Science.gov

Sample records for related jmjc domain

  1. Structure of the JmjC domain-containing protein NO66 complexed with ribosomal protein Rpl8

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chengliang; Zhang, Qiongdi; Hang, Tianrong; Tao, Yue; Ma, Xukai; Wu, Minhao; Zhang, Xuan Zang, Jianye

    2015-08-28

    The structure of the complex of NO66 and Rpl8 was solved in the native state and NO66 recognizes the consensus motif NHXH . Tetramerization is required for efficient substrate binding and catalysis by NO66. The JmjC domain-containing proteins belong to a large family of oxygenases possessing distinct substrate specificities which are involved in the regulation of different biological processes, such as gene transcription, RNA processing and translation. Nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) is a JmjC domain-containing protein which has been reported to be a histone demethylase and a ribosome protein 8 (Rpl8) hydroxylase. The present biochemical study confirmed the hydroxylase activity of NO66 and showed that oligomerization is required for NO66 to efficiently catalyze the hydroxylation of Rpl8. The structures of NO66{sup 176–C} complexed with Rpl8{sup 204–224} in a tetrameric form and of the mutant protein M2 in a dimeric form were solved. Based on the results of structural and biochemical analyses, the consensus sequence motif NHXH recognized by NO66 was confirmed. Several potential substrates of NO66 were found by a BLAST search according to the consensus sequence motif. When binding to substrate, the relative positions of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer shift. Oligomerization may facilitate the motion of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer and affect the catalytic activity.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Soybean JmjC Domain-Containing Proteins Suggests Evolutionary Conservation Following Whole-Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yapeng; Li, Xiangyong; Cheng, Lin; Liu, Yanchun; Wang, Hui; Ke, Danxia; Yuan, Hongyu; Zhang, Liangsheng; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications, such as methylation and demethylation, play an important role in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression. The JmjC domain-containing proteins, an important family of histone lysine demethylases (KDMs), play a key role in maintaining homeostasis of histone methylation in vivo. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the jumonji C (JmjC) gene family in the soybean genome and identified 48 JmjC genes (GmJMJs) distributed unevenly across 18 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these JmjC domain-containing genes can be divided into eight groups. GmJMJs within the same phylogenetic group share similar exon/intron organization and domain composition. In addition, 16 duplicated gene pairs were formed by a Glycine-specific whole-genome duplication (WGD) event approximately 13 million years ago (Mya). By investigating the expression profiles of these gene pairs in various tissues, we showed that the expression pattern is conserved in the polyploidy-derived JmjC duplicates, demonstrating that the majority of GmJMJs were preferentially retained after the most recent WGD event and suggesting important roles for demethylase duplications in soybean evolution. These results shed light on the evolutionary history of this family in soybean and provide insights into the JmjCs which will be helpful to reveal their functions in controlling soybean development. PMID:27994610

  3. MoJMJ1, Encoding a Histone Demethylase Containing JmjC Domain, Is Required for Pathogenic Development of the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Aram; Dubey, Akanksha; Kim, Seongbeom; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Histone methylation plays important roles in regulating chromatin dynamics and transcription in eukaryotes. Implication of histone modifications in fungal pathogenesis is, however, beginning to emerge. Here, we report identification and functional analysis of a putative JmjC-domain-containing histone demethylase in Magnaporthe oryzae. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified seven genes, which encode putative histone demethylases containing JmjC domain. Deletion of one gene, MoJMJ1, belonging to JARID group, resulted in defects in vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, appressorium formation as well as invasive growth in the fungus. Western blot analysis showed that global H3K4me3 level increased in the deletion mutant, compared to wild-type strain, indicating histone demethylase activity of MoJMJ1. Introduction of MoJMJ1 gene into ΔMojmj1 restored defects in pre-penetration developments including appressorium formation, indicating the importance of histone demethylation through MoJMJ1 during infection-specific morphogenesis. However, defects in penetration and invasive growth were not complemented. We discuss such incomplete complementation in detail here. Our work on MoJMJ1 provides insights into H3K4me3-mediated regulation of infection-specific development in the plant pathogenic fungus. PMID:28381966

  4. MoJMJ1, Encoding a Histone Demethylase Containing JmjC Domain, Is Required for Pathogenic Development of the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Huh, Aram; Dubey, Akanksha; Kim, Seongbeom; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2017-04-01

    Histone methylation plays important roles in regulating chromatin dynamics and transcription in eukaryotes. Implication of histone modifications in fungal pathogenesis is, however, beginning to emerge. Here, we report identification and functional analysis of a putative JmjC-domain-containing histone demethylase in Magnaporthe oryzae. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified seven genes, which encode putative histone demethylases containing JmjC domain. Deletion of one gene, MoJMJ1, belonging to JARID group, resulted in defects in vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, appressorium formation as well as invasive growth in the fungus. Western blot analysis showed that global H3K4me3 level increased in the deletion mutant, compared to wild-type strain, indicating histone demethylase activity of MoJMJ1. Introduction of MoJMJ1 gene into ΔMojmj1 restored defects in pre-penetration developments including appressorium formation, indicating the importance of histone demethylation through MoJMJ1 during infection-specific morphogenesis. However, defects in penetration and invasive growth were not complemented. We discuss such incomplete complementation in detail here. Our work on MoJMJ1 provides insights into H3K4me3-mediated regulation of infection-specific development in the plant pathogenic fungus.

  5. Jmjd6, a JmjC Dioxygenase with Many Interaction Partners and Pleiotropic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Janice; O’Shea, Marie; Hume, David A.; Lengeling, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Lysyl hydroxylation and arginyl demethylation are post-translational events that are important for many cellular processes. The jumonji domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) has been reported to catalyze both lysyl hydroxylation and arginyl demethylation on diverse protein substrates. It also interacts directly with RNA. This review summarizes knowledge of JMJD6 functions that have emerged in the last 15 years and considers how a single Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing enzyme can target so many different substrates. New links and synergies between the three main proposed functions of Jmjd6 in histone demethylation, promoter proximal pause release of polymerase II and RNA splicing are discussed. The physiological context of the described molecular functions is considered and recently described novel roles for JMJD6 in cancer and immune biology are reviewed. The increased knowledge of JMJD6 functions has wider implications for our general understanding of the JmjC protein family of which JMJD6 is a member. PMID:28360925

  6. Arginine demethylation is catalysed by a subset of JmjC histone lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Walport, Louise J.; Hopkinson, Richard J.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schiller, Rachel; Ge, Wei; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    While the oxygen-dependent reversal of lysine Nɛ-methylation is well established, the existence of bona fide Nω-methylarginine demethylases (RDMs) is controversial. Lysine demethylation, as catalysed by two families of lysine demethylases (the flavin-dependent KDM1 enzymes and the 2-oxoglutarate- and oxygen-dependent JmjC KDMs, respectively), proceeds via oxidation of the N-methyl group, resulting in the release of formaldehyde. Here we report detailed biochemical studies clearly demonstrating that, in purified form, a subset of JmjC KDMs can also act as RDMs, both on histone and non-histone fragments, resulting in formaldehyde release. RDM catalysis is studied using peptides of wild-type sequences known to be arginine-methylated and sequences in which the KDM's methylated target lysine is substituted for a methylated arginine. Notably, the preferred sequence requirements for KDM and RDM activity vary even with the same JmjC enzymes. The demonstration of RDM activity by isolated JmjC enzymes will stimulate efforts to detect biologically relevant RDM activity. PMID:27337104

  7. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  8. Relating Hippocampus to Relational Memory Processing across Domains and Delays

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Jim M.; Cooke, Gillian E.; Watson, Patrick D.; Voss, Michelle W.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus has been implicated in a diverse set of cognitive domains and paradigms, including cognitive mapping, long-term memory, and relational memory, at long or short study–test intervals. Despite the diversity of these areas, their association with the hippocampus may rely on an underlying commonality of relational memory processing shared among them. Most studies assess hippocampal memory within just one of these domains, making it difficult to know whether these paradigms all assess a similar underlying cognitive construct tied to the hippocampus. Here we directly tested the commonality among disparate tasks linked to the hippocampus by using PCA on performance from a battery of 12 cognitive tasks that included two traditional, long-delay neuropsychological tests of memory and two laboratory tests of relational memory (one of spatial and one of visual object associations) that imposed only short delays between study and test. Also included were different tests of memory, executive function, and processing speed. Structural MRI scans from a subset of participants were used to quantify the volume of the hippocampus and other subcortical regions. Results revealed that the 12 tasks clustered into four components; critically, the two neuropsychological tasks of long-term verbal memory and the two laboratory tests of relational memory loaded onto one component. Moreover, bilateral hippocampal volume was strongly tied to performance on this component. Taken together, these data emphasize the important contribution the hippocampus makes to relational memory processing across a broad range of tasks that span multiple domains. PMID:25203273

  9. Relating hippocampus to relational memory processing across domains and delays.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jim M; Cooke, Gillian E; Watson, Patrick D; Voss, Michelle W; Kramer, Arthur F; Cohen, Neal J

    2015-02-01

    The hippocampus has been implicated in a diverse set of cognitive domains and paradigms, including cognitive mapping, long-term memory, and relational memory, at long or short study-test intervals. Despite the diversity of these areas, their association with the hippocampus may rely on an underlying commonality of relational memory processing shared among them. Most studies assess hippocampal memory within just one of these domains, making it difficult to know whether these paradigms all assess a similar underlying cognitive construct tied to the hippocampus. Here we directly tested the commonality among disparate tasks linked to the hippocampus by using PCA on performance from a battery of 12 cognitive tasks that included two traditional, long-delay neuropsychological tests of memory and two laboratory tests of relational memory (one of spatial and one of visual object associations) that imposed only short delays between study and test. Also included were different tests of memory, executive function, and processing speed. Structural MRI scans from a subset of participants were used to quantify the volume of the hippocampus and other subcortical regions. Results revealed that the 12 tasks clustered into four components; critically, the two neuropsychological tasks of long-term verbal memory and the two laboratory tests of relational memory loaded onto one component. Moreover, bilateral hippocampal volume was strongly tied to performance on this component. Taken together, these data emphasize the important contribution the hippocampus makes to relational memory processing across a broad range of tasks that span multiple domains.

  10. Cross-Domain Analogies as Relating Derived Relations among Two Separate Relational Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Francisco J.; Luciano, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary behavior analytic research is making headway in analyzing analogy as the establishment of a relation of coordination among common types of trained or derived relations. Previous studies have been focused on within-domain analogy. The current study expands previous research by analyzing cross-domain analogy as relating relations among…

  11. Between- and Within-Domain Relations of Students' Academic Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Hall, Nathan C.; Ludtke, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated between- and within-domain relations of academic emotions, including students' enjoyment, pride, anxiety, anger, and boredom experienced in mathematics, physics, German, and English classes (N = 542; Grades 8 and 11). Corroborating assumptions of domain specificity, the between-domains relations of these emotions were weak…

  12. Between-domain relations of students' academic emotions and their judgments of school domain similarity

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Thomas; Haag, Ludwig; Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Keller, Melanie M.; Frenzel, Anne C.; Collier, Antonie P. M.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to deepen our understanding of the between-domain relations of academic emotions, a series of three studies was conducted. We theorized that between-domain relations of trait (i.e., habitual) emotions reflected students' judgments of domain similarities, whereas between-domain relations of state (i.e., momentary) emotions did not. This supposition was based on the accessibility model of emotional self-report, according to which individuals' beliefs tend to strongly impact trait, but not state emotions. The aim of Study 1 (interviews; N = 40; 8th and 11th graders) was to gather salient characteristics of academic domains from students' perspective. In Study 2 (N = 1709; 8th and 11th graders) the 13 characteristics identified in Study 1 were assessed along with academic emotions in four different domains (mathematics, physics, German, and English) using a questionnaire-based trait assessment. With respect to the same domains, state emotions were assessed in Study 3 (N = 121; 8th and 11th graders) by employing an experience sampling approach. In line with our initial assumptions, between-domain relations of trait but not state academic emotions reflected between-domain relations of domain characteristics. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25374547

  13. The Definition, Dimensions, and Domain of Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutton, James G.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how the field of public relations has left itself vulnerable to other fields that are making inroads into public relations' traditional domain, and to critics who are filling in their own definitions of public relations. Proposes a definition and a three-dimensional framework to compare competing philosophies of public relations and to…

  14. de Gennes Narrowing Describes the Relative Motion of Protein Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Smolin, Nikolai; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-04-01

    The relative motion of structural domains is essential for the biological function of many proteins. Here, by analyzing neutron scattering data and performing molecular dynamics simulations, we find that interdomain motion in several proteins obeys the principle of de Gennes narrowing, in which the wave vector dependence of the interdomain diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interdomain structure factor. Thus, the rate of interdomain motion is inversely proportional to the probability distribution of the spatial configurations of domains.

  15. Cross-Domain Analogies as Relating Derived Relations among Two Separate Relational Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Francisco J; Luciano, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary behavior analytic research is making headway in analyzing analogy as the establishment of a relation of coordination among common types of trained or derived relations. Previous studies have been focused on within-domain analogy. The current study expands previous research by analyzing cross-domain analogy as relating relations among separate relational networks and by correlating participants' performance with a standard measure of analogical reasoning. In two experiments, adult participants first completed general intelligence and analogical reasoning tests. Subsequently, they were exposed to a computerized conditional discrimination training procedure designed to create two relational networks, each consisting of two 3-member equivalence classes. The critical test was a two-part analogical test in which participants had to relate combinatorial relations of coordination and distinction between the two relational networks. In Experiment 1, combinatorial relations for each network were individually tested prior to analogical testing, but in Experiment 2 they were not. Across both experiments, 65% of participants passed the analogical test on the first attempt. Moreover, results from the training procedure were strongly correlated with the standard measure of analogical reasoning. PMID:21547072

  16. Cross-domain analogies as relating derived relations among two separate relational networks.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francisco J; Luciano, Carmen

    2011-05-01

    Contemporary behavior analytic research is making headway in analyzing analogy as the establishment of a relation of coordination among common types of trained or derived relations. Previous studies have been focused on within-domain analogy. The current study expands previous research by analyzing cross-domain analogy as relating relations among separate relational networks and by correlating participants' performance with a standard measure of analogical reasoning. In two experiments, adult participants first completed general intelligence and analogical reasoning tests. Subsequently, they were exposed to a computerized conditional discrimination training procedure designed to create two relational networks, each consisting of two 3-member equivalence classes. The critical test was a two-part analogical test in which participants had to relate combinatorial relations of coordination and distinction between the two relational networks. In Experiment 1, combinatorial relations for each network were individually tested prior to analogical testing, but in Experiment 2 they were not. Across both experiments, 65% of participants passed the analogical test on the first attempt. Moreover, results from the training procedure were strongly correlated with the standard measure of analogical reasoning.

  17. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  18. Some proposed relations among the domains of behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J.; Cooper, John O.

    2003-01-01

    The present article examines the nature of and relations among the domains of behavior analysis. It first proposes a set of annotated, descriptive criteria to aid in distinguishing the experimental analysis of behavior, applied behavior analysis, and service delivery. It then argues that the experimental analysis of behavior lies at one end of a continuum of behavior-analytic activity, with applied behavior analysis in the middle, service delivery at the other end, and the theoretical-philosophical-conceptual position known as “radical behaviorism” informing the three domains on the continuum. Finally, it argues that clarifying the distinctions among the domains of behavior analysis will help the behavior-analytic community to focus its efforts in training programs and overall support of behavior analysis. PMID:22478395

  19. Kernel-Based Learning for Domain-Specific Relation Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basili, Roberto; Giannone, Cristina; Del Vescovo, Chiara; Moschitti, Alessandro; Naggar, Paolo

    In a specific process of business intelligence, i.e. investigation on organized crime, empirical language processing technologies can play a crucial role. The analysis of transcriptions on investigative activities, such as police interrogatories, for the recognition and storage of complex relations among people and locations is a very difficult and time consuming task, ultimately based on pools of experts. We discuss here an inductive relation extraction platform that opens the way to much cheaper and consistent workflows. The presented empirical investigation shows that accurate results, comparable to the expert teams, can be achieved, and parametrization allows to fine tune the system behavior for fitting domain-specific requirements.

  20. Domain Importance and Involvement: Relations between Domain Self-Concepts and General Self-Esteem in Preadolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, Ellen E.; Vispoel, Walter P.

    This study examined the role that domain importance plays in mediating the relations between domain-specific (such as verbal ability, physical appearance, opposite sex relations, and honesty) and general self-perceptions. Focusing on two previous studies by Hoge and McCarthy (1984) and Marsh (1986), the current study was designed to address the…

  1. Delineating relative homogeneous G+C domains in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, W

    2001-10-03

    The concept of homogeneity of G+C content is always relative and subjective. This point is emphasized and quantified in this paper using a simple example of one sequence segmented into two subsequences. Whether the sequence is homogeneous or not can be answered by whether the two-subsequence model describes the DNA sequence better than the one-sequence model. There are at least three equivalent ways of looking at the 1-to-2 segmentation: Jensen-Shannon divergence measure, log likelihood ratio test, and model selection using Bayesian information criterion. Once a criterion is chosen, a DNA sequence can be recursively segmented into multiple domains. We use one subjective criterion called segmentation strength based on the Bayesian information criterion. Whether or not a sequence is homogeneous and how many domains it has depend on this criterion. We compare six different genome sequences (yeast S. cerevisiae chromosome III and IV, bacterium M. pneumoniae, human major histocompatibility complex sequence, longest contigs in human chromosome 21 and 22) by recursive segmentations at different strength criteria. Results by recursive segmentation confirm that yeast chromosome IV is more homogeneous than yeast chromosome III, human chromosome 21 is more homogeneous than human chromosome 22, and bacterial genomes may not be homogeneous due to short segments with distinct base compositions. The recursive segmentation also provides a quantitative criterion for identifying isochores in human sequences. Some features of our recursive segmentation, such as the possibility of delineating domain borders accurately, are superior to those of the moving-window approach commonly used in such analyses.

  2. A relational metric, its application to domain analysis, and an example analysis and model of a remote sensing domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    An objective and quantitative method has been developed for deriving models of complex and specialized spheres of activity (domains) from domain-generated verbal data. The method was developed for analysis of interview transcripts, incident reports, and other text documents whose original source is people who are knowledgeable about, and participate in, the domain in question. To test the method, it is applied here to a report describing a remote sensing project within the scope of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The method has the potential to improve the designs of domain-related computer systems and software by quickly providing developers with explicit and objective models of the domain in a form which is useful for design. Results of the analysis include a network model of the domain, and an object-oriented relational analysis report which describes the nodes and relationships in the network model. Other products include a database of relationships in the domain, and an interactive concordance. The analysis method utilizes a newly developed relational metric, a proximity-weighted frequency of co-occurrence. The metric is applied to relations between the most frequently occurring terms (words or multiword entities) in the domain text, and the terms found within the contexts of these terms. Contextual scope is selectable. Because of the discriminating power of the metric, data reduction from the association matrix to the network is simple. In addition to their value for design. the models produced by the method are also useful for understanding the domains themselves. They can, for example, be interpreted as models of presence in the domain.

  3. Examining the Relation between Domain-Related Communication and Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anjewierden, Anjo; Gijlers, Hannie; Kolloffel, Bas; Saab, Nadira; de Hoog, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that providing others with elaborated explanations is more beneficial for learning than receiving explanations (e.g., Webb, 1989). Applied to chat communication in a collaborative inquiry learning environment, we would expect that in a dyad learners with more domain-related contributions than their partners would learn more. In…

  4. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  5. Domain-specific reports of visual imagery vividness are not related to perceptual expertise.

    PubMed

    Sunday, Mackenzie; McGugin, Rankin W; Gauthier, Isabel

    2016-04-08

    Just as people vary in their perceptual expertise with a given domain, they also vary in their abilities to imagine objects. Visual imagery and perception share common mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether domain-specific expertise is relevant to visual imagery. Although the vividness of visual imagery is typically measured as a domain-general construct, a component of this vividness may be domain-specific. For example, individuals who have gained perceptual expertise with a specific domain might experience clearer mental images within this domain. Here we investigated whether perceptual expertise for cars relates to visual imagery vividness in the same domain, by assessing the correlations between a widely used domain-general measure of visual imagery vividness (the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire; Marks in British Journal of Psychology, 64, 17-24, 1973), a new measure of visual imagery vividness specific to cars, and behavioral tests of car expertise. We found that domain-specific imagery relates most strongly to general imagery vividness and less strongly to self-reported expertise, while it does not relate to perceptual or semantic expertise.

  6. Relational Reasoning in STEM Domains: A Foundation for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    What is relational reasoning? Why is it critical to consider the role of relational reasoning in students learning and development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)? Moreover, how do the particular contributions populating this special issue address the pressing societal needs and offer guidance to researchers and…

  7. Defining Novel Health-Related Quality of Life Domains in Lung Transplantation: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan Paul; Chen, Joan; Katz, Patricia P; Blanc, Paul David; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Stewart, Anita L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Health-related quality of life (HRQL) domains vary across disease conditions and are determined by standards, values, and priorities internal to patients. Although the clinical goals of lung transplantation are to improve patient survival and HRQL, what defines HRQL in lung transplantation is unknown. Employing a qualitative approach, we aimed to identify HRQL domains important in lung transplantation. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews in purposefully sampled lung transplant recipients (n=8) representing a spectrum of ages, gender, indications for transplantation, and time since transplantation as well as health-care practitioners representing a spectrum of practitioner types (n=9). Grounded Theory was used to identify HRQL domains important in lung transplantation, building on but going beyond domains already defined in the SF-36, the most commonly used instrument in this population. Results In addition to confirming the relevance of the eight SF-36 domains, we identified 11 novel HRQL domains. Palliation of respiratory symptoms was identified as important. After transplant surgery, new HRQL domains emerged including: distressing symptoms spanning multiple organ systems; worry about infection and acute rejection; treatment burden; and depression. Further, patients identified challenges to intimacy, changes in social relationships, and problems with cognitive functioning. Saliently, worry about limited life expectancy was pervasive and impaired life planning. Conclusions We found that HRQL in lung transplantation is defined by both generic and transplant-specific domains. Delineating and refining these domains can inform efforts to improve clinical outcomes and HRQL measurement in lung transplantation. PMID:25471287

  8. Characterization of a Linked Jumonji Domain of the KDM5/JARID1 Family of Histone H3 Lysine 4 Demethylases*

    PubMed Central

    Horton, John R.; Engstrom, Amanda; Zoeller, Elizabeth L.; Liu, Xu; Shanks, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Johns, Margaret A.; Vertino, Paula M.; Fu, Haian; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The KDM5/JARID1 family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent demethylases remove methyl groups from tri- and dimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3. Accumulating evidence from primary tumors and model systems supports a role for KDM5A (JARID1A/RBP2) and KDM5B (JARID1B/PLU1) as oncogenic drivers. The KDM5 family is unique among the Jumonji domain-containing histone demethylases in that there is an atypical insertion of a DNA-binding ARID domain and a histone-binding PHD domain into the Jumonji domain, which separates the catalytic domain into two fragments (JmjN and JmjC). Here we demonstrate that internal deletion of the ARID and PHD1 domains has a negligible effect on in vitro enzymatic kinetics of the KDM5 family of enzymes. We present a crystal structure of the linked JmjN-JmjC domain from KDM5A, which reveals that the linked domain fully reconstitutes the cofactor (metal ion and α-ketoglutarate) binding characteristics of other structurally characterized Jumonji domain demethylases. Docking studies with GSK-J1, a selective inhibitor of the KDM6/KDM5 subfamilies, identify critical residues for binding of the inhibitor to the reconstituted KDM5 Jumonji domain. Further, we found that GSK-J1 inhibited the demethylase activity of KDM5C with 8.5-fold increased potency compared with that of KDM5B at 1 mm α-ketoglutarate. In contrast, JIB-04 (a pan-inhibitor of the Jumonji demethylase superfamily) had the opposite effect and was ∼8-fold more potent against KDM5B than against KDM5C. Interestingly, the relative selectivity of JIB-04 toward KDM5B over KDM5C in vitro translates to a ∼10–50-fold greater growth-inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell lines. These data define the minimal requirements for enzymatic activity of the KDM5 family to be the linked JmjN-JmjC domain coupled with the immediate C-terminal helical zinc-binding domain and provide structural characterization of the linked JmjN-JmjC domain for the KDM5 family, which should prove useful in

  9. Structural genomics reveals EVE as a new ASCH/PUA-related domain.

    PubMed

    Bertonati, Claudia; Punta, Marco; Fischer, Markus; Yachdav, Guy; Forouhar, Farhad; Zhou, Weihong; Kuzin, Alexander P; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Abashidze, Mariam; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Cort, John R; Belachew, Adam; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T; Rost, Burkhard

    2009-05-15

    We report on several proteins recently solved by structural genomics consortia, in particular by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium (NESG). The proteins considered in this study differ substantially in their sequences but they share a similar structural core, characterized by a pseudobarrel five-stranded beta sheet. This core corresponds to the PUA domain-like architecture in the SCOP database. By connecting sequence information with structural knowledge, we characterize a new subgroup of these proteins that we propose to be distinctly different from previously described PUA domain-like domains such as PUA proper or ASCH. We refer to these newly defined domains as EVE. Although EVE may have retained the ability of PUA domains to bind RNA, the available experimental and computational data suggests that both the details of its molecular function and its cellular function differ from those of other PUA domain-like domains. This study of EVE and its relatives illustrates how the combination of structure and genomics creates new insights by connecting a cornucopia of structures that map to the same evolutionary potential. Primary sequence information alone would have not been sufficient to reveal these evolutionary links.

  10. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  11. Bidirectional Transfer between Metaphorical Related Domains in Implicit Learning of Form-Meaning Connections

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiliang; Dienes, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    People can implicitly learn a connection between linguistic forms and meanings, for example between specific determiners (e.g. this, that…) and the type of nouns to which they apply. Li et al (2013) recently found that transfer of form-meaning connections from a concrete domain (height) to an abstract domain (power) was achieved in a metaphor-consistent way without awareness, showing that unconscious knowledge can be abstract and flexibly deployed. The current study aims to determine whether people transfer knowledge of form-meaning connections not only from a concrete domain to an abstract one, but also vice versa, consistent with metaphor representation being bi-directional. With a similar paradigm as used by Li et al, participants learnt form- meaning connections of different domains (concrete vs. abstract) and then were tested on two kinds of generalizations (same and different domain generalization). As predicted, transfer of form-meaning connections occurred bidirectionally when structural knowledge was unconscious. Moreover, the present study also revealed that more transfer occurred between metaphorically related domains when judgment knowledge was conscious (intuition) rather than unconscious (guess). Conscious and unconscious judgment knowledge may have different functional properties. PMID:23844159

  12. Constructing Domain-Specific Knowledge in Kindergarten: Relations among Knowledge, Intelligence, and Strategic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Joyce M.; Johnson, Kathy E.; Leibham, Mary E.; DeBauge, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    Thirty kindergarten children from two classrooms participated in a 3-week curricular unit on dinosaurs designed to teach taxonomic relations and distinguishing features aligned with 15 dinosaur species. Both domain-specific learning and strategic performance on a Twenty Questions game were assessed twice throughout the curriculum, as well as…

  13. The Dynamics of Effective Performance Evaluation Systems in Education: Conceptual, Human Relations, and Technical Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.

    1991-01-01

    A triad of conceptual, human relations, and technical domains is proposed as a basis for effective performance evaluation systems in education. Systems incorporating the relevant issues in this triad address a fundamental rule of performance evaluation: if it is worth doing, it is worth doing well. (SLD)

  14. International Note: Between-Domain Relations of Chinese High School Students' Academic Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yangyang, Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements. In a sample of 1870 Chinese 10th grade students, the results indicated that Chinese high school students' academic achievements were correlated across nine subjects. In line with the previous Western findings, the findings suggested that…

  15. Uniqueness in shape identification of a time-varying domain and related parabolic equations on non-cylindrical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hajime; Tsuchiya, Masaaki

    2010-12-01

    The paper deals with an inverse problem determining the shape of a time-varying Lipschitz domain by boundary measurements of the temperature; such a domain is treated as a non-cylindrical domain in the time-space. Here we focus on the uniqueness of the shape identification. As a general treatment to show the uniqueness, a comparability condition on a pair of domains is introduced; the condition holds automatically in the time-independent case. Based on the condition, we provide several classes of domains in which the uniqueness of the shape identification holds under an appropriate initial shape condition or initial temperature condition. Each of such classes is characterized by a certain geometric condition on its each single element; in particular, it is verified that the class of polyhedral domains and any class of domains with C1 smoothness and with a common initial shape fulfil the uniqueness property. The inverse problem is studied via a parabolic equation with a mixed boundary condition. Then the unique continuation property of weak solutions and the uniqueness of weak solutions to an induced parabolic equation with the homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition on a non-cylindrical non-Lipschitz domain play key roles. This work was partially supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research 21540160.

  16. Domain-based identification and analysis of glutamate receptor ion channels and their relatives in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ger, Mao-Feng; Rendon, Gloria; Tilson, Jeffrey L; Jakobsson, Eric

    2010-10-06

    Voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels are used in eukaryotic organisms for the purpose of electrochemical signaling. There are prokaryotic homologues to major eukaryotic channels of these sorts, including voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, Ach-receptor and glutamate-receptor channels. The prokaryotic homologues have been less well characterized functionally than their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we identify likely prokaryotic functional counterparts of eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels by comprehensive analysis of the prokaryotic sequences in the context of known functional domains present in the eukaryotic members of this family. In particular, we searched the nonredundant protein database for all proteins containing the following motif: the two sections of the extracellular glutamate binding domain flanking two transmembrane helices. We discovered 100 prokaryotic sequences containing this motif, with a wide variety of functional annotations. Two groups within this family have the same topology as eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. Group 1 has a potassium-like selectivity filter. Group 2 is most closely related to eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. We present analysis of the functional domain architecture for the group of 100, a putative phylogenetic tree, comparison of the protein phylogeny with the corresponding species phylogeny, consideration of the distribution of these proteins among classes of prokaryotes, and orthologous relationships between prokaryotic and human glutamate receptor channels. We introduce a construct called the Evolutionary Domain Network, which represents a putative pathway of domain rearrangements underlying the domain composition of present channels. We believe that scientists interested in ion channels in general, and ligand-gated ion channels in particular, will be interested in this work. The work should also be of interest to bioinformatics researchers who are interested in the use

  17. Severity of personality disorders and domains of general personality dysfunction related to attachment.

    PubMed

    Hengartner, Michael P; von Wyl, Agnes; Tanis, Thachell; Halmi, Winter; Galynker, Igor; Cohen, Lisa J

    2015-08-01

    This is the first study to link attachment to both severity of total DSM-IV personality disorder (PD) traits and domains of general personality dysfunction, using a sample of 72 inpatients from New York City. We assessed a measure of global PD severity and the core domains of personality functioning using the severity indices of personality problems (SIPP-118). Attachment was measured with the experience in close relationships-revised (ECR-R) and the relationship style questionnaire (RSQ). Global PD severity correlated most strongly with attachment anxiety (r = 0.65). Regression of the SIPP-118 domains on attachment produced models that accounted for a substantial proportion of variance in those scales (R(2) ranging from 28.2 to 54.2%). SIPP-118 relational capacities were the strongest predictor of ECR-R avoidance (β = -0.88) and anxiety (β = -0.58), as well as RSQ secure (β = 0.53) and fearful (β = -0.65). In conclusion, insecure attachment strongly related to the severity of global PD traits and specifically to relational capacities, which are a higher-order domain of general personality dysfunction. These findings provide further evidence that interpersonal problems are at the core of PDs and that attachment could constitute an important mediator of the social dysfunction in persons with personality pathology.

  18. Domain-specific physical activity and health-related quality of life in university students.

    PubMed

    Pedišić, Zeljko; Rakovac, Marija; Titze, Sylvia; Jurakić, Danijel; Oja, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Information on the relationship between domain-specific physical activity (PA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the general population and specific groups is still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between PA in work, transport, domestic and leisure-time domains and HRQoL among university students. PA and HRQoL were assessed in a random stratified sample of 1750 university students using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - long form and 12-item Short Form Health Survey, respectively. The Spearman's rank correlations, adjusted for age, community size, personal monthly budget, body mass index, smoking habits and alcohol intake ranged from -0.11 to 0.18 in female students and -0.29 to 0.19 in male students. Leisure-time, domestic, transport-related PA and total PA were positively related to HRQoL. Inverse correlations with HRQoL were only found for work-related PA in male students. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only leisure-time PA was related to the Physical Summary Component score (β = 0.08 for females and β = 0.10 for males, P < 0.05). Domain-specific PA levels were not significantly related to the Mental Component Summary score. To get a more comprehensive insight in the relationship between PA and HRQoL, future studies should not only analyse total PA levels but also domain-specific PA levels. The evidence on the positive relationship of leisure-time, transport and domestic PA with HRQoL can potentially be used to support evidence-based promotion of PA in a university setting, and as a hypothesis for future longitudinal studies on such potential causal relationships.

  19. Are maladaptive schema domains and perfectionism related to body image concerns in eating disorder patients?

    PubMed

    Boone, Liesbet; Braet, Caroline; Vandereycken, Walter; Claes, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Both maladaptive schemas (MS) and perfectionism have been associated with eating pathology. However, previous research has not examined these variables simultaneously and has not studied possible mediating relationships between MS and multidimensional perfectionism for body image concerns in eating disorder (ED) patients. Eighty-eight female ED patients completed the Young Schema Questionnaire, the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, and the Body Attitude Test. Body image concerns were found to be positively related to Personal Standards (PS) and Evaluative Concerns (EC) perfectionism and all five schema domains. PS Perfectionism was positively associated with Disconnection, Other-directedness, and Overvigilance. EC Perfectionism was positively related to Disconnection, Impaired Autonomy, Other-directedness, and Overvigilance. Moreover, EC perfectionism was found to be a significant mediator in the relationship between the schema domains Impaired Autonomy and Overvigilance and body image concerns. These findings denote the importance to address both core beliefs and perfectionism in ED treatment.

  20. Ring-like oligomers of Synaptotagmins and related C2 domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Maria N; Bello, Oscar D; Wang, Jing; Coleman, Jeff; Cai, Yiying; Sindelar, Charles V; Rothman, James E; Krishnakumar, Shyam S

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the C2AB portion of Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) could self-assemble into Ca2+-sensitive ring-like oligomers on membranes, which could potentially regulate neurotransmitter release. Here we report that analogous ring-like oligomers assemble from the C2AB domains of other Syt isoforms (Syt2, Syt7, Syt9) as well as related C2 domain containing protein, Doc2B and extended Synaptotagmins (E-Syts). Evidently, circular oligomerization is a general and conserved structural aspect of many C2 domain proteins, including Synaptotagmins. Further, using electron microscopy combined with targeted mutations, we show that under physiologically relevant conditions, both the Syt1 ring assembly and its rapid disruption by Ca2+ involve the well-established functional surfaces on the C2B domain that are important for synaptic transmission. Our data suggests that ring formation may be triggered at an early step in synaptic vesicle docking and positions Syt1 to synchronize neurotransmitter release to Ca2+ influx. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17262.001 PMID:27434670

  1. The effect of domain-general inhibition-related training on language switching: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Liang, Lijuan; Dunlap, Susan; Fan, Ning; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that inhibitory control ability could be improved by training, and the Inhibitory Control (IC) Model implies that enhanced domain-general inhibition may elicit certain changes in language switch costs. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of domain-general inhibition training on performance in a language switching task, including which phase of domain-general inhibitory control benefits from training during an overt picture naming task in L1 and L2, using the event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Results showed that the language switch costs of bilinguals with high inhibitory control (high-IC) were symmetrical in both pretest and posttest, and those of bilinguals with low inhibitory control (low-IC) were asymmetrical in the pretest, but symmetrical in the posttest. Moreover, the high-IC group showed a larger LPC (late positive component) for L2 switch trials than for L1 trials in both pretest and posttest. In contrast, the low-IC group only exhibited a similar pattern of LPC in the posttest, but not in the pretest. These results indicate that inhibition training could increase the efficiency of language switching, and inhibitory control may play a key role during the lexical selection response phase. Overall, the present study is the first one to provide electrophysiological evidence for individual differences in the domain-general inhibition impact on language switching performance in low-proficient bilinguals.

  2. Recognizing Mantle Domains Related to an Extensional Cycle: the Record from Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picazo, S.; Muntener, O.; Manatschal, G.

    2015-12-01

    Most of the studies on rifted margins have shown that the classical predictions of models assuming a "homogeneous" mantle lithosphere without some inheritance are unable to capture the observed large variety of magmatic budgets as a function of extension. More recently, new ideas and concepts have been developed to understand the evolution of the mantle lithosphere in hyper-extended magma-poor rifted margins that are mainly based on observations from the present-day Iberia-Newfoundland and ancient Alpine Tethys rifted margins and the Pyrenean systems. In contrast to the classical assumption assuming a simple, isotropic mantle lithosphere, these new models integrate observations from exposed and drilled mantle rocks and propose that the mantle lithosphere evolved and was modified during an extensional cycle from post-orogenic collapse through several periods of rifting to embryonic oceanic (ultra-) slow seafloor spreading. But it is, at present, unclear how far these ideas can be generalized and if they can explain the nature of mantle rocks observed across Western Europe and, in a more general way, at Atlantic type rifted margins. We review the available mantle data from Western Europe, i.e. ophiolite massifs, xenoliths and dredged samples, revisit the available terminology concerning mantle massifs and xenoliths and compile the available data to identify different mantle domains. We define chemical and petrological characteristics of mantle domains based on clinopyroxene and spinel compositions and compile them on present-day and paleo-geographic maps of Western Europe. Finally we link the observed distribution of mantle domains to the post-Variscan extensional cycle and link domains to processes related to the late post-Variscan extension, the rift evolution and refertilization associated to hyper-extension and the development of embryonic oceanic domains.

  3. Statistical significance of task related deep brain EEG dynamic changes in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Chládek, J; Brázdil, M; Halámek, J; Plešinger, F; Jurák, P

    2013-01-01

    We present an off-line analysis procedure for exploring brain activity recorded from intra-cerebral electroencephalographic data (SEEG). The objective is to determine the statistical differences between different types of stimulations in the time-frequency domain. The procedure is based on computing relative signal power change and subsequent statistical analysis. An example of characteristic statistically significant event-related de/synchronization (ERD/ERS) detected across different frequency bands following different oddball stimuli is presented. The method is used for off-line functional classification of different brain areas.

  4. A mathematically related singularity and the maximum size of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, András

    2008-06-01

    In a paper titled "A topologically related singularity suggests a maximum preferred size for protein domains" (Zbilut et al., Proteins 2007;66:621-629), Zbilut et al. claim to have found a singularity in certain geometrical properties of protein structures, and suggest that this singularity may limit the maximum size of protein domains. They find further support for the singularity in their analysis of G-factors calculated by the PROCHECK program. Here, we show that the claimed singularity is a mathematical artifact with no physical meaning, and we reanalyze the G-factors to show that Zbilut et al.'s results are due to a single outlier in the data. Thus, the existence of an actual singularity in the topological properties of proteins is not supported by the findings of Zbilut et al.

  5. The H+ related defects in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals investigated by domain reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenbo; Kong, Yongfa; Shi, Lihong; Xie, Xiang; Li, Xiaochun; Xu, Jingjun; Lou, Cibo; Liu, Hongde; Zhang, Wanlin; Zhang, Guangyin

    2004-07-01

    Domain reversal and heat treatment were carried out on near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals and H+ related defect structure of this crystal was studied through infrared absorption spectra. It is found that the position and halfwidth of some deconvoluted peaks of absorption band change apparently during domain reversal and heat treatment. According to these experimental results, a more suitable model about the location of Li-vacancy in LiNbO3 is introduced. In this model, the four Li vacancies, charge-compensating an anti-site Nb5+ ion (Nb4+Li), occupy two types of lattice positions: three of them at the nearest Li-sites Nb4+Li and the other one at a nearer Li-site above the same oxygen plane with Nb4+Li.

  6. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  7. On the relation between traditional iterative methods and modern multilevel/domain decomposition methods

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, it has turned out that many modern iterative algorithms (multigrid schemes, multilevel preconditioners, domain decomposition methods etc.) for solving problems resulting from the discretization of PDEs can be interpreted as additive (Jacobi-like) or multiplicative (Gauss-Seidel-like) subspace correction methods. The key to their analysis is the study of certain metric properties of the underlying splitting of the discretization space V into a sum of subspaces V{sub j}, j = 1{hor_ellipsis}, J resp. of the variational problem on V into auxiliary problems on these subspaces. Here, the author proposes a modified approach to the abstract convergence theory of these additive and multiplicative Schwarz iterative methods, that makes the relation to traditional iteration methods more explicit. To this end he introduces the enlarged Hilbert space V = V{sub 0} x {hor_ellipsis} x V{sub j} which is nothing else but the usual construction of the Cartesian product of the Hilbert spaces V{sub j} and use it now in the discretization process. This results in an enlarged, semidefinite linear system to be solved instead of the usual definite system. Then, modern multilevel methods as well as domain decomposition methods simplify to just traditional (block-) iteration methods. Now, the convergence analysis can be carried out directly for these traditional iterations on the enlarged system, making convergence proofs of multilevel and domain decomposition methods more clear, or, at least, more classical. The terms that enter the convergence proofs are exactly the ones of the classical iterative methods. It remains to estimate them properly. The convergence proof itself follow basically line by line the old proofs of the respective traditional iterative methods. Additionally, new multilevel/domain decomposition methods are constructed straightforwardly by now applying just other old and well known traditional iterative methods to the enlarged system.

  8. Examining Complexity across Domains: Relating Subjective and Objective Measures of Affective Environmental Scenes, Paintings and Music

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Manuela M.; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Subjective complexity has been found to be related to hedonic measures of preference, pleasantness and beauty, but there is no consensus about the nature of this relationship in the visual and musical domains. Moreover, the affective content of stimuli has been largely neglected so far in the study of complexity but is crucial in many everyday contexts and in aesthetic experiences. We thus propose a cross-domain approach that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of complexity and that uses a wide range of objective complexity measures combined with subjective ratings. In four experiments, we employed pictures of affective environmental scenes, representational paintings, and Romantic solo and chamber music excerpts. Stimuli were pre-selected to vary in emotional content (pleasantness and arousal) and complexity (low versus high number of elements). For each set of stimuli, in a between-subjects design, ratings of familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal were obtained for a presentation time of 25 s from 152 participants. In line with Berlyne’s collative-motivation model, statistical analyses controlling for familiarity revealed a positive relationship between subjective complexity and arousal, and the highest correlations were observed for musical stimuli. Evidence for a mediating role of arousal in the complexity-pleasantness relationship was demonstrated in all experiments, but was only significant for females with regard to music. The direction and strength of the linear relationship between complexity and pleasantness depended on the stimulus type and gender. For environmental scenes, the root mean square contrast measures and measures of compressed file size correlated best with subjective complexity, whereas only edge detection based on phase congruency yielded equivalent results for representational paintings. Measures of compressed file size and event density also showed positive correlations with complexity and arousal in music, which is

  9. Examining complexity across domains: relating subjective and objective measures of affective environmental scenes, paintings and music.

    PubMed

    Marin, Manuela M; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Subjective complexity has been found to be related to hedonic measures of preference, pleasantness and beauty, but there is no consensus about the nature of this relationship in the visual and musical domains. Moreover, the affective content of stimuli has been largely neglected so far in the study of complexity but is crucial in many everyday contexts and in aesthetic experiences. We thus propose a cross-domain approach that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of complexity and that uses a wide range of objective complexity measures combined with subjective ratings. In four experiments, we employed pictures of affective environmental scenes, representational paintings, and Romantic solo and chamber music excerpts. Stimuli were pre-selected to vary in emotional content (pleasantness and arousal) and complexity (low versus high number of elements). For each set of stimuli, in a between-subjects design, ratings of familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal were obtained for a presentation time of 25 s from 152 participants. In line with Berlyne's collative-motivation model, statistical analyses controlling for familiarity revealed a positive relationship between subjective complexity and arousal, and the highest correlations were observed for musical stimuli. Evidence for a mediating role of arousal in the complexity-pleasantness relationship was demonstrated in all experiments, but was only significant for females with regard to music. The direction and strength of the linear relationship between complexity and pleasantness depended on the stimulus type and gender. For environmental scenes, the root mean square contrast measures and measures of compressed file size correlated best with subjective complexity, whereas only edge detection based on phase congruency yielded equivalent results for representational paintings. Measures of compressed file size and event density also showed positive correlations with complexity and arousal in music, which is

  10. Development of quantitative diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration using Spectral Domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.; Chiu, Stephanie J.; Davies, Emily; Davis, Anjul M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Wiley, David F.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2007-02-01

    We report on the development of quantitative, reproducible diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). 3D SDOCT volumetric data sets (512 x 1000 x 100 voxels) were collected (5.7 seconds acquisition time) in over 50 patients with age-related macular degeneration and geographic atrophy using a state-of-the-art SDOCT scanner. Commercial and custom software utilities were used for manual and semi-automated segmentation of photoreceptor layer thickness, total drusen volume, and geographic atrophy cross-sectional area. In a preliminary test of reproducibility in segmentation of total drusen volume and geographic atrophy surface area, inter-observer error was less than 5%. Extracted volume and surface area of AMD-related drusen and geographic atrophy, respectively, may serve as useful observables for tracking disease state that were not accessible without the rapid 3D volumetric imaging capability unique to retinal SDOCT.

  11. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  12. Characterization of genes encoding proteins containing HD-related output domain in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-Ming; Liao, Chao-Tsai; Chiang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Yu-Yin; Yeh, Yu-Tzu; Du, Shin-Chiao; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causative agent of black rot in crucifers. The production of Xcc virulence factors is regulated by Clp and RpfF. HD-related output domain (HDOD) is a protein domain of unknown biochemical function. The genome of Xcc encodes three proteins (GsmR, HdpA, and HdpB) with an HDOD. The GsmR has been reported to play a role in the general stress response and cell motility and its expression is positively regulated by Clp. Here, the function and transcription of hdpA and hdpB were characterized. Mutation of hdpA resulted in enhanced bacterial attachment. In addition, the expression of hdpA was positively regulated by RpfF but not by Clp, subject to catabolite repression and affected by several stress conditions. However, mutational analysis and reporter assay showed that hdpB had no effect on the production of a range of virulence factors and its expression was independent of Clp and RpfF. The results shown here not only extend the previous work on RpfF regulation to show that it influences the expression of hdpA in Xcc, but also expand knowledge of the function of the HDOD containing proteins in bacteria.

  13. Between-Domain Relations of Academic Emotions: Does Having the Same Instructor Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Ludtke, Oliver; Hall, Nathan C.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research indicates that academic emotions are largely organized along domain-specific lines. In the present study (N = 1,687; Grades 8/11), the authors explored the domain specificity of academic emotions in terms of the moderating influence of having the same versus a different course instructor across domains. The authors evaluated…

  14. Expanding the Landscape of Chromatin Modification (CM)-Related Functional Domains and Genes in Human

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L.; Vlasblom, James; On, Tuan; Xiong, Xuejian; Emili, Andrew; Zhang, Zhaolei; Greenblatt, Jack; Parkinson, John; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin modification (CM) plays a key role in regulating transcription, DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, our knowledge of these processes in humans remains very limited. Here we use computational approaches to study proteins and functional domains involved in CM in humans. We analyze the abundance and the pair-wise domain-domain co-occurrences of 25 well-documented CM domains in 5 model organisms: yeast, worm, fly, mouse and human. Results show that domains involved in histone methylation, DNA methylation, and histone variants are remarkably expanded in metazoan, reflecting the increased demand for cell type-specific gene regulation. We find that CM domains tend to co-occur with a limited number of partner domains and are hence not promiscuous. This property is exploited to identify 47 potentially novel CM domains, including 24 DNA-binding domains, whose role in CM has received little attention so far. Lastly, we use a consensus Machine Learning approach to predict 379 novel CM genes (coding for 329 proteins) in humans based on domain compositions. Several of these predictions are supported by very recent experimental studies and others are slated for experimental verification. Identification of novel CM genes and domains in humans will aid our understanding of fundamental epigenetic processes that are important for stem cell differentiation and cancer biology. Information on all the candidate CM domains and genes reported here is publicly available. PMID:21124763

  15. Crystalline lipid domains: characterization by X-ray diffraction and their relation to biology.

    PubMed

    Ziblat, Roy; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2011-04-11

    Biological membranes comprise thousands of different lipids, differing in their alkyl chains, headgroups, and degree of saturation. It is estimated that 5% of the genes in the human genome are responsible for regulating the lipid composition of cell membranes. Conceivably, the functional explanation for this diversity is found, at least in part, in the propensity of lipids to segregate into distinct domains, which are important for cell function. X-ray diffraction has been used increasingly to characterize the packing and phase behavior of lipids in membranes. Crystalline domains have been studied in synthetic membranes using wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Herein we summarize recent results obtained using the various X-ray methods, discuss the correlation between crystalline domains and liquid ordered domains studied with other techniques, and the relevance of crystalline domains to functional lipid domains in biological membranes.

  16. Polyomavirus middle-T antigen associates with the kinase domain of Src-related tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Dunant, N M; Senften, M; Ballmer-Hofer, K

    1996-01-01

    Middle-T antigen of mouse polyomavirus, an oncogenic DNA virus, associates with and activates the cellular tyrosine kinases c-Src, c-Yes, and Fyn. This interaction is essential for polyomavirus-mediated transformation of cells in culture and tumor formation in animals. To determine the domain of c-Src directing association with middle-T, mutant c-Src proteins lacking the amino-terminal unique domain and the myristylation signal, the SH2 domain, the SH3 domain, or all three of these domains were coexpressed with middle-T in NIH 3T3 cells. All mutants were found to associate with middle-T, demonstrating that the kinase domain of c-Src, including the carboxy-terminal regulatory tail, is sufficient for association with middle-T. Moreover, we found that Hck, another member of the Src kinase family, does not bind middle-T, while chimeric kinases consisting of the amino-terminal domains of c-Src fused to the kinase domain of Hck or the amino-terminal domains of Hck fused to the kinase domain of c-Src associated with middle-T. Hck mutated at its carboxy-terminal regulatory residue, tyrosine 501, was also found to associate with middle-T. These results suggest that in Hck, the postulated intramolecular interaction between the carboxy-terminal regulatory tyrosine and the SH2 domain prevents association with middle-T. This intramolecular interaction apparently also limits the ability of c-Src to associate with middle-T, since removal of the SH2 or SH3 domain increases the efficiency with which middle-T binds c-Src. PMID:8627648

  17. Overexpression of the JmjC histone demethylase KDM5B in human carcinogenesis: involvement in the proliferation of cancer cells through the E2F/RB pathway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although an increasing number of histone demethylases have been identified and biochemically characterized, their biological functions largely remain uncharacterized, particularly in the context of human diseases such as cancer. We investigated the role of KDM5B, a JmjC histone demethylase, in human carcinogenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR and microarray analyses were used to examine the expression profiles of histone demethylases in clinical tissue samples. We also examined the functional effects of KDM5B on the growth of cancer cell lines treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Downstream genes and signal cascades induced by KDM5B expression were identified from Affymetrix Gene Chip experiments, and validated by real-time PCR and reporter assays. Cell cycle-dependent characteristics of KDM5B were identified by immunofluorescence and FACS. Results Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed that expression levels of KDM5B are significantly higher in human bladder cancer tissues than in their corresponding non-neoplastic bladder tissues (P < 0.0001). The expression profile analysis of clinical tissues also revealed up-regulation of KDM5B in various kinds of malignancies. Transfection of KDM5B-specific siRNA into various bladder and lung cancer cell lines significantly suppressed the proliferation of cancer cells and increased the number of cells in sub-G1 phase. Microarray expression analysis indicated that E2F1 and E2F2 are downstream genes in the KDM5B pathway. Conclusions Inhibition of KDM5B may affect apoptosis and reduce growth of cancer cells. Further studies will explore the pan-cancer therapeutic potential of KDM5B inhibition. PMID:20226085

  18. Response Biases and Their Relation to Sex Differences in Multiple Domains of Self-Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vispoel, Walter P.; Forte Fast, Ellen E.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the influence of two forms of socially desirable responding on scores within 17 domains of self-concept from 3 measures completed by 390 college students. Found significant sex differences in 12 domains. Discusses the role of impression management in creating some apparent sex differences. (SLD)

  19. Medical Resident Ability to Self-Assess in Relation to Their Competence within the Assessed Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whicker, Shari Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between resident communication skills competence and their ability to self-assess within that domain. Six research questions guided the study. The first research question sought to explore the varied levels with which residents demonstrated competence within the domain of communication…

  20. Issues Related to the Construction of a Purpose-Built Domain-Specific Word Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa; Pfister, H. Peter; Peterson, Peter

    2004-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of semantic collections in order to identify and analyse domain knowledge. This paper describes some technical issues to consider when contemplating research which incorporates small-to-medium domain-specific word sets. The purpose of the corpus construction described was to provide an external word collection…

  1. Immunocytochemical distribution of WARP (von Willebrand A domain-related protein) in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Duong, Trac; Lopez, Ivan A; Ishiyama, Akira; Ishiyama, Gail

    2011-01-07

    The basic components of the epithelial, perineural, and perivascular basement membranes in the inner ear have been well-documented in several animal models and in the human inner ear. The von Willebrand A domain-related protein (WARP) is an extracellular matrix molecule with restricted expression in cartilage, and a subset of basement membranes in peripheral nerves, muscle, and central nervous system vasculature. It has been suggested that WARP has an important role in maintaining the blood-brain barrier. To date no studies on WARP distribution have been performed in the inner ear, which is equipped with an intricate vasculature network. In the present study, we determined the distribution of WARP by immunocytochemistry in the human inner ear using auditory and vestibular endorgans microdissected from human temporal bones obtained at autopsy. All subjects (n=5, aged 55-87years old) had documented normal auditory and vestibular function. We also determined the WARP immunolocalization in the mouse inner ear. WARP immunoreactivity localized to the vasculature throughout the stroma of the cristae ampullaris, the maculae utricle, and saccule in the human and mouse. In the human and mouse inner ear, WARP immunoreactivity delineated blood vessels located in the stria vascularis, spiral ligament, sub-basilar region, stromal tissue, and the spiral and vestibular ganglia. The distinct localization of WARP in the inner ear vasculature suggests an important role in maintaining its integrity. In addition, WARP allows delineation of microvessels in the inner ear allowing the study of vascular pathology in the development of otological diseases.

  2. Reconstitution of the NF1 GAP-related domain in NF1-deficient human Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stacey L.; Deadwyler, Gail D.; Tang, Jun; Stubbs, Evan B.; Muir, David; Hiatt, Kelly K. . E-mail: George.Devries@med.va.gov

    2006-09-29

    Schwann cells derived from peripheral nerve sheath tumors from individuals with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are deficient for the protein neurofibromin, which contains a GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD). Neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells have increased Ras activation, increased proliferation in response to certain growth stimuli, increased angiogenic potential, and altered cell morphology. This study examined whether expression of functional NF1-GRD can reverse the transformed phenotype of neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells from both benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We reconstituted the NF1-GRD using retroviral transduction and examined the effects on cell morphology, growth potential, and angiogenic potential. NF1-GRD reconstitution resulted in morphologic changes, a 16-33% reduction in Ras activation, and a 53% decrease in proliferation in neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells. However, NF1-GRD reconstitution was not sufficient to decrease the in vitro angiogenic potential of the cells. This study demonstrates that reconstitution of the NF1-GRD can at least partially reverse the transformation of human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cells.

  3. Plasmodium alveolins possess distinct but structurally and functionally related multi-repeat domains.

    PubMed

    Al-Khattaf, Fatimah S; Tremp, Annie Z; Dessens, Johannes T

    2015-02-01

    The invasive and motile life stages of malaria parasites (merozoite, ookinete and sporozoite) possess a distinctive cortical structure termed the pellicle. The pellicle is characterised by a double-layered 'inner membrane complex' (IMC) located underneath the plasma membrane, which is supported by a cytoskeletal structure termed the subpellicular network (SPN). The SPN consists of intermediate filaments, whose major constituents include a family of proteins called alveolins. Here, we re-appraise the alveolins in the genus Plasmodium with respect to their repertoire, structure and interrelatedness. Amongst 13 family members identified, we distinguish two domain types that, albeit distinct at the primary structure level, are structurally related and contain tandem repeats with a consensus 12-amino acid periodicity. Analysis in Plasmodium berghei of the most divergent alveolin, PbIMC1d, reveals a zoite-specific expression in ookinetes and a subcellular localisation in the pellicle, consistent with its predicted role as a SPN component. Knockout of PbIMC1d gives rise to a wild-type phenotype with respect to ookinete morphogenesis, tensile strength, gliding motility and infectivity, presenting the first example of apparent functional redundancy amongst alveolin family members.

  4. The NHR domains of Neuralized and related proteins: Beyond Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sili; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2017-01-01

    Neuralized Homology Repeats (NHRs) were first identified in Neuralized, an E3-ubiquitin ligase that plays a key role in the Notch signalling pathway. Since their original discovery, NHR domains have been shown to regulate protein-protein interactions in a broad range of developmental processes and in a wide variety of species from flies to humans. The NHR family of proteins can be categorized into three groups: (1) those that contain a RING finger, (2) those that contain a SOCS box and, (3) those that only have NHR domains. Here we review the structure and function of NHR domains in various cellular and developmental processes.

  5. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  6. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Activation by Competition with WH2 Domain Proteins for Actin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Weissbach, Julia; Schikora, Franziska; Weber, Anja; Kessels, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are coactivators of serum response factor (SRF)-mediated gene expression. Activation of MRTF-A occurs in response to alterations in actin dynamics and critically requires the dissociation of repressive G-actin–MRTF-A complexes. However, the mechanism leading to the release of MRTF-A remains unclear. Here we show that WH2 domains compete directly with MRTF-A for actin binding. Actin nucleation-promoting factors, such as N-WASP and WAVE2, as well as isolated WH2 domains, including those of Spire2 and Cobl, activate MRTF-A independently of changes in actin dynamics. Simultaneous inhibition of Arp2-Arp3 or mutation of the CA region only partially reduces MRTF-A activation by N-WASP and WAVE2. Recombinant WH2 domains and the RPEL domain of MRTF-A bind mutually exclusively to cellular and purified G-actin in vitro. The competition by different WH2 domains correlates with MRTF-SRF activation. Following serum stimulation, nonpolymerizable actin dissociates from MRTF-A, and de novo formation of the G-actin–RPEL complex is impaired by a transferable factor. Our work demonstrates that WH2 domains activate MRTF-A and contribute to target gene regulation by a competitive mechanism, independently of their role in actin filament formation. PMID:26976641

  7. Molecular evolution and domain structure of plasminogen-related growth factors (HGF/SF and HGF1/MSP).

    PubMed Central

    Donate, L. E.; Gherardi, E.; Srinivasan, N.; Sowdhamini, R.; Aparicio, S.; Blundell, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Plasminogen-related growth factors, a new family of polypeptide growth factors with the basic domain organization and mechanism of activation of the blood proteinase plasminogen, include hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), a potent effector of the growth, movement, and differentiation of epithelia and endothelia, and hepatocyte growth factor-like/macrophage stimulating protein (HGF1/MSP), an effector of macrophage chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Phylogeny of the serine proteinase domains and analysis of intron-exon boundaries and kringle sequences indicate that HGF/SF, HGF1/MSP, plasminogen, and apolipoprotein (a) have evolved from a common ancestral gene that consisted of an N-terminal domain corresponding to plasminogen activation peptide (PAP), 3 copies of the kringle domain, and a serine proteinase domain. Models of the N domains of HGF/SF, HGF1/MSP, and plasminogen, characterized by the presence of 4 conserved Cys residues forming a loop in a loop, have been modeled based on disulfide-bond constraints. There is a distinct pattern of charged and hydrophobic residues in the helix-strand-helix motif proposed for the PAP domain of HGF/SF; these may be important for receptor interaction. Three-dimensional structures of the 4 kringle and the serine proteinase domains of HGF/SF were constructed by comparative modeling using the suite of programs COMPOSER and were energy minimized. Docking of a lysine analogue indicates a putative lysine-binding pocket within kringle 2 (and possibly another in kringle 4). The models suggest a mechanism for the formation of a noncovalent HGF/SF homodimer that may be responsible for the activation of the Met receptor. These data provide evidence for the divergent evolution and structural similarity of plasminogen, HGF/SF, and HGF1/MSP, and highlight a new strategy for growth factor evolution, namely the adaptation of a proteolytic enzyme to a role in receptor activation. PMID:7756992

  8. A novel firmicute protein family related to the actinobacterial resuscitation-promoting factors by non-orthologous domain displacement

    PubMed Central

    Ravagnani, Adriana; Finan, Christopher L; Young, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background In Micrococcus luteus growth and resuscitation from starvation-induced dormancy is controlled by the production of a secreted growth factor. This autocrine resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is the founder member of a family of proteins found throughout and confined to the actinobacteria (high G + C Gram-positive bacteria). The aim of this work was to search for and characterise a cognate gene family in the firmicutes (low G + C Gram-positive bacteria) and obtain information about how they may control bacterial growth and resuscitation. Results In silico analysis of the accessory domains of the Rpf proteins permitted their classification into several subfamilies. The RpfB subfamily is related to a group of firmicute proteins of unknown function, represented by YabE of Bacillus subtilis. The actinobacterial RpfB and firmicute YabE proteins have very similar domain structures and genomic contexts, except that in YabE, the actinobacterial Rpf domain is replaced by another domain, which we have called Sps. Although totally unrelated in both sequence and secondary structure, the Rpf and Sps domains fulfil the same function. We propose that these proteins have undergone "non-orthologous domain displacement", a phenomenon akin to "non-orthologous gene displacement" that has been described previously. Proteins containing the Sps domain are widely distributed throughout the firmicutes and they too fall into a number of distinct subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the accessory domains in the Rpf and Sps proteins, together with their weak similarity to lytic transglycosylases, provide clear evidence that they are muralytic enzymes. Conclusions The results indicate that the firmicute Sps proteins and the actinobacterial Rpf proteins are cognate and that they control bacterial culturability via enzymatic modification of the bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15774001

  9. Mutational analysis of the NF1 GAP-related domain in neuroectodermal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Vinanzi, C.; Basso, G.; Perilongo, G.

    1994-09-01

    To try to contribute to the more precise characterization of the function of the NF1 gene in tumorigenesis we have analyzed the most conserved region of its coding sequence, the GAP-related domain (NF1 GRD), which is attributed with tumor suppressor function. The rationale for the study was based on the likelihood of finding structural alterations resulting in loss of function of this region, in situations such as tumors of neuroepithelial tissues. In these situations, the activity of the NF1 gene product, neurofibromis, a GTPase activating protein, seems to be crucial in regulating the mechanisms of signal transduction mediated by p21 ras. We have studied the NF1 GRD region by PCR amplification of each exon (exons 21-27a) followed by subsequent PAGE and SSCP analysis of the amplification products in 60 primary sporadic neuroectodermal tumors. Our sample included: 14 neuroblastoma, 11 glioblastoma, 8 medulloblastoma, 7 ependimoma, 6 peripheral PNET, 1 ganglioneuroma, 1 glioma, 1 Ewing sarcoma, 1 meningioma and 1 schwannoma. We have not identified structural alterations of the NF1 GRD region in the tumors analysed, with one possible exception now in the process of being characterized. We can conclude that the loss of the NF1 gene tumor suppressor function that might lead or contribute to the development of malignancies in tissues of neuroectodermal origin is not due to structural abnormalities of the region of the gene interacting with p21 ras, either as a negative regulator or as a downstream effector of it. These data, together with the observation that the oncogene ras 21 is not typically mutated in neuroectodermal tumors, and that GTP-ras has been found normally regulated in neurofibromis-deficient melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines, seem to support the hypothesis that the antioncogene activity of the NF1 gene could be totally independent from its interaction with ras.

  10. Discoidin domain receptor 2 facilitates prostate cancer bone metastasis via regulating parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhang; Jin, Su; Wei, Zhang; Huilian, Hou; Zhanhai, Yin; Yue, Teng; Juan, Li; Jing, Li; Libo, Yao; Xu, Li

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to the skeleton but the underlying mechanism remains largely undefined. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a member of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family and is activated by collagen binding. This study aimed to investigate the function and detailed mechanism of DDR2 in prostate cancer bone dissemination. Herein we found that DDR2 was strongly expressed in bone-metastatic prostate cancer cells and tissues compared to that in normal controls. Enhanced expression of constitutively activated DDR2 led to elevation in motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, whereas knockdown of DDR2 through specific shRNA caused a dramatic repression. Knockdown of DDR2 in prostate cancer cells resulted in significant decrease in the proliferation, differentiation and function of osteoblast. Over-expression of DDR2 in prostate cancer cells resulted in notable acceleration of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, whereas knockdown of DDR2 exhibited the opposite effects. An intrabone injection bone metastasis animal model demonstrated that DDR2 promoted osteolytic metastasis in vivo. Molecular evidence demonstrated that DDR2 regulated the expression, secretion, and promoter activity of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), via modulating Runx2 phosphorylation and transactivity. DDR2 was responsive to TGF-β and involved in TGF-β-mediated osteoclast activation and bone resorption. In addition, DDR2 facilitated prostate cancer cells adhere to type I collagen. This study reveals for the first time that DDR2 plays an essential role in prostate cancer bone metastasis. The mechanism disclosure may provide therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Barophily-Related Amino Acid Content in Protein Domains of Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Yafremava, Liudmila S.; Di Giulio, Massimo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid substitution patterns between the nonbarophilic Pyrococcus furiosus and its barophilic relative P. abyssi confirm that hydrostatic pressure asymmetry indices reflect the extent to which amino acids are preferred by barophilic archaeal organisms. Substitution patterns in entire protein sequences, shared protein domains defined at fold superfamily level, domains in homologous sequence pairs, and domains of very ancient and very recent origin now provide further clues about the environment that led to the genetic code and diversified life. The pyrococcal proteomes are very similar and share a very early ancestor. Relative amino acid abundance analyses showed that biases in the use of amino acids are due to their shared fold superfamilies. Within these repertoires, only two of the five amino acids that are preferentially barophilic, aspartic acid and arginine, displayed this preference significantly and consistently across structure and in domains appearing in the ancestor. The more primordial asparagine, lysine and threonine displayed a consistent preference for nonbarophily across structure and in the ancestor. Since barophilic preferences are already evident in ancient domains that are at least ~3 billion year old, we conclude that barophily is a very ancient trait that unfolded concurrently with genetic idiosyncrasies in convergence towards a universal code. PMID:24187517

  12. How Working Memory Relates to Children's Reading Comprehension: The Importance of Domain-Specificity in Storage and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nouwens, Suzan; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    Working memory is considered a well-established predictor of individual variation in reading comprehension in children and adults. However, how storage and processing capacities of working memory in both the phonological and semantic domain relate to reading comprehension is still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the contribution of…

  13. BC-box protein domain-related mechanism for VHL protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Maria Elena; Varadaraj, Archana; Mattoscio, Domenico; Jaffray, Ellis G.; Miccolo, Claudia; Galimberti, Viviana; Tommasino, Massimo; Hay, Ronald T.; Chiocca, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor VHL (von Hippel–Lindau) protein is a substrate receptor for Ubiquitin Cullin Ring Ligase complexes (CRLs), containing a BC-box domain that associates to the adaptor Elongin B/C. VHL targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1α to proteasome-dependent degradation. Gam1 is an adenoviral protein, which also possesses a BC-box domain that interacts with the host Elongin B/C, thereby acting as a viral substrate receptor. Gam1 associates with both Cullin2 and Cullin5 to form CRL complexes targeting the host protein SUMO enzyme SAE1 for proteasomal degradation. We show that Gam1 protein expression induces VHL protein degradation leading to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α stabilization and induction of its downstream targets. We also characterize the CRL-dependent mechanism that drives VHL protein degradation via proteasome. Interestingly, expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) domain-containing viral proteins and cellular BC-box proteins leads to VHL protein degradation, in a SOCS domain-containing manner. Our work underscores the exquisite ability of viral domains to uncover new regulatory mechanisms by hijacking key cellular proteins. PMID:24145437

  14. Putative chitin synthases from Branchiostoma floridae show extracellular matrix-related domains and mosaic structures.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea

    2012-08-01

    The transition from unicellular to multicellular life forms requires the development of a specialized structural component, the extracellular matrix (ECM). In Metazoans, there are two main supportive systems, which are based on chitin and collagen/hyaluronan, respectively. Chitin is the major constituent of fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeleton. However, presence of chitin/chitooligosaccharides has been reported in lower chordates and during specific stages of vertebrate development. In this study, the occurrence of chitin synthases (CHSs) was investigated with a bioinformatics approach in the cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae, in which the presence of chitin was initially reported in the skeletal rods of the pharyngeal gill basket. Twelve genes coding for proteins containing conserved amino acid residues of processive glycosyltransferases from GT2 family were found and 10 of them display mosaic structures with novel domains never reported previously in a chitin synthase. In particular, the presence of a discoidin (DS) and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain was found in nine identified proteins. Sequence analyses and homology modelling suggest that these domains might interact with the extracellular matrix and mediate protein-protein interaction. The multi-domain putative chitin synthases from B. floridae constitute an emblematic example of the explosion of domain innovation and shuffling which predate Metazoans.

  15. Redistribution of demethylated RNA helicase A during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection: Role of Jumonji C-domain containing protein 6 in RHA demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paul; Conderino, Joseph S.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2014-03-15

    Previously, RNA helicase A (RHA) re-localization from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected cells was shown to coincide with loss of RHA methylated arginine residues at its C-terminus. The potential interaction between RHA and Jumonji C-domain (JmjC) protein 6 (JMJD6) arginine demethylase in infected cells was investigated. Treatment with N-oxalylglycine (NOG) inhibitor of JmjC demethylases prevented FMDV-induced RHA demethylation and re-localization, and also decreased viral protein synthesis and virus titers. Physical interaction between JMJD6 and RHA was demonstrated via reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation, where RHA preferentially bound JMJD6 monomers. Nuclear efflux of demethylated RHA (DM-RHA) coincided with nuclear influx of JMJD6, which was not observed using another picornavirus. A modified biochemical assay demonstrated JMJD6 induced dose-dependent demethylation of RHA and two RHA-derived isoforms, which could be inhibited by NOG. We propose a role for JMJD6 in RHA demethylation stimulated by FMDV, that appears to facilitate virus replication. - Highlights: • We examined the role of JMJD6 in FMDV-induced RHA demethylation process. • Using an arginine demethylation assay showed that JMJD6 is involved in RHA demethylation. • A demethylases inhibitor reduced cytoplasmic accumulation of RHA and FMDV titers.

  16. Redistribution of demethylated RNA helicase A during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection: role of Jumonji C-domain containing protein 6 in RHA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Paul; Conderino, Joseph S; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Previously, RNA helicase A (RHA) re-localization from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected cells was shown to coincide with loss of RHA methylated arginine residues at its C-terminus. The potential interaction between RHA and Jumonji C-domain (JmjC) protein 6 (JMJD6) arginine demethylase in infected cells was investigated. Treatment with N-oxalylglycine (NOG) inhibitor of JmjC demethylases prevented FMDV-induced RHA demethylation and re-localization, and also decreased viral protein synthesis and virus titers. Physical interaction between JMJD6 and RHA was demonstrated via reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation, where RHA preferentially bound JMJD6 monomers. Nuclear efflux of demethylated RHA (DM-RHA) coincided with nuclear influx of JMJD6, which was not observed using another picornavirus. A modified biochemical assay demonstrated JMJD6 induced dose-dependent demethylation of RHA and two RHA-derived isoforms, which could be inhibited by NOG. We propose a role for JMJD6 in RHA demethylation stimulated by FMDV, that appears to facilitate virus replication.

  17. The new health-related top-level domains are coming: will cureforcancer.health go to the highest bidder?

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2014-03-05

    In 2012, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) opened a new round of applications for generic top-level domain (gTLD) names, receiving 1930 applications, of which at least 18 were related to health (eg, ".doctor", ".health", ".med"). The entry of new, commercial players applying to create health-related names reopens the debate on the role of international organizations, governments, non-governmental organizations, and other stakeholders regarding the safeguards and policies needed to protect consumers.

  18. Dielectric permittivity of room temperature ionic liquids: a relation to the polar and nonpolar domain structures.

    PubMed

    Mizoshiri, Makoto; Nagao, Takena; Mizoguchi, Yuri; Yao, Makoto

    2010-04-28

    We measured microwave transmission and reflection spectra for typical room temperature ionic liquids, [C(4)min][TFSA], [C(4)min][PF(6)], [C(6)min][PF(6)], and [C(8)min][PF(6)], at frequencies between 40 MHz and 40 GHz in the temperature range up to 100 degrees C. The transmission spectra were analyzed using complex dielectric functions, and the static permittivity epsilon(S) was determined as a function of temperature. Applying the effective medium approximation to epsilon(S), we have estimated that the static permittivity of the polar domain is around 20, and that of the nonpolar domain around 2.5.

  19. Structural and biochemical basis for ubiquitin ligase recruitment by arrestin-related domain-containing protein-3 (ARRDC3).

    PubMed

    Qi, Shiqian; O'Hayre, Morgan; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hurley, James H

    2014-02-21

    After protracted stimulation, the β2-adrenergic receptor and many other G-protein-coupled receptors are ubiquitinated and down-regulated. Arrestin-related domain-containing protein-3 (ARRDC3) has been proposed to recruit the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 to the β2-adrenergic receptor. ARRDC3 contains two PPXY motifs that could potentially interact with any of the four WW domains of Nedd4. Here we dissect the interaction determinants. ARRDC3 PPXY-Nedd4 WW dissociation constants vary from unmeasurable to Kd = 3 μM for the third WW domain of Nedd4 binding to the first PPXY motif of ARRDC3. Structures of the uncomplexed and PPXY1-bound WW3 domain were determined at 1.1 and 1.7 Å resolution. The structures revealed conformational changes upon binding and the hydrogen bonding network in exquisite detail. Tight packing of ARRDC3 Val-352', part of a 310 helix at the C terminus of PPXY1, is important for high affinity binding to WW3. Although no single WW domain is strictly essential for the binding of Nedd4 and ARRDC3 expressed in HEK293 cells, high affinity binding of full-length ARRDC3 and Nedd4 is driven by the avid interaction of both PPXY motifs with either the WW2-WW3 or WW3-WW4 combinations, with Kd values as low as 300 nM.

  20. Modulation of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic differentiation by proteins containing complement-related domains.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Minoru; Hama, Chihiro

    2011-02-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play central roles in basic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have revealed that some transmembrane and extracellular proteins bind to neurotransmitter receptors, forming protein complexes that are required for proper synaptic localization or gating of core receptor molecules. Consequently, the components of these complexes contribute to long-term potentiation, a process that is critical for learning and memory. Here, we review factors that regulate neurotransmitter receptors, with a focus on proteins containing CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) or CCP (complement control protein) domains, which are frequently found in complement system proteins. Proteins that contain these domains are structurally distinct from TARPs (transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins), and may constitute new protein families that modulate either the localization or function of neurotransmitter receptors. In addition, other CCP domain-containing proteins participate in dendritic patterning and/or synaptic differentiation, although current evidence has not identified any direct activities on neurotransmitter receptors. Some of these proteins are involved in pathologic conditions such as epileptic seizure and mental retardation. Together, these lines of information have shown that CUB and CCP domain-containing proteins contribute to a wide variety of neuronal events that ultimately establish neural circuits.

  1. Domain-Specific Self-Concept in Relation to Traditional and Cyber Peer Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledano, Shanee; Werch, Brittany L.; Wiens, Brenda A.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who aggress against others have been described both as having overall low self-concept and as having high, inflated self-concept. The conceptualization of self-concept as domain specific provides an alternate means to resolving this controversy. In this study, 223 middle school students completed self-report measures assessing…

  2. Grammatical Language Impairment and the Specificity of Cognitive Domains: Relations between Auditory and Language Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Lely, Heather K. J.; Rosen, Stuart; Adlard, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Grammatical-specific language impairment (G-SLI) in children, arguably, provides evidence for the existence of a specialised grammatical sub-system in the brain, necessary for normal language development. Some researchers challenge this, claiming that domain-general, low-level auditory deficits, particular to rapid processing, cause phonological…

  3. The Relative Influence of Different Domains of Social Connectedness on Self-Directed Violence in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Jennifer W.; Puddy, Richard W.; Hall, Diane M.; Cashman, Sandra Y.; Crosby, Alexander E.; Ortega, LaVonne A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has linked greater social connectedness with a lowered risk of self-directed violence among adolescents. However, few studies have analyzed the comparative strength of different domains of connectedness (e.g., family, peers and school) to determine where limited resources might best be focused. Data to address that gap were taken…

  4. Structural priming across cognitive domains: from simple arithmetic to relative-clause attachment.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, Christoph; Sturt, Patrick; Martin, Catherine J; Myachykov, Andriy; Teevan, Kay; Viskupova, Izabela

    2011-10-01

    In the two experiments reported here, we uncovered evidence for shared structural representations between arithmetic and language. Specifically, we primed subjects using mathematical equations either with or without parenthetical groupings, such as 80 - (9 + 1) × 5 or 80 - 9 + 1 × 5, and then presented a target sentence fragment, such as "The tourist guide mentioned the bells of the church that . . .," which subjects had to complete. When the mathematical equations were solved correctly, their structure influenced the noun phrase--for example, either "the bells of the church" or "the church," respectively--that subjects chose to attach their sentence completion to. These experiments provide the first demonstration of cross-domain structural priming from mathematics to language. They highlight the importance of global structural representations at a very high level of abstraction and have potentially far-reaching implications regarding the domain generality of structural representations.

  5. Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder Symptom Domains Relate Differentially to PTSD and Depression: A Study of War-Exposed Bosnian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, Meredith A; Charak, Ruby; Kaplow, Julie; Layne, Christopher M; Pynoos, Robert; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-10-01

    Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder (PCBD) is a newly proposed diagnosis placed in the Appendix of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as an invitation for further research. To date, no studies have examined the dimensionality of PCBD or explored whether different PCBD criteria domains relate in similar, versus differential, ways to other psychological conditions common to war-exposed bereaved youth, including symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression. We evaluated the dimensionality of proposed PCBD B and C symptom domains, and their respective relations with measures of PTSD and depression, in 1142 bereaved Bosnian adolescents exposed to the 1992-1995 Bosnian civil war. Instruments included the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index, the Depression Self-Rating Scale, and the UCLA Grief Screening Scale (a prototype measure of PCBD symptoms). We investigated potential differences in grief, PTSD, and depression scores as a function of cause of death. We then examined hypothesized differential relations between PCBD B and C symptom domain subscales and selected external correlates, specifically measures of depression and the four-factor emotional numbing model of PTSD. Results of both analyses provide preliminary evidence of a multidimensional structure for PCBD in this population, in that the PCBD Criterion C subscale score covaried more strongly with each of the four PTSD factors and with depression than did PCBD Criterion B. We conclude by discussing theoretical, methodological, clinical, and policy-related implications linked to the ongoing study of essential features of PCBD.

  6. Mapping domain structures in silks from insects and spiders related to protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Bini, Elisabetta; Knight, David P; Kaplan, David L

    2004-01-02

    The exceptional solubility in vivo (20-30%, w/v) of the silk proteins of insects and spiders is dictated by both the need to produce solid fibres with a high packing fraction and the high mesogen concentration required for lyotropic liquid crystalline spinning. A further design requirement for silk proteins is a strong predominance of hydrophobic amino acid residues to provide for the hydrophobic interactions, water exclusion, and beta-crystallite formation required to produce strong insoluble threads. Thus, the domain structure of silk proteins needs to enable nanoscale phase separation to achieve high solubility of hydrophobic proteins in aqueous solutions. Additionally, silk proteins need to avoid premature precipitation as beta-sheets during storage and processing. Here we use mapping of domain types, sizes and distributions in silks to identify consistent design features that have evolved to meet these requirements. We show that silk proteins consist of conspicuously hydrophilic terminal domains flanking a very long central portion constructed from hydrophobic blocks separated by hydrophilic ones, discussing the domain structure in detail. The general rules of construction for silk proteins based on our observations should give a useful guide to the way in which Nature has solved the problem of processing hydrophobic proteins in water and how this can be copied industrially. Following these rules may also help in obtaining adequate expression, soluble products and controllable conformational switches in the production of genetically engineered or chemically synthesized silk analogues. Thus these insights have implications for structural biology and relevance to fundamental and applied questions in material science and engineering.

  7. Structural Analyses of the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of TRPV6 and Related TRPV Ion Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, C.B.; Huang, R.J.; Lishko, P.V.; Wang, R.R.; Gaudet, R.

    2008-06-03

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are cation channels composed of a transmembrane domain flanked by large N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains. All members of the vanilloid family of TRP channels (TRPV) possess an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD). The ARD of mammalian TRPV6, an important regulator of calcium uptake and homeostasis, is essential for channel assembly and regulation. The 1.7 A crystal structure of the TRPV6-ARD reveals conserved structural elements unique to the ARDs of TRPV proteins. First, a large twist between the fourth and fifth repeats is induced by residues conserved in all TRPV ARDs. Second, the third finger loop is the most variable region in sequence, length and conformation. In TRPV6, a number of putative regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the base of this third finger. Size exclusion chromatography and crystal packing indicate that the TRPV6-ARD does not assemble as a tetramer and is monomeric in solution. Adenosine triphosphate-agarose and calmodulin-agarose pull-down assays show that the TRPV6-ARD does not interact with either ligand, indicating a different functional role for the TRPV6-ARD than in the paralogous thermosensitive TRPV1 channel. Similar biochemical findings are also presented for the highly homologous mammalian TRPV5-ARD. The implications of the structural and biochemical data on the role of the ankyrin repeats in different TRPV channels are discussed.

  8. [Interspecific polymorphism of the glucosyltransferase domain of the sucrose synthase gene in the genus Malus and related species of Rosaceae].

    PubMed

    Boris, K V; Kochieva, E Z; Kudryavtsev, A M

    2014-12-01

    The sequences that encode the main functional glucosyltransferase domain of sucrose synthase genes have been identified for the first time in 14 species of the genus Malus and related species of the family Rosaceae, and their polymorphism was investigated. Single nucleotide substitutions leading to amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence, including the conservative transmembrane motif sequence common to all sucrose synthase genes of higher plants, were detected in the studied sequences.

  9. A novel Krueppel related factor consisting of only a KRAB domain is expressed in the murine trigeminal ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulina, Karina; Bodeker, MacDara; Warren, John; Matthews, Philip; Margolis, Todd P. . E-mail: todd.margolis@ucsf.edu

    2006-09-29

    The largest family of zinc-finger (ZnF) transcription factors is that containing the Krueppel-associated box, or KRAB domain. The amino-terminal KRAB domain of these proteins functions as a transcriptional repressor with the downstream ZnF motifs providing DNA-binding specificity. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel murine Krueppel-related factor (KLF), MIF1, which contains a KRAB domain but lacks a ZnF motif. Western blot analysis identified MIF1-like proteins in the murine trigeminal ganglion (TG) and immunostaining localized these proteins primarily to the cytoplasm of TG neuronal cell bodies. In situ hybridization for Mif1 transcripts confirms the selective expression of Mif1 in TG neurons. Consistent with the non-nuclear localization of MIF1 we could detect no transcriptional repressor activity of the MIF1 protein. However MIF1 appears to be capable of interacting with the co-repressor TIF1{beta} and exhibits transcription repressor activity when fused to yeast GAL4 binding domain protein. Genomic analysis of Mif1 sequence suggests that the Mif1 transcript may result from splicing of a longer KRAB-ZnF containing transcript.

  10. An exact solution for a thick domain wall in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein equations for a static, planar domain wall with finite thickness is presented. At infinity, density and pressure vanish and the space-time tends to the Minkowski vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Taub vacuum on the other side. A surprising feature of this solution is that the density and pressure distribution are symmetric about the central plane of the wall whereas the space-time metric and therefore also the gravitational field experienced by a test particle is asymmetric.

  11. Cognitive Composites Domain Scores Related to Neuroimaging Biomarkers within Probable-Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment-Storage Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Ana; Alegret, Montserrat; Pesini, Pedro; Valero, Sergi; Lafuente, Asunción; Buendía, Mar; San José, Itziar; Ibarria, Marta; Tejero, Miguel A.; Giménez, Joan; Ruiz, Susana; Hernández, Isabel; Pujadas, Francesc; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Munuera, Josep; Arbizu, Javier; Tárraga, Lluis; Hendrix, Suzanne B.; Ruiz, Agustín; Becker, James T.; Landau, Susan M.; Sotolongo-Grau, Oscar; Sarasa, Manuel; Boada, Mercè

    2017-01-01

    The probable-amnestic (Pr-a) mild cognitive impairment (MCI)-storage subtype is a phenotype with 8.5 times more risk of conversion to dementia, mainly Alzheimer’s disease (AD), than the possible non-amnestic (Pss-na) MCI. The aim of this study was to find the optimized cognitive composites (CCs) domain scores most related to neuroimaging biomarkers within Pr-aMCI-storage subtype patients. The Fundació ACE (ACE) study with 20 Pr-aMCI-storage subtype subjects (MCI) were analyzed. All subjects underwent a neuropsychological assessment, a structural MRI, FDG-PET, and PIB-PET. The adjusted hippocampal volume (aHV) on MRI, the standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) on FDG-PET and PIB-PET SUVR measures were analyzed. The construction of the CCs domain scores, and the aHV on MRI and FDG-PET SUVR measures, were replicated in the parental AB255 study database (n = 133 MCI). Partial correlations adjusted by age, gender, and education were calculated with the associated p-value among every CC domain score and the neuroimaging biomarkers. The results were replicated in the “MCI due to AD” with memory storage impairments from ADNI. Delayed Recall CC domain score was significantly correlated with PIB-PET SUVR (β= –0.61, p = 0.003) in the ACE study and also with aHV on MRI (β= 0.27, p = 0.01) and FDG-PET SUVR (β= 0.27, p = 0.01) in the AB255 study. After a median survival time of 20.6 months, 85% from the ACE MCI converted to AD. The replication of our results in the ADNI dataset also confirmed our findings. Delayed Recall is the CC domain score best correlated with neuroimaging biomarkers associated with prodromal AD diagnosis. PMID:28269787

  12. Cognitive Composites Domain Scores Related to Neuroimaging Biomarkers within Probable-Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment-Storage Subtype.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Ana; Alegret, Montserrat; Pesini, Pedro; Valero, Sergi; Lafuente, Asunción; Buendía, Mar; San José, Itziar; Ibarria, Marta; Tejero, Miguel A; Giménez, Joan; Ruiz, Susana; Hernández, Isabel; Pujadas, Francesc; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Munuera, Josep; Arbizu, Javier; Tárraga, Lluis; Hendrix, Suzanne B; Ruiz, Agustín; Becker, James T; Landau, Susan M; Sotolongo-Grau, Oscar; Sarasa, Manuel; Boada, Mercè

    2017-01-01

    The probable-amnestic (Pr-a) mild cognitive impairment (MCI)-storage subtype is a phenotype with 8.5 times more risk of conversion to dementia, mainly Alzheimer's disease (AD), than the possible non-amnestic (Pss-na) MCI. The aim of this study was to find the optimized cognitive composites (CCs) domain scores most related to neuroimaging biomarkers within Pr-aMCI-storage subtype patients. The Fundació ACE (ACE) study with 20 Pr-aMCI-storage subtype subjects (MCI) were analyzed. All subjects underwent a neuropsychological assessment, a structural MRI, FDG-PET, and PIB-PET. The adjusted hippocampal volume (aHV) on MRI, the standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) on FDG-PET and PIB-PET SUVR measures were analyzed. The construction of the CCs domain scores, and the aHV on MRI and FDG-PET SUVR measures, were replicated in the parental AB255 study database (n = 133 MCI). Partial correlations adjusted by age, gender, and education were calculated with the associated p-value among every CC domain score and the neuroimaging biomarkers. The results were replicated in the "MCI due to AD" with memory storage impairments from ADNI. Delayed Recall CC domain score was significantly correlated with PIB-PET SUVR (β= -0.61, p = 0.003) in the ACE study and also with aHV on MRI (β= 0.27, p = 0.01) and FDG-PET SUVR (β= 0.27, p = 0.01) in the AB255 study. After a median survival time of 20.6 months, 85% from the ACE MCI converted to AD. The replication of our results in the ADNI dataset also confirmed our findings. Delayed Recall is the CC domain score best correlated with neuroimaging biomarkers associated with prodromal AD diagnosis.

  13. The New Health-Related Top-Level Domains Are Coming: Will Cureforcancer.health Go to the Highest Bidder?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) opened a new round of applications for generic top-level domain (gTLD) names, receiving 1930 applications, of which at least 18 were related to health (eg, “.doctor”, “.health”, “.med”). The entry of new, commercial players applying to create health-related names reopens the debate on the role of international organizations, governments, non-governmental organizations, and other stakeholders regarding the safeguards and policies needed to protect consumers. PMID:24598704

  14. Team deliberate practice in medicine and related domains: a consideration of the issues.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kevin R; Eccles, David W; Shatzer, John H

    2017-03-01

    A better understanding of the factors influencing medical team performance and accounting for expert medical team performance should benefit medical practice. Therefore, the aim here is to highlight key issues with using deliberate practice to improve medical team performance, especially given the success of deliberate practice for developing individual expert performance in medicine and other domains. Highlighting these issues will inform the development of training for medical teams. The authors first describe team coordination and its critical role in medical teams. Presented next are the cognitive mechanisms that allow expert performers to accurately interpret the current situation via the creation of an accurate mental "model" of the current situation, known as a situation model. Following this, the authors propose that effective team performance depends at least in part on team members having similar models of the situation, known as a shared situation model. The authors then propose guiding principles for implementing team deliberate practice in medicine and describe how team deliberate practice can be used in an attempt to reduce barriers inherent in medical teams to the development of shared situation models. The paper concludes with considerations of limitations, and future research directions, concerning the implementation of team deliberate practice within medicine.

  15. Electrophysiology and pharmacology of tandem domain potassium channel TREK-1 related BDNF synthesis in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Wang, Weiping; Peng, Ying; Li, Jiang; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, the functional properties and pharmacology of two-pore domain potassium channel (K2P) TREK-1 in primary cultured rat brain astrocytes were investigated. Western blot, patch clamping techniques, and ELISA were used to detect the distribution and function of TREK-1 as well as the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the primary cultured astrocytes. It was shown that TREK-1 protein expressed in astrocytes was 2.4-fold higher than it was expressed in microglia. Single channel recording via patch clamping showed that the TREK-1 outward currents in astrocytes could be activated by arachidonic acid (AA) or chloroform with the conductance of 113 ± 14 and 120 ± 13 pS, respectively. The current was also sensitive to mechanical stretch and intracellular acidification. Negative pressure (-30 cm H2O) and acidification of intracellular solution (pH 6.8 or 6.3) both enhanced TREK-1 channel open probability significantly. Further pharmacological studies showed that TREK-1 antagonist penfluridol inhibited AA-induced currents, and both penfluridol and methionine (TREK-1 blockers) significantly increased BDNF level in astrocytes by 50 %. These results indicated that TREK-1 channel current was a major component of K2P currents in astrocytes. TREK-1 channels might play important roles in regulating the function of astrocytes and might be used as a drug target for neuroprotection.

  16. The relative influence of different domains of social connectedness on self-directed violence in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Jennifer W; Puddy, Richard W; Hall, Diane M; Cashman, Sandra Y; Crosby, Alexander E; Ortega, Lavonne A G

    2010-05-01

    Previous research has linked greater social connectedness with a lowered risk of self-directed violence among adolescents. However, few studies have analyzed the comparative strength of different domains of connectedness (e.g., family, peers and school) to determine where limited resources might best be focused. Data to address that gap were taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Student Health and Safety Survey, administered to 4,131 7th-12th graders (51.5% female; 43.8% Hispanic; 22.6% African American or Black). Logistic regressions (controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family structure, academic performance, and depressive symptoms) suggest that family connectedness was a stronger predictor than connectedness to peers, school, or adults at school for non-suicidal self-harm, suicidal ideation, suicide plans, and non-fatal suicidal behavior. In some analyses, peer connectedness was unexpectedly a risk factor. Results have implications for prevention of suicide in adolescence, especially in the context of the current trend towards school-based prevention programs.

  17. Spatial and temporal frequency domain laser-ultrasound applied in the direct measurement of dispersion relations of surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünsteidl, Clemens; Veres, István A.; Roither, Jürgen; Burgholzer, Peter; Murray, Todd W.; Berer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a laser-ultrasound measurement technique which combines adjustable spatial and temporal modulation of the excitation laser beam. Our method spreads the intensity of an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser over a micro-scale pattern on the sample surface to excite surface acoustic waves. The excitation pattern consists of parallel, equidistant lines and the waves generated from the individual lines interfere on the sample surface. Measurement is done in the spatial-temporal frequency domain allowing the direct determination of dispersion relations. The technique performs with high signal-to-noise-ratios and low peak power densities on the sample.

  18. Demand-Driven Clustering in Relational Domains for Predicting Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jesse; Costa, Vítor Santos; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael; Berg, Elizabeth; Page, David

    2013-01-01

    Learning from electronic medical records (EMR) is challenging due to their relational nature and the uncertain dependence between a patient's past and future health status. Statistical relational learning is a natural fit for analyzing EMRs but is less adept at handling their inherent latent structure, such as connections between related medications or diseases. One way to capture the latent structure is via a relational clustering of objects. We propose a novel approach that, instead of pre-clustering the objects, performs a demand-driven clustering during learning. We evaluate our algorithm on three real-world tasks where the goal is to use EMRs to predict whether a patient will have an adverse reaction to a medication. We find that our approach is more accurate than performing no clustering, pre-clustering, and using expert-constructed medical heterarchies. PMID:25285329

  19. Working memory and language: skill-specific or domain-general relations to mathematics?

    PubMed

    Purpura, David J; Ganley, Colleen M

    2014-06-01

    Children's early mathematics skills develop in a cumulative fashion; foundational skills form a basis for the acquisition of later skills. However, non-mathematical factors such as working memory and language skills have also been linked to mathematical development at a broad level. Unfortunately, little research has been conducted to evaluate the specific relations of these two non-mathematical factors to individual aspects of early mathematics. Thus, the focus of this study was to determine whether working memory and language were related to only individual aspects of early mathematics or related to many components of early mathematics skills. A total of 199 4- to 6-year-old preschool and kindergarten children were assessed on a battery of early mathematics tasks as well as measures of working memory and language. Results indicated that working memory has a specific relation to only a few-but critically important-early mathematics skills and language has a broad relation to nearly all early mathematics skills.

  20. Structural and functional characterization of the CAP domain of pathogen-related yeast 1 (Pry1) protein

    PubMed Central

    Darwiche, Rabih; Kelleher, Alan; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2016-01-01

    The production, crystal structure, and functional characterization of the C-terminal cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1 (CAP) domain of pathogen-related yeast protein-1 (Pry1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The CAP domain of Pry1 (Pry1CAP) is functional in vivo as its expression restores cholesterol export to yeast mutants lacking endogenous Pry1 and Pry2. Recombinant Pry1CAP forms dimers in solution, is sufficient for in vitro cholesterol binding, and has comparable binding properties as full-length Pry1. Two crystal structures of Pry1CAP are reported, one with Mg2+ coordinated to the conserved CAP tetrad (His208, Glu215, Glu233 and His250) in spacegroup I41 and the other without divalent cations in spacegroup P6122. The latter structure contains four 1,4-dioxane molecules from the crystallization solution, one of which sits in the cholesterol binding site. Both structures reveal that the divalent cation and cholesterol binding sites are connected upon dimerization, providing a structural basis for the observed Mg2+-dependent sterol binding by Pry1. PMID:27344972

  1. Structural and functional characterization of the CAP domain of pathogen-related yeast 1 (Pry1) protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwiche, Rabih; Kelleher, Alan; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2016-06-01

    The production, crystal structure, and functional characterization of the C-terminal cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1 (CAP) domain of pathogen-related yeast protein-1 (Pry1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The CAP domain of Pry1 (Pry1CAP) is functional in vivo as its expression restores cholesterol export to yeast mutants lacking endogenous Pry1 and Pry2. Recombinant Pry1CAP forms dimers in solution, is sufficient for in vitro cholesterol binding, and has comparable binding properties as full-length Pry1. Two crystal structures of Pry1CAP are reported, one with Mg2+ coordinated to the conserved CAP tetrad (His208, Glu215, Glu233 and His250) in spacegroup I41 and the other without divalent cations in spacegroup P6122. The latter structure contains four 1,4-dioxane molecules from the crystallization solution, one of which sits in the cholesterol binding site. Both structures reveal that the divalent cation and cholesterol binding sites are connected upon dimerization, providing a structural basis for the observed Mg2+-dependent sterol binding by Pry1.

  2. Academic Self-Concept and Emotion Relations: Domain Specificity and Age Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Cronjaeger, Hanna; Frenzel, Anne C.; Ludtke, Oliver; Hall, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations between academic self-concepts and the emotions of enjoyment, pride, anxiety, anger, and boredom as experienced in mathematics, physics, German, and English classes (N=1710; grades 8 and 11). In line with our hypotheses derived from appraisal-based emotion theories and self-efficacy research,…

  3. Quality of Parental Homework Involvement: Predictors and Reciprocal Relations with Academic Functioning in the Reading Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumont, Hanna; Trautwein, Ulrich; Nagy, Gabriel; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined predictors of the quality of parental homework involvement and reciprocal relations between the quality of parental homework involvement and students' reading achievement and academic functioning in a reading-intensive subject (German). Data from 2,830 students in nonacademic tracks and their parents who were surveyed in both…

  4. What Is Learned when Concept Learning Fails?--A Theory of Restricted-Domain Relational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anthony A.; Lickteig, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Two matching-to-sample (MTS) and four same/different (S/D) experiments employed tests to distinguish between item-specific learning and relational learning. One MTS experiment showed item-specific learning when concept learning failed (i.e., no novel-stimulus transfer). Another MTS experiment showed item-specific learning when pigeons'…

  5. Parkinsonian motor impairment predicts personality domains related to genetic risk and treatment outcomes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Molina, Juan L; Calvó, María; Padilla, Eduardo; Balda, Mara; Alemán, Gabriela González; Florenzano, Néstor V; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Kamis, Danielle; Rangeon, Beatriz Molina; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Conesa, Horacio A; Escobar, Javier I; Zwir, Igor; Cloninger, C Robert; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2017-01-01

    Identifying endophenotypes of schizophrenia is of critical importance and has profound implications on clinical practice. Here we propose an innovative approach to clarify the mechanims through which temperament and character deviance relates to risk for schizophrenia and predict long-term treatment outcomes. We recruited 61 antipsychotic naïve subjects with chronic schizophrenia, 99 unaffected relatives, and 68 healthy controls from rural communities in the Central Andes. Diagnosis was ascertained with the Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry; parkinsonian motor impairment was measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale; mesencephalic parenchyma was evaluated with transcranial ultrasound; and personality traits were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory. Ten-year outcome data was available for ~40% of the index cases. Patients with schizophrenia had higher harm avoidance and self-transcendence (ST), and lower reward dependence (RD), cooperativeness (CO), and self-directedness (SD). Unaffected relatives had higher ST and lower CO and SD. Parkinsonism reliably predicted RD, CO, and SD after correcting for age and sex. The average duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was over 5 years. Further, SD was anticorrelated with DUP and antipsychotic dosing at follow-up. Baseline DUP was related to antipsychotic dose-years. Further, 'explosive/borderline', 'methodical/obsessive', and 'disorganized/schizotypal' personality profiles were associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Parkinsonism predicts core personality features and treatment outcomes in schizophrenia. Our study suggests that RD, CO, and SD are endophenotypes of the disease that may, in part, be mediated by dopaminergic function. Further, SD is an important determinant of treatment course and outcome.

  6. Parkinsonian motor impairment predicts personality domains related to genetic risk and treatment outcomes in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Juan L; Calvó, María; Padilla, Eduardo; Balda, Mara; Alemán, Gabriela González; Florenzano, Néstor V; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Kamis, Danielle; Rangeon, Beatriz Molina; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Conesa, Horacio A; Escobar, Javier I; Zwir, Igor; Cloninger, C Robert; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2017-01-01

    Identifying endophenotypes of schizophrenia is of critical importance and has profound implications on clinical practice. Here we propose an innovative approach to clarify the mechanims through which temperament and character deviance relates to risk for schizophrenia and predict long-term treatment outcomes. We recruited 61 antipsychotic naïve subjects with chronic schizophrenia, 99 unaffected relatives, and 68 healthy controls from rural communities in the Central Andes. Diagnosis was ascertained with the Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry; parkinsonian motor impairment was measured with the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale; mesencephalic parenchyma was evaluated with transcranial ultrasound; and personality traits were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory. Ten-year outcome data was available for ~40% of the index cases. Patients with schizophrenia had higher harm avoidance and self-transcendence (ST), and lower reward dependence (RD), cooperativeness (CO), and self-directedness (SD). Unaffected relatives had higher ST and lower CO and SD. Parkinsonism reliably predicted RD, CO, and SD after correcting for age and sex. The average duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was over 5 years. Further, SD was anticorrelated with DUP and antipsychotic dosing at follow-up. Baseline DUP was related to antipsychotic dose-years. Further, ‘explosive/borderline’, ‘methodical/obsessive’, and ‘disorganized/schizotypal’ personality profiles were associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Parkinsonism predicts core personality features and treatment outcomes in schizophrenia. Our study suggests that RD, CO, and SD are endophenotypes of the disease that may, in part, be mediated by dopaminergic function. Further, SD is an important determinant of treatment course and outcome. PMID:28127577

  7. Student Agency: an Analysis of Students' Networked Relations Across the Informal and Formal Learning Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappa, Natasha Anne; Tang, Kok-Sing

    2016-05-01

    Agency is a construct facilitating our examination of when and how young people extend their own learning across contexts. However, little is known about the role played by adolescent learners' sense of agency. This paper reports two cases of students' agentively employing and developing science literacy practices—one in Singapore and the other in the USA. The paper illustrates how these two adolescent learners in different ways creatively accessed, navigated and integrated in-school and out-of-school discourses to support and nurture their learning of physics. Data were gleaned from students' work and interviews with students participating in a physics curricular programme in which they made linkages between their chosen out-of-school texts and several physics concepts learnt in school. The students' agentive moves were identified by means of situational mapping, which involved a relational analysis of the students' chosen artefacts and discourses across time and space. This relational analysis enabled us to address questions of student agency—how it can be effected, realised, construed and examined. It highlights possible ways to intervene in these networked relations to facilitate adolescents' agentive moves in their learning endeavours.

  8. Relative increase in Alzheimer's disease of soluble forms of cerebral Abeta amyloid protein precursor containing the Kunitz protease inhibitory domain.

    PubMed

    Moir, R D; Lynch, T; Bush, A I; Whyte, S; Henry, A; Portbury, S; Multhaup, G; Small, D H; Tanzi, R E; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L

    1998-02-27

    Although a number of studies have examined amyloid precursor protein (APP) mRNA levels in Alzheimer's disease (AD), no clear consensus has emerged as to whether the levels of transcripts for isoforms containing a Kunitz protease inhibitory (KPI)-encoded region are increased or decreased in AD. Here we compare AD and control brain for the relative amounts of APP protein containing KPI to APP protein lacking this domain. APP protein was purified from the soluble subcellular fraction and Triton X-100 membrane pellet extract of one hemisphere of AD (n = 10), normal (n = 7), and neurological control (n = 5) brains. The amount of KPI-containing APP in the purified protein samples was determined using two independent assay methods. The first assay exploited the inhibitory action of KPI-containing APP on trypsin. The second assay employed reflectance analysis of Western blots. The proportion of KPI-containing forms of APP in the soluble subcellular fraction of AD brains is significantly elevated (p < 0.01) compared with controls. Species containing a KPI domain comprise 32-41 and 76-77% of purified soluble APP from control and AD brains, respectively. For purified membrane-associated APP, 72-77 and 65-82% of control and AD samples, respectively, contain a KPI domain. Since KPI-containing species of APP may be more amyloidogenic (Ho, L., Fukuchi, K., and Yonkin, S. G. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 30929-30934), our findings support an imbalance of isoforms as one possible mechanism for amyloid deposition in sporadic AD.

  9. Assessing the co-occurrence of intimate partner violence domains across the life-course: relating typologies to mental health

    PubMed Central

    Armour, Cherie; Sleath, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Background The inter-generational transmission of violence (ITV) hypothesis and polyvictimisation have been studied extensively. The extant evidence suggests that individuals from violent families are at increased risk of subsequent intimate partner violence (IPV) and that a proportion of individuals experience victimisation across multiple rather than single IPV domains. Both ITV and polyvictimisation are shown to increase the risk of psychiatric morbidity, alcohol use, and anger expression. Objective The current study aimed to 1) ascertain if underlying typologies of victimisation across the life-course and over multiple victimisation domains were present and 2) ascertain if groupings differed on mean scores of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, alcohol use, and anger expression. Method University students (N=318) were queried in relation to victimisation experiences and psychological well-being. Responses across multiple domains of IPV spanning the life-course were used in a latent profile analysis. ANOVA was subsequently used to determine if profiles differed in their mean scores on PTSD, depression, alcohol use, and anger expression. Results Three distinct profiles were identified; one of which comprised individuals who experienced “life-course polyvictimisation,” another showing individuals who experienced “witnessing parental victimisation,” and one which experienced “psychological victimisation only.” Life-course polyvictims scored the highest across most assessed measures. Conclusion Witnessing severe physical aggression and injury in parental relationships as a child has an interesting impact on the ITV into adolescence and adulthood. Life-course polyvictims are shown to experience increased levels of psychiatric morbidity and issues with alcohol misuse and anger expression. PMID:25279106

  10. GNBP domain of Anopheles darlingi: are polymorphic inversions and gene variation related to adaptive evolution?

    PubMed

    Bridi, L C; Rafael, M S

    2016-02-01

    Anopheles darlingi is the main malaria vector in humans in South America. In the Amazon basin, it lives along the banks of rivers and lakes, which responds to the annual hydrological cycle (dry season and rainy season). In these breeding sites, the larvae of this mosquito feed on decomposing organic and microorganisms, which can be pathogenic and trigger the activation of innate immune system pathways, such as proteins Gram-negative binding protein (GNBP). Such environmental changes affect the occurrence of polymorphic inversions especially at the heterozygote frequency, which confer adaptative advantage compared to homozygous inversions. We mapped the GNBP probe to the An. darlingi 2Rd inversion by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), which was a good indicator of the GNBP immune response related to the chromosomal polymorphic inversions and adaptative evolution. To better understand the evolutionary relations and time of divergence of the GNBP of An. darlingi, we compared it with nine other mosquito GNBPs. The results of the phylogenetic analysis of the GNBP sequence between the species of mosquitoes demonstrated three clades. Clade I and II included the GNBPB5 sequence, and clade III the sequence of GNBPB1. Most of these sequences of GNBP analyzed were homologous with that of subfamily B, including that of An. gambiae (87 %), therefore suggesting that GNBP of An. darling belongs to subfamily B. This work helps us understand the role of inversion polymorphism in evolution of An. darlingi.

  11. Constructs of human neuropathy target esterase catalytic domain containing mutations related to motor neuron disease have altered enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Hein, Nichole D; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Rainier, Shirley R; Fink, John K; Richardson, Rudy J

    2010-07-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is a phospholipase/lysophospholipase associated with organophosphorus (OP) compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). Distal degeneration of motor axons occurs in both OPIDN and the hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Recently, mutations within the esterase domain of NTE were identified in patients with a novel type of HSP (SPG39) designated NTE-related motor neuron disease (NTE-MND). Two of these mutations, arginine 890 to histidine (R890H) and methionine 1012 to valine (M1012V), were created in human recombinant NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to measure possible changes in catalytic properties. These mutated enzymes had decreased specific activities for hydrolysis of the artificial substrate, phenyl valerate. In addition, the M1012V mutant exhibited a reduced bimolecular rate constant of inhibition (k(i)) for all three inhibitors tested: mipafox, diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, and chlorpyrifos oxon. Finally, while both mutated enzymes inhibited by OP compounds exhibited altered time-dependent loss of their ability to be reactivated by nucleophiles (aging), more pronounced effects were seen with the M1012V mutant. Taken together, the results from specific activity, inhibition, and aging experiments suggest that the mutations found in association with NTE-MND have functional correlates in altered enzymological properties of NTE.

  12. The ATM- and ATR-related SCD domain is over-represented in proteins involved in nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Cara, Lukas; Baitemirova, Medina; Follis, Jack; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Ribes-Zamora, Albert

    2016-01-08

    ATM and ATR are cellular kinases with a well-characterized role in the DNA-damage response. Although the complete set of ATM/ATR targets is unknown, they often contain clusters of S/TQ motifs that constitute an SCD domain. In this study, we identified putative ATM/ATR targets that have a conserved SCD domain across vertebrates. Using this approach, we have identified novel putative ATM/ATR targets in pathways known to be under direct control of these kinases. Our analysis has also unveiled significant enrichment of SCD-containing proteins in cellular pathways, such as vesicle trafficking and actin cytoskeleton, where a regulating role for ATM/ATR is either unknown or poorly understood, hinting at a much broader and overarching role for these kinases in the cell. Of particular note is the overrepresentation of conserved SCD-containing proteins involved in pathways related to neural development. This finding suggests that ATM/ATR could be directly involved in controlling this process, which may be linked to the adverse neurological effects observed in patients with mutations in ATM.

  13. Recognition of Histone H3 Lysine-4 Methylation by the Double Tudor Domain of JMJD2A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Y.; Fang, J.; Bedford, M.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Biological responses to histone methylation critically depend on the faithful readout and transduction of the methyl-lysine signal by 'effector' proteins, yet our understanding of methyl-lysine recognition has so far been limited to the study of histone binding by chromodomain and WD40-repeat proteins. The double tudor domain of JMJD2A, a Jmjc domain-containing histone demethylase, binds methylated histone H3-K4 and H4-K20. We found that the double tudor domain has an interdigitated structure, and the unusual fold is required for its ability to bind methylated histone tails. The cocrystal structure of the JMJD2A double tudor domain with a trimethylated H3-K4 peptide reveals that the trimethyl-K4 is bound in a cage of three aromatic residues, two of which are from the tudor-2 motif, whereas the binding specificity is determined by side-chain interactions involving amino acids from the tudor-1 motif. Our study provides mechanistic insights into recognition of methylated histone tails by tudor domains and reveals the structural intricacy of methyl-lysine recognition by two closely spaced effector domains.

  14. Development of the serotonergic cells in murine raphe nuclei and their relations with rhombomeric domains.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Antonia; Merchán, Paloma; Sandoval, Juan E; Sánchez-Arrones, Luisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Artuch, Rafael; Ferrán, José L; Martínez-de-la-Torre, Margaret; Puelles, Luis

    2013-09-01

    The raphe nuclei represent the origin of central serotonergic projections. The literature distinguishes seven nuclei grouped into rostral and caudal clusters relative to the pons. The boundaries of these nuclei have not been defined precisely enough, particularly with regard to developmental units, notably hindbrain rhombomeres. We hold that a developmental point of view considering rhombomeres may explain observed differences in connectivity and function. There are twelve rhombomeres characterized by particular genetic profiles, and each develops between one and four distinct serotonergic populations. We have studied the distribution of the conventional seven raphe nuclei among these twelve units. To this aim, we correlated 5-HT-immunoreacted neurons with rhombomeric boundary landmarks in sagittal mouse brain sections at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we performed a partial genoarchitectonic analysis of the developing raphe nuclei, mapping all known serotonergic differentiation markers, and compared these results, jointly with others found in the literature, with our map of serotonin-containing populations, in order to examine regional variations in correspondence. Examples of regionally selective gene patterns were identified. As a result, we produced a rhombomeric classification of some 45 serotonergic populations, and suggested a corresponding modified terminology. Only a minor rostral part of the dorsal raphe nucleus lies in the midbrain. Some serotonergic neurons were found in rhombomere 4, contrary to the conventional assumption that it lacks such neurons. We expect that our reclassification of raphe nuclei may be useful for causal analysis of their differential molecular specification, as well as for studies of differential connectivity and function.

  15. Adaptive extraction of emotion-related EEG segments using multidimensional directed information in time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Petrantonakis, Panagiotis C; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2010-01-01

    Emotion discrimination from electroencephalogram (EEG) has gained attention the last decade as a user-friendly and effective approach to EEG-based emotion recognition (EEG-ER) systems. Nevertheless, challenging issues regarding the emotion elicitation procedure, especially its effectiveness, raise. In this work, a novel method, which not only evaluates the degree of emotion elicitation but localizes the emotion information in the time-frequency domain, as well, is proposed. The latter, incorporates multidimensional directed information at the time-frequency EEG representation, extracted using empirical mode decomposition, and introduces an asymmetry index for adaptive emotion-related EEG segment selection. Experimental results derived from 16 subjects visually stimulated with pictures from the valence/arousal space drawn from the International Affective Picture System database, justify the effectiveness of the proposed approach and its potential contribution to the enhancement of EEG-ER systems.

  16. Domain-general mediators of the relation between kindergarten number sense and first-grade mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Jordan, Nancy C; Glutting, Joseph; Irwin, Casey; Dyson, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    Domain-general skills that mediate the relation between kindergarten number sense and first-grade mathematics skills were investigated. Participants were 107 children who displayed low number sense in the fall of kindergarten. Controlling for background variables, multiple regression analyses showed that both attention problems and executive functioning were unique predictors of mathematics outcomes. Attention problems were more important for predicting first-grade calculation performance, whereas executive functioning was more important for predicting first-grade performance on applied problems. Moreover, both executive functioning and attention problems were unique partial mediators of the relationship between kindergarten and first-grade mathematics skills. The results provide empirical support for developing interventions that target executive functioning and attention problems in addition to instruction in number skills for kindergartners with initial low number sense.

  17. Archaeal surface layer proteins contain beta propeller, PKD, and beta helix domains and are related to metazoan cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hua; Takagi, Junichi; Liu, Jin-huan; Lindgren, Sara; Zhang, Rong-guang; Joachimiak, A; Wang, Jia-huai; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-10-01

    The surface layer of archaeobacteria protects cells from extreme environments and, in Methanosarcina, may regulate cell adhesion. We identify three domain types that account for the complete architecture of numerous Methanosarcina surface layer proteins (SLPs). We solve the crystal structure for two of these domains, which correspond to the two N-terminal domains of an M. mazei SLP. One domain displays a unique, highly symmetrical, seven-bladed beta propeller fold, and the other belongs to the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) superfamily fold. The third domain is predicted to adopt a beta helix fold. These domains have homologs in metazoan cell surface proteins, suggesting remarkable relationships between domains in archaeal SLPs and metazoan cell surface proteins.

  18. Is there an evolutionary relationship between WARP (von Willebrand factor A-domain-related protein) and the FACIT and FACIT-like collagens?

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jamie; Bateman, John F

    2003-09-25

    We suggest that there is an evolutionary relationship between von Willebrand factor A-domain-related protein (WARP), and the fibril-associated collagen with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) and FACIT-like subfamilies of collagens. Data from a comparison of amino acid sequences, domain organisation and chromosomal location are consistent with the hypothesis that WARP and these collagens share a common collagen ancestor. In support of this is the observation that the WARP 3' coding region is GC-rich suggesting that this may represent the remnant of a triple helix protein domain which WARP has 'lost' during evolution.

  19. Structural Studies of the Tandem Tudor Domains of Fragile X Mental Retardation Related Proteins FXR1 and FXR2

    SciTech Connect

    Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; Guo, Yahong; Bian, ChuanBing; Amaya, Maria F.; Lam, Robert; Wasney, Gregory A.; Vedadi, Masoud; Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-11-23

    Expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1, fragile X mental retardation 1, gene results in suppression of protein expression for this gene and is the underlying cause of Fragile X syndrome. In unaffected individuals, the FMRP protein, together with two additional paralogues (Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome-related Protein 1 and 2), associates with mRNA to form a ribonucleoprotein complex in the nucleus that is transported to dendrites and spines of neuronal cells. It is thought that the fragile X family of proteins contributes to the regulation of protein synthesis at sites where mRNAs are locally translated in response to stimuli. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the non-canonical nuclear localization signals of the FXR1 and FXR2 autosomal paralogues of FMRP, which were determined at 2.50 and 1.92 {angstrom}, respectively. The nuclear localization signals of the FXR1 and FXR2 comprise tandem Tudor domain architectures, closely resembling that of UHRF1, which is proposed to bind methylated histone H3K9. The FMRP, FXR1 and FXR2 proteins comprise a small family of highly conserved proteins that appear to be important in translational regulation, particularly in neuronal cells. The crystal structures of the N-terminal tandem Tudor domains of FXR1 and FXR2 revealed a conserved architecture with that of FMRP. Biochemical analysis of the tandem Tudor doamins reveals their ability to preferentially recognize trimethylated peptides in a sequence-specific manner.

  20. The H+ related defects involved in domain reversal for both near-stoichiometric and heavily Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.; Kong, Y.; Shi, L.; Yao, J.; Chen, S.; Sun, L.; Zhao, D.; Xu, J.; Zhang, G.

    2005-02-01

    Domain reversal was performed on both near-stoichiometric and heavily Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals. H+ related defect structures in these two types of crystals were studied through the infrared absorption spectra. It is found that the intensity of some decomposed peaks of absorption band change apparently during domain reversal for near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals but not for heavily Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals. According to these experimental results, distinct models about H+ related defect structure in LiNbO3 lattice were supposed for them. Nb4+Li and Mg3-Nb were considered as the centers of H+ related defect complex for near-stoichiometric and heavily Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals respectively. Different behavior of them was used to explain the difference of infrared absorption spectra during domain reversal between two types of crystals.

  1. Interaction between a Domain of the Negative Regulator of the Ras-ERK Pathway, SPRED1 Protein, and the GTPase-activating Protein-related Domain of Neurofibromin Is Implicated in Legius Syndrome and Neurofibromatosis Type 1*♦

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yasuko; Brems, Hilde; Suzuki, Mayu; Kanamori, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Masahiro; Morita, Rimpei; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Ose, Toyoyuki; Messiaen, Ludwine; Legius, Eric; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Constitutional heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the SPRED1 gene cause a phenotype known as Legius syndrome, which consists of symptoms of multiple café-au-lait macules, axillary freckling, learning disabilities, and macrocephaly. Legius syndrome resembles a mild neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) phenotype. It has been demonstrated that SPRED1 functions as a negative regulator of the Ras-ERK pathway and interacts with neurofibromin, the NF1 gene product. However, the molecular details of this interaction and the effects of the mutations identified in Legius syndrome and NF1 on this interaction have not yet been investigated. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid system and an immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293 cells, we found that the SPRED1 EVH1 domain interacts with the N-terminal 16 amino acids and the C-terminal 20 amino acids of the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin, which form two crossing α-helix coils outside the GAP domain. These regions have been shown to be dispensable for GAP activity and are not present in p120GAP. Several mutations in these N- and C-terminal regions of the GRD in NF1 patients and pathogenic missense mutations in the EVH1 domain of SPRED1 in Legius syndrome reduced the binding affinity between the EVH1 domain and the GRD. EVH1 domain mutations with reduced binding to the GRD also disrupted the ERK suppression activity of SPRED1. These data clearly demonstrate that SPRED1 inhibits the Ras-ERK pathway by recruiting neurofibromin to Ras through the EVH1-GRD interaction, and this study also provides molecular basis for the pathogenic mutations of NF1 and Legius syndrome. PMID:26635368

  2. Verticillium infection triggers VASCULAR-RELATED NAC DOMAIN7-dependent de novo xylem formation and enhances drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Reusche, Michael; Thole, Karin; Janz, Dennis; Truskina, Jekaterina; Rindfleisch, Sören; Drübert, Christine; Polle, Andrea; Lipka, Volker; Teichmann, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The soilborne fungal plant pathogen Verticillium longisporum invades the roots of its Brassicaceae hosts and proliferates in the plant vascular system. Typical aboveground symptoms of Verticillium infection on Brassica napus and Arabidopsis thaliana are stunted growth, vein clearing, and leaf chloroses. Here, we provide evidence that vein clearing is caused by pathogen-induced transdifferentiation of chloroplast-containing bundle sheath cells to functional xylem elements. In addition, our findings suggest that reinitiation of cambial activity and transdifferentiation of xylem parenchyma cells results in xylem hyperplasia within the vasculature of Arabidopsis leaves, hypocotyls, and roots. The observed de novo xylem formation correlates with Verticillium-induced expression of the VASCULAR-RELATED NAC DOMAIN (VND) transcription factor gene VND7. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the chimeric repressor VND7-SRDX under control of a Verticillium infection-responsive promoter exhibit reduced de novo xylem formation. Interestingly, infected Arabidopsis wild-type plants show higher drought stress tolerance compared with noninfected plants, whereas this effect is attenuated by suppression of VND7 activity. Together, our results suggest that V. longisporum triggers a tissue-specific developmental plant program that compensates for compromised water transport and enhances the water storage capacity of infected Brassicaceae host plants. In conclusion, we provide evidence that this natural plant-fungus pathosystem has conditionally mutualistic features.

  3. Synergy between loss of NF1 and overexpression of MYCN in neuroblastoma is mediated by the GAP-related domain.

    PubMed

    He, Shuning; Mansour, Marc R; Zimmerman, Mark W; Ki, Dong Hyuk; Layden, Hillary M; Akahane, Koshi; Gjini, Evisa; de Groh, Eric D; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Zhu, Shizhen; Epstein, Jonathan A; Look, A Thomas

    2016-04-27

    Earlier reports showed that hyperplasia of sympathoadrenal cell precursors during embryogenesis in Nf1-deficient mice is independent of Nf1's role in down-modulating RAS-MAPK signaling. We demonstrate in zebrafish that nf1 loss leads to aberrant activation of RAS signaling in MYCN-induced neuroblastomas that arise in these precursors, and that the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain (GRD) is sufficient to suppress the acceleration of neuroblastoma in nf1-deficient fish, but not the hypertrophy of sympathoadrenal cells in nf1 mutant embryos. Thus, even though neuroblastoma is a classical "developmental tumor", NF1 relies on a very different mechanism to suppress malignant transformation than it does to modulate normal neural crest cell growth. We also show marked synergy in tumor cell killing between MEK inhibitors (trametinib) and retinoids (isotretinoin) in primary nf1a-/- zebrafish neuroblastomas. Thus, our model system has considerable translational potential for investigating new strategies to improve the treatment of very high-risk neuroblastomas with aberrant RAS-MAPK activation.

  4. Structure-function relations in the NTPase domain of the antiviral tRNA ribotoxin Escherichia coli PrrC

    SciTech Connect

    Meineke, Birthe; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-06-05

    Breakage of tRNA by Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC (EcoPrrC) underlies a host antiviral response to phage T4 infection. Expression of EcoPrrC is cytocidal in yeast, signifying that PrrC ribotoxicity crosses phylogenetic domain boundaries. EcoPrrC consists of an N-terminal NTPase module that resembles ABC transporters and a C-terminal nuclease module that is sui generis. PrrC homologs are prevalent in many other bacteria. Here we report that Haemophilus influenzae PrrC is toxic in E. coli and yeast. To illuminate structure-activity relations, we conducted a new round of mutational analysis of EcoPrrC guided by primary structure conservation among toxic PrrC homologs. We indentify 17 candidate active site residues in the NTPase module that are essential for toxicity in yeast when EcoPrrC is expressed at high gene dosage. Their functions could be educed by integrating mutational data with the atomic structure of the transition-state complex of a homologous ABC protein.

  5. Synergy between loss of NF1 and overexpression of MYCN in neuroblastoma is mediated by the GAP-related domain

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuning; Mansour, Marc R; Zimmerman, Mark W; Ki, Dong Hyuk; Layden, Hillary M; Akahane, Koshi; Gjini, Evisa; de Groh, Eric D; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Zhu, Shizhen; Epstein, Jonathan A; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier reports showed that hyperplasia of sympathoadrenal cell precursors during embryogenesis in Nf1-deficient mice is independent of Nf1’s role in down-modulating RAS-MAPK signaling. We demonstrate in zebrafish that nf1 loss leads to aberrant activation of RAS signaling in MYCN-induced neuroblastomas that arise in these precursors, and that the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain (GRD) is sufficient to suppress the acceleration of neuroblastoma in nf1-deficient fish, but not the hypertrophy of sympathoadrenal cells in nf1 mutant embryos. Thus, even though neuroblastoma is a classical “developmental tumor”, NF1 relies on a very different mechanism to suppress malignant transformation than it does to modulate normal neural crest cell growth. We also show marked synergy in tumor cell killing between MEK inhibitors (trametinib) and retinoids (isotretinoin) in primary nf1a-/- zebrafish neuroblastomas. Thus, our model system has considerable translational potential for investigating new strategies to improve the treatment of very high-risk neuroblastomas with aberrant RAS-MAPK activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14713.001 PMID:27130733

  6. Analysis of von Willebrand factor A domain-related protein (WARP) polymorphism in temperate and tropical Plasmodium vivax field isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Saber; Djadid, Navid Dinparast; Basseri, Hamid Reza; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Ladoni, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Background The identification of key molecules is crucial for designing transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs), among those ookinete micronemal proteins are candidate as a general class of malaria transmission-blocking targets. Here, the sequence analysis of an extra-cellular malaria protein expressed in ookinetes, named von Willebrand factor A domain-related protein (WARP), is reported in 91 Plasmodium vivax isolates circulating in different regions of Iran. Methods Clinical isolates were collected from north temperate and southern tropical regions in Iran. Primers have been designed based on P. vivax sequence (ctg_6991) which amplified a fragment of about 1044 bp with no size variation. Direct sequencing of PCR products was used to determine polymorphism and further bioinformatics analysis in P. vivax sexual stage antigen, pvwarp. Results Amplified pvwarp gene showed 886 bp in size, with no intron. BLAST analysis showed a similarity of 98–100% to P. vivax Sal-I strain; however, Iranian isolates had 2 bp mismatches in 247 and 531 positions that were non-synonymous substitution [T (ACT) to A (GCT) and R (AGA) to S (AGT)] in comparison with the Sal-I sequence. Conclusion This study presents the first large-scale survey on pvwarp polymorphism in the world, which provides baseline data for developing WARP-based TBV against both temperate and tropical P. vivax isolates. PMID:19549316

  7. Functions of the C-terminal domains of apoptosis-related proteins of the Bcl-2 family.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2014-10-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are involved in cell homeostasis, where they regulate cell death. Some of these proteins are pro-apoptotic and others pro-survival. Moreover, many of them share a similar domain composition with several of the so-called BH domains, although some only have a BH3 domain. A C-terminal domain is present in all the multi-BH domain proteins and in some of the BH3-only ones. This C-terminal domain is hydrophobic or amphipathic, for which reason it was thought when they were discovered that they were membrane anchors. Although this is indeed one of their functions, it has since been observed that they may also serve as regulators of the function of some members of this family, such as Bax. They may also serve to recognize the target membrane of some of these proteins, which only after an apoptotic signal, are incorporated into a membrane. It has been shown that peptides that imitate the sequence of C-terminal domains can form pores and may serve as a model to design cytotoxic molecules.

  8. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  9. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  10. Work locus of control and its relationship to stress perception, related affections, attitudes and behaviours from a domain-specific perspective.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jiajin; Wang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    This research aims to examine the value of applying the Work Locus of Control Scale in predicting work-related outcomes. Study 1 surveyed 323 employees from different companies in China and found that the domain-specific scale was more predictive than the general scale in predicting perceived stressors, rather than in predicting organizational affective commitment and altruistic behaviour. Study 2 applied a multi-wave and multi-source design and used commensurate Likert scales to measure work and general locus of control. Participants were 344 employees from one corporation. Work locus of control was found to be more useful in predicting supervisor-rated job performance, conscientious and altruistic behaviours. These findings help understand the theory-based and measurement-based reasons for the advantages of using domain-specific measures. They claim the importance for employing the domain-specific measure to predict work-related perceptions and behaviours. Implications for the theory and practice are discussed.

  11. A Combinatorial Code for Gene Expression Generated by Transcription Factor Bach2 and MAZR (MAZ-Related Factor) through the BTB/POZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Akira; Yamagiwa, Hironori; Hoshino, Hideto; Muto, Akihiko; Sato, Kazushige; Morita, Masanobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Bach2 is a B-cell- and neuron-specific transcription repressor that forms heterodimers with the Maf-related oncoproteins. We show here that Bach2 activates transcription by interacting with its novel partner MAZR. MAZR was isolated by the yeast two-hybrid screen using the BTB/POZ domain of Bach2 as bait. Besides the BTB/POZ domain, MAZR possesses Zn finger motifs that are closely related to those of the Myc-associated Zn finger (MAZ) protein. MAZR mRNA was coexpressed with Bach2 in B cells among hematopoietic cells and in developing mouse limb buds, suggesting a cooperative role for MAZR and Bach2 in these cells. MAZR forms homo- and hetero-oligomers with Bach2 through the BTB domain, which oligomers bind to guanine-rich sequences. Unlike MAZ, MAZR functioned as a strong activator of the c-myc promoter in transfection assays with B cells. However, it does not possess a typical activation domain, suggesting a role for it as an unusual type of transactivator. The fgf4 gene, which regulates morphogenesis of limb buds, contains both guanine-rich sequences and a Bach2 binding site in its regulatory region. In transfection assays using fibroblast cells, the fgf4 gene was upregulated in the presence of both MAZR and Bach2 in a BTB/POZ domain-dependent manner. The results provide a new perspective on the function of BTB/POZ domain factors and indicate that BTB/POZ domain-mediated oligomers of transcription factors may serve as combinatorial codes for gene expression. PMID:10669750

  12. The Allantoic Core Domain: New Insights Into Development of the Murine Allantois and Its Relation to the Primitive Streak

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Karen M.; Inman, Kimberly E.; Jin, Dexter X.; Enders, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    The whereabouts and properties of the posterior end of the primitive streak have not been identified in any species. In the mouse, the streak’s posterior terminus is assumed to be confined to the embryonic compartment, and to give rise to the allantois, which links the embryo to its mother during pregnancy. In this study, we have refined our understanding of the biology of the murine posterior primitive streak and its relation to the allantois. Through a combination of immunostaining and morphology, we demonstrate that the primitive streak spans the posterior extraembryonic and embryonic regions at the onset of the neural plate stage (~7.0 days postcoitum, dpc). Several hours later, the allantoic bud emerges from the extraembryonic component of the primitive streak (XPS). Then, possibly in collaboration with overlying allantois-associated extraembryonic visceral endoderm, the XPS establishes a germinal center within the allantois, named here the Allantoic Core Domain (ACD). Microsurgical removal of the ACD beyond headfold (HF) stages resulted in the formation of allantoic regenerates that lacked the ACD and failed to elongate; nevertheless, vasculogenesis and vascular patterning proceeded. In situ and transplantation fate mapping demonstrated that, from HF stages onward, the ACD’s progenitor pool contributed to the allantois exclusive of the proximal flanks. By contrast, the posterior intraembryonic primitive streak (IPS) provided the flanks. Grafting the ACD into TC/TC hosts, whose allantoises are significantly foreshortened, restored allantoic elongation. These results revealed that the ACD is essential for allantoic elongation, but the cues required for vascularization lie outside of it. On the basis of these and previous findings, we conclude that the posterior primitive streak of the mouse conceptus is far more complex than was previously believed. Our results provide new directives for addressing the origin and development of the umbilical cord, and

  13. Models of the Joint Structure of Domain-Related and Global Distress: Implications for the Reconciliation of Quality of Life and Mental Health Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, William; St-Arnaud, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Research on subjective wellbeing includes studies of both domain-related and global distress. The mental health literature, though, focuses almost exclusively on global distress. This seems to be partly due to a common belief that psychological distress, and the moods that comprise distress, necessarily lack referential content. However, if that…

  14. Binding domains of Bacillus anthracis phage endolysins recognize cell culture age-related features on the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Mundra, Ruchir V; Mehta, Krunal K; Pangule, Ravindra C; Wu, Xia; Glatfelter, Willing S; Chen, Zijing; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriolytic enzymes often possess a C-terminal binding domain that recognizes specific motifs on the bacterial surface and a catalytic domain that cleaves covalent linkages within the cell wall peptidoglycan. PlyPH, one such lytic enzyme of bacteriophage origin, has been reported to be highly effective against Bacillus anthracis, and can kill up to 99.99% of the viable bacteria. The bactericidal activity of this enzyme, however, appears to be strongly dependent on the age of the bacterial culture. Although highly bactericidal against cells in the early exponential phase, the enzyme is substantially less effective against stationary phase cells, thus limiting its application in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the binding domain of PlyPH may differ in affinity to cells in different Bacillus growth stages and may be primarily responsible for the age-restricted activity. We therefore employed an in silico approach to identify phage lysins differing in their specificity for the bacterial cell wall. Specifically we focused our attention on Plyβ, an enzyme with improved cell wall-binding ability and age-independent bactericidal activity. Although PlyPH and Plyβ have dissimilar binding domains, their catalytic domains are highly homologous. We characterized the biocatalytic mechanism of Plyβ by identifying the specific bonds cleaved within the cell wall peptidoglycan. Our results provide an example of the diversity of phage endolysins and the opportunity for these biocatalysts to be used for broad-based protection from bacterial pathogens.

  15. Method of assessing the state of a rolling bearing based on the relative compensation distance of multiple-domain features and locally linear embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shouqiang; Ma, Danyang; Wang, Yujing; Lan, Chaofeng; Chen, Qingguo; Mikulovich, V. I.

    2017-03-01

    To effectively assess different fault locations and different degrees of performance degradation of a rolling bearing with a unified assessment index, a novel state assessment method based on the relative compensation distance of multiple-domain features and locally linear embedding is proposed. First, for a single-sample signal, time-domain and frequency-domain indexes can be calculated for the original vibration signal and each sensitive intrinsic mode function obtained by improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition, and the singular values of the sensitive intrinsic mode function matrix can be extracted by singular value decomposition to construct a high-dimensional hybrid-domain feature vector. Second, a feature matrix can be constructed by arranging each feature vector of multiple samples, the dimensions of each row vector of the feature matrix can be reduced by the locally linear embedding algorithm, and the compensation distance of each fault state of the rolling bearing can be calculated using the support vector machine. Finally, the relative distance between different fault locations and different degrees of performance degradation and the normal-state optimal classification surface can be compensated, and on the basis of the proposed relative compensation distance, the assessment model can be constructed and an assessment curve drawn. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively assess different fault locations and different degrees of performance degradation of the rolling bearing under certain conditions.

  16. Sensing the Coherence of Biology in Contrast to Psychology: Young Children's Use of Causal Relations to Distinguish Two Foundational Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Jane E.; Keil, Frank C.; Lockhart, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    To what extent do children understand that biological processes fall into 1 coherent domain unified by distinct causal principles? In Experiments 1 and 2 (N = 125) kindergartners are given triads of biological and psychological processes and asked to identify which 2 members of the triad belong together. Results show that 5-year-olds correctly…

  17. The Relation between Preschool Children's False-Belief Understanding and Domain-General Experimentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekny, Jeanette; Grube, Dietmar; Maehler, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the present study is on the developmental antecedents of domain-general experimentation skills. We hypothesized that false-belief understanding would predict the ability to distinguish a conclusive from an inconclusive experiment. We conducted a longitudinal study with two assessment points (t1 and t2) to investigate this hypothesis.…

  18. The Relative Contribution of Health Status and Quality of Life Domains in Subjective Health in Old Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto-Flores, Maria-Eugenia; Moreno-Jimenez, Antonio; Fernandez-Mayoralas, Gloria; Rojo-Perez, Fermina; Forjaz, Maria Joao

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the influence of different health status dimensions and quality of life (QoL) domains on older adults' subjective health, and to assess the role that residential satisfaction plays in these relationships. A QoL survey was conducted on a representative sample of the community-dwelling older adult population in Madrid province (Spain).…

  19. The β5-Loop and Lid Domain Contribute to the Substrate Specificity of Pancreatic Lipase-related Protein 2 (PNLIPRP2).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xunjun; Lowe, Mark E

    2015-11-27

    Pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PNLIP) is essential for dietary fat digestion in children and adults, whereas a homolog, pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PNLIPRP2), is critical in newborns. The two lipases are structurally similar, yet they have different substrate specificities. PNLIP only cleaves neutral fats. PNLIPRP2 cleaves neutral and polar fats. To test the hypothesis that the differences in activity between PNLIP and PNLIPRP2 are governed by surface loops around the active site, we created multiple chimeras of both lipases by exchanging the surface loops singly or in combination. The chimeras were expressed, purified, and tested for activity against various substrates. The structural determinants of PNLIPRP2 galactolipase activity were contained in the N-terminal domain. Of the surface loops tested, the lid domain and the β5-loop influenced activity against triglycerides and galactolipids. Any chimera on PNLIP with the PNLIPRP2 lid domain or β5-loop had decreased triglyceride lipase activity similar to that of PNLIPRP2. The corresponding chimeras of PNLIPRP2 did not increase activity against neutral lipids. Galactolipase activity was abolished by the PNLIP β5-loop and decreased by the PNLIP lid domain. The source of the β9-loop had minimal effect on activity. We conclude that the lid domain and β5-loop contribute to substrate specificity but do not completely account for the differing activities of PNLIP and PNLIPRP2. Other regions in the N-terminal domain must contribute to the galactolipase activity of PNLIPRP2 through direct interactions with the substrate or by altering the conformation of the residues surrounding the hydrophilic cavity in PNLIPRP2.

  20. Effects of gender-related domain violations and sexual orientation on perceptions of male and female targets: an analogue study.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Powlishta, Kimberly K

    2012-10-01

    The current study examined factors that influenced heterosexual male and female raters' evaluations of male and female targets who were gay or heterosexual, and who displayed varying gender roles (i.e., typical vs. atypical) in multiple domains (i.e., activities, traits, and appearance). Participants were 305 undergraduate students from a private, midwestern Jesuit institution who read vignettes describing one of 24 target types and then rated the target on possession of positive and negative characteristics, psychological adjustment, and on measures reflecting the participants' anticipated behavior toward or comfort with the target. Results showed that gender atypical appearance and activity attributes (but not traits) were viewed more negatively than their gender typical counterparts. It was also found that male participants in particular viewed gay male targets as less desirable than lesbian and heterosexual male targets. These findings suggest a nuanced approach for understanding sexual prejudice, which incorporates a complex relationship among sex, gender, sexual orientation, and domain of gendered attributes.

  1. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  2. Cetacean distribution and abundance in relation to oceanographic domains on the eastern Bering Sea shelf: 1999-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friday, Nancy A.; Waite, Janice M.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Moore, Sue E.

    2012-06-01

    Visual line transect surveys for cetaceans were conducted on the eastern Bering Sea shelf in association with pollock stock assessment surveys aboard the NOAA ship Miller Freeman in June and July of 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. Transect survey effort ranged from 1188 km in 1999 to 3761 km in 2002. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were the most common large whale in all years except 2004 when humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were more abundant. Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) were the most common small cetacean in all years. Abundance estimates were calculated by year for each oceanographic domain: coastal, middle, and outer/slope. The middle and outer/slope domains were divided into two strata ("north" and "south") because of variable survey effort. The distribution and abundance of baleen whales changed between the earlier (colder) and later (warmer) survey years. Fin whales consistently occupied the outer shelf and secondarily the middle shelf, and their abundance was an order of magnitude greater in cold compared to warm years. Humpback whales "lived on the margin" of the northern Alaska Peninsula, eastern Aleutian Islands and Bristol Bay; their preferred habitat is possibly associated with areas of high prey availability due to nutrient upwelling and aggregation mechanisms. Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) occur shoreward of fin whales in the outer and middle shelf and in coastal habitats along the Alaska Peninsula. The highest abundance for this species was observed in a cold (1999) year. No clear relationship emerged for odontocetes with regard to warm and cold years. Dall's porpoise occupied both outer and middle domains and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) were more common in middle and coastal domains. This study provided a unique, broad-scale assessment of cetacean distribution and abundance on the eastern Bering Sea shelf and a baseline for future comparisons.

  3. Relating surface roughness and magnetic domain structure to giant magneto-impedance of Co-rich melt-extracted microwires

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, S. D.; Eggers, T.; Thiabgoh, O.; Xing, D. W.; Fei, W. D.; Shen, H. X.; Liu, J. S.; Zhang, J. R.; Fang, W. B.; Sun, J. F.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between the surface conditions and giant magneto-impedance (GMI) in Co-rich melt-extracted microwires is key to optimizing their magnetic responses for magnetic sensor applications. The surface magnetic domain structure (SMDS) parameters of ~45 μm diameter Co69.25Fe4.25Si13B13.5-xZrx (x = 0, 1, 2, 3) microwires, including the magnetic domain period (d) and surface roughness (Rq) as extracted from the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) images, have been correlated with GMI in the range 1–1000 MHz. It was found that substitution of B with 1 at. % Zr increased d of the base alloy from 729 to 740 nm while retaining Rq from ~1 nm to ~3 nm. A tremendous impact on the GMI ratio was found, increasing the ratio from ~360% to ~490% at an operating frequency of 40 MHz. Further substitution with Zr decreased the high frequency GMI ratio, which can be understood by the significant increase in surface roughness evident by force microscopy. This study demonstrates the application of the domain period and surface roughness found by force microscopy to the interpretation of the GMI in Co-rich microwires.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Na-ASP-1, a multi-domain pathogenesis-related-1 protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Loukas, Alex; Inan, Mehmet; Barent, Rick; Huang, Jicai; Plantz, Brad; Swanson, Amber; Gouthro, Mark; Meagher, Michael M.; Hotez, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the pathogenesis-related-1 domain, Na-ASP-1, the first multi-domain ASP from the human hookworm parasite N. americanus, has been crystallized. 2.2 Å resolution data have been collected from a crystal belonging to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}. Human hookworm infection is a major cause of anemia and malnutrition in the developing world. In an effort to control hookworm infection, the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative has identified candidate vaccine antigens from the infective larval stage (L3) of the parasite, including a family of pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) proteins known as the ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). The functions of the ASPs are unknown. In addition, it is unclear why some ASPs have one while others have multiple PR-1 domains. There are no known structures of a multi-domain ASP and in an effort to remedy this situation, recombinant Na-ASP-1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Na-ASP-1 is a 406-amino-acid multi-domain ASP from the prevalent human hookworm parasite Necator americanus. Useful X-ray data to 2.2 Å have been collected from a crystal that belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = 67.7, b = 74.27, c = 84.60 Å, β = 112.12°. An initial molecular-replacement solution has been obtained with one monomer in the asymmetric unit.

  5. Mapping of structural and transcription-related matrix attachment sites in the alpha-globin gene domain of avian erythroblasts and erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Farache, G; Razin, S V; Rzeszowska-Wolny, J; Moreau, J; Targa, F R; Scherrer, K

    1990-01-01

    The positions of preferential DNA interaction with the nuclear matrix were mapped within the domain of the chicken alpha-globin genes in transcriptionally active erythroblast nuclei and inactive nuclei of mature erythrocytes. In the latter, only two major distinct attachment sites were observed, close to the A + T-rich sequences previously found at the boundaries of the domain. Sequencing of these structural matrix attachment points revealed several known DNA motifs; some of them were present on both sides of the domain. In actively transcribing erythroblast nuclei of adult animals, a large fraction of the transcribed area was represented in nuclear matrix DNA, including upstream and downstream elements. In particular, adult alpha A- and alpha D-globin genes were found in matrix DNA, while the transcribed but translationally unexpressed embryonic pi gene was underrepresented. The data are discussed in terms of the existence of stable or structural and expression-related matrix attachment sites; correlations to the origin of replication and the units of transcription of the domain are shown. Images PMID:2398893

  6. Social anxiety disorder and quality of life: How fears of negative and positive evaluation relate to specific domains of life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Dryman, M Taylor; Gardner, Shani; Weeks, Justin W; Heimberg, Richard G

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) experience functional impairment in social, educational, and occupational arenas, contributing to poor quality of life. Previous research using the Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) has identified four distinct domains of quality of life among individuals with SAD: Achievement, Personal Growth, Social Functioning, and Surroundings. The present study was designed to investigate how fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and fear of positive evaluation (FPE) relate to the four QOLI domains among individuals with SAD. We also examined the relationships of FNE and FPE to Satisfaction and Importance ratings on the QOLI. Individuals with SAD (N=129) completed a battery of questionnaires prior to initiating treatment. FNE and FPE showed distinct relationships with the four QOLI domains, even after controlling for demographic characteristics and comorbid depression. Both FNE and FPE were associated with ratings of Satisfaction with the QOLI domains, but neither was associated with ratings of Importance. Our findings highlight the differential impacts of FNE and FPE on SAD. Treatment implications are discussed.

  7. Exact First-Passage Exponents of 1D Domain Growth: Relation to a Reaction-Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Hakim, Vincent; Pasquier, Vincent

    1995-07-01

    In the zero temperature Glauber dynamics of the ferromagnetic Ising or q-state Potts model, the size of domains is known to grow like t1/2. Recent simulations have shown that the fraction r\\(q,t\\) of spins, which have never flipped up to time t, decays like the power law r\\(q,t\\)~t-θ\\(q\\) with a nontrivial dependence of the exponent θ\\(q\\) on q and on space dimension. By mapping the problem on an exactly soluble one-species coagulation model ( A+A-->A), we obtain the exact expression of θ\\(q\\) in dimension one.

  8. Proteins Related to the Type I Secretion System Are Associated with Secondary SecA_DEAD Domain Proteins in Some Species of Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi

    PubMed Central

    Kamneva, Olga K.; Poudel, Saroj; Ward, Naomi L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of bacteria belonging to the PVC (Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae) super-phylum contain unusual ribosome-bearing intracellular membranes. The evolutionary origins and functions of these membranes are unknown. Some proteins putatively associated with the presence of intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria contain signal peptides. Signal peptides mark proteins for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in prokaryotes, and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum in eukaryotes, by highly conserved Sec machinery. This suggests that proteins might be targeted to intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria via the Sec pathway. Here, we show that canonical signal peptides are significantly over-represented in proteins preferentially present in PVC bacteria possessing intracellular membranes, indicating involvement of Sec translocase in their cellular targeting. We also characterized Sec proteins using comparative genomics approaches, focusing on the PVC super-phylum. While we were unable to detect unique changes in Sec proteins conserved among membrane-bearing PVC species, we identified (1) SecA ATPase domain re-arrangements in some Planctomycetes, and (2) secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins in the genomes of some Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi. This is the first report of potentially duplicated SecA in Gram-negative bacteria. The phylogenetic distribution of secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins suggests that the presence of these proteins is not related to the occurrence of PVC endomembranes. Further genomic analysis showed that secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins are located within genomic neighborhoods that also encode three proteins possessing domains specific for the Type I secretion system. PMID:26030905

  9. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    SciTech Connect

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  10. Proteins Related to the Type I Secretion System Are Associated with Secondary SecA_DEAD Domain Proteins in Some Species of Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi.

    PubMed

    Kamneva, Olga K; Poudel, Saroj; Ward, Naomi L

    2015-01-01

    A number of bacteria belonging to the PVC (Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae) super-phylum contain unusual ribosome-bearing intracellular membranes. The evolutionary origins and functions of these membranes are unknown. Some proteins putatively associated with the presence of intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria contain signal peptides. Signal peptides mark proteins for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in prokaryotes, and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum in eukaryotes, by highly conserved Sec machinery. This suggests that proteins might be targeted to intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria via the Sec pathway. Here, we show that canonical signal peptides are significantly over-represented in proteins preferentially present in PVC bacteria possessing intracellular membranes, indicating involvement of Sec translocase in their cellular targeting. We also characterized Sec proteins using comparative genomics approaches, focusing on the PVC super-phylum. While we were unable to detect unique changes in Sec proteins conserved among membrane-bearing PVC species, we identified (1) SecA ATPase domain re-arrangements in some Planctomycetes, and (2) secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins in the genomes of some Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi. This is the first report of potentially duplicated SecA in Gram-negative bacteria. The phylogenetic distribution of secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins suggests that the presence of these proteins is not related to the occurrence of PVC endomembranes. Further genomic analysis showed that secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins are located within genomic neighborhoods that also encode three proteins possessing domains specific for the Type I secretion system.

  11. Enhancing the soluble expression of an amylase in Escherichia coli by the mutations related to its domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peili; Qin, Weitong; Xu, Jiangtao; Yan, Yaru; Tian, Jian; Wu, Ningfeng; Yao, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The sequence and structure of the target protein exert a marked effect on its soluble expression in Escherichia coli. The effects of the mutation of an amylase isolated from Bacillus licheniformis (BLA) on its soluble expression in E. coli were investigated. A random mutation library of BLA was constructed to screen for mutations that resulted in enhanced soluble expression in E. coli. Two interesting mutations (A390I and D401V) were identified, which are located at the interaction surface between the A and C domains of BLA. The A390I mutation enhanced soluble BLA expression by 2.0-fold compared to wild type, while D401V decreased soluble expression 160-fold. Structural analysis revealed that A390 and D401 residues could affect the interaction between the A and C domains of BLA. Therefore, soluble expression of the target protein in E. coli could be affected by introduction of a mutation in the protein sequence.

  12. Disparate evolution of prion protein domains and the distinct origin of Doppel- and prion-related loci revealed by fish-to-mammal comparisons.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Milla, Eric; Oidtmann, Birgit; Panagiotidis, Cynthia H; Baier, Michael; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Hoffmann, Rudolf; Zhou, Yi; Solis, Gonzalo P; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2006-02-01

    Prions result from the misfolding and selective accumulation of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP) in the brain. Despite intensive research on mammalian models, basic questions about the biological role of PrP and the evolutionary origin of prion disease remain unanswered. Following our previous identification of novel fish PrP homologues, here we generated new fish PrP sequences and performed genomic analysis to demonstrate the existence of two homologous PrP loci in bony fish, which display extensive molecular variation and are highly expressed in adult and developing fish brains. The fish PrP genomic regions contain PrP-related loci directly downstream of each PrP locus, suggesting an independent origin of prion-related proteins in fish and mammals. Our structural prediction analysis uncovers a conserved molecular "bauplan" for all vertebrate PrPs. The C- and N-terminal protein domains have evolved independently from one another, the former having retained its basic globular structure despite high sequence divergence and the latter having undergone differential expansion-degeneration cycles in its repetitive domains. Our evolutionary analysis redefines fundamental concepts on the functional significance of PrP domains and opens up new possibilities for the experimental analysis of prion misfolding and neurodegeneration in a non-mammalian model like the zebrafish.

  13. Using common spatial distributions of atoms to relate functionally divergent influenza virus N10 and N11 protein structures to functionally characterized neuraminidase structures, toxin cell entry domains, and non-influenza virus cell entry domains.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  14. Association between P3 event-related potential amplitude and externalizing disorders: a time-domain and time-frequency investigation of 29-year-old adults.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Henry H; Malone, Stephen M; Burwell, Scott J; Bernat, Edward M; Iacono, William G

    2013-07-01

    This study determined whether time-domain P3 amplitude and time-frequency principal component (TF-PC) reductions are present in adulthood (age 29) when participants have largely passed through the age of heaviest substance misuse. Participants were assessed from age 17 through 29 for lifetime externalizing (EXT) disorders. EEG comparisons from three topographic regions were examined for P3 amplitude and TF-PCs at delta and theta frequency ranges. Significant P3 amplitude reductions were found in those with EXT for both regional and site-Pz analyses, with stronger effects observed the greater the EXT comorbidity. Reductions were also observed in all eight TF-PCs extracted, with a delta component yielding frontal effects not apparent in the time domain. Overall, results suggest that these brain measures continue, at age 29, to provide effective indices of EXT that potentially tap a neural substrate related to behavioral disinhibition.

  15. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge.

  16. Regulation and Essentiality of the StAR-related Lipid Transfer (START) Domain-containing Phospholipid Transfer Protein PFA0210c in Malaria Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ross J.; Ringel, Alessa; Knuepfer, Ellen; Moon, Robert W.; Blackman, Michael J.; van Ooij, Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domains are phospholipid- or sterol-binding modules that are present in many proteins. START domain-containing proteins (START proteins) play important functions in eukaryotic cells, including the redistribution of phospholipids to subcellular compartments and delivering sterols to the mitochondrion for steroid synthesis. How the activity of the START domain is regulated remains unknown for most of these proteins. The Plasmodium falciparum START protein PFA0210c (PF3D7_0104200) is a broad-spectrum phospholipid transfer protein that is conserved in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is most closely related to the mammalian START proteins STARD2 and STARD7. PFA0210c is unusual in that it contains a signal sequence and a PEXEL export motif that together mediate transfer of the protein from the parasite to the host erythrocyte. The protein also contains a C-terminal extension, which is very uncommon among mammalian START proteins. Whereas the biochemical properties of PFA0210c have been characterized, the function of the protein remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the unusual C-terminal extension negatively regulates phospholipid transfer activity. Furthermore, we use the genetically tractable Plasmodium knowlesi model and recently developed genetic technology in P. falciparum to show that the protein is essential for growth of the parasite during the clinically relevant asexual blood stage life cycle. Finally, we show that the regulation of phospholipid transfer by PFA0210c is required in vivo, and we identify a potential second regulatory domain. These findings provide insight into a novel mechanism of regulation of phospholipid transfer in vivo and may have important implications for the interaction of the malaria parasite with its host cell. PMID:27694132

  17. Emotional Modulation of Conflict Processing in the Affective Domain: Evidence from Event-related Potentials and Event-related Spectral Perturbation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianling; Liu, Chang; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the impact of emotion on conflict processing. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cognitive control in the affective domain is also affected by emotion. Emotional face-word and body-word Stroop tasks were explored and contrasted, and both behavioural and electrophysiological measures were recorded. Behavioural results showed that both tasks replicated previous robust interference effects. At the physiological level, the two tasks showed dissociable neural activity in the early attention and perception stages. It was also found that the face-word task evoked more pronounced N1 and P2 amplitudes than the body-word task. However, the two tasks evoked comparable N450 amplitudes. At later processing stages, positive slow potentials were modulated by target emotion and congruency. In addition, time-frequency analyses also revealed that the face-word task induced enhanced theta activity compared to the body-word task at both early and later stages of processing. The present findings provide support for the dual competition framework and suggest the dynamic modulation of emotion on cognitive control in the affective domain. PMID:27511609

  18. PASS2 database for the structure-based sequence alignment of distantly related SCOP domain superfamilies: update to version 5 and added features

    PubMed Central

    Gandhimathi, Arumugam; Ghosh, Pritha; Hariharaputran, Sridhar; Mathew, Oommen K.; Sowdhamini, R.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-based sequence alignment is an essential step in assessing and analysing the relationship of distantly related proteins. PASS2 is a database that records such alignments for protein domain superfamilies and has been constantly updated periodically. This update of the PASS2 version, named as PASS2.5, directly corresponds to the SCOPe 2.04 release. All SCOPe structural domains that share less than 40% sequence identity, as defined by the ASTRAL compendium of protein structures, are included. The current version includes 1977 superfamilies and has been assembled utilizing the structure-based sequence alignment protocol. Such an alignment is obtained initially through MATT, followed by a refinement through the COMPARER program. The JOY program has been used for structural annotations of such alignments. In this update, we have automated the protocol and focused on inclusion of new features such as mapping of GO terms, absolutely conserved residues among the domains in a superfamily and inclusion of PDBs, that are absent in SCOPe 2.04, using the HMM profiles from the alignments of the superfamily members and are provided as a separate list. We have also implemented a more user-friendly manner of data presentation and options for downloading more features. PASS2.5 version is available at http://caps.ncbs.res.in/pass2/. PMID:26553811

  19. Direct Association of Sprouty-related Protein with an EVH1 Domain (SPRED) 1 or SPRED2 with DYRK1A Modifies Substrate/Kinase Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Jackson, Rebecca A.; Yusoff, Permeen; Guy, Graeme R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian SPRED (Sprouty-related protein with an EVH1 domain) proteins include a family of three members, SPRED1–3. Currently, little is known about their biochemistry. The best described, SPRED1, has been shown to inhibit the Ras/ERK pathway downstream of Ras. All three SPREDs have a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) that has high homology to the CRD of the Sprouty family of proteins, several of which are also Ras/ERK inhibitors. In the belief that binding partners would clarify SPRED function, we assayed for their associated proteins. Here, we describe the direct and endogenous interaction of SPRED1 and SPRED2 with the novel kinase, DYRK1A. DYRK1A has become the subject of recent research focus as it plays a central role in Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte maturation and egg activation, and there is strong evidence that it could be involved in Down syndrome in humans. Both SPRED1 and SPRED2 inhibit the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate its substrates, Tau and STAT3. This inhibition occurs via an interaction of the CRD of the SPREDs with the kinase domain of DYRK1A. DYRK1A substrates must bind to the kinase to enable phosphorylation, and SPRED proteins compete for the same binding site to modify this process. Our accumulated evidence indicates that the SPRED proteins are likely physiological modifiers of DYRK1A. PMID:20736167

  20. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B.; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. PMID:23904483

  1. Xerostomia After Treatment for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Using the University of Washington Saliva Domain and a Xerostomia-Related Quality-of-Life Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Simon N.; Johnson, Ian A.; Lowe, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: The first aim of this study was to identify which clinical factors are associated with xerostomia in patients after treatment for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, using the Xerostomia-Related Quality-of-Life Scale (XeQoLS) and the University of Washington Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Version 4 dry mouth item (UW-QOL v4). The second aim was to compare these two questionnaires and postulate a cutoff in the UW-QOL below which patients are doing sufficient badly to warrant further evaluation and support. Methods and Materials: In all, 371 patients alive and disease free treated between 1992 and 2005 were sent the survey, of whom 250 (67%) responded. Various clinical factors correlated with xerostomia, particularly adjuvant radiotherapy and Pstage. Results: In logistic regression analyses to predict three or more problems on the XeQoLS, only adjuvant radiotherapy (p < 0.001) was significant at the 5% level. There were significant (p < 0.001) correlations between the XeQoLS scores (total average and domain) with all the UW-QOL domain scores, the strongest with swallowing (-0.69), taste (-0.64), chewing (-0.64), mood (-0.60), and saliva (-0.59) domains. Patients scoring <70 (i.e., 0 or 30) on the UW-QOL could be used as a screening cutoff because it formed 1 in 5 of all patients (49/242) but accounted for half (299/566) of the significant problems generated by the XeQoLS. This also identified 13/21 patients with 10 or more problems. Conclusion: The UW-QOL saliva domain seems to be a suitable means of screening for dry mouth in head-and-neck clinics and could be used to trigger interventions.

  2. Relationship of work-family conflict with burnout and marital satisfaction: cross-domain or source attribution relations?

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh, Razieh; Taghizadeh, Ziba; Mohammadi, Eesa; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Pourreza, Abolghasem; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was conducted to examine the relationship between two dimensions of work-family conflict (WFC) with marital satisfaction and burnout in a society in which few studies have been done about the consequences of WFC. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. Surveys were distributed to 420 employed married women with various jobs living in Bushehr province, Iran. Data were collected using a questionnaire for demographic characteristic, the Netmeyer’s WFC questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory: General Survey (MBI-GS), and Enrich maritalsatisfaction questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There was a negatively significant association between work interference with family(WIF) and overall burnout as well as emotional exhaustion (P < .01). Family interference with work (FIW) was significantly associated with depersonalization (P < .01). The overall marital satisfaction and its subscales were significantly associated with WIF (P < .01) and FIW (P < .01 for overall marital satisfaction and P < .05 for its subscales). Conclusion: In terms of practical implication, to avoid creating disadvantages of WIF and FIW,facilitation in two domains of improving work and family conditions can be a useful means to prevent WFC and its consequences. PMID:27123434

  3. Comparative Analysis of Genome and Epigenome in Closely Related Medaka Species Identifies Conserved Sequence Preferences for DNA Hypomethylated Domains.

    PubMed

    Uno, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryohei; Tsukahara, Tatsuya; Qu, Wei; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Morishita, Shinichi; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of vertebrates are globally methylated, but a small portion of genomic regions are known to be hypomethylated. Although hypomethylated domains (HMDs) have been implicated in transcriptional regulation in various ways, how a HMD is determined in a particular genomic region remains elusive. To search for DNA motifs essential for the formation of HMDs, we performed the genome-wide comparative analysis of genome and DNA methylation patterns of the two medaka inbred lines, Hd-rRII1 and HNI-II, which are derived from northern and southern subpopulations of Japan and exhibit high levels of genetic variations (SNP, ∼ 3%). We successfully mapped > 70% of HMDs in both genomes and found that the majority of those mapped HMDs are conserved between the two lines (common HMDs). Unexpectedly, the average genetic variations are similar in the common HMD and other genome regions. However, we identified short well-conserved motifs that are specifically enriched in HMDs, suggesting that they may play roles in the establishment of HMDs in the medaka genome.

  4. Arabidopsis VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN6 directly regulates the genes that govern programmed cell death and secondary wall formation during xylem differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Oda, Yoshihisa; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-10-01

    Xylem consists of three types of cells: tracheary elements (TEs), parenchyma cells, and fiber cells. TE differentiation includes two essential processes, programmed cell death (PCD) and secondary cell wall formation. These two processes are tightly coupled. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. Here, we show that VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN6 (VND6), a master regulator of TEs, regulates some of the downstream genes involved in these processes in a coordinated manner. We first identified genes that are expressed downstream of VND6 but not downstream of SECONDARY WALL-ASSOCIATED NAC DOMAIN PROTEIN1 (SND1), a master regulator of xylem fiber cells, using transformed suspension culture cells in microarray experiments. We found that VND6 and SND1 governed distinct aspects of xylem formation, whereas they regulated a number of genes in common, specifically those related to secondary cell wall formation. Genes involved in TE-specific PCD were upregulated only by VND6. Moreover, we revealed that VND6 directly regulated genes that harbor a TE-specific cis-element, TERE, in their promoters. Thus, we found that VND6 is a direct regulator of genes related to PCD as well as to secondary wall formation.

  5. Measuring postural-related changes of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity after repeated long-duration diving: frequency domain approaches.

    PubMed

    Faes, Luca; Masè, Michela; Nollo, Giandomenico; Chon, Ki H; Florian, John P

    2013-11-01

    Sustained water immersion is thought to modulate orthostatic tolerance to an extent dependent on the duration and repetition over consecutive days of the diving sessions. We tested this hypothesis investigating in ten healthy subjects the potential changes in the cardiovascular response to head-up tilt induced by single and multiple resting air dives. Parametric cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous RR interval and systolic arterial pressure variability was performed in three experimental sessions: before diving (BD), after single 6-hour dive (ASD), and after multiple 6-hour dives (AMD, 5 consecutive days with 18-hour surface interval). From this analysis, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was computed as spectral power ratio (αBRS), non-causal transfer function gain (tfBRS) and causal transfer function gain (γBRS) evaluated at low frequency (0.04-0.14Hz) in the supine position (su) as well as in the standing upright position in the early tilt (et) and late tilt (lt) epochs. We found that, while αBRS decreased significantly in et and lt compared to su during all sessions, tfBRS and γBRS decreased during ASD and AMD but not during BD; moreover γBRS evidenced a progressive decrease from BD to ASD and to AMD in both et and lt epochs. These results indicate the necessity of following a causal approach for the estimation of BRS in the frequency domain, and suggest a progressive impairment of the baroreflex response to postural stress after single and multiple dives, which may reflect symptoms of increasing orthostatic intolerance.

  6. The effect of education on age-related changes in three cognitive domains: a cross-sectional study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Martins, Isabel Pavão; Maruta, Carolina; Silva, Cláudia; Rodrigues, Pedro; Chester, Catarina; Ginó, Sandra; Freitas, Vanda; Freitas, Sara; Oliveira, António Gouveia

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the protective effect of formal education on age-related changes in different cognitive domains with the hypothesis that it may attenuate the rate of decline. Individuals aged 50 years or older attending primary care physicians without known brain disease (431 participants, mostly [60.3%] female with 66.3 [±9.1] years of age and 7.7 [±4.1] years of education, on average), were evaluated with a neuropsychological battery including 28 cognitive measures. Cognitive domains identified by factor analysis were subject to repeated multiple regression analyses to determine the variance explained by age and education controlling for gender, depressive symptoms, and vascular risk factors. The slope of the regression equation was compared between two educational groups with an average of 4 years and 11 years of education, respectively. Factors identified corresponded to processing ability (Factor 1), memory (Factor 2), and acquired knowledge (Factor 3). Although education improved performance in Factors 1 and 3, it did not change the slope of age-related decline in any factor. This study suggests that in culturally heterogeneous groups, small increments in education enhance cognition but do not modify the rate of decline of executive functioning with age. These results contradict some clinical findings and need to be confirmed in longitudinal studies.

  7. Inhibition deficit in the spatial tendency of the response in multiple-domain amnestic mild cognitive impairment. An event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Cespón, Jesús; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Díaz, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal studies have shown that a high percentage of people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Prodromal AD is known to involve deficits in executive control processes. In the present study, we examined such deficits by recording EEG in 13 single-domain amnestic MCI (sdaMCI), 12 multiple-domain amnestic MCI (mdaMCI) and 18 healthy elderly (control group, CG) participants while they performed a Simon task. The Simon task demands deployment of executive processes because participants have to respond to non-spatial features of a lateralized stimulus and inhibit the more automatic spatial tendency of the response. We specifically focused on the negativity central contralateral (N2cc), an event-related potential (ERP) component related to brain activity that prevents the cross-talk between direction of spatial attention and manual response preparation. The reaction time (RT) was not significantly different among the three groups of participants. The percentage of errors (PE) was higher in mdaMCI than in CG and sdaMCI participants. In addition, N2cc latency was delayed in mdaMCI (i.e., delayed implementation of mechanisms for controlling the spatial tendency of the response). The N2cc latency clearly distinguished among mdaMCI and CG/sdaMCI participants (area under curve: 0.91). Longer N2cc was therefore associated with executive control deficits, which suggests that N2cc latency is a correlate of mdaMCI. PMID:25999853

  8. Chinese Students' Implicit Theories of Intelligence and Other Personal Attributes: Cross-Domain Generality and Age-Related Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Zi-Juan; Hau, Kit-Tai; Wen, Jian-Bing; Kong, Chit-Kwong

    Using structural equation modeling (SEM), researchers examined whether there was a general dominating factor that governed students' implicit theories of intelligence, morality, personality, creativity, and social intelligence. The possible age-related changes of students' implicit theories were also studied. In all, 1,650 elementary and junior…

  9. Multiple Personality Domains in Relation to Occupational Choice and Performance among Established Teachers. Research Report. ETS RR-04-41

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmerich, Walter; Rock, Donald A.; Trapani, Catherine S.

    2004-01-01

    Does personality impact differently on occupational choice and occupational performance? In a study of established teachers, interests, the Five-Factor Model, and attributions were examined in relation to occupational choice and performance. Attributions were assessed using a new instrument designed for teachers. Choice of teaching specialty was…

  10. Mutations activating the yeast eIF-2 alpha kinase GCN2: isolation of alleles altering the domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, M; Wek, R C; Vazquez de Aldana, C R; Jackson, B M; Freeman, B; Hinnebusch, A G

    1992-01-01

    The protein kinase GCN2 stimulates expression of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 at the translational level by phosphorylating the alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF-2 alpha) in amino acid-starved cells. Phosphorylation of eIF-2 alpha reduces its activity, allowing ribosomes to bypass short open reading frames present in the GCN4 mRNA leader and initiate translation at the GCN4 start codon. We describe here 17 dominant GCN2 mutations that lead to derepression of GCN4 expression in the absence of amino acid starvation. Seven of these GCN2c alleles map in the protein kinase moiety, and two in this group alter the presumed ATP-binding domain, suggesting that ATP binding is a regulated aspect of GCN2 function. Six GCN2c alleles map in a region related to histidyl-tRNA synthetases, and two in this group alter a sequence motif conserved among class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that directly interacts with the acceptor stem of tRNA. These results support the idea that GCN2 kinase function is activated under starvation conditions by binding uncharged tRNA to the domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase. The remaining GCN2c alleles map at the extreme C terminus, a domain required for ribosome association of the protein. Representative mutations in each domain were shown to depend on the phosphorylation site in eIF-2 alpha for their effects on GCN4 expression and to increase the level of eIF-2 alpha phosphorylation in the absence of amino acid starvation. Synthetic GCN2c double mutations show greater derepression of GCN4 expression than the parental single mutations, and they have a slow-growth phenotype that we attribute to inhibition of general translation initiation. The phenotypes of the GCN2c alleles are dependent on GCN1 and GCN3, indicating that these two positive regulators of GCN4 expression mediate the inhibitory effects on translation initiation associated with activation of the yeast eIF-2 alpha kinase GCN2. Images PMID:1448107

  11. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.

  12. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    DOE PAGES

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; ...

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. Amore » putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.« less

  13. Minor lesion mutational spectrum of the entire NF1 gene does not explain its high mutability but points to a functional domain upstream of the GAP-related domain.

    PubMed

    Fahsold, R; Hoffmeyer, S; Mischung, C; Gille, C; Ehlers, C; Kücükceylan, N; Abdel-Nour, M; Gewies, A; Peters, H; Kaufmann, D; Buske, A; Tinschert, S; Nürnberg, P

    2000-03-01

    More than 500 unrelated patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) were screened for mutations in the NF1 gene. For each patient, the whole coding sequence and all splice sites were studied for aberrations, either by the protein truncation test (PTT), temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of genomic PCR products, or, most often, by direct genomic sequencing (DGS) of all individual exons. A total of 301 sequence variants, including 278 bona fide pathogenic mutations, were identified. As many as 216 or 183 of the genuine mutations, comprising 179 or 161 different ones, can be considered novel when compared to the recent findings of Upadhyaya and Cooper, or to the NNFF mutation database. Mutation-detection efficiencies of the various screening methods were similar: 47.1% for PTT, 53.7% for TGGE, and 54.9% for DGS. Some 224 mutations (80.2%) yielded directly or indirectly premature termination codons. These mutations showed even distribution over the whole gene from exon 1 to exon 47. Of all sequence variants determined in our study, <20% represent C-->T or G-->A transitions within a CpG dinucleotide, and only six different mutations also occur in NF1 pseudogenes, with five being typical C-->T transitions in a CpG. Thus, neither frequent deamination of 5-methylcytosines nor interchromosomal gene conversion may account for the high mutation rate of the NF1 gene. As opposed to the truncating mutations, the 28 (10.1%) missense or single-amino-acid-deletion mutations identified clustered in two distinct regions, the GAP-related domain (GRD) and an upstream gene segment comprising exons 11-17. The latter forms a so-called cysteine/serine-rich domain with three cysteine pairs suggestive of ATP binding, as well as three potential cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) recognition sites obviously phosphorylated by PKA. Coincidence of mutated amino acids and those conserved between human and Drosophila strongly suggest significant functional relevance of this region

  14. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Reliability and reproducibility of spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography images before and after correction for patients with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Mohammad A.; Rashid, Aymen; Channa, Roomasa; Hatef, Elham; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Sepah, Yasir J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility and reliability of optical coherence tomography scans obtained using the time domain (TD-OCT) Stratus TM OCT, and the Spectral Domain (SD-OCT) Spectralis TM and Cirrus TM OCT devices before and after manual correction in eyes with either Neovascular (NV-AMD) or Non-Neovascular (NNV-AMD) age-related macular degeneration. Design: Prospective observational study. Methods: Setting: University-based retina practice. Patients: Thirty-six patients (50 eyes) with NV-AMD or NNV-AMD. Procedure: OCT scans were taken simultaneously using one TD-OCT and two SD-OCT devices. Main Outcome Measures: Macular thickness measurements were assessed before and after correction of the algorithm by constructing Bland-Altman plots for agreement and calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of repeatability (COR) to evaluate intraclass repeatability. Results: Spectralis had the highest number of images needing manual correction.  All machines had high ICCs, with Spectralis having the highest.  Also, Bland-Altman plots indicated that there was low agreement between Cirrus™ and Stratus™, Spectralis™ and Stratus™, while there was good agreement between the Cirrus™ and Spectralis™.  The CORs were lowest for Spectralis TM and similar and higher for Cirrus TM and Stratus TM.  Agreement, CORs, and ICCs generally improved after manual correction, but only minimally.  Conclusion: Agreement is low between devices, except between both SD-OCT machines.  Manual correction tends to improve results. PMID:26097682

  16. Multiple classes of transcription factors regulate the expression of VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7, a master switch of xylem vessel differentiation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Tamura, Taizo; Nakano, Yoshimi; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Yoneda, Arata; Kato, Ko; Kubo, Minoru; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku

    2015-02-01

    The secondary cell walls of xylem cells, including vessel elements, provide mechanical strength and contribute to the conduction of water and minerals. VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7) is a NAC-domain transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes required for xylem vessel element formation. Transient expression assays using 68 transcription factors that are expressed during xylem vessel differentiation showed that 14 transcription factors, including VND1-VND7, are putative positive regulators of VND7 expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that all seven VND proteins bound to the VND7 promoter region at its SMBE/TERE motif, indicating that VND7 is a direct target of all of the VND transcription factors. Overexpression of VND1-VND5, GATA12 and ANAC075, newly identified transcription factors that function upstream of VND7, resulted in ectopic xylem vessel element formation. These data suggest that VND7 transcription is a regulatory target of multiple classes of transcription factors.

  17. Connective tissue disease related interstitial lung diseases and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: provisional core sets of domains and instruments for use in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Mittoo, Shikha; Huscher, Dörte; Khanna, Dinesh; Dellaripa, Paul F; Distler, Oliver; Flaherty, Kevin R; Frankel, Sid; Oddis, Chester V; Denton, Christopher P; Fischer, Aryeh; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia M; LeSage, Daphne; Merkel, Peter A; Phillips, Kristine; Pittrow, David; Swigris, Jeffrey; Antoniou, Katerina; Baughman, Robert P; Castelino, Flavia V; Christmann, Romy B; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent; Danoff, Sonye; Highland, Kristin B; Hummers, Laura; Shah, Ami A; Kim, Dong Soon; Lynch, David A; Miller, Frederick W; Proudman, Susanna M; Richeldi, Luca; Ryu, Jay H; Sandorfi, Nora; Sarver, Catherine; Wells, Athol U; Strand, Vibeke; Matteson, Eric L; Brown, Kevin K; Seibold, James R

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Clinical trial design in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) has been hampered by lack of consensus on appropriate outcome measures for reliably assessing treatment response. In the setting of connective tissue diseases (CTDs), some measures of ILD disease activity and severity may be confounded by non-pulmonary comorbidities. Methods The Connective Tissue Disease associated Interstitial Lung Disease (CTD-ILD) working group of Outcome Measures in Rheumatology—a non-profit international organisation dedicated to consensus methodology in identification of outcome measures—conducted a series of investigations which included a Delphi process including >248 ILD medical experts as well as patient focus groups culminating in a nominal group panel of ILD experts and patients. The goal was to define and develop a consensus on the status of outcome measure candidates for use in randomised controlled trials in CTD-ILD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Results A core set comprising specific measures in the domains of lung physiology, lung imaging, survival, dyspnoea, cough and health-related quality of life is proposed as appropriate for consideration for use in a hypothetical 1-year multicentre clinical trial for either CTD-ILD or IPF. As many widely used instruments were found to lack full validation, an agenda for future research is proposed. Conclusion Identification of consensus preliminary domains and instruments to measure them was attained and is a major advance anticipated to facilitate multicentre RCTs in the field. PMID:24368713

  18. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use.

  19. The NTR module: domains of netrins, secreted frizzled related proteins, and type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer protein are homologous with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases.

    PubMed Central

    Bányai, L.; Patthy, L.

    1999-01-01

    Using homology search, structure prediction, and structural characterization methods we show that the C-terminal domains of (1) netrins, (2) complement proteins C3, C4, C5, (3) secreted frizzled-related proteins, and (4) type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer proteins (PCOLCEs) are homologous with the N-terminal domains of (5) tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). The proteins harboring this netrin module (NTR module) fulfill diverse biological roles ranging from axon guidance, regulation of Wnt signaling, to the control of the activity of metalloproteases. With the exception of TIMPs, it is not known at present what role the NTR modules play in these processes. In view of the fact that the NTR modules of TIMPs are involved in the inhibition of matrixin-type metalloproteases and that the NTR module of PCOLCEs is involved in the control of the activity of the astacin-type metalloprotease BMP1, it seems possible that interaction with metzincins could be a shared property of NTR modules and could be critical for the biological roles of the host proteins. PMID:10452607

  20. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling with Potent Killing Activity against Pneumococci and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Blas; Fresco-Taboada, Alba; Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Menéndez, Margarita; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is pushing the need of alternative treatments. In this context, phage therapy is already a reality to successfully fight certain multiresistant bacteria. Among different phage gene products, murein hydrolases responsible of phage progeny liberation (also called lysins or endolysins) are weapons that target specific peptidoglycan bonds, leading to lysis and death of susceptible bacteria when added from the outside. In the pneumococcal system, all but one phage murein hydrolases reported to date share a choline-binding domain that recognizes cell walls containing choline residues in the (lipo)teichoic acids. Some purified pneumococcal or phage murein hydrolases, as well as several chimeric proteins combining natural catalytic and cell wall-binding domains (CBDs) have been used as effective antimicrobials. In this work we have constructed a novel chimeric N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (PL3) by fusing the catalytic domain of the Pal amidase (a phage-coded endolysin) to the CBD of the LytA amidase, the major pneumococcal autolysin. The physicochemical properties of PL3 and the bacteriolytic effect against several pneumococci (including 48 multiresistant representative strain) and related species, like Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus oralis, have been studied. Results have shown that low doses of PL3, in the range of 0.5–5 μg/ml, are enough to practically sterilize all choline-containing strains tested. Moreover, a single 20-μg dose of PL3 fully protected zebrafish embryos from infection by S. pneumoniae D39 strain. Importantly, PL3 keeps 95% enzymatic activity after 4 weeks at 37°C and can be lyophilized without losing activity, demonstrating a remarkable robustness. Such stability, together with a prominent efficacy against a narrow spectrum of human pathogens, confers to PL3 the characteristic to be an effective therapeutic. In addition, our results demonstrate

  1. A Multivariate Analysis of Age-Related Differences in Default Mode and Task Positive Networks Across Multiple Cognitive Domains

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Cheryl L.; Protzner, Andrea B.; Kovacevic, Natasa; Strother, Stephen C.; Afshin-Pour, Babak; Wojtowicz, Magda; Anderson, John A.E.; Churchill, Nathan; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the effects of aging on two large scale brain networks, the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network (TPN). During fMRI scanning, young and older participants carried out four visual tasks: detection, perceptual matching, attentional cueing, and working memory. Accuracy of performance was roughly matched at 80% across tasks and groups. Modulations of activity across conditions were assessed, as well as functional connectivity of both networks. Younger adults showed a broader engagement of the DMN, and older adults a more extensive engagement of the TPN. Functional connectivity in the DMN was reduced in older adults, whereas the main pattern of TPN connectivity was equivalent in the two groups. Age-specific connectivity also was seen in TPN regions. Increased activity in TPN areas predicted worse accuracy on the tasks, but greater expression of a connectivity pattern associated with a right dorsolateral prefrontal TPN region, seen only in older adults, predicted better performance. These results provide further evidence for age-related differences in the DMN, and new evidence of age differences in the TPN. Increased use of the TPN may reflect greater demand on cognitive control processes in older individuals that may be partially offset by alterations in prefrontal functional connectivity. PMID:19789183

  2. Fixation-related FMRI analysis in the domain of reading research: using self-paced eye movements as markers for hemodynamic brain responses during visual letter string processing.

    PubMed

    Richlan, Fabio; Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Braun, Mario; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin; Hutzler, Florian

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using self-paced eye movements during reading (measured by an eye tracker) as markers for calculating hemodynamic brain responses measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Specifically, we were interested in whether the fixation-related fMRI analysis approach was sensitive enough to detect activation differences between reading material (words and pseudowords) and nonreading material (line and unfamiliar Hebrew strings). Reliable reading-related activation was identified in left hemisphere superior temporal, middle temporal, and occipito-temporal regions including the visual word form area (VWFA). The results of the present study are encouraging insofar as fixation-related analysis could be used in future fMRI studies to clarify some of the inconsistent findings in the literature regarding the VWFA. Our study is the first step in investigating specific visual word recognition processes during self-paced natural sentence reading via simultaneous eye tracking and fMRI, thus aiming at an ecologically valid measurement of reading processes. We provided the proof of concept and methodological framework for the analysis of fixation-related fMRI activation in the domain of reading research.

  3. Perspectives on the Two-Pore Domain Potassium Channel TREK-1 (TWIK-Related K(+) Channel 1). A Novel Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Vivier, Delphine; Bennis, Khalil; Lesage, Florian; Ducki, Sylvie

    2016-06-09

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are membrane proteins expressed in most living cells that selectively control the flow of K(+) ions. More than 80 genes encode the K(+) channel subunits in the human genome. The TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK-1) belongs to the two-pore domain K(+) channels (K2P) and displays various properties including sensitivity to physical (membrane stretch, acidosis, temperature) and chemical stimuli (signaling lipids, volatile anesthetics). The distribution of TREK-1 in the central nervous system, coupled with the physiological consequences of its opening and closing, leads to the emergence of this channel as an attractive therapeutic target. We review the TREK-1 channel, its structural and functional properties, and the pharmacological agents (agonists and antagonists) able to modulate its gating.

  4. Laboratory permittivity measurements of icy planetary analogs in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, in relation with JUICE mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Y.; Jacob, K.; Murk, A.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft is planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030. It will observe the planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. One instrument on the JUICE spacecraft is the Sub-millimeter Wave Instrument (SWI), which will measure brightness temperatures from Jupiter's stratosphere and troposphere, and from subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons. In the baseline configuration SWI consists of two tunable sub-millimeter wave receivers operating from 530 to 625 GHz. As an alternative one of the receivers could cover the range of 1080 and 1275 GHz. Inversion models are strongly dependent on the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (hereafter permittivity) of the target material to retrieve the physical properties of the subsurface (e.g. [1][2]). We set up a laboratory experiment allowing us to perform reproducible measurements of the complex scattering parameters S11 and S21 in the ranges of 70 to 110 GHz, of 100 to 160 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz and of 510 to 715 GHz. These scattering parameters can be used to retrieve the permittivity of icy analogs of the surfaces and subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons in order to prepare the data interpretation of SWI [3]. The measurements are performed under laboratory conditions with a quasi-optical bench (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). The icy analogs that we prepare in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy, Physics Institute, University of Bern), include two different porous water ice samples composed of fine-grained ice particles with a size range of 4 to 6 microns and ice particles with a size range of 50 to 100 microns [4][5]; and possibly CO2 ice. We will present the general experimental set-up and the first results in the context to prepare the data interpretation of SWI. [1] Ulaby, F. T., Long, D. G., 2014. Microwave radar and radiometric remote

  5. Cross Domain Analogies for Learning Domain Theories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Example Problem and Worked Solution All problems and worked solutions used in this work were taken from the same physics textbook ( Giancoli 1991...domain theory. We close with a discussion of related work and our plans for the future. Representations and Problem Solving Representing physics ...small compared to the 30,000+ concepts and 8,000+ predicates already defined in the KB. Thus, objects, relations, and events that appear in physics

  6. Is Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Essential for Flexible Treatment Regimens with Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya, Abdullah; Agca, Alper; Ozgurhan, Engin Bilge; Karakucuk, Yalcin; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the ability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to detect subtle amounts of retinal fluid when the choroidal neovascularization is detected as inactive via time-domain optical coherence tomography and clinical examination in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) patients. Methods. Forty-nine eyes of 49 patients with nAMD after ranibizumab treatment were included in this cross-sectional, prospective study. All patients were imaged with TD-OCT and SD-OCT at the same visit one month after a ranibizumab injection. The presence of subretinal, intraretinal, and subretinal pigment epithelium fluid (subRPE) in SD-OCT was evaluated; also mean central retinal thickness (CRT) and the rate of vitreoretinal surface disorders detected via the two devices were evaluated. Results. The mean CRT via TD-OCT and SD-OCT was 218.1 ± 51.3 and 325.7 ± 78.8 microns. Sixteen patients (32.6%) showed any kind of retinal fluid via SD-OCT. In detail, 8 patients (16.3%) showed subretinal fluid, 10 patients (20.4%) showed intraretinal fluid, and 3 patients (6.1%) showed SubRPE fluid. The ability of detecting vitreoretinal surface disorders was comparable between the two devices, except vitreomacular traction. Conclusion. SD-OCT is essential for the nAMD patients who are on an as-needed treatment regimen with ranibizumab. Only TD-OCT and clinical examination may cause insufficient treatment in this group of patients. PMID:24324880

  7. Relative impact of residues at the intracellular and extracellular ends of the human GABAC rho1 receptor M2 domain on picrotoxinin activity.

    PubMed

    Carland, Jane E; Johnston, Graham A R; Chebib, Mary

    2008-02-02

    The relative impact on picrotoxinin activity of residues at the intracellular (2' and 6' residues) and extracellular (15' and 17' residues) ends of the second transmembrane (M2) domain of the human gamma-aminobutyric acid-C (GABA(C)) rho1 receptor was investigated. A series of GABA(C) rho1 subunits were produced containing either single or multiple mutations at the positions of interest. Wild-type and mutant subunits (containing one or more of the following mutations: P2'S, T6'M, I15'N, G17'H) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Changes in agonist activity were observed for mutant receptors. Most notably, mutation at the 2' position resulted in decreased agonist potency, while mutation at the 15' and 17' residues increased agonist potency. The affinity of the competitive antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) was unchanged compared to wild-type at all mutant receptors. Of the four residues studied, mutation of residues at the 2' and 6' positions had the greatest impact on picrotoxinin activity. Inclusion of the P2'S mutation typically produced receptors with increased picrotoxinin potency, while the T6'M mutation reduced picrotoxinin potency. Picrotoxinin is a mixed antagonist at wild-type and all mutant receptors, with the exception of the double mutant rho1P2'S/T6'M receptors at which the non-competitive component was isolated. It is proposed that the contribution of M2 domain residues to picrotoxinin activity is potentially two-fold: (1) their role as a potential picrotoxinin binding site within the pore; and (2) they are critical for receptor activation properties of the receptor, thus may alter the allosteric mechanism of picrotoxinin.

  8. Self-Esteem is Relatively Stable Late in Life: The Role of Resources in the Health, Self-Regulation, and Social Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jenny; Hoppmann, Christiane; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A large body of research has documented changes in self-esteem across adulthood and individual-difference correlates thereof. However, little is known about whether people maintain their self-esteem until the end of life and what role key risk factors in the health, cognitive, self-regulatory, and social domains play. To examine these questions, we apply growth modeling to 13-year longitudinal data obtained from by now deceased participants of the Berlin Aging Study (BASE, N = 462; age 70 – 103, M = 86.3 yrs., SD = 8.3; 51% male). Results revealed that self-esteem, on average, does decline in very old age and close to death, but the amount of typical decline is minor. Health-related constraints and disabilities as well as lower control beliefs and higher loneliness were each associated with lower self-esteem late in life. We obtained initial evidence that some of these associations were stronger among the oldest-old participants. Our results corroborate and extend initial reports that self-esteem is, on average, fairly stable into the last years of life. We discuss possible pathways by which common and often severe late-life challenges may undermine an otherwise relatively robust self-esteem system. PMID:25546600

  9. Loss of Function of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Kinesin-Related Cin8 and Kip1 Is Suppressed by Kar3 Motor Domain Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, M. A.; He, L.; Totis, L.; Saunders, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    The kinesin-related products of the CIN8 and KIP1 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae redundantly perform an essential function in mitosis. The action of either gene-product is required for an outwardly directed force that acts upon the spindle poles. We have selected mutations that suppress the temperature-sensitivity of a cin8-temperature-sensitive kip1-δ strain. The extragenic suppressors analyzed were all found to be alleles of the KAR3 gene. KAR3 encodes a distinct kinesin-related protein whose action antagonizes Cin8p/Kip1p function. All seven alleles analyzed were altered within the region of KAR3 that encodes the putative force-generating (or ``motor'') domain. These mutations also suppressed the inviability associated with the cin8-δ kip1-δ genotype, a property not shared by a deletion of KAR3. Other properties of the suppressing alleles revealed that they were not null for function. Six of the seven were unaffected for the essential karyogamy and meiosis properties of KAR3 and the seventh was dominant for the suppressing trait. Our findings suggest that despite an antagonistic relationship between Cin8p/Kip1p and Kar3p, aspects of their mitotic roles may be similar. PMID:8224825

  10. A large protein containing zinc finger domains binds to related sequence elements in the enhancers of the class I major histocompatibility complex and kappa immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, A S; LeClair, K P; Singh, H; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA from a B-cell library was previously isolated that encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein with affinities for related sites in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and kappa immunoglobulin gene enhancers. We report here approximately 6.5 kilobases of sequence of the MBP-1 (MHC enhancer binding protein 1) cDNA. MBP-1 protein has a molecular weight predicted to be greater than 200,000. A DNA-binding domain with high affinity for the MHC enhancer sequence TGGGGATTCCCCA was localized to an 118-amino-acid protein fragment containing two zinc fingers of the class Cys2-X12-His2. Analysis of expression of MBP-1 mRNA revealed relatively high expression in HeLa cells and in a human retinal cell line, with lower levels in Jurkat T cells and in two B-cell lines. Interestingly, expression of MBP-1 mRNA was inducible by mitogen and phorbol ester treatment of Jurkat T cells and by serum treatment of confluent serum-deprived human fibroblasts. Images PMID:2108316

  11. Meta-analytic investigations of structural grey matter, executive domain-related functional activations, and white matter diffusivity in obsessive compulsive disorder: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Eng, Goi Khia; Sim, Kang; Chen, Shen-Hsing Annabel

    2015-05-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating disorder. However, existing neuroimaging findings involving executive function and structural abnormalities in OCD have been mixed. Here we conducted meta-analyses to investigate differences in OCD samples and controls in: Study 1 - grey matter structure; Study 2 - executive function task-related activations during (i) response inhibition, (ii) interference, and (iii) switching tasks; and Study 3 - white matter diffusivity. Results showed grey matter differences in the frontal, striatal, thalamus, parietal and cerebellar regions; task domain-specific neural differences in similar regions; and abnormal diffusivity in major white matter regions in OCD samples compared to controls. Our results reported concurrence of abnormal white matter diffusivity with corresponding abnormalities in grey matter and task-related functional activations. Our findings suggested the involvement of other brain regions not included in the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical network, such as the cerebellum and parietal cortex, and questioned the involvement of the orbitofrontal region in OCD pathophysiology. Future research is needed to clarify the roles of these brain regions in the disorder.

  12. Human CENP-A contains a histone H3 related histone fold domain that is required for targeting to the centromere

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Centromeres are the differentiated chromosomal domains that specify the mitotic behavior of chromosomes. To examine the molecular basis for the specification of centromeric chromatin, we have cloned a human cDNA that encodes the 17-kD histone-like centromere antigen, CENP-A. Two domains are evident in the 140 aa CENP-A polypeptide: a unique NH2- terminal domain and a 93-amino acid COOH-terminal domain that shares 62% identity with nucleosomal core protein, histone H3. An epitope tagged derivative of CENP-A was faithfully targeted to centromeres when expressed in a variety of animal cells and this targeting activity was shown to reside in the histone-like COOH-terminal domain of CENP-A. These data clearly indicate that the assembly of centromeres is driven, at least in part, by the incorporation of a novel core histone into centromeric chromatin. PMID:7962047

  13. Data Resource Profile: Cross-national and cross-study sociodemographic and health-related harmonized domains from SAGE plus ELSA, HRS and SHARE (SAGE+, Wave 1).

    PubMed

    Minicuci, Nadia; Naidoo, Nirmala; Chatterji, Somnath; Kowal, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Four longitudinal studies were included in this rigorous harmonization process: the Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE); English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA); US Health and Retirement Study (HRS); and Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). An ex-post harmonized process was applied to nine health-related thematic domains (socio-demographic and economic, health states, overall self-report of health and mental state, health examinations, physical and mental performance tests, risk factors, chronic conditions, social network and subjective well-being) for data from the 2004 wave of each study. Large samples of adults aged 50 years and older were available from each study: SAGE, n = 18 886; ELSA, n = 9181; HRS, n = 19 303; and SHARE, n = 29 917. The microdata, along with further details about the harmonization process and all metadata, are available through the World Health Organization (WHO) data archive at [http://apps.who.int/healthinfo/systems/surveydata/index.php/catalog]. Further information and enquiries can be made to [sagesurvey@who.int] or the corresponding author. The data resource will continue to be updated with data across additional waves of these surveys and new waves.

  14. Semiautomated segmentation and analysis of retinal layers in three-dimensional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images of patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Shi, Yue; Nandanan, Kiran; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-01-01

    Historically, regular drusen and geographic atrophy (GA) have been recognized as the hallmarks of nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recent imaging developments have revealed another distinct nonneovascular AMD phenotype, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD). We develop an approach to semiautomatically quantify retinal surfaces associated with various AMD lesions (i.e., regular drusen, RPD, and GA) in spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. More specifically, a graph-based algorithm was used to segment multiple retinal layers in SD-OCT volumes. Varying surface feasibility constraints based on the presegmentation were applied on the double-surface graph search to refine the surface segmentation. The thicknesses of these layers and their correlation with retinal functional measurements, including microperimetry (MP) sensitivity and visual acuity (VA), were investigated. The photoreceptor outer segment layer demonstrated significant thinning with a reduction in MP sensitivity and VA score when atrophic AMD lesions were present. Regular drusen and RPD were separately segmented on SD-OCT images to allow their characteristics and distribution to be studied separately. The mean thickness of regular drusen was found to significantly correlate with the VA score. RPD appeared to be distributed evenly throughout the macula and regular drusen appeared to be more concentrated centrally.

  15. Development of a high capacity bubble domain memory element and related epitaxial garnet materials for application in spacecraft data recorders. Item 2: The optimization of material-device parameters for application in bubble domain memory elements for spacecraft data recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Bubble domain materials and devices are discussed. One of the materials development goals was a materials system suitable for operation of 16 micrometer period bubble domain devices at 150 kHz over the temperature range -10 C to +60 C. Several material compositions and hard bubble suppression techniques were characterized and the most promising candidates were evaluated in device structures. The technique of pulsed laser stroboscopic microscopy was used to characterize bubble dynamic properties and device performance at 150 kHz. Techniques for large area LPE film growth were developed as a separate task. Device studies included detector optimization, passive replicator design and test and on-chip bridge evaluation. As a technology demonstration an 8 chip memory cell was designed, tested and delivered. The memory elements used in the cell were 10 kilobit serial registers.

  16. Field Evolution of Antiferromagnetic Domains and Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Eric E.; Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas K.

    2003-03-01

    We have used magnetron sputtered [Co(4Å)Pt(7Å)]X Co(4Å)Ru(9Å)N multiplayer films to create artificially layered antiferromagnets. In contrast to atomic antiferromagnets our model system has an antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange energy comparable to the Zeemann energy in moderate fields and allows to fine tune the relative magnitude of the different magnetic energy terms by varying the parameters X and N. With increasing X and N we observe a transition from traditionally observed sharp AF domain walls towards AF domain walls with a finite width which consist of ferromagnetic stripes, i.e. the AF domains have zero net moment whereas the domain walls carry a finite magnetic moment. Such AF domain walls have not been observed before and are a direct consequence of balancing out exchange and Zeeman energy. We also show that such domain walls are expected from theoretical energy calculations. In this contribution we study the nature and field evolution of the AF stripe domain walls by Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM). The surface sensitivity of MFM and the finite moment of the AF domain walls allow us to image AF domains as well as domain walls. We are showing first experiments to study the AF domain wall evolution in real space while applying an external field. O.H. was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via a Forschungsstipendium under the contract number HE 3286/1-1.

  17. Differences in activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptors of white sturgeon relative to lake sturgeon are predicted by identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2015-04-07

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are pollutants of global environmental concern. DLCs elicit their adverse outcomes through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms that result in differences in sensitivity to DLCs among different species of fishes. Understanding these mechanisms is critical for protection of the diversity of fishes exposed to DLCs, including endangered species. This study investigated specific mechanisms that drive responses of two endangered fishes, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) to DLCs. It determined whether differences in sensitivity to activation of AhRs (AhR1 and AhR2) can be predicted based on identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain (LBD). White sturgeon were 3- to 30-fold more sensitive than lake sturgeon to exposure to 5 different DLCs based on activation of AhR2. There were no differences in sensitivity between white sturgeon and lake sturgeon based on activation of AhR1. Adverse outcomes as a result of exposure to DLCs have been shown to be mediated through activation of AhR2, but not AhR1, in all fishes studied to date. This indicates that white sturgeon are likely to have greater sensitivity in vivo relative to lake sturgeon. Homology modeling and in silico mutagenesis suggests that differences in sensitivity to activation of AhR2 result from differences in key amino acids at position 388 in the LBD of AhR2 of white sturgeon (Ala-388) and lake sturgeon (Thr-388). This indicates that identities of key amino acids in the LBD of AhR2 could be predictive of both in vitro activation by DLCs and in vivo sensitivity to DLCs in these, and potentially other, fishes.

  18. Domain Validity and Generalizability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Michael, William B.

    1975-01-01

    An alternative derivation of Tryon's basic formula for the coefficient of domain validity or the coefficient of generalizability developed by Cronbach, Rajaratnam, and Glaser is provided. This derivation, which is also the generalized Kuder-Richardson coefficient, requires a relatively minimal number of assumptions compared with that in previously…

  19. Cetacean distribution and abundance in relation to oceanographic domains on the eastern Bering Sea shelf, June and July of 2002, 2008, and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friday, Nancy A.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Waite, Janice M.; Moore, Sue E.; Clapham, Phillip J.

    2013-10-01

    As part of the Bering Sea Project, cetacean surveys were conducted to describe distribution and estimate abundance on the eastern Bering Sea shelf. Three marine mammal observers conducted visual surveys along transect lines sampled during the Alaska Fisheries Science Center walleye pollock assessment survey in June and July of 2008 and 2010. Distribution and abundance in 2008 and 2010 (cold years) are compared with results from a similar survey conducted in 2002 (a warm year), as the only three years that the entire survey area was sampled; patterns largely match those previously observed. Abundance estimates for comparable areas in 2002, 2008 and 2010 were as follows: humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae): 231 (CV=0.63), 436 (CV=0.45), and 675 (CV=0.80); fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus): 419 (CV=0.33), 1368 (CV=0.34), and 1061 (CV=0.38); minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata): 389 (CV=0.52), 517 (CV=0.69), and 2020 (CV=0.73); Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli): 35,303 (CV=0.53), 14,543 (CV=0.32), and 11,143 (CV=0.32); and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena): 1971 (CV=0.46), 4056 (CV=0.40), and 833 (CV=0.66). It should be noted that these abundance estimates are not corrected for biases due to perception, availability, or responsive movement. Estimates for humpback, fin and minke whales increased from 2002 to 2010, while those for harbor and Dall's porpoise decreased; trends were significant for fin whales. It is likely that changes in estimated abundance are due at least in part to shifts in distribution and not just changes in overall population size. Annual abundance estimates were examined by oceanographic domain. Humpback whales were consistently concentrated in coastal waters north of Unimak Pass. Fin whales were broadly distributed in the outer domain and slope in 2008 and 2010, but sightings were sparse in 2002. Minke whales were distributed throughout the study area in 2002 and 2008, but in 2010 they were concentrated in the outer domain and

  20. NON-CONFORMING FINITE ELEMENTS; MESH GENERATION, ADAPTIVITY AND RELATED ALGEBRAIC MULTIGRID AND DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHODS IN MASSIVELY PARALLEL COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, R; Pasciak, J; Jones, J

    2002-02-01

    Construction, analysis and numerical testing of efficient solution techniques for solving elliptic PDEs that allow for parallel implementation have been the focus of the research. A number of discretization and solution methods for solving second order elliptic problems that include mortar and penalty approximations and domain decomposition methods for finite elements and finite volumes have been investigated and analyzed. Techniques for parallel domain decomposition algorithms in the framework of PETC and HYPRE have been studied and tested. Hierarchical parallel grid refinement and adaptive solution methods have been implemented and tested on various model problems. A parallel code implementing the mortar method with algebraically constructed multiplier spaces was developed.

  1. Convergence in the Domains of Static Spatial Relations and Events of Putting and Taking: Evidence from Bilingual Speakers of Romansh and German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthele, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    In this article the way bilinguals handle differing semantic categories in their two languages will be investigated. Drawing on bilingual data from multilingual speakers of Romansh as well as from speakers of (Swiss) German, the tensions that emerge from "conflicting habits" in the two languages are analyzed in the semantic domain of…

  2. Self-Esteem Is Relatively Stable Late in Life: The Role of Resources in the Health, Self-Regulation, and Social Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Jenny; Hoppmann, Christiane; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A large body of research has documented changes in self-esteem across adulthood and individual-difference correlates thereof. However, little is known about whether people maintain their self-esteem until the end of life and what role key risk factors in the health, cognitive, self-regulatory, and social domains play. To examine these questions,…

  3. Do Nice Guys Really Finish Last? Exploring the Relations between Ethical Conduct, Motivation and Satisfaction among Undergraduates in the Domains of Academics and Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yukhymenko, Mariya A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored patterns of the ethical conduct of collegiate students in academic and athletic domains employing social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1997) using non-experimental, comparative and correlational designs. The study explored response patterns on anonymous surveys between varsity (N = 1151) and non-varsity (N = 227)…

  4. Multifunctionalities driven by ferroic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. C.; Huang, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; He, Q.

    2014-08-14

    Considerable attention has been paid to ferroic systems in pursuit of advanced applications in past decades. Most recently, the emergence and development of multiferroics, which exhibit the coexistence of different ferroic natures, has offered a new route to create functionalities in the system. In this manuscript, we step from domain engineering to explore a roadmap for discovering intriguing phenomena and multifunctionalities driven by periodic domain patters. As-grown periodic domains, offering exotic order parameters, periodic local perturbations and the capability of tailoring local spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom, are introduced as modeling templates for fundamental studies and novel applications. We discuss related significant findings on ferroic domain, nanoscopic domain walls, and conjunct heterostructures based on the well-organized domain patterns, and end with future prospects and challenges in the field.

  5. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  6. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  7. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  8. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis. PMID:26903619

  9. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J

    2016-03-08

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis.

  10. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Chopp, Treasa; Qi Shengmei; Cutler, Mary Lou . E-mail: mcutler@usuhs.mil

    2005-05-15

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion.

  11. Cross-sectional and longitudinal correlations between disease progression and different health-related quality of life domains in persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Imelda J M; Post, Marcel W M; van Heuveln, Tineke; Van den Berg, Leonard H; Lindeman, Eline

    2007-12-01

    In ALS it would be expected that quality of life (QoL) would be decreased. However, studies to date show diverging results. Our study focuses on how ALS affects QoL on the different domains of the SF-36 cross-sectionally and during progression. The method used was a prospective cohort study, with assessments at baseline, at six months, and at one year. Patients were included with possible, probable or definite ALS according to the revised El Escorial criteria and were between 30 and 70 years of age. ALS functional rating scale was used to establish disease status, SF-36 as QoL scale. At baseline 73 completed ALSFRS forms were available and 62 completed SF-36 forms. The ALSFRS showed disease progression. SF-36 scores showed lower QoL scores of persons with ALS compared to the general population both in cross-sectional and longitudinal aspects in the domains of Physical Functioning, Role Physical, and Social Functioning, but similar compared with the general population in the Mental Health and Role Emotional domains. This study shows deteriorating physical health but stable mental health, thereby illustrating the diverging correlations between ALS severity and HRQoL. The diverging pattern of physical and mental health suggests a frame-shift in the experience of HRQoL.

  12. Domain wall orientation and domain shape in KTiOPO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Vaskina, E. M.; Pelegova, E. V.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kizko, O. V.; Ivanov, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Domain shape evolution and domain wall motion have been studied in KTiOPO4 (KTP) ferroelectric single crystals using complementary experimental methods. The in situ visualization of domain kinetics has allowed revealing: (1) qualitative change of the domain shape, (2) dependence of the domain wall velocity on its orientation, (3) jump-like domain wall motion caused by domain merging, (4) effect of domain shape stability. The model of domain wall motion driven by generation of elementary steps (kink-pair nucleation) and subsequent kink motion is presented. The decrease in the relative velocity of the approaching parallel domain walls is attributed to electrostatic interaction. The effect of polarization reversal induced by chemical etching is observed. The obtained results are important for the development of domain engineering in the crystals of KTP family.

  13. Creation of active TIM barrel enzymes through genetic fusion of half-barrel domain constructs derived from two distantly related glycosyl hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prerna; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-12-01

    Diverse unrelated enzymes that adopt the beta/alpha (or TIM) barrel topology display similar arrangements of beta/alpha units placed in a radial eight-fold symmetry around the barrel's axis. The TIM barrel was originally thought to be a single structural domain; however, it is now thought that TIM barrels arose from duplication and fusion of smaller half-barrels consisting of four beta/alpha units. We describe here the design, expression and purification, as well as characterization of folding, activity and stability, of chimeras of two TIM barrel glycosyl hydrolases, made by fusing different half-barrel domains derived from an endoglucanase from Clostridium cellulolyticum, CelCCA and a beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus, CelB. We show that after refolding following purification from inclusion bodies, the two half-barrel fusion chimeras (CelCCACelB and CelBCelCCA) display catalytic activity although they assemble into large soluble oligomeric aggregated species containing chains of mixed beta and alpha structure. CelBCelCCA displays hyperthermophile-like structural stability as well as significant stability to chemical denaturation (Cm of 2.6 m guanidinium hydrochloride), whereas CelCCACelB displays mesophile-like stability (Tm of ~ 71 °C). The endoglucanase activities of both chimeras are an order of magnitude lower than those of CelB or CelCCA, whereas the beta-glucosidase activity of CelBCelCCA is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of CelB. The chimera CelCCACelB shows no beta-glucosidase activity. Our results demonstrate that half-barrel domains from unrelated sources can fold, assemble and function, with scope for improvement.

  14. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  15. Supporting multiple domains in a single reuse repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David

    1992-01-01

    Domain analysis typically results in the construction of a domain-specific repository. Such a repository imposes artificial boundaries on the sharing of similar assets between related domains. A lattice-based approach to repository modeling can preserve a reuser's domain specific view of the repository, while avoiding replication of commonly used assets and supporting a more general perspective on domain interrelationships.

  16. Housing satisfaction among chronically homeless adults: identification of its major domains, changes over time, and relation to subjective well-being and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Mares, Alvin S; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2012-06-01

    There is limited consensus on the critical domains of housing satisfaction among chronically homeless adults and little information on changes in housing satisfaction over time or whether housing satisfaction at initial entry into housing is correlated with subsequent subjective well-being or other outcomes. The current study tracked housing satisfaction over a 2-year period in a multi-site supported housing initiative and examined the predictive value of clients' housing satisfaction when they were first housed on various subjective and functional outcomes. A total of 756 participants from 11 sites were enrolled in the study. Six domains of housing satisfaction were identified: good environment, control and consumer choice, physical quality, geographic proximity to desirable resources, positive case manager contact, and frequency of landlord interaction. Over 2 years, there were slight declines in housing satisfaction on physical quality of housing and satisfaction with case manager contact, and an increase in satisfaction with landlord interaction. Consistent with some previous research, housing satisfaction was not predictive of housing tenure, clinical outcomes, or duration of program participation. While becoming housed is a significant gain for chronically homeless people, their satisfaction with housing did not predict functional outcomes.

  17. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  18. Generic domain models in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, Neil

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines three research directions related to domain-specific software development: (1) reuse of generic models for domain-specific software development; (2) empirical evidence to determine these generic models, namely elicitation of mental knowledge schema possessed by expert software developers; and (3) exploitation of generic domain models to assist modelling of specific applications. It focuses on knowledge acquisition for domain-specific software development, with emphasis on tool support for the most important phases of software development.

  19. Mid-infrared pump-related electric-field domains in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As quantum-cascade structures for terahertz lasing without population inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Giehler, M.; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the effect of mid-infrared (MIR) pumping on the transport properties of GaAs/(Al,Ga)As terahertz (THz) quantum lasers (TQLs), which rely on quantum coherence effects of intersubband transitions. Aiming at THz lasing at elevated temperatures, we extend the concept of THz gain with and without population inversion of a single, MIR-pumped, electrically driven THz stage proposed by Waldmueller et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 117401 (2007)] to an entire TQL. However, experiments using a CO{sub 2} as well as a free-electron laser and numerical simulations show that this resonant MIR pumping causes a negative differential conductivity (NDC) in addition to the NDC caused by sequential tunneling. Lasing of these TQLs is prevented by the formation of electric-field domains below the resonance field strength for gain of each single THz stage.

  20. The StarD4 subfamily of steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins: new players in cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Dominguez, Maria; Gil, Gregorio; Medina, Miguel Angel; Pandak, William M; Rodríguez-Agudo, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Cholesterol levels in the body are maintained through the coordinated regulation of its uptake, synthesis, distribution, storage and efflux. However, the way cholesterol is sorted within cells remains poorly defined. The discovery of the newly described StarD4 subfamily, part of the steroidogenic acute regulatory lipid transfer (START) domain family of proteins, affords an opportunity for the study of intracellular cholesterol movement, metabolism and its disorders. The three members of this intracellular subfamily of proteins (StarD4, StarD5 and StarD6) have a similar lipid binding pocket specific for sterols (cholesterol in particular), but differing regulation and localization. The ability to bind and transport cholesterol through a non-vesicular mean suggests that they play a previously unappreciated role in cholesterol homeostasis.

  1. Identification of hormone-interacting amino acid residues within the steroid-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other steroid hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Stroemstedt, P.E.; Persson, B.; Cederlund, E.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Joernvall, H.

    1988-05-15

    Purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was covalently charged with (/sup 3/H)glucocorticoid by photoaffinity labeling (UV irradiation of (/sup 3/H)triamcinolone acetonide-glucocorticoid receptor) or affinity labeling (incubation with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate). After labeling, separate samples of the denatured receptor were cleaved with trypsin (directly or after prior succinylation), chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. Labeled residues in the peptides obtained were identified by radiosequence analysis. The peaks of radioactivity corresponded to Met-622 and Cys-754 after photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)triamcinolone acetonide and Cys-656 after affinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate. The labeled residues are all positioned within hydrophobic segments of the steroid-binding domain. The patterns of hydropathy and secondary structure for the glucocorticoid receptor are highly similar to those for the progestin receptor and similar but less so to those for the estrogen receptor and to those for c-erb A.

  2. Inherent chaperone-like activity of aspartic proteases reveals a distant evolutionary relation to double-ψ barrel domains of AAA-ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Hulko, Michael; Lupas, Andrei N.; Martin, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Chaperones and proteases share the ability to interact with unfolded proteins. Here we show that enzymatically inactive forms of the aspartic proteases HIV-1 protease and pepsin have inherent chaperone-like activity and can prevent the aggregation of denatured substrate proteins. In contrast to proteolysis, which requires dimeric enzymes, chaperone-like activity could be observed also with monomeric domains. The involvement of the active site cleft in the chaperone-like function was demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of peptide substrate inhibitors. The high structural similarity between aspartic proteases and the N-terminal double-ψ barrels of Cdc48-like proteins, which are involved in the unfolding and dissociation of proteins, suggests that they share a common ancestor. The latent chaperone-like activity in aspartic proteases can be seen as a relic that has further evolved to serve substrate binding in the context of proteolytic activity. PMID:17384229

  3. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) via the Venus flytrap domain (VFTD) inhibits amygdala plasticity, stress, and anxiety-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine E; Peterlik, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Bouhelal, Rochdi; Kaupmann, Klemens; Laue, Grit; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Feuerbach, Dominik; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Ofner, Silvio; Cryan, John F; van der Putten, Herman; Fendt, Markus; Vranesic, Ivo; Glatthar, Ralf; Flor, Peter J

    2014-04-18

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) is an important presynaptic regulator of neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. mGlu7 function has been linked to autism, drug abuse, anxiety, and depression. Despite this, it has been difficult to develop specific blockers of native mGlu7 signaling in relevant brain areas such as amygdala and limbic cortex. Here, we present the mGlu7-selective antagonist 7-hydroxy-3-(4-iodophenoxy)-4H-chromen-4-one (XAP044), which inhibits lateral amygdala long term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from wild type mice with a half-maximal blockade at 88 nm. There was no effect of XAP044 on LTP of mGlu7-deficient mice, indicating that this pharmacological effect is mGlu7-dependent. Unexpectedly and in contrast to all previous mGlu7-selective drugs, XAP044 does not act via the seven-transmembrane region but rather via a binding pocket localized in mGlu7's extracellular Venus flytrap domain, a region generally known for orthosteric agonist binding. This was shown by chimeric receptor studies in recombinant cell line assays. XAP044 demonstrates good brain exposure and wide spectrum anti-stress and antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like efficacy in rodent behavioral paradigms. XAP044 reduces freezing during acquisition of Pavlovian fear and reduces innate anxiety, which is consistent with the phenotypes of mGlu7-deficient mice, the results of mGlu7 siRNA knockdown studies, and the inhibition of amygdala LTP by XAP044. Thus, we present an mGlu7 antagonist with a novel molecular mode of pharmacological action, providing significant application potential in psychiatry. Modeling the selective interaction between XAP044 and mGlu7's Venus flytrap domain, whose three-dimensional structure is already known, will facilitate future drug development supported by computer-assisted drug design.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Outer Retinal Tubulation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration From Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Litts, Katie M.; Ach, Thomas; Hammack, Kristen M.; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Zhang, Yuhua; Freund, K. Bailey; Curcio, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess outer retinal tubulation (ORT) morphology from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes and donor eye histology, analyze ORT reflectivity, and estimate the number of cones surviving in ORT. Methods In SD-OCT volumes from nine patients with advanced AMD, ORT was analyzed en face and in B-scans. The hyperreflective ORT border in cross-section was delineated and surface area calculated. Reflectivity was compared between ORT types (Closed, Open, Forming, and Branching). A flatmount retina from a donor with neovascular AMD was labeled to visualize the external limiting membrane that delimits ORT and allow measurements of cross-sectional cone area, center-to-center cone spacing, and cone density. The number of cones surviving in ORT was estimated. Results By en face SD-OCT, ORT varies in complexity and shape. Outer retinal tubulation networks almost always contain Closed cross-sections. Spectral-domain OCT volumes containing almost exclusively Closed ORTs showed no significant direction-dependent differences in hyperreflective ORT border intensity. The surface areas of partial ORT assessed by SD-OCT volumes ranged from 0.16 to 1.76 mm2. From the flatmount retina, the average cross-sectional area of cone inner segments was 49.1 ± 7.9 μm2. The average cone spacing was 7.5 ± 0.6 μm. Outer retinal tubulation cone density was 20,351 cones/mm2. The estimated number of cones in ORT in a macula ranged from 26,399 to 186,833 cones, which is 6% to 44% of the cones present in a healthy macula. Conclusions These first estimates for cone density and number of cones surviving in ORT suggest that ORT formation considerably distorts the photoreceptor mosaic. Results provide additional insight into the reflectivity characteristics and number of ORT cones observable in living patients by SD-OCT, as cones persist and disease progresses. PMID:27177321

  5. GsmR, a response regulator with an HD-related output domain in Xanthomonas campestris, is positively controlled by Clp and is involved in the expression of genes responsible for flagellum synthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Liao, Chao-Tsai; Song, Wan-Ling; Hsu, Pei-Chi; Du, Shin-Chiao; Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2013-01-01

    In prokaryotes, two-component signal transduction systems, consisting of a histidine kinase and a response regulator, play a critical role in regulating a range of cellular functions. A recent study suggests that XCC3315, a response regulator with a CheY-like receiver domain attached to an uncharacterized HD-related output domain (HDOD domain), plays a role in the general stress response of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the causal agent of black rot in cruciferous plants. Here, we demonstrated genetically that XCC3315, designated as gsmR (general stress and motility regulator), is involved in the expression of genes responsible for flagellum synthesis, including rpoN2, flhF, flhB, and fliC. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Glu9 and Arg100 in the receiver domain and Gly205, Asp263, His287, Trp298 and His311 in the HDOD are critical amino acids for GsmR function in cell motility regulation. The gsmR transcription initiation site was mapped. Promoter analysis and gel retardation assay revealed that the expression of gsmR is positively controlled by the global transcriptional regulator Clp in a direct manner, and is subject to catabolite repression. Our findings not only extend the previous work on Clp regulation to show that it influences the expression of gsmR in Xcc, but are also the first to characterize the expression of this response regulator gene in this phytopathogen. Furthermore, GsmR is the first HDOD-containing protein of bacteria in which key amino acids have been experimentally identified and characterized.

  6. FILAMENTOUS FLOWER, a meristem and organ identity gene of Arabidopsis, encodes a protein with a zinc finger and HMG-related domains.

    PubMed

    Sawa, S; Watanabe, K; Goto, K; Liu, Y G; Shibata, D; Kanaya, E; Morita, E H; Okada, K

    1999-05-01

    Distinctive from that of the animal system, the basic plan of the plant body is the continuous formation of a structural unit, composed of a stem with a meristem at the top and lateral organs continuously forming at the meristem. Therefore, mechanisms controlling the formation, maintenance, and development of a meristem will be a key to understanding the body plan of higher plants. Genetic analyses of filamentous flower (fil) mutants have indicated that FIL is required for the maintenance and growth of inflorescence and floral meristems, and of floral organs of Arabidopsis thaliana. FIL encodes a protein carrying a zinc finger and a HMG box-like domain, which is known to work as a transcription regulator. As expected, the FIL protein was shown to have a nuclear location. In situ hybridization clearly demonstrated that FIL is expressed only at the abaxial side of primordia of leaves and floral organs. Transgenic plants, ectopically expressing FIL, formed filament-like leaves with randomly arranged cells at the leaf margin. Our results indicate that cells at the abaxial side of the lateral organs are responsible for the normal development of the organs as well as for maintaining the activity of meristems.

  7. Depletion of the Trypanosome Pumilio Domain Protein PUF2 or of Some Other Essential Proteins Causes Transcriptome Changes Related to Coding Region Length

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Bhaskar Anand; Fadda, Abeer; Merce, Clementine; Mugo, Elisha; Droll, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Pumilio domain RNA-binding proteins are known mainly as posttranscriptional repressors of gene expression that reduce mRNA translation and stability. Trypanosoma brucei has 11 PUF proteins. We show here that PUF2 is in the cytosol, with roughly the same number of molecules per cell as there are mRNAs. Although PUF2 exhibits a low level of in vivo RNA binding, it is not associated with polysomes. PUF2 also decreased reporter mRNA levels in a tethering assay, consistent with a repressive role. Depletion of PUF2 inhibited growth of bloodstream-form trypanosomes, causing selective loss of mRNAs with long open reading frames and increases in mRNAs with shorter open reading frames. Reexamination of published RNASeq data revealed the same trend in cells depleted of some other proteins. We speculate that these length effects could be caused by inhibition of the elongation phase of transcription or by an influence of translation status or polysomal conformation on mRNA decay. PMID:24681684

  8. Indirect DNA Readout by an H-NS Related Protein: Structure of the DNA Complex of the C-Terminal Domain of Ler

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Tiago N.; Schmidt, Holger; Madrid, Cristina; Juárez, Antonio; Bernadó, Pau; Griesinger, Christian; García, Jesús; Pons, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Ler, a member of the H-NS protein family, is the master regulator of the LEE pathogenicity island in virulent Escherichia coli strains. Here, we determined the structure of a complex between the DNA-binding domain of Ler (CT-Ler) and a 15-mer DNA duplex. CT-Ler recognizes a preexisting structural pattern in the DNA minor groove formed by two consecutive regions which are narrower and wider, respectively, compared with standard B-DNA. The compressed region, associated with an AT-tract, is sensed by the side chain of Arg90, whose mutation abolishes the capacity of Ler to bind DNA. The expanded groove allows the approach of the loop in which Arg90 is located. This is the first report of an experimental structure of a DNA complex that includes a protein belonging to the H-NS family. The indirect readout mechanism not only explains the capacity of H-NS and other H-NS family members to modulate the expression of a large number of genes but also the origin of the specificity displayed by Ler. Our results point to a general mechanism by which horizontally acquired genes may be specifically recognized by members of the H-NS family. PMID:22114557

  9. Origin and evolution of the archaeo-eukaryotic primase superfamily and related palm-domain proteins: structural insights and new members

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Leipe, Detlef D.; Aravind, L.

    2005-01-01

    We report an in-depth computational study of the protein sequences and structures of the superfamily of archaeo-eukaryotic primases (AEPs). This analysis greatly expands the range of diversity of the AEPs and reveals the unique active site shared by all members of this superfamily. In particular, it is shown that eukaryotic nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses, including poxviruses, asfarviruses, iridoviruses, phycodnaviruses and the mimivirus, encode AEPs of a distinct family, which also includes the herpesvirus primases whose relationship to AEPs has not been recognized previously. Many eukaryotic genomes, including chordates and plants, encode previously uncharacterized homologs of these predicted viral primases, which might be involved in novel DNA repair pathways. At a deeper level of evolutionary connections, structural comparisons indicate that AEPs, the nucleases involved in the initiation of rolling circle replication in plasmids and viruses, and origin-binding domains of papilloma and polyoma viruses evolved from a common ancestral protein that might have been involved in a protein-priming mechanism of initiation of DNA replication. Contextual analysis of multidomain protein architectures and gene neighborhoods in prokaryotes and viruses reveals remarkable parallels between AEPs and the unrelated DnaG-type primases, in particular, tight associations with the same repertoire of helicases. These observations point to a functional equivalence of the two classes of primases, which seem to have repeatedly displaced each other in various extrachromosomal replicons. PMID:16027112

  10. Characterization of lipid domains in erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W; Glaser, M

    1991-02-15

    Fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used to study the lateral distribution of the lipid components in erythrocyte membranes. Intact erythrocytes labeled with phospholipids containing a fluorophore attached to one fatty acid chain showed an uneven distribution of the phospholipids in the membrane thereby demonstrating the presence of membrane domains. The enrichment of the lipotropic compound chlor-promazine in domains in intact erythrocytes also suggested that the domains are lipid-enriched regions. Similar membrane domains were present in erythrocyte ghosts. The phospholipid enrichment was increased in the domains by inducing membrane protein aggregation. Double-labeling experiments were done to determine the relative distributions of different phospholipids in the membrane. Vesicles made from extracted lipids did not show the presence of domains consistent with the conclusion that membrane proteins were responsible for creating the domains. Overall, it was found that large domains exist in the red blood cell membrane with unequal enrichment of the different phospholipid species.

  11. Understanding the Public Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

  12. Analyses of disease-related GNPTAB mutations define a novel GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase interaction domain and an alternative site-1 protease cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Renata Voltolini; De Pace, Raffaella; Klünder, Sarah; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Schwartz, Ida V. D.; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) and III alpha/beta are autosomal-recessive diseases of childhood caused by mutations in GNPTAB encoding the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase complex. This enzyme modifies lysosomal hydrolases with mannose 6-phosphate targeting signals. Upon arrival in the Golgi apparatus, the newly synthesized α/β-subunit precursor is catalytically activated by site-1 protease (S1P). Here we performed comprehensive expression studies of GNPTAB mutations, including two novel mutations T644M and T1223del, identified in Brazilian MLII/MLIII alpha/beta patients. We show that the frameshift E757KfsX1 and the non-sense R587X mutations result in the retention of enzymatically inactive truncated precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to loss of cytosolic ER exit motifs consistent with a severe clinical phenotype in homozygosity. The luminal missense mutations, C505Y, G575R and T644M, partially impaired ER exit and proteolytic activation in accordance with less severe MLIII alpha/beta disease symptoms. Analogous to the previously characterized S399F mutant, we found that the missense mutation I403T led to retention in the ER and loss of catalytic activity. Substitution of further conserved residues in stealth domain 2 (I346 and W357) revealed similar biochemical properties and allowed us to define a putative binding site for accessory proteins required for ER exit of α/β-subunit precursors. Interestingly, the analysis of the Y937_M972del mutant revealed partial Golgi localization and formation of abnormal inactive β-subunits generated by S1P which correlate with a clinical MLII phenotype. Expression analyses of mutations identified in patients underline genotype–phenotype correlations in MLII/MLIII alpha/beta and provide novel insights into structural requirements of proper GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity. PMID:25788519

  13. A single mutation in framework 2 of the heavy variable domain improves the properties of a diabody and a related single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Everardo Remi; Ledezma-Candanoza, Luis M; Contreras-Ferrat, Luis Gabriel; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar; Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia

    2012-10-26

    Excellent results regarding improved therapeutic properties have been often obtained through the conversion of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) into a noncovalent dimeric antibody (diabody) via peptide linker shortening. We utilized this approach to obtain a dimeric version of the human scFv 6009F, which was originally engineered to neutralize the Cn2 toxin of Centruroides noxius scorpion venom. However, some envenoming symptoms remained with diabody 6009F. Diabody 6009F was subjected to directed evolution to obtain a variant capable of eliminating envenoming symptoms. After two rounds of biopanning, diabody D4 was isolated. It exhibited a single mutation (E43G) in framework 2 of the heavy-chain variable domain. Diabody D4 displayed an increase in T(m) (thermal transition midpoint temperature) of 6.3°C compared with its dimeric precursor. The importance of the E43G mutation was tested in the context of the human scFv LR, a highly efficient antibody against Cn2, which was previously generated by our group [Riaño-Umbarila, L., Contreras-Ferrat, G., Olamendi-Portugal, T., Morelos-Juárez, C., Corzo, G., Possani, L. D. and Becerril, B. (2011). J. Biol. Chem.286, 6143-6151]. The new variant, scFv LER, displayed an increase in T(m) of 3.4°C and was capable of neutralizing 2 LD(50) of Cn2 toxin with no detectable symptoms when injected into mice at a 1:1 toxin-to-antibody molar ratio. These results showed that the E43G mutation might increase the therapeutic properties of these antibody fragments. Molecular modeling and dynamics results suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network near the E43G mutation could explain the improved functional stability and neutralization properties of both the diabody D4 and scFv LER.

  14. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more

  15. The Temporal Context Model in Spatial Navigation and Relational Learning: Toward a Common Explanation of Medial Temporal Lobe Function Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Marc W.; Fotedar, Mrigankka S.; Datey, Aditya V.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) has been studied extensively at all levels of analysis, yet its function remains unclear. Theory regarding the cognitive function of the MTL has centered along 3 themes. Different authors have emphasized the role of the MTL in episodic recall, spatial navigation, or relational memory. Starting with the temporal…

  16. Students' tripartite efficacy beliefs in high school physical education: within- and cross-domain relations with motivational processes and leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Ben; Whipp, Peter R; Chua, K L Peter; Dimmock, James A; Hagger, Martin S

    2013-02-01

    Within instructional settings, individuals form relational efficacy appraisals that complement their self-efficacy beliefs. In high school physical education (PE), for instance, students develop a level of confidence in their teacher's capabilities, as well as estimating how confident they think their teacher is in their (i.e., the students') ability. Grounded in existing transcontextual work, we examined the motivational pathways through which students' relational efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs in PE were predictive of their leisure-time physical activity. Singaporean students (N = 990; age M = 13.95, SD = 1.02) completed instruments assessing efficacy beliefs, perceptions of teacher relatedness support, and autonomous motivation toward PE, and 2 weeks later they reported their motivation toward, and engagement in, leisure-time physical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed that students reported stronger other-efficacy and RISE beliefs when they felt that their teacher created a highly relatedness-supportive environment. In turn, their relational efficacy beliefs (a) supported their confidence in their own ability, (b) directly and indirectly predicted more autonomous motives for participation in PE, and (c) displayed prospective transcontextual effects in relation to leisure-time variables. By emphasizing the adaptive motivational effects associated with the tripartite constructs, these findings highlight novel pathways linking students' efficacy perceptions with leisure-time outcomes.

  17. The Temporal Context Model in spatial navigation and relational learning: Toward a common explanation of medial temporal lobe function across domains

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Marc W.; Fotedar, Mrigankka S.; Datey, Aditya V.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) has been studied extensively at all levels of analysis, yet its function remains unclear. Theory regarding the cognitive function of the MTL has centered along 3 themes. Different authors have emphasized the role of the MTL in episodic recall, spatial navigation, or relational memory. Starting with the temporal context model (M. W. Howard and M. J. Kahana, 2002), a distributed memory model that has been applied to benchmark data from episodic recall tasks, the authors propose that the entorhinal cortex supports a gradually changing representation of temporal context and the hippocampus proper enables retrieval of these contextual states. Simulation studies show this hypothesis explains the firing of place cells in the entorhinal cortex and the behavioral effects of hippocampal lesion in relational memory tasks. These results constitute a first step towards a unified computational theory of MTL function that integrates neurophysiological, neuropsychological and cognitive findings. PMID:15631589

  18. HRF, a putative basic helix-loop-helix-PAS-domain transcription factor is closely related to hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha and developmentally expressed in blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Flamme, I; Fröhlich, T; von Reutern, M; Kappel, A; Damert, A; Risau, W

    1997-04-01

    Transcription factors of the bHLH-PAS protein family are important regulators of developmental processes such as neurogenesis and tracheal development in invertebrates. Recently a bHLH-PAS protein, named trachealess (trl) was identified as a master regulator of tracheogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF-1 alpha, is a vertebrate relative of trl which is likely to be involved in growth of blood vessels by the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to hypoxia. In the present study we describe mRNA cloning and mRNA expression pattern of mouse HIF-related factor (HRF), a novel close relative of HIF-1 alpha which is expressed most prominently in brain capillary endothelial cells and other blood vessels as well as in bronchial epithelium in the embryo and the adult. In addition, smooth muscle cells of the uterus, neurons, brown adipose tissue and various epithelial tissues express HRF mRNA as well. High expression levels of HRF mRNA in embryonic choroid plexus and kidney glomeruli, places where VEGF is highly expressed, suggest a role of this factor in VEGF gene activation similar to that of HIF-1 alpha. Given the similarity between morphogenesis of the tracheal system and the vertebrate vascular system, the expression pattern of HRF in the vasculature and the bronchial tree raises the possibility that this family of transcription factors may be involved in tubulogenesis.

  19. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus-resistant tomato plants expressing the multifunctional N-terminal domain of the replication-associated protein show transcriptional changes resembling stress-related responses.

    PubMed

    Lucioli, Alessandra; Berardi, Alessandra; Gatti, Francesca; Tavazza, Raffaela; Pizzichini, Daniele; Tavazza, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-130) of the replication-associated protein (Rep130 ) of Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) retains the ability of full-length Rep to localize to the nucleus and to down-regulate C1 transcription when ectopically expressed in plants, both functions being required to inhibit homologous viral replication. In this study, we analysed the effect of Rep130 expression on virus resistance and the plant transcriptome in the natural and agronomically important host species of TYLCSV, Solanum lycopersicum. Tomato plants accumulating high levels of Rep130 were generated and proved to be resistant to TYLCSV. Using an in vitro assay, we showed that plant-expressed Rep130 also retains the catalytic activity of Rep, thus supporting the notion that this protein domain is fully functional. Interestingly, Rep130 -expressing tomatoes were characterized by an altered transcriptional profile resembling stress-related responses. Notably, the serine-type protease inhibitor (Ser-PI) category was over-represented among the 20 up-regulated genes. The involvement of Rep130 in the alteration of host mRNA steady-state levels was confirmed using a distinct set of virus-resistant transgenic tomato plants expressing the same TYLCSV Rep130 , but from a different, synthetic, gene. Eight genes were found to be up-regulated in both types of transgenic tomato and two encoded Ser-PIs. Four of these eight genes were also up-regulated in TYLCSV-infected wild-type tomato plants. Implications with regard to the ability of this Rep domain to interfere with viral infections and to alter the host transcriptome are discussed.

  20. Patterns of Depressive Symptoms and Social Relating Behaviors Differ Over Time From Other Behavioral Domains for Young People With Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Bourke, Jenny; Einfeld, Stewart L.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Jacoby, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract People with intellectual disabilities are at a higher risk for experiencing behavioral, emotional, and psychiatric problems in comparison with the general population. People with Down syndrome have been reported as experiencing fewer behavioral problems than others with intellectual disability, although still at a greater level than the non-intellectually disabled population, except for depression and Alzheimer disease. The aim of this study was to describe the trajectories of subscales of behavior, including depressive symptoms, communication disturbance, anxiety, disruptiveness, and social relating abilities, for young adults with Down syndrome. Families of young adults with Down syndrome living in Perth, Western Australia, participated in a questionnaire study over 8 years, 2004 (n = 255), 2009 (n = 191), and 2011 (n = 188). Questionnaires collected information about young person characteristics and family functioning. The parent-completed Developmental Behavior Checklist-Adult (DBC-A) and Developmental Behavior Checklist-Primary Carer Version (DBC-P) were used to measure emotional and behavioral problems. These measures include the following subscales: disruptive, communication and anxiety disturbances, self-absorbed, antisocial, depressive, and social relating. DBC score declined from 2004 to 2011 reflecting an improvement in behavior in the self-absorbed (coeff −0.011, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.031, −0.008), anxiety (coef −0.009 95%CI −0.129, −0.006), communication disturbances (coeff −0.008, 95% CI −0.012, −0.005) and disruptive/antisocial behavior (coeff −0.013, 95% CI −0.016, −0.009) subscales. Subscales for depressive symptoms and social relating problems decreased less (coeff −0.003, 95% CI −0.007, −0.0001) (coeff −0.003 95% CI −0.007, 0.001). Young people who were lower functioning were reported as exhibiting significantly more behavioral problems across every subscale when compared with those

  1. Predicting students' physical activity and health-related well-being: a prospective cross-domain investigation of motivation across school physical education and exercise settings.

    PubMed

    Standage, Martyn; Gillison, Fiona B; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Treasure, Darren C

    2012-02-01

    A three-wave prospective design was used to assess a model of motivation guided by self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2008) spanning the contexts of school physical education (PE) and exercise. The outcome variables examined were health-related quality of life (HRQoL), physical self-concept (PSC), and 4 days of objectively assessed estimates of activity. Secondary school students (n = 494) completed questionnaires at three separate time points and were familiarized with how to use a sealed pedometer. Results of structural equation modeling supported a model in which perceptions of autonomy support from a PE teacher positively predicted PE-related need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and relatedness). Competence predicted PSC, whereas relatedness predicted HRQoL. Autonomy and competence positively predicted autonomous motivation toward PE, which in turn positively predicted autonomous motivation toward exercise (i.e., 4-day pedometer step count). Autonomous motivation toward exercise positively predicted step count, HRQoL, and PSC. Results of multisample structural equation modeling supported gender invariance. Suggestions for future work are discussed.

  2. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, Thomas J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  3. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, William J; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T; Martin, Thomas J; Parker, Michael W

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 A, and diffracted to 2.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  4. Large-scale brain networks in board game experts: insights from a domain-related task and task-free resting state.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xujun; Liao, Wei; Liang, Dongmei; Qiu, Lihua; Gao, Qing; Liu, Chengyi; Gong, Qiyong; Chen, Huafu

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive performance relies on the coordination of large-scale networks of brain regions that are not only temporally correlated during different tasks, but also networks that show highly correlated spontaneous activity during a task-free state. Both task-related and task-free network activity has been associated with individual differences in cognitive performance. Therefore, we aimed to examine the influence of cognitive expertise on four networks associated with cognitive task performance: the default mode network (DMN) and three other cognitive networks (central-executive network, dorsal attention network, and salience network). During fMRI scanning, fifteen grandmaster and master level Chinese chess players (GM/M) and fifteen novice players carried out a Chinese chess task and a task-free resting state. Modulations of network activity during task were assessed, as well as resting-state functional connectivity of those networks. Relative to novices, GM/Ms showed a broader task-induced deactivation of DMN in the chess problem-solving task, and intrinsic functional connectivity of DMN was increased with a connectivity pattern associated with the caudate nucleus in GM/Ms. The three other cognitive networks did not exhibit any difference in task-evoked activation or intrinsic functional connectivity between the two groups. These findings demonstrate the effect of long-term learning and practice in cognitive expertise on large-scale brain networks, suggesting the important role of DMN deactivation in expert performance and enhanced functional integration of spontaneous activity within widely distributed DMN-caudate circuitry, which might better support high-level cognitive control of behavior.

  5. C2-Domain Abscisic Acid-Related Proteins Mediate the Interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR Abscisic Acid Receptors with the Plasma Membrane and Regulate Abscisic Acid Sensitivity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C.; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A.; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A.; Mulet, Jose M.; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca2+-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling. PMID:25465408

  6. C2-domain abscisic acid-related proteins mediate the interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR abscisic acid receptors with the plasma membrane and regulate abscisic acid sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A; Mulet, Jose M; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2014-12-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling.

  7. Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, Hans

    2004-02-01

    Preface; Notation; Part I. Special Relativity: 1. Introduction: inertial systems and Galilei invariance of classical mechanics; 2. Light propagation in moving coordinate systems and Lorentz transformations; 3. Our world as a Minkowski space; 4. Mechanics of special relativity; 5. Optics of plane waves; 6. Four-dimensional vectors and tensors; 7. Electrodynamics in vacuo; 8. Transformation properties of electromagnetic fields: examples; 9. Null vectors and the algebraic properties of electromagnetic field tensors; 10. Charged point particles and their field; 11. Pole-dipole particles and their field; 12. Electrodynamics in media; 13. Perfect fluids and other physical theories; Part II. Riemannian Geometry: 14. Introduction: the force-free motion of particles in Newtonian mechanics; 15. Why Riemannian geometry?; 16. Riemannian space; 17. Tensor algebra; 18. The covariant derivative and parallel transport; 19. The curvature tensor; 20. Differential operators, integrals and integral laws; 21. Fundamental laws of physics in Riemannian spaces; Part III. Foundations of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation: 22. The fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of gravitation; 23. The Schwarzschild solution; 24. Experiments to verify the Schwarzschild metric; 25. Gravitational lenses; 26. The interior Schwarzschild solution; Part IV. Linearized Theory of Gravitation, Far Fields and Gravitational Waves: 27. The linearized Einstein theory of gravity; 28. Far fields due to arbitrary matter distributions and balance equations for momentum and angular momentum; 29. Gravitational waves; 30. The Cauchy problem for the Einstein field equations; Part V. Invariant Characterization of Exact Solutions: 31. Preferred vector fields and their properties; 32. The Petrov classification; 33. Killing vectors and groups of motion; 34. A survey of some selected classes of exact solutions; Part VI. Gravitational Collapse and Black Holes: 35. The Schwarzschild singularity; 36. Gravitational collapse

  8. Oral health related quality of life in pregnant and post partum women in two social network domains; predominantly home-based and work-based networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals connected to supportive social networks have better general and oral health quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess whether there were differences in oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) between women connected to either predominantly home-based and work-based social networks. Methods A follow-up prevalence study was conducted on 1403 pregnant and post-partum women (mean age of 25.2 ± 6.3 years) living in two cities in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Women were participants in an established cohort followed from pregnancy (baseline) to post-partum period (follow-up). All participants were allocated to two groups; 1. work-based social network group - employed women with paid work, and, 2. home-based social network group - women with no paid work, housewives or unemployed women. Measures of social support and social network were used as well as questions on sociodemographic characteristics and OHRQoL and health related behaviors. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to obtain OR of relationships between occupational contexts, affectionate support and positive social interaction on the one hand, and oral health quality of life, using the Oral Health Impacts Profile (OHIP) measure, adjusted for age, ethnicity, family income, schooling, marital status and social class. Results There was a modifying effect of positive social interaction on the odds of occupational context on OHRQoL. The odds of having a poorer OHIP score, ≥4, was significantly higher for women with home-based social networks and moderate levels of positive social interactions [OR 1.64 (95% CI: 1.08-2.48)], and for women with home-based social networks and low levels of positive social interactions [OR 2.15 (95% CI: 1.40-3.30)] compared with women with work-based social networks and high levels of positive social interactions. Black ethnicity was associated with OHIP scores ≥4 [OR 1.73 (95% CI: 1.23-2.42)]. Conclusions Pregnant and post

  9. Association of Piebaldism, multiple café-au-lait macules, and intertriginous freckling: clinical evidence of a common pathway between KIT and sprouty-related, ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Dugan, Stefanie; Basel, Donald; Siegel, Dawn H

    2013-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare genodermatosis caused by KIT mutations. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who had the white forelock and leukoderma of piebaldism, but the presence of many café-au-lait macules and axillary and inguinal freckling complicated the diagnosis. Patients with similar cutaneous findings have been previously reported, and their disorder has been attributed to an overlap of piebaldism and neurofibromatosis type 1. Legius syndrome is a recently described syndrome caused by Sprouty-related, Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1) mutations that also has multiple café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling. Based on our current understanding of KIT and SPRED1 protein interactions, we propose that café-au-lait macules and freckling may be seen in some patients with piebaldism and does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1.

  10. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective.

  11. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  12. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  13. Bias/Variance Analysis for Relational Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-15

    EDtr ,Dte,t[L(t, y)] = EDtr ,Dte,t[(t − y)2] = Et[(t − E[t])2] + EDtr ,Dte...y − E[t])2] = NT (x) + EDtr ,Dte[(y − EDtr ,Dte[y] + EDtr ,Dte[y]− E[t])2] = NT (x) + EDtr ,Dte[(y − EDtr ,Dte[y])2 + ( EDtr ,Dte[y]− E[t])2 + 2(y − EDtr ,Dte...y]) · ( EDtr ,Dte[y]− E[t])] = NT (x) + EDtr ,Dte[(y − EDtr ,Dte[y])2] + ( EDtr ,Dte[y]− E[t])2 = NT (x) + VT (x) + BT (x) In this decomposition the

  14. Three genes expressing Kunitz domains in the epididymis are related to genes of WFDC-type protease inhibitors and semen coagulum proteins in spite of lacking similarity between their protein products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously identified a locus on human chromosome 20q13.1, encompassing related genes of postulated WFDC-type protease inhibitors and semen coagulum proteins. Three of the genes with WFDC motif also coded for the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor motif. In this report, we have reinvestigated the locus for homologous genes encoding Kunitz motif only. The identified genes have been analyzed with respect to structure, expression and function. Results We identified three novel genes; SPINT3, SPINT4 and SPINT5, and the structure of their transcripts were determined by sequencing of DNA generated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Each gene encodes a Kunitz domain preceded by a typical signal peptide sequence, which indicates that the proteins of 7.6, 8.7, and 9.7 kDa are secreted. Analysis of transcripts in 26 tissues showed that the genes predominantly are expressed in the epididymis. The recombinantly produced proteins could not inhibit the amidolytic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin, thrombin, coagulation factor Xa, elastase, urokinase and prostate specific antigen, whereas similarly made bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) had the same bioactivity as the protein isolated from bovine pancreas. Conclusions The similar organization, chromosomal location and site of expression, suggests that the novel genes are homologous with the genes of WFDC-type protease inhibitors and semen coagulum proteins, despite the lack of similarity in primary structure of their protein products. Their restricted expression to the epididymis suggests that they could be important for male reproduction. The recombinantly produced proteins are presumably bioactive, as demonstrated with similarly made BPTI, but may have a narrower spectrum of inhibition, as indicated by the lacking activity against eight proteases with differing specificity. Another possibility is that they have lost the protease inhibiting properties, which is typical of Kunitz domains, in

  15. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  16. A Domain Analysis Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Bauhaus , a prototype CASE workstation for D-SAPS development. [ARAN88A] Guillermo F. Arango. Domain Engineering for Software Reuse. PhD thesis...34 VITA90B: Domain Analysis within the ISEC Rapid Center 48 CMU/SEI-90-SR-3 Appendix III Alphabetical by Organization/Project BAUHAUS * ALLE87A

  17. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  18. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  19. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  20. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  1. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  2. Extra domains in secondary transport carriers and channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Barabote, Ravi D; Tamang, Dorjee G; Abeywardena, Shannon N; Fallah, Neda S; Fu, Jeffrey Yu Chung; Lio, Jeffrey K; Mirhosseini, Pegah; Pezeshk, Ronnie; Podell, Sheila; Salampessy, Marnae L; Thever, Mark D; Saier, Milton H

    2006-10-01

    "Extra" domains in members of the families of secondary transport carrier and channel proteins provide secondary functions that expand, amplify or restrict the functional nature of these proteins. Domains in secondary carriers include TrkA and SPX domains in DASS family members, DedA domains in TRAP-T family members (both of the IT superfamily), Kazal-2 and PDZ domains in OAT family members (of the MF superfamily), USP, IIA(Fru) and TrkA domains in ABT family members (of the APC superfamily), ricin domains in OST family members, and TrkA domains in AAE family members. Some transporters contain highly hydrophilic domains consisting of multiple repeat units that can also be found in proteins of dissimilar function. Similarly, transmembrane alpha-helical channel-forming proteins contain unique, conserved, hydrophilic domains, most of which are not found in carriers. In some cases the functions of these domains are known. They may be ligand binding domains, phosphorylation domains, signal transduction domains, protein/protein interaction domains or complex carbohydrate-binding domains. These domains mediate regulation, subunit interactions, or subcellular targeting. Phylogenetic analyses show that while some of these domains are restricted to closely related proteins derived from specific organismal types, others are nearly ubiquitous within a particular family of transporters and occur in a tremendous diversity of organisms. The former probably became associated with the transporters late in the evolutionary process; the latter probably became associated with the carriers much earlier. These domains can be located at either end of the transporter or in a central region, depending on the domain and transporter family. These studies provide useful information about the evolution of extra domains in channels and secondary carriers and provide novel clues concerning function.

  3. XML Based Markup Languages for Specific Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varde, Aparna; Rundensteiner, Elke; Fahrenholz, Sally

    A challenging area in web based support systems is the study of human activities in connection with the web, especially with reference to certain domains. This includes capturing human reasoning in information retrieval, facilitating the exchange of domain-specific knowledge through a common platform and developing tools for the analysis of data on the web from a domain expert's angle. Among the techniques and standards related to such work, we have XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This serves as a medium of communication for storing and publishing textual, numeric and other forms of data seamlessly. XML tag sets are such that they preserve semantics and simplify the understanding of stored information by users. Often domain-specific markup languages are designed using XML, with a user-centric perspective. Standardization bodies and research communities may extend these to include additional semantics of areas within and related to the domain. This chapter outlines the issues to be considered in developing domain-specific markup languages: the motivation for development, the semantic considerations, the syntactic constraints and other relevant aspects, especially taking into account human factors. Illustrating examples are provided from domains such as Medicine, Finance and Materials Science. Particular emphasis in these examples is on the Materials Markup Language MatML and the semantics of one of its areas, namely, the Heat Treating of Materials. The focus of this chapter, however, is not the design of one particular language but rather the generic issues concerning the development of domain-specific markup languages.

  4. Misexpression of AtTX12 encoding a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain induces growth defects and expression of defense-related genes partially independently of EDS1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Kee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a tissue-specific GAL4/UAS activation tagging system was used for the characterization of genes which could induce lethality when ubiquitously expressed. A dominant mutant exhibiting stunted growth was isolated and named defective root development 1-D (drd1-D). The T-DNA tag was located within the promoter region of AtTX12, which is predicted to encode a truncated nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) protein, containing a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The transcript levels of AtTX12 and defense-related genes were elevated in drd1-D, and the misexpression of AtTX12 recapitulated the drd1-D phenotypes. In the presence of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), a key transducer of signals triggered by TIR-type NLRs, a low-level of AtTX12 misexpression induced strong defective phenotypes including seedling lethality whereas, in the absence of EDS1, a high-level of AtTX12 misexpression induced weak growth defects like dwarfism, suggesting that AtTX12 might function mainly in an EDS1-dependent and partially in an EDS1-independent manner. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(12): 693–698] PMID:27802841

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica rapa MATH-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liming; Huang, Yong; Hu, Yan; He, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenhui; Liu, Chunlin; Ruan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel β-helices involved in protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 90 MATH-domain proteins from the Brassica rapa genome. By sequence analysis together with MATH-domain proteins from other species, the B. rapa MATH-domain proteins can be grouped into 6 classes. Class-I protein has one or several MATH domains without any other recognizable domain; Class-II protein contains a MATH domain together with a conserved BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-Brac ) domain; Class-III protein belongs to the MATH/Filament domain family; Class-IV protein contains a MATH domain frequently combined with some other domains; Class-V protein has a relative long sequence but contains only one MATH domain; Class-VI protein is characterized by the presence of Peptidase and UBQ (Ubiquitinylation) domains together with one MATH domain. As part of our study regarding seed development of B. rapa, six genes are screened by SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and their expression levels are analyzed in combination with seed developmental stages, and expression patterns suggested that Bra001786, Bra03578 and Bra036572 may be seed development specific genes, while Bra001787, Bra020541 and Bra040904 may be involved in seed and flower organ development. This study provides the first characterization of the MATH domain proteins in B. rapa PMID:24179444

  6. The Plant Growth Regulator Daminozide is a Selective Inhibitor of the Human KDM2/7 Histone Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Nathan R.; Woon, Esther C.Y.; Tumber, Anthony; Walport, Louise J.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Li, Xuan Shirley; King, Oliver N.F.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Ng, Stanley S.; Krojer, Tobias; Chan, Mun Chiang; Rydzik, Anna M.; Hopkinson, Richard J.; Che, Ka Hing; Daniel, Michelle; Strain-Damerell, Claire; Gileadi, Carina; Kochan, Grazyna; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Dunford, James; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Burgess-Brown, Nicola; von Delft, Frank; Muller, Susanne; Marsden, Brian; Brennan, Paul E.; McDonough, Michael A.; Oppermann, Udo; Klose, Robert J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-01-01

    The JmjC oxygenases catalyse the N-demethylation of Nε-methyl lysine residues in histones and are current therapeutic targets. A set of 2-oxoglutarate analogues were screened using a unified assay platform for JmjC demethylases and related oxygenases. Results led to the finding that daminozide (N-(dimethylamino)succinamic acid, 160 Da), a plant growth regulator, selectively inhibits the KDM2/7 JmjC subfamily. Kinetic and crystallographic studies reveal daminozide chelates the active site metal via its hydrazide carbonyl and dimethylamino groups. PMID:22724510

  7. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  8. Biology and Beyond: Domain Specificity in a Broader Developmental Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keil, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    The assumption of domain specificity has been invaluable to the study of the emergence of biological thought in young children. Yet, domains of thought must be understood within a broader context that explains how those domains relate to the surrounding cultures, to different kinds of cognitive constraints, to framing effects, to abilities to…

  9. Changing Your Domain Name in 25 Nail-Biting Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Carol

    2012-01-01

    When staff at the Wisconsin State Law Library began compiling a wish list for a new website, the topic of a new domain name came up almost immediately. Their old website was located at http://wsll.state.wi.us. Spelling that relatively complex domain over the phone day after day provided the impetus to explore other options. Whatever domain name…

  10. Certifying Domain-Specific Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proof-checking code for compliance to safety policies potentially enables a product-oriented approach to certain aspects of software certification. To date, previous research has focused on generic, low-level programming-language properties such as memory type safety. In this paper we consider proof-checking higher-level domain -specific properties for compliance to safety policies. The paper first describes a framework related to abstract interpretation in which compliance to a class of certification policies can be efficiently calculated Membership equational logic is shown to provide a rich logic for carrying out such calculations, including partiality, for certification. The architecture for a domain-specific certifier is described, followed by an implemented case study. The case study considers consistency of abstract variable attributes in code that performs geometric calculations in Aerospace systems.

  11. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  12. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  13. Generation and characterization of ABBV642, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin molecule (DVD-Ig) that potently neutralizes VEGF and PDGF-BB and is designed for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Kun; Eaton, Lucia; Bowley, Diana; Rieser, Matthew; Chang, Qing; Harris, Maria C; Clabbers, Anca; Dong, Feng; Shen, Jikui; Hackett, Sean F; Touw, Debra S; Bixby, Jacqueline; Zhong, Suju; Benatuil, Lorenzo; Bose, Sahana; Grinnell, Christine; Preston, Gregory M; Iyer, Ramesh; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Marchie, Susan; Overmeyer, Gary; Ghayur, Tariq; van Riet, Deborah A; Tang, Shibo; Campochario, Peter A; Gu, Jijie

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of moderate and severe vision loss in developed countries. Intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A)-neutralizing proteins provide substantial benefit, but frequent, long-term injections are needed. In addition, many patients experience initial visual gains that are ultimately lost due to subretinal fibrosis. Preclinical studies and early phase clinical trials suggest that combined suppression of VEGF and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) provides better outcomes than suppression of VEGF alone, due to more frequent regression of neovascularization (NV) and suppression of subretinal fibrosis. We generated a dual variable domain immunoglobulin molecule, ABBV642 that specifically and potently binds and neutralizes VEGF and PDGF-BB. ABBV642 has been optimized for treatment of exudative AMD based on the following design characteristics: 1) high affinity binding to all VEGF-A isoforms and both soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated PDGF-BB; 2) potential for extended residence time in the vitreous cavity to decrease the frequency of intraocular injections; 3) rapid clearance from systemic circulation compared with molecules with wild type Fc region for normal FcRn binding, which may reduce the risk of systemic complications; and 4) low risk of potential effector function. The bispecificity of ABBV642 allows for a single injection of a single therapeutic agent, and thus a more streamlined development and regulatory path compared with combination products. In a mouse model of exudative AMD, ABBV642 was observed to be more effective than aflibercept. ABBV642 has potential to improve efficacy with reduced injection frequency in patients with exudative AMD, thereby reducing the enormous disease burden for patients and society.

  14. The ASH1-RELATED3 SET-Domain Protein Controls Cell Division Competence of the Meristem and the Quiescent Center of the Arabidopsis Primary Root1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumpf, Robert; Thorstensen, Tage; Rahman, Mohummad Aminur; Heyman, Jefri; Nenseth, H. Zeynep; Lammens, Tim; Herrmann, Ullrich; Swarup, Ranjan; Veiseth, Silje Veie; Emberland, Gitika; Bennett, Malcolm J.; De Veylder, Lieven; Aalen, Reidunn B.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell niche of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) primary root apical meristem is composed of the quiescent (or organizing) center surrounded by stem (initial) cells for the different tissues. Initial cells generate a population of transit-amplifying cells that undergo a limited number of cell divisions before elongating and differentiating. It is unclear whether these divisions occur stochastically or in an orderly manner. Using the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine to monitor DNA replication of cells of Arabidopsis root meristems, we identified a pattern of two, four, and eight neighboring cells with synchronized replication along the cortical, epidermal, and endodermal cell files, suggested to be daughters, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters of the direct progeny of each stem cell. Markers of mitosis and cytokinesis were not present in the region closest to the transition zone where the cells start to elongate, suggesting that great-granddaughter cells switch synchronously from the mitotic cell cycle to endoreduplication. Mutations in the stem cell niche-expressed ASH1-RELATED3 (ASHR3) gene, encoding a SET-domain protein conferring histone H3 lysine-36 methylation, disrupted this pattern of coordinated DNA replication and cell division and increased the cell division rate in the quiescent center. E2Fa/E2Fb transcription factors controlling the G1-to-S-phase transition regulate ASHR3 expression and bind to the ASHR3 promoter, substantiating a role for ASHR3 in cell division control. The reduced length of the root apical meristem and primary root of the mutant ashr3-1 indicate that synchronization of replication and cell divisions is required for normal root growth and development. PMID:25034019

  15. The bldC Developmental Locus of Streptomyces coelicolor Encodes a Member of a Family of Small DNA-Binding Proteins Related to the DNA-Binding Domains of the MerR Family

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Alison C.; Servín-González, Luis; Kelemen, Gabriella H.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    The bldC locus, required for formation of aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor, was localized by map-based cloning to the overlap between cosmids D17 and D25 of a minimal ordered library. Subcloning and sequencing showed that bldC encodes a member of a previously unrecognized family of small (58- to 78-residue) DNA-binding proteins, related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family of transcriptional activators. BldC family members are found in a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Constructed ΔbldC mutants were defective in differentiation and antibiotic production. They failed to form an aerial mycelium on minimal medium and showed severe delays in aerial mycelium formation on rich medium. In addition, they failed to produce the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin, and bldC was shown to be required for normal and sustained transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene actII-orf4. Although ΔbldC mutants produced the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin, transcripts of the pathway-specific activator gene (redD) were reduced to almost undetectable levels after 48 h in the bldC mutant, in contrast to the bldC+ parent strain in which redD transcription continued during aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. This suggests that bldC may be required for maintenance of redD transcription during differentiation. bldC is expressed from a single promoter. S1 nuclease protection assays and immunoblotting showed that bldC is constitutively expressed and that transcription of bldC does not depend on any of the other known bld genes. The bldC18 mutation that originally defined the locus causes a Y49C substitution that results in instability of the protein. PMID:15629942

  16. The bldC developmental locus of Streptomyces coelicolor encodes a member of a family of small DNA-binding proteins related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Alison C; Servín-González, Luis; Kelemen, Gabriella H; Buttner, Mark J

    2005-01-01

    The bldC locus, required for formation of aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor, was localized by map-based cloning to the overlap between cosmids D17 and D25 of a minimal ordered library. Subcloning and sequencing showed that bldC encodes a member of a previously unrecognized family of small (58- to 78-residue) DNA-binding proteins, related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family of transcriptional activators. BldC family members are found in a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Constructed DeltabldC mutants were defective in differentiation and antibiotic production. They failed to form an aerial mycelium on minimal medium and showed severe delays in aerial mycelium formation on rich medium. In addition, they failed to produce the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin, and bldC was shown to be required for normal and sustained transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene actII-orf4. Although DeltabldC mutants produced the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin, transcripts of the pathway-specific activator gene (redD) were reduced to almost undetectable levels after 48 h in the bldC mutant, in contrast to the bldC+ parent strain in which redD transcription continued during aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. This suggests that bldC may be required for maintenance of redD transcription during differentiation. bldC is expressed from a single promoter. S1 nuclease protection assays and immunoblotting showed that bldC is constitutively expressed and that transcription of bldC does not depend on any of the other known bld genes. The bldC18 mutation that originally defined the locus causes a Y49C substitution that results in instability of the protein.

  17. The effects of domain knowledge on metacomprehension accuracy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Thomas D; Jee, Benjamin D; Wiley, Jennifer

    2009-10-01

    In the present research, we examined the relationship between readers' domain knowledge and their ability to judge their comprehension of novel domain-related material. Participants with varying degrees of baseball knowledge read five texts on baseball-related topics and five texts on non-baseball-related topics, predicted their performance, and completed tests for each text. Baseball knowledge was positively related to absolute accuracy within the baseball domain but was unrelated to relative accuracy within the baseball domain. Also, the readers showed a general underconfidence bias, but the bias was less extreme for higher knowledge readers. The results challenge common assumptions that experts' metacognitive judgments are less accurate than novices'. Results involving topic familiarity ratings and a no-reading control group suggest that higher knowledge readers are not more likely to ignore text-specific cues in favor of a domain familiarity heuristic, but they do appear to make more effective use of domain familiarity in predicting absolute performance levels.

  18. Construction of Galerkin's matrix for elementary potentials and an ellipsoidal solution domain based on series developments and general relations between Legendre's functions of the first and the second kind: Application in Earth's gravity field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holota, Petr; Nesvadba, Otakar

    2016-04-01

    The role of boundary value problems in physical geodesy and in Earth's gravity field studies in particular is well-known. The paper focuses on Neumann's problem formulated for the exterior of an oblate ellipsoid of revolution as this is considered a basis for an iteration solution of the linear gravimetric boundary value problem in the determination of the disturbing potential. The approach follows the concept of variational methods and the notion of the weak solution. Hence Galerkin's approximations are applied, which means that the solution of the problem is approximated by linear combinations of basis functions with scalar coefficients. Our aim is to discuss the construction of Galerkin's matrix for basis functions generated by elementary potentials. Possibly, the computation of the entries of Galerkin's matrix is expected to be very simple for the elementary functions like these. Nevertheless, the opposite is true. Ellipsoidal harmonics are applied as a natural tool and elementary potentials are expressed by means of series of ellipsoidal harmonics. The problem, however, is the summation of the series that represent the entries of Galerkin's matrix. It is difficult to reduce the number of summation indices since in the ellipsoidal case there is no analogue to the addition theorem known for spherical harmonics. This makes the computation of Galerkin's matrix rather demanding. Therefore, the straightforward application of series of ellipsoidal harmonics is complemented by deeper relations contained in the theory of ordinary differential equations of second order and Legendre's functions. Subsequently, hypergeometric functions and series are used. Moreover, within some approximations the entries are split into parts. Some of the resulting series may be summed relatively easily, apart from technical tricks. For the remaining series the summation needs more complex tools. It was converted to elliptic integrals. The approach made it possible to deduce a closed

  19. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  20. Optimal domain decomposition strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Yonghyun; Soni, Bharat K.

    1995-01-01

    The primary interest of the authors is in the area of grid generation, in particular, optimal domain decomposition about realistic configurations. A grid generation procedure with optimal blocking strategies has been developed to generate multi-block grids for a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The focus of this study is the domain decomposition which optimizes solution algorithm/block compatibility based on geometrical complexities as well as the physical characteristics of flow field. The progress realized in this study is summarized in this paper.

  1. Walking droplets in confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A millimetric liquid drop can walk spontaneously along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled by a resonant interaction with its own wave field. These walking droplets exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. We here explore experimentally the dynamics and statistics of this macroscopic wave-particle system in confined domains, or 'corrals'. Particular attention is given to characterizing the influence of the corral geometry on the emergent probability distributions. The relation to analogous quantum systems (specifically, quantum corrals, the quantum mirage and scarring in Bose-Einstein condensates) is discussed. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. The Domains of TESOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, Betty Wallace

    The domains of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) are those spheres of concern involving persons who speak languages other than English or dialects of English other than the standard. This clientele has been classified traditionally in terms of programs in English as a foreign language, English as a second language, English…

  4. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  5. Time-domain flicker measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miseli, Joseph

    1999-04-01

    The visibility of flicker on a display depends upon many factors, including the observer's sensitivity to flicker. Whenever flicker is observed, it is probably undesirable and often unacceptable. Much has been written about flicker, its perception, and its variability. Methods have been presented to the industry that use frequency domain analysis of measured flicker response. Here we prose an alternate method to quantify flicker in the time domain, just as people see it, and we will try to understand how the measurements relate to what people see. Both the frequency domain and time domain flicker measurements can be found in the Video Electronics Standards Association Flat Panel Display Measurements Standard. An attempt is made to compare the two methods and show how the simpler measurement can be employed for many display technologies.

  6. Magnetic domain and domain wall in Co/Pt multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, A.; Mohanty, J.

    2016-05-01

    We report systematic micromagnetic investigation of formation of magnetic domains in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer with the variation in magnetic anisotropy and stack thickness. The lowering of anisotropy makes the domain wall broader and domain formation less efficient. Domain sizeincreases with increasing thickness of the stack to minimize the stray field energy.The minimization of energy of the system due to domain formation makes the M-H loop narrower whereas, lower stack thickness results in a wider loop. The magnetization reversalin this system occurs due tothe nucleation and growth of reverse domains.

  7. Conducting Ferroelectric Walls, Domain Topology, and Domain Switching Kinetics in a Hybrid Improper Ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Sang-Wook; Rutgers CenterEmergent Materials Team

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric domain walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 , across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric domain walls can be highly conducting but energetically unfavored; however, they were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 single crystals. From the exploration of antiphase domain boundaries, which are hidden in piezoresponse force microscopy, using dark-field electron microscopy, we have explored the macroscopic topology of polarization domains and antiphase domains. We found that the macroscopic domain topology is directly responsible for the presence of charged domain walls, and is closely related with the polarization domain switching mechanism in (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 . Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

  8. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  9. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sai; Collett, Michael; Robinson, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD). Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis. PMID:26659814

  10. An inhibitor domain in Sp3 regulates its glutamine-rich activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Dennig, J; Beato, M; Suske, G

    1996-01-01

    Sp3 is a ubiquitously expressed human transcription factor closely related to Sp1 and Sp4. All three proteins contain a highly conserved DNA binding domain and two glutamine-rich regions, suggesting that they possess similar activation functions. In our previous experiments, however, Sp3 failed to activate transcription. Instead, it repressed Sp1-mediated transcriptional activation, suggesting that it is an inhibitory member of this family of regulatory factors. Here we show that Sp3 can also act as a positive regulator of transcription. The glutamine-rich domains on their own have a strong activation function and interact with the TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor dTAFII110. However, in full-length Sp3 as well as in Gal4-Sp3 fusion proteins, both activation domains are silenced by an inhibitory domain located between the second glutamine-rich region and the DNA binding domain. The inhibitory domain completely suppressed transcriptional activation when fused to a heterologous glutamine-rich domain but only moderately suppressed transcription when linked to an acidic activation domain. Site-directed mutagenesis identified a stretch of highly charged amino acid residues essential for inhibitor function. Substitution of the amino acid triplet KEE by alanine residues within this region changed the almost transcriptionally inactive Sp3 into a strong activator. Our results suggest that the transcriptional activity of Sp3 might be regulated in vivo by relief of inhibition. Images PMID:8896459

  11. Circular permutation of betaB2-crystallin changes the hierarchy of domain assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, G.; Basak, A. K.; Wieligmann, K.; Mayr, E. M.; Slingsby, C.

    1998-01-01

    The betagamma-crystallins form a superfamily of eye lens proteins comprised of multiple Greek motifs that are symmetrically organized into domains and higher assemblies. In the betaB2-crystallin dimer each polypeptide folds into two similar domains that are related to monomeric gamma-crystallin by domain swapping. The crystal structure of the circularly permuted two-domain betaB2 polypeptide shows that permutation converts intermolecular domain pairing into intramolecular pairing. However, the dimeric permuted protein is, in fact, half a native tetramer. This result shows how the sequential order of domains in multi-domain proteins can affect quaternary domain assembly. PMID:9655330

  12. Crystal structure of domain-swapped STE20 OSR1 kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2009-09-15

    OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive-1) and SPAK (Ste20/Sps1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) belong to the GCK-VI subfamily of Ste20 group kinases. OSR1 and SPAK are key regulators of NKCCs (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporters) and activated by WNK family members (with-no-lysine kinase), mutations of which are known to cause Gordon syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of inherited hypertension. The crystal structure of OSR1 kinase domain has been solved at 2.25 {angstrom}. OSR1 forms a domain-swapped dimer in an inactive conformation, in which P+1 loop and {alpha}EF helix are swapped between dimer-related monomers. Structural alignment with nonswapped Ste20 TAO2 kinase indicates that the integrity of chemical interactions in the kinase domain is well preserved in the domain-swapped interfaces. The OSR1 kinase domain has now been added to a growing list of domain-swapped protein kinases recently reported, suggesting that the domain-swapping event provides an additional layer of complexity in regulating protein kinase activity.

  13. Joining RDC data from flexible protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgheri, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We study the inverse problem of determining the conformational freedom of two protein domains from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements. For each paramagnetic ion attached to one of the domains we obtain a magnetic susceptibility tensor χ from the RDC of couples of atoms of that domain, and a mean paramagnetic susceptibility tensor {\\bar{\\chi }} from the RDC of couples of atoms of the other domain. The latter is an integral average of rotations of χ which depends on the conformational freedom of the two domains. In this paper we consider the case when we have data from paramagnetic ions attached separately to each of the domains. We prove that in this case not all the elements of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} are independent. We derive the mathematical equations for the compatibility of the measurements and show how these relations can be used in the presence of noisy data to determine a compatible set of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} with an unconstrained minimization. If available, information about the shape of the noise can be included in the target function. We show that in this case the compatible set obtained has a reduced error with respect to the noisy data.

  14. Incubational domain characterization in lightly doped ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; John Auchterlonie, Graeme; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2012-08-15

    Microstructures of both Gd- and Y-doped ceria with different doping level (i.e., 10 at% and 25 at%) have been comprehensively characterized by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Coherent nano-sized domains can be widely observed in heavily doped ceria. Nevertheless, it was found that a large amount of dislocations actually exist in lightly doped ceria instead of heavily doped ones. Furthermore, incubational domains can be detected in lightly doped ceria, with dislocations located at the interfaces. The interactions between such linear dislocations and dopant defects have been simulated accordingly. As a consequence, the formation mechanism of incubational domains is rationalized in terms of the interaction between intrinsic dislocations of doped ceria and dopant defects. This study offers the insights into the initial state and related mechanism of the formation of nano-sized domains, which have been widely observed in heavily rare-earth-doped ceria in recent years. - Graphical abstract: Interactions between dislocations and dopants lead to incubational domain formation in lightly doped ceria. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures were characterized in both heavily and light Gd-/Y-doped ceria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocations are existed in lightly doped ceria rather than heavily doped one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions between dislocations and dopant defects were simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of dislocation associated incubational domain is rationalized.

  15. Multi-domain training enhances attentional control.

    PubMed

    Binder, Julia C; Martin, Mike; Zöllig, Jacqueline; Röcke, Christina; Mérillat, Susan; Eschen, Anne; Jäncke, Lutz; Shing, Yee Lee

    2016-06-01

    Multi-domain training potentially increases the likelihood of overlap in processing components with transfer tasks and everyday life, and hence is a promising training approach for older adults. To empirically test this, 84 healthy older adults aged 64 to 75 years were randomly assigned to one of three single-domain training conditions (inhibition, visuomotor function, spatial navigation) or to the simultaneous training of all three cognitive functions (multi-domain training condition). All participants trained on an iPad at home for 50 training sessions. Before and after the training, and at a 6-month follow-up measurement, cognitive functioning and training transfer were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery including tests targeting the trained functions (near transfer) and transfer to executive functions (far transfer: attentional control, working memory, speed). Participants in all four training groups showed a linear increase in training performance over the 50 training sessions. Using a latent difference score model, the multi-domain training group, compared with the single-domain training groups, showed more improvement on the far transfer attentional control composite. Individuals with initially lower baseline performance showed higher training-related improvements, indicating that training compensated for lower initial cognitive performance. At the 6-month follow-up, performance on the cognitive test battery remained stable. This is one of the first studies to investigate systematically multi-domain training including comparable single-domain training conditions. Our findings suggest that multi-domain training enhances attentional control involved in handling several different tasks at the same time, an aspect in everyday life that is particularly challenging for older people. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Sensor domains of two-component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jonah; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2010-04-01

    Two-component systems regulate crucial cellular processes in microorganisms, and each comprises a homodimeric histidine kinase receptor and a cytoplasmic response regulator. Histidine kinases, often membrane associated, detect environmental input at sensor domains and propagate resulting signals to catalytic cytoplasmic transmitter domains. Recent studies on the great diversity of sensor domains reveal patterns of domain organization and biochemical properties that provide insight into mechanisms of signaling. Despite the enormous sequence variability found within sensor input domains, they fall into a relatively small number of discrete structural classes. Subtle rearrangements along a structurally labile dimer interface, in the form of possible sliding or rotational motions, are propagated from the sensor domain to the transmitter domain to modulate activity of the receptor.

  17. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  18. Public Domain Generic Tools: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erjavec, Tomaz

    This paper presents an introduction to language engineering software, especially for computerized language and text corpora. The focus of the paper is on small and relatively independent pieces of software designed for specific, often low-level language analysis tasks, and on tools in the public domain. Discussion begins with the application of…

  19. Space Domain Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    information required to characterize a space object. Another key parameter to be considered is the frequency of observation. This sampling rate varies...useful to define the values of these parameters that approximate the current and future state of the space domain. The current catalog and network... Parameters used in estimating data needs for SDA Current Threshold Objective βmo , βimg 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb Number of Objects (Na , Np

  20. Structure of a double-domain phosphagen kinase reveals an asymmetric arrangement of the tandem domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiming; Qiao, Zhu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2015-04-01

    Tandem duplications and fusions of single genes have led to magnificent expansions in the divergence of protein structures and functions over evolutionary timescales. One of the possible results is polydomain enzymes with interdomain cooperativities, few examples of which have been structurally characterized at the full-length level to explore their innate synergistic mechanisms. This work reports the crystal structures of a double-domain phosphagen kinase in both apo and ligand-bound states, revealing a novel asymmetric L-shaped arrangement of the two domains. Unexpectedly, the interdomain connections are not based on a flexible hinge linker but on a rigid secondary-structure element: a long α-helix that tethers the tandem domains in relatively fixed positions. Besides the connective helix, the two domains also contact each other directly and form an interdomain interface in which hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions further stabilize the L-shaped domain arrangement. Molecular-dynamics simulations show that the interface is generally stable, suggesting that the asymmetric domain arrangement crystallographically observed in the present study is not a conformational state simply restrained by crystal-packing forces. It is possible that the asymmetrically arranged tandem domains could provide a structural basis for further studies of the interdomain synergy.

  1. Simplicity and Specificity in Language: Domain-General Biases Have Domain-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Kirby, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which the linguistic system—its architecture, the representations it operates on, the constraints it is subject to—is specific to language has broad implications for cognitive science and its relation to evolutionary biology. Importantly, a given property of the linguistic system can be “specific” to the domain of language in several ways. For example, if the property evolved by natural selection under the pressure of the linguistic function it serves then the property is domain-specific in the sense that its design is tailored for language. Equally though, if that property evolved to serve a different function or if that property is domain-general, it may nevertheless interact with the linguistic system in a way that is unique. This gives a second sense in which a property can be thought of as specific to language. An evolutionary approach to the language faculty might at first blush appear to favor domain-specificity in the first sense, with individual properties of the language faculty being specifically linguistic adaptations. However, we argue that interactions between learning, culture, and biological evolution mean any domain-specific adaptations that evolve will take the form of weak biases rather than hard constraints. Turning to the latter sense of domain-specificity, we highlight a very general bias, simplicity, which operates widely in cognition and yet interacts with linguistic representations in domain-specific ways. PMID:26793132

  2. NMR studies of the R2 repeat and related peptide fragments of the DNA binding domain of c-Myb. New light on the structure and folding of R2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ségalas, I.; Desjardins, S.; Oulyadi, H.; Prigent, Y.; Tribouillard, S.; Bernardi, E.; Schoofs, A. R.; Davoust1, D.; Toma, F.

    1999-10-01

    The solution structure of the R2 repeat of the DNA binding domain of the protooncogene c-Myb contains a N-terminal structural motif comprising two antiparallel helices. The motif is stabilized by interactions involving conserved residues. The recognition region in C-terminal position is flexible. This structure differs from that of R2 of another c-Myb protein. La structure en solution de la répétition R2 du domaine de liaison à l'ADN du protooncogène c-Myb possède un motif à deux hélices antiparallèles dans la moitié N-terminale, stabilisé par des interactions entre résidus conservés. La région de reconnaissance à l'ADN en position C-terminale est flexible. Cette structure diffère de celle montrée pour la répétition R2 d'une autre protéine c-Myb.

  3. Sprouty-related Ena/Vasodilator-stimulated Phosphoprotein Homology 1-Domain-containing Protein (SPRED1), a Tyrosine-Protein Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 11 (SHP2) Substrate in the Ras/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar-Audelo, Martina; Yusoff, Permeen; Sinniah, Saravanan; Chandramouli, Sumana; Guy, Graeme R.

    2011-01-01

    SHP2 is a tyrosine phosphatase involved in the activation of the Ras/ERK signaling pathway downstream of a number of receptor tyrosine kinases. One of the proposed mechanisms involving SHP2 in this context is to dephosphorylate and inactivate inhibitors of the Ras/ERK pathway. Two protein families bearing a unique, common domain, Sprouty and SPRED proteins, are possible candidates because they have been reported to inhibit the Ras/ERK pathway upon FGF activation. We tested whether any of these proteins are likely substrates of SHP2. Our findings indicate that Sprouty2 binds to the C-terminal tail of SHP2, which is an unlikely substrate binding site, whereas SPRED proteins bind to the tyrosine phosphatase domain that is known to be the binding site for its substrates. Overexpressed SHP2 was able to dephosphorylate SPREDs but not Sprouty2. Finally, we found two tyrosine residues on SPRED1 that are required, when phosphorylated, to inhibit Ras/ERK activation and identified Tyr-420 as a specific dephosphorylation target of SHP2. The evidence obtained indicates that SPRED1 is a likely substrate of SHP2, whose tyrosine dephosphorylation is required to attenuate the inhibitory action of SPRED1 in the Ras/ERK pathway. PMID:21531714

  4. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins.

  5. Saccharomyces SRP RNA secondary structures: a conserved S-domain and extended Alu-domain.

    PubMed

    Van Nues, Rob W; Brown, Jeremy D

    2004-01-01

    The contribution made by the RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) to its function in protein targeting is poorly understood. We have generated a complete secondary structure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRP RNA, scR1. The structure conforms to that of other eukaryotic SRP RNAs. It is rod-shaped with, at opposite ends, binding sites for proteins required for the SRP functions of signal sequence recognition (S-domain) and translational elongation arrest (Alu-domain). Micrococcal nuclease digestion of purified S. cerevisiae SRP separated the S-domain of the RNA from the Alu-domain as a discrete fragment. The Alu-domain resolved into several stable fragments indicating a compact structure. Comparison of scR1 with SRP RNAs of five yeast species related to S. cerevisiae revealed the S-domain to be the most conserved region of the RNA. Extending data from nuclease digestion with phylogenetic comparison, we built the secondary structure model for scR1. The Alu-domain contains large extensions, including a sequence with hallmarks of an expansion segment. Evolutionarily conserved bases are placed in the Alu- and S-domains as in other SRP RNAs, the exception being an unusual GU(4)A loop closing the helix onto which the signal sequence binding Srp54p assembles (domain IV). Surprisingly, several mutations within the predicted Srp54p binding site failed to disrupt SRP function in vivo. However, the strength of the Srp54p-scR1 and, to a lesser extent, Sec65p-scR1 interaction was decreased in these mutant particles. The availability of a secondary structure for scR1 will facilitate interpretation of data from genetic analysis of the RNA.

  6. Swarming in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Motsch, Sébastien; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Vicsek model is a prototype for the emergence of collective motion. In free space, it is characterized by a swarm of particles all moving in the same direction. Since this dynamic does not include attraction among particles, the swarm, while aligning in velocity space, has no spatial coherence. Adding specular reflection at the boundaries generates global spatial coherence of the swarms while maintaining its velocity alignment. We investigate numerically how the geometry of the domain influences the Vicsek model using three type of geometry: a channel, a disk and a rectangle. Varying the parameters of the Vicsek model (e.g. noise levels and influence horizons), we discuss the mechanisms that generate spatial coherence and show how they create new dynamical solutions of the swarming motions in these geometries. Several observables are introduced to characterize the simulated patterns (e.g. mass profile, center of mass, connectivity of the swarm).

  7. Beyond the Number Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human cultures, and development. We then turn to the question of whether the ANS constitutes a specialized cognitive and neural domain--a question central to understanding how this system works, the nature of its evolutionary and developmental trajectory, and its physical instantiation in the brain. PMID:19131268

  8. Three Domains, Not Five Kingdoms: A Phylogenetic Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peirce, Susan K.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the Woesian three domain view of life should replace the five kingdom taxonomic scheme presented in most general biology texts and courses. Presents evidence for employing the three domain scheme and a related activity for classroom use. Contains 11 references. (WRM)

  9. 43 CFR 3101.2-1 - Public domain lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public domain lands. 3101.2-1 Section 3101.2-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 3101.2-1 Public domain lands. (a) No person or entity shall take, hold, own or control more than...

  10. Fifth Graders Metacognitive Knowledge: General or Domain-Specific?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuenhaus, Nora; Artelt, Cordula; Lingel, Klaus; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the structure of metacognitive knowledge in fifth grade pupils and its relation to school achievement. Since the structure of metacognitive knowledge is controversially discussed with little empirical evidence for either its domain specificity or its domain transferability, the debate remains…

  11. 43 CFR 3101.2-1 - Public domain lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public domain lands. 3101.2-1 Section 3101.2-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 3101.2-1 Public domain lands. (a) No person or entity shall take, hold, own or control more than...

  12. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section and length is developed for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  13. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  14. Classification of domain movements in proteins using dynamic contact graphs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: "free", "open-closed", "anchored", "sliding-twist", and "see-saw." A directed graph is introduced called the "Dynamic Contact Graph" which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.

  15. Domain specificity in social interactions, social thought, and social development.

    PubMed

    Turiel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) have taken good steps in formulating a domain-specific view of parent-child interactions. This commentary supports the introduction of domain specificity to analyses of parenting. Their formulation is an advance over formulations that characterized parental practices globally. This commentary calls for inclusion of definitions of the classification system of domain-specific interactions and criteria for each domain. It is also maintained that Grusec and Davidov's domains of social interaction imply that processes of development are involved, along with socialization; that bidirectionality in parent-child relations needs to be extended to include mutual influences and the construction of domains of social thought; and that conflicts and opposition within families coexist with compliance and social harmony.

  16. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  17. The evolution of filamin – A protein domain repeat perspective

    PubMed Central

    Light, Sara; Sagit, Rauan; Ithychanda, Sujay S.; Qin, Jun; Elofsson, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Particularly in higher eukaryotes, some protein domains are found in tandem repeats, performing broad functions often related to cellular organization. For instance, the eukaryotic protein filamin interacts with many proteins and is crucial for the cytoskeleton. The functional properties of long repeat domains are governed by the specific properties of each individual domain as well as by the repeat copy number. To provide better understanding of the evolutionary and functional history of repeating domains, we investigated the mode of evolution of the filamin domain in some detail. Among the domains that are common in long repeat proteins, sushi and spectrin domains evolve primarily through cassette tandem duplications while scavenger and immunoglobulin repeats appear to evolve through clustered tandem duplications. Additionally, immunoglobulin and filamin repeats exhibit a unique pattern where every other domain shows high sequence similarity. This pattern may be the result of tandem duplications, serve to avert aggregation between adjacent domains or it is the result of functional constraints. In filamin, our studies confirm the presence of interspersed integrin binding domains in vertebrates, while invertebrates exhibit more varied patterns, including more clustered integrin binding domains. The most notable case is leech filamin, which contains a 20 repeat expansion and exhibits unique dimerization topology. Clearly, invertebrate filamins are varied and contain examples of similar adjacent integrin-binding domains. Given that invertebrate integrin shows more similarity to the weaker filamin binder, integrin β3, it is possible that the distance between integrin-binding domains is not as crucial for invertebrate filamins as for vertebrates. PMID:22414427

  18. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  19. Domain view: a web tool for protein domain visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaokang; Bingman, Craig A; Wesenberg, Gary E; Sun, Zhaohui; Phillips, George N

    2010-12-01

    The identification of sequence-based protein domains and their boundaries is often a prelude to structure determination. An accurate prediction of disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences can improve the efficiency of selection in structural genomics and also aid in design of constructs for directed structural biology studies. At the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) we have developed DomainView, a web tool to visualize and analyze predicted protein domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences for selection of experimental protein structure attempts. DomainView consists of a relational database and a web graphical-user interface. The database was developed based on MySQL, which stores data from target protein sequences and their domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments. The program of the web user interface is a Perl CGI script. When a user searches for a target protein sequence, the script displays the combinational information about the domains and other features of that target sequence graphically on a web page by querying the database. The graphical representation for each feature is linked to a web page showing more detailed annotation information or to a new window directly running the corresponding prediction program to show further information about that feature.

  20. Regional Climate Model Sensitivity to Domain Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, M.; Laprise, R.

    2006-05-01

    change, the correlation improves in small-scale features, suggesting that their consistence is in some way helped by the increased correlation of the large-scale flow. A second effect of the domain size on small-scales is based on the fact that these scales need a spin-up time to fully develop from the low-resolution lateral boundary conditions. Variance-ratio maps show that the relative intensity of small-scales tend to grow from their entrance inside the domain until they reach the full amplitude of the Big-Brother variance. A spin-up zone is observed for small-scales of all examined fields (e.g. geopotential, temperature, relative humidity and relative vorticity). The spin-up area grows in size at higher levels where winds are stronger, suggesting that small-scale features are advected out of the domain area before they have time to fully develop.

  1. Mapping the Moral Domain

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  2. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  3. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Schymkowitz, Joost WH; Rousseau, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures. PMID:18842137

  4. The "Methyl-CpG Binding Domain protein 2" plays a repressive role in relation to the promoter CpG content in the normal human cell line MRC5.

    PubMed

    Perriaud, Laury; Lachuer, Joel; Dante, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In cancer cells, methylation-dependent gene silencing is at least partly mediated by the "Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain protein 2" (MBD2 protein), via the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. However this repressive role was poorly investigated in normal cells. To identify the genes repressed by MBD2 in these cells, we have determined the impact of MBD2 depletion on gene expression in human embryonic MRC5 fibroblasts, using RNA inference combined with microarray analysis. The up-regulation of some randomly selected genes was confirmed and a direct association between gene repression and MBD2 binding on methylated promoters associated to these genes was subsequently established. This control of gene expression appears to depend on the CpG content of promoters as MBD2 depletion was not sufficient to induce the expression of silent genes associated with High-CpG promoters, but it was required to achieve the methyl-dependent transcriptional locking of the genes associated with promoters exhibiting intermediate CpG content. Therefore, MBD2 seems to play a selective role in gene repression depending on the CpG content of the promoter regions.

  5. C1q/TNF-related Protein 4 (CTRP4) Is a Unique Secreted Protein with Two Tandem C1q Domains That Functions in the Hypothalamus to Modulate Food Intake and Body Weight*

    PubMed Central

    Byerly, Mardi S.; Petersen, Pia S.; Ramamurthy, Santosh; Seldin, Marcus M.; Lei, Xia; Provost, Elayne; Wei, Zhikui; Ronnett, Gabriele V.; Wong, G. William

    2014-01-01

    CTRP4 is a unique member of the C1q family, possessing two tandem globular C1q domains. Its physiological function is poorly defined. Here, we show that CTRP4 is an evolutionarily conserved, ∼34-kDa secretory protein expressed in the brain. In human, mouse, and zebrafish brain, CTRP4 expression begins early in development and is widespread in the central nervous system. Neurons, but not astrocytes, express and secrete CTRP4, and secreted proteins form higher-order oligomeric complexes. CTRP4 is also produced by peripheral tissues and circulates in blood. Its serum levels are increased in leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice. Functional studies suggest that CTRP4 acts centrally to modulate energy metabolism. Refeeding following an overnight fast induced the expression of CTRP4 in the hypothalamus. Central administration of recombinant protein suppressed food intake and altered the whole-body energy balance in both chow-fed and high-fat diet-fed mice. Suppression of food intake by CTRP4 is correlated with a decreased expression of orexigenic neuropeptide (Npy and Agrp) genes in the hypothalamus. These results establish CTRP4 as a novel nutrient-responsive central regulator of food intake and energy balance. PMID:24366864

  6. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  7. ELISA: a unified, multidimensional view of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Shakhnovich, Boris E; Harvey, John Max; Delisi, Charles

    2004-01-01

    ELISA (http://romi.bu.edu/elisa/) is a database that was designed for flexibility in defining interesting queries about protein domain evolution. We have defined and included both the inherent characteristics of the domains such as structure and function and comparisons of these characteristics between domains. Thus, the database is useful in defining structural and functional links between related protein domains and by extension sequences that encode them. In this database we introduce and employ a novel method of functional annotation and comparison. For each protein domain we create a probabilistic functional annotation tree using GO. We have designed an algorithm that accurately compares these trees and thus provides a measure of "functional distance" between two protein domains. Along with functional annotation, we have also included structural comparison between protein domains and best sequence comparisons to all known genomes. The latter enables researchers to dynamically do searches for domains sharing similar phylogenetic profiles. This combination of data and tools enables the researcher to design complex queries to carry out research in the areas of protein domain evolution, structure prediction and functional annotation of novel sequences.

  8. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  9. Phase-domain photoacoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Ruochong; Feng, Xiaohua; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Qiu, Lei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-01-01

    As one of the fastest-growing imaging modalities in recent years, photoacoustic imaging has attracted tremendous research interest for various applications including anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging. The majority of the photoacoustic imaging systems are based on the time-domain pulsed photoacoustic method, which utilizes a pulsed laser source to induce a wideband photoacoustic signal, revealing optical absorption contrast. An alternative way is the frequency-domain photoacoustic method utilizing the chirping modulation of laser intensity to achieve lower system cost. In this paper, we report another way of the photoacoustic method, called phase-domain photoacoustic sensing, which explores the phase difference between two consequent intensity-modulated laser pulse induced photoacoustic measurements to reveal the optical properties. The basic principle is introduced, modeled, and experimentally validated in this paper, which opens another potential pathway to perform photoacoustic sensing and imaging, eliminating acoustic detection variations beyond the conventional time-domain and frequency-domain photoacoustic methods.

  10. VOLUME CALCULATION OF RATS' ORGANS AND ITS APPLICATION IN THE VALIDATION OF THE VOLUME RELATION BETWEEN THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY AND THE HERNIAL SAC IN INCISIONAL HERNIAS WITH "LOSS OF ABDOMINAL DOMAIN"

    PubMed Central

    de ARAÚJO, Luz Marina Gonçalves; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; LOPES, Carolina Marques; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background The calculation of the volume ratio between the hernia sac and the abdominal cavity of incisional hernias is based on tomographic sections as well as the mathematical formula of the volume of the ellipsoid, which allows determining whether this is a giant hernia or there is a "loss of domain". As the images used are not exact geometric figures, the study of the volume of two solid organs of Wistar rats was performed to validate these calculations. Aim To correlate two methods for determining the volume of the kidney and spleen of rats, comparing a direct method of observation of the volume with the mathematical calculation of this value. Methods The volume of left kidney, geometrically more regular, and spleen, with its peculiar shape, of ten animals was established in cubic centimeters after complete immersion in water with the aid of a beaker graduated in millimeters. These values ​​were compared with those obtained by calculating the same volume with a specific mathematical formula: V = 4/3 × π × (r1 x r2 x r3). Data were compared and statistically analyzed by Student's t test. RESULTS: Although the average volume obtained was higher through the direct method (1.13 cm3 for the left kidney and 0.71 cm3 for the spleen) than the values ​​calculated with the mathematical formula (0.81 cm3 and 0.54 cm3), there were no statistically significant differences between the values ​​found for the two organs (p>0.05). Conclusion There was adequate correlation between the direct calculation of the volume of the kidney and spleen with the result of mathematical calculation of these values ​​in the animals' studies. PMID:25184766

  11. 2.0A resolution crystal structures of the ternary complexes of human phenylalanine hydroxylase catalytic domain with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine or L-norleucine: substrate specificity and molecular motions related to substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Stokka, Anne J; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2003-10-31

    The crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH) in complex with the physiological cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the substrate analogues 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) or L-norleucine (NLE) have been determined at 2.0A resolution. The ternary THA complex confirms a previous 2.5A structure, and the ternary NLE complex shows that similar large conformational changes occur on binding of NLE as those observed for THA. Both structures demonstrate that substrate binding triggers structural changes throughout the entire protomer, including the displacement of Tyr138 from a surface position to a buried position at the active site, with a maximum displacement of 20.7A for its hydroxyl group. Two hinge-bending regions, centred at Leu197 and Asn223, act in consort upon substrate binding to create further large structural changes for parts of the C terminus. Thus, THA/L-Phe binding to the active site is likely to represent the epicentre of the global conformational changes observed in the full-length tetrameric enzyme. The carboxyl and amino groups of THA and NLE are positioned identically in the two structures, supporting the conclusion that these groups are of key importance in substrate binding, thus explaining the broad non-physiological substrate specificity observed for artificially activated forms of the enzyme. However, the specific activity with NLE as the substrate was only about 5% of that with THA, which is explained by the different affinities of binding and different catalytic turnover.

  12. Examining the Domain-Specificity of Metacognition Using Academic Domains and Task-Specific Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Brianna M.; Berman, Ashleigh F.

    2013-01-01

    Metacognition refers to students' knowledge and regulation of cognition, as well as their accuracy in predicting their academic performance. This study addressed two major questions: 1) how do metacognitive knowledge, regulation and accuracy differ across domains?, and 2) how do students' individual differences relate to their reported…

  13. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  14. Indexing Flower Patent Images using Domain Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    approach is illustrated by using it to provide a solution to the problem of indexing images of flowers for searching a flower patents database by color...The flower region is isolated from the background by using an automatic iterative segmentation algorithm with domain knowledge driven feedback. The...color of the flower is defined by the color names present in the flower region and their relative proportions. The database can be queried by example

  15. 2015 Cross-Domain Deterrence Seminar Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, Anthony

    2016-02-04

    In November 2015, the Center for Global Security Research, NSO, and Global Security program jointly sponsored a seminar investigating questions related to cross-domain deterrence at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the seminar, experts were asked to moderate discussion based on the four topics below. For each of these topics, we have compiled a short list of literature that will help analysts develop a baseline understanding of the issue.

  16. Time Domain Aperture Antenna Study. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    Introduction 96 6.2 Special Case, Inpul",e - 97 6.3 Sjwcial Case, :mpulse :.xcitation, R =0, g,ý1 99 6.4 Gene Excitation, Proadside Direcion (e:90), R -O...can be calculated in a simple, closed form, with relative ease using only cime -domain techniques (almost a "back-of-the- envelope" type of calculation

  17. Plant defence suppression is mediated by a fungal sirtuin during rice infection by Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jessie; Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Nandakumar, Renu; Shijo, Sara; Cornwell, Kathryn M; Li, Gang; Wilson, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    Crop destruction by the hemibiotrophic rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae requires plant defence suppression to facilitate extensive biotrophic growth in host cells before the onset of necrosis. How this is achieved at the genetic level is not well understood. Here, we report that a M. oryzae sirtuin, MoSir2, plays an essential role in rice defence suppression and colonization by controlling superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene expression. Loss of MoSir2 function in Δsir2 strains did not affect appressorial function, but biotrophic growth in rice cells was attenuated. Compared to wild type, Δsir2 strains failed to neutralize plant-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicited robust defence responses in rice epidermal cells that included elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression and granular depositions. Deletion of a SOD-encoding gene under MoSir2 control generated Δsod1 deletion strains that mimicked Δsir2 for impaired rice defence suppression, confirming SOD activity as a downstream output of MoSir2. In addition, comparative protein acetylation studies and forward genetic analyses identified a JmjC domain-containing protein as a likely target of MoSir2, and a Δsir2 Δjmjc double mutant was restored for MoSOD1 expression and defence suppression in rice epidermal cells. Together, this work reveals MoSir2 and MoJmjC as novel regulators of early rice cell infection.

  18. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Ali Md; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A

    2011-03-15

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC-3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function.

  19. Separated matter and antimatter domains with vanishing domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.; Godunov, S.I.; Rudenko, A.S.; Tkachev, I.I. E-mail: sgodunov@itep.ru E-mail: tkachev@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2015-10-01

    We present a model of spontaneous (or dynamical) C and CP violation where it is possible to generate domains of matter and antimatter separated by cosmologically large distances. Such C(CP) violation existed only in the early universe and later it disappeared with the only trace of generated baryonic and/or antibaryonic domains. So the problem of domain walls in this model does not exist. These features are achieved through a postulated form of interaction between inflaton and a new scalar field, realizing short time C(CP) violation.

  20. Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Chen, Jihua; Ngo, Evan C.; ...

    2014-12-31

    In this study, inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with two different fullerene derivatives namely phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM) and indene-C60 bis-adduct (IC60BA). The effects of annealing temperatures on the morphology, optical and structural properties were studied and correlated to differences in photovoltaic device performance. It was observed that annealing temperature significantly improved the performance of P3HT:IC60BA solar cells while P3HT:PC60BM cells showed relatively less improvement. The performance improvement is attributed to the extent of fullerene mixing with polymer domains. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that ICBAmore » mixes with disordered P3HT much more readily than PC60BM which leads to lower short circuit current density and fill factor for P3HT:IC60BA cells annealed below 120°C. Annealing above 120°C improves the crystallinity of P3HT in case of P3HT:IC60BA whereas in P3HT:PC60BM films, annealing above 80°C leads to negligible change in crystallinity. Crystallization of P3HT also leads to higher domain purity as seen EFTEM. Further it is seen that cells processed with additive nitrobenzene (NB) showed enhanced short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency regardless of the fullerene derivative used. Addition of NB led to nanoscale phase separation between purer polymer and fullerene domains. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) images showed that enhanced domain purity in additive casted films led to a sharper interface between polymer and fullerene. Lastly, enhanced domain purity and interfacial sharpness led to lower bimolecular recombination and higher mobility and charge carrier lifetime in NB modified devices.« less

  1. Identification of another actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex binding site in neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) that complements actin polymerization induced by the Arp2/3 complex activating (VCA) domain of N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, S; Miki, H; Takenawa, T

    2001-08-31

    Neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) is an essential regulator of actin cytoskeleton formation via its association with the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. It is believed that the C-terminal Arp2/3 complex-activating domain (verprolin homology, cofilin homology, and acidic (VCA) or C-terminal region of WASP family proteins domain) of N-WASP is usually kept masked (autoinhibition) but is opened upon cooperative binding of upstream regulators such as Cdc42 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). However, the mechanisms of autoinhibition and association with Arp2/3 complex are still unclear. We focused on the acidic region of N-WASP because it is thought to interact with Arp2/3 complex and may be involved in autoinhibition. Partial deletion of acidic residues from the VCA portion alone greatly reduced actin polymerization activity, demonstrating that the acidic region contributes to Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. Surprisingly, the same partial deletion of the acidic region in full-length N-WASP led to constitutive activity comparable with the activity seen with the VCA portion. Therefore, the acidic region in full-length N-WASP plays an indispensable role in the formation of the autoinhibited structure. This mutant contains WASP-homology (WH) 1 domain with weak affinity to the Arp2/3 complex, leading to activity in the absence of part of the acidic region. Furthermore, the actin comet formed by the DeltaWH1 mutant of N-WASP was much smaller than that of wild-type N-WASP. Partial deletion of acidic residues did not affect actin comet size, indicating the importance of the WH1 domain in actin structure formation. Collectively, the acidic region of N-WASP plays an essential role in Arp2/3 complex activation as well as in the formation of the autoinhibited structure, whereas the WH1 domain complements the activation of the Arp2/3 complex achieved through the VCA portion.

  2. Mutation of domain III and domain VI in L gene conserved domain of Nipah virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalani, Siti Aishah; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is the etiologic agent responsible for the respiratory illness and causes fatal encephalitis in human. NiV L protein subunit is thought to be responsible for the majority of enzymatic activities involved in viral transcription and replication. The L protein which is the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase has high sequence homology among negative sense RNA viruses. In negative stranded RNA viruses, based on sequence alignment six conserved domain (domain I-IV) have been determined. Each domain is separated on variable regions that suggest the structure to consist concatenated functional domain. To directly address the roles of domains III and VI, site-directed mutations were constructed by the substitution of bases at sequences 2497, 2500, 5528 and 5532. Each mutated L gene can be used in future studies to test the ability for expression on in vitro translation.

  3. Expansion and Functional Divergence of Jumonji C-Containing Histone Demethylases: Significance of Duplications in Ancestral Angiosperms and Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shengzhan; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Liangsheng

    2015-08-01

    Histone modifications, such as methylation and demethylation, are crucial mechanisms altering chromatin structure and gene expression. Recent biochemical and molecular studies have uncovered a group of histone demethylases called Jumonji C (JmjC) domain proteins. However, their evolutionary history and patterns have not been examined systematically. Here, we report extensive analyses of eukaryotic JmjC genes and define 14 subfamilies, including the Lysine-Specific Demethylase3 (KDM3), KDM5, JMJD6, Putative-Lysine-Specific Demethylase11 (PKDM11), and PKDM13 subfamilies, shared by plants, animals, and fungi. Other subfamilies are detected in plants and animals but not in fungi (PKDM12) or in animals and fungi but not in plants (KDM2 and KDM4). PKDM7, PKDM8, and PKDM9 are plant-specific groups, whereas Jumonji, AT-Rich Interactive Domain2, KDM6, and PKDM10 are animal specific. In addition to known domains, most subfamilies have characteristic conserved amino acid motifs. Whole-genome duplication (WGD) was likely an important mechanism for JmjC duplications, with four pairs from an angiosperm-wide WGD and others from subsequent WGDs. Vertebrates also experienced JmjC duplications associated with the vertebrate ancestral WGDs, with additional mammalian paralogs from tandem duplication and possible transposition. The sequences of paralogs have diverged in both known functional domains and other regions, showing evidence of selection pressure. The increases of JmjC copy number and the divergences in sequence and expression might have contributed to the divergent functions of JmjC genes, allowing the angiosperms and vertebrates to adapt to a great number of ecological niches and contributing to their evolutionary successes.

  4. Modeling software systems by domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippolito, Richard; Lee, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Software Architectures Engineering (SAE) Project at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has developed engineering modeling techniques that both reduce the complexity of software for domain-specific computer systems and result in systems that are easier to build and maintain. These techniques allow maximum freedom for system developers to apply their domain expertise to software. We have applied these techniques to several types of applications, including training simulators operating in real time, engineering simulators operating in non-real time, and real-time embedded computer systems. Our modeling techniques result in software that mirrors both the complexity of the application and the domain knowledge requirements. We submit that the proper measure of software complexity reflects neither the number of software component units nor the code count, but the locus of and amount of domain knowledge. As a result of using these techniques, domain knowledge is isolated by fields of engineering expertise and removed from the concern of the software engineer. In this paper, we will describe kinds of domain expertise, describe engineering by domains, and provide relevant examples of software developed for simulator applications using the techniques.

  5. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  6. ECOD: an evolutionary classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua; Schaeffer, R Dustin; Liao, Yuxing; Kinch, Lisa N; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or "fold"). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies.

  7. Phase field modeling of domain structures in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Artemev, A; Slutsker, J; Roytburd, A L

    2008-05-01

    Phase-field simulations were used to explore the effect of the characteristics of the Landau-Devonshire free energy and values of electrostatic and elastic interactions on the formation of different types of domain structures in ferroelectric thin films. Simulations were performed at different constant-applied electric fields and by using a cyclic continuously changing field. It is shown that the 180 degrees or 90 degrees domain structures can be produced depending on the relative strength of elastic interactions and the ratio of barrier heights that determine the energy of the 180 degrees and 90 degrees domain boundaries. It is shown that the applied field strength and the thickness of the dead layer can play a minor role in the transition between the 90 degrees and 180 degrees domain structures. It is also demonstrated that the poling history can affect the type of the domain structure.

  8. Magnitude and spatial orientation of the hydrophobic moments of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruhong; Royyuru, Ajay; Athma, Prasanna; Suits, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The distributions of residue hydrophobicity for individual domains as well as for the aggregates of domains on a single chain have been found to exhibit well-defined second-order hydrophobic moment profiles. This indicates that most of the domains do fold into a stable entity with a core composed predominantly of hydrophobic residues as well as a prevalence of hydrophobic residues at the interface between domains. A simple scoring function based upon the relative hydrophobic moment dipole orientations shows that 80% of the dipoles of adjacent domains point to each other, highlighting hydrophobic residue prevalence at the domain interfaces.

  9. The role of TOG domains in microtubule plus end dynamics.

    PubMed

    Slep, Kevin C

    2009-10-01

    The XMAP215 (Xenopus microtubule-associated protein 215) and CLASP [CLIP-170 (cytoskeletal linker protein 170) associated protein] microtubule plus end tracking families play central roles in the regulation of interphase microtubule dynamics and the proper formation of mitotic spindle architecture and flux. XMAP215 members comprise N-terminally-arrayed hexa-HEAT (huntingtin, elongation factor 3, the PR65/A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and the lipid kinase Tor) repeats known as TOG (tumour overexpressed gene) domains. Higher eukaryotic XMAP215 members are monomeric and have five TOG domains. Yeast counterparts are dimeric and have two TOG domains. Structure determination of the TOG domain reveals that the six HEAT repeats are aligned to form an oblong scaffold. The TOG domain face composed of intra-HEAT loops forms a contiguous, conserved tubulin-binding surface. Nested within the conserved intra-HEAT loop 1 is an invariant, signature, surface-exposed tryptophan residue that is a prime determinant in the TOG domain-tubulin interaction. The arrayed organization of TOG domains is critical for the processive mechanism of XMAP215, indicative that multiple tubulin/microtubule-binding sites are required for plus end tracking activity. The CLASP family has been annotated as containing a single N-terminal TOG domain. Using XMAP215 TOG domain structure determinants as a metric to analyse CLASP sequence, it is anticipated that CLASP contains two additional cryptic TOGL (TOG-like) domains. The presence of additional TOGL domains implicates CLASP as an ancient XMAP215 relative that uses a similar, multi-TOG-based mechanism to processively track microtubule ends.

  10. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  11. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    forms of ordered phases such as antiferromagnetism and ferroelectricity. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who happily agreed to contribute their latest results to this special issue, and the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter staff for their help, patience and professionalism. In such a fast-moving field it is not possible to give a definitive account, and this special issue can be no more than a snapshot of the current state of knowledge regarding this topic. Nevertheless, we hope that this collection of papers is a useful resource for experienced workers in the field, forms a useful introduction to researchers early in their careers and inspires others in related areas of nanotechnology to enter into the study of domain dynamics in nanostructures. Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures contents Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motionA Yamaguchi, A Hirohata, T Ono and H Miyajima Magnetization reversal in magnetic nanostripes via Bloch wall formation M Zeisberger and R Mattheis Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowiresMi-Young Im, Lars Bocklage, Guido Meier and Peter Fischer Domain wall propagation in meso- and nanoscale ferroelectrics R G P McQuaid, M McMillen, L-W Chang, A Gruverman and J M Gregg Transverse and vortex domain wall structure in magnetic nanowires with uniaxial in-plane anisotropyM T Bryan, S Bance, J Dean, T Schrefl and D A Allwood The stochastic nature of the domain wall motion along high perpendicular anisotropy strips with surface roughness Eduardo Martinez Temperature-dependent dynamics of stochastic domain-wall depinning in nanowiresClemens Wuth, Peter Lendecke and Guido Meier Controlled pinning and depinning of domain walls in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropyTheo Gerhardt, André Drews and Guido Meier The interaction of transverse domain wallsBenjamin Krüger The increase of the

  12. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  13. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  14. Entropy gives rise to topologically associating domains

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Paula A.; Hult, Caitlin; Adalsteinsson, David; Lawrimore, Josh; Forest, Mark G.; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    We investigate chromosome organization within the nucleus using polymer models whose formulation is closely guided by experiments in live yeast cells. We employ bead-spring chromosome models together with loop formation within the chains and the presence of nuclear bodies to quantify the extent to which these mechanisms shape the topological landscape in the interphase nucleus. By investigating the genome as a dynamical system, we show that domains of high chromosomal interactions can arise solely from the polymeric nature of the chromosome arms due to entropic interactions and nuclear confinement. In this view, the role of bio-chemical related processes is to modulate and extend the duration of the interacting domains. PMID:27257057

  15. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-04-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  16. Apo raver1 structure reveals distinct RRM domain orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Izard, Tina

    2012-09-17

    Raver1 is a multifunctional protein that modulates both alternative splicing and focal adhesion assembly by binding to the nucleoplasmic splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract protein (PTB) or to the cytoskeletal proteins vinculin and {alpha}-actinin. The amino-terminal region of raver1 has three RNA recognition motif (RRM1, RRM2, and RRM3) domains, and RRM1 interacts with the vinculin tail (Vt) domain and vinculin mRNA. We previously determined the crystal structure of the raver1 RRM1-3 domains in complex with Vt at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. Here, we report crystal structure of the unbound raver1 RRM1-3 domains at 2 {angstrom} resolution. The apo structure reveals that a bound sulfate ion disrupts an electrostatic interaction between the RRM1 and RRM2 domains, triggering a large relative domain movement of over 30{sup o}. Superposition with other RNA-bound RRM structures places the sulfate ion near the superposed RNA phosphate group suggesting that this is the raver1 RNA binding site. While several single and some tandem RRM domain structures have been described, to the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of a three-tandem RRM domain structure.

  17. Starch-binding domain shuffling in Aspergillus niger glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Catherine A G; Fang, Tsuei-Yun; Reilly, Peter J; Ford, Clark

    2003-07-01

    Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA) consists mainly of two forms, GAI [from the N-terminus, catalytic domain + linker + starch-binding domain (SBD)] and GAII (catalytic domain + linker). These domains were shuffled to make RGAI (SBD + linker + catalytic domain), RGAIDeltaL (SBD + catalytic domain) and RGAII (linker + catalytic domain), with domains defined by function rather than by tertiary structure. In addition, Paenibacillus macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD replaced the closely related A.niger GA SBD to give GAE. Soluble starch hydrolysis rates decreased as RGAII approximately GAII approximately GAI > RGAIDeltaL approximately RGAI approximately GAE. Insoluble starch hydrolysis rates were GAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAI > GAE approximately RGAII > GAII, while insoluble starch-binding capacities were GAI > RGAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAII > GAII > GAE. These results indicate that: (i) moving the SBD to the N-terminus or replacing the native SBD somewhat affects soluble starch hydrolysis; (ii) SBD location significantly affects insoluble starch binding and hydrolysis; (iii) insoluble starch hydrolysis is imperfectly correlated with its binding by the SBD; and (iv) placing the P.macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD at the end of a linker, instead of closely associated with the rest of the enzyme, severely reduces its ability to bind and hydrolyze insoluble starch.

  18. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  19. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S F; Gan, W L; Kwon, J; Luo, F L; Lim, G J; Wang, J B; Lew, W S

    2016-04-21

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~10(12) A/m(2). Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 10(11) A/m(2). Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  20. Engineered autonomous human variable domains

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Tessier, Peter M.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2017-01-01

    The complex multi-chain architecture of antibodies has spurred interest in smaller derivatives that retain specificity but can be more easily produced in bacteria. Domain antibodies consisting of single variable domains are the smallest antibody fragments and have been shown to possess enhanced ability to target epitopes that are difficult to access using multidomain antibodies. However, in contrast to natural camelid antibody domains, human variable domains typically suffer from low stability and high propensity to aggregate. This review summarizes strategies to improve the biophysical properties of heavy chain variable domains from human antibodies with an emphasis on aggregation resistance. Several protein engineering approaches have targeted antibody frameworks and complementarity determining regions to stabilize the native state and prevent aggregation of the denatured state. Recent findings enable the construction of highly diverse libraries enriched in aggregation-resistant variants that are expected to provide binders to diverse antigens. Engineered domain antibodies possess unique advantages in expression, epitope preference and flexibility of formatting over conventional immunoreagents and are a promising class of antibody fragments for biomedical development. PMID:27655414

  1. Protein domain definition should allow for conditional disorder.

    PubMed

    Yegambaram, Kavestri; Bulloch, Esther M M; Kingston, Richard L

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are often classified in a binary fashion as either structured or disordered. However this approach has several deficits. Firstly, protein folding is always conditional on the physiochemical environment. A protein which is structured in some circumstances will be disordered in others. Secondly, it hides a fundamental asymmetry in behavior. While all structured proteins can be unfolded through a change in environment, not all disordered proteins have the capacity for folding. Failure to accommodate these complexities confuses the definition of both protein structural domains and intrinsically disordered regions. We illustrate these points with an experimental study of a family of small binding domains, drawn from the RNA polymerase of mumps virus and its closest relatives. Assessed at face value the domains fall on a structural continuum, with folded, partially folded, and near unstructured members. Yet the disorder present in the family is conditional, and these closely related polypeptides can access the same folded state under appropriate conditions. Any heuristic definition of the protein domain emphasizing conformational stability divides this domain family in two, in a way that makes no biological sense. Structural domains would be better defined by their ability to adopt a specific tertiary structure: a structure that may or may not be realized, dependent on the circumstances. This explicitly allows for the conditional nature of protein folding, and more clearly demarcates structural domains from intrinsically disordered regions that may function without folding.

  2. Barkhausen avalanches in anisotropic ferromagnets with 180 degrees domain walls

    PubMed

    Tadic; Nowak

    2000-04-01

    We show that Barkhausen noise in two-dimensional disordered ferromagnets with extended domain walls is characterized by the avalanche size exponent tau(s)=1.54 at low disorder. With increasing disorder the characteristic domain size is reduced relative to the system size due to nucleation of new domains and a dynamic phase transition occurs to the scaling behavior with tau(s)=1.30. The exponents decrease at finite driving rate. The results agree with recently observed behavior in amorphous Metglas and Fe-Co-B ribbons when the applied anisotropic stress is varied.

  3. Extreme Growth of Enstrophy on 2D Bounded Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Sliwiak, Adam

    2016-11-01

    We study the vortex states responsible for the largest instantaneous growth of enstrophy possible in viscous incompressible flow on 2D bounded domain. The goal is to compare these results with estimates obtained using mathematical analysis. This problem is closely related to analogous questions recently considered in the periodic setting on 1D, 2D and 3D domains. In addition to systematically characterizing the most extreme behavior, these problems are also closely related to the open question of the finite-time singularity formation in the 3D Navier-Stokes system. We demonstrate how such extreme vortex states can be found as solutions of constrained variational optimization problems which in the limit of small enstrophy reduce to eigenvalue problems. Computational results will be presented for circular and square domains emphasizing the effect of geometric singularities (corners of the domain) on the structure of the extreme vortex states. Supported by an NSERC (Canada) Discovery Grant.

  4. Domain and Specification Models for Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscoe, Neil; Liu, Zheng-Yang; Feng, Guohui

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses our approach to representing application domain knowledge for specific software engineering tasks. Application domain knowledge is embodied in a domain model. Domain models are used to assist in the creation of specification models. Although many different specification models can be created from any particular domain model, each specification model is consistent and correct with respect to the domain model. One aspect of the system-hierarchical organization is described in detail.

  5. Localization of resistive domains in inhomogeneous superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of resistive domains due to the Joule heating in inhomogeneous superconductors with transport currents are studied. The equilibrium of a domain at an inhomogeneity of arbitrary type and with dimensions much smaller than the dimensions of the domain is investigated. It is shown that resistive domains can become localized at inhomogeneities. The temperature distribution in a domain and the current--voltage characteristic of the domain are determined. The stability of localized domains is discussed. It is shown that such domains give rise to a hysteresis in the destruction (recovery) of the superconductivity by the transport current.

  6. Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory

    1986-01-01

    Intensity modulation sensors are classified by the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength, or time domains. To implement the time-domain referencing, different types of fiber-optic loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

  7. Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.

    1986-01-01

    Intensity modulation sensors are classified depending on the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength (frequency), or time domains. To implement the time domain referencing different types of fiber optic (FO) loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

  8. Sialo-oligosaccharide receptors for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and related oligosaccharides of poly-N-acetyllactosamine series are polarized at the cilia and apical-microvillar domains of the ciliated cells in human bronchial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Loveless, R W; Feizi, T

    1989-04-01

    The occurrence and distribution of the sialo-oligosaccharide receptors (sialosyl-I and sialosyl-i) for Mycoplasma pneumoniae as well as other related oligosaccharide structures of poly-N-acetyllactosamine type, and their short-chain analogs based on galactose linked beta 1-4 or beta 1-3 to N-acetylglucosamine (Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc or Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc, respectively) were investigated in the human bronchial epithelium by histochemistry by using sequence-specific monoclonal antibodies and lectins. Among the mature epithelial cells, only ciliated cells were found to express the long-chain antigens, whereas mucus-secreting cells contained the short-chain antigens associated with mucus globules. The long-chain oligosaccharides were found to be highly polarized at the luminal aspects of the ciliated cells where the branched structures (I and sialosyl-I antigens) were detected both at the apical-microvillar border and on the cilia, but the linear structures (i, sialosyl-i, and VIM-2 antigens) were detected exclusively at the apical-microvillar border. These observations provide the first in situ visualization of the receptor structures for M. pneumoniae at the primary site of infection. The lack of sialo-oligosaccharide receptors in secretory cells and the mucus they produce provides a biochemical basis for evasion by this microorganism of the secreted mucus barrier.

  9. Evolution of distinct EGF domains with specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Merridee A.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Chu, Carmen K.; Feng, Lina L.; Sparrow, Duncan B.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    EGF domains are extracellular protein modules cross-linked by three intradomain disulfides. Past studies suggest the existence of two types of EGF domain with three-disulfides, human EGF-like (hEGF) domains and complement C1r-like (cEGF) domains, but to date no functional information has been related to the two different types, and they are not differentiated in sequence or structure databases. We have developed new sequence patterns based on the different C-termini to search specifically for the two types of EGF domains in sequence databases. The exhibited sensitivity and specificity of the new pattern-based method represents a significant advancement over the currently available sequence detection techniques. We re-annotated EGF sequences in the latest release of Swiss-Prot looking for functional relationships that might correlate with EGF type. We show that important post-translational modifications of three-disulfide EGFs, including unusual forms of glycosylation and post-translational proteolytic processing, are dependent on EGF subtype. For example, EGF domains that are shed from the cell surface and mediate intercellular signaling are all hEGFs, as are all human EGF receptor family ligands. Additional experimental data suggest that functional specialization has accompanied subtype divergence. Based on our structural analysis of EGF domains with three-disulfide bonds and comparison to laminin and integrin-like EGF domains with an additional inter-domain disulfide, we propose that these hEGF and cEGF domains may have arisen from a four-disulfide ancestor by selective loss of different cysteine residues. PMID:15772310

  10. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  11. Domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Johnny

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we continue the study of domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory initiated by Keye Martin and Bob Coecke in 2002. The first part of the thesis is focused on exploring the domain theoretic properties of qubit channels. We discover that the Scott continuous qubit channels are exactly those that are unital or constant. We then prove that the unital qubit channels form a continuous dcpo, and identify various measurements on them. We show that Holevo capacity is a measurement on unital qubit channels, and discover the natural measurement in this setting. We find that qubit channels also form a continuous dcpo, but capacity fails to be a measurement. In the second part we focus on the study of exact dcpos, a domain theoretic structure, closely related to continuous dcpos, possessed by quantum states. Exact dcpos admit a topology, called the exact topology, and we show that the exact topology has an order theoretic characterization similar to the characterization of the Scott topology on continuous dcpos. We then explore the connection between exact and continuous dcpos; first, by identifying an important set of points, called the split points, that distinguishes between exact and continuous structures; second, by exploring a continuous completion of exact dcpos, and showing that we can recover the exact topology from the Scott topology of the completion.

  12. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states."

  13. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  14. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  15. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  16. Metrology for terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, John F.; Naftaly, Mira

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the terahertz time-domain spectrometer (THz TDS) [1] has emerged as a key measurement device for spectroscopic investigations in the frequency range of 0.1-5 THz. To date, almost every type of material has been studied using THz TDS, including semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, metal films, liquid crystals, glasses, pharmaceuticals, DNA molecules, proteins, gases, composites, foams, oils, and many others. Measurements with a TDS are made in the time domain; conversion from the time domain data to a frequency spectrum is achieved by applying the Fourier Transform, calculated numerically using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. As in many other types of spectrometer, THz TDS requires that the sample data be referenced to similarly acquired data with no sample present. Unlike frequency-domain spectrometers which detect light intensity and measure absorption spectra, a TDS records both amplitude and phase information, and therefore yields both the absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the sample material. The analysis of the data from THz TDS relies on the assumptions that: a) the frequency scale is accurate; b) the measurement of THz field amplitude is linear; and c) that the presence of the sample does not affect the performance characteristics of the instrument. The frequency scale of a THz TDS is derived from the displacement of the delay line; via FFT, positioning errors may give rise to frequency errors that are difficult to quantify. The measurement of the field amplitude in a THz TDS is required to be linear with a dynamic range of the order of 10 000. And attention must be given to the sample positioning and handling in order to avoid sample-related errors.

  17. Shortened Engineered Human Antibody CH2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Qi; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain is critical for antibody effector functions. Isolated CH2 domains are promising scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders that could also confer some effector functions. We have shown previously that an isolated human CH2 domain is relatively unstable to thermally induced unfolding, but its stability can be improved by engineering an additional disulfide bond (Gong, R., Vu, B. K., Feng, Y., Prieto, D. A., Dyba, M. A., Walsh, J. D., Prabakaran, P., Veenstra, T. D., Tarasov, S. G., Ishima, R., and Dimitrov, D. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14203–14210). We have hypothesized that the stability of this engineered antibody domain could be further increased by removing unstructured residues. To test our hypothesis, we removed the seven N-terminal residues that are in a random coil as suggested by our analysis of the isolated CH2 crystal structure and NMR data. The resulting shortened engineered CH2 (m01s) was highly soluble, monomeric, and remarkably stable, with a melting temperature (Tm) of 82.6 °C, which is about 10 and 30 °C higher than those of the original stabilized CH2 (m01) and CH2, respectively. m01s and m01 were more resistant to protease digestion than CH2. A newly identified anti-CH2 antibody that recognizes a conformational epitope bound to m01s significantly better (>10-fold higher affinity) than to CH2 and slightly better than to m01. m01s bound to a recombinant soluble human neonatal Fc receptor at pH 6.0 more strongly than CH2. These data suggest that shortening the m01 N terminus significantly increases stability without disrupting its conformation and that our approach for increasing stability and decreasing size by removing unstructured regions may also apply to other proteins. PMID:21669873

  18. Sinh-domain complex integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotis, George-Drosos; Khanday, Farooq A.; Psychalinos, Costas

    2015-07-01

    The basic building blocks for performing complex signal processing in the Sinh-domain are introduced in this article. Attractive offered benefits are the capabilities for achieving resistorless realisations with electronic adjustment of their frequency characteristics, independent tuning of centre frequency and bandwidth and operating in a low-voltage environment. In addition, the inherent class-AB operation of Sinh-domain filters allows the handling of signals greater than the bias current, leading to a power saving. The aforementioned benefits have been evaluated through simulation results, using the Analog Design Environment of the Cadence software.

  19. Genome architecture: domain organization of interphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Bickmore, Wendy A; van Steensel, Bas

    2013-03-14

    The architecture of interphase chromosomes is important for the regulation of gene expression and genome maintenance. Chromosomes are linearly segmented into hundreds of domains with different protein compositions. Furthermore, the spatial organization of chromosomes is nonrandom and is characterized by many local and long-range contacts among genes and other sequence elements. A variety of genome-wide mapping techniques have made it possible to chart these properties at high resolution. Combined with microscopy and computational modeling, the results begin to yield a more coherent picture that integrates linear and three-dimensional (3D) views of chromosome organization in relation to gene regulation and other nuclear functions.

  20. Solution structure of Q388A3 PDZ domain from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Mei, Song; Dong, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules that often recognize short amino acid motifs at the C-termini of target proteins and regulate multiple biological processes. So far, no PDZ domain in Trypanosoma brucei, an eukaryotic parasite causing sleeping sickness, has been studied. Q388A3, conserved in the related kinetoplastid parasites, is a 1634-residue protein containing a PDZ domain at its C-terminus. In this work, the solution structure of Q388A3 PDZ domain was solved by NMR spectroscopy. Q388A3 PDZ domain adopts a PDZ-like fold composed by a five-stranded β-sheet capped by two α-helices, which is similar to the PDZ domains from HtrA family proteins. Meanwhile, Q388A3 PDZ domain shows some structural features quite different from HtrA PDZ domain.

  1. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section is developed and used for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the domain nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field within the material. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  2. X-ray study of aligned magnetic stripe domains in perpendicular multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, O.; Denbeaux, G.P.; Kortright, J.B.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2003-03-03

    We have investigated the stripe domain structure and the magnetic reversal of perpendicular Co/Pt based multilayers at room temperature using magnetometry, magnetic imaging and magnetic x-ray scattering. In-plane field cycling aligns the stripe domains along the field direction. In magnetic x-ray scattering the parallel stripe domains act as a magnetic grating resulting in observed Bragg reflections up to 5th order. We model the scattering profile to extract and quantify the domain as well as domain wall widths. Applying fields up to {approx}1.2 kOe perpendicular to the film reversibly changes the relative width of up versus down domains while maintaining the overall stripe periodicity. Fields above 1.2 kOe introduce irreversible changes into the domain structure by contracting and finally annihilating individual stripe domains. We compare the current results with modeling and previous measurements of films with perpendicular anisotropy.

  3. Kinetics of enzymatic reactions in lipid membranes containing domains.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-03-06

    An appreciable part of enzymes operating in vivo is associated with lipid membranes. The function of such enzymes can be influenced by the presence of domains containing proteins and/or composed of different lipids. The corresponding experimental model-system studies can be performed under well controlled conditions, e.g., on a planar supported lipid bilayer or surface-immobilized vesicles. To clarify what may happen in such systems, we propose general kinetic equations describing the enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion occurring via the Michaelis-Menten (MM) mechanism on a membrane with domains which do not directly participate in reaction. For two generic situations when a relatively slow reaction takes place primarily in or outside domains, we take substrate saturation and lateral substrate-substrate interactions at domains into account and scrutinize the dependence of the reaction rate on the average substrate coverage. With increasing coverage, depending on the details, the reaction rate reaches saturation via an inflection point or monotonously as in the conventional MM case. In addition, we show analytically the types of reaction kinetics occurring primarily at domain boundaries. In the physically interesting situation when the domain growth is fast on the reaction time scale, the latter kinetics are far from conventional. The opposite situation when the reaction is fast and controlled by diffusion has been studied by using the Monte Carlo technique. The corresponding results indicate that the dependence of the reaction kinetics on the domain size may be weak.

  4. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2014-01-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  5. Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Chen, Jihua; Ngo, Evan C.; Dubey, Ashish; Khatiwada, Devendra; Zhang, Cheng; Qiao, Qiquan

    2014-12-31

    In this study, inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with two different fullerene derivatives namely phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM) and indene-C60 bis-adduct (IC60BA). The effects of annealing temperatures on the morphology, optical and structural properties were studied and correlated to differences in photovoltaic device performance. It was observed that annealing temperature significantly improved the performance of P3HT:IC60BA solar cells while P3HT:PC60BM cells showed relatively less improvement. The performance improvement is attributed to the extent of fullerene mixing with polymer domains. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that ICBA mixes with disordered P3HT much more readily than PC60BM which leads to lower short circuit current density and fill factor for P3HT:IC60BA cells annealed below 120°C. Annealing above 120°C improves the crystallinity of P3HT in case of P3HT:IC60BA whereas in P3HT:PC60BM films, annealing above 80°C leads to negligible change in crystallinity. Crystallization of P3HT also leads to higher domain purity as seen EFTEM. Further it is seen that cells processed with additive nitrobenzene (NB) showed enhanced short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency regardless of the fullerene derivative used. Addition of NB led to nanoscale phase separation between purer polymer and fullerene domains. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) images showed that enhanced domain purity in additive casted films led to a sharper interface between polymer and fullerene. Lastly, enhanced domain purity and interfacial sharpness led to lower bimolecular recombination and higher mobility and charge carrier lifetime in NB modified devices.

  6. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  7. Domain adaptation problems: a DASVM classification technique and a circular validation strategy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Marconcini, Mattia

    2010-05-01

    This paper addresses pattern classification in the framework of domain adaptation by considering methods that solve problems in which training data are assumed to be available only for a source domain different (even if related) from the target domain of (unlabeled) test data. Two main novel contributions are proposed: 1) a domain adaptation support vector machine (DASVM) technique which extends the formulation of support vector machines (SVMs) to the domain adaptation framework and 2) a circular indirect accuracy assessment strategy for validating the learning of domain adaptation classifiers when no true labels for the target--domain instances are available. Experimental results, obtained on a series of two-dimensional toy problems and on two real data sets related to brain computer interface and remote sensing applications, confirmed the effectiveness and the reliability of both the DASVM technique and the proposed circular validation strategy.

  8. Evolution of ferroelectric domain structures embedded inside polychrystalline BaTiO3 during heating

    SciTech Connect

    Varlioglu, Mesut; Ustundag, Ersan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Jones, Jacob L.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of ferroelectric domains inside a single grain of a polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} ceramic was investigated under quasistatic heating by using polychromatic scanning x-ray microdiffraction. Four domain orientations were observed, three of which exhibited a classic of {approx}90{sup o} ferroelastic relationship. The fourth domain orientation was found to be crystallographically related with one of the other orientations by a rotation of either 180.47{sup o} or 0.47{sup o}. While heating the polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} from room temperature to above the Curie temperature (125 C), all four ferroelectric domain orientations rotated toward a paraelectric cubic orientation which was found to be at an intermediate orientation relative to the four domain orientations. The crystallographic relationships of the domains with respect to paraelectric phase were explained using a domain structure model by Nepochatenko.

  9. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Development in the Food Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Discusses problems of general interest in developmental psychology that can be successfully studied in the domain of food; these include (1) development of food likes and dislikes; (2) establishment of the edible/inedible distinction; (3) disgust and contagion; (4) transgenerational communication of preferences; and (5) transition to food…

  11. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  12. The Vanderbilt Expertise Test reveals domain-general and domain-specific sex effects in object recognition.

    PubMed

    McGugin, Rankin W; Richler, Jennifer J; Herzmann, Grit; Speegle, Magen; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-09-15

    Individual differences in face recognition are often contrasted with differences in object recognition using a single object category. Likewise, individual differences in perceptual expertise for a given object domain have typically been measured relative to only a single category baseline. In Experiment 1, we present a new test of object recognition, the Vanderbilt Expertise Test (VET), which is comparable in methods to the Cambridge Face Memory Task (CFMT) but uses eight different object categories. Principal component analysis reveals that the underlying structure of the VET can be largely explained by two independent factors, which demonstrate good reliability and capture interesting sex differences inherent in the VET structure. In Experiment 2, we show how the VET can be used to separate domain-specific from domain-general contributions to a standard measure of perceptual expertise. While domain-specific contributions are found for car matching for both men and women and for plane matching in men, women in this sample appear to use more domain-general strategies to match planes. In Experiment 3, we use the VET to demonstrate that holistic processing of faces predicts face recognition independently of general object recognition ability, which has a sex-specific contribution to face recognition. Overall, the results suggest that the VET is a reliable and valid measure of object recognition abilities and can measure both domain-general skills and domain-specific expertise, which were both found to depend on the sex of observers.

  13. Creativity as action: findings from five creative domains.

    PubMed

    Glaveanu, Vlad; Lubart, Todd; Bonnardel, Nathalie; Botella, Marion; de Biaisi, Pierre-Marc; Desainte-Catherine, Myriam; Georgsdottir, Asta; Guillou, Katell; Kurtag, Gyorgy; Mouchiroud, Christophe; Storme, Martin; Wojtczuk, Alicja; Zenasni, Franck

    2013-01-01

    The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter-subjective phenomenon. This framework, drawing extensively from the work of Dewey (1934) on art as experience, is used to derive a coding frame for the analysis of interview material. The article reports findings from the analysis of 60 interviews with recognized French creators in five creative domains: art, design, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not "inside" individual creators but "in between" actors and their environment. Implications for the field of educational psychology are discussed.

  14. Creativity as action: findings from five creative domains

    PubMed Central

    Glaveanu, Vlad; Lubart, Todd; Bonnardel, Nathalie; Botella, Marion; de Biaisi, Pierre-Marc; Desainte-Catherine, Myriam; Georgsdottir, Asta; Guillou, Katell; Kurtag, Gyorgy; Mouchiroud, Christophe; Storme, Martin; Wojtczuk, Alicja; Zenasni, Franck

    2013-01-01

    The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter-subjective phenomenon. This framework, drawing extensively from the work of Dewey (1934) on art as experience, is used to derive a coding frame for the analysis of interview material. The article reports findings from the analysis of 60 interviews with recognized French creators in five creative domains: art, design, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not “inside” individual creators but “in between” actors and their environment. Implications for the field of educational psychology are discussed. PMID:23596431

  15. Domain adaptation for semantic role labeling of clinical text

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaoyun; Tang, Buzhou; Jiang, Min; Wang, Jingqi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Semantic role labeling (SRL), which extracts a shallow semantic relation representation from different surface textual forms of free text sentences, is important for understanding natural language. Few studies in SRL have been conducted in the medical domain, primarily due to lack of annotated clinical SRL corpora, which are time-consuming and costly to build. The goal of this study is to investigate domain adaptation techniques for clinical SRL leveraging resources built from newswire and biomedical literature to improve performance and save annotation costs. Materials and Methods Multisource Integrated Platform for Answering Clinical Questions (MiPACQ), a manually annotated SRL clinical corpus, was used as the target domain dataset. PropBank and NomBank from newswire and BioProp from biomedical literature were used as source domain datasets. Three state-of-the-art domain adaptation algorithms were employed: instance pruning, transfer self-training, and feature augmentation. The SRL performance using different domain adaptation algorithms was evaluated by using 10-fold cross-validation on the MiPACQ corpus. Learning curves for the different methods were generated to assess the effect of sample size. Results and Conclusion When all three source domain corpora were used, the feature augmentation algorithm achieved statistically significant higher F-measure (83.18%), compared to the baseline with MiPACQ dataset alone (F-measure, 81.53%), indicating that domain adaptation algorithms may improve SRL performance on clinical text. To achieve a comparable performance to the baseline method that used 90% of MiPACQ training samples, the feature augmentation algorithm required <50% of training samples in MiPACQ, demonstrating that annotation costs of clinical SRL can be reduced significantly by leveraging existing SRL resources from other domains. PMID:26063745

  16. Impact of Domain Analysis on Reuse Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-06

    libraries with very different domain models . The semantic network knowledge representation system (differing in this respect from object-oriented approaches...2.1.4 Organizational Strategies ...... ............. 10 2.1.5 Role of Existing Systems ..... .............. ..11 2.2 Process Models for Domain Analysis...Acquire Domain Analysis Resources. ... 15 2.2.4 Develop the Domain Model ..... .............. .16 2.2.4.1 Identification of Domain Objects

  17. Remotely Piloted Aircraft and War in the Public Relations Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as...Airmen about life-and-death combat decisions, they tend to do so in terms of direct orders rather than leading suggestions. How can Mark Bowden...premises, (b) identify an ambiguous definition, or (c) demon- strate a logical fallacy in the argument.2 Many of the RPA articles, opin- ions, and

  18. Characteristic microwave background distortions from collapsing domain wall bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and angular pattern of distortions of the microwave background are analyzed by collapsing spherical domain walls. A characteristic pattern of redshift distortions of red or blue spikes surrounded by blue discs was found. The width and height of a spike is related to the diameter and magnitude of the disc. A measurement of the relations between these quantities thus can serve as an unambiguous indicator for a collapsing spherical domain wall. From the redshift distortion in the blue discs an upper bound was found on the surface energy density of the walls sigma is less than or approximately 8 MeV cubed.

  19. Preparation for Old Age in Different Life Domains: Dimensions and Age Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornadt, Anna E.; Rothermund, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We investigated preparation for age-related changes from a multidimensional, life span perspective and administered a newly developed questionnaire to a large sample aged 30-80 years. Preparing for age-related changes was organized by life domains, with domain-specific types of preparation addressing obstacles and opportunities in the respective…

  20. The Influence of Domain Knowledge on the Functional Capacity of Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, Travis Rex; Wiley, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Theories of expertise have proposed that superior cognitive performance is in part due to increases in the functional capacity of working memory during domain-related tasks. Consistent with this approach Fincher-Kiefer et al. (1988), found that domain knowledge increased scores on baseball-related reading span tasks. The present studies extended…

  1. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  2. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  3. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  4. Domain Processes in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-14

    WALLS Electron holography utilizing the wave characteristics of electrons. Through a sharp emission tip, the emitted electron beam is largely coherent, or...mirostructural modulation at 25% doping. The strongly first order ferroelectric phase transition in PbTiO3 is also gradually changed to a nearly second...a new domain configuraton. 13 The end-member of the PZT solid solution, PbTiO3 , has the highest transition temperature (Tc = 490 °C) and the largest

  5. Dynamic optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-04-21

    We describe a dynamic Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system which enables real time, long range, acoustic sensing at high sampling rate. The system is based on a fast scanning laser and coherent detection scheme. Distributed sensing is obtained by probing the Rayleigh backscattered light. The system was tested by interrogation of a 10 km communication type single mode fiber and successfully detected localized impulse and sinusoidal excitations.

  6. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated.

  7. Cross-Domain Network Fault Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    digest, or simply digest, for Gi. • Gj = ( n ] i6=j f(Gi) ) ] Gj , where j is a domain performing cross-domain inference and ] is a model-specific union... Gj is the cross-domain model integrating the digests from all the other domains with domain j’s undigested graph. Now, domain j may use an existing...algorithm such as SHRINK to perform inference over Gj . Before a practical graph digest design can be implemented, interoperability standards must be

  8. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  9. Mechanical unfolding of titin domains at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ensheng; Yang, Guoliang

    2002-03-01

    Titin is a large protein composed of several hundred of globular domains and a number of still unknown structures, with total molecular weight of more than 3 MDa. Titin spans half the sarcomere in striated muscle, and plays critical roles to the proper function of the muscle. Recent studies using single-molecule techniques have revealed that the force-induced changes in the titin domains are intimately related to the mechanisms of titin’s biological functions. To further investigate the behaviors of titin under the influence of an external force, we have investigated the mechanical unfolding of individual titin domains under various temperatures using the atomic force microscopy. The sample used was a polymer composed of 12 identical titin I27 domains, which was synthesized by protein engineering (a gift from M. Carrion and J.Fernandez, Mayo Foundation). The force-induced domain unfolding has been characterized in the temperature range of 5.5 ºC to 30 ºC. From the temperature dependence of the unfolding forces and the unfolding/refolding rates, the force-induced unfolding/refolding pathways of titin domains can be probed in more details. The results can also provide information on the molecular basis of muscle elasticity at low temperatures.

  10. Micro- and nano-domain engineering in lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.

    2015-12-15

    The physical basis of the domain engineering in ferroelectrics and its application to lithium niobate crystals were reviewed. The unified kinetic approach to the domain structure evolution in electric field was formulated and its validity for understanding the variety of observed domain evolution scenarios was demonstrated. The kinetics and statics of the domain structure in the crystals of lithium niobate family including congruent, stoichiometric, and MgO doped ones have been discussed. The main stages of the periodical poling process and related problems have been pointed out. The basic poling techniques applied for creation of the periodical domain structures in bulk crystals and waveguides were compared. The recent applications of the periodically poled lithium niobate for light frequency conversion using second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation, excitation of the surface acoustic waves, and generation of terahertz radiation have been discussed. The special attention has been paid for achievements in fabrication of high-power optical parametric oscillation and integrated optical devices with periodically poled lithium niobate. The future trends in periodical poling and development of the nanodomain engineering which will allow to create the nanoscale domain patterns necessary for utilization of the new nonlinear interactions were reviewed.

  11. Screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin

    2009-02-01

    Transplant technologies have been studied for the recovery of vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In several rodent retinal degeneration models and in patients, retinal progenitor cells transplanted as layers to the subretinal space have been shown to restore or preserve vision. The methods for evaluation of transplants are expensive considering the large amount of animals. Alternatively, time-domain Stratus OCT was previously shown to be able to image the morphological structure of transplants to some extent, but could not clearly identify laminated transplants. The efficacy of screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT was studied on 37 S334ter line 3 rats with retinal degeneration 6-67 days after transplant surgery. The transplants were morphologically categorized as no transplant, detachment, rosettes, small laminated area and larger laminated area with both Fourier-domain OCT and histology. The efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants was evaluated by comparing the categorization results with OCT and histology. Additionally, 4 rats were randomly selected for multiple OCT examinations (1, 5, 9, 14 and 21days post surgery) in order to determine the earliest image time of OCT examination since the transplanted tissue may need some time to show its tendency of growing. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants in early stages and determined the earliest imaging time for OCT. Fourier-domain OCT makes itself valuable in saving resource spent on animals with unsuccessful transplants.

  12. Singlet CH domain containing human multidomain proteins: an inventory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton presents the basic force in processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking and cell migration. Here, we list 30 human singlet CH (calpononin homology/actin binding) containing multidomain molecules, each encoded by one gene. We show the domain distributions as given by the SMART program. These mosaic proteins organize geographically the placement of selected proteins in proximity within the cell. In most instances, their precise location, their actin binding capacity by way of the singlet CH (or by other domains?) and their physiological functions need further elucidation. A dendrogram based solely on the relationship for the human singlet CH domains (in terms of AA sequences) for the various molecules that possess the domain, implies that the singlet descended from a common ancestor which in turn sprouted three main branches of protein products. Each branch bifurcated multiple times thus accounting for a cornucopia of products. Wherever, additional (unassigned), highly homologous regions exist in related proteins (e.g., in LIM and LMO7 or in Tangerin and EH/BP1), these unrecognized domain regions await assignment as specific functional domains. Frequently genes coding multidomain proteins duplicated. The varying modular nature within multidomain proteins should have accelerated evolutionary changes to a degree not feasible to achieve by means of mere post-duplication mutational changes.

  13. Ferroelectricity of domain walls in rare earth iron garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. I.; Zvezdin, K. A.; Gareeva, Z. V.; Mazhitova, F. A.; Vakhitov, R. M.; Yumaguzin, A. R.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report on electric polarization arising in a vicinity of Bloch-like domain walls in rare-earth iron garnet films. The domain walls generate an intrinsic magnetic field that breaks an antiferroelectric structure formed in the garnets due to an exchange interaction between rare earth and iron sublattices. We explore 180° domain walls whose formation is energetically preferable in the films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic and electric structures of the 180° quasi-Bloch domain walls have been simulated at various relations between system parameters. Singlet, doublet ground states of rare earth ions and strongly anisotropic rare earth Ising ions have been considered. Our results show that electric polarization appears in rare earth garnet films at Bloch domain walls, and the maximum of magnetic inhomogeneity is not always linked to the maximum of electric polarization. A number of factors including the temperature, the state of the rare earth ion and the type of a wall influence magnetically induced electric polarization. We show that the value of polarization can be enhanced by the shrinking of the Bloch domain wall width, decreasing the temperature, and increasing the deviations of magnetization from the Bloch rotation that are regulated by impacts given by magnetic anisotropies of the films.

  14. Optimized wavelet domain watermark embedding strategy using linear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Shelby; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav V.; Pun, Thierry

    2000-04-01

    Invisible Digital watermarks have been proposed as a method for discouraging illicit copying and distribution of copyright material. In recent years it has been recognized that embedding information in a transform domain leads to more robust watermarks. In particular, several approaches based on the wavelet transform have ben proposed to address the problem of image water marking. The advantage of the wavelet transform relative to the DFT or DCT is that it allows for localized water marking of the image. A major difficulty, however, in watermarking in any transform domain lies in the fact that constraints on the allowable distortion at any pixel are specified in the spatial domain. In order to insert an invisible watermark, the current trend has been to model the Human Visual Systems and specify a masking function which yields the allowable distortion for any pixel. This complex function combines contrast, luminance, color, texture and edges. The watermark is then inserted in the transform domain and the inverse transform computed. The watermark is finally adjusted to satisfy the constraints on the pixel distortions. However this method is highly suboptimal since it leads to irreversible losses at the embedding stage because the watermark is being adjusted in the spatial domain with no care for the consequences in the transform domain.

  15. Aberration correction for time-domain ultrasound diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Mast, T Douglas

    2002-07-01

    Extensions of a time-domain diffraction tomography method, which reconstructs spatially dependent sound speed variations from far-field time-domain acoustic scattering measurements, are presented and analyzed. The resulting reconstructions are quantitative images with applications including ultrasonic mammography, and can also be considered candidate solutions to the time-domain inverse scattering problem. Here, the linearized time-domain inverse scattering problem is shown to have no general solution for finite signal bandwidth. However, an approximate solution to the linearized problem is constructed using a simple delay-and-sum method analogous to "gold standard" ultrasonic beamforming. The form of this solution suggests that the full nonlinear inverse scattering problem can be approximated by applying appropriate angle- and space-dependent time shifts to the time-domain scattering data; this analogy leads to a general approach to aberration correction. Two related methods for aberration correction are presented: one in which delays are computed from estimates of the medium using an efficient straight-ray approximation, and one in which delays are applied directly to a time-dependent linearized reconstruction. Numerical results indicate that these correction methods achieve substantial quality improvements for imaging of large scatterers. The parametric range of applicability for the time-domain diffraction tomography method is increased by about a factor of 2 by aberration correction.

  16. Ferroelectricity of domain walls in rare earth iron garnet films.

    PubMed

    Popov, A I; Zvezdin, K A; Gareeva, Z V; Mazhitova, F A; Vakhitov, R M; Yumaguzin, A R; Zvezdin, A K

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, we report on electric polarization arising in a vicinity of Bloch-like domain walls in rare-earth iron garnet films. The domain walls generate an intrinsic magnetic field that breaks an antiferroelectric structure formed in the garnets due to an exchange interaction between rare earth and iron sublattices. We explore 180° domain walls whose formation is energetically preferable in the films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic and electric structures of the 180° quasi-Bloch domain walls have been simulated at various relations between system parameters. Singlet, doublet ground states of rare earth ions and strongly anisotropic rare earth Ising ions have been considered. Our results show that electric polarization appears in rare earth garnet films at Bloch domain walls, and the maximum of magnetic inhomogeneity is not always linked to the maximum of electric polarization. A number of factors including the temperature, the state of the rare earth ion and the type of a wall influence magnetically induced electric polarization. We show that the value of polarization can be enhanced by the shrinking of the Bloch domain wall width, decreasing the temperature, and increasing the deviations of magnetization from the Bloch rotation that are regulated by impacts given by magnetic anisotropies of the films.

  17. Compassion and professional care: exploring the domain.

    PubMed

    van der Cingel, Margreet

    2009-04-01

    Compassion unites people during times of suffering and distress. Unfortunately, compassion cannot take away suffering. Why then, is compassion important for people who suffer? Nurses work in a domain where human suffering is evidently present. In order to give meaning to compassion in the domain of professional care, it is necessary to describe what compassion is. The purpose of this paper is to explore questions and contradictions in the debate on compassion related to nursing care. The paper reviews classical philosophers as well as contemporary scientists' main arguments on compassion. First, I will examine the relationship between compassion and suffering. Second, how does one recognize serious suffering? This issue raises questions about the role of imagination and the need for identification. Third, literature describes compassion as an emotion. Some philosophers consider emotions uncontrollable feelings; others see a clear rational dimension in emotions. In order to determine what compassion is, it is necessary to weigh these contradictional arguments. Fourth, I will discuss motives for compassion. Is compassion an act of altruism or egoism? In this debate Nietzsche and Schopenhauer are well-known opponents. Today, analysis of their arguments leads to some surprising conclusions. Fifth, there is the issue of fault and compassion. Can we only feel compassionate when people who suffer are not to blame for their own suffering? Such a condition faces professional caretakers with a dilemma which needs a thorough analysis if compassion is to be of use in the field of professional care. Finally, I will explore the moral meaning of compassion. Compassion, described as a concept with cognitive as well as affective dimensions, also has volitional and behavioural aspects. These aspects specifically are of importance to nursing care and further research of compassion in the nursing domain.

  18. Spin wave quantization in continuous film with stripe domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Seok; Yoon, Jungbum; Lee, Sukmock; You, Chun-Yeol; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Young Keun

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the spin wave dynamics of CoFeSiB film, which has a stripe domain structure at a low magnetic field region (<1 kOe). We measured the spin wave excitation spectra by employing Brillouin light scattering. Abnormal field dependence and dispersion relations were observed, and they are similar to spin wave quantization in laterally confined magnetic structures such as arrays of magnetic nanowires. The observed spin wave excitation spectra must be interpreted with spin wave quantization such as Damon-Eshbach mode separation. It was found that the spin wave quantization is related to the stripe magnetic domain structure in continuous film. The physical origin of the quantization is the partial reflection of the propagating spin wave at the periodic stripe domain boundaries.

  19. Domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among inpatient adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Jeremy W; Green, Kelly L; Grover, Kelly E; Schatte, Dawnelle J; Morgan, Sharon T

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chronic stress in youth suicidal behaviors. This study examined the relations between specific domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among 131 inpatient youth (M age = 15.02 years) who completed measures of stress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide intent. After controlling for demographics, diagnostic status, past history of attempt, and life event stress, the predictors of suicidal ideation were chronic stress in family relationships, close friendship, and physical health. Chronic close friendship stress also predicted suicide intent among attempters after controlling for covariates. No domain robustly predicted the presence of an attempt or moderated the relation between life event stress and suicidal behaviors. These findings highlight the role of certain domains of chronic stress in suicidal ideation and suicide intent.

  20. Domains in microbial beta-1, 4-glycanases: sequence conservation, function, and enzyme families.

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, N R; Henrissat, B; Kilburn, D G; Miller, R C; Warren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Several types of domain occur in beta-1, 4-glycanases. The best characterized of these are the catalytic domains and the cellulose-binding domains. The domains may be joined by linker sequences rich in proline or hydroxyamino acids or both. Some of the enzymes contain repeated sequences up to 150 amino acids in length. The enzymes can be grouped into families on the basis of sequence similarities between the catalytic domains. There are sequence similarities between the cellulose-binding domains, of which two types have been identified, and also between some domains of unknown function. The beta-1, 4-glycanases appear to have arisen by the shuffling of a relatively small number of progenitor sequences. PMID:1886523

  1. A novel domain-by-domain survivable mechanism in multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Xingwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Chongshan; Li, Hongming; Wang, Hongpeng; Liu, Xin

    2009-03-01

    In multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical networks, the inter-domain routing is a challenge since each single-domain cannot view the full network topology. At the same time, survivability is also an important issue in optical networks since the failures of fiber links or network nodes may lead to a lot of traffic being blocked. In this paper, we study the survivability in multi-domain WDM optical networks, and propose a new survivable mechanism called load balanced domain-by-domain routing (LBDDR). In LBDDR, in order to obtain the efficient inter-domain survivable routes, we present the domain-by-domain routing (DDR) method which can find the intra-domain sub-working path and sub-backup path in each single-domain to form the inter-domain working path and backup path for each demand. In order to reduce the blocking probability, we present the load balanced routing method which can encourage the traffic to be uniformly distributed on the links with more free wavelengths. Simulation results show that, compared with conventional mechanism, LBDDR can obtain better performances.

  2. Frequency Domain Calculations Of Acoustic Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Two complex geometry problems are solved using the linearized Euler equations. The impedance mismatch method1 is used to impose the solid surfaces without the need to use a body-fitted grid. The problem is solved in the frequency domain to avoid long run times. Although the harmonic assumption eliminates all time dependence, a pseudo-time term is added to allow conventional iterative methods to be employed. A Jameson type, Runge-Kutta scheme is used to advance the solution in pseudo time. The spatial operator is based on a seven-point, sixth-order finite difference. Constant coefficient, sixth-derivative artificial dissipation is used throughout the domain. A buffer zone technique employing a complex frequency to damp all waves near the boundaries is used to minimize reflections. The results show that the method is capable of capturing the salient features of the scattering, but an excessive number of grid points are required to resolve the phenomena in the vicinity of the solid bodies because the wavelength of the acoustics is relatively short compared with the size of the bodies. Smoothly transitioning into the immersed boundary condition alleviates the difficulties, but a fine mesh is still required.

  3. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  4. Children’s Experience of Posttraumatic Growth: Distinguishing General from Domain-Specific Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Laceulle, Odilia M.; Kleber, Rolf J.; Alisic, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Although the five domains of posttraumatic growth (new possibilities, relating to others, personal strength, spiritual change and appreciation of life) have been studied extensively in adults, little is known about these domains and their correlates in children. We aimed to examine whether demographic and/or social characteristics are related to children’s reports of overall posttraumatic growth and of growth in specific domains. In a general population study, children aged 8–12 years who had been exposed to adverse events (N = 1290) filled out questionnaires on their experiences, demographic characteristics (gender, age, time lag since event), stress reactions, peer support, religiosity and posttraumatic growth. All demographic and social characteristics were related to overall posttraumatic growth, except time lag. Associations varied across the five domains with the strongest effects being found for stress reactions and religiosity. A higher level of stress reactions was related to more growth in all domains (general effect), whereas religious children experienced more spiritual growth than non-religious children without differences on other domains (domain specific effect). Other effects were small, and some did not remain significant after Bonferroni corrections. These findings suggest the presence of both general and domain-specific correlates of child posttraumatic growth. Although effects were generally small, the current findings show the need to differentiate between the domains of posttraumatic growth in both further research and clinical practice. This will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of posttraumatic growth in children as well as more tailored assessment and intervention. PMID:26714193

  5. DEP domains: structurally similar but functionally different.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Sarah V; Maurice, Madelon M; Bos, Johannes L

    2014-05-01

    The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain is a globular protein domain that is present in about ten human protein families with well-defined structural features. A picture is emerging that DEP domains mainly function in the spatial and temporal control of diverse signal transduction events by recruiting proteins to the plasma membrane. DEP domains can interact with various partners at the membrane, including phospholipids and membrane receptors, and their binding is subject to regulation.

  6. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  7. Domain adaptation based on deep denoising auto-encoders for classification of remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, Emanuele; Demir, Begüm; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of deep learning (DL) for domain adaptation (DA) problems in the classification of remote sensing images to generate land-cover maps. To this end, we introduce two different DL architectures: 1) single-stage domain adaptation (SS-DA) architecture; and 2) hierarchal domain adaptation (H-DA) architecture. Both architectures require that a reliable training set is available only for one of the images (i.e., the source domain) from a previous analysis, whereas it is not for another image to be classified (i.e., the target domain). To classify the target domain image, the proposed architectures aim to learn a shared feature representation that is invariant across the source and target domains in a completely unsupervised fashion. To this end, both architectures are defined based on the stacked denoising auto-encoders (SDAEs) due to their high capability to define high-level feature representations. The SS-DA architecture leads to a common feature space by: 1) initially unifying the samples in source and target domains; and 2) then feeding them simultaneously into the SDAE. To further increase the robustness of the shared representations, the H-DA employs: 1) two SDAEs for learning independently the high level representations of source and target domains; and 2) a consensus SDAE to learn the domain invariant high-level features. After obtaining the domain invariant features through proposed architectures, the classifier is trained by the domain invariant labeled samples of the source domain, and then the domain invariant samples of the target domain are classified to generate the related classification map. Experimental results obtained for the classification of very high resolution images confirm the effectiveness of the proposed DL architectures.

  8. Linguistic relativity.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Phillip; Holmes, Kevin J

    2011-05-01

    The central question in research on linguistic relativity, or the Whorfian hypothesis, is whether people who speak different languages think differently. The recent resurgence of research on this question can be attributed, in part, to new insights about the ways in which language might impact thought. We identify seven categories of hypotheses about the possible effects of language on thought across a wide range of domains, including motion, color, spatial relations, number, and false belief understanding. While we do not find support for the idea that language determines the basic categories of thought or that it overwrites preexisting conceptual distinctions, we do find support for the proposal that language can make some distinctions difficult to avoid, as well as for the proposal that language can augment certain types of thinking. Further, we highlight recent evidence suggesting that language may induce a relatively schematic mode of thinking. Although the literature on linguistic relativity remains contentious, there is growing support for the view that language has a profound effect on thought. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 253-265 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.104 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  10. Pectin Homogalacturonans: Nanostructural Characterization of Methylesterified Domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functionality of pectic hydrocolloids is largely dependent on the two major domains commonly found in their homogalacturonan (HG) regions, i.e., methylester protected domains (MPDs)and non methylesterified domains (NMDs). MPDs can participate in hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions but unli...

  11. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  12. The Motor Domain and its Correlates in Educationally Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rarick, G. Lawrence; And Others

    This monograph is an account of two related investigations of the motor domain and its correlates in educationally handicapped children. Part I describes an investigation primarily concerned with the identification of the basic components of the motor behavior of educable mentally retarded children through the use of factor analysis techniques.…

  13. Mediated Conversations and the Affective Domain: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Lorraine; Cronje, Johannes; Rauscher, Willem; Obermeyer, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Typically, online conversations within a university course or a community of professionals tend to take the form of a dialogue or discussion focusing on a given theme. The two different cases presented here are quite different, despite being goal-related. Cronje and Rauscher explored the affective domain of email messages sent during an online…

  14. From Cognitive-Domain Theory to Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy E.; Deane, Paul; van Rijn, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    This article exemplifies how assessment design might be grounded in theory, thereby helping to strengthen validity claims. Spanning work across multiple related projects, the article first briefly summarizes an assessment system model for the elementary and secondary levels. Next the article describes how cognitive-domain theory and principles are…

  15. Four Critical Domains of Accountability for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Willians, Joseph M.; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Despite recognition of accountability for school counselors, no clear set of interrelated performance measures exists to guide school counselors in collecting and evaluating data that relates to student academic success. This article outlines four critical domains of accountability for school counselors (i.e., grades, attendance, disciplinary…

  16. Adolescents' Perceived Control: Domain Specificity, Expectations and Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grob, Alexander; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined two questions related to adolescents' perceived control, conceptualized as agentic representation persons construct for themselves: (1) To what extent is perceived control specific to particular domains? and (2) How many dimensions are involved in perceived control? Confirmatory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure: an…

  17. Teachers' Domain: Classroom Media Resources from Public Television's WGBH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Explains Teachers' Domain, a digital library being developed for the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) by WGBH, the Boston public television station, which includes an online index of archival resources related to K-12 life sciences supported by customized lesson plans, background essays, discussion questions, and correlations to national…

  18. Repetitive Domain-Referenced Testing Using Computers: the TITA System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olympia, P. L., Jr.

    The TITA (Totally Interactive Testing and Analysis) System algorithm for the repetitive construction of domain-referenced tests utilizes a compact data bank, is highly portable, is useful in any discipline, requires modest computer hardware, and does not present a security problem. Clusters of related keyphrases, statement phrases, and distractors…

  19. Domains of Chronic Stress and Suicidal Behaviors among Inpatient Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Green, Kelly L.; Grover, Kelly E.; Schatte, Dawnelle J.; Morgan, Sharon T.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chronic stress in youth suicidal behaviors. This study examined the relations between specific domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among 131 inpatient youth (M age = 15.02 years) who completed measures of stress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide intent. After controlling for…

  20. Domain 4: Growth and Development National Standards for Sport Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimon, Jane; Darden, Gibson

    2004-01-01

    This article, the third in a series of articles from the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) sport structures, explains how the following two scenarios relate to Domain 4 Standards: (1) two adolescent boys have different baseball throwing skill levels, even though they have been on the same team for the past four years;…

  1. The Importance of Domain-Specific Expertise in Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, John

    2015-01-01

    Although creativity and expertise are related, they are nonetheless very different things. Expertise does not usually require creativity, but creativity generally does require a certain level of expertise. There are similarities in the relationships of both expertise and creativity to domains, however. Research has shown that just as expertise in…

  2. p15RS/RPRD1A (p15INK4b-related Sequence/Regulation of Nuclear Pre-mRNA Domain-containing Protein 1A) Interacts with HDAC2 in Inhibition of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yanquan; Li, Jun; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Zhou, Yifan; Wu, Yinyuan; Feng, Yarui; Zhou, Yu; Su, Fuqin; Jia, Baoqing; Wang, Dong; Chang, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that p15RS (p15INK4b-related sequence), a regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing protein, inhibited Wnt signaling by interrupting the formation of the β-catenin·TCF4 complex. However, how p15RS functions as an intrinsic repressor to repress transcription remains unclear. In this study, we show that p15RS, through a specific interaction with HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2), a deacetylase that regulates gene transcription, maintains histone H3 in a deacetylated state in the promoter region of Wnt-targeted genes where β-catenin·TCF4 is bound. We observed that histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the ability of p15RS in inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Depletion of HDAC2 markedly disabled p15RS inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Interestingly, overexpression of p15RS decreases the level of acetylated histone H3 in the c-MYC promoter. Finally, we demonstrate that p15RS significantly enhances the association of HDAC2 and TCF4 and enhances the occupancy of HDAC2 to DNA, resulting in the deacetylation of histone H3 and the failure of β-catenin interaction. We propose that p15RS acts as an intrinsic transcriptional repressor for Wnt/β-catenin-mediated gene transcription at least partially through recruiting HDAC2 to occupy the promoter and maintaining deacetylated histone H3. PMID:25697359

  3. The Promise of Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, Ashish A.; Li, Jingling; Vaijanapurkar, Samarth; Bue, Brian; Miller, Adam; Donalek, Ciro; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Graham, Matthew; CRTS, iPTF

    2016-01-01

    Most new surveys spend an appreciable time in collecting data on which to train classifiers before they can be used on future observations from the same dataset. The result generating phase can start much earlier if the training could incorporate data accumulated from older surveys enhanced with a small set from the new survey. This is exactly what Domain Adaptation (DA) allows us to do. The main idea behind DAs can be summarized thus: if we have two classes of separable objects in some feature space of a Source survey (S), we can define a hyperplane to separate the two types. In a second Target survey (T), for the same features the hyperplane would be inclined differently. DA methods get the mapping between the two hyperplanes using a small fraction of data from the Target (T) survey and can then be used to predict the classes of the remaining majority of data in T. We discuss the parameters that need to be tuned, the difficulties involved, and ways to improve the results. As we move towards bigger, and deeper surveys, being able to use existing labelled information to conduct classification in future surveys will be more cost-effective and promote time efficiency as well. Starting with the light curve data of 50,000 periodic objects from Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), we have applied domain adaptation techniques such as Geodesic Flow Kernel (GFK) with Random forest classifier and Co-training for domain adaptation (CODA) to the CRTS data which has 35,000 points overlapping with Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and 12,000 with Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR). The results suggest that domain adaptation is an area worth exploring as the knowledge between these surveys is transferable and the approaches to find the mappings between these surveys can be applied to the remaining data as well as for near future surveys such as CRTS-II, Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) to name a few at the optical

  4. Research Domain Criteria: toward future psychiatric nosologies.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Bruce N

    2015-03-01

    The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project was initiated by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in early 2009 as the implementation of Goal 1.4 of its just-issued strategic plan. In keeping with the NIMH mission, to "transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research," RDoC was explicitly conceived as a research-related initiative. The statement of the relevant goal in the strategic plan reads: "Develop, for research purposes, new ways of classifying mental disorders based on dimensions of observable behavior and neurobiological measures." Due to the novel approach that RDoC takes to conceptualizing and studying mental disorders, it has received widespread attention, well beyond the borders of the immediate research community. This review discusses the rationale for the experimental framework that RDoC has adopted, and its implications for the nosology of mental disorders in the future.

  5. Time domain backcalculation of pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kunihito; Nishizawa, Tatsuo; Kikuta, Yukio

    1998-03-01

    Falling weight deflectometor (FWD) has been frequently used to evaluate structural integrity of pavement. The device applies an impulsive force on the surface of pavement and measure surface deflections at several locations including the place of loading. Although the test is dynamic, the data is regarded as pseudo-static data. According to common practice, using the peak load and the corresponding peak deflections, layer moduli are estimated in a static domain such that the measured peak deflections coincide with the corresponding calculated deflections based on the assumption of the theory of linear elasticity. This paper presents a method to back calculate layer moduli in dynamic domain such that the histories of both measured and calculated responses corresponding to the impulsive force coincide. Pavement is modeled by an axisymmetric linear elastic system. FEM is utilized coupled with Ritz vector to reduce a matrix and thus to improve computational efficiency. The backcalculation algorithm used is the Gauss-Newton method coupled with a truncated singular value decomposition.

  6. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  7. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  8. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  9. Observation of large nematic domains of discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Abhijeet; Wang, Xuezhen; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-03-01

    Discotic liquid crystals are commonly found in nature in the form of clay, nacre. They are technologically important in applications such as conductive polymers, semiconductors and photovoltaics. Size and its distribution play an important role in their self-assemblies. Here we observed large nematic domains of discotic liquid crystals grown on a time scale of months. The development of such domains is observed to be faster for nanodisks that relatively smaller in size. The orientation of nanodisks is affected by gravity and inter-particle interactions which are yet to be fully understood.

  10. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  11. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  12. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level.

  13. Structure and function of KH domains.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Roberto; Edwards, Laura; Regan, Lynne

    2008-06-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  14. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  15. Functional divergence in the Arabidopsis LOB-domain gene family

    PubMed Central

    Mangeon, Amanda; Lin, Wan-ching; Springer, Patricia S.

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis LOB-domain (LBD) gene family is composed by 43 members divided in two classes based on amino acid conservation within the LOB-domain. The LOB domain is known to be responsible for DNA binding and protein-protein interactions. There is very little functional information available for most genes in the LBD family and many lbd single mutants do not exhibit conspicuous phenotypes. One plausible explanation for the limited loss-of-function phenotypes observed in this family is that LBD genes exhibit significant functional redundancy. Here we discuss an example of one phylogenetic subgroup of the LBD family, in which genes that are closely related based on phylogeny exhibit distinctly different expression patterns and do not have overlapping functions. We discuss the challenges of using phylogenetic analyses to predict redundancy in gene families. PMID:23073009

  16. Diversity of the DNA replication system in the Archaea domain.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Long, Feng; Cann, Isaac; Whitman, William B

    2014-01-01

    The precise and timely duplication of the genome is essential for cellular life. It is achieved by DNA replication, a complex process that is conserved among the three domains of life. Even though the cellular structure of archaea closely resembles that of bacteria, the information processing machinery of archaea is evolutionarily more closely related to the eukaryotic system, especially for the proteins involved in the DNA replication process. While the general DNA replication mechanism is conserved among the different domains of life, modifications in functionality and in some of the specialized replication proteins are observed. Indeed, Archaea possess specific features unique to this domain. Moreover, even though the general pattern of the replicative system is the same in all archaea, a great deal of variation exists between specific groups.

  17. Diversity of the DNA Replication System in the Archaea Domain

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Cann, Isaac; Whitman, William B.

    2014-01-01

    The precise and timely duplication of the genome is essential for cellular life. It is achieved by DNA replication, a complex process that is conserved among the three domains of life. Even though the cellular structure of archaea closely resembles that of bacteria, the information processing machinery of archaea is evolutionarily more closely related to the eukaryotic system, especially for the proteins involved in the DNA replication process. While the general DNA replication mechanism is conserved among the different domains of life, modifications in functionality and in some of the specialized replication proteins are observed. Indeed, Archaea possess specific features unique to this domain. Moreover, even though the general pattern of the replicative system is the same in all archaea, a great deal of variation exists between specific groups. PMID:24790526

  18. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

  19. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, Paul C.; Thürmer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, ‘ripening'; domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV per C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene–substrate interaction reproduces the results. This work suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials. PMID:25892219

  20. Voltage-controlled domain wall traps in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2013-06-01

    Electrical control of magnetism has the potential to bring about revolutionary new spintronic devices, many of which rely on efficient manipulation of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires. Recently, it has been shown that voltage-induced charge accumulation at a metal-oxide interface can influence domain wall motion in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets, but the effects have been relatively modest and limited to the slow, thermally activated regime. Here we show that a voltage can generate non-volatile switching of magnetic properties at the nanoscale by modulating interfacial chemistry rather than charge density. Using a solid-state ionic conductor as a gate dielectric, we generate unprecedentedly strong voltage-controlled domain wall traps that function as non-volatile, electrically programmable and switchable pinning sites. Pinning strengths of at least 650 Oe can be readily achieved, enough to bring to a standstill domain walls travelling at speeds of at least ~20 m s-1. We exploit this new magneto-ionic effect to demonstrate a prototype non-volatile memory device in which voltage-controlled domain wall traps facilitate electrical bit selection in a magnetic nanowire register.

  1. Nucleation and growth mechanisms of hcp domains in compressed iron.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-06-12

    In our previous work, we have pointed out that the shock-induced phase transition in iron occurs with the help of interface energy which reduces the potential barrier between two phases. Here, through studying the nucleation and growth mechanisms of hcp domains in compressed iron, we find that the flatted-octahedral-structure (FOS) is the primary structural unit of the embryo nucleus and phase interface of hcp domains, and the interfacial energy is reduced via formation of FOSs. The phase transition process can be described by the following four stages: (i) Some atoms deviate from their equilibrium positions with the aid of thermal fluctuations to form FOSs with two different deformation directions in the local region; (ii) FOSs with different deformation directions aggregate to form a thin stratified structure like twin-crystal configuration; (iii) The thin stratified structure undergoes a relative slip to form the new hcp phase; (iv) The hcp phase domain grows up through the formation of new FOSs along the phase boundary. In addition, through comparing the time evolution curves of initial single phase domain, we find that the growth rate of single phase domain depends on the loading way and its occurrence time.

  2. Domain conservation in several volvocalean cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Woessner, J P; Molendijk, A J; van Egmond, P; Klis, F M; Goodenough, U W; Haring, M A

    1994-11-01

    Based on our previous work demonstrating that (SerPro)x epitopes are common to extensin-like cell wall proteins in Chlamydomonas' reinhardtii, we looked for similar proteins in the distantly related species C. eugametos. Using a polyclonal antiserum against a (SerPro)10 oligopeptide, we found distinct sets of stage-specific polypeptides immunoprecipitated from in vitro translations of C. eugametos RNA. Screening of a C. eugametos cDNA expression library with the antiserum led to the isolation of a cDNA (WP6) encoding a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. Analysis of a similarly selected cDNA (VSP-3) from a C. reinhardtii cDNA expression library revealed that it also coded for a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. The C-terminal rod domains of VSP-3 and WP6 are highly homologous, while the N-terminal domains are dissimilar; however, the N-terminal domain of VSP-3 is homologous to the globular domain of a cell wall protein from Volvox carteri. Exon shuffling might be responsible for this example of domain conservation over 350 million years of volvocalean cell wall protein evolution.

  3. Voltage-controlled domain wall traps in ferromagnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2013-06-01

    Electrical control of magnetism has the potential to bring about revolutionary new spintronic devices, many of which rely on efficient manipulation of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires. Recently, it has been shown that voltage-induced charge accumulation at a metal-oxide interface can influence domain wall motion in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets, but the effects have been relatively modest and limited to the slow, thermally activated regime. Here we show that a voltage can generate non-volatile switching of magnetic properties at the nanoscale by modulating interfacial chemistry rather than charge density. Using a solid-state ionic conductor as a gate dielectric, we generate unprecedentedly strong voltage-controlled domain wall traps that function as non-volatile, electrically programmable and switchable pinning sites. Pinning strengths of at least 650 Oe can be readily achieved, enough to bring to a standstill domain walls travelling at speeds of at least ~20 m s(-1). We exploit this new magneto-ionic effect to demonstrate a prototype non-volatile memory device in which voltage-controlled domain wall traps facilitate electrical bit selection in a magnetic nanowire register.

  4. Anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Morse, Jennifer Q; Hill, Jonathan; Pilkonis, Paul A; Yaggi, Kirsten; Broyden, Nichaela; Stepp, Stephanie; Reed, Lawrence Ian; Feske, Ulrike

    2009-06-01

    Emotional dysregulation and attachment insecurity have been reported in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Domain disorganization, evidenced in poor regulation of emotions and behaviors in relation to the demands of different social domains, may be a distinguishing feature of BPD. Understanding the interplay between these factors may be critical for identifying interacting processes in BPD and potential subtypes of BPD. Therefore, we examined the joint and interactive effects of anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization on BPD traits in a clinical sample of 128 psychiatric patients. The results suggest that these factors contribute to BPD both independently and in interaction, even when controlling for other personality disorder traits and Axis I symptoms. In regression analyses, the interaction between anger and domain disorganization predicted BPD traits. In recursive partitioning analyses, two possible paths to BPD were identified: high anger combined with high domain disorganization and low anger combined with preoccupied attachment. These results may suggest possible subtypes of BPD or possible mechanisms by which BPD traits are established and maintained.

  5. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    DOE PAGES

    Thuermer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles; ...

    2015-04-20

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, ‘ripening’; domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV permore » C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene–substrate interaction reproduces the results. This study suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials.« less

  6. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Paul C.; Thürmer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, `ripening' domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV per C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene-substrate interaction reproduces the results. This work suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials.

  7. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Thuermer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles; Rogge, Paul C.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2015-04-20

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, ‘ripening’; domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV per C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene–substrate interaction reproduces the results. This study suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials.

  8. Hydrodynamics of domain relaxation in a polymer monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, E. K.; Hénon, S.; Langevin, D.; Meunier, J.; Léger, L.

    1995-06-01

    The line tension between two phases within a monolayer can be determined from the characteristic relaxation time of deformed domains, if the hydrodynamics of that relaxation, in particular the relative roles of surface and bulk viscosity, can be established. This is accomplished here for a polymer monolayer by varying the viscosity of the bulk substrate. A Poly(dimethyl)siloxane monolayer segregates into dense and dilute polymer domains on aqueous glycerol and glucose solutions (of viscosity 1.2<η/ ηwater<75) as well as on pure water. The surface pressures of these polymer films are, for moderate surface pressures and within experimental precision, independent of the glycerol and glucose content of the substrate solutions. Isolated polymer domains relax toward the circular form, linearly for the early ``bola'' form and exponentially for moderate deformations. Relaxation times Tc are measured for domains of size 10 μmdomains in the two limits, in which surface or bulk viscosity dominates, is discussed. All data are consistent with dissipation dominated by viscosity in the substrate. The deduced line tension is λ=(1.1+/-0.3)×10-12 N.

  9. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    PubMed Central

    Standley, Daron M; Toh, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website . Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies. PMID:17407606

  10. Influence of flexoelectric coupling on domain patterns in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajeev; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Yudin, Petr; Setter, Nava; Ng, Nathaniel; Srolovitz, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Using Ginzburg-Landau theory and two-dimensional (2D) phase field simulations, we analyze the influence of flexoelectric coupling on the domain patterns in ferroelectrics. The phase field simulations predict that a high strength of the flexoelectric coupling leads to formation of a fine structure in domain patterns in ferroelectrics. The fine structure forms when the coupling strength exceeds a critical value and is related to local transition into an incommensurate phase. Depending on the parameters, a structure with stripe patterns with antiparallel polarizations or another one, not seen before, with two-dimensional arrays of alternating vortices is found. Complex domain configurations with coexisting phases and unusual domain walls between them are observed. Although the incommensurate phase does not form for weaker couplings, the influence of flexoelectricity on bulk domain patterns can still be significant. The results of the calculations are rationalized using an analytical model. Directions for the modulation wave vectors in the fine structure are found in the framework of a linear analysis, while the type of the structure—stripes or vortices—is determined by anharmonicity.

  11. Functional domains in tetraspanin proteins.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Christopher S; Kolesnikova, Tatiana V; Hemler, Martin E

    2003-02-01

    Exciting new findings have emerged about the structure, function and biochemistry of tetraspanin proteins. Five distinct tetraspanin regions have now been delineated linking structural features to specific functions. Within the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, there is a variable region that mediates specific interactions with other proteins, as well as a more highly conserved region that has been suggested to mediate homodimerization. Within the transmembrane region, the four tetraspanin transmembrane domains are probable sites of both intra- and inter-molecular interactions that are crucial during biosynthesis and assembly of the network of tetraspanin-linked membrane proteins known as the 'tetraspanin web'. In the intracellular juxtamembrane region, palmitoylation of cysteine residues also contributes to tetraspanin web assembly, and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail region could provide specific functional links to cytoskeletal or signaling proteins.

  12. Identification of the WW domain-interaction sites in the unstructured N-terminal domain of EBV LMP 2A.

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Duk; Park, Sung Jean; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Bong Jin

    2007-01-09

    Epstein-Barr virus latency is maintained by the latent membrane protein (LMP) 2A, which mimics the B-cell receptor (BCR) and perturbs BCR signaling. The cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of LMP2A is composed of 119 amino acids. The N-terminal domain of LMP2A (LMP2A NTD) contains two PY motifs (PPPPY) that interact with the WW domains of Nedd4 family ubiquitin-protein ligases. Based on our analysis of NMR data, we found that the LMP2A NTD adopts an overall random-coil structure in its native state. However, the region between residues 60 and 90 was relatively ordered, and seemed to form the hydrophobic core of the LMP2A NTD. This region resides between two PY motifs and is important for WW domain binding. Mapping of the residues involved in the interaction between the LMP2A NTD and WW domains was achieved by chemical shift perturbation, by the addition of WW2 and WW3 peptides. Interestingly, the binding of the WW domains mainly occurred in the hydrophobic core of the LMP2A NTD. In addition, we detected a difference in the binding modes of the two PY motifs against the two WW peptides. The binding of the WW3 peptide caused the resonances of five residues (Tyr(60), Glu(61), Asp(62), Trp(65), and Gly(66)) just behind the N-terminal PY motif of the LMP2A NTD to disappear. A similar result was obtained with WW2 binding. However, near the C-terminal PY motif, the chemical shift perturbation caused by WW2 binding was different from that due to WW3 binding, indicating that the residues near the PY motifs are involved in selective binding of WW domains. The present work represents the first structural study of the LMP2A NTD and provides fundamental structural information about its interaction with ubiquitin-protein ligase.

  13. Domain Adaptation with Conditional Transferable Components

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Mingming; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Domain adaptation arises in supervised learning when the training (source domain) and test (target domain) data have different distributions. Let X and Y denote the features and target, respectively, previous work on domain adaptation mainly considers the covariate shift situation where the distribution of the features P(X) changes across domains while the conditional distribution P(Y∣X) stays the same. To reduce domain discrepancy, recent methods try to find invariant components T(X) that have similar P(T(X)) on different domains by explicitly minimizing a distribution discrepancy measure. However, it is not clear if P(Y∣T(X)) in different domains is also similar when P(Y∣X) changes. Furthermore, transferable components do not necessarily have to be invariant. If the change in some components is identifiable, we can make use of such components for prediction in the target domain. In this paper, we focus on the case where P(X∣Y) and P(Y) both change in a causal system in which Y is the cause for X. Under appropriate assumptions, we aim to extract conditional transferable components whose conditional distribution P(T(X)∣Y) is invariant after proper location-scale (LS) transformations, and identify how P(Y) changes between domains simultaneously. We provide theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data to show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:28239433

  14. Domain Adaptation with Conditional Transferable Components.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mingming; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Domain adaptation arises in supervised learning when the training (source domain) and test (target domain) data have different distributions. Let X and Y denote the features and target, respectively, previous work on domain adaptation mainly considers the covariate shift situation where the distribution of the features P(X) changes across domains while the conditional distribution P(Y∣X) stays the same. To reduce domain discrepancy, recent methods try to find invariant components [Formula: see text] that have similar [Formula: see text] on different domains by explicitly minimizing a distribution discrepancy measure. However, it is not clear if [Formula: see text] in different domains is also similar when P(Y∣X) changes. Furthermore, transferable components do not necessarily have to be invariant. If the change in some components is identifiable, we can make use of such components for prediction in the target domain. In this paper, we focus on the case where P(X∣Y) and P(Y) both change in a causal system in which Y is the cause for X. Under appropriate assumptions, we aim to extract conditional transferable components whose conditional distribution [Formula: see text] is invariant after proper location-scale (LS) transformations, and identify how P(Y) changes between domains simultaneously. We provide theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data to show the effectiveness of our method.

  15. Materialism and Satisfaction with Over-All Quality of Life and Eight Life Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James A.; Clement, Aimee

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has shown that materialism relates negatively to satisfaction with many life domains. The present study broadens this body of research by examining the relationship between three dimensions of materialism and eight quality of life (QOL) domains in a large, diverse sample of U.S. respondents. Two hypotheses were tested: First,…

  16. Probing Ferroelectric Domain Engineering in BiFeO3 Thin Films by Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Trassin, Morgan; Luca, Gabriele De; Manz, Sebastian; Fiebig, Manfred

    2015-09-02

    An optical probe of the ferroelectric domain distribution and manipulation in BiFeO3 thin films is reported using optical second harmonic generation. A unique relation between the domain distribution and its integral symmetry is established. The ferroelectric signature is even resolved when the film is covered by a top electrode. The effect of voltage-induced ferroelectric switching is imaged.

  17. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Symptom Domains in Twins and Siblings with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Riley, Brien P.; Maes, Hermine H.

    2008-01-01

    Clarifying the sources of variation among autism symptom domains is important to the identification of homogenous subgroups for molecular genetic studies. This study explored the genetic and environmental bases of nonverbal communication and social interaction, two symptom domains that have also been related to treatment response, in 1294 child…

  18. Network Search: A New Way of Seeing the Education Knowledge Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Daniel; Klopfer, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background: The educational knowledge domain may be understood as a system composed of multiple, co-evolving networks that reflect the form and content of a cultural field. This paper describes the educational knowledge domain as having a community structure (form) based in relations of production (authoring) and consumption (referencing), and a…

  19. Conceptualizing and Re-Evaluating Resilience across Levels of Risk, Time, and Domains of Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderbilt-Adriance, Ella; Shaw, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines potential theoretical constraints on resilience across levels of risk, time, and domain of outcome. Studies of resilience are reviewed as they relate to the prevalence of resilience across levels of risk (e.g., single life events vs. cumulative risk), time, and domains of adjustment. Based on a thorough review of pertinent…

  20. 77 FR 37409 - Request for Domains, Instruments, and Measures for Development of a Standardized Instrument for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Domains, Instruments, and Measures for Development of a Standardized... domains, instruments, and measures is occurring now because of the multi-phased survey development and... consistency, test-retest, etc) and validity (content, construct, criterion-related). Results of...

  1. Certain topological properties and duals of the domain of a triangle matrix in a sequence space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Bilâl; Basar, Feyzi

    2007-12-01

    The matrix domain of the particular limitation methods Cesàro, Riesz, difference, summation and Euler were studied by several authors. In the present paper, certain topological properties and [beta]- and [gamma]-duals of the domain of a triangle matrix in a sequence space have been examined as an application of the characterization of the related matrix classes.

  2. Elastic Membrane Deformations Govern Interleaflet Coupling of Lipid-Ordered Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzyanov, Timur R.; Molotkovsky, Rodion J.; Bozdaganyan, Marine E.; Cohen, Fredric S.; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A.

    2015-08-01

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components or interactions at the membrane midplane.

  3. The HARP domain dictates the annealing helicase activity of HARP/SMARCAL1.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Gargi; Yuan, Jingsong; Chen, Junjie

    2011-06-01

    Mutations in HepA-related protein (HARP, or SMARCAL1) cause Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD). HARP has ATP-dependent annealing helicase activity, which helps to stabilize stalled replication forks and facilitate DNA repair during replication. Here, we show that the conserved tandem HARP (2HP) domain dictates this annealing helicase activity. Furthermore, chimeric proteins generated by fusing the 2HP domain of HARP with the SNF2 domain of BRG1 or HELLS show annealing helicase activity in vitro and, when targeted to replication forks, mimic the functions of HARP in vivo. We propose that the HARP domain endows HARP with this ATP-driven annealing helicase activity.

  4. ELASTIC MEMBRANE DEFORMATIONS GOVERN INTERLEAFLET COUPLING OF LIPID-ORDERED DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Galimzyanov, Timur R.; Molotkovsky, Rodion J.; Bozdaganyan, Marine E.; Cohen, Fredric S.; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components nor interactions at the membrane midplane. PMID:26340212

  5. Shape of isolated domains in lithium tantalate single crystals at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shur, V. Ya. Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.; Chezganov, D. S.; Lobov, A. I.; Smirnov, M. M.

    2013-12-09

    The shape of isolated domains has been investigated in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystals at elevated temperatures and analyzed in terms of kinetic approach. The obtained temperature dependence of the growing domain shape in CLT including circular shape at temperatures above 190 °C has been attributed to increase of relative input of isotropic ionic conductivity. The observed nonstop wall motion and independent domain growth after merging in CLT as opposed to stoichiometric lithium tantalate have been attributed to difference in wall orientation. The computer simulation has confirmed applicability of the kinetic approach to the domain shape explanation.

  6. UXDs-Driven Transferring Method from TRIZ Solution to Domain Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihui; Cao, Guozhong; Chang, Yunxia; Wei, Zihui; Ma, Kai

    The translation process from TRIZ solutions to domain solutions is an analogy-based process. TRIZ solutions, such as 40 inventive principles and the related cases, are medium-solutions for domain problems. Unexpected discoveries (UXDs) are the key factors to trigger designers to generate new ideas for domain solutions. The Algorithm of UXD resolving based on Means-Ends Analysis(MEA) is studied and an UXDs-driven transferring method from TRIZ solution to domain solution is formed. A case study shows the application of the process.

  7. Time domain scattering and radar cross section calculations for a thin, coated perfectly conducting plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) calculations for flat, perfectly conducting plates are readily available through the use of conventional frequency domain techniques such as the Method of Moments (MOM). However, if the plate is covered with a dielectric material that is relatively thick in comparison with the wavelength in the material, these frequency domain techniques become increasingly difficult to apply. We present the application of the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Technique to the problem of electromagnetic scattering and RCS calculations from a thin, perfectly conducting plate that is coated with a thick layer of lossless dielectric material. Both time domain and RCS calculations are presented and disclosed.

  8. Time domain scattering and radar cross section calculations for a thin, coated perfectly conducting plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) calculations for flat, perfectly conducting plates are readily available through the use of conventional frequency domain techniques such as the Method of Moments (MOM). However, if the plate is covered with a dielectric material that is relatively thick in comparison with the wavelength in the material, these frequency domain techniques become increasingly difficult to apply. The application is presented of the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique to the problem of electromagnetic scattering and RCS calculations from a thin, perfectly conducting plate that is coated with a thick layer of lossless dielectric material. Both time domain and RCS calculations are presented and discussed.

  9. On the Analysis Methods for the Time Domain and Frequency Domain Response of a Buried Objects*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poljak, Dragan; Šesnić, Silvestar; Cvetković, Mario

    2014-05-01

    There has been a continuous interest in the analysis of ground-penetrating radar systems and related applications in civil engineering [1]. Consequently, a deeper insight of scattering phenomena occurring in a lossy half-space, as well as the development of sophisticated numerical methods based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, Finite Element Method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM) and various hybrid methods, is required, e.g. [2], [3]. The present paper deals with certain techniques for time and frequency domain analysis, respectively, of buried conducting and dielectric objects. Time domain analysis is related to the assessment of a transient response of a horizontal straight thin wire buried in a lossy half-space using a rigorous antenna theory (AT) approach. The AT approach is based on the space-time integral equation of the Pocklington type (time domain electric field integral equation for thin wires). The influence of the earth-air interface is taken into account via the simplified reflection coefficient arising from the Modified Image Theory (MIT). The obtained results for the transient current induced along the electrode due to the transmitted plane wave excitation are compared to the numerical results calculated via an approximate transmission line (TL) approach and the AT approach based on the space-frequency variant of the Pocklington integro-differential approach, respectively. It is worth noting that the space-frequency Pocklington equation is numerically solved via the Galerkin-Bubnov variant of the Indirect Boundary Element Method (GB-IBEM) and the corresponding transient response is obtained by the aid of inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). The results calculated by means of different approaches agree satisfactorily. Frequency domain analysis is related to the assessment of frequency domain response of dielectric sphere using the full wave model based on the set of coupled electric field integral

  10. Recombinant thrombomodulin of different domains for pharmaceutical, biomedical, and cell transplantation applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Jiang, Rui; Sun, Xue-Long

    2014-05-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a membrane glycoprotein mainly expressed by vascular endothelial cells and is involved in many physiological and pathological processes, such as coagulation, inflammation, cancer development, and embryogenesis. Human TM consists of 557 amino acids divided into five distinct domains: N-terminal lectin-like domain (designated as TMD1); six epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain (TMD2); Ser/Thr-rich domain (TMD3); transmembrane domain (TMD4); and cytoplasmic tail domain (TMD5). The different domains are responsible for different biological functions of TM. In the past decades, various domains of TM have been cloned and expressed for TM structural and functional study. Further, recombinant TMs of different domains show promising antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory activity in both rodents and primates and a recombinant soluble TM has been approved for therapeutic application. This review highlights recombinant TMs of diverse structures and their biological functions, as well as the complex interactions of TM with factors involved in the related biological processes. Particularly, recent advances in exploring recombinant TM of different domains for pharmaceutical, biomedical, and cell transplantation applications are summarized.

  11. Floret-shaped solid domains on giant fluid lipid vesicles induced by pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofou, Stavroula; Bandekar, Amey

    2012-02-01

    Lateral lipid phase separation and domain formation induced by changes in pH is significant in liposome-based drug delivery: environmentally responsive lipid heterogeneities can be tuned to alter collective membrane properties such as drug release and drug carrier reactivity impacting, therefore, the therapeutic outcomes. At the micron-meter scale, fluorescence microscopy on Giant Unilamellar fluid Vesicles (GUVs) shows that lowering pH (from 7.0 to 5.0) promotes the condensation of titratable PS or PA lipids into beautiful floret-shaped solid domains in which lipids are tightly packed via H-bonding and VdWs interactions. Solid domains phenomenologically comprise a circular ``core'' cap beyond which interfacial instabilities emerge resembling leaf-like stripes of almost vanishing Gaussian curvature independent of GUVs' preparation path and in agreement with a general condensation mechanism. Increasing incompressibility of domains is strongly correlated with larger number of thinner stripes per domain, and increasing relative rigidity of domains with smaller core cap areas. Line tension drives domain ripening, however the final domain shape is a result of enhanced incompressibility and rigidity maximized by domain coupling across the bilayer. Introduction of a transmembrane osmotic gradient (hyperosmotic on the outer lipid leaflet) allows the domain condensation process to reach its maximum extent which, however, is limited by the minimal expansivity of the continuous fluid membrane.

  12. Systematic analyses reveal uniqueness and origin of the CFEM domain in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Na; Wu, Qin-Yi; Zhang, Gui-Zhi; Zhu, Yue-Yan; Murphy, Robert W.; Liu, Zhen; Zou, Cheng-Gang

    2015-01-01

    CFEM domain commonly occurs in fungal extracellular membrane proteins. To provide insights for understanding putative functions of CFEM, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics of CFEM domains by systematic comparative genomic analyses among diverse animals, plants, and more than 100 fungal species, which are representative across the entire group of fungi. We here show that CFEM domain is unique to fungi. Experiments using tissue culture demonstrate that the CFEM-containing ESTs in some plants originate from endophytic fungi. We also find that CFEM domain does not occur in all fungi. Its single origin dates to the most recent common ancestors of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, instead of multiple origins. Although the length and architecture of CFEM domains are relatively conserved, the domain-number varies significantly among different fungal species. In general, pathogenic fungi have a larger number of domains compared to other species. Domain-expansion across fungal genomes appears to be driven by domain duplication and gene duplication via recombination. These findings generate a clear evolutionary trajectory of CFEM domains and provide novel insights into the functional exchange of CFEM-containing proteins from cell-surface components to mediators in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26255557

  13. Gene3D: Multi-domain annotations for protein sequence and comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Lee, David; Studer, Romain A; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Das, Sayoni; Yeats, Corin; Dessailly, Benoit H; Rentzsch, Robert; Orengo, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Gene3D (http://gene3d.biochem.ucl.ac.uk) is a database of protein domain structure annotations for protein sequences. Domains are predicted using a library of profile HMMs from 2738 CATH superfamilies. Gene3D assigns domain annotations to Ensembl and UniProt sequence sets including >6000 cellular genomes and >20 million unique protein sequences. This represents an increase of 45% in the number of protein sequences since our last publication. Thanks to improvements in the underlying data and pipeline, we see large increases in the domain coverage of sequences. We have expanded this coverage by integrating Pfam and SUPERFAMILY domain annotations, and we now resolve domain overlaps to provide highly comprehensive composite multi-domain architectures. To make these data more accessible for comparative genome analyses, we have developed novel search algorithms for searching genomes to identify related multi-domain architectures. In addition to providing domain family annotations, we have now developed a pipeline for 3D homology modelling of domains in Gene3D. This has been applied to the human genome and will be rolled out to other major organisms over the next year.

  14. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  15. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  16. Allosteric ACTion: the varied ACT domains regulating enzymes of amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lang, Eric J M; Cross, Penelope J; Mittelstädt, Gerd; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2014-12-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzyme activity plays important metabolic roles. Here we review the allostery of enzymes of amino-acid metabolism conferred by a discrete domain known as the ACT domain. This domain of 60-70 residues has a βαββαβ topology leading to a four-stranded β4β1β3β2 antiparallel sheet with two antiparallel helices on one face. Extensive sequence variation requires a combined sequence/structure/function analysis for identification of the ACT domain. Common features include highly varied modes of self-association of ACT domains, ligand binding at domain interfaces, and transmittal of allosteric signals through conformational changes and/or the manipulation of quaternary equilibria. A recent example illustrates the relatively facile adoption of this versatile module of allostery by gene fusion.

  17. Unsupervised Spatial Event Detection in Targeted Domains with Applications to Civil Unrest Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Feng; Dai, Jing; Hua, Ting; Lu, Chang-Tien; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2014-01-01

    Twitter has become a popular data source as a surrogate for monitoring and detecting events. Targeted domains such as crime, election, and social unrest require the creation of algorithms capable of detecting events pertinent to these domains. Due to the unstructured language, short-length messages, dynamics, and heterogeneity typical of Twitter data streams, it is technically difficult and labor-intensive to develop and maintain supervised learning systems. We present a novel unsupervised approach for detecting spatial events in targeted domains and illustrate this approach using one specific domain, viz. civil unrest modeling. Given a targeted domain, we propose a dynamic query expansion algorithm to iteratively expand domain-related terms, and generate a tweet homogeneous graph. An anomaly identification method is utilized to detect spatial events over this graph by jointly maximizing local modularity and spatial scan statistics. Extensive experiments conducted in 10 Latin American countries demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25350136

  18. Dynamics of the Tec-family tyrosine kinase SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justin M; Tarafdar, Sreya; Joseph, Raji E; Andreotti, Amy H; Smithgall, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Wales, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    The Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain is an important regulatory domain found in many signaling proteins. X-ray crystallography and NMR structures of SH3 domains are generally conserved but other studies indicate that protein flexibility and dynamics are not. We previously reported that based on hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) studies, there is variable flexibility and dynamics among the SH3 domains of the Src-family tyrosine kinases and related proteins. Here we have extended our studies to the SH3 domains of the Tec family tyrosine kinases (Itk, Btk, Tec, Txk, Bmx). The SH3 domains of members of this family augment the variety in dynamics observed in previous SH3 domains. Txk and Bmx SH3 were found to be highly dynamic in solution by HX MS and Bmx was unstructured by NMR. Itk and Btk SH3 underwent a clear EX1 cooperative unfolding event, which was localized using pepsin digestion and mass spectrometry after hydrogen exchange labeling. The unfolding was localized to peptide regions that had been previously identified in the Src-family and related protein SH3 domains, yet the kinetics of unfolding were not. Sequence alignment does not provide an easy explanation for the observed dynamics behavior, yet the similarity of location of EX1 unfolding suggests that higher-order structural properties may play a role. While the exact reason for such dynamics is not clear, such motions can be exploited in intra- and intermolecular binding assays of proteins containing the domains.

  19. Electron-beam-induced ferroelectric domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope: Toward deterministic domain patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, James L.; Liu, Shi; Lang, Andrew C.; Hubert, Alexander; Zukauskas, Andrius; Canalias, Carlota; Beanland, Richard; Rappe, Andrew M.; Arredondo, Miryam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on transmission electron microscope beam-induced ferroelectric domain nucleation and motion. While previous observations of this phenomenon have been reported, a consistent theory explaining induced domain response is lacking, and little control over domain behavior has been demonstrated. We identify positive sample charging, a result of Auger and secondary electron emission, as the underlying mechanism driving domain behavior. By converging the electron beam to a focused probe, we demonstrate controlled nucleation of nanoscale domains. Molecular dynamics simulations performed are consistent with experimental results, confirming positive sample charging and reproducing the result of controlled domain nucleation. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of sample geometry and electron irradiation conditions on induced domain response. These findings elucidate past reports of electron beam-induced domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope and provide a path towards more predictive, deterministic domain patterning through electron irradiation.

  20. Structural and functional analysis of domains of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hill, Krista K; Roemer, Sarah C; Churchill, Mair E A; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-01-30

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors.