics in three different systems, i.e. BT-PZT, PMN-PT and PMN-PZT, was measured under uniaxial compressive pre-stress to investigate the contributions of different domain-phenomena. The dielectric constant was observed at room temperature under the compressive pre-stress up to 15 MPa, 22 MPa and 5 MPa for BT-PZT, PMN-PT and PMN-PZT, respectively, using a homebuilt uniaxial compressometer. Dielectric constant of the BT-PZT ceramics increased significantly with increasing applied stress. Larger changes in the dielectric constant with the applied stress were observed in the PZT-rich compositions. However, for PMN-PT and PMN-PZT ceramic systems, changes in the dielectric constant with the stress were found to depend significantly on the ceramic compositions. The experimental results could be explained by both intrinsic and extrinsic domain-related mechanisms involving domain wall motions, as well as the de-aging phenomenon from the application of the compressive pre-stress. Roles of different types of domains, i.e. micro-domains and nano-domains, were also discussed.

  16. The anomalous Hall effect and related transport phenomena in ferromagnetic spinel copper chromium selenium bromide, manganese-doped chalcopyrite copper gallium ditelluride, and ruthenate bismuth ruthenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li

    One of the interesting and unsettled transport phenomena is the, so called, "anomalous Hall Effect". It generally refers to the phenomenon of a non-linear field dependence of the Hall resistivity rhoxy. An emerging idea relates to the "gauge field O" experienced by electrons. It gives rise to Berry phase accumulation. In ferromagnets, a non-vanishing O( k⃗ ) is related to the spin-orbit coupling and the time-reversal asymmetry. We show that, in the ferromagnetic spinel CuCr2Se 4-xBrx, the anomalous Hall conductivity sigma xy (normalized to per carrier, at 5K) remains unchanged with a 1000-fold increase in resistivity. From the anomalous Nernst effect, we uncover a simple relation for the off-diagonal Peltier conductivity tensor alphaxy, which is a measure of a transverse electrical current density generated per unit of applied temperature gradient. They both strongly support the anomalous-velocity theory based on the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of the electrons. An alternative way to procure O is from the spin-chirality effect. In the Mn-doped chalcopyrite semiconductor CuGaTe2, with a few percent doping, the orbitals of the Mn ions overlap to form an impurity band. Therefore, the electrons will accumulate Berry phase while hopping around the Mn ions that have a non-collinear magnetic ground state. We observed the enhanced and non-monotonic field dependence of rhoxy, which may be understood from the spin-chirality effect. Finally, we studied the Hall effect and thermopower in the ruthenate Bi3Ru3O 11. From the Hall effect, we observed field-tuning of electron and hole populations. We also found a large field dependence of the thermopower at low temperature. The origin of the colossal field-dependence in the thermopower is still an open question, but it is linked to the unusual electronic properties in the Bi3Ru3O11.

  17. An exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface for the Ne-CO interaction. II. Molecular beam scattering and bulk gas phenomena in Ne-CO mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dham, Ashok K; McBane, George C; McCourt, Frederick R W; Meath, William J

    2010-01-14

    Four potential energy surfaces are of current interest for the Ne-CO interaction. Two are high-level fully ab initio surfaces obtained a decade ago using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and supermolecule coupled-cluster methods. The other two are very recent exchange-Coulomb (XC) model potential energy surfaces constructed by using ab initio Heitler-London interaction energies and literature long range dispersion and induction energies, followed by the determination of a small number of adjustable parameters to reproduce a selected subset of pure rotational transition frequencies for the (20)Ne-(12)C(16)O van der Waals cluster. Testing of the four potential energy surfaces against a wide range of available experimental microwave, millimeter-wave, and mid-infrared Ne-CO transition frequencies indicated that the XC potential energy surfaces gave results that were generally far superior to the earlier fully ab initio surfaces. In this paper, two XC model surfaces and the two fully ab initio surfaces are tested for their abilities to reproduce experiment for a wide range of nonspectroscopic Ne-CO gas mixture properties. The properties considered here are relative integral cross sections and the angle dependence of rotational state-to-state differential cross sections, rotational relaxation rate constants for CO(v=2) in Ne-CO mixtures at T=296 K, pressure broadening of two pure rotational lines and of the rovibrational lines in the CO fundamental and first overtone transitions at 300 K, and the temperature and, where appropriate, mole fraction dependencies of the interaction second virial coefficient, the binary diffusion coefficient, the interaction viscosity, the mixture shear viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients, and the thermal diffusion factor. The XC model potential energy surfaces give results that lie within or very nearly within the experimental uncertainties for all properties considered, while the coupled-cluster ab initio surface gives

  18. Thomas precession and spin interaction energy in very special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjitabar, Hassan; Shojai, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Very Special Relativity (VSR), proposed by Cohen and Glashow, considers one of the subgroups of Poincaré group as the symmetry of spacetime. This paper investigates the transformations of electromagnetic fields under boosts of VSR, and by the aid of them studies the interaction energy between spin of an electron and external electromagnetic fields. Here, we argue that Thomas precession, one of the consequences of Special Relativity (SR), does not exist in HOM(2) avatar of VSR. The predictions of SR and VSR about the spin interaction energy in a certain case are compared, and despite the absence of Thomas precession in VSR, no noticeable departure is seen.

  19. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  20. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  1. Detecting remotely related proteins by their interactions and sequence similarity

    PubMed Central

    Espadaler, Jordi; Aragüés, Ramón; Eswar, Narayanan; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Querol, Enrique; Avilés, Francesc X.; Sali, Andrej; Oliva, Baldomero

    2005-01-01

    The function of an uncharacterized protein is usually inferred either from its homology to, or its interactions with, characterized proteins. Here, we use both sequence similarity and protein interactions to identify relationships between remotely related protein sequences. We rely on the fact that homologous sequences share similar interactions, and, therefore, the set of interacting partners of the partners of a given protein is enriched by its homologs. The approach was benchmarked by assigning the fold and functional family to test sequences of known structure. Specifically, we relied on 1,434 proteins with known folds, as defined in the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, and with known interacting partners, as defined in the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP). For this subset, the specificity of fold assignment was increased from 54% for position-specific iterative blast to 75% for our approach, with a concomitant increase in sensitivity for a few percentage points. Similarly, the specificity of family assignment at the e-value threshold of 10-8 was increased from 70% to 87%. The proposed method would be a useful tool for large-scale automated discovery of remote relationships between protein sequences, given its unique reliance on sequence similarity and protein-protein interactions. PMID:15883372

  2. Helping Students Assess the Relative Importance of Different Intermolecular Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasien, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    A semi-quantitative model has been developed to estimate the relative effects of dispersion, dipole-dipole interactions, and H-bonding on the normal boiling points ("T[subscript b]") for a subset of simple organic systems. The model is based upon a statistical analysis using multiple linear regression on a series of straight-chain organic…

  3. Helping Students Assess the Relative Importance of Different Intermolecular Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasien, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    A semi-quantitative model has been developed to estimate the relative effects of dispersion, dipole-dipole interactions, and H-bonding on the normal boiling points ("T[subscript b]") for a subset of simple organic systems. The model is based upon a statistical analysis using multiple linear regression on a series of straight-chain organic…

  4. Pump instability phenomena generated by fluid forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Rotor dynamic behavior of high energy centrifugal pumps is significantly affected by two types of fluid forces; one due to the hydraulic interaction of the impeller with the surrounding volute or diffuser and the other due to the effect of the wear rings. The available data on these forces is first reviewed. A simple one degree-of-freedom system containing these forces is analytically solved to exhibit the rotor dynamic effects. To illustrate the relative magnitude of these phenomena, an example of a multistage boiler feed pump is worked out. It is shown that the wear ring effects tend to suppress critical speed and postpone instability onset. But the volute-impeller forces tend to lower the critical speed and the instability onset speed. However, for typical boiler feed pumps under normal running clearances, the wear ring effects are much more significant than the destabilizing hydraulic interaction effects.

  5. Science and Paranormal Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H. Pierre

    1999-06-03

    In order to ground my approach to the study of paranormal phenomena, I first explain my operational approach to physics, and to the ''historical'' sciences of cosmic, biological, human, social and political evolution. I then indicate why I believe that ''paranormal phenomena'' might-but need not- fit into this framework. I endorse the need for a new theoretical framework for the investigation of this field presented by Etter and Shoup at this meeting. I close with a short discussion of Ted Bastin's contention that paranormal phenomena should be defined as contradicting physics.

  6. Interactive relations among maternal depressive symptomatology, nutrition, and parenting.

    PubMed

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L; Thomas, David G; Kennedy, Tay S; Grant, Stephanie L; Valtr, Tabitha

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models linking maternal nutrition, depressive symptomatology, and parenting are underdeveloped. However, existing literature suggests that iron status and depressive symptomatology interact in relation to problematic parenting styles (authoritarian, permissive). Therefore, in the current study the authors investigate these interactive relations in a sample of breastfeeding mothers (n = 105) interviewed at three months postpartum. Participants completed questionnaires (from December 2008 to January 2011) regarding their depressive symptomatology and parenting styles. Iron status (i.e., hemoglobin, soluble transferrin receptors, and serum ferritin concentrations) was assessed from blood samples. Significant interactions were found between iron status and depressive symptomatology in relation to authoritarian parenting style (low warmth, high punishment and directiveness). For those women with hemoglobin below 14.00 g/dL, depressive symptomatology was positively related to authoritarian parenting style (p < 0.001). Thus, screening for poor iron status and depressive sympatomology in postpartum women may help to identify those at risk for problematic parenting. Dietary interventions may help to eliminate relations between depressive symptoms and problematic parenting.

  7. qPIPSA: Relating enzymatic kinetic parameters and interaction fields

    PubMed Central

    Gabdoulline, Razif R; Stein, Matthias; Wade, Rebecca C

    2007-01-01

    Background The simulation of metabolic networks in quantitative systems biology requires the assignment of enzymatic kinetic parameters. Experimentally determined values are often not available and therefore computational methods to estimate these parameters are needed. It is possible to use the three-dimensional structure of an enzyme to perform simulations of a reaction and derive kinetic parameters. However, this is computationally demanding and requires detailed knowledge of the enzyme mechanism. We have therefore sought to develop a general, simple and computationally efficient procedure to relate protein structural information to enzymatic kinetic parameters that allows consistency between the kinetic and structural information to be checked and estimation of kinetic constants for structurally and mechanistically similar enzymes. Results We describe qPIPSA: quantitative Protein Interaction Property Similarity Analysis. In this analysis, molecular interaction fields, for example, electrostatic potentials, are computed from the enzyme structures. Differences in molecular interaction fields between enzymes are then related to the ratios of their kinetic parameters. This procedure can be used to estimate unknown kinetic parameters when enzyme structural information is available and kinetic parameters have been measured for related enzymes or were obtained under different conditions. The detailed interaction of the enzyme with substrate or cofactors is not modeled and is assumed to be similar for all the proteins compared. The protein structure modeling protocol employed ensures that differences between models reflect genuine differences between the protein sequences, rather than random fluctuations in protein structure. Conclusion Provided that the experimental conditions and the protein structural models refer to the same protein state or conformation, correlations between interaction fields and kinetic parameters can be established for sets of related enzymes

  8. Molecular model for chirality phenomena.

    PubMed

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank H; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2016-10-21

    Chirality is a hallmark feature for molecular recognition in biology and chemical physics. We present a three-dimensional continuum model for studying chirality phenomena in condensed phases using molecular simulations. Our model system is based upon a simple four-site molecule and incorporates non-trivial kinetic behavior, including the ability to switch chirality or racemize, as well as thermodynamics arising from an energetic preference for specific chiral interactions. In particular, we introduce a chiral renormalization parameter that can locally favor either homochiral or heterochiral configurations. Using this model, we explore a range of chirality-specific phenomena, including the kinetics of chiral inversion, the mechanism of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the liquid, chirally driven liquid-liquid phase separation, and chiral crystal structures.

  9. Physical phenomena in lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayless, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Electric lamps depend for their performance on an extraordinary range of natural phenomena, some of considerable subtlety or complexity, making them a fascinating field for the scientist or engineer. The author describes some of the less obvious phenomena which are crucial to the efficient performance of modern lamps. These include: thermal diffusion; resonance line broadening; hyperfine structure; metal halide cycles; ionic pumping; voids in tungsten; photoelectricity and electrolysis; and Penning effect

  10. Relative species abundance of replicator dynamics with sparse interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki; Tokita, Kei

    2016-11-01

    A theory of relative species abundance on sparsely-connected networks is presented by investigating the replicator dynamics with symmetric interactions. Sparseness of a network involves difficulty in analyzing the fixed points of the equation, and we avoid this problem by treating large self interaction u, which allows us to construct a perturbative expansion. Based on this perturbation, we find that the nature of the interactions is directly connected to the abundance distribution, and some characteristic behaviors, such as multiple peaks in the abundance distribution and all species coexistence at moderate values of u, are discovered in a wide class of the distribution of the interactions. The all species coexistence collapses at a critical value of u, u c , and this collapsing is regarded as a phase transition. To get more quantitative information, we also construct a non-perturbative theory on random graphs based on techniques of statistical mechanics. The result shows those characteristic behaviors are sustained well even for not large u. For even smaller values of u, extinct species start to appear and the abundance distribution becomes rounded and closer to a standard functional form. Another interesting finding is the non-monotonic behavior of diversity, which quantifies the number of coexisting species, when changing the ratio of mutualistic relations Δ . These results are examined by numerical simulations, which show that our theory is exact for the case without extinct species, but becomes less and less precise as the proportion of extinct species grows.

  11. A Connection between Transport Phenomena and Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaney, Ross; Bird, R. Byron

    2017-01-01

    Although students take courses in transport phenomena and thermodynamics, they probably do not ask whether these two subjects are related. Here we give an answer to that question. Specifically we give relationships between the equations of change for total energy, internal energy, and entropy of transport phenomena and key equations of equilibrium…

  12. Eighty phenomena about the self: representation, evaluation, regulation, and change

    PubMed Central

    Thagard, Paul; Wood, Joanne V.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for examining self-related aspects and phenomena. The approach includes (1) a taxonomy and (2) an emphasis on multiple levels of mechanisms. The taxonomy categorizes approximately eighty self-related phenomena according to three primary functions involving the self: representing, effecting, and changing. The representing self encompasses the ways in which people depict themselves, either to themselves or to others (e.g., self-concepts, self-presentation). The effecting self concerns ways in which people facilitate or limit their own traits and behaviors (e.g., self-enhancement, self-regulation). The changing self is less time-limited than the effecting self; it concerns phenomena that involve lasting alterations in how people represent and control themselves (e.g., self-expansion, self-development). Each self-related phenomenon within these three categories may be examined at four levels of interacting mechanisms (social, individual, neural, and molecular). We illustrate our approach by focusing on seven self-related phenomena. PMID:25870574

  13. Comparative genomics of free-living Gammaproteobacteria: pathogenesis-related genes or interaction-related genes?

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rosas-Landa, Mirna; Ponce-Soto, Gabriel Yaxal; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, V

    2017-07-31

    Bacteria have numerous strategies to interact with themselves and with their environment, but genes associated with these interactions are usually cataloged as pathogenic. To understand the role that these genes have not only in pathogenesis but also in bacterial interactions, we compared the genomes of eight bacteria from human-impacted environments with those of free-living bacteria from the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB), a relatively pristine oligotrophic site. Fifty-one genomes from CCB bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Photobacterium and Aeromonas, were analyzed. We found that the CCB strains had several virulence-related genes, 15 of which were common to all strains and were related to flagella and chemotaxis. We also identified the presence of Type III and VI secretion systems, which leads us to propose that these systems play an important role in interactions among bacterial communities beyond pathogenesis. None of the CCB strains had pathogenicity islands, despite having genes associated with antibiotics. Integrons were rare, while CRISPR elements were common. The idea that pathogenicity-related genes in many cases form part of a wider strategy used by bacteria to interact with other organisms could help us to understand the role of pathogenicity-related elements in an ecological and evolutionary framework leading toward a more inclusive One Health concept. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Interaction between chitosan and its related enzymes: A review.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Shoko; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2017-02-20

    Chitosan-related enzymes including chitosanases, exo-β-glucosaminidases, and enzymes having chitosan-binding modules recognize ligands through electrostatic interactions between the acidic amino acids in proteins and amino groups of chitosan polysaccharides. However, in GH8 chitosanases, several aromatic residues are also involved in substrate recognition through stacking interactions, and these enzymes consequently hydrolyze β-1,4-glucan as well as chitosan. The binding grooves of these chitosanases are extended and opened at both ends of the grooves, so that the enzymes can clamp a long chitosan polysaccharide. The association/dissociation of positively charged glucosamine residues to/from the binding pocket of a GH2 exo-β-glucosaminidase controls the p Ka of the catalytic acid, thereby maintaining the high catalytic potency of the enzyme. In contrast to chitosanases, chitosan-binding modules only accommodate a couple of glucosamine residues, predominantly recognizing the non-reducing end glucosamine residue of chitosan by electrostatic interactions and a hydrogen-bonding network. These structural findings on chitosan-related enzymes may contribute to future applications for the efficient conversion of the chitin/chitosan biomass.

  15. {alpha}-decay and fusion phenomena in heavy ion collisions using nucleon-nucleon interactions derived from relativistic mean-field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, BirBikram; Sahu, B. B.; Patra, S. K.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleus-nucleus potentials are determined in the framework of the double-folding model for a new microscopic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction relativistic mean field-3-Yukawa (R3Y) derived from the popular relativistic mean-field theory Lagrangian, and the results are compared for the use of Michigan-3-Yukawa (M3Y) effective NN interactions. The double-folding potentials so obtained are further taken up in the context of the preformed cluster model (PCM) of Gupta and collaborators and the barrier penetration model to study respectively the ground-state (g.s.) {alpha}-decay and low-energy fusion reactions. In this paper, using PCM, we deduce empirically the {alpha} preformation probability P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)} from experimental data on a few g.s. {alpha} decays in the trans-lead region. For fusion reactions, two projectile-target systems {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb are selected for calculating the barrier energies as well positions, fusion cross sections ({sigma}{sub fus}), and fusion barrier distribution [D(E{sub c.m.})]. The barrier energies and positions change for the R3Y NN interactions in comparison with those of the M3Y NN interactions. We find that in the {alpha}-decay studies the values of P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)}(R3Y) are similar to those of P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)}(M3Y). Further, both NN interactions give similar {sigma}{sub fus} values using the Wong formula specifically when the R3Y NN interaction calculated {sigma}{sub fus} values are reduced by 1.5 times, and the results are in agreement with the experimental data for both the systems, especially for the higher energies. Results for D(E{sub c.m.}) are also quite similar for both choices of NN interaction.

  16. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  17. Hypervelocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a need to determine the equations of state of materials in regimes of extreme high pressures, temperatures and strain rates that are not attainable on current two-stage light-gas guns. Understanding high-pressure material behavior is crucial to address the physical processes associated with a variety of hypervelocity impact events related to space sciences-orbital-debris impact, debris-shield designs, high-speed plasma propagation, and impact lethality applications. At very high impact velocities material properties will be dominated by phase-changes, such as melting or vaporization, which cannot be achieved at lower impact velocities. Development of well-controlled and repeatable hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step necessary to improve our understanding of material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not currently available using conventional two-stage light-gas gun techniques. In this paper, techniques that have been used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light gas gun to 16 km/s, and their use to determine the material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. The newly developed hypervelocity launcher (HVL) can launch intact (macroscopic dimensions) plates to 16 km/s. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock-loading/release characteristics of materials impacted by such fliers as well as shock-induced vaporization phenomena in fully vaporized states. High-speed photography or radiography has been used to evaluate the debris propagation characteristics resulting from disc impact of thin bumper sheets at hypervelocities in excess of 10 km/s using the HVL. Examples of these experiments are provided in this paper.

  18. Gene-Diet Interactions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50 % of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation is the only available treatment option for the dry form of the disease known to slow progression of AMD. Despite an excellent understanding of genes and nutrition in AMD, there is remarkably little known about gene-diet interactions that may identify efficacious approaches to treat individuals. This review will summarize our current understanding of gene-diet interactions in AMD with a focus on animal models and human epidemiological studies.

  19. Review on electrode-electrolyte solution interactions, related to cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurbach, Doron; Markovsky, Boris; Salitra, Gregory; Markevich, Elena; Talyossef, Yossi; Koltypin, Maxim; Nazar, Linda; Ellis, Brian; Kovacheva, Daniella

    In this paper we review some critical aspects related to interactions between cathode materials and electrolyte solutions in lithium-ion batteries. Previous results are briefly summarized, together with the presentation of new results. This review deals with the basic anodic stability of commonly-used electrolyte solutions for Li-ion batteries (mostly based on alkyl carbonate solvents). We discuss herein the surface chemistry of the following cathode materials: LiCoO 2, V 2O 5, LiMn 2O 4, LiMn 1.5Ni 0.5O 4, LiMn 0.5Ni 0.5O 2, and LiFePO 4. The methods applied included solution studies by ICP, Raman, X-ray photoelectron and FTIR spectroscopies, and electron microscopy, all in conjunction with electrochemical techniques. General phenomena are the possible dissolution of transition metal ions from these materials, which leads to changes in the active mass and a retardation in the electrode kinetics due to the formation of blocking surface films. These phenomena are significant mostly at elevated temperatures and in electrolyte solutions containing acidic species. Water-contaminated LiPF 6 solutions can reach a high concentration of acidic species (e.g., HF), which is detrimental to the performance of materials such as LiCoO 2 and LiFePO 4. Both LiMn 1.5Ni 0.5O 4 and LiMn 0.5Ni 0.5O 2, even when used as nanomaterials, show a high stability in commonly-used electrolyte solutions at high temperatures. This stability is attributed to unique surface chemistry that is correlated to the presence of Ni ions in the lattice.

  20. Imaging of snapping phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Guillin, R; Marchand, A J; Roux, A; Niederberger, E; Duvauferrier, R

    2012-01-01

    Snapping phenomena result from the sudden impingement between anatomical and/or heterotopical structures with subsequent abrupt movement and noise. Snaps are variously perceived by patients, from mild discomfort to significant pain requiring surgical management. Identifying the precise cause of snaps may be challenging when no abnormality is encountered on routinely performed static examinations. In this regard, dynamic imaging techniques have been developed over time, with various degrees of success. This review encompasses the main features of each imaging technique and proposes an overview of the main snapping phenomena in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:22744321

  1. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  2. Frost phenomena on Mars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M; Gaffney, E S; Low, P F

    1967-01-20

    The hypothesis that the Martian wave of darkening might be a frostheaving phenomenon has been examined. Consideration of the water-vapor sorption characteristics of a silicate mineral surface at temperatures below freezing leads to the conclusion that, without strongly deliquescent salts to attract and retain liquid water in the Martian soil, frost-heaving phenomena are not to be expected on Mars. On the other hand frost-heaving phenomena involving the freezing and thawing of ammonia may be common in the soils of Jupiter.

  3. Examining Classroom Interactions Related to Difference in Students' Science Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zady, Madelon F.; Portes, Pedro R.; Ochs, V. Dan

    2003-01-01

    Examines the cognitive supports that underlie achievement in science using a cultural historical framework and the activity setting (AS) construct with five features: personnel, motivation, scripts, task demands, and beliefs. Reports four emergent phenomena--science activities, the building of learning, meaning in lessons, and the conflict over…

  4. Relative Displacement Method for Track-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Pantaleón, Marcos J.

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  5. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  6. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  7. Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, Paul; Corson, Dale R.; Lorrain, Francois

    Based on the classic Electromagnetic Fields and Waves by the same authors, Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena capitalizes on the older text's traditional strengths--solid physics, inventive problems, and an experimental approach--while offering a briefer, more accessible introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetism.

  8. Stochastic models for large interacting systems and related correlation inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Liggett, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    A very large and active part of probability theory is concerned with the formulation and analysis of models for the evolution of large systems arising in the sciences, including physics and biology. These models have in their description randomness in the evolution rules, and interactions among various parts of the system. This article describes some of the main models in this area, as well as some of the major results about their behavior that have been obtained during the past 40 years. An important technique in this area, as well as in related parts of physics, is the use of correlation inequalities. These express positive or negative dependence between random quantities related to the model. In some types of models, the underlying dependence is positive, whereas in others it is negative. We give particular attention to these issues, and to applications of these inequalities. Among the applications are central limit theorems that give convergence to a Gaussian distribution. PMID:20826441

  9. Content-Related Interactions in Self-initiated Study Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Karen; Talanquer, Vicente

    2012-09-01

    The central goal of the present exploratory study was to investigate the nature of the content-related interactions in study groups independently organized by college organic chemistry students. We were particularly interested in the identification of the different factors that affected the emergence of opportunities for students to co-construct understanding and engage in higher levels of cognitive processing. Our results are based on the analysis of in situ observations of 34 self-initiated study sessions involving over a 100 students in three academic semesters. The investigation revealed three major types of social regulation processes, teaching, tutoring, and co-construction in the observed study sessions. However, the extent to which students engaged in each of them varied widely from one session to another. This variability was mostly determined by the specific composition of the study groups and the nature of the study tasks in which they were engaged. Decisions about how to organize the study session, the relative content knowledge and conceptual understanding expressed by the participants, as well as the cognitive level of the problems that guided group work had a strong impact on the nature of student interactions. Nevertheless, group talk in the observed study groups was mostly focused on low-level cognitive processes. The results of our work provide insights on how to better support students' productive engagement in study groups.

  10. Interactive exploration of implicit and explicit relations in faceted datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Collins, Christopher; Chevalier, Fanny; Balakrishnan, Ravin

    2013-12-01

    Many datasets, such as scientific literature collections, contain multiple heterogeneous facets which derive implicit relations, as well as explicit relational references between data items. The exploration of this data is challenging not only because of large data scales but also the complexity of resource structures and semantics. In this paper, we present PivotSlice, an interactive visualization technique which provides efficient faceted browsing as well as flexible capabilities to discover data relationships. With the metaphor of direct manipulation, PivotSlice allows the user to visually and logically construct a series of dynamic queries over the data, based on a multi-focus and multi-scale tabular view that subdivides the entire dataset into several meaningful parts with customized semantics. PivotSlice further facilitates the visual exploration and sensemaking process through features including live search and integration of online data, graphical interaction histories and smoothly animated visual state transitions. We evaluated PivotSlice through a qualitative lab study with university researchers and report the findings from our observations and interviews. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of PivotSlice using a scenario of exploring a repository of information visualization literature.

  11. Cannabinoids, opioids and MDMA: neuropsychological interactions related to addiction.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Patricia

    2010-04-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is an amphetamine derivative with psychostimulant properties. This substance is widely used around the world by young adults in recreational settings. One of the most remarkable characteristic of ecstasy users is the concurrent consumption of several other drugs of abuse including psychostimulants, alcohol, tobacco, LSD, cannabis and opioids. This poly-drug pattern of use is now prompting research towards understanding how the combination of MDMA with cannabis and opioids could affect neuropsychobiological processes related to addiction. As with other drugs of abuse, behavioural evidence has been presented supporting the role of the endocannabinoid system as a modulator of the rewarding/reinforcing properties of MDMA. On the other hand, the neurochemical substrate for the complex interactions between the endocannabinoid system and MDMA is poorly understood. MDMA also modulates the activity of the dynorphinergic and enkephalinergic systems in several brain structures related to addiction, as it has been shown for other psychostimulants. The work regarding the contribution of micro- and delta-opioid receptors in the rewarding effects of MDMA shows differential results in pharmacological studies in rats, with respect to studies using knock-out mice. The present review describes the behavioural and neurochemical interactions between MDMA, cannabinoids and opioids with respect to addiction processes.

  12. Phase transitions and critical phenomena in the two-dimensional Ising model with dipole interactions: A short-time dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C M; Bab, M A; Mazzini, M; Rubio Puzzo, M L; Saracco, G P

    2015-10-01

    The ferromagnetic Ising model with antiferromagnetic dipole interactions is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations, focusing on the characterization of the phase transitions between the tetragonal liquid and stripe of width h phases. The dynamic evolution of the physical observables is analyzed within the short-time regime for 0.5≤δ≤1.3, where δ is the ratio between the short-range exchange and the long-range dipole interaction constants. The obtained results for the interval 0.5≤δ≤1.2 indicate that the phase transition line between the h=1 stripe and tetragonal liquid phases is continuous. This finding contributes to clarifying the controversy about the order of this transition. This controversy arises from the difficulties introduced in the simulations due to the presence of long-range dipole interactions, such as an important increase in the simulation times that limits the system size used, strong finite size effects, as well as to the existence of multiple metastable states at low temperatures. The study of the short-time dynamics of the model allows us to avoid these hindrances. Moreover, due to the fact that the finite-size effects do not significantly affect the power-law behavior exhibited in the observables within the short-time regime, the results could be attributed to those corresponding to the thermodynamic limit. As a consequence of this, a careful characterization of the critical behavior for the whole transition line is performed by giving the complete set of critical exponents.

  13. Some remarks about simulation of cosmic ray phenomena with use of nuclear interaction models based on the current SPS proton-antiproton data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotniak, J. A.; Yodh, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    The x-y controversy is studied by introducing models with as many features (except for x and y distributions) in common, as possible, to avoid an extrapolation problem, only primary energies of 500 TeV are considered. To prove the point, Monte Carlo simulations are performed of EAS generated by 500 TeV vertical primary protons. Four different nuclear interaction models were used. Two of them are described elsewhere. Two are: (1) Model M-Y00 - with inclusive x and y distributions behaving in a scaling way; and (2) Model M-F00 - at and below ISR energies (1 TeV in Lab) exactly equivalent to the above, then gradually changing to provide the distributions in rapidity at 155 TeV as given by SPS proton-antiproton. This was achieved by gradual decrease in the scale unit in x distributions of produced secondaries, as interaction energy increases. Other modifications to the M-Y00 model were made.

  14. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  15. Lunar transient phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W. S.

    1991-03-01

    Lunar transient phenomena (LTP) sightings are classified into five categories: brightenings, darkenings, reddish colorations, bluish colorations, and obscurations. There is evidence that the remaining LTP's are of lunar origin. A substantial number of sightings are independently confirmed. They have been recorded on film and spectrograms, as well as with photoelectric photometers and polarization equipment. It suggested that the LTP's may be gentle outgassings of less-than-volcanic proportions.

  16. Research advances in interactions related to Toxoplasma gondii microneme proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Li, Fa-Cai; Zhou, Chun-Xue; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii microneme proteins (TgMICs), secreted by micronemes upon contact with host cells, are reported to play important roles in multiple stages of the T. gondii life cycle, including parasite motility, invasion, intracellular survival, and egress from host cells. Meanwhile, during these processes, TgMICs participate in many protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions, such as undergoing proteolytic maturation, binding to aldolase, engaging the host cell receptors and forming the moving junction (MJ), relying on different types of ectodomains, transmembrane (TM) domains and cytoplasmic domains (CDs). In this review, we summarize the research advances in protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions related to TgMICs, and their intimate associations with corresponding biological processes during T. gondii infection, which will contribute to an improved understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of T. gondii infection, and provide a basis for developing effective control strategies against T. gondii. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser-matter interactions, phase changes and diffusion phenomena during laser annealing of plasmonic AlN:Ag templates and their applications in optical encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siozios, A.; Koutsogeorgis, D. C.; Lidorikis, E.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Kehagias, T.; Komninou, P.; Cranton, W.; Kosmidis, C.; Patsalas, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nanocomposite thin films incorporating silver nanoparticles are emerging as photosensitive templates for optical encoding applications. However, a deep understanding of the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms occurring during laser-matter interactions is still lacking. In this work, the photosensitivity of AlN:Ag plasmonic nanocomposites is thoroughly examined and a series of UV laser annealing parameters, such as wavelength, fluence and the number of pulses are investigated. We report and study effects such as the selective crystallization of the AlN matrix, the enlargement of the Ag nanoparticle inclusions by diffusion of laser-heated Ag and the outdiffusion of Ag to the film’s surface. Detailed optical calculations contribute to the identification and understanding of the aforementioned physical mechanisms and of their dependency on the laser processing parameters. We are then able to predetermine the plasmonic response of processed AlN:Ag nanocomposites and demonstrate its potential by means of optically encoding an overt or covert cryptographic pattern.

  18. Paramutation phenomena in plants.

    PubMed

    Pilu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is a particular epigenetic phenomenon discovered in Zea mays by Alexander Brink in the 1950s, and then also found in other plants and animals. Brink coined the term paramutation (from the Greek syllable "para" meaning beside, near, beyond, aside) in 1958, with the aim to differentiate paramutation from mutation. The peculiarity of paramutation with respect to other gene silencing phenomena consists in the ability of the silenced allele (named paramutagenic) to silence the other allele (paramutable) present in trans. The newly silenced (paramutated) allele remains stable in the next generations even after segregation from the paramutagenic allele and acquires paramutagenic ability itself. The inheritance behaviour of these epialleles permits a fast diffusion of a particular gene expression level/phenotype in a population even in the absence of other evolutionary influences, thus breaking the Hardy-Weinberg law. As with other gene silencing phenomena such as quelling in the fungus Neurospora crassa, transvection in Drosophila, co-suppression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) described in transgenic plants and RNA interference (RNAi) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, paramutation occurs without changes in the DNA sequence. So far the molecular basis of paramutation remains not fully understood, although many studies point to the involvement of RNA causing changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure of the silenced genes. In this review I summarize all paramutation phenomena described in plants, focusing on the similarities and differences between them.

  19. Synchronization Phenomena and Epoch Filter of Electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matani, Ayumu

    Nonlinear electrophysiological synchronization phenomena in the brain, such as event-related (de)synchronization, long distance synchronization, and phase-reset, have received much attention in neuroscience over the last decade. These phenomena contain more electrical than physiological keywords and actually require electrical techniques to capture with electroencephalography (EEG). For instance, epoch filters, which have just recently been proposed, allow us to investigate such phenomena. Moreover, epoch filters are still developing and would hopefully generate a new paradigm in neuroscience from an electrical engineering viewpoint. Consequently, electrical engineers could be interested in EEG once again or from now on.

  20. Gravitational anomaly and transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Landsteiner, Karl; Megías, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-07-08

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  1. Concept recognition for extracting protein interaction relations from biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, William A; Lu, Zhiyong; Johnson, Helen L; Caporaso, J Gregory; Paquette, Jesse; Lindemann, Anna; White, Elizabeth K; Medvedeva, Olga; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Background: Reliable information extraction applications have been a long sought goal of the biomedical text mining community, a goal that if reached would provide valuable tools to benchside biologists in their increasingly difficult task of assimilating the knowledge contained in the biomedical literature. We present an integrated approach to concept recognition in biomedical text. Concept recognition provides key information that has been largely missing from previous biomedical information extraction efforts, namely direct links to well defined knowledge resources that explicitly cement the concept's semantics. The BioCreative II tasks discussed in this special issue have provided a unique opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of concept recognition in the field of biomedical language processing. Results: Through the modular construction of a protein interaction relation extraction system, we present several use cases of concept recognition in biomedical text, and relate these use cases to potential uses by the benchside biologist. Conclusion: Current information extraction technologies are approaching performance standards at which concept recognition can begin to deliver high quality data to the benchside biologist. Our system is available as part of the BioCreative Meta-Server project and on the internet . PMID:18834500

  2. Aging-related dysregulation of dopamine and angiotensin receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Valenzuela, Rita; Granado, Noelia; Moratalla, Rosario; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2014-07-01

    It is not known whether the aging-related decrease in dopaminergic function leads to the aging-related higher vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons and risk for Parkinson's disease. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in the inflammatory response, neuronal oxidative stress, and dopaminergic vulnerability via type 1 (AT1) receptors. In the present study, we observed a counterregulatory interaction between dopamine and angiotensin receptors. We observed overexpression of AT1 receptors in the striatum and substantia nigra of young adult dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-deficient mice and young dopamine-depleted rats, together with compensatory overexpression of AT2 receptors or compensatory downregulation of angiotensinogen and/or angiotensin. In aged rats, we observed downregulation of dopamine and dopamine receptors and overexpression of AT1 receptors in aged rats, without compensatory changes observed in young animals. L-Dopa therapy inhibited RAS overactivity in young dopamine-depleted rats, but was ineffective in aged rats. The results suggest that dopamine may play an important role in modulating oxidative stress and inflammation in the substantia nigra and striatum via the RAS, which is impaired by aging.

  3. Magnetic sponge phenomena associated with interchain dipole-dipole interactions in a series of ferrimagnetic chain compounds doped with minor diamagnetic species.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Masaki; Miyasaka, Hitoshi

    2014-05-05

    The donor/acceptor ionic chain (i.e., the D(+)A(-) chain) [Ru2(2-MeO-4-ClPhCO2)4(BTDA-TCNQ)]·2.5(benzene) (1; 2-MeO-4-ClPhCO2(-) = 2-methoxy-4-chlorobenzoate; BTDA-TCNQ = bis(1,2,5-thiadiazolo)tetracyanoquinodimethane) is a ferrimagnetic chain with S = 3/2 from [Ru2(II,III)](+) (i.e., D(+)) and S = 1/2 from BTDA-TCNQ(•-) (i.e., A(-)), with J ≈ -100 K, in which long-range antiferromagnetic ordering at TN = 11 K occurs because interchain antiferromagnetic interactions are critical. Compound 1 undergoes a reversible crystal-to-crystal structural transformation with the elimination/absorption of the crystallization solvent to form the dried compound [Ru2(2-MeO-4-ClPhCO2)4(BTDA-TCNQ)] (1'), which has a higher TN (14 K). This change is clearly caused by the shortening of the interchain distances because the exchange coupling parameter for the chain is the same in both 1 and 1'. The chain compounds in 1 can be doped with minor diamagnetic [Rh2(II,II)] species, [{(Ru2)(1-x)(Rh2)(x)(2-MeO-4-ClPhCO2)4}(BTDA-TCNQ)]·2.5(benzene) (x = 0.03 for Rh-3%; x = 0.05 for Rh-5%; x = 0.16 for Rh-16%), which shifts the TN to lower temperatures, the magnitude of the shift being dependent on the doping ratio x (TN = 5.9 K for Rh-3%, TN = 3.7 K for Rh-5%, and TN was not observed above 1.8 K for Rh-16%). Drying a doped compound increased its TN, as was found for 1': TN = 9.9 K for Rh-3%', TN = 9.2 K for Rh-5%', and TN was not observed above 1.8 K for Rh-16%'. TN had a linear relationship with the doping ratio x of the [Rh2] species in both the fresh and dried compounds. The TN linear relationship is associated with the magnitude of the effective magnetic dipole (i.e., the average correlation length) in the chains caused by the [Rh2] defects as well as naturally generated defects in the synthetic process and with the interchain distances affected by the crystal-to-crystal transformations. These results demonstrate that slightly modifying the short-range correlation lengths, which changes

  4. Near real-time model to monitor SST anomalies related to undersea earthquakes and SW monsoon phenomena from TRMM-AQUA satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    impending under-sea earthquakes sometimes leading to tsunamis. The results of the analysis for the ENSO-Monsoon rainfall relation show that the time series of SST distribution within the Nino 4 or Nino-BP regions with larger number of pixels with SSTs between 27-28° C is generally a favourable condition for normal rainfall condi-tion. While both Nino 4 and Nino-BP provide similar results, Nino-BP region is found to be a more sensitive region for such assessment of monitoring the trend of SW monsoon rainfall over India. This result has the potential to be used in the prognosis of overall rainfall pattern of the monsoon season at weekly intervals which may serve as vital information for Indian agricul-tural production. While simple geophysical models are able to explain the above correlations, more detailed modelling of the plate tectonics and heat fluxes (for undersea earthquakes) and ocean-cloud interaction/dynamics (for ENSO and Monsoon rainfall pattern) would need to be undertaken.

  5. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  6. A Challenge for Developers: Preserving the Interactivity of Human Relations in a Standalone Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, F. E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the efforts taken by the Cornell Interactive Theater Ensemble to provide interactive human relations training on date rape using live dramatizations, video with facilitated audience participation, and an electronic multimedia format with decision trees for interactive involvement. (EA)

  7. Interaction of absorbing aerosols with high relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M.; Bluvshtein, N.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-12-01

    One of the major uncertainties in the understanding of Earth's climate system is the interaction between solar radiation and aerosols in the atmosphere. This interaction is dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the aerosols and on the wavelength of the incident light. Aerosols exposed to high humidity areas will change their chemical, physical, and optical properties. To model hydrated aerosols, atmospheric chemistry models use the volume weighted mixing rule to predict the complex refractive index (RI) of aerosols when they interact with high relative humidity areas, and, in general, assume homogeneous mixing. The validity of these assumptions is explored. The extinction coefficient and growth factor of humidified aerosols, at 80% and 90% RH, and at 532 nm and 355 nm wavelengths was measured for size-selected aerosols of ammonium sulfate, peat (a lightly absorbing humic-like substance proxy), nigrosine (a black dye to model highly absorbing substances), and a mixture of AS and nigrosine. The ratio of the humidified extinction coefficients to the dry (fRHext(%RH,Dry)) is explored. The measured fRHext(%RH,Dry) is compared to theoretical calculations based on Mie theory, and using the measured growth factors and assuming homogeneous mixing the expected RIs using the volume weighted mixing rule are compared to the RIs derived from the extinction measurements. Moreover, the differences between assuming a core-shell structure or a homogeneous mixing of the substances is examined. We found slightly linear to no dependency of fRH(%RH,Dry) with size for absorbing substances in contrast to the decreasing exponential behavior with size for purely scattering substances, but no discernable difference could be made between the two wavelengths used. Less than 5% differences were found between the real parts of the complex refractive indices derived and those calculated using the volume weighted mixing rule, and the imaginary parts had up to a 20% difference

  8. Nanoflares, Spicules, and Other Small-Scale Dynamic Phenomena on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James

    2010-01-01

    There is abundant evidence of highly dynamic phenomena occurring on very small scales in the solar atmosphere. For example, the observed pr operties of many coronal loops can only be explained if the loops are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively by nanoflares. Type II spicules recently discovered by Hinode are an example of small-scale impulsive events occurring in the chromosphere. The exist ence of these and other small-scale phenomena is not surprising given the highly structured nature of the magnetic field that is revealed by photospheric observations. Dynamic phenomena also occur on much lar ger scales, including coronal jets, flares, and CMEs. It is tempting to suggest that these different phenomena are all closely related and represent a continuous distribution of sizes and energies. However, this is a dangerous over simplification in my opinion. While it is tru e that the phenomena all involve "magnetic reconnection" (the changin g of field line connectivity) in some form, how this occurs depends s trongly on the magnetic geometry. A nanoflare resulting from the interaction of tangled magnetic strands within a confined coronal loop is much different from a major flare occurring at the current sheet form ed when a CME rips open an active region. I will review the evidence for ubiquitous small-scale dynamic phenomena on the Sun and discuss wh y different phenomena are not all fundamentally the same.

  9. Nanoflares, Spicules, and Other Small-Scale Dynamic Phenomena on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James

    2010-01-01

    There is abundant evidence of highly dynamic phenomena occurring on very small scales in the solar atmosphere. For example, the observed pr operties of many coronal loops can only be explained if the loops are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively by nanoflares. Type II spicules recently discovered by Hinode are an example of small-scale impulsive events occurring in the chromosphere. The exist ence of these and other small-scale phenomena is not surprising given the highly structured nature of the magnetic field that is revealed by photospheric observations. Dynamic phenomena also occur on much lar ger scales, including coronal jets, flares, and CMEs. It is tempting to suggest that these different phenomena are all closely related and represent a continuous distribution of sizes and energies. However, this is a dangerous over simplification in my opinion. While it is tru e that the phenomena all involve "magnetic reconnection" (the changin g of field line connectivity) in some form, how this occurs depends s trongly on the magnetic geometry. A nanoflare resulting from the interaction of tangled magnetic strands within a confined coronal loop is much different from a major flare occurring at the current sheet form ed when a CME rips open an active region. I will review the evidence for ubiquitous small-scale dynamic phenomena on the Sun and discuss wh y different phenomena are not all fundamentally the same.

  10. Wolf-Rayet phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of stars showing Wolf-Rayet phenomena are outlined along with the direction of future work. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of W-R spectra. Specifically the following topics are covered: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions the mass loss rates; and the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. Also, a brief overview of current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R spectra are included.

  11. [Lateralization phenomena and headache].

    PubMed

    Nattero, G; Savi, L

    1984-09-08

    Ipsilateral carotid and vertebral vasomotor phenomena are marked components of a unilateral cluster headache crisis. Investigation of lateralisation at the height of a crisis has shown that Doppler findings supplement Heick's observation of the reversible opening of both intra and extracranial arteriovenous shunts. This observation is in line with personal thermographic evidence and that of Lance indicating local hypothermia, and with Wolff's demonstration of dilatation and congestion associated with the superficial temporal artery. Personal dynamographic findings now point to a local extra-intracranial artery pressure gradient as the cause of the peripheral component of lateralisation in cluster headache.

  12. (Theory of weak interactions and related topics; and study of e sup + e sup minus interactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Lay Nam; Tze, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the following topics: Higher point anomalous amplitudes; topological phase of quantum gravity; chiral symmetry breaking at finite temperature; Skyrmions as representations of current algebras; D {ge} 4 critical phenomena: self-duality, infinite dimensional symmetries and hypercomplex analyticity; D {ge} 3 topological field theories: anionic membranes and division algebras, geometric quantization by the method of orbits; and novel non-perturbative approaches. (LSP)

  13. Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

    2002-06-01

    This annual report describes progress of the project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is working to provide advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The MIDCARB project is developing improved online tools to provide real-time display and analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The system links together data from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

  14. Classifying prion and prion-like phenomena.

    PubMed

    Harbi, Djamel; Harrison, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The universe of prion and prion-like phenomena has expanded significantly in the past several years. Here, we overview the challenges in classifying this data informatically, given that terms such as "prion-like", "prion-related" or "prion-forming" do not have a stable meaning in the scientific literature. We examine the spectrum of proteins that have been described in the literature as forming prions, and discuss how "prion" can have a range of meaning, with a strict definition being for demonstration of infection with in vitro-derived recombinant prions. We suggest that although prion/prion-like phenomena can largely be apportioned into a small number of broad groups dependent on the type of transmissibility evidence for them, as new phenomena are discovered in the coming years, a detailed ontological approach might be necessary that allows for subtle definition of different "flavors" of prion / prion-like phenomena.

  15. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  16. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M.; Goldak, J.A.; DebRoy, T.A.; Rappaz, M.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  17. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  18. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  19. Synchronization phenomena in nephron-nephron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Yip, Kay-Pong; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2001-06-01

    Experimental data for tubular pressure oscillations in rat kidneys are analyzed in order to examine the different types of synchronization that can arise between neighboring functional units. For rats with normal blood pressure, the individual unit (the nephron) typically exhibits regular oscillations in its tubular pressure and flow variations. For such rats, both in-phase and antiphase synchronization can be demonstrated in the experimental data. For spontaneously hypertensive rats, where the pressure variations in the individual nephrons are highly irregular, signs of chaotic phase and frequency synchronization can be observed. Accounting for a hemodynamic as well as for a vascular coupling between nephrons that share a common interlobular artery, we develop a mathematical model of the pressure and flow regulation in a pair of adjacent nephrons. We show that this model, for appropriate values of the parameters, can reproduce the different types of experimentally observed synchronization.

  20. MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

    2003-07-01

    This annual report describes progress in the second year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is providing advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. Data is being assembled to analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration potential from a single object (e.g., power plant or well) to a region and across geographic boundaries. The MIDCARB system is robust and capable of being updated from multiple sources on a daily basis. The MIDCARB project has developed improved online tools to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The MIDCARB project is a functional template for distributed data systems to address CO{sub 2} sequestration and other natural resource issues that cross the

  1. Functional theories of thermoelectric phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, F. G.; Di Ventra, M.; Vignale, G.

    2017-02-01

    We review the progress that has been recently made in the application of time-dependent density functional theory to thermoelectric phenomena. As the field is very young, we emphasize open problems and fundamental issues. We begin by introducing the formal structure of thermal density functional theory, a density functional theory with two basic variables—the density and the energy density—and two conjugate fields—the ordinary scalar potential and Luttinger’s thermomechanical potential. The static version of this theory is contrasted with the familiar finite-temperature density functional theory, in which only the density is a variable. We then proceed to constructing the full time-dependent non equilibrium theory, including the practically important Kohn-Sham equations that go with it. The theory is shown to recover standard results of the Landauer theory for thermal transport in the steady state, while showing greater flexibility by allowing a description of fast thermal response, temperature oscillations and related phenomena. Several results are presented here for the first time, i.e. the proof of invertibility of the thermal response function in the linear regime, the full expression of the thermal currents in the presence of Luttinger’s thermomechanical potential, an explicit prescription for the evaluation of the Kohn-Sham potentials in the adiabatic local density approximation, a detailed discussion of the leading dissipative corrections to the adiabatic local density approximation and the thermal corrections to the resistivity that follow from it.

  2. The Seminole Serpent Warrior At Miramar, FL, Shows Settlement Locations Enabled Environmental Monitoring Reminiscent Of the Four-corners Kokopelli-like EMF Phenomena, and Related to Earthquakes, Tornados and Hurricanes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balam Matagamon, Chan; Pawa Matagamon, Sagamo

    2004-03-01

    Certain Native Americans of the past seem to have correctly deduced that significant survival information for their tradition-respecting cultures resided in EMF-based phenomena that they were monitoring. This is based upon their myths and the place or cult-hero names they bequeathed us. The sites we have located in FL have been detectable by us visually, usually by faint blue light, or by the elicitation of pin-like prickings, by somewhat intense nervous-system response, by EMF interactions with aural electrochemical systems that can elicit tinitus, and other ways. In the northeast, Cautantowit served as a harbinger of Indian summer, and appears to be another alter ego of the EMF. The Miami, FL Tequesta site along the river clearly correlates with tornado, earthquake and hurricane locations. Sites like the Mohave Deserts giant man may have had similar significance.

  3. Novel QCD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    I discuss a number of novel topics in QCD, including the use of the AdS/CFT correspondence between Anti-de Sitter space and conformal gauge theories to obtain an analytically tractable approximation to QCD in the regime where the QCD coupling is large and constant. In particular, there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimension coordinate z of AdS space and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of mesons and baryons, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of exclusive scattering amplitudes. I also discuss a number of novel phenomenological features of QCD. Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, the breakdown of the Lam Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, and nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing--leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also discuss tests of hidden color in nuclear wavefunctions, the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency, and anomalous heavy quark effects. The presence of direct higher-twist processes where a proton is produced in the hard subprocess can explain the large proton-to-pion ratio seen in high centrality heavy ion collisions.

  4. Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

  5. The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and related tools 2005 update

    PubMed Central

    Alfarano, C.; Andrade, C. E.; Anthony, K.; Bahroos, N.; Bajec, M.; Bantoft, K.; Betel, D.; Bobechko, B.; Boutilier, K.; Burgess, E.; Buzadzija, K.; Cavero, R.; D'Abreo, C.; Donaldson, I.; Dorairajoo, D.; Dumontier, M. J.; Dumontier, M. R.; Earles, V.; Farrall, R.; Feldman, H.; Garderman, E.; Gong, Y.; Gonzaga, R.; Grytsan, V.; Gryz, E.; Gu, V.; Haldorsen, E.; Halupa, A.; Haw, R.; Hrvojic, A.; Hurrell, L.; Isserlin, R.; Jack, F.; Juma, F.; Khan, A.; Kon, T.; Konopinsky, S.; Le, V.; Lee, E.; Ling, S.; Magidin, M.; Moniakis, J.; Montojo, J.; Moore, S.; Muskat, B.; Ng, I.; Paraiso, J. P.; Parker, B.; Pintilie, G.; Pirone, R.; Salama, J. J.; Sgro, S.; Shan, T.; Shu, Y.; Siew, J.; Skinner, D.; Snyder, K.; Stasiuk, R.; Strumpf, D.; Tuekam, B.; Tao, S.; Wang, Z.; White, M.; Willis, R.; Wolting, C.; Wong, S.; Wrong, A.; Xin, C.; Yao, R.; Yates, B.; Zhang, S.; Zheng, K.; Pawson, T.; Ouellette, B. F. F.; Hogue, C. W. V.

    2005-01-01

    The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND) (http://bind.ca) archives biomolecular interaction, reaction, complex and pathway information. Our aim is to curate the details about molecular interactions that arise from published experimental research and to provide this information, as well as tools to enable data analysis, freely to researchers worldwide. BIND data are curated into a comprehensive machine-readable archive of computable information and provides users with methods to discover interactions and molecular mechanisms. BIND has worked to develop new methods for visualization that amplify the underlying annotation of genes and proteins to facilitate the study of molecular interaction networks. BIND has maintained an open database policy since its inception in 1999. Data growth has proceeded at a tremendous rate, approaching over 100 000 records. New services provided include a new BIND Query and Submission interface, a Standard Object Access Protocol service and the Small Molecule Interaction Database (http://smid.blueprint.org) that allows users to determine probable small molecule binding sites of new sequences and examine conserved binding residues. PMID:15608229

  6. The Generation of Surface-bound Exospheres via Electron-Stimulated Desorption (and Related Phenomena): Results from Apollo samples and Hermian Regolith Simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C.; Poston, M.; McLain, J. L.; Orlando, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    The generation of surface-bound exospheres present around the Moon, Mercury and other airless rocky bodies are produced primarily by the interaction of micrometeoroid impacts and charged particles from the solar wind, and magnetospheres with those surfaces. While the study of the interactions of both micrometeoroids and ion sputtering are well investigated, the contributions arising from energetic electron interactions are typically less-well established. Observations from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS), taken < 400 km from the surface, have shown a plasma cusp with energetic heavy ions (i.e. Na+- and O+-groups) for which the source has not been determined. However, the precipitation of keV electrons onto the surfaces of Mercury has recently been inferred from measurements using the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft observations of the night-side of Mercury. A newly developed global kinetic transport model suggests that electron-stimulated desorption (ESD), and possibly light ion stimulated desorption (ISD), can directly yield ions that can be transported and dynamically accelerated to the plasma cusp regions observed by FIPS. In addition, keV electrons and ions from the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere frequently bombard with the lunar surface. Here, we present some of the most recent results from our ongoing work studying the effects of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD), ion-stimulated desorption (ISD) and implantation, as well as electron-stimulated desorption (ESD). Apollo samples collected from both the lunar highland and Mare regions, as well as simulants of the Mercury Regolith have been investigated. The temperature- (100-600 K) and energy-dependence (threshold - 2 keV) of ESD time-of-flight (ToF) results will be presented for these materials along with some preliminary results from our group based on photon-desorption studies of water on lunar material, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies of

  7. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  8. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  9. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  10. Solution‐crystallization and related phenomena in 9,9‐dialkyl‐fluorene polymers. II. Influence of side‐chain structure

    PubMed Central

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Solution‐crystallization is studied for two polyfluorene polymers possessing different side‐chain structures. Thermal analysis and temperature‐dependent optical spectroscopy are used to clarify the nature of the crystallization process, while X‐ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveal important differences in the resulting microstructures. It is shown that the planar‐zigzag chain conformation termed the β‐phase, which is observed for certain linear‐side‐chain polyfluorenes, is necessary for the formation of so‐called polymer‐solvent compounds for these polymers. Introduction of alternating fluorene repeat units with branched side‐chains prevents formation of the β‐phase conformation and results in non‐solvated, i.e. melt‐crystallization‐type, polymer crystals. Unlike non‐solvated polymer crystals, for which the chain conformation is stabilized by its incorporation into a crystalline lattice, the β‐phase conformation is stabilized by complexation with solvent molecules and, therefore, its formation does not require specific inter‐chain interactions. The presented results clarify the fundamental differences between the β‐phase and other conformational/crystalline forms of polyfluorenes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2015, 53, 1492–1506 PMID:27546983

  11. Causes of Sex Ratio Bias May Account for Unisexual Sterility in Hybrids: A New Explanation of Haldane's Rule and Related Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, L. D.; Pomiankowski, A.

    1991-01-01

    Unisexual hybrid disruption can be accounted for by interactions between sex ratio distorters which have diverged in the species of the hybrid cross. One class of unisexual hybrid disruption is described by Haldane's rule, namely that the sex which is absent, inviable or sterile is the heterogametic sex. This effect is mainly due to incompatibility between X and Y chromosomes. We propose that this incompatibility is due to a mutual imbalance between meiotic drive genes, which are more likely to evolve on sex chromosomes than autosomes. The incidences of taxa with sex chromosome drive closely matches those where Haldane's rule applies: Aves, Mammalia, Lepidoptera and Diptera. We predict that Haldane's rule is not universal but is correct for taxa with sex chromosome meiotic drive. A second class of hybrid disruption affects the male of the species regardless of which sex is heterogametic. Typically the genes responsible for this form of disruption are cytoplasmic. These instances are accounted for by the release from suppression of cytoplasmic sex ratio distorters when in a novel nuclear cytotype. Due to the exclusively maternal transmission of cytoplasm, cytoplasmic sex ratio distorters cause only female-biased sex ratios. This asymmetry explains why hybrid disruption is limited to the male. PMID:1916248

  12. Something Blossoms in Between: Silence-Phenomena as a Bordering Notions in Psychology.

    PubMed

    Lehmann Oliveros, Olga V

    2016-03-01

    Mysterious yet unavoidable, silence-phenomena appear to us in inherent ambiguity. In its plurality of meanings, phenomena related to silence are often perceived as overwhelming because they transcend the communicative capacity of language making it a challenge for cultural psychology to understand its involvement in our processes of making sense of experience and existence. Human growth and development involve processes where presence, void and content, voice, sound and noise, motion, transition and stillness, have dialectic interactions. In this article I discuss silence-phenomena as a bordering notion in terms of its discursive quality, the silent quality of speech, and the awareness of the ineffable. In addition, I highlight the possible implications of such notion in the understanding of affect from the perspective of Semiotic Cultural Psychology. I also emphasize the importance of considering psychological borders as multi-dimensional, taking the phenomenological experience of temporality as an illustration, which is also related to high emotional involvement of attention.

  13. Hysteresis phenomena in hydraulic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, H. J.; Luo, X. W.; Chen, Y. L.; Xu, H. Y.; Farhat, M.

    2012-11-01

    Hysteresis phenomena demonstrate the lag between the generation and the removal of some physical phenomena. This paper studies the hysteresis phenomena of the head-drop in a scaled model pump turbine using experiment test and CFD methods. These lag is induced by complicated flow patterns, which influenced the reliability of rotating machine. Keeping the same measurement procedure is concluded for the hydraulic machine measurement.

  14. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  15. Long term puzzles of the CH and CD energetics and related phenomena revisited; solutions sought through REMPI-photofragmentations of bromomethanes.

    PubMed

    Hafliðason, Arnar; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2016-01-21

    Ever since the pioneering work by Herzberg and Johns in 1969 (The Astrophysical Journal, 1969, 158, 399) the spectral assignment and the energetics of the fundamental molecular fragment CH, in the region of 63 000-65 000 cm(-1) (7.81-8.06 eV), have remained a puzzle to a large extent. The dissociation of bromoform and deuterated bromoform following two-photon resonance excitations to molecular Rydberg states forms the fragment species CH* and CD* in the excited state A(2)Δ(v' =0) as well as carbon and bromine atoms in the ground and first excited states, C/C* and Br/Br*. Further (1r + 1i)REMPI of CH* and CD* resonance excites the fragments to the energy region of concern, whereas the atom fragments were identified by further (2r + 1i)REMPI. Analysis based on spectral simulations, isotope shifts and comparison with other data allowed spectral identifications, assignments and partial characterization of four highly excited bound states for each of the molecular fragments (CH**/CD**); including the (3)(2)Π valence state and the (4)(2)Π Rydberg state, for the first time. Perturbations, shown as line-shifts, line-intensity and/or line-width alterations, due to the level-to-level state interactions between the bound states and predissociations by a repulsive state are recognized. Recording of C(+) signals in REMPI of several bromomethanes for a one-photon energy of about 40 333 cm(-1) allows the clarification of a mystery concerning a broad C(+) band frequently observed. This work, presented, demonstrates the usefulness of molecular REMPI for fragment analysis.

  16. Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena from the Correlation, Coupling and Criticality Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. H.; Hu, B. L.; Subaşi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this sequel paper we explore how macroscopic quantum phenomena can be measured or understood from the behavior of quantum correlations which exist in a quantum system of many particles or components and how the interaction strengths change with energy or scale, under ordinary situations and when the system is near its critical point. We use the nPI (master) effective action related to the Boltzmann-BBGKY / Schwinger-Dyson hierarchy of equations as a tool for systemizing the contributions of higher order correlation functions to the dynamics of lower order correlation functions. Together with the large N expansion discussed in our first paper [1] we explore 1) the conditions whereby an H-theorem is obtained, which can be viewed as a signifier of the emergence of macroscopic behavior in the system. We give two more examples from past work: 2) the nonequilibrium dynamics of N atoms in an optical lattice under the large Script N (field components), 2PI and second order perturbative expansions, illustrating how N and Script N enter in these three aspects of quantum correlations, coherence and coupling strength. 3) the behavior of an interacting quantum system near its critical point, the effects of quantum and thermal fluctuations and the conditions under which the system manifests infrared dimensional reduction. We also discuss how the effective field theory concept bears on macroscopic quantum phenomena: the running of the coupling parameters with energy or scale imparts a dynamical-dependent and an interaction-sensitive definition of 'macroscopia'.

  17. Bioelectrochemistry II: Membrane Phenomena,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-11

    techniques for studying protein-lipid interactions and molecular movements in membranes. He discussed spin labels, fluorescent probes, NMR studies and recent...transduction in chloroplasts . Re reviewed the components and reactions at the two reaction centers In photosynthesis, and carefully correlated the structure...particularly useful for considering biological problems involving charge movement (e.g., ion transport, energy transduction, and electrical excitation

  18. Lean limit phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of flammability limits in the presence of flame interaction, and the existence of negative flame speeds are discussed. Downstream interaction between two counterflow premixed flames of different stoichiometries are experimentally studied. Various flame configurations are observed and quantified; these include the binary system of two lean or rich flames, the triplet system of a lean and a rich flame separated by a diffusion flame, and single diffusion flames with some degree of premixedness. Extinction limits are determined for methane/air and butane/air mixtures over the entire range of mixture concentrations. The results show that the extent of flame interaction depends on the separation distance between the flames which are functions of the mixtures' concentrations, the stretch rate, and the effective Lewis numbers (Le). In particular, in a positively-stretched flow field Le 1 ( 1) mixtures tend to interact strongly (weakly), while the converse holds for flames in a negatively-stretched flow. Also established was the existence of negative flames whose propagation velocity is in the same general direction as that of the bulk convective flow, being supported by diffusion alone. Their existence demonstrates the tendency of flames to resist extinction, and further emphasizes the possibility of very lean or rich mixtures to undergo combustion.

  19. Self field electromagnetism and quantum phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1994-07-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) has been extremely successful inits predictive capability for atomic phenomena. Thus the greatest hope for any alternative view is solely to mimic the predictive capability of quantum mechanics (QM), and perhaps its usefulness will lie in gaining a better understanding of microscopic phenomena. Many ?paradoxes? and problematic situations emerge in QED. To combat the QED problems, the field of Stochastics Electrodynamics (SE) emerged, wherein a random ?zero point radiation? is assumed to fill all of space in an attmept to explain quantum phenomena, without some of the paradoxical concerns. SE, however, has greater failings. One is that the electromagnetic field energy must be infinit eto work. We have examined a deterministic side branch of SE, ?self field? electrodynamics, which may overcome the probelms of SE. Self field electrodynamics (SFE) utilizes the chaotic nature of electromagnetic emissions, as charges lose energy near atomic dimensions, to try to understand and mimic quantum phenomena. These fields and charges can ?interact with themselves? in a non-linear fashion, and may thereby explain many quantum phenomena from a semi-classical viewpoint. Referred to as self fields, they have gone by other names in the literature: ?evanesccent radiation?, ?virtual photons?, and ?vacuum fluctuations?. Using self fields, we discuss the uncertainty principles, the Casimir effects, and the black-body radiation spectrum, diffraction and interference effects, Schrodinger's equation, Planck's constant, and the nature of the electron and how they might be understood in the present framework. No new theory could ever replace QED. The self field view (if correct) would, at best, only serve to provide some understanding of the processes by which strange quantum phenomena occur at the atomic level. We discuss possible areas where experiments might be employed to test SFE, and areas where future work may lie.

  20. Intriguing relations of interaction energy components in stacked nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, Karol M.; Sokalski, W. Andrzej; Leszczynski, J.

    2007-09-01

    Major components of the interaction energy that define several approximate levels starting from second order Möller-Plesset theory were studied for 58 stacked nucleic acid dimers. They included typical B-DNA and A-DNA structures, and selected published geometries. A survey of the various terms yields an unexpected correlation between the Pauli exchange and dispersion or correlation terms, which holds for each class of similar planar geometries and for various basis sets. The geometries that exhibit these correlations span a specific range of molecular overlaps when compared to a model benzene-pyridine stacked dimer. Also, the relationship between electrostatic interactions and MP2 stabilization energies reported earlier is confirmed and a prediction interval of practical relevance is estimated.

  1. Detection of moisture and moisture related phenomena from Skylab. [correlation of brightness and antenna temperature with soil moisture for Texas and Kansas test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleman, J. R.; Pogge, E. C.; Moore, R. K. (Principal Investigator); Hardy, N.; Lin, W.; League, L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Skylab 2 data for June 5, 1973 (Texas site) relates favorably with previously calculated aircraft data when correlating brightness temperature to soil moisture. However, more detailed work is needed to determine the corrected surface temperature. In addition, correlations between the S194 antenna temperature and soil moisture have been obtained for five sets of Skylab data. The best correlations were obtained for the surface to one inch depth in four cases and for surface to two inches depth for the fifth case. Correlation coefficients for the surface to one inch depth were -0.98, -0.95, -0.90, -0.82, and -0.80.

  2. Interactions of solar wind streams and related small structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, D.

    1994-09-01

    Coronal holes produce high-speed, low-density, and high-temperature streams that propagate into the interplanetary space. These streams interact with the slow-speed, high-density, and low-temperature stream of the ambient solar wind. We investigate this problem using the time-dependent, two- dimensional hydrodynamic model in the spherical-equatorial coordinate system. More accurate numerical methods and finer difference meshes used enable us to track the evolution of detailed features of the fast and slow stream interaction. An analysis of formation of shock pairs (forward and reverse shocks) is presented for both erupting and corotating parts of fast streams. Further, it is shown that the process of interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams may contain richer structures. Such structures may originate during the reconfinement process (internal shocks), spatial substructures (flux tubes), and small temporal modulations (shock wings). They may influence the global shape of stream interfaces and heating of the plasma. Finally, conclusion can be made that boundaries between the fast and slow coronal streams seem to be stable against small random fluctuations and against small introduced disturbances and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is not initiated.

  3. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed

  4. Local phenomena, chapter 3, part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Oceanic and coastal phenomena with dimensions ranging to 100 km are dealt with. The two major categories discussed are waves, their generation and dynamics and ocean-land related problems. The dynamics, of surface waves in both capillary and gravity ranges indicates that microwave technology provides a superior means of measuring simultaneously the spatial and temporal properties of ocean waves. The need for basic studies of physical phenomena in support of active microwave sensing is indicated. Active microwave scattering from surface waves is discussed in terms of wave dynamics.

  5. Some Phenomena on Negative Inversion Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Tae-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of NDI (negative degree inversion) and its relation with other inversion phenomena such as SVI (subject-verb inversion) and SAI (subject-auxiliary inversion). The negative element in the NDI construction may be" not," a negative adverbial, or a negative verb. In this respect, NDI has similar licensing…

  6. Exotic phenomena in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Thomas; Feldmeier, Hans; Roth, Robert

    2006-10-01

    In the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model the nuclear many-body system is described using Slater determinants with Gaussian wave-packets as single-particle states. The flexibility of the FMD wave functions allows for a consistent description of shell model like structures, deformed states, cluster structures as well as halos. An effective interaction derived from the realistic Argonne V18 interaction using the Unitary Correlation Operator Method is used for all nuclei. Results for nuclei in the p-shell will be presented. Halo features are present in the Helium isotopes, cluster structures are studied in Beryllium and Carbon isotopes. The interplay between shell structure and cluster structures in the ground and the Hoyle state in ^12C will be discussed.

  7. Diversity of threshold phenomena in geophysical media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The sample analysis of threshold phenomena in the lithosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere is conducted. The phenomena due to the flow of electric current and pore fluid in the rocks are considered, the scenario of wind-driven generation of atmospheric electricity is suggested, and the model of the geomagnetic storm time Dst variation is analyzed. An important general conclusion consists in the fact that in the geophysical media there is a wide class of threshold phenomena that are affine with phase transitions of the second kind. These phenomena are also related to the critical transitions in self-oscillatory systems with soft self-excitation. The integral representation of bifurcation diagrams for threshold phenomena is suggested. This provides a simple way to take into account the influence of the fluctuations on the transition of a system through the threshold. Fluctuations remove singularity at the threshold point and, generally, lead to a certain shifting of the threshold. The question concerning the hard transition through the threshold and several aspects of modeling the blow-up instability which is presumed to occasionally develop in the geophysical media are discussed.

  8. Parent-Child Interactions and Relational Aggression in Peer Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michiels, Daisy; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick; Kuppens, Sofie

    2008-01-01

    The major aim of this review is to propose new ways of thinking about the role of parents in the development and course of children's relationally aggressive behavior. An important theoretical framework from which to start thinking about linkages between parenting and relational aggression is provided by attachment theory. Attachment theory…

  9. The making of extraordinary psychological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the extraordinary phenomena that have been central to unorthodox areas of psychological knowledge. It shows how even the agreed facts relating to mesmerism, spiritualism, psychical research, and parapsychology have been framed as evidence both for and against the reality of the phenomena. It argues that these disputes can be seen as a means through which beliefs have been formulated and maintained in the face of potentially challenging evidence. It also shows how these disputes appealed to different forms of expertise, and that both sides appealed to belief in various ways as part of the ongoing dispute about both the facts and expertise. Finally, it shows how, when a formal Psychology of paranormal belief emerged in the twentieth century, it took two different forms, each reflecting one side of the ongoing dispute about the reality of the phenomena. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Our Professional Responsibilities Relative to Human-Animal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bustad, L. K.; Hines, L.

    1984-01-01

    An interesting area with great potential for benefiting and enriching the lives and conditions of people and animals is opening to us in research, service and teaching. By working with colleagues in other disciplines, we can develop new and creative ways to realize the great promise inherent in people-animal interactions properly studied and utilized. Veterinarians who understand that a strong human-companion animal bond can augment people's mental and physical states will help develop sound and effective companion animal programs for individuals who are lonely or handicapped and for persons in the school systems of the community, as well as its hospices, nursing and convalescent homes, prisons and other institutions. Children experiencing the deep satisfaction of interacting with animals while young will more likely become responsible pet owners and advocates as adults. The image of the profession is enhanced when children and adults see veterinarians as concerned teachers and compassionate health professionals. We as professionals will be required not only to update our knowledge and skills, but to acquire new knowledge in fields of animal and human behavior, psychology and sociology. We are needed on interdisciplinary research teams to study human-animal interactions. We will also be asked to commit time and personal energies in community programs, sometimes with no remuneration. But if skilled health professionals like veterinarians do not take the lead in establishing sound, long-term companion animal programs in their own communities, everyone will suffer including the animals. How we, as individual professionals, respond will be an important reflection of our compassion and our humanity. PMID:17422458

  11. Microscopical characterization of carbon materials derived from coal and petroleum and their interaction phenomena in making steel electrodes, anodes and cathode blocks for the Microscopy of Carbon Materials Working Group of the ICCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Predeanu, G.; Panaitescu, C.; Bălănescu, M.; Bieg, G.; Borrego, A.G.; Diez, M. A.; Hackley, Paul C.; Kwiecińska, B.; Marques, M.; Mastalerz, Maria; Misz-Kennan, M.; Pusz, S.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Rodrigues, S.; Singh, A. K.; Varma, A. K.; Zdravkov, A.; Zivotić, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of petrographic textures representing the structural organization of the organic matter derived from coal and petroleum and their interaction phenomena in the making of steel electrodes, anodes and cathode blocks.This work represents the results of the Microscopy of Carbon Materials Working Group in Commission III of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology between the years 2009 and 2013. The round robin exercises were run on photomicrograph samples. For textural characterization of carbon materials the existing ASTM classification system for metallurgical coke was applied.These round robin exercises involved 15 active participants from 12 laboratories who were asked to assess the coal and petroleum based carbons and to identify the morphological differences, as optical texture (isotropic/anisotropic), optical type (punctiform, mosaic, fibre, ribbon, domain), and size. Four sets of digital black and white microphotographs comprising 151 photos containing 372 fields of different types of organic matter were examined. Based on the unique ability of carbon to form a wide range of textures, the results showed an increased number of carbon occurrences which have crucial role in the chosen industrial applications.The statistical method used to evaluate the results was based on the “raw agreement indices”. It gave a new and original view on the analysts' opinion by not only counting the correct answers, but also all of the knowledge and experience of the participants. Comparative analyses of the average values of the level of overall agreement performed by each analyst in the exercises during 2009–2013 showed a great homogeneity in the results, the mean value being 90.36%, with a minimum value of 83% and a maximum value of 95%.

  12. Pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Smith, R. A.; Jackson, A. D.

    1981-12-01

    The correlated-basis-function method is extended to deal with pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. With a variational ansatz for the model wave function we derive the "correlated" analog of the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (or Balian-Werthamer), Anderson-Brinkman-Morel theory of pairing. A suitable (and well-controlled) set of approximations brings the theory into a form identical to the conventional theories, but with the bare interaction replaced by a weak effective interaction and the bare single-particle energies replaced by an effective single-particle spectrum. As usual, liquid 3He provides a very stringent test of the theory, as both the interaction and the experimental facts are pretty clear. The variational estimates for the pairing interaction are improved by nonorthogonal perturbation theory. We find the expected enhancement of the attraction in P waves, although the restriction to effective two-body interactions appears to be insufficient to generate P-wave pairing.

  13. Relativity constraints on the two-nucleon contact interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Girlanda, L.; Pastore, S.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M.

    2010-03-15

    We construct the most general, relativistically invariant, contact Lagrangian at order Q{sup 2} in the power counting, with Q denoting the low momentum scale. A complete, but nonminimal, set of (contact) interaction terms is identified, which upon nonrelativistic reduction generate two leading independent operator combinations of order Q{sup 0} and seven subleading ones of order Q{sup 2}--a result derived previously in the heavy-baryon formulation of effective field theories (EFTs). We show that Poincare covariance of the theory requires that additional terms with fixed coefficients be included, to describe the two-nucleon potential in reference frames other than the center-of-mass frame. These terms will contribute in systems with mass number A>2, and their impact on EFT calculations of binding energies and scattering observables in these systems should be studied.

  14. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  15. Gene-diet interactions in age-related macular degeneration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50% of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation...

  16. Preschool Contexts and Teacher Interactions: Relations with School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Priscilla; Hanish, Laura D.; Martin, Carol Lynn; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.; Foster, Stacie A.; Fabes, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of early education programs promote children's learning through a mix of experiences in child- and teacher-managed contexts. The current study examined time spent in child- and teacher-managed contexts and the nature of children's experiences with teachers in these contexts as they relate to children's skill development. Participants…

  17. Extraterrestrial materials processing and related transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R.; Sridhar, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    Several concepts for significant cost reductions in extraterrestrial resource utilization are described. After an introduction of the desirability of in situ resource utilization, several candidate chemical processes are mentioned. It is brought out that many of the key processes require fluid dynamics and heat transfer processes under reduced- and microgravity. These aspects are discussed within the broad framework of a two-phase thermal control systems. Another important aspect of space processing is that reliability and self-repairability are mandatory; automation aspects are discussed. In addition to these general considerations, the paper includes several specific processes that vary from solid electrolytic production of oxygen from carbon dioxide, to plasma-augmented reactions for reducing ilmenite on the moon.

  18. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  19. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  20. Extraterrestrial materials processing and related transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R.; Sridhar, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    Several concepts for significant cost reductions in extraterrestrial resource utilization are described. After an introduction of the desirability of in situ resource utilization, several candidate chemical processes are mentioned. It is brought out that many of the key processes require fluid dynamics and heat transfer processes under reduced- and microgravity. These aspects are discussed within the broad framework of a two-phase thermal control systems. Another important aspect of space processing is that reliability and self-repairability are mandatory; automation aspects are discussed. In addition to these general considerations, the paper includes several specific processes that vary from solid electrolytic production of oxygen from carbon dioxide, to plasma-augmented reactions for reducing ilmenite on the moon.

  1. Solar Influences on Geomagnetic and Related Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestine, E. H.

    1961-01-01

    A discussion of the geomagnetic effects of streams of electromagnetic and particular radiation from the sun. The interplay of forces between the geomagnetic field and solar streams is outlined; and the theoretical relationship between these, the solar storms, the trapped Van Allen radiations, the polar aurora, and geomagnetic field distortion are presented.

  2. Relating Things and Stuff via ObjectProperty Interactions.

    PubMed

    Min Sun; Byung-Soo Kim; Kohli, Pushmeet; Savarese, Silvio

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, substantially different approaches have been adopted for segmenting and detecting "things" (object categories that have a well defined shape such as people and cars) and "stuff" (object categories which have an amorphous spatial extent such as grass and sky). While things have been typically detected by sliding window or Hough transform based methods, detection of stuff is generally formulated as a pixel or segment-wise classification problem. This paper proposes a framework for scene understanding that models both things and stuff using a common representation while preserving their distinct nature by using a property list. This representation allows us to enforce sophisticated geometric and semantic relationships between thing and stuff categories via property interactions in a single graphical model. We use the latest advances made in the field of discrete optimization to efficiently perform maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference in this model. We evaluate our method on the Stanford dataset by comparing it against state-of-the-art methods for object segmentation and detection. We also show that our method achieves competitive performances on the challenging PASCAL '09 segmentation dataset.

  3. Relating Things and Stuff via Object Property Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kohli, Pushmeet; Savarese, Silvio

    2013-10-02

    In the last few years, substantially different approaches have been adopted for segmenting and detecting "things" (object categories that have a well defined shape such as people and cars) and "stuff" (object categories which have an amorphous spatial extent such as grass and sky). While things have been typically detected by sliding window or Hough transform based methods, detection of stuff is generally formulated as a pixel or segment-wise classification problem. This paper proposes a framework for scene understanding that models both things and stuff using a common representation while preserving their distinct nature by using a property list. This representation allows us to enforce sophisticated geometric and semantic relationships between thing and stuff categories via property interactions in a single graphical model. We use the latest advances made in the field of discrete optimization to efficiently perform maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference in this model. We evaluate our method on the Stanford dataset by comparing it against state-of-the-art methods for object segmentation and detection. We also show that our method achieves competitive performances on the challenging PASCAL'09 segmentation dataset.

  4. Interacting varying ghost dark energy models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, Martiros; Khurshudyan, Amalya; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by recent developments in Cosmology we would like to consider an extension of the Ghost DE which we will name as varying Ghost DE. Ghost DE like other models was introduced recently as a possible way to explain accelerated expansion of the Universe. For the phenomenological origin of the varying Ghost dark energy in our Universe we can suggest an existence of some unknown dynamics between the Ghost Dark energy and a fluid which evaporated completely making sense of the proposed effect. Moreover, we assume that this was in the epochs and scales which are unreachable by present-day experiments, like in very early Universe. In this study we will investigate the model for cosmological validity. We will apply observational and causality constraints to illuminate physically correct behavior of the model from the phenomenological one. We saw that an interaction between the varying Ghost DE and cold DM (CDM) also provides a solution to the cosmological coincidence problem. And we found that the Ghost DE behaves as a fluid-like matter in early Universe.

  5. PPI-IRO: a two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Ru-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Ya-Ru; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identification of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifies and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At first, IRO is applied in a binary classifier to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the significant performance of IRO on relation sentences classification and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and BioInfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods.

  6. Relating drug–protein interaction network with drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Pauwels, Edouard; Stoven, Véronique; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the emergence and underlying mechanisms of drug side effects is a challenging task in the drug development process. This underscores the importance of system–wide approaches for linking different scales of drug actions; namely drug-protein interactions (molecular scale) and side effects (phenotypic scale) toward side effect prediction for uncharacterized drugs. Results: We performed a large-scale analysis to extract correlated sets of targeted proteins and side effects, based on the co-occurrence of drugs in protein-binding profiles and side effect profiles, using sparse canonical correlation analysis. The analysis of 658 drugs with the two profiles for 1368 proteins and 1339 side effects led to the extraction of 80 correlated sets. Enrichment analyses using KEGG and Gene Ontology showed that most of the correlated sets were significantly enriched with proteins that are involved in the same biological pathways, even if their molecular functions are different. This allowed for a biologically relevant interpretation regarding the relationship between drug–targeted proteins and side effects. The extracted side effects can be regarded as possible phenotypic outcomes by drugs targeting the proteins that appear in the same correlated set. The proposed method is expected to be useful for predicting potential side effects of new drug candidate compounds based on their protein-binding profiles. Supplementary information: Datasets and all results are available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/smizutan/target-effect/. Availability: Software is available at the above supplementary website. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp, or goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22962476

  7. The Role of Family Phenomena in Posttraumatic Stress in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Deatrick, Janet A.

    2010-01-01

    Topic Youth face trauma that can cause posttraumatic stress (PTS). Purpose 1). To identify the family phenomena used in youth PTS research; and 2). Critically examine the research findings regarding the relationship between family phenomena and youth PTS. Sources Systematic literature review in PsycInfo, PILOTS, CINAHL, and MEDLINE. Twenty-six empirical articles met inclusion criteria. Conclusion Measurement of family phenomena included family functioning, support, environment, expressiveness, relationships, cohesion, communication, satisfaction, life events related to family, parental style of influence, and parental bonding. Few studies gave clear conceptualization of family or family phenomena. Empirical findings from the 26 studies indicate inconsistent empirical relationships between family phenomena and youth PTS, though a majority of the prospective studies support a relationship between family phenomena and youth PTS. Future directions for leadership by psychiatric nurses in this area of research and practice are recommended. PMID:21344778

  8. External Catalyst Breakup Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    the liquid velocity. During a cold start contact with hydrazine leading to liquid wetting can lead to very high internal pressures as a result ot the...strength leading ultimately to bed failure. * Means to reduce the relatively large scatter ii individual particle crush strength vould eliminate a... leads to the conclusion that rapid pressure release should not resuvlt in damage t, the pellets since the presstire in the pellet closely approaches that

  9. Complexity and emergent phenomena.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H T; Frey, Urs

    2011-04-01

    Complex biological systems operate under non-equilibrium conditions and exhibit emergent properties associated with correlated spatial and temporal structures. These properties may be individually unpredictable, but tend to be governed by power-law probability distributions and/or correlation. This article reviews the concepts that are invoked in the treatment of complex systems through a wide range of respiratory-related examples. Following a brief historical overview, some of the tools to characterize structural variabilities and temporal fluctuations associated with complex systems are introduced. By invoking the concept of percolation, the notion of multiscale behavior and related modeling issues are discussed. Spatial complexity is then examined in the airway and parenchymal structures with implications for gas exchange followed by a short glimpse of complexity at the cellular and subcellular network levels. Variability and complexity in the time domain are then reviewed in relation to temporal fluctuations in airway function. Next, an attempt is given to link spatial and temporal complexities through examples of airway opening and lung tissue viscoelasticity. Specific examples of possible and more direct clinical implications are also offered through examples of optimal future treatment of fibrosis, exacerbation risk prediction in asthma, and a novel method in mechanical ventilation. Finally, the potential role of the science of complexity in the future of physiology, biology, and medicine is discussed.

  10. Identification of Crew-Systems Interactions and Decision Related Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Evans, Joni K.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Ancel, Ersin; Barr, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    NASA Vehicle System Safety Technology (VSST) project management uses systems analysis to identify key issues and maintain a portfolio of research leading to potential solutions to its three identified technical challenges. Statistical data and published safety priority lists from academic, industry and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed by NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) systems analysis personnel to identify issues and future research needs related to one of VSST's technical challenges, Crew Decision Making (CDM). The data examined in the study were obtained from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Aviation Accident and Incident Data System, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Accident/Incident Data System and the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). In addition, this report contains the results of a review of safety priority lists, information databases and other documented references pertaining to aviation crew systems issues and future research needs. The specific sources examined were: Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) Safety Enhancements Reserved for Future Implementation (SERFIs), Flight Deck Automation Issues (FDAI) and NTSB Most Wanted List and Open Recommendations. Various automation issues taxonomies and priority lists pertaining to human factors, automation and flight design were combined to create a list of automation issues related to CDM.

  11. A review of impulsive phase phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of impulsive phase phenomena in support of the models used to compute the energies of the different components of the flares under study. The observational characteristics of the impulsive phase are discussed as well as the evidence for multi-thermal or non-thermal phenomena. The significance of time delays between hard X-rays and microwaves is discussed in terms of electron beams and Alfven waves, two-step acceleration, and secondary bursts at large distances from the primary source. Observations indicating the occurrence of chromospheric evaporation, coronal explosions, and thermal conduction fronts are reviewed briefly, followed by the gamma ray and neutron results. Finally, a preferred flare scenario and energy source are presented involving the interactions in a complex of magnetic loops with the consequent reconnection and electron acceleration.

  12. Optimizing Laboratory Experiments for Dynamic Astrophysical Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Remington, B

    2005-09-13

    To make a laboratory experiment an efficient tool for the studying the dynamical astrophysical phenomena, it is desirable to perform them in such a way as to observe the scaling invariance with respect to the astrophysical system under study. Several examples are presented of such scalings in the area of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena, where a number of scaled experiments have been performed. A difficult issue of the effect of fine-scale dissipative structures on the global scale dissipation-free flow is discussed. The second part of the paper is concerned with much less developed area of the scalings relevant to the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a pre-formed plasma. The use of the symmetry arguments in such experiments is also considered.

  13. Parity-time-symmetric quantum critical phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Yuto; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic non-conservative systems with parity-time (PT) symmetric gain–loss structures can exhibit unusual spontaneous symmetry breaking that accompanies spectral singularity. Recent studies on PT symmetry in optics and weakly interacting open quantum systems have revealed intriguing physical properties, yet many-body correlations still play no role. Here by extending the idea of PT symmetry to strongly correlated many-body systems, we report that a combination of spectral singularity and quantum criticality yields an exotic universality class which has no counterpart in known critical phenomena. Moreover, we find unconventional low-dimensional quantum criticality, where superfluid correlation is anomalously enhanced owing to non-monotonic renormalization group flows in a PT-symmetry-broken quantum critical phase, in stark contrast to the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless paradigm. Our findings can be experimentally tested in ultracold atoms and predict critical phenomena beyond the Hermitian paradigm of quantum many-body physics. PMID:28593991

  14. Unsteady flow phenomena in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, Edward M.; Epstein, Alan H.; Giles, Michael B.; McCune, James E.; Tan, Choon S.

    1990-01-01

    Work carried out at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at M.I.T. as part of the multi-investigator effort on basic unsteady flow phenomena is described. Within the overall project, four separate tasks are specified. These are, in brief: unsteady flow in compressors; computational techniques for unsteady flows; unsteady phenomena, inlet distortion, and flow instabilities in multistage compressors; and unsteady vortical wakes behind blade rows - prediction of relationships with blade properties.

  15. Schizoid phenomena in substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ralph H

    2002-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the spectrum of schizoid disorders, schizoid phenomena, and the underlying psychodynamics can often be found in the gamut of addictions and stand in the way of recovery. Features of schizoidness, the varieties of schizoid presentations, the etiology and pathogenesis of drug/alcohol abuse in the schizoid, and readily clinically apparent psychodynamic features are discussed. Schizoid phenomena can be dealt with effectively with an informed psychotherapy.

  16. WESF natural phenomena hazards survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

  17. Conductance phenomena in microcrystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, M.

    2006-02-01

    We have investigated the conduction phenomena in compacted tablets of cellulose with varying relative humidity (RH) with techniques such as Low Frequency Dielectric Spectroscopy (LFDS) and Transient Current (TC) at room temperature. Two exponential decaying regions in the transient current measurements indicate two ionic species contributing to the conduction mechanism. A high power-law exponent of 9 for the conductance with moisture content has been found. The mobility initially decreases with RH up to monolayer coverage, and further water vapor increases the mobility, indicating a blocking of available positions for the charge carrier ions. When the amount of water molecules present in the tablet increases one order of magnitude, the number of charge carriers increases 5-6 orders of magnitude, suggesting a transition from a power-law increase to a linear effective medium theory for the conduction. The charge carrier dependence on RH suggests that a percolating network of water molecules adsorbed to 6-OH units on the cellulose chain span through the sample. The conductivity mechanisms in cellulose are still not clear.

  18. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-03-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor.

  19. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  20. The phenomenology of life phenomena--in a nursing context.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Charlotte

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and develop knowledge about life phenomena in a life-philosophical and nursing context. Knowledge about life phenomena is part of a care-ethical understanding with a focus on relations. Life phenomena are to be understood as a generalized label for the various phenomena which are given with human existence. The Danish life philosophical tradition with the perspective of life as experienced has something to say in relation to a further refinement of the phenomenology of life phenomena. The refinement will be described as an ethical and existential understanding of the phenomena of nursing. The first part of the article takes a philosophical approach to the phenomenology of life phenomena. It attempts to locate life phenomena in relation to, respectively, needs, senses, and feelings. In order to maintain an overview, the attempt is made to separate needs, senses, and feelings, although in real life these are closely interwoven. The article also describes philosophy and life phenomena in relation to nursing as an empirical field. In nursing there is a risk that life phenomena become invisible to those whose task is to help the ill person adjust to a new life situation. For the nurse, it will be a continuing task, never completed, to develop a sensory-based, situation-determined attention to the patient. And the nurse must be continually aware of whether mere 'need-oriented' nursing is controlling her professional actions as a nurse. Taking a point of departure in the nurse's sensory, situationally determined attention, the last part of the article focuses on needs, senses, and feelings in connection with the nurse being able to direct her attention to the patient's life phenomena.

  1. Pendulum Phenomena and the Assessment of Scientific Inquiry Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Phenomena associated with the "pendulum" present numerous opportunities for assessing higher order human capabilities related to "scientific inquiry" and the "discovery" of natural law. This paper illustrates how systematic "assessment of scientific inquiry capabilities", using "pendulum" phenomena, can provide a useful tool for classroom teachers…

  2. Toward Understanding Astrophysical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing

    2015-06-01

    I hope to resume working on fast radio bursts (FRBs) in the near future. But after we completed our FRB paper, I decided to pause this project because of the lack of observational constraints. The pulsar triple system, J0733+1715, has its orbital parameters fitted to high accuracy owing to the precise timing of the central ms pulsar. The two orbits are highly hierarchical, namely Porb,1 " Porb,2, where 1 and 2 label the inner and outer white dwarf (WD) companions respectively. Moreover, their orbital planes almost coincide, providing a unique opportunity to study secular interaction associated purely with eccentricity beyond the solar system. Secular interaction only involves effect averaged over many orbits. Thus each companion can be represented by an elliptical wire with its mass distributed inversely proportional to its local orbital speed. Generally there exists a mutual torque, which vanishes only when their apsidal lines are parallel or anti-parallel. To maintain either mode, the eccentricity ratio, e1/ e2, must be of the proper value, so that both apsidal lines precess together. For J0733+1715, e1 " e2 for the parallel mode, while e 1 " e2 for the anti-parallel one. We show that the former precesses ˜10 times slower than the latter. Currently the system is dominated by the parallel mode. Although only a little anti-parallel mode survives, both eccentricities especially e1 oscillate on ˜103yr timescale. Detectable changes would occur within ˜1y. We demonstrate that the anti-parallel mode gets damped ˜10 4 times faster than its parallel brother by any dissipative process diminishing e1. If it is the tidal damping in the inner WD, we proceed to estimate its tidal quantity parameter (Q) to be ˜106, which was poorly constrained by observations. However, tidal damping may also happen during the preceding low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase or hydrogen thermal nuclear flashes. But, in both cases, the inner companion fills its Roche lobe and probably suffers

  3. Geophysical phenomena classification by artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, M. P.; Bruckner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Space science information systems involve accessing vast data bases. There is a need for an automatic process by which properties of the whole data set can be assimilated and presented to the user. Where data are in the form of spectrograms, phenomena can be detected by pattern recognition techniques. Presented are the first results obtained by applying unsupervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) to the classification of magnetospheric wave spectra. The networks used here were a simple unsupervised Hamming network run on a PC and a more sophisticated CALM network run on a Sparc workstation. The ANN's were compared in their geophysical data recognition performance. CALM networks offer such qualities as fast learning, superiority in generalizing, the ability to continuously adapt to changes in the pattern set, and the possibility to modularize the network to allow the inter-relation between phenomena and data sets. This work is the first step toward an information system interface being developed at Sussex, the Whole Information System Expert (WISE). Phenomena in the data are automatically identified and provided to the user in the form of a data occurrence morphology, the Whole Information System Data Occurrence Morphology (WISDOM), along with relationships to other parameters and phenomena.

  4. Reduplication phenomena: body, mind and archetype.

    PubMed

    Garner, J

    2000-09-01

    The many biological and few psychodynamic explanations of reduplicative syndromes tend to have paralleled the dualism of the phenomenon with organic theories concentrating on form and dynamic theories emphasising content. This paper extends the contribution of psychoanalytic thinking to an elucidation of the form of the delusion. Literature on clinical and aetiological aspects of reduplicative phenomena is reviewed alongside a brief examination of psychoanalytic models not overtly related to these phenomena. The human experience of doubles as universal archetype is considered. There is an obvious aetiological role for brain lesions in delusional misidentifications, but psychological symptoms in an individual can rarely be reduced to an organic disorder. The splitting and doubling which occurs in the phenomena have resonances in cultural mythology and in theories from different schools of psychodynamic thought. For the individual patient and doctor, it is a diverting but potentially empty debate to endeavour to draw strict divisions between what is physical and what is psychological although both need to be investigated. Nevertheless, in patients in whom there is clear evidence of an organic contribution to aetiology a psychodynamic understanding may serve to illuminate the patient's experience. Organic brain disease or serious functional illness predispose to regression to earlier modes of archetypical and primitive thinking with concretization of the metaphorical and mythological world. Psychoanalytic models have a contribution in describing the form as well as the content of reduplicative phenomena.

  5. Geophysical phenomena classification by artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, M. P.; Bruckner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Space science information systems involve accessing vast data bases. There is a need for an automatic process by which properties of the whole data set can be assimilated and presented to the user. Where data are in the form of spectrograms, phenomena can be detected by pattern recognition techniques. Presented are the first results obtained by applying unsupervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) to the classification of magnetospheric wave spectra. The networks used here were a simple unsupervised Hamming network run on a PC and a more sophisticated CALM network run on a Sparc workstation. The ANN's were compared in their geophysical data recognition performance. CALM networks offer such qualities as fast learning, superiority in generalizing, the ability to continuously adapt to changes in the pattern set, and the possibility to modularize the network to allow the inter-relation between phenomena and data sets. This work is the first step toward an information system interface being developed at Sussex, the Whole Information System Expert (WISE). Phenomena in the data are automatically identified and provided to the user in the form of a data occurrence morphology, the Whole Information System Data Occurrence Morphology (WISDOM), along with relationships to other parameters and phenomena.

  6. BCS quantum critical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Theoretically, we recently showed that the scaling relation between the transition temperature T c and the superfluid density at zero temperature n s (0) might exhibit a parabolic pattern: Tc\\propto \\sqrt {ns(0)} (Tao Y., Sci. Rep., 6 (2016) 23863). It is significantly different from the linear scaling described by Homes' law, which is well known as a mean-field result. More recently, Božović et al. have observed such a parabolic scaling in the overdoped copper oxides with a sufficiently low transition temperature T c (Božović I. et al., Nature, 536 (2016) 309). They further point out that this experimental finding is incompatible with the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) description. Here we report that if T c is sufficiently low, applying the renormalization group approach into the BCS action at zero temperature will naturally lead to the parabolic scaling. Our result indicates that when T c sufficiently approaches zero, quantum fluctuations will be overwhelmingly amplified so that the mean-field approximation may break down at zero temperature.

  7. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  8. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    2010-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS state contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as to the geometry at the Planck scale.In the second part we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multi-centered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  9. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS states contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as such to the geometry at the Planck scale. In the second part, we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multicentered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  10. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Sindo

    1996-10-01

    An extremely useful guide to the theory and applications of transport phenomena in materials processing This book defines the unique role that transport phenomena play in materials processing and offers a graphic, comprehensive treatment unlike any other book on the subject. The two parts of the text are, in fact, two useful books. Part I is a very readable introduction to fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer for materials engineers and anyone not yet thoroughly familiar with the subject. It includes governing equations and boundary conditions particularly useful for studying materials processing. For mechanical and chemical engineers, and anyone already familiar with transport phenomena, Part II covers the many specific applications to materials processing, including a brief description of various materials processing technologies. Readable and unencumbered by mathematical manipulations (most of which are allocated to the appendixes), this book is also a useful text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level courses in materials, mechanical, and chemical engineering. It includes hundreds of photographs of materials processing in action, single and composite figures of computer simulation, handy charts for problem solving, and more. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing: * Describes eight key materials processing technologies, including crystal growth, casting, welding, powder and fiber processing, bulk and surface heat treating, and semiconductor device fabrication * Covers the latest advances in the field, including recent results of computer simulation and flow visualization * Presents special boundary conditions for transport phenomena in materials processing * Includes charts that summarize commonly encountered boundary conditions and step-by-step procedures for problem solving * Offers a unique derivation of governing equations that leads to both overall and differential balance equations * Provides a list of publicly available computer

  11. Beam-Material Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Cerutti, F.

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high-intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target, and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and environment in challenging current and future applications.

  12. Peer-Related Social Interactions of Developmentally Delayed Young Children: Development and Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Weinhouse, Ellen

    1984-01-01

    A short-term longitudinal study of the peer-related social interactions of 111 developmentally delayed toddlers and preschool children was carried out. Results suggested the existence of unusually marked deficits in peer interactions. Possible contributing factors were discussed. (Author/RH)

  13. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  14. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  15. Physical and Relational Aggression in Young Children: The Role of Mother-Child Interactional Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Holly N.; Menna, Rosanne

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between the quality of parent-child interactions, specifically interactional synchrony (IS), and physical and relational aggression in young children. Seventy-three children (3-6 years; 44 males, 29 females) and their mothers participated in this study. The children's level of aggression was assessed through…

  16. Peer-Related Social Interactions of Developmentally Delayed Young Children: Development and Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Weinhouse, Ellen

    1984-01-01

    A short-term longitudinal study of the peer-related social interactions of 111 developmentally delayed toddlers and preschool children was carried out. Results suggested the existence of unusually marked deficits in peer interactions. Possible contributing factors were discussed. (Author/RH)

  17. Physical and Relational Aggression in Young Children: The Role of Mother-Child Interactional Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Holly N.; Menna, Rosanne

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between the quality of parent-child interactions, specifically interactional synchrony (IS), and physical and relational aggression in young children. Seventy-three children (3-6 years; 44 males, 29 females) and their mothers participated in this study. The children's level of aggression was assessed through…

  18. Politico-Military Relations, a Basis for Military Interaction between Argentina and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    POLITICO -MILITARY RELATIONS, A BASIS FOR MILITARY INTERACTION BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND THE UNITED STATES N IN w Fn STRATEGY AND CAMPAIGN DEPARTMENT...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classificationi Politico -Military Relations, A...America. Politico -Military relations. civil-military relations, military coups. military to military relations. South American democracy -con- 𔄃

  19. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  20. Undergraduates' understanding of cardiovascular phenomena.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joel A; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Modell, Harold I; Cliff, William; Horwitz, Barbara; McHale, Philip; Richardson, Daniel; Silverthorn, Dee; Williams, Stephen; Whitescarver, Shirley

    2002-12-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the students' answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the students' inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  1. Comprehending emergent systems phenomena through direct-manipulation animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Priscilla Abel

    This study seeks to understand the type of interaction mode that best supports learning and comprehension of emergent systems phenomena. Given that the literature has established that students hold robust misconceptions of such phenomena, this study investigates the influence of using three types of interaction; speed-manipulation animation (SMN), post-manipulation animation (PMA) and direct-manipulation animation (DMA) for increasing comprehension and testing transfer of the phenomena, by looking at the effect of simultaneous interaction of haptic and visual channels on long term and working memories when seeking to comprehend emergent phenomena. The questions asked were: (1) Does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool (i.e., SMA, PMA or DMA), improve students' mental model construction of systems, thus increasing comprehension of this scientific concept? And (2) does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, give the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which can then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios? In an empirical study undergraduate and graduate students were asked to participate in one of three experimental conditions: SMA, PMA, or DMA. The results of the study found that it was the participants of the SMA treatment condition that had the most improvement in post-test scores. Students' understanding of the phenomena increased most when they used a dynamic model with few interactive elements (i.e., start, stop, and speed) that allowed for real time visualization of one's interaction on the phenomena. Furthermore, no indication was found that the learning of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, gave the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which could then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios

  2. Electrokinetic phenomena and dielectrophoresis in charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. P.; Karttunen, Mikko; Yu, K. W.; Dong, L.

    2003-03-01

    AC electrokinetic phenomena, i.e., electrorotation, dielectrophoresis and traveling wave dielectrophoresis, have gained an increasing amount of attention. This is due to their wide range of applications from cancer research to identifying and separating parasites, cell populations and viruses, and even to design of nanomotors. Despite the number of applications, there is need for a theory that treats the different aspects of electrokinetic phenomena on an equal footing starting from the general underlying physical principles. Here, we present a theoretical study of dielectrophoretic (DEP) crossover spectrum of two polarizable particles under the action of a nonuniform AC electric field. For two approaching particles, the mutual polarization interaction yields a change in their respective dipole moments, and hence, in the DEP crossover spectrum. We use the multiple image method to study the induced polarization effects and using spectral representation theory, an analytic expression for the DEP force is derived. Our results shows that the mutual polarization effects can change the crossover frequency at which the DEP force changes sign. The results are in agreement with recent experimental observations. Importantly, this approach goes beyond the standard theory and helps to clarify the important question of the underlying polarization mechanisms. The extension to dense systems and relation to electrorotation is discussed.

  3. Interface-Driven Phenomena in Solids: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2016-05-04

    The study of materials interfaces dates back over a century. In solid systems and from an engineering perspective, free surfaces and internal (grain and/or phase) boundaries influence a wide range of properties, such as thermal, electrical and optical transport, and mechanical ones. The properties and the role of interfaces has been discussed extensively in various reviews such as by Sutton and Balluffi. As the characteristic feature size of a materials system (i.e., grain size) is decreased to the nanometer scale, interface-driven physics is expected to dominate due to the increased density of such planar defects. Moreover, interfacial attributes, thermodynamics, andmore » mobility play a key role in phase transformations, such as solidification dynamics and structural transitions in solids, and in homogenization and microstructural evolution processes, such as grain growth, coarsening, and recrystallization. In summary, the set of articles published in this special topic titled: “Interface-Driven Phenomena in Solids: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Chemistry” covers topics related to microstructure evolution, segregation/adsorption phenomena and interface interactions with other materials defects.« less

  4. Interface-Driven Phenomena in Solids: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2016-05-04

    The study of materials interfaces dates back over a century. In solid systems and from an engineering perspective, free surfaces and internal (grain and/or phase) boundaries influence a wide range of properties, such as thermal, electrical and optical transport, and mechanical ones. The properties and the role of interfaces has been discussed extensively in various reviews such as by Sutton and Balluffi. As the characteristic feature size of a materials system (i.e., grain size) is decreased to the nanometer scale, interface-driven physics is expected to dominate due to the increased density of such planar defects. Moreover, interfacial attributes, thermodynamics, and mobility play a key role in phase transformations, such as solidification dynamics and structural transitions in solids, and in homogenization and microstructural evolution processes, such as grain growth, coarsening, and recrystallization. In summary, the set of articles published in this special topic titled: “Interface-Driven Phenomena in Solids: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Chemistry” covers topics related to microstructure evolution, segregation/adsorption phenomena and interface interactions with other materials defects.

  5. Interface-Driven Phenomena in Solids: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2016-05-04

    The study of materials interfaces dates back over a century. In solid systems and from an engineering perspective, free surfaces and internal (grain and/or phase) boundaries influence a wide range of properties, such as thermal, electrical and optical transport, and mechanical ones. The properties and the role of interfaces has been discussed extensively in various reviews such as by Sutton and Balluffi. As the characteristic feature size of a materials system (i.e., grain size) is decreased to the nanometer scale, interface-driven physics is expected to dominate due to the increased density of such planar defects. Moreover, interfacial attributes, thermodynamics, and mobility play a key role in phase transformations, such as solidification dynamics and structural transitions in solids, and in homogenization and microstructural evolution processes, such as grain growth, coarsening, and recrystallization. In summary, the set of articles published in this special topic titled: “Interface-Driven Phenomena in Solids: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Chemistry” covers topics related to microstructure evolution, segregation/adsorption phenomena and interface interactions with other materials defects.

  6. Dopamine/adenosine interactions involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce

    2009-12-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) is involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation. Accumbens DA depletions reduce the tendency of rats to work for food, and alter effort-related choice, but leave other aspects of food motivation and appetite intact. DA and adenosine receptors interact to regulate effort-related processes. Adenosine A(2A) antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D(2) antagonists on effort-related choice, and intra-accumbens injections of a adenosine A(2A) agonist produce effects that are similar to those produced by accumbens DA depletion or antagonism. These studies have implications for understanding the neurochemical interactions that underlie activational aspects of motivation.

  7. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  8. Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tonomura, Akira

    2011-05-06

    Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

  9. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  10. Interactions of two identical wave trains with a relative separation angle of 24°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuxiang; Liu, Dianyong; Liu, Wei; Dong, Guohai; Perlin, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Interactions between two identical monochromatic wave trains with a relative separation angle of 24° were experimentally investigated in a well-designed `X' configuration. Wave trains with different amplitudes and frequencies were generated. The results demonstrated that the interaction was strongly dependent on both wave amplitude and frequency. For nonbreaking and lower-frequency cases, the wave trains can approximately reestablish their initial state following the interaction. However, for larger waves, the interaction was enhanced, distorting the surfaces significantly - the wave trains were no longer two-dimensional after the encounter. During the interaction process, there was an obvious increase in wave height, reaching a maximum amplification in the middle of the interaction region that was approximately 1.55 times the initial height. Furthermore, the images captured by high-speed cameras illustrated that two wave trains entered the interaction region at the same time and then merged during the interaction process, resulting in an increase in wave amplitude. The combined wave crest was initially composed of two straight segments with a relative angle of 24° and gradually morphed into a single segment as is evident in the plan view. The wave then broke in the downstream, still within the interaction region, exhibiting a crescent pattern along the crest.

  11. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  12. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  13. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation.

    PubMed

    Endedijk, H M; Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Cillessen, A H N; Hunnius, S

    2017-04-01

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children's interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power) were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. HPA Axis Genes, and Their Interaction with Childhood Maltreatment, are Related to Cortisol Levels and Stress-Related Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Lotte; Milaneschi, Yuri; Vinkers, Christiaan H; van Hemert, Albert M; van Velzen, Laura; Schmaal, Lianne; Penninx, Brenda Wjh

    2017-06-07

    Stress responses are controlled by the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal (HPA)-axis and maladaptive stress responses are associated with the onset and maintenance of stress-related disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Genes that play a role in the HPA-axis regulation may likely contribute to the relation between relevant neurobiological substrates and stress-related disorders. Therefore, we performed gene-wide analyses for 30 a priori literature-based genes involved in HPA-axis regulation in 2014 subjects (34% male; mean age: 42.5) to study the relations with lifetime MDD diagnosis, cortisol awakening response, and dexamethasone suppression test (DST) levels (subsample N=1472) and hippocampal and amygdala volume (3T MR images; subsample N=225). Additionally, gene by childhood maltreatment (CM) interactions were investigated. Gene-wide significant results were found for dexamethasone suppression (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, POU1F1, AKR1D1), hippocampal volume (CYP17A1, CYP11A1, HSD3B2, PROP1, AVPRA1, SRD5A1), amygdala volume (POMC, CRH, HSD3B2), and lifetime MDD diagnosis (FKBP5 and CRH), all permutation p-values<0.05. Interactions with CM were found for several genes; the strongest interactions were found for NR3C2, where the minor allele of SNP rs17581262 was related to smaller hippocampal volume, smaller amygdala volume, higher DST levels, and higher odds of MDD diagnosis only in participants with CM. As hypothesized, several HPA-axis genes are associated with stress-related endophenotypes including cortisol response and reduced brain volumes. Furthermore, we found a pleiotropic interaction between CM and the mineralocorticoid receptor gene, suggesting that this gene plays an important moderating role in stress and stress-related disorders.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 5 July 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.118.

  15. Animal network phenomena: insights from triadic games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Sherratt, Tom N.

    Games of animal conflict in networks rely heavily on computer simulation because analysis is difficult, the degree of difficulty increasing sharply with the size of the network. For this reason, virtually the entire analytical literature on evolutionary game theory has assumed either dyadic interaction or a high degree of symmetry, or both. Yet we cannot rely exclusively on computer simulation in the study of any complex system. So the study of triadic interactions has an important role to play, because triads are both the simplest groups in which asymmetric network phenomena can be studied and the groups beyond dyads in which analysis of population games is most likely to be tractable, especially when allowing for intrinsic variation. Here we demonstrate how such analyses can illuminate a variety of behavioral phenomena within networks, including coalition formation, eavesdropping (the strategic observation of contests between neighbors) and victory displays (which are performed by the winners of contests but not by the losers). In particular, we show that eavesdropping acts to lower aggression thresholds compared to games without it, and that victory displays to bystanders will be most intense when there is little difference in payoff between dominating an opponent and not subordinating.

  16. Animal network phenomena: insights from triadic games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Sherratt, Tom N.

    Games of animal conflict in networks rely heavily on computer simulation because analysis is difficult, the degree of difficulty increasing sharply with the size of the network. For this reason, virtually the entire analytical literature on evolutionary game theory has assumed either dyadic interaction or a high degree of symmetry, or both. Yet we cannot rely exclusively on computer simulation in the study of any complex system. So the study of triadic interactions has an important role to play, because triads are both the simplest groups in which asymmetric network phenomena can be studied and the groups beyond dyads in which analysis of population games is most likely to be tractable, especially when allowing for intrinsic variation. Here we demonstrate how such analyses can illuminate a variety of behavioral phenomena within networks, including coalition formation, eavesdropping (the strategic observation of contests between neighbors) and victory displays (which are performed by the winners of contests but not by the losers). In particular, we show that eavesdropping acts to lower aggression thresholds compared to games without it, and that victory displays to bystanders will be most intense when there is little difference in payoff between dominating an opponent and not subordinating.

  17. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  18. Reciprocal and Complementary Sibling Interactions: Relations with Socialization Outcomes in the Kindergarten Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Harrist, Amanda W.; Achacoso, Joseph A.; John, Aesha; Pettit, Gregory S.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings To examine associations between sibling interaction patterns and later social outcomes in single- and two-parent families, 113 kindergarteners took part in naturalistic observations at home with siblings, classmates participated in sociometric interviews, and teachers completed behavior ratings. Sibling interactions were coded using a newly-developed 39-item checklist, and proportions of complementary and reciprocal sibling interactions computed. Complementarity occurred more among dyads where kindergartners were with toddler or infant siblings than among kindergartners with older or near-age younger siblings. Higher levels of complementarity predicted lower levels of internalizing but were not related to externalizing problems. Kindergartners’ sociometric status in the classroom differed as a function of sibling interaction patterns, with neglected and controversial children experiencing less complementarity/more reciprocity than popular, average, and rejected children. Finally, there was some evidence for differential associations of sibling interaction patterns with social outcomes for children in single- versus two-parent families: regressions testing interaction effects show sibling reciprocity positively associated with kindergartners’ social skills only in single-parent families, and complementary sibling interactions positively related to internalizing problems only in two-parent families. Implications for Practice Those working with divorcing or other single-parent families might consider sibling interactions as a potential target for social skill building. PMID:26005311

  19. Seismoelectric Phenomena in Fluid-Saturated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Block, G I; Harris, J G

    2005-04-22

    Seismoelectric phenomena in sediments arise from acoustic wave-induced fluid motion in the pore space, which perturbs the electrostatic equilibrium of the electric double layer on the grain surfaces. Experimental techniques and the apparatus built to study this electrokinetic (EK) effect are described and outcomes for studies of seismoelectric phenomena in loose glass microspheres and medium-grain sand are presented. By varying the NaCl concentration in the pore fluid, we measured the conductivity dependence of two kinds of EK behavior: (1) the electric fields generated within the samples by the passage of transmitted acoustic waves, and (2) the electromagnetic wave produced at the fluid-sediment interface by the incident acoustic wave. Both phenomena are caused by relative fluid motion in the sediment pores--this feature is characteristic of poroelastic (Biot) media, but not predicted by either viscoelastic fluid or solid models. A model of plane-wave reflection from a fluid-sediment interface using EK-Biot theory leads to theoretical predictions that compare well to the experimental data for both sand and glass microspheres.

  20. Stability and restoration phenomena in competitive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uechi, Lisa; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    A conservation law along with stability, recovering phenomena, and characteristic patterns of a nonlinear dynamical system have been studied and applied to physical, biological, and ecological systems. In our previous study, we proposed a system of symmetric 2n-dimensional conserved nonlinear differential equations. In this paper, competitive systems described by a 2-dimensional nonlinear dynamical (ND) model with external perturbations are applied to population cycles and recovering phenomena of systems from microbes to mammals. The famous 10-year cycle of population density of Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare is numerically analyzed. We find that a nonlinear dynamical system with a conservation law is stable and generates a characteristic rhythm (cycle) of population density, which we call the standard rhythm of a nonlinear dynamical system. The stability and restoration phenomena are strongly related to a conservation law and the balance of a system. The standard rhythm of population density is a manifestation of the survival of the fittest to the balance of a nonlinear dynamical system.

  1. Maternal ADHD: Parent-Child Interactions and Relations with Child Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisser, Alison R.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how ADHD symptoms in mothers of children with ADHD relate to their behavior during parent-child interactions and to their children's disruptive behavior. Findings indicated that mothers' retrospective self-ratings of ADHD symptoms were related to their present negativity during parent-led play. Mothers' self-ratings of current…

  2. 17 CFR 232.406T - Temporary rule related to Interactive Data Files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary rule related to..., 2014. After these dates, an Interactive Data File is subject to the same liability provisions as the Related Official Filing. This temporary section will expire on October 31, 2014. Effective Date Note: At...

  3. 17 CFR 232.406T - Temporary rule related to Interactive Data Files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary rule related to..., 2014. After these dates, an Interactive Data File is subject to the same liability provisions as the Related Official Filing. This temporary section will expire on October 31, 2014. Effective Date Note: At...

  4. Interactive Links between Relational Aggression, Theory of Mind, and Moral Disengagement among Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Voulgaridou, Ioanna; Mandrali, Marianna; Parousidou, Chrysoula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible interactive links between theory of mind (ToM), moral disengagement and relational aggression, using a moderated mediation analysis, with gender as a moderator, in a sample of 120 Greek preadolescents. Results indicated that relational aggression was significantly positively associated with moral…

  5. Human Relations Skills in Individual Interactions for the Occupational Specialist. Competency-Based Modular Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, Juanita B.; Boland, Jeanne M.

    This self-instructional module, one volume of a series of competency-based modules in human relations skills for occupational specialists, is designed to help the specialist interact effectively with a variety of students, teachers, co-workers and employees. Other modules in this set of three are Level I Human Relations Skills for the Occupational…

  6. Interactive Links between Relational Aggression, Theory of Mind, and Moral Disengagement among Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Voulgaridou, Ioanna; Mandrali, Marianna; Parousidou, Chrysoula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible interactive links between theory of mind (ToM), moral disengagement and relational aggression, using a moderated mediation analysis, with gender as a moderator, in a sample of 120 Greek preadolescents. Results indicated that relational aggression was significantly positively associated with moral…

  7. Hydrodynamic interactions between two forced objects of arbitrary shape. II. Relative translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Diamant, Haim; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    We study the relative translation of two arbitrarily shaped objects, caused by their hydrodynamic interaction as they are forced through a viscous fluid in the limit of zero Reynolds number. It is well known that in the case of two rigid spheres in an unbounded fluid, the hydrodynamic interaction does not produce relative translation. More generally, such an effective pair-interaction vanishes in configurations with spatial inversion symmetry; for example, an enantiomorphic pair in mirror image positions has no relative translation. We show that the breaking of inversion symmetry by boundaries of the system accounts for the interactions between two spheres in confined geometries, as observed in experiments. The same general principle also provides new predictions for interactions in other object configurations near obstacles. We examine the time-dependent relative translation of two self-aligning objects, extending the numerical analysis of our preceding publication [Goldfriend, Diamant, and Witten, Phys. Fluids 27, 123303 (2015)], 10.1063/1.4936894. The interplay between the orientational interaction and the translational one, in most cases, leads over time to repulsion between the two objects. The repulsion is qualitatively different for self-aligning objects compared to the more symmetric case of uniform prolate spheroids. The separation between the two objects increases with time t as t1 /3 in the former case, and more strongly, as t , in the latter.

  8. Relative abundance of an invasive alien plant affects insect-flower interaction networks in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Jane C.; Casey, Leanne M.

    2014-02-01

    Invasive alien flowering plants may affect native plant pollinator interactions and have knock on impacts on populations of native plants and animals. The magnitude of these impacts, however, may be modified by the relative abundance of the invasive plant and the number of flowers it presents.We tested this by examining the structure of insect-flower interaction networks in six sites with increasing levels of invasion by Rhododendron ponticum in Ireland.Neither flower-visiting insect abundance, species richness nor diversity were related to R. ponticum flower abundance, but the composition of insect communities was. The total number of flowers in a site increased with the relative abundance of R. ponticum flowers but the number of co-flowering native plant species in these sites was low (<6), making interaction networks relatively small.As a result, changes in interaction network properties (connectance, interaction evenness and network level specialisation), which correlated with R. ponticum flower abundance, were a result of the small network size rather than due to changes in the resilience of networks.Overall, we conclude that the impacts of invasive alien plants on native plant-pollinator interactions are not only species specific, but site specific, according to the abundance of flowers produced by both the invasive and the native plants.

  9. Single event phenomena: A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, W. E.; Coss, J. R.

    1989-04-01

    Single event phenomena (SEP) are effects resulting from a single particle inducing a significant response in an integrated circuit. SEP are of greatest concern to spacecraft designers but are becoming of concern to avionics and large earth-bound electronic systems due to the continual reduction in size (which increases SEP sensitivity) of circuit elements. The phenomena include soft error and multiple errors in memory cells or logic latches, latchup, MOSFET power device burnout, MNOS punch-through and transients. Cyclotron and Van de Graaff accelerators are used to produce heavy ions, protons and neutrons which induce SEP effects. Methods of testing are described. Solutions to SEP are varied, but include parts substitutions or redesign and software solutions which will be described.

  10. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    PubMed

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  11. Statistical phenomena in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1984-09-01

    Particle beams are subject to a variety of apparently distinct statistical phenomena such as intrabeam scattering, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, coherent instabilities, and radiofrequency noise diffusion. In fact, both the physics and mathematical description of these mechanisms are quite similar, with the notion of correlation as a powerful unifying principle. In this presentation we will attempt to provide both a physical and a mathematical basis for understanding the wide range of statistical phenomena that have been discussed. In the course of this study the tools of the trade will be introduced, e.g., the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, noise theory, correlation functions, and beam transfer functions. Although a major concern will be to provide equations for analyzing machine design, the primary goal is to introduce a basic set of physical concepts having a very broad range of applicability.

  12. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  13. New phenomena searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-01

    The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Diverse Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tensor calculus is applied to the formulation of mathematical models of diverse phenomena. Aeronautics, fluid dynamics, and cosmology are among the areas of application. The feasibility of combining tensor methods and computer capability to formulate problems is demonstrated. The techniques described are an attempt to simplify the formulation of mathematical models by reducing the modeling process to a series of routine operations, which can be performed either manually or by computer.

  15. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  16. The early development of executive function and its relation to social interaction: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Executive function (EF) refers to the ability to execute appropriate actions and to inhibit inappropriate actions for the attainment of a specific goal. Research has shown that this ability develops rapidly during the preschool years. Recently, it has been proposed that research on EF should consider the importance of social interaction. In this article, recent evidence regarding the early development of EF and its relation to social interaction has been reviewed. Research consistently showed that social interaction can influence EF skills in young children. However, the development of EF may facilitate the cognitive skills that are important for social interaction. Taken together, there might be functional dependency between the development of EF and social interaction. PMID:24808885

  17. Age and work environment characteristics in relation to sleep: Additive, interactive and curvilinear effects.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2016-05-01

    Although additive combinations of age and work environment characteristics have been found to predict sleep impairment, possible age x work environment interactions have been largely disregarded. The present study examined linear and curvilinear interactions of age with work environment measures in relation to sleep quality and duration. Survey data were collected from offshore day-shift personnel (N = 901). Main effects and interactions of the age terms with work environment measures (job demand, control, and social support, physical environment and strenuous work) were evaluated. Sleep duration was predicted by a curvilinear interaction, age(2) x job demand (p < .005), and by the age x social support interaction (p < .002); sleep quality was predicted by age x job demand (p < .002). Job control and physical environment showed significant additive effects. At a time when older employees are encouraged to remain in the workforce, the findings serve to increase understanding of how ageing and work demands jointly contribute to sleep impairment.

  18. The early development of executive function and its relation to social interaction: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Executive function (EF) refers to the ability to execute appropriate actions and to inhibit inappropriate actions for the attainment of a specific goal. Research has shown that this ability develops rapidly during the preschool years. Recently, it has been proposed that research on EF should consider the importance of social interaction. In this article, recent evidence regarding the early development of EF and its relation to social interaction has been reviewed. Research consistently showed that social interaction can influence EF skills in young children. However, the development of EF may facilitate the cognitive skills that are important for social interaction. Taken together, there might be functional dependency between the development of EF and social interaction.

  19. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    PubMed

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  20. Universal relations for the two-dimensional spin-1/2 Fermi gas with contact interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente, Manuel; Zinner, Nikolaj T.; Moelmer, Klaus

    2011-12-15

    We present universal relations for a two-dimensional Fermi gas with pairwise contact interactions. The derivation of these relations is made possible by obtaining the explicit form of a generalized function--selector--in the momentum representation. The selector implements the short-distance boundary condition between two fermions in a straightforward manner and leads to simple derivations of the universal relations, in the spirit of Tan's original method for the three-dimensional gas.

  1. Asymmetric current-phase relation due to spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2013-12-04

    We theoretically study the current-phase relation in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. In the nanowire, the impurity scattering with strong SO interaction is taken into account using the random matrix theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the Josephson current I and phase difference φ between the superconductors satisfy the relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In the presence of magnetic field along the nanowire, the interplay between the SO interaction and Zeeman effect breaks the current-phase relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In this case, we show that the critical current depends on the current direction, which qualitatively agrees with recent experimental findings.

  2. Prediction of the Ebola virus infection related human genes using protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuanming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-03-10

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes.

  3. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  4. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  5. Uncommon corrosion phenomena of archaeological bronze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingo, G. M.; de Caro, T.; Riccucci, C.; Khosroff, S.

    2006-06-01

    In the framework of the EFESTUS project (funded by the European Commission, contract No. ICA3-CT-2002-10030) the corrosion products of a large number of archaeological bronze artefacts are investigated by means of the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (OM) and tentative correlation of their nature with the chemical composition of the artefacts and the burial context is proposed. The results provide good insight into the corrosion layers and evidence in some bronze Roman coins and artefacts; the occurrence of uncommon corrosion phenomena that give rise to the formation of a yellowish-green complex chlorine-phosphate of lead (pyromorphite, (PbCl)Pb4(PO4)3) and of a gold-like thick layer of an iron and copper sulphide (chalcopyrite, CuFeS2). The micro-chemical and micro-structural results show that the coins were buried in a soil enriched in phosphorus for the accidental presence of a large amount of decomposing fragments of bones or in an anaerobic and humus rich soil where the chalcopyrite layer has been produced via the interaction between the iron of the soil, the copper of the coin and the sulphur produced by the decomposition of organic matter in an almost oxygen free environment. Finally, some unusual periodic corrosion phenomena occurring in high tin bronze mirrors found at Zama (Tunisia) are described.

  6. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  7. Phenomena and Diosignes of Aratous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoloupis, S. I.

    2013-01-01

    Aratous (305-240B.C.) was a singular intellectual, writer and poet which engage himself to compose a very interesting astronomical poet, using the "Dactylous sixstage' style, the formal style of the ancient Greek Epic poetry. This astronomic poem of Aratous "Phenomena and Diosignes" became very favorite reading during the Alexandrine, the Romman and the Byzandin eras as well and had received many praises from significant poets and particularly from Hipparchous and from Theonas from Alexandria, an astronomer of 4rth century A.C.(in Greeks)

  8. Interpretation of cell culture phenomena.

    PubMed

    Vierck, J L; Dodson, M V

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses the dilemma of interpreting unusual or abnormal phenomena seen in cell cultures and is not intended to address the statistical design of experiments. Problems that can be encountered when growing cells in experimental situations include low or decreasing cell numbers, abnormal cell morphology, microbial contamination, and detachment of the cell monolayer. If any of these situations occur, it is not realistic to proceed with data analysis until the problem is corrected. The best policy is to attempt to standardize all types of cultures used for analysis and to avoid using any cultures that display atypical characteristics.

  9. The Shuttle era - A challenge to the earth scientist. [observations of land, ocean and atmosphere phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, W. R.; Wilmarth, V. R.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite observations of large-scale earth features and phenomena, with either instruments or astronauts, are discussed on the basis of earlier experience (mainly Skylab). Off-nadir views and photographs by astronauts have provided valuable supplements to instrument nadir views, providing cross-checks through remote sensing at different angles, different altitudes, and in different seasons. New information on plate tectonics, global cooling/drying trends, global oceanographic data (changing positions of major ocean current patterns, evolution of warm and cold eddies and their relation to sea temperatures and concentrations of marine fauna, location of internal sea waves, interactions between ocean currents and atmosphere, plankton blooms), storm development, snow cover patterns, lake and sea ice growth, sand-dune patterns, desert storms blown out to sea, effects of grazing and swidden agriculture, and other earth features and phenomena are surveyed.

  10. The Shuttle era - A challenge to the earth scientist. [observations of land, ocean and atmosphere phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, W. R.; Wilmarth, V. R.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite observations of large-scale earth features and phenomena, with either instruments or astronauts, are discussed on the basis of earlier experience (mainly Skylab). Off-nadir views and photographs by astronauts have provided valuable supplements to instrument nadir views, providing cross-checks through remote sensing at different angles, different altitudes, and in different seasons. New information on plate tectonics, global cooling/drying trends, global oceanographic data (changing positions of major ocean current patterns, evolution of warm and cold eddies and their relation to sea temperatures and concentrations of marine fauna, location of internal sea waves, interactions between ocean currents and atmosphere, plankton blooms), storm development, snow cover patterns, lake and sea ice growth, sand-dune patterns, desert storms blown out to sea, effects of grazing and swidden agriculture, and other earth features and phenomena are surveyed.

  11. Interaction between droplets in a ternary microemulsion evaluated by the relative form factor method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Michihiro; Seto, Hideki; Yamada, Norifumi L.

    2007-06-15

    This paper describes the concentration dependence of the interaction between water droplets coated by a surfactant monolayer using the contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering technique. In the first part, we explain the idea of how to extract a relatively model free structure factor from the scattering data, which is called the relative form factor method. In the second part, the experimental results for the shape of the droplets (form factor) are described. In the third part the relatively model free structure factor is shown, and finally the concentration dependence of the interaction potential between droplets is discussed. The result indicates the validity of the relative form factor method, and the importance of the estimation of the model free structure factor to discuss the nature of structure formation in microemulsion systems.

  12. Teaching wave phenomena via biophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel; Robbins, Mark; Leheny, Robert; Wonnell, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Over the past several years we have developed a two-semester second-year physics course sequence for students in the biosciences, tailored in part to the needs of undergraduate biophysics majors. One semester, ``Biological Physics,'' is based on the book of that name by P. Nelson. This talk will focus largely on the other semester, ``Wave Phenomena with Biophysical Applications,'' where we provide a novel introduction to the physics of waves, primarily through the study of experimental probes used in the biosciences that depend on the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. Topic covered include: Fourier analysis, sound and hearing, diffraction - culminating in an analysis of x-ray fiber diffraction and its use in the determination of the structure of DNA - geometrical and physical optics, the physics of modern light microscopy, NMR and MRI. Laboratory exercises tailored to this course will also be described.

  13. Certain relativistic phenomena in crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee-Seng, Lim

    1980-01-01

    Relativistic unsteady phenomena are established for a crystalline medium with unaligned sets of permittivity and permeability principal axes, but incorporating a compounded uniaxiality about some nonprincipal direction. All effects originate from a suddenly activated, arbitrarily oriented, maintained line current conducted with a finite velocity v. Integral representations studied in another paper (Chee-Seng) are applied. The original coordinate system is subjected to a series of rotational and translational, scaled and unscaled transformations. No specific coordinate frame is strictly adhered to. Instead, it is often expedient and advantageous to exploit several reference frames simultaneously in the course of the analysis and interpretations. The electric field is directly related to a net scalar field Δ involving another scalar Ψ and its complement Ψ¯ which can be deduced from Ψ; Ψ and Ψ¯ are associated with two expanding, inclined ellipsoidal wavefronts ξ and ξ¯; these are cocentered at the current origin and touch each other twice along the uniaxis. Elsewhere, ξ leads ξ¯. For a source current faster than ξ:vt ∈ extξ, Ψ≢0 within a finite but growing ''ice-cream cone'' domain, its nontrivial composition being χ-1/2 inside ξ and 2χ-1/2 inside part of a tangent cone from the advancing current edge vt to, and terminating at, ξ; the function χ vanishes along such a tangent cone. Alternatively, for a source current slower than ξ:vt∈ intξ, if vt is avoided, χ≳0 everywhere, while Ψ=χ-1/2 inside ξ but vanishes identically outside ξ. However, the crucial scalar field Δ depends on three separate current-velocity regimes. Over a slow regime: vt∈ intξ¯, Δ is nontrivial inside ξ wherein it is discontinuous across ξ¯. Over an intermediate regime: vt ∈ intξ extξ¯, Δ takes four distinct forms on 12 adjacent domains bounded by ξ, ξ¯ and a double-conical tangent surface linking vt to ξ¯. But for a fast regime: vt∈ ext

  14. The outcomes of most aggressive interactions among closely related bird species are asymmetric.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R; Freshwater, Cameron; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive interactions among closely related species are common, and can play an important role as a selective pressure shaping species traits and assemblages. The nature of this selective pressure depends on whether the outcomes of aggressive contests are asymmetric between species (i.e., one species is consistently dominant), yet few studies have estimated the prevalence of asymmetric versus symmetric outcomes to aggressive contests. Here we use previously published data involving 26,212 interactions between 270 species pairs of birds from 26 taxonomic families to address the question: How often are aggressive interactions among closely related bird species asymmetric? We define asymmetry using (i) the proportion of contests won by one species, and (ii) statistical tests for asymmetric outcomes of aggressive contests. We calculate these asymmetries using data summed across different sites for each species pair, and compare results to asymmetries calculated using data separated by location. We find that 80% of species pairs had aggressive outcomes where one species won 80% or more of aggressive contests. We also find that the majority of aggressive interactions among closely related species show statistically significant asymmetries, and above a sample size of 52 interactions, all outcomes are asymmetric following binomial tests. Species pairs with dominance data from multiple sites showed the same dominance relationship across locations in 93% of the species pairs. Overall, our results suggest that the outcome of aggressive interactions among closely related species are usually consistent and asymmetric, and should thus favor ecological and evolutionary strategies specific to the position of a species within a dominance hierarchy.

  15. The outcomes of most aggressive interactions among closely related bird species are asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Freshwater, Cameron; Ghalambor, Cameron K.

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive interactions among closely related species are common, and can play an important role as a selective pressure shaping species traits and assemblages. The nature of this selective pressure depends on whether the outcomes of aggressive contests are asymmetric between species (i.e., one species is consistently dominant), yet few studies have estimated the prevalence of asymmetric versus symmetric outcomes to aggressive contests. Here we use previously published data involving 26,212 interactions between 270 species pairs of birds from 26 taxonomic families to address the question: How often are aggressive interactions among closely related bird species asymmetric? We define asymmetry using (i) the proportion of contests won by one species, and (ii) statistical tests for asymmetric outcomes of aggressive contests. We calculate these asymmetries using data summed across different sites for each species pair, and compare results to asymmetries calculated using data separated by location. We find that 80% of species pairs had aggressive outcomes where one species won 80% or more of aggressive contests. We also find that the majority of aggressive interactions among closely related species show statistically significant asymmetries, and above a sample size of 52 interactions, all outcomes are asymmetric following binomial tests. Species pairs with dominance data from multiple sites showed the same dominance relationship across locations in 93% of the species pairs. Overall, our results suggest that the outcome of aggressive interactions among closely related species are usually consistent and asymmetric, and should thus favor ecological and evolutionary strategies specific to the position of a species within a dominance hierarchy. PMID:28070465

  16. Relations of Parent-Youth Interactive Exchanges to Adolescent Socioemotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutt, Rachel L.; Wang, Qi; Evans, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relations of parent-youth agreement and disagreement during a joint problem-solving task and multi-methodological indices of socioemotional outcomes in adolescents (mean age = 13). One hundred and sixty-seven parents and their adolescent children participated. Each parent-youth pair played the interactive game "Jenga", and…

  17. Accomplishing Marginalization in Bilingual Interaction: Relational Work as a Resource for the Intersubjective Construction of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Holly R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of impoliteness by Spanish-English bilingual pre-adolescents as a resource for accomplishing identities in spontaneous conversational interactions in an elementary school setting. The theoretical approach employed integrates the concept of relational work (Locher 2004; Locher and Watts 2005), which is based on Goffman's…

  18. Social Capital, Human Capital and Parent-Child Relation Quality: Interacting for Children's Educational Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Otter, Cecilia; Stenberg, Sten-Åke

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data.…

  19. Precision Communication: Interactive Computer Applications in Data-Based Public Relations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalupa, Frank B.; Trotter, Edgar P.

    To develop research capabilities among public relations professionals, a research teaching program was begun as part of an advanced undergraduate course using an online computer terminal system to analyze up-to-date field survey data. Students use an interactive computer program designed to provide a linking system of live research data and active…

  20. Effects of Message Interactivity upon Relational Maintenance Strategy in Digital Communications between Organizations and the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Zhan-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication between organizations and the public is strategically important in shaping mutual understanding and long term relationship. The primary focus of this project was to investigate the relationship between message interactivity and relational maintenance strategy in the email communication process on organization websites. At…

  1. Informant Discrepancies in Assessing Child Dysfunction Relate to Dysfunction within Mother-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Kazdin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    We examined whether mother-child discrepancies in perceived child behavior problems relate to dysfunctional interactions between mother and child and stress in the mother. Participants included 239 children (6-16 years old; 58 girls, 181 boys) referred for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior, and their mothers. Mother-child…

  2. The Relation Between Social Support, Infant Risk Status and Mother-Infant Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiring, Candice; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Mothers from inner-city, poor families with high-risk infants were interviewed when their infants were three months of age concerning sources of support (e.g., fathers, relatives, friends) and types of support received (e.g., goods, services, advice, financial support). Observations of the mother-infant interaction in a free-play setting were also…

  3. The Relations among Theory of Mind, Behavioral Inhibition, and Peer Interactions in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suway, Jenna G.; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Sussman, Amy L.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined relations among child temperament, peer interaction, and theory of mind (ToM) development. We hypothesized that: (1) children classified as behaviorally inhibited at 24 months would show less ToM understanding at 36 months in comparison to nonbehaviorally inhibited children; (2) children who displayed negative peer…

  4. Microteaching Lesson Study: Mentor Interaction Structure and Its Relation to Elementary Preservice Mathematics Teacher Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Roxanne V.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated Microteaching Lesson Study (MLS) and three possible MLS mentor interaction structures during the debriefing sessions in relation to elementary preservice teacher development of knowledge for teaching. One hundred three elementary preservice teachers enrolled in five different sections of a mathematics methods course at a…

  5. Training and Deriving Precalculus Relations: A Small-Group, Web-Interactive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Jenny; Ninness, Chris; McCuller, Glen; Rumph, Robin; Goodwin, Andrea; Kelso, Ginger; Lopez, Angie; Kelly, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    A small-group, web-interactive approach to teaching precalculus concepts was investigated. Following an online pretest, 3 participants were given a brief (15 min) presentation on the details of reciprocal math relations and how they operate on the coordinate axes. During baseline, participants were tested regarding their ability to construct…

  6. Three-wave interaction and Manley-Rowe relations in quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Erik; Zamanian, Jens; Brodin, Gert; Brodin

    2014-08-01

    The theory for nonlinear three-wave interaction in magnetized plasmas is reconsidered using quantum hydrodynamics. The general coupling coefficients are calculated for the generalized Bohm de Broglie term. It is found that the Manley-Rowe relations are fulfilled only if the form of the particle dispersive term coincides with the standard expression. The implications of our results are discussed.

  7. Social Capital, Human Capital and Parent-Child Relation Quality: Interacting for Children's Educational Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Otter, Cecilia; Stenberg, Sten-Åke

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data.…

  8. The Relations among Theory of Mind, Behavioral Inhibition, and Peer Interactions in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suway, Jenna G.; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Sussman, Amy L.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined relations among child temperament, peer interaction, and theory of mind (ToM) development. We hypothesized that: (1) children classified as behaviorally inhibited at 24 months would show less ToM understanding at 36 months in comparison to nonbehaviorally inhibited children; (2) children who displayed negative peer…

  9. A Framework for Categorizing Social Interactions Related to End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Almost half of people age 85 and older who die annually in the United States die as nursing home residents, yet because it is not always clear who is close to death, not all residents who might benefit from end-of-life care receive it. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for organizing social interactions related to…

  10. Accomplishing Marginalization in Bilingual Interaction: Relational Work as a Resource for the Intersubjective Construction of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Holly R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of impoliteness by Spanish-English bilingual pre-adolescents as a resource for accomplishing identities in spontaneous conversational interactions in an elementary school setting. The theoretical approach employed integrates the concept of relational work (Locher 2004; Locher and Watts 2005), which is based on Goffman's…

  11. Interactions of individual perceived barriers and neighbourhood destinations with obesity-related behaviours in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mackenbach, J D; Lakerveld, J; Van Lenthe, F J; Teixeira, P J; Compernolle, S; De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Charreire, H; Oppert, J-M; Bárdos, H; Glonti, K; Rutter, H; McKee, M; Nijpels, G; Brug, J

    2016-01-01

    Perceived barriers towards physical activity and healthy eating as well as local availability of opportunities (destinations in the neighbourhood) are important determinants of obesity-related behaviours in adults. Little is known, however, about how these factors interact with the behaviours. Data were analysed from 5,205 participants of the SPOTLIGHT survey, conducted in 60 neighbourhoods in urban regions of five different countries across Europe. A virtual audit was conducted to collect data on the presence of destinations in each neighbourhood. Direct associations of, and interactions between, the number of individual perceived barriers and presence of destinations with obesity-related behaviours (physical activity and dietary behaviours) were analysed using multilevel regression analyses, adjusted for key covariates. Perceiving more individual barriers towards physical activity and healthy eating was associated with lower odds of physical activity and healthy eating. The presence of destinations such as bicycle lanes, parks and supermarkets was associated with higher levels of physical activity and healthier dietary behaviours. Analyses of additive interaction terms suggested that the interaction of destinations and barriers was competitive, such that the presence of destinations influenced obesity-related behaviours most among those perceiving more barriers. These explorative findings emphasize the interest and importance of combining objective (e.g. virtual neighbourhood audit) methods and subjective (e.g. individual perceived barriers collected in a survey) to better understand how the characteristics of the residential built environment can shape obesity-related behaviours depending on individual characteristics.

  12. The Relation of Prosocial Orientation to Peer Interactions, Family Social Environment and Personality of Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Hing Keung; Cheung, Ping Chung; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relation of peer interactions, family social environment and personality to prosocial orientation in Chinese adolescents. The results indicated no sex differences in general prosocial orientation and inclination to help others, but sex differences in inclination to maintain an affective relationship and inclination to…

  13. A Framework for Categorizing Social Interactions Related to End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Almost half of people age 85 and older who die annually in the United States die as nursing home residents, yet because it is not always clear who is close to death, not all residents who might benefit from end-of-life care receive it. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for organizing social interactions related to…

  14. Appropriate Relational Messages in Direct Selling Interaction: Should Salespeople Adapt to Buyers' Communicator Style?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Jamie; Higgins, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Prescribes rules for appropriate behavior for the direct sales relationship. Suggests that sellers may not completely understand these rules. Determines that buyers prefer sellers who are trustworthy, composed, and task-oriented. Shows that sellers are well aware of buyers' preferences for task-related interaction but may overestimate the value of…

  15. Task-Related Interactions between Kindergarten Children and Their Teachers: The Role of Emotional Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thijs, Jochem T.; Koomen, Helma M. Y.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the emotional security of kindergarten children in dyadic task-related interactions with their teachers. In particular, it examined the interrelations between security, task behaviours (persistence and independence), social inhibition, and teachers' support. Participants were 79 kindergartners (mean age = 69.7 months) and their…

  16. Facial and Full-Length Ratings of Attractiveness Related to the Social Interactions of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory J.

    1985-01-01

    Aggressive and prosocial peer interactions were observed in 38 preschool-age children. Attractive girls received more prosocial and fewer aggressive advances than unattractive girls. There was no differential treatment of boys related to attractiveness. Results are discussed in relationship to possible developmental implications and their parallel…

  17. Effects of Message Interactivity upon Relational Maintenance Strategy in Digital Communications between Organizations and the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Zhan-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication between organizations and the public is strategically important in shaping mutual understanding and long term relationship. The primary focus of this project was to investigate the relationship between message interactivity and relational maintenance strategy in the email communication process on organization websites. At…

  18. Direct Observation of Maternal Sensitivity and Dyadic Interactions in the Home: Relations to Maternal Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biringen, Zeynep

    1990-01-01

    Possible relations between mothers' recollection of the degree to which they were accepted by their parents, sense of self, and perceptions of their children to mother-child interaction were studied. There was an 84 percent concordant classification between recall of parental acceptance and observationally assessed dyadic harmony classification.…

  19. Adolescents' Relational Schemas and Their Subjective Understanding of Romantic Relationship Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Justin D.; Welsh, Deborah P.; Fite, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the association between adolescents' relational schemas and their subjective understanding of interactions in the context of male-female romantic relationships. We employed an innovative multimodal methodology: the video-recall system [Welsh, D. P., & Dickson, J. W. (2005). Video-recall procedures for examining subjective…

  20. The demystification of autoscopic phenomena: experimental propositions.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Christine; Blanke, Olaf

    2005-06-01

    Autoscopic phenomena (AP) are rare, illusory visual experiences during which the subject has the impression of seeing a second own body in extrapersonal space. AP consist of out-of-body experience, autoscopic hallucination, and heautoscopy. Recent neurologic reports support the role of multisensory integration deficits of body-related information and vestibular dysfunctions in AP at the temporo-parietal junction. A caveat to test the underlying neurologic and cognitive mechanisms of AP has been their rare and spontaneous occurrence. Recent evidence linked AP to mental own-body imagery engaging brain mechanisms at the temporo-parietal junction. These recent observations open a new avenue for testing AP-related cognitive mechanisms in selected clinical and normal populations. We review evidence on several clinical syndromes (psychosis, depression, anxiety, depersonalization, body dysmorphic disorder), suggesting that some of these syndromes may relate to AP-proneness, thereby leading to testable propositions for future research on body and self processing in addition to AP.

  1. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    2000-04-20

    We have compiled a topical reference on the phenomena, experiences, experiments, and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) with specific applications to SNFP process and situations. The purpose of the compilation is to create a reference to integrate and preserve this knowledge. Decades ago, uranium and zirconium fires were commonplace at Atomic Energy Commission facilities, and good documentation of experiences is surprisingly sparse. Today, these phenomena are important to site remediation and analysis of packaging, transportation, and processing of unirradiated metal scrap and spent nuclear fuel. Our document, bearing the same title as this paper, will soon be available in the Hanford document system [Plys, et al., 2000]. This paper explains general content of our topical reference and provides examples useful throughout the DOE complex. Moreover, the methods described here can be applied to analysis of potentially pyrophoric plutonium, metal, or metal hydride compounds provided that kinetic data are available. A key feature of this paper is a set of straightforward equations and values that are immediately applicable to safety analysis.

  2. Transport phenomena in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-12

    Diffusion, that is, the irregular movement of atoms and molecules, is a universal phenomenon of mass transfer occurring in all states of matter. It is of equal importance for fundamental research and technological applications. The present review deals with the challenges of the reliable observation of these phenomena in nanoporous materials. Starting with a survey of the different variants of diffusion measurement, it highlights the potentials of "microscopic" techniques, notably the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR and the techniques of microimaging by interference microscopy (IFM) and IR microscopy (IRM). Considering ensembles of guest molecules, these techniques are able to directly record mass transfer phenomena over distances of typically micrometers. Their concerted application has given rise to the clarification of long-standing discrepancies, notably between microscopic equilibrium and macroscopic non-equilibrium measurements, and to a wealth of new information about molecular transport under confinement, hitherto often inaccessible and sometimes even unimaginable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Critical phenomena on k -booklets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We define a "k -booklet" to be a set of k semi-infinite planes with -∞ phenomena: self-avoiding random walks, the Ising model, and percolation. For k =2 , a booklet is equivalent to a single infinite lattice, and for k =1 to a semi-infinite lattice. In both these cases the systems show standard critical phenomena. This is not so for k ≥3 . Self-avoiding walks starting at y =0 show a first-order transition at a shifted critical point, with no power-behaved scaling laws. The Ising model and percolation show hybrid transitions, i.e., the scaling laws of the standard models coexist with discontinuities of the order parameter at y ≈0 , and the critical points are not shifted. In the case of the Ising model, ergodicity is already broken at T =Tc , and not only for T

  4. Toward a Molecular-Based Understanding of High-Temperature Solvation Phenomena in Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T.; Kusalik, P.G.; Simonson, J.M.

    1999-10-30

    The theoretical treatment of the solvation phenomenon of simple ions in aqueous solutions has been rather difficult, despite the apparent simplicity of the system. Long-range solvent-screened electrostatic interactions, coupled to the large variation (with state conditions) of the dielectric permittivity of water, give rise to a variety of rather complex solvation phenomena including dielectric saturation, electrostriction, and ion association. Notably, ion solvation in high-temperature/pressure aqueous solutions plays a leading role in hydrothermal chemistry, such as in the natural formation of ore deposits, the corrosion in boilers and reactors, and in high-temperature microbiology. Tremendous effort has been invested in the study of hydrothermal solutions to determine their thermodynamic, transport, and spectroscopic properties with the goal of elucidating the solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions over a wide range of state conditions. It is precisely at these conditions where our understanding and predictive capabilities are most precarious, in part, as a result of the coexistence of processes with two rather different length scales, i.e., short-ranged (solvation) and long-ranged (compressibility-driven) phenomena (Chialvo and Cummings 1994a). The latter feature makes hydrothermal systems extremely challenging to model, unless we are able to isolate the (compressibility-driven) propagation of the density perturbation from the (solvation-related) finite-density perturbation phenomena (Chialvo and Cummings 1995a).

  5. Deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Ma, N.; Liu, H. J.; Bian, Y. X.; Tao, J. C.; Hu, Min

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report that the deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain are frequently observed using a humidified nephelometer system. The deliquescence relative humidity (RH) primarily ranges from 73% to 81%, with an average of 76.8%. The observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols exhibit distinct diurnal patterns and are highly correlated with ammonium sulfate. The diurnal variations of ammonium and nitrate may play significant roles on occurrences of observed deliquescent phenomena. The frequently observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols in this paper imply that current parameterization schemes that describe the RH dependence of particle light scattering may result in a significant bias when estimating aerosol effects on climate.

  6. Ambroise August Liébeault and psychic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Carlos S

    2009-10-01

    Some nineteenth-century hypnosis researchers did not limit their interest to the study of the conventional psychological and behavioral aspects of hypnosis, but also studied and wrote about psychic phenomena such as mental suggestion and clairvoyance. One example, and the topic of this paper, was French physician Ambroise August Liébeault (1823-1904), who influenced the Nancy school of hypnosis. Liébeault wrote about mental suggestion, clairvoyance, mediumship, and even so-called poltergeists. Some of his writings provide conventional explanations of the phenomena. Still of interest today, Liébeault's writings about psychic phenomena illustrate the overlap that existed during the nineteenth-century between hypnosis and psychic phenomena--an overlap related to the potentials of the mind and its subconscious activity.

  7. New theoretical treatment of ion resonance phenomena.

    PubMed

    Vincze, G; Szasz, A; Liboff, A R

    2008-07-01

    Despite experimental evidence supporting ICR-like interactions in biological systems, to date there is no reasonable theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. The parametric resonance approach introduced by Lednev has enjoyed limited success in predicting the response as a function of the ratio of AC magnetic intensity to that of the DC field, explaining the results in terms of magnetically induced changes in the transition probability of calcium binding states. In the present work, we derive an expression for the velocity of a damped ion with arbitrary q/m under the influence of the Lorentz force. Series solutions to the differential equations reveal transient responses as well as resonance-like terms. One fascinating result is that the expressions for ionic drift velocity include a somewhat similar Bessel function dependence as was previously obtained for the transition probability in parametric resonance. However, in the present work, not only is there an explicit effect due to damping, but the previous Bessel dependence now occurs as a subset of a more general solution, including not only the magnetic field AC/DC ratio as an independent variable, but also the ratio of the cyclotronic frequency Omega to the applied AC frequency omega. In effect, this removes the necessity to explain the ICR interaction as stemming from ion-protein binding sites. We hypothesize that the selectively enhanced drift velocity predicted in this model can explain ICR-like phenomena as resulting from increased interaction probabilities in the vicinity of ion channel gates.

  8. Measured Gene by Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective Summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene by environment interactions in relation to ADHD. Method A selective review of methodological issues is followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured GxE; the search yielded 16 studies, which are discussed in qualitative fashion. Results Relatively consistent evidence points to the interaction of genotype with psychosocial factors in the development of ADHD. The next step is to identify the mechanisms on the environment side and the gene combinations on the genetic side accounting for this effect. By contrast, evidence for gene-environment interactions involving pre- and peri-natal risk factors is generally negative or unreplicated. The aggregate effect size for psychosocial interaction with genotype is more than double that for the interaction of pre- and perinatal risks with genotype. Only a small fraction of candidate environments and gene markers have been studied, and multivariate methods to integrate multiple gene or environment markers have yet to be implemented. Conclusions GxE appears likely to prove fruitful in understanding the etiology of ADHD. Findings to date already suggest new avenues of investigation particularly involving psychosocial mechanisms and their interplay with genotype. Further pursuit of theoretically promising leads is recommended. PMID:20732623

  9. CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P-interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β-galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue-specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH-SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:27357083

  10. Novel Measure of Driver and Vehicle Interaction Demonstrates Transient Changes Related to Alerting

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Justin R.; Kerick, Scott E.; McDowell, Kaleb

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Driver behavior and vehicle-road kinematics have been shown to change over prolonged periods of driving; however, the interaction between these two indices has not been examined. Here we develop a measure that examines how drivers turn the steering wheel relative to heading error velocity, which the authors call the relative steering wheel compensation (RSWC). The RSWC transiently changes on a short time scale coincident with a verbal query embedded within the study paradigm. In contrast, more traditional variables are dynamic over longer time scales consistent with previous research. The results suggest drivers alter their behavioral output (steering wheel correction) relative to sensory input (vehicle heading error velocity) on a distinct temporal scale and may reflect an interaction of alerting and control. PMID:25356659

  11. Theoretical interpretation of Traveling Interplanetary Phenomena and their solar origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1980-01-01

    A review is made of recent theoretical studies on Traveling Interplanetary Phenomena (TIP) and their possible solar origins in the context of mathematical methods and physical processes. Flare-generated interplanetary shocks are used as examples to illustrate the following set of contrasting approaches to the phenomena: analytical vs numerical, hydrodynamic vs magnetohydrodynamic, dissipative vs non-dissipative, continuum/macroscopic vs kinetic/microscopic. It is suggested in conclusion that future research should emphasize continuum/macroscopic physical processes together with the kinetic approach to deepen understanding of microscopic interactions.

  12. Alpha shape and Delaunay triangulation in studies of protein-related interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiqiang; Yan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, more 3D protein structures have become available, which has made the analysis of large molecular structures much easier. There is a strong demand for geometric models for the study of protein-related interactions. Alpha shape and Delaunay triangulation are powerful tools to represent protein structures and have advantages in characterizing the surface curvature and atom contacts. This review presents state-of-the-art applications of alpha shape and Delaunay triangulation in the studies on protein-DNA, protein-protein, protein-ligand interactions and protein structure analysis.

  13. Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) is a fluids experiment supported by the Fundamentals in Biotechnology program in association with the Human Exploration and Development of Space (BEDS) initiative. The MTP Experiment will investigate fluid transport phenomena both in ground based experiments and in the microgravity environment. Many fluid transport processes are affected by gravity. Osmotic flux kinetics in planar membrane systems have been shown to be influenced by gravimetric orientation, either through convective mixing caused by unstably stratified fluid layers, or through a stable fluid boundary layer structure that forms in association with the membrane. Coupled transport phenomena also show gravity related effects. Coefficients associated with coupled transport processes are defined in terms of a steady state condition. Buoyancy (gravity) driven convection interferes with the attainment of steady state, and the measurement of coupled processes. The MTP Experiment measures the kinetics of molecular migration that occurs in fluids, in response to the application of various driving potentials. Three separate driving potentials may be applied to the MTP Experiment fluids, either singly or in combination. The driving potentials include chemical potential, thermal potential, and electrical potential. Two separate fluid arrangements are used to study membrane mediated and bulk fluid transport phenomena. Transport processes of interest in membrane mediated systems include diffusion, osmosis, and streaming potential. Bulk fluid processes of interest include coupled phenomena such as the Soret Effect, Dufour Effect, Donnan Effect, and thermal diffusion potential. MTP Experiments are performed in the Microgravity Transport Apparatus (MTA), an instrument that has been developed specifically for precision measurement of transport processes. Experiment fluids are contained within the MTA fluid cells, designed to create a one dimensional flow geometry

  14. Earthquake prediction with electromagnetic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Short-term earthquake (EQ) prediction is defined as prospective prediction with the time scale of about one week, which is considered to be one of the most important and urgent topics for the human beings. If this short-term prediction is realized, casualty will be drastically reduced. Unlike the conventional seismic measurement, we proposed the use of electromagnetic phenomena as precursors to EQs in the prediction, and an extensive amount of progress has been achieved in the field of seismo-electromagnetics during the last two decades. This paper deals with the review on this short-term EQ prediction, including the impossibility myth of EQs prediction by seismometers, the reason why we are interested in electromagnetics, the history of seismo-electromagnetics, the ionospheric perturbation as the most promising candidate of EQ prediction, then the future of EQ predictology from two standpoints of a practical science and a pure science, and finally a brief summary.

  15. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin

  16. Phenomena of Pneumatic Tire Hydroplaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1963-01-01

    Recent research on pneumatic tire hydroplaning has been collected and summarized with the aim of describing what is presently known about the phenomena of tire hydroplaning. A physical description of tire hydroplaning is given along with formulae for estimating the ground speed at which it occurs. Eight manifestations of tire hydroplaning which have been experimentally observed are presented and discussed. These manifestations are: detachment of tire footprint, hydrodynamic ground pressure, spin-down of wheel, suppression of tire bow wave, scouring action of escaping fluid in tire-ground footprint region, peaking of fluid displacement drag, loss in braking traction, and loss of tire directional stability. The vehicle, pavement, tire, and fluid parameters of importance to tire hydroplaning are listed and described. Finally, the hazards of tire hydroplaning to ground and air-vehicle-ground performance are listed, and procedures are given to minimize these effects.

  17. Cathode phenomena in plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrade, H. O.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.

    1987-05-01

    Processes at the arc cathode attachment decisively determine the entire discharge behavior of almost all arc devices and therefore also of MPD and/or arc jet thrusters. One well known process occurring on spotty arc attachments in a transverse magnetic field is the fact that the cathode spots move or jump in the direction opposite to the Lorentzian rule. In pulsed thruster devices with cold cathodes and very likely also in continuously running thrusters with so-called thermionic-seemingly diffuse attachments of hot surfaces, the arc attachment consists of many high current density spots. These spots can stick or spread upstream and thereby overheat the insulating material of the back-plate of the thruster. In this paper an explanation of the phenomena of spot motion is presented.

  18. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP): Phenomena, simulation, and hardening. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning natural and nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) phenomena, simulation, and hardening. Topics include analyses, evaluations, and simulations of EMP interactions, and EMP coupling with various susceptible systems, devices, objects, and materials. Protective methods and technology for specific devices and overall premises are included along with testing methodologies and experimental results from simulated EMP phenomena. Computer aided analysis of EMP phenomena is also included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP): Phenomena, simulation, and hardening. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning natural and nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) phenomena, simulation, and hardening. Topics include analyses, evaluations, and simulations of EMP interactions, and EMP coupling with various susceptible systems, devices, objects, and materials. Protective methods and technology for specific devices and overall premises are included along with testing methodologies and experimental results from simulated EMP phenomena. Computer aided analysis of EMP phenomena is also included. (Contains a minimum of 240 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Turbulent phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kalgin, Igor V; Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal β sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal β strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially "laminar" and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

  1. Instability phenomena in plasticity: Modelling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, E.; Steinmann, P.; Miehe, C.

    1995-12-01

    We presented aspects and results related to the broad field of strain localization with special focus on large strain elastoplastic response. Therefore, we first re-examined issues related to the classification of discontinuities and the classical description of localization with a particular emphasis on an Eulerian geometric representation. We touched the problem of mesh objectivity and discussed results of a particular regularization method, namely the micropolar approach. Generally, regularization has to preserve ellipticity and to reflect the underlying physics. For example ductile materials have to be modelled including viscous effects whereas geomaterials are adequately described by the micropolar approach. Then we considered localization phenomena within solids undergoing large strain elastoplastic deformations. Here, we documented the influence of isotropic damage on the failure analysis. Next, the interesting influence of an orthotropic yield condition on the spatial orientation of localized zones has been studied. Finally, we investigated the localization condition for an algorithmic model of finite strain single crystal plasticity.

  2. A study of the relative effectiveness and cost of computerized information retrieval in the interactive mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Furniss, M. A.; Potter, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a number of experiments to illuminate the relative effectiveness and costs of computerized information retrieval in the interactive mode are reported. It was found that for equal time spent in preparing the search strategy, the batch and interactive modes gave approximately equal recall and relevance. The interactive mode however encourages the searcher to devote more time to the task and therefore usually yields improved output. Engineering costs as a result are higher in this mode. Estimates of associated hardware costs also indicate that operation in this mode is more expensive. Skilled RECON users like the rapid feedback and additional features offered by this mode if they are not constrained by considerations of cost.

  3. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  4. Physical phenomena and the microgravity response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The living biological cell is not a sack of Newtonian fluid containing systems of chemical reactions at equilibrium. It is a kinetically driven system, not a thermodynamically driven system. While the cell as a whole might be considered isothermal, at the scale of individual macromolecular events there is heat generated, and presumably sharp thermal gradients exist at the submicron level. Basic physical phenomena to be considered when exploring the cell's response to inertial acceleration include particle sedimentation, solutal convection, motility electrokinetics, cytoskeletal work, and hydrostatic pressure. Protein crystal growth experiments, for example, illustrate the profound effects of convection currents on macromolecular assembly. Reaction kinetics in the cell vary all the way from diffusion-limited to life-time limited. Transport processes vary from free diffusion, to facilitated and active transmembrane transport, to contractile-protein-driven motility, to crystalline immobilization. At least four physical states of matter exist in the cell: aqueous, non-aqueous, immiscible-aqueous, and solid. Levels of order vary from crystalline to free solution. The relative volumes of these states profoundly influence the cell's response to inertial acceleration. Such subcellular phenomena as stretch-receptor activation, microtubule re-assembly, synaptic junction formation, chemotactic receptor activation, and statolith sedimentation were studied recently with respect to both their basic mechanisms and their responsiveness to inertial acceleration. From such studies a widespread role of cytoskeletal organization is becoming apparent.

  5. Computational prediction of protein interactions related to the invasion of erythrocytes by malarial parasites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuewu; Huang, Yuxiao; Liang, Jiao; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Jun; Shen, Yan; Xu, Zhikai; Zhao, Ya

    2014-11-30

    The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by malarial parasites is an essential step in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. Human-parasite surface protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Although several interactions between human and parasite proteins have been discovered, the mechanism related to invasion remains poorly understood because numerous human-parasite protein interactions have not yet been identified. High-throughput screening experiments are not feasible for malarial parasites due to difficulty in expressing the parasite proteins. Here, we performed computational prediction of the PPIs involved in malaria parasite invasion to elucidate the mechanism by which invasion occurs. In this study, an expectation maximization algorithm was used to estimate the probabilities of domain-domain interactions (DDIs). Estimates of DDI probabilities were then used to infer PPI probabilities. We found that our prediction performance was better than that based on the information of D. melanogaster alone when information related to the six species was used. Prediction performance was assessed using protein interaction data from S. cerevisiae, indicating that the predicted results were reliable. We then used the estimates of DDI probabilities to infer interactions between 490 parasite and 3,787 human membrane proteins. A small-scale dataset was used to illustrate the usability of our method in predicting interactions between human and parasite proteins. The positive predictive value (PPV) was lower than that observed in S. cerevisiae. We integrated gene expression data to improve prediction accuracy and to reduce false positives. We identified 80 membrane proteins highly expressed in the schizont stage by fast Fourier transform method. Approximately 221 erythrocyte membrane proteins were identified using published mass spectral datasets. A network consisting of 205 interactions was predicted. Results of network analysis suggest that SNARE proteins of

  6. Interactivity and Reward-Related Neural Activation during a Serious Videogame

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Yoo, Daniel J.; Knutson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether playing a “serious” interactive digital game (IDG) – the Re-Mission videogame for cancer patients – activates mesolimbic neural circuits associated with incentive motivation, and if so, whether such effects stem from the participatory aspects of interactive gameplay, or from the complex sensory/perceptual engagement generated by its dynamic event-stream. Healthy undergraduates were randomized to groups in which they were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) as they either actively played Re-Mission or as they passively observed a gameplay audio-visual stream generated by a yoked active group subject. Onset of interactive game play robustly activated mesolimbic projection regions including the caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens, as well as a subregion of the parahippocampal gyrus. During interactive gameplay, subjects showed extended activation of the thalamus, anterior insula, putamen, and motor-related regions, accompanied by decreased activation in parietal and medial prefrontal cortex. Offset of interactive gameplay activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate. Between-group comparisons of within-subject contrasts confirmed that mesolimbic activation was significantly more pronounced in the active playgroup than in the passive exposure control group. Individual difference analyses also found the magnitude of parahippocampal activation following gameplay onset to correlate with positive attitudes toward chemotherapy assessed both at the end of the scanning session and at an unannounced one-month follow-up. These findings suggest that IDG-induced activation of reward-related mesolimbic neural circuits stems primarily from participatory engagement in gameplay (interactivity), rather than from the effects of vivid and dynamic sensory stimulation. PMID:22442733

  7. [Non-epileptic motor paroxysmal phenomena in wakefulness in childhood].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2013-09-06

    Paroxysmal events in childhood are a challenge for pediatric neurologists, given its highly heterogeneous clinical manifestations, often difficult to distinguish between phenomena of epileptic seizure or not. The non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes are neurological phenomena, with motor, sensory symptoms, and/or sensory impairments, with or without involvement of consciousness, epileptic phenomena unrelated, so no electroencephalographic correlative expression between or during episodes. From the clinical point of view can be classified into four groups: motor phenomena, syncope, migraine (and associated conditions) and acute psychiatric symptoms. In this paper we analyze paroxysmal motor phenomena in awake children, dividing them according to their clinical manifestations: extrapyramidal episodes (paroxysmal kinesiogenic, non kinesiogenic and not related to exercise dyskinesias, Dopa responsive dystonia) and similar symptoms of dystonia (Sandifer syndrome); manifestations of startle (hyperekplexia); episodic eye and head movements (benign paroxysmal tonic upward gaze nistagmus deviation); episodic ataxia (familial episodic ataxias, paroxysmal benign vertigo); stereotyped and phenomena of self-gratification; and myoclonic events (benign myoclonus of early infancy). The detection of these syndromes will, in many cases, allow an adequate genetic counseling, initiate a specific treatment and avoid unnecessary additional studies. Molecular studies have demonstrated a real relationship between epileptic and non-epileptic basis of many of these entities and surely the identification of the molecular basis and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in many of them allow us, in the near future will benefit our patients.

  8. Relative charge density model on chitosan-fucoidan electrostatic interaction: qualitative approach with element analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ju; Lim, Kwang-Hee

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a relative charge density model of prepared chitosan-fucoidan nanoparticles (CFNs) to provide insight into an analysis of the ionic interactions in terms of polyelectrolyte complexes. Using the relative charge density model, the extent of the ionic interactions is predicted in terms of the pH (2 through 6) and used fucoidan to chitosan mass ratio (FCMR) (1:0.05 through 1:1), through which the formation of CFNs can be controlled to be ranked qualitatively according to size and stability. It was confirmed by the measurements of their zeta potentials and sizes and by the analysis of their decay with time. Moreover, the relative charge density model was validated to predict the isoelectric condition of a polyelectrolyte complexed suspension of CFNs. Elemental analysis with a proper mass-conversion showed that the ratio of the stoichiometric coefficients of sulfate groups to amino groups in CFNs formed were almost consistent to that of the sulfate groups to amino groups in a chitosan solution mixed with a fucoidan solution prior to the occurrence of polyelectrolyte complexation. In a pH 2-environment, there were locally intensive electrostatic interactions with a low yield to form sulfate group-rich CFNs. In contrast, in a pH 6-environment, extensive electrostatic interactions occurred to form sulfate group-poor CFNs with a high yield. In addition to the chitosan-amide groups, the separate yield-distribution of loaded chitosan indicated the possible involvement of positively charged amino groups in the electrostatic interactions among chitosan molecules. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A numerical weather prediction system designed to simulate atmospheric downburst phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S.; Proctor, F. H.; Zack, J. W.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that an increase in the understanding of weather-related aircraft accidents can save hundreds of human lives and million of dollars. A better understanding regarding the interaction between aircraft operation and severe weather conditions can be obtained with the aid of flight simulator facilities. It is shown that numerical weather modeling is one of the most precise and cost-effective inputs for flight simulators in the long run. A comprehensive weather modeling system is being developed for the simulation of different scales of atmospheric phenomena. The modeling system utilizes two numerical weather models, including the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation system, and the Terminal Area Simulation System.

  10. A numerical weather prediction system designed to simulate atmospheric downburst phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S.; Proctor, F. H.; Zack, J. W.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that an increase in the understanding of weather-related aircraft accidents can save hundreds of human lives and million of dollars. A better understanding regarding the interaction between aircraft operation and severe weather conditions can be obtained with the aid of flight simulator facilities. It is shown that numerical weather modeling is one of the most precise and cost-effective inputs for flight simulators in the long run. A comprehensive weather modeling system is being developed for the simulation of different scales of atmospheric phenomena. The modeling system utilizes two numerical weather models, including the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation system, and the Terminal Area Simulation System.

  11. Concentration-related response potentiometric titrations to study the interaction of small molecules with large biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hamidi-Asl, Ezat; Daems, Devin; De Wael, Karolien; Van Camp, Guy; Nagels, Luc J

    2014-12-16

    In the present paper, the utility of a special potentiometric titration approach for recognition and calculation of biomolecule/small-molecule interactions is reported. This approach is fast, sensitive, reproducible, and inexpensive in comparison to the other methods for the determination of the association constant values (Ka) and the interaction energies (ΔG). The potentiometric titration measurement is based on the use of a classical polymeric membrane indicator electrode in a solution of the small-molecule ligand. The biomolecule is used as a titrant. The potential is measured versus a reference electrode and transformed into a concentration-related signal over the entire concentration interval, also at low concentrations, where the millivolt (y-axis) versus log canalyte (x-axis) potentiometric calibration curve is not linear. In the procedure, Ka is calculated for the interaction of cocaine with a cocaine binding aptamer and with an anticocaine antibody. To study the selectivity and cross-reactivity, other oligonucleotides and aptamers are tested, as well as other small ligand molecules such as tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl)borate, metergoline, lidocaine, and bromhexine. The calculated Ka compared favorably to the value reported in the literature using surface plasmon resonance. The potentiometric titration approach called "concentration-related response potentiometry" is used to study molecular interaction for seven macromolecular target molecules and four small-molecule ligands.

  12. Data analysis and interpretation related to space system/environment interactions at LEO altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. John; Schunk, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    Several studies made on the interaction of active systems with the LEO space environment experienced from orbital or suborbital platforms are covered. The issue of high voltage space interaction is covered by theoretical modeling studies of the interaction of charged solar cell arrays with the ionospheric plasma. The theoretical studies were complemented by experimental measurements made in a vacuum chamber. The other active system studied was the emission of effluent from a space platform. In one study the emission of plasma into the LEO environment was studied by using initially a 2-D model, and then extending this model to 3-D to correctly take account of plasma motion parallel to the geomagnetic field. The other effluent studies related to the releases of neutral gas from an orbiting platform. One model which was extended and used determined the density, velocity, and energy of both an effluent gas and the ambient upper atmospheric gases over a large volume around the platform. This model was adapted to study both ambient and contaminant distributions around smaller objects in the orbital frame of reference with scale sizes of 1 m. The other effluent studies related to the interaction of the released neutral gas with the ambient ionospheric plasma. An electrostatic model was used to help understand anomalously high plasma densities measured at times in the vicinity of the space shuttle orbiter.

  13. Positive Engagement Behaviors in Observed Family Interactions: A Social Relations Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Robert A.; Kashy, Deborah A.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Conger, Rand D.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the nature of positive engagement (an interpersonal style characterized by attentiveness, warmth, cooperation, and clear communication) in family interactions involving at least one adolescent. Approximately 400 families (mothers, fathers, and two siblings) were videotaped during brief conflict resolution discussions that occurred on a yearly basis for three years. Coders rated the degree to which each family member was positively engaged with every other family member during the interactions. The Social Relations Model was used to partition variation in positive engagement behavior into family-level, individual-level, and dyad-level effects. Results demonstrated the importance of family norms and individual factors in determining the expression of positive engagement behaviors in dyadic family relationships. Moreover, longitudinal analyses indicated that these effects are stable over a three year period. Finally, results highlighted the relative distinctiveness of the marital and sibling relationships, as well as the existence of reciprocity within these dyads. PMID:21875194

  14. Positive-engagement behaviors in observed family interactions: a social relations perspective.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Robert A; Kashy, Deborah A; Donnellan, M Brent; Conger, Rand D

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigates the nature of positive engagement (an interpersonal style characterized by attentiveness, warmth, cooperation, and clear communication) in family interactions involving at least one adolescent. Approximately 400 families (mothers, fathers, and two siblings) were videotaped during brief conflict-resolution discussions that occurred on a yearly basis for 3 years. Coders rated the degree to which each family member was positively engaged with every other family member during the interactions. The social relations model was used to partition variation in positive-engagement behavior into family-level, individual-level, and dyad-level effects. Results demonstrated the importance of family norms and individual factors in determining the expression of positive-engagement behaviors in dyadic family relationships. Moreover, longitudinal analyses indicated that these effects are stable over a 3-year period. Finally, results highlighted the relative distinctiveness of the marital and sibling relationships, as well as the existence of reciprocity within these dyads.

  15. Meteorological phenomena in Western classical orchestral music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Aplin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact, but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant, because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for Monet, Constable, and Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies. But to what extent does weather inspire composers? The authors of this presentation, who are atmospheric scientists by day but amateur classical musicians by night, have been contemplating this question. We have built a systematic musical database, which has allowed us to catalogue and analyze the frequencies with which weather is depicted in a sample of classical orchestral music. The depictions vary from explicit mimicry using traditional and specialized orchestral instruments, through to subtle suggestions. We have found that composers are generally influenced by their own environment in the type of weather they choose to represent. As befits the national stereotype, British composers seem disproportionately keen to depict the UK's variable weather patterns and stormy coastline. Reference: Aplin KL and Williams PD (2011) Meteorological phenomena in Western classical orchestral music. Weather, 66(11), pp 300-306. doi:10.1002/wea.765

  16. On the relation between friction losses and pressure pulsations caused by Rotor Stator interaction on the Francis-99 turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østby, Petter T. K.; Tore Billdal, Jan; Haugen, Bjørn; Dahlhaug, Ole Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    High head Francis runners are subject to pressure pulsations caused by rotor stator interaction. To ensure safe operation of such turbines, it is important to be able to predict these pulsations. For turbine manufacturers it is often a dilemma whether to perform very advanced and time consuming CFD calculations or to rely on simpler calculations to save development time. This paper tries to evaluate simplifications of the CFD model while still capturing the RSI phenomena and ensuring that the calculation does not underpredict the pressure amplitudes. The effects which turbulence modeling, wall friction, viscosity and mesh have on the pressure amplitudes will be investigated along with time savings with each simplification. The hypothesis is that rotor stator interaction is manly driven by inviscid flow and can therefore be modeled by the Euler equations.

  17. Assessing time-by-covariate interactions in relative survival models using restrictive cubic spline functions.

    PubMed

    Bolard, P; Quantin, C; Abrahamowicz, M; Esteve, J; Giorgi, R; Chadha-Boreham, H; Binquet, C; Faivre, J

    2002-01-01

    The Cox model is widely used in the evaluation of prognostic factors in clinical research. However, in population-based studies, which assess long-term survival of unselected populations, relative-survival models are often considered more appropriate. In both approaches, the validity of proportional hazards hypothesis should be evaluated. We propose a new method in which restricted cubic spline functions are employed to model time-by-covariate interactions in relative survival analyses. The method allows investigation of the shape of possible dependence of the covariate effect on time without having to specify a particular functional form. Restricted cubic spline functions allow graphing of such time-by-covariate interactions, to test formally the proportional hazards assumption, and also to test the linearity of the time-by-covariate interaction. Application of our new method to assess mortality in colon cancer provides strong evidence against the proportional hazards hypothesis, which is rejected for all prognostic factors. The results corroborate previous analyses of similar data-sets, suggesting the importance of both modelling of non-proportional hazards and relative survival approach. We also demonstrate the advantages of using restricted cubic spline functions for modelling non-proportional hazards in relative-survival analysis. The results provide new insights in the estimated impact of older age and of period of diagnosis. Using restricted cubic splines in a relative survival model allows the representation of both simple and complex patterns of changes in relative risks over time, with a single parsimonious model without a priori assumptions about the functional form of these changes.

  18. Strongly interacting p -wave Fermi gas in two dimensions: Universal relations and breathing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Zhang, Shizhong

    2017-02-01

    The contact is an important concept that characterizes the universal properties of a strongly interacting quantum gas. It appears in both thermodynamic (energy, pressure, etc.) and dynamic quantities (radio-frequency and Bragg spectroscopies, etc.) of the system. Very recently, the concept of contact was extended to higher partial waves; in particular, the p -wave contacts have been experimentally probed in recent experiments. So far, discussions on p -wave contacts have been limited to three dimensions. In this paper, we generalize the p -wave contacts to two dimensions and derive a series of universal relations, including the adiabatic relations, high-momentum distribution, virial theorem, and pressure relation. At the high-temperature and low-density limit, we calculate the p -wave contacts explicitly using virial expansion. A formula which directly connects the shift of the breathing-mode frequency and the p -wave contacts is given in a harmonically trapped system. Finally, we also derive the relationships between interaction parameters in three- and two-dimensional Fermi gases and discuss possible experimental realization of a two-dimensional Fermi gas with p -wave interactions.

  19. Mathematical methods of studying physical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, substantial theoretical and experimental progress was achieved in understanding the quantum nature of physical phenomena that serves as the foundation of present and future quantum technologies. Quantum correlations like the entanglement of the states of composite systems, the phenomenon of quantum discord, which captures other aspects of quantum correlations, quantum contextuality and, connected with these phenomena, uncertainty relations for conjugate variables and entropies, like Shannon and Rényi entropies, and the inequalities for spin states, like Bell inequalities, reflect the recently understood quantum properties of micro and macro systems. The mathematical methods needed to describe all quantum phenomena mentioned above were also the subject of intense studies in the end of the last, and beginning of the new, century. In this section of CAMOP 'Mathematical Methods of Studying Physical Phenomena' new results and new trends in the rapidly developing domain of quantum (and classical) physics are presented. Among the particular topics under discussion there are some reviews on the problems of dynamical invariants and their relations with symmetries of the physical systems. In fact, this is a very old problem of both classical and quantum systems, e.g. the systems of parametric oscillators with time-dependent parameters, like Ermakov systems, which have specific constants of motion depending linearly or quadratically on the oscillator positions and momenta. Such dynamical invariants play an important role in studying the dynamical Casimir effect, the essence of the effect being the creation of photons from the vacuum in a cavity with moving boundaries due to the presence of purely quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field in the vacuum. It is remarkable that this effect was recently observed experimentally. The other new direction in developing the mathematical approach in physics is quantum tomography that provides a new vision of

  20. Formalization and Interaction: Toward a Comprehensive History of Technology-Related Knowledge in Early Modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Popplow, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    Recent critical approaches to what has conventionally been described as "scientific" and "technical" knowledge in early modern Europe have provided a wealth of new insights. So far, the various analytical concepts suggested by these studies have not yet been comprehensively discussed. The present essay argues that such comprehensive approaches might prove of special value for long-term and cross-cultural reflections on technology-related knowledge. As heuristic tools, the notions of "formalization" and "interaction" are proposed as part of alternative narratives to those highlighting the emergence of "science" as the most relevant development for technology-related knowledge in early modern Europe.

  1. Interpersonal interactions, job demands and work-related outcomes in pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Caroline A; Nadkarni, Anagha

    2012-04-01

    Objectives  The objective of this study was to examine the interaction between job demands of pharmacists and resources in the form of interpersonal interactions and its association with work-related outcomes such as organizational and professional commitment, job burnout, professional identity and job satisfaction. The job demands-resources (JD-R) model served as the theoretical framework. Methods  Subjects for the study were drawn from the Pharmacy Manpower Project Database (n = 1874). A 14-page mail-in survey measured hospital pharmacists' responses on the frequency of occurrence of various job-related scenarios as well as work-related outcomes. The study design was a 2 × 2 factorial design. Responses were collected on a Likert scale. Descriptive statistics, reliability analyses and correlational and multiple regression analyses were conducted using SPSS version 17 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Key findings  The 566 pharmacists (30% response rate) who responded to the survey indicated that high-demand/pleasant encounters and low-demand/pleasant encounters occurred more frequently in the workplace. The strongest correlations were found between high-demand/unpleasant encounters and frequency and intensity of emotional exhaustion. Multiple regression analyses indicated that when controlling for demographic factors high-demand/unpleasant encounters were negatively related to affective organizational commitment and positively related to frequency and intensity of emotional exhaustion. Low-demand/pleasant encounters were positively related to frequency and intensity of personal accomplishment. Low-demand/unpleasant encounters were significantly and negatively related to professional commitment, job satisfaction and frequency and intensity of emotional exhaustion, while high-demand/pleasant encounters were also related to frequency and intensity of emotional exhaustion Conclusion  Support was found for the JD-R model and the proposed interaction effects

  2. Ordering Phenomena in Undercooled Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, Brent

    1997-07-17

    Much of the work performed under this grant was devoted to using modern ideas in kinetics to understand atom movements in metallic alloys far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Kinetics arguments were based explicitly on the vacancy mechanism for atom movements. The emphasis was on how individual atom movements are influenced by the local chemical environment of the moving atom, and how atom movements cause changes in the local chemical environments. The author formulated a kinetic master equation method to treat atom movements on a crystal lattice with a vacancy mechanism. Some of these analyses [3,10,16] are as detailed as any treatment of the statistical kinetics of atom movements in crystalline alloys. Three results came from this work. Chronologically they were (1) A recognition that tracking time dependencies is not necessarily the best way to study kinetic phenomena. If multiple order parameters can be measured in a material, the ''kinetic path'' through the space spanned by these order parameters maybe just as informative about the chemical factors that affect atom movements [2,3,5-7,9-11,14-16,18,19,21,23,24,26,36,37]. (2) Kinetic paths need not follow the steepest gradient of the free energy function (this should be well-known), and for alloys far from equilibrium the free energy function can be almost useless in describing kinetic behavior. This is why the third result surprised me. (3) In cluster approximations with multiple order parameters, saddle points are common features of free energy functions. Interestingly, kinetic processes stall or change time scale when the kinetic path approaches a state at a saddle point in the free energy function, even though these states exist far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The author calls such a state a ''pseudostable'' (falsely stable) state [6,21,26]. I have also studied these phenomena by more ''exact'' Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetic paths showed features similar to those found in analytical theories. The

  3. Pseudospin-mediated phenomena in photonic graphene (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Daohong; Efremedis, Nikos; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    "Photonic graphene" has been demonstrated as a useful platform to study fundamental physics such as edge states and topological insulators. Recently, we have demonstrated pseudospin-mediated generation of topological charges in photonic graphene. Due to sublattice degree of freedom, charge flipping is observed as the sublattices are selectively excited. Our experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulation as well as by theoretical analysis of the 2D Dirac-Weyl equations. In this talk, we will discuss such pseudospin-related phenomena due to the sublattice degree of freedom, along with our recent work on related phenomena due to the graphene valley degree of freedom.

  4. EDITORIAL: Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Twenty years ago the Institute of Physics launched the journal Nanotechnology from its publishing house based in the home town of Paul Dirac, a legendary figure in the development of quantum mechanics at the turn of the last century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the adoption of quantum mechanical descriptions of events transformed the existing deterministic world view. But in many ways it also revolutionised the progress of research itself. For the first time since the 17th century when Francis Bacon established inductive reasoning as the means of advancing science from fact to axiom to law, theory was progressing ahead of experiments instead of providing explanations for observations that had already been made. Dirac's postulation of antimatter through purely theoretical investigation before its observation is the archetypal example of theory leading the way for experiment. The progress of nanotechnology and the development of tools and techniques that enabled the investigation of systems at the nanoscale brought with them many fascinating observations of phenomena that could only be explained through quantum mechanics, first theoretically deduced decades previously. At the nanoscale, quantum confinement effects dominate the electrical and optical properties of systems. They also render new opportunities for manipulating the response of systems. For example, a better understanding of these systems has enabled the rapid development of quantum dots with precisely determined properties, which can be exploited in a range of applications from medical imaging and photovoltaic solar cells to quantum computation, a radically new information technology being currently developed in many labs worldwide. As the first ever academic journal in nanotechnology, {\\it Nanotechnology} has been the forum for papers detailing progress of the science through extremely exciting times. In the early years of the journal, the investigation of electron spin led to the formulation

  5. Interaction of Insulin Resistance and Related Genetic Variants With Triglyceride-Associated Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    Klimentidis, Yann C; Arora, Amit

    2016-04-01

    Several studies suggest that some triglyceride-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have pleiotropic and opposite effects on glycemic traits. This potentially implicates them in pathways such as de novo lipogenesis, which is presumably upregulated in the context of insulin resistance. We therefore tested whether the association of triglyceride-associated SNPs with triglyceride levels differs according to one's level of insulin resistance. In 3 cohort studies (combined n=12 487), we tested the interaction of established triglyceride-associated SNPs (individually and collectively) with several traits related to insulin resistance, on triglyceride levels. We also tested the interaction of triglyceride SNPs with fasting insulin-associated SNPs, individually and collectively, on triglyceride levels. We find significant interactions of a weighted genetic risk score for triglycerides with insulin resistance on triglyceride levels (Pinteraction=2.73×10(-11) and Pinteraction=2.48×10(-11) for fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, respectively). The association of the triglyceride genetic risk score with triglyceride levels is >60% stronger among those in the highest tertile of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance compared with those in the lowest tertile. Individual SNPs contributing to this trend include those in/near GCKR, CILP2, and IRS1, whereas PIGV-NROB2 and LRPAP1 display an opposite trend of interaction. In the pooled data set, we also identify a SNP-by-SNP interaction involving a triglyceride-associated SNP, rs4722551 near MIR148A, with a fasting insulin-associated SNP, rs4865796 in ARL15 (Pinteraction=4.1×10(-5)). Our findings may thus provide genetic evidence for the upregulation of triglyceride levels in insulin-resistant individuals, in addition to identifying specific genetic loci and a SNP-by-SNP interaction implicated in this process. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Breakdown phenomena in rf windows

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.

    1995-07-05

    The multipactor and flashover phenomena of alumina rf windows used in high-power klystrons have been investigated. Multipactoring due to the high yield of secondary electron emission takes place during rf operation. A spectrum analysis of the luminescence due to multipactoring shows that multipactor electron bombardment causes an F-center of alumina, thus leading to surface melting. From the results of a high-power examination of rf windows with several kinds of alumina ceramics, it was found that an alumina material with a crystallized grain-boundary and without any voids between the boundaries, thus having a low loss-tangent value, is not liable to F-centers, even under multipactoring. Flashovers in a tree-like pattern of alumina luminescence occasionally take place on a TiN-coated surface. From the results of surface-charging measurements and high-power examinations of annealed alumina disks, the flashover phenomenon is considered to be an avalanche of electrons which have been trapped in mechanically introduced defects. The effectivenesses of multipactor-suppressing coatings and of a field-reduced window structure were also examined. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Monitoring of Transient Lunar Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy; Farber, Ryan; Ahrendts, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Transient Lunar Phenomena (TLP’s) are described as short-lived changes in the brightness of areas on the face of the Moon. TLP research is characterized by the inability to substantiate, reproduce, and verify findings. Our current research includes the analysis of lunar images taken with two Santa Barbara Instrument Group (SBIG) ST8-E CCD cameras mounted on two 0.36m Celestron telescopes. On one telescope, we are using a sodium filter, and on the other an H-alpha filter, imaging approximately one-third of the lunar surface. We are focusing on two regions: Hyginus and Ina. Ina is of particular interest because it shows evidence of recent activity (Schultz, P., Staid, M., Pieters, C. Nature, Volume 444, Issue 7116, pp. 184-186, 2006). A total of over 50,000 images have been obtained over approximately 35 nights and visually analyzed to search for changes. As of March, 2014, no evidence of TLPs has been found. We are currently developing a Matlab program to do image analysis to detect TLPs that might not be apparent by visual inspection alone.

  8. Electronic phenomena at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure research is undertaken either to investigate intrinsically high pressure phenomena or in order to get a better understanding of the effect of the chemical environment on properties or processes at one atmosphere. Studies of electronic properties which fall in each area are presented. Many molecules and complexes can assume in the excited state different molecular arrangements and intermolecular forces depending on the medium. Their luminescence emission is then very different in a rigid or a fluid medium. With pressure one can vary the viscosity of the medium by a factor of 10/sup 7/ and thus control the distribution and rate of crossing between the excited state conformations. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand chemistry at one atmosphere. At high pressure electronic states can be sufficiently perturbed to provide new ground states. In EDA complexes these new ground states exhibit unusual chemical reactivity and new products.

  9. Interaction of Complement Factor H and Fibulin3 in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, M. Keith; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Mishra, Sanghamitra; Campos, Maria; Jaworski, Cynthia; Fariss, Robert N.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Wistow, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen) in Bruch’s membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A sequence variant (Y402H) in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7) of complement factor H (CFH) is associated with risk for “dry” AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3), which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H). This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD. PMID:23840815

  10. Interactions of early adversity with stress-related gene polymorphisms impact regional brain structure in females

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Bonyadi, Mariam; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Bradesi, Sylvie; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Early adverse life events (EALs) have been associated with regional thinning of the subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), a brain region implicated in the development of disorders of mood and affect, and often comorbid functional pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Regional neuroinflammation related to chronic stress system activation has been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying these neuroplastic changes. However, the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in these changes is poorly understood. The current study aimed to evaluate the interactions of EALs and candidate gene polymorphisms in influencing thickness of the sgACC. 210 female subjects (137 healthy controls; 73 IBS) were genotyped for stress and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms. Genetic variation with EALs, and diagnosis on sgACC thickness was examined, while controlling for race, age, and total brain volume. Compared to HCs, IBS had significantly reduced sgACC thickness (p = 0.03). Regardless of disease group (IBS vs. HC), thinning of the left sgACC was associated with a significant gene-gene environment interaction between the IL-1β genotype, the NR3C1 haplotype, and a history of EALs (p = 0.05). Reduced sgACC thickness in women with the minor IL-1β allele, was associated with EAL total scores regardless of NR3C1 haplotype status (p = 0.02). In subjects homozygous for the major IL-1β allele, reduced sgACC with increasing levels of EALs was seen only with the less common NR3C1 haplotype (p = 0.02). These findings support an interaction between polymorphisms related to stress and inflammation and early adverse life events in modulating a key region of the emotion arousal circuit. PMID:25630611

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana AUCSIA-1 Regulates Auxin Biology and Physically Interacts with a Kinesin-Related Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pii, Youry; Korte, Arthur; Spena, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Aucsia is a green plant gene family encoding 44–54 amino acids long miniproteins. The sequenced genomes of most land plants contain two Aucsia genes. RNA interference of both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Aucsia genes (SlAucsia-1 and SlAucsia-2) altered auxin sensitivity, auxin transport and distribution; it caused parthenocarpic development of the fruit and other auxin-related morphological changes. Here we present data showing that the Aucsia-1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana alters, by itself, root auxin biology and that the AtAUCSIA-1 miniprotein physically interacts with a kinesin-related protein. The AtAucsia-1 gene is ubiquitously expressed, although its expression is higher in roots and inflorescences in comparison to stems and leaves. Two allelic mutants for AtAucsia-1 gene did not display visible root morphological alterations; however both basipetal and acropetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) root transport was reduced as compared with wild-type plants. The transcript steady state levels of the auxin efflux transporters ATP BINDING CASSETTE subfamily B (ABCB) ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCB19 were reduced in ataucsia-1 plants. In ataucsia-1 mutant, lateral root growth showed an altered response to i) exogenous auxin, ii) an inhibitor of polar auxin transport and iii) ethylene. Overexpression of AtAucsia-1 inhibited primary root growth. In vitro and in vivo protein-protein interaction experiments showed that AtAUCSIA-1 interacts with a 185 amino acids long fragment belonging to a 2712 amino acids long protein of unknown function (At4g31570). Bioinformatics analysis indicates that the AtAUCSIA-1 interacting protein (AtAUCSIA-1IP) clusters with a group of CENP-E kinesin-related proteins. Gene ontology predictions for the two proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the AtAUCSIA-1/AtAUCSIA-1IP complex is involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton dynamics underlying auxin biology. PMID:22911780

  12. Autistic phenomena in The Adventures of Pinocchio.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that the protagonist of Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio illustrates numerous autistic phenomena such as communication difficulties, sensory and perceptual distortions and mindblindness. While Pinocchio is viewed as a literary construct with contraindications of autism, it will be argued that his autistic traits are sufficient to suggest the possibility that Collodi had a partial intuition of the syndrome 60 years before it was identified by Leo Kanner. Approaching Collodi's text in this manner is taken as an opportunity to survey and reflect upon the psychoanalytic literature on autism and to position it in relation to contemporary theories from cognitive neuroscience. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  13. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  14. Novel nuclear phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    Many of the key issues in understanding quantum chromodynamics involve processes in nuclear targets at intermediate energies. A range of hadronic and nuclear phenomena-exclusive processes, color transparency, hidden color degrees of freedom in nuclei, reduced nuclear amplitudes, jet coalescence, formation zone effects, hadron helicity selection rules, spin correlations, higher twist effects, and nuclear diffraction were discussed as tools for probing hadron structure and the propagation of quark and gluon jets in nuclei. Several areas were also reviewed where there has been significant theoretical progress determining the form of hadron and nuclear wave functions, including QCD sum rules, lattice gauge theory, and discretized light-cone quantization. A possible interpretation was also discussed of the large spin correlation A/sub NN/ in proton-proton scattering, and how relate this effect to an energy and angular dependence of color transparency in nuclei. 76 refs., 24 figs.

  15. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  16. CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P‑interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two‑hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β‑galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co‑immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue‑specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH‑SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS.

  17. Relative stability of the FCC and HCP polymorphs with interacting polymers.

    PubMed

    Mahynski, Nathan A; Kumar, Sanat K; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2015-01-14

    Recent work [Mahynski et al., Nat. Commun., 2014, 5, 4472] has demonstrated that the addition of long linear homopolymers thermodynamically biases crystallizing hard-sphere colloids to produce the hexagonal close-packed (HCP) polymorph over the closely related face-centered cubic (FCC) structure when the polymers and colloids are purely repulsive. In this report, we investigate the effects of thermal interactions on each crystal polymorph to explore the possibility of stabilizing the FCC crystal structure over the HCP. We find that the HCP polymorph remains at least as stable as its FCC counterpart across the entire range of interactions we explored, where interactions were quantified by the reduced second virial coefficient, -1.50 < B < 1.01. This metric conveniently characterizes the crossover from entropically to energetically dominated systems at B ≈ 0. While the HCP relies on its octahedral void arrangement for enhanced stability when B > 0, its tetrahedral voids produce a similar effect when B < 0 (i.e. when energetics dominate). Starting from this, we derive a mean-field expression for the free energy of an infinitely-dilute polymer adsorbed in the crystal phase for nonzero B. Our results reveal that co-solute biasing of a single polymorph can still be observed in experimentally realizable scenarios when the colloids and polymers have attractive interactions, and provide a possible explanation for the experimental finding that pure FCC crystals are elusive in these binary mixtures.

  18. Definition of the molecular basis for estrogen receptor-related receptor-alpha-cofactor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Stéphanie; Dwyer, Mary A; McDonnell, Donald P

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor-alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor that does not appear to require a classical small molecule ligand to facilitate its interaction with coactivators and/or hormone response elements within target genes. Instead, the apo-receptor is capable of interacting in a constitutive manner with coactivators that stimulate transcription by acting as protein ligands. We have screened combinatorial phage libraries for peptides that selectively interact with ERRalpha to probe the architecture of the ERRalpha-coactivator pocket. In this manner, we have uncovered a fundamental difference in the mechanism by which this receptor interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, as compared with members of the steroid receptor coactivator subfamily of coactivators. Our findings suggest that it may be possible to develop ERRalpha ligands that exhibit different pharmacological activities as a consequence of their ability to differentially regulate coactivator recruitment. In addition, these findings have implications beyond ERRalpha because they suggest that subtle alterations in the structure of the activation function-2 pocket within any nuclear receptor may enable differential recruitment of coactivators, an observation of notable pharmaceutical importance.

  19. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling.

  20. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network.

  1. Unusual role of epilayer–substrate interactions in determining orientational relations in van der Waals epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Siegel, David A.; Chen, Wei; Liu, Peizhi; Guo, Junjie; Duscher, Gerd; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; McCarty, Kevin F.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gu, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Using selected-area low-energy electron diffraction analysis, we showed strict orientational alignment of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) crystallites with Cu(100) surface lattices of Cu foil substrates during atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. In sharp contrast, the graphene–Cu(100) system is well-known to assume a wide range of rotations despite graphene’s crystallographic similarity to h-BN. Our density functional theory calculations uncovered the origin of this surprising difference: The crystallite orientation is determined during nucleation by interactions between the cluster’s edges and the substrate. Unlike the weaker B– and N–Cu interactions, strong C–Cu interactions rearrange surface Cu atoms, resulting in the aligned geometry not being a distinct minimum in total energy. The discovery made in this specific case runs counter to the conventional wisdom that strong epilayer–substrate interactions enhance orientational alignment in epitaxy and sheds light on the factors that determine orientational relation in van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials. PMID:25385622

  2. Genotype by environment interactions in relation to growth traits in slow growing chickens

    PubMed Central

    N'Dri, Aya Lydie; Sellier, Nadine; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Beaumont, Catherine; Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine

    2007-01-01

    Since feed conversion ratio (FCR) is higher in slow-growing "Label Rouge" chickens than in broiler chickens, it is important to work on its improvement in this breed. However, this involves rearing animals in cages (C), an environment very different from that used for selection (in floor pens, S) and production (outdoor, E). The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of genotype by environment (G × E) interactions between S, C, and E environments, to find the best way to select for FCR, using 2002 related animals. Growth curve parameters were estimated and body composition measured. Individual feed conversion ratios (FCR) were recorded between 8 and 10 weeks in C. The presence of G × E interactions was assessed by the genetic correlations between the same trait recorded in different environments. Moderate but significant G × E interactions were detected for carcass traits, a significant one was observed between E and S or C for growth curve parameters but none between C and S. If G × E interactions are set aside, i.e. selecting on traits recorded in C, abdominal fatness is the best indirect selection criterion for FCR but if they are taken in account then leg yield or growth curve parameters in S and growth curve parameters in E are better. PMID:17897594

  3. Sensory interaction between 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine and oxidation-related compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Coetzee, C; Brand, J; Emerton, G; ...

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims:Wine aroma is influenced by complex interactions between various wine constituents. This study investigated the sensorial interactive effects of Sauvignon Blanc impact compounds, 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine with aldehydes typically originating from oxidation of white wines, methional and phenylacetaldehyde. Methods and Results: Spiked model wines were subjected to sensory descriptive analysis using a trained panel. The concentration of each compound varied from below aroma threshold value to high values reported in wine. Combinations of the four compounds were also evaluated sensorially. Depending on the concentration of the compounds, methional had a strong suppressive effect on the intensity of attributes contributedmore » by 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol, such as grapefruit and guava, whereas methional and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine enhanced the intensity of certain attributes, which included cooked beans and cooked potato. Conclusions: Complex sensory interactions may occur between Sauvignon Blanc impact compounds and compounds related to oxidation depending on concentration of the compounds. Oxidation-derived compounds such as methional can suppress pleasant aroma attributes linked to volatile thiols, while contributing negative attributes especially in the presence of 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine. Significance of the Study: This study highlights the importance of preserving fresh and fruity flavours while preventing the formation of unwanted aldehydes due to interactions that can influence the overall aroma profile of the wine. This study may also contribute to the sensory characterisation of oxidised Sauvignon Blanc wine.« less

  4. The interaction of extraversion and anxiety sensitivity on social anxiety: evidence of specificity relative to depression.

    PubMed

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Rutter, Lauren A; Brown, Timothy A

    2014-05-01

    Neuroticism and extraversion have been linked to the etiologies and course of anxiety and mood disorders, such that neuroticism is broadly associated with numerous disorders and extraversion is most strongly associated with social anxiety and depression. While previous research has established the broad associations between temperament and emotional disorders, less is known about the specific, proximal factors that are associated with them, and very few studies have situated these risk factors into a larger etiological model that specifies how they may relate to one another. The current study examined the interaction of extraversion and anxiety sensitivity (AS) in predicting social anxiety symptoms in a large, diagnostically diverse clinical sample (N=826). Symptoms were assessed with self-report and dimensional interview measures, and regression analyses were performed examining the main effects and interaction of extraversion and AS (examining both total and lower-order components) on social anxiety. Results showed that at higher levels of AS, the inverse relationship between extraversion and social anxiety was stronger, and the social concerns component of AS is responsible for this effect. This interaction was also observed with regard to depression symptoms, but the interaction was not present after accounting for shared variance (i.e., comorbidity) between depression and social anxiety symptoms. Clinical and theoretical implications of the results are discussed.

  5. Sensory interaction between 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine and oxidation-related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Coetzee, C; Brand, J; Emerton, G; Jacobson, Daniel A; Silva Ferreira, A C; Du Toit, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims:Wine aroma is influenced by complex interactions between various wine constituents. This study investigated the sensorial interactive effects of Sauvignon Blanc impact compounds, 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine with aldehydes typically originating from oxidation of white wines, methional and phenylacetaldehyde. Methods and Results: Spiked model wines were subjected to sensory descriptive analysis using a trained panel. The concentration of each compound varied from below aroma threshold value to high values reported in wine. Combinations of the four compounds were also evaluated sensorially. Depending on the concentration of the compounds, methional had a strong suppressive effect on the intensity of attributes contributed by 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol, such as grapefruit and guava, whereas methional and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine enhanced the intensity of certain attributes, which included cooked beans and cooked potato. Conclusions: Complex sensory interactions may occur between Sauvignon Blanc impact compounds and compounds related to oxidation depending on concentration of the compounds. Oxidation-derived compounds such as methional can suppress pleasant aroma attributes linked to volatile thiols, while contributing negative attributes especially in the presence of 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine. Significance of the Study: This study highlights the importance of preserving fresh and fruity flavours while preventing the formation of unwanted aldehydes due to interactions that can influence the overall aroma profile of the wine. This study may also contribute to the sensory characterisation of oxidised Sauvignon Blanc wine.

  6. Habitat effects on the relative importance of trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions.

    PubMed

    Trussell, Geoffrey C; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Matassa, Catherine M

    2006-11-01

    Classical views of trophic cascades emphasize the primacy of consumptive predator effects on prey populations to the transmission of indirect effects [density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs)]. However, trophic cascades can also emerge without changes in the density of interacting species because of non-consumptive predator effects on prey traits such as foraging behaviour [trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs)]. Although ecologists appreciate this point, measurements of the relative importance of each indirect predator effect are rare. Experiments with a three-level, rocky shore food chain containing an invasive predatory crab (Carcinus maenas), an intermediate consumer (the snail, Nucella lapillus) and a basal resource (the barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides) revealed that the strength of TMIIs is comparable with, or exceeds, that of DMIIs. Moreover, the sign and strength of each indirect predator effect depends on whether it is measured in risky or refuge habitats. Because habitat shifts are often responsible for the emergence of TMIIs, attention to the sign and strength of these interactions in both habitats will improve our understanding of the link between individual behaviour and community dynamics.

  7. Couples coping with chronic pain: How do intercouple interactions relate to pain coping?

    PubMed

    Prenevost, Mathilde Hallingstad; Reme, Silje Endresen

    2017-07-01

    Pain is not merely an isolated experience occurring within the person. It takes place in a wider social context, including the immediate social relationships that the person is a part of. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of how intercouple interactions might influence pain coping in couples coping with chronic pain. Four different approaches to understanding the influence of intercouple interactions have been proposed in the literature. In this review, we present and discuss the empirical support for each of these models. A literature search on all studies published up until May 2017 (PubMed and PsycINFO) was performed. The search string consisted of 3 steps: Chronic pain AND couple interaction*/partner validation/marital interaction/chronic pain couple*/spouse response* AND coping/adjustment/disability/function/work participation/sick leave/sickness absence/work disability. The operant model views partner responses from the perspective of conditioned learning and focuses on how such responses might increase or decrease the occurrence of pain behaviour. The notion that partner responses can reinforce pain behaviour generally finds support in the literature. However, when it comes to negative partner responses results are mixed, and the model paints a limited picture of the range of interactions that takes place in a couple. The communal coping model focuses on one specific type of coping (i.e. catastrophizing), and emphasizes the interpersonal aspect of pain coping. There is some evidence that a tendency to catastrophize is related both to couple interactions and pain coping, but it has proved difficult to test this model empirically. The interpersonal process model of intimacy is concerned with patient disclosures of distress and subsequent validating and invalidating partner responses. There is some preliminary support that such mechanisms of validation and invalidation can be linked to pain coping. A dyadic approach focuses on processes where the

  8. MATERNAL ROLE CONFUSION: RELATIONS TO MATERNAL ATTACHMENT AND MOTHER–CHILD INTERACTION FROM INFANCY TO ADOLESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    VULLIEZ-COADY, LAURIANE; OBSUTH, INGRID; TORREIRO-CASAL, MONICA; ELLERTSDOTTIR, LYDIA; LYONS-RUTH, KARLEN

    2014-01-01

    Self-reports of role confusion with the parent in childhood are associated with a variety of adverse outcomes. However, role-confusion has been studied primarily from the point of view of the child. The current study evaluated an instrument for assessing role confusion from maternal interviews rather than from child observations or self-reports in adulthood. Fifty-one mothers participating in a longitudinal study since their own child’s infancy were administered the Experiences of Caregiving Interview (C. George & J. Solomon, 1996) when the child was age 20. Interviews were coded using the newly developed Parental Assessment of Role Confusion (PARC; L. Vulliez-Coady & K. Lyons-Ruth, 2009). Maternal PARC scores were related to observational measures of role-confusion in interaction with the child both in infancy and late adolescence. PARC scores also were related to mothers’ hostile-helpless states of mind on the Adult Attachment Interview (C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1984, 1985, 1986) and to the extent of Unresolved loss, but not Unresolved Trauma. PARC scores also were related to mothers’ self-reports of helplessness experienced in the parenting role. Discriminant validity of the PARC was demonstrated in that role confusion on the PARC was not related to hostile or disoriented forms of parent–child interaction. Implications for clinical assessment of role confusion are discussed. PMID:25544789

  9. Delusions related to infant and their association with mother-infant interactions in postpartum psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Chandra, P S; Bhargavaraman, R P; Raghunandan, V N G P; Shaligram, D

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between mother infant interactions and psychopathology in postpartum psychotic disorders has been recognised as being clinically important, however data in the field is sparse. The current study had two aims--firstly, to study the prevalence and nature of delusions towards the infant among mothers with postpartum onset severe mental illness and secondly, to study the association between delusional symptoms towards the infant and mother infant interactions. 108 consecutive women with onset of severe mental illness in the postpartum, who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit in South India over a two-year period, were systematically assessed for presence of delusions related to the infant, using the Kannada version of the Birmingham Interview for Maternal Mental Health. Fifty-three percent of subjects reported delusions related to the infant, with 34% reporting more than one delusion. Mothers with infant related persecutory delusions were more likely to show affectionate behaviour and had normal competence and caring for baby's basic needs; however, they were more likely to get disturbed and agitated if separated from the baby. Mothers who had delusions that the baby was a devil or ill fated or someone else's baby, were more likely to have significant abusive incidents towards the baby. Overall, the mothers who had delusions related to the infant were seen to have more significant abusive incidents and were more likely to be considered unsafe in looking after the baby alone. The study emphasises the need for systematic clinical assessment of psychopathology in mothers with postpartum psychosis.

  10. Novel collective phenomena in high-energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusling, Kevin; Li, Wei; Schenke, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The observation of long-range rapidity correlations among particles in high-multiplicity p-p and p-Pb collisions has created new opportunities for investigating novel high-density QCD phenomena in small colliding systems. We review experimental results related to the study of collective phenomena in small systems at RHIC and the LHC along with the related developments in theory and phenomenology. Perspectives on possible future directions for research are discussed with the aim of exploring emergent QCD phenomena.

  11. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Follis, Jack L.; Smith, Caren E.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Garaulet, Marta; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Bartz, Traci M.; Kovanen, Leena; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Muka, Taulant; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Mikkilä, Vera; Ordovás, José M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. RESULTS We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (<7 h) and higher FG and replicated known MTNR1B associations with glycemic traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed nominally significant interactions (all P < 0.01) between carbohydrate intake and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for FG with a 0.003 mmol/L higher FG with each additional 1% carbohydrate intake in the presence of the T allele, between sleep duration and CRY2-rs11605924 for HDL-cholesterol with a 0.010 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol with each additional hour of sleep in the presence of the A allele, and between long sleep duration (≥9 h) and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for BMI with a 0.60 kg/m2 higher BMI with long sleep duration in the presence of the T allele relative to normal sleep duration (≥7 to <9 h). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that lower carbohydrate intake and normal sleep duration may ameliorate cardiometabolic abnormalities conferred by common circadian-related genetic variants

  12. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E; Tanaka, Toshiko; Garaulet, Marta; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A J L; Bartz, Traci M; Kovanen, Leena; Wojczynski, Mary K; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Muka, Taulant; Kalafati, Ioanna P; Mikkilä, Vera; Ordovás, José M

    2015-08-01

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (<7 h) and higher FG and replicated known MTNR1B associations with glycemic traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed nominally significant interactions (all P < 0.01) between carbohydrate intake and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for FG with a 0.003 mmol/L higher FG with each additional 1% carbohydrate intake in the presence of the T allele, between sleep duration and CRY2-rs11605924 for HDL-cholesterol with a 0.010 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol with each additional hour of sleep in the presence of the A allele, and between long sleep duration (≥9 h) and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for BMI with a 0.60 kg/m(2) higher BMI with long sleep duration in the presence of the T allele relative to normal sleep duration (≥7 to <9 h). Our results suggest that lower carbohydrate intake and normal sleep duration may ameliorate cardiometabolic abnormalities conferred by common circadian-related genetic variants. Until further mechanistic examination of the nominally

  13. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Vaz, C A F; Walker, F J; Ahn, C H; Ismail-Beigi, S

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  14. The Interaction between Speed Camera Enforcement and Speed-Related Mass Media Publicity in Victoria, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, M. H.; Newstead, S. V.; Diamantopoulou, K.; Oxley, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to measure the presence of any interaction between the effect of mobile covert speed camera enforcement and the effect of intensive mass media road safety publicity with speed-related themes. During 1999, the Victoria Police varied the levels of speed camera activity substantially in four Melbourne police districts according to a systematic plan. Camera hours were increased or reduced by 50% or 100% in respective districts for a month at a time, during months when speed-related publicity was present and during months when it was absent. Monthly frequencies of casualty crashes, and their severe injury outcome, in each district during 1996–2000 were analysed to test the effects of the enforcement, publicity and their interaction. Reductions in crash frequency were associated monotonically with increasing levels of speed camera ticketing, and there was a statistically significant 41% reduction in fatal crash outcome associated with very high camera activity. High publicity awareness was associated with 12% reduction in crash frequency. The interaction between the enforcement and publicity was not statistically significant. PMID:12941230

  15. An analysis of multi-type relational interactions in FMA using graph motifs with disjointness constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Lingyun; Ogbuji, Chime; Joslyn, Cliff; Mejino, Jose; Sahoo, Satya S

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of multiple types of relationships among anatomical classes in the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) can provide inferred information valuable for quality assurance. This paper introduces a method called Motif Checking (MOCH) to study the effects of such multi-relation type interactions for detecting logical inconsistencies as well as other anomalies represented by the motifs. MOCH represents patterns of multi-type interaction as small labeled (with multiple types of edges) sub-graph motifs, whose nodes represent class variables, and labeled edges represent relational types. By representing FMA as an RDF graph and motifs as SPARQL queries, fragments of FMA are automatically obtained as auditing candidates. Leveraging the scalability and reconfigurability of Semantic Web Technology, we performed exhaustive analyses of a variety of labeled sub-graph motifs. The quality assurance feature of MOCH comes from the distinct use of a subset of the edges of the graph motifs as constraints for disjointness, whereby bringing in rule-based flavor to the approach as well. With possible disjointness implied by antonyms, we performed manual inspection of the resulting FMA fragments and tracked down sources of abnormal inferred conclusions (logical inconsistencies), which are amendable for programmatic revision of the FMA. Our results demonstrate that MOCH provides a unique source of valuable information for quality assurance. Since our approach is general, it is applicable to any ontological system with an OWL representation.

  16. Zinc–gene interaction related to inflammatory/immune response in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The pivotal role played by zinc–gene interaction in affecting some relevant cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) and heat shock proteins (HSP70-2) in ageing, successful ageing (nonagenarians) and the most common age-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis and infections, is now recognized. The polymorphisms of genes codifying proteins related to the inflammation are predictive on one hand in longevity, on the other hand they are associated with atherosclerosis or severe infections. Since the health life-span has a strong genetic component, which in turn also affected by nutritional factors like zinc, the association of these polymorphisms with innate immune response, zinc ion bioavailability and Metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis is an useful tool to unravel the role played by zinc–gene interactions in longevity, especially due to the inability of MT in zinc release in ageing and chronic inflammation. In ageing, this last fact leads to depressed innate immune response for host defence. In contrast, in very old age the inflammation is lower with subsequent more zinc ion bioavailability, less MT gene expression and satisfactory innate immunity. Therefore, the zinc–gene (IL-6, TNF-α, Hsp70-2) interactions, via MT homeostasis, are crucial to achieve successful ageing. PMID:18850188

  17. An Analysis of Multi-type Relational Interactions in FMA Using Graph Motifs with Disjointness Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Lingyun; Ogbuji, Chime; Joslyn, Cliff; Mejino, Jose; Sahoo, Satya S

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of multiple types of relationships among anatomical classes in the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) can provide inferred information valuable for quality assurance. This paper introduces a method called Motif Checking (MOCH) to study the effects of such multi-relation type interactions for detecting logical inconsistencies as well as other anomalies represented by the motifs. MOCH represents patterns of multi-type interaction as small labeled (with multiple types of edges) sub-graph motifs, whose nodes represent class variables, and labeled edges represent relational types. By representing FMA as an RDF graph and motifs as SPARQL queries, fragments of FMA are automatically obtained as auditing candidates. Leveraging the scalability and reconfigurability of Semantic Web Technology, we performed exhaustive analyses of a variety of labeled sub-graph motifs. The quality assurance feature of MOCH comes from the distinct use of a subset of the edges of the graph motifs as constraints for disjointness, whereby bringing in rule-based flavor to the approach as well. With possible disjointness implied by antonyms, we performed manual inspection of the resulting FMA fragments and tracked down sources of abnormal inferred conclusions (logical inconsistencies), which are amendable for programmatic revision of the FMA. Our results demonstrate that MOCH provides a unique source of valuable information for quality assurance. Since our approach is general, it is applicable to any ontological system with an OWL representation. PMID:23304382

  18. Hippocampus and striatum: dynamics and interaction during acquisition and sleep-related motor sequence memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Albouy, Geneviève; King, Bradley R; Maquet, Pierre; Doyon, Julien

    2013-11-01

    While several models of memory consolidation have previously associated hippocampal activity with declarative memory, there is now increasing evidence that the hippocampus also plays a crucial role in procedural memory. Here, we review recent human functional neuroimaging studies demonstrating that the hippocampus is involved in the acquisition and sleep-related consolidation of procedural memories, and motor sequence-based skills in particular. More specifically, we present evidence that hippocampal activity and its functional interactions with other brain structures, particularly competition with the striatum, contribute to initial learning of sequential motor behavior. Interestingly, these early cerebral representations in the hippocampus and striatum, which may interact through the prefrontal cortex, can even predict subsequent sleep-related memory consolidation processes. We propose that sleep can reorganize the activity within, as well as the functional interactions between, these structures, ultimately favoring overnight performance enhancement. Finally, we conclude by offering insights into the respective roles of these structures in procedural memory consolidation processes. We argue that, in the context of motor sequence memory consolidation, the hippocampal system triggers subsequent sleep-dependent performance enhancement whereas the striatal system is involved in the maintenance of the motor behavior over time.

  19. Relative advantages of thin-layer Navier-Stokes and interactive boundary-layer procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U.; Chang, K. C.; Cebeci, T.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical procedures for solving the thin-shear-layer Navier-Stokes equations and for the interaction of solutions to inviscid and boundary-layer equations are described and evaluated. To allow appraisal of the numerical and fluid dynamic abilities of the two schemes, they have been applied to one airfoil as a function of angle of attack at two slightly different Reynolds numbers. The NACA 0012 airfoil has been chosen because it allows comparison with measured lift, drag, and moment and with surface-pressure distributions. Calculations have been performed with algebraic eddy-viscosity formulations, and they include consideration of transition. The results are presented in a form that allows easy appraisal of the accuracy of both procedures and of the relative costs. The interactive procedure is computationally efficient but restrictive relative to the thin-layer Navier-Stokes procedure. The latter procedure does a better job of predicting drag than does the former. In both procedures, the location of transition is crucial for accurate or detailed computations, particularly at high angles of attack. When the upstream influence of pressure field through the shear layer is important, the thin-layer Navier-Stokes procedure has an edge over the interactive procedure.

  20. Interaction between the RGS6 gene and psychosocial stress on obesity-related traits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Min, Jin-Young; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2017-03-31

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases and arises from the interactions between environmental factors and multiple genes. Psychosocial stress may affect the risk for obesity, modifying food intake and choice. A recent study suggested regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) as a novel candidate gene for obesity in terms of reward-related feeding under stress. In this study, we tried to verify the unidentified connection between RGS6 and human obesity with psychosocial stress in a Korean population. A total of 1,462 adult subjects, who participated in the Korean Association Resource cohort project, were included for this analysis. Obesity-related traits including waist circumference, body mass index, and visceral adipose tissue were recorded. A total of 4 intronic SNPs for the RGS6 gene were used for this study. We found that interactions between SNP rs2239219 and psychosocial stress are significantly associated with abdominal obesity (p = 0.007). As risk allele of this SNP increased, prevalence of abdominal obesity under high-stress conditions gradually increased (p = 0.013). However, we found no SNPs-by-stress interaction effect on other adiposity phenotypes. This study suggests that RGS6 is closely linked to stress-induced abdominal obesity in Korean adults.