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Sample records for relations spin-down rates

  1. Tidal spin down rates of homogeneous triaxial viscoelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Frouard, Julien; Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-12-01

    We use numerical simulations to measure the sensitivity of the tidal spin-down rate of a homogeneous triaxial ellipsoid to its axis ratios by comparing the drift rate in orbital semimajor axis to that of a spherical body with the same mass, volume and simulated rheology. We use a mass-spring model approximating a viscoelastic body spinning around its shortest body axis, with spin aligned with orbital spin axis, and in circular orbit about a point mass. The torque or drift rate can be estimated from that predicted for a sphere with equivalent volume if multiplied by 0.5 (1 + b^4/a^4)(b/a)^{-4/3} (c/a)^{-α _c} where b/a and c/a are the body axis ratios and index αc ≈ 1.05 is consistent with the random lattice mass-spring model simulations but αc = 4/3 suggested by scaling estimates. A homogeneous body with axis ratios 0.5 and 0.8, like Haumea, has orbital semimajor axis drift rate about twice as fast as a spherical body with the same mass, volume and material properties. A simulation approximating a mostly rocky body but with 20 per cent of its mass as ice concentrated at its ends has a drift rate 10 times faster than the equivalent homogeneous rocky sphere. However, this increase in drift rate is not enough to allow Haumea's satellite, Hi'iaka, to have tidally drifted away from Haumea to its current orbital semimajor axis.

  2. Measuring the Spin-Down Rate of a High-Velocity Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John

    2013-10-01

    The X-ray and radio morphology of IGR J11014-6103 strongly suggest that it is an energetic pulsar/PWN moving away from the center of the SNR MSH 11-61A at an extraordinarily large velocity of >2,400 km/s. Using XMM-Newton, we recently discovered 62.8 ms pulsations from IGR J11014-6103. Now, we need to measure the spin-down rate of PSR J1101-6101 in order to determine its spin-down power and spin-down age. The spin-down power is needed to understand the structure of its apparent bow-shock nebula and mysterious X-ray streak. The spin-down age is an upper limit on its true age, and will establish whether PSR J1101-6101 could have originated in MSH 11-61A, which would make it the pulsar with the largest known natal kick velocity.

  3. Understanding the spin-down rate changes of PSR B0919+06

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, B. B. P.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Bassa, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    We study the spin-down properties of PSR B0919+06 based on almost 30 years of radio observations. We confirm that the time derivative of the rotational frequency dot{ν} is modulated quasi-periodically and show that it exhibits a repeating double-peaked structure throughout the entire observation span. We model the dot{ν} variation of the pulsar assuming two spin-down rates with sudden switches between them in time. Our results show that the double-peak structure in dot{ν} has a repetition time of about 630 d until MJD 52000 (2001 April) and 550 d since then. During this cycle, the pulsar spin varies from the lower spin-down rate to the upper spin-down rate twice with different amounts of time spent in each state, resulting in a further quasi-stable secondary modulation of the two-state switching. This particular spin-down state switching is broadly consistent with free precession of the pulsar; however, strong evidence linked with this mechanism is not clearly established. We also confirm that the pulsar occasionally emits groups of pulses which appear early in pulse phase, so-called flares, and these events significantly contribute to the pulse-profile shape. We find the dot{ν} modulation and the pulse-shape variations are correlated throughout the observations. However, the flare state is not entirely responsible for this correlation. In addition to the flare state, we detect flare-like events from the pulsar in single-pulse observations. During these events, the shift in pulse phase is small compared to that of the main flare state and clearly visible only in single-pulse observations.

  4. Exploration of spin-down rate of neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lang; Liu, Xi-Wei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-04-01

    We use the evolutionary population synthesis method to investigate the statistical properties of the wind-fed neutron-star (NS) compact (Porb < 10 d) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in our Galaxy, based on different spin-down models. Model 1 assumes that the surrounding material is treated as forming a quasi-static atmosphere. Model 2 assumes that the characteristic velocity of matter and the typical Alfvén velocity of material in the magnetospheric boundary layer are comparable to the sound speed in the external medium. We find that the spin-down rate in the supersonic propeller phase in either model 1 or model 2 is too low to produce the observed number of compact HMXBs. Model 3 assumes that the infalling material is ejected with the corotation velocity at the magnetospheric radius when the magnetospheric radius is larger than the corotation radius. Model 4 uses simple integration of the magnetic torque over the magnetosphere. Both models 3 and 4 have a larger spin down rate than that given by model 1 or 2. We also find that models 3 and 4 can predict a reasonable number of observed wind-fed NS compact HMXBs. By comparing our calculated results with the observed particular distributions of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in a Ps versus Porb diagram, we find that the subsonic propeller phase may not exist at all. However, the spin-down rates in models 3 and 4 both seem reasonable to produce the observed distribution of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in the Ps versus Porb diagram. We cannot find which spin-down rate seems more reasonable from our calculations.

  5. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  6. Correlated spin-down rates and radio emission in PSR B1859+07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, B. B. P.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Rankin, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the spin-down changes of PSR B1859+07 over a period of more than 28 years of radio observation. We identify that the time derivative of the rotational frequency (ν) varies quasi-periodically with a period of ˜350 d, switching mainly between two spin-down states. The profile shape of the pulsar is correlated with the ν˙ variation, producing two slightly different profile shapes corresponding to high- and low-ν˙ states. In addition to these two normal emission states, we confirm the occasional flare-state of the pulsar, in which the emission appears early in spin phase compared to that of the common normal emission. The profile of the flare-state is significantly different from that of the two normal emission states. The correlation analysis further shows that the flare-state is not directly linked with the ν˙ changes. With a simple emission beam model, we estimate the emission altitude of the normal emission to be 240 km, and explain the origin of the flare-state as an emission height variation from the leading edge of the beam. We also argue that the emission of these states can be explained with a partially active beam model. In this scenario, the trailing portion of the radio beam is usually active and the normal emission is produced. The flare-state occurs when the leading edge of the beam becomes active while the trailing part is being blocked. This model estimates a fixed emission altitude of 360 km. However, the cause of the flare-state (i.e. the emission height variation, or the time-dependent activity across the radio beam) is not easily explained.

  7. SGR 1822-1606 (Swift 1822.3-1606): Spin-down rate and inferred dipole field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Strohmayer, Tod; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2011-07-01

    We have been monitoring the new source Swift 1822.3-1606 (Cummings et al. GCN 12159) with RXTE. We acquired a total exposure of 20.6 ks in 5 pointings, spanning a time baseline of 5 days. We clearly detect the 8.44 s pulsations reported earlier (Pagani et al. ATel #3489, Gogus et al ATel #3491, Rea et al Atel #3501). We employed an epoch folding technique to determine the spin ephemeris. Our preliminary analysis reveal the spin period, P = 8.4377158(9) s and the spin-down rate, Pdot = 2.2(5) x 10-11 s/s (Epoch: 55758.5 MJD).

  8. Discovery of a Spin-down State Change in the LMC Pulsar B0540-69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Martin, P.; Smith, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery of a large, sudden, and persistent increase in the spin-down rate of B0540-69, a young pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using observations from the Swift and RXTE satellites. The relative increase in the spin-down rate \\dot{ν } of 36% is unprecedented for B0540-69. No accompanying change in the spin rate is seen, and no change is seen in the pulsed X-ray emission from B0540-69 following the change in the spin-down rate. Such large relative changes in the spin-down rate are seen in the recently discovered class of “intermittent pulsars,” and we compare the properties of B0540-69 to such pulsars. We consider possible changes in the magnetosphere of the pulsar that could cause such a large change in the spin-down rate.

  9. A grid of MHD models for stellar mass loss and spin-down rates of solar analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    Stellar winds are believed to be the dominant factor in the spin-down of stars over time. However, stellar winds of solar analogs are poorly constrained due to observational challenges. In this paper, we present a grid of magnetohydrodynamic models to study and quantify the values of stellar mass loss and angular momentum loss rates as a function of the stellar rotation period, magnetic dipole component, and coronal base density. We derive simple scaling laws for the loss rates as a function of these parameters, and constrain the possible mass loss rate of stars with thermally driven winds. Despite the success of our scaling law in matching the results of the model, we find a deviation between the 'solar dipole' case and a real case based on solar observations that overestimates the actual solar mass loss rate by a factor of three. This implies that the model for stellar fields might require a further investigation with additional complexity. Mass loss rates in general are largely controlled by the magnetic field strength, with the wind density varying in proportion to the confining magnetic pressure B {sup 2}. We also find that the mass loss rates obtained using our grid models drop much faster with the increase in rotation period than scaling laws derived using observed stellar activity. For main-sequence solar-like stars, our scaling law for angular momentum loss versus poloidal magnetic field strength retrieves the well-known Skumanich decline of angular velocity with time, Ω{sub *}∝t {sup –1/2}, if the large-scale poloidal magnetic field scales with rotation rate as B{sub p}∝Ω{sub ⋆}{sup 2}.

  10. Magnetar Spin-Down.

    PubMed

    Harding; Contopoulos; Kazanas

    1999-11-10

    We examine the effects of a relativistic wind on the spin-down of a neutron star and apply our results to the study of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), which are thought to be neutron stars with magnetic fields greater than 1014 G. We derive a spin-down formula that includes torques from both dipole radiation and episodic or continuous particle winds. We find that if SGR 1806-20 puts out a continuous particle wind of 1037 ergs s-1, then the pulsar age is consistent with that of the supernova remnant, but the derived surface dipole magnetic field is only 3x1013 G, in the range of normal radio pulsars. If instead the particle wind flows are episodic with small duty cycle, then the observed period derivatives imply magnetar-strength fields, while still allowing characteristic ages within a factor of 2 of the estimated supernova remnant age. Close monitoring of the periods of SGRs will allow us to establish or place limits on the wind duty cycle and thus the magnetic field and age of the neutron star.

  11. A QUARTER-CENTURY OF OBSERVATIONS OF COMET 10P/TEMPEL 2 AT LOWELL OBSERVATORY: CONTINUED SPIN-DOWN, COMA MORPHOLOGY, PRODUCTION RATES, AND NUMERICAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Christensen, Samantha R.; Farnham, Tony L.

    2012-11-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1983 through 2011. We measured a nucleus rotation period of 8.950 {+-} 0.002 hr from 16 nights of imaging acquired between 2010 September and 2011 January. This rotation period is longer than the period we previously measured in 1999, which was itself longer than the period measured in 1988, and demonstrates that Tempel 2 is continuing to spin down, presumably due to torques caused by asymmetric outgassing. A nearly linear jet was observed which varied little during a rotation cycle in both R and CN images acquired during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions. We measured the projected direction of this jet throughout the two apparitions and, under the assumption that the source region of the jet was near the comet's pole, determined a rotational pole direction of R.A./decl. = 151 Degree-Sign /+59 Degree-Sign from CN measurements and R.A./decl. = 173 Degree-Sign /+57 Degree-Sign from dust measurements (we estimate a circular uncertainty of 3 Degree-Sign for CN and 4 Degree-Sign for dust). Different combinations of effects likely bias both gas and dust solutions and we elected to average these solutions for a final pole direction of R.A./decl. = 162 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign /+58 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign . Photoelectric photometry was acquired on 3 nights in 1983, 2 nights in 1988, 19 nights in 1999/2000, and 10 nights in 2010/2011. The activity exhibited a steep 'turn-on' {approx}3 months prior to perihelion (the exact timing of which varies) and a relatively smooth decline after perihelion. The activity during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions was similar; limited data in 1983 and 1988 (along with IUE data from the literature) were systematically higher and the difference cannot be explained entirely by the smaller perihelion distance. We measured a 'typical' composition, in agreement with previous investigators. Monte Carlo numerical modeling with our pole solution best

  12. Switched magnetospheric regulation of pulsar spin-down.

    PubMed

    Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; Kramer, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid; Stappers, Ben

    2010-07-23

    Pulsars are famed for their rotational clocklike stability and their highly repeatable pulse shapes. However, it has long been known that there are unexplained deviations (often termed timing noise) from the rate at which we predict these clocks should run. We show that timing behavior often results from two different spin-down rates. Pulsars switch abruptly between these states, often quasi-periodically, leading to the observed spin-down patterns. We show that for six pulsars the timing noise is correlated with changes in the pulse shape. Many pulsar phenomena, including mode changing, nulling, intermittency, pulse-shape variability, and timing noise, are therefore linked and are caused by changes in the pulsar's magnetosphere. We consider the possibility that high-precision monitoring of pulse profiles could lead to the formation of highly stable pulsar clocks.

  13. Spin-down dynamics of magnetized solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough and McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor and Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  14. Spin-down Dynamics of Magnetized Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough & McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor & Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  15. Spinning-Down of Moving Magnetars in the Propeller Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropina, O. D.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2006-08-01

    We use axisymmmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the spinning-down of magnetars rotating in the propeller regime and moving supersonically through the interstellar medium. The star loses its angular momentum due to direct interaction of the rotating magnetosphere with the non-rotating interstellar medium. The simulations indicate that magnetars spin-down rapidly due to this interaction, much faster than for the case of a non-moving star. A magnetar with a surface magnetic field of 1013 - 1015 G is found to spin-down to a period P > 10^5-10^6 s in 10^4 - 10^5 yr. This may explain, why a number of soft gamma-repeaters is so small: because only a tiny fraction of all magnetars rotate sufficiently fast to be identified with the neutron stars. From many simulation runs we have derived an approximate scaling law for the angular momentum loss rate, dot{L} ∝ - ρ0.8μ0.6Ω_*1.5/v0.4, where ρ is the density of the interstellar medium, μ is the star's magnetic moment, Ω_* is its angular velocity, and v is velocity of motion.

  16. SPIN-UP/SPIN-DOWN MODELS FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, R. Di; Voss, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M{sub crit}, needed for explosion. When M{sub crit} is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M{sub Ch} WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  17. Spin-up/Spin-down Models for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Voss, R.; Claeys, J. S. W.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M crit, needed for explosion. When M crit is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M Ch WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  18. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays and a New Spin-Down State of the LMC Pulsar B0540-69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Francis E.; Guillemot, Lucas; Kust Harding, Alice; Martin, Pierrick; Smith, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The young pulsar B0540-69 in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud has the third largest spin-down luminosity of the ~2500 known pulsars. Multi-year observations with Fermi/LAT using the ephemerides from RXTE reveal that B0540-69 is the most luminous gamma-ray pulsar ever detected. Its pulsed luminosity above 100 MeV is 5.7x1036 erg/s, about 20 times brighter than the Crab Pulsar, the next brightest. The pulse profile in gamma rays is similar to that seen in X-rays and optical light; the giant radio pulses align with the shoulders of the high-energy profiles. The detection of B0540-69 in gamma rays offers a new look at particle acceleration and emission in the magnetospheres of very young pulsars. Unpulsed gamma-ray emission has also been detected from PSR J0537-6910, another young pulsar in the LMC. The two pulsars contribute most of the gamma-ray emission from the 30 Doradus nebula, indicating that cosmic rays contribute only a small part. Recent monitoring of B0540-69 with the Swift/XRT shows a large, sudden, and persistent increase in the spin-down rate of B0540-69. The relative increase in the spin-down rate of 36% is unprecedented for B0540-69. No accompanying change in the spin rate was seen, and no change was seen in the pulsed X-ray emission from B0540-69 following the change in the spin-down rate. Such large relative changes in the spin-down rate are seen in the recently discovered class of ``intermittent pulsars'', and we compare the properties of B0540-69 to such pulsars. We consider possible changes in the magnetosphere of the pulsar that could cause such a large change in the spin-down rate. These changes are likely to result in a new braking index for the pulsar. We report on continued monitoring with Swift/XRT to determine the new braking index and to detect a new state change, should it occur.

  19. On the Variable Spin-Down of SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Christopher; Duncan, Robert C.; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Finger, Mark H.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the physical implications of the rapid spindown of Soft Gamma Repeater 1900+14 reported in a companion paper by Woods et al. During an 80 day interval between June 1998 and the large outburst on August 27, 1998, the mean spin-down rate increased by a factor 2.3 resulting in a positive period offset of delta P/P = 1 X 10(exp -4)/ A radiation hydrodynamical outflow associated with the August 27 event could impart the required torque, but only if the dipole magnetic field is stronger than about 10(exp 14) G and the outflow lasts longer than the observed X-ray flare. A positive period increment is also a natural consequence of a gradual plastic deformation of the neutron star crust by an intense magnetic field. Finally, we discuss the relative stability of the long term spin-down rate of SGR 1900+14, and compare the relative spindown rates of the SGRs and the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars.

  20. Spin-Down and Active Nutation Controller /SDANC/ for the Galileo project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    The Spin-Down and Active Nutation Controller stabilizes the Galileo spacecraft during spin-down from approximately 70 to 1 rpm. Angular motion of the spacecraft is sensed through a pair of accelerometers and a sun sensor which is needed only at low spin rates. Spin and nutation information is derived by a set of 'loosely coupled' spin and transverse rate estimators. Spin rate is reduced by two spin-down thrusters. The transverse angular rate is compared with a variable threshold; exceeding the threshold activates axial thrusters which impart appropriate transverse torque to reduce the nutation. The scheme was verified by extensive computer simulations and has been demonstrated over a wide range of initial conditions.

  1. Spin-down of a rotating air hockey disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick; Julien, Keith

    2013-11-01

    We extend the work of Weidman (APS, DFD 2008) on the steady float height of a rotating disk to formulate and solve for the unsteady behavior of spin-down to rest. A similarity reduction of the Navier-Stokes equations reduces the problem to a coupled pair of partial differential equations in space and time. For a disk of fixed radius and density, the PDE's must be solved taking into account constraints imposed by the aerodynamic torque and aerodynamic lift. Thus the full solution for the unsteady azimuthal and axial dynamics of the disk can be obtained for given initial values of disk Reynolds number R = W h / ν and dimensionless disk rotation speed S =√{ 2} Ωh / W , where h is the float height, W is the fluid levitation velocity, Ω is the disk rotation rate, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. Integrations reveal interesting families of solutions when plotted over steady solution curves in R- S parameter space and vindicate the quasi-steady spin-down theory reported in earlier work, valid only in a restricted region of parameter space.

  2. Realistic MHD Modelling of Cataclysmic Variable Spin-Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascelles, Alex; Garraffo, Cecilia; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The orbital evolution of cataclysmic variables with periods above the "period gap" (>3 hrs) is governed by angular momentum loss via the magnetized wind of the unevolved secondary star. The usual prescription to study such systems takes into account only the magnetic field of the secondary and assumes its field is dipolar. It has been shown that introduction of the white dwarf and its magnetic field can significantly impact the wind’s structure, leading to a change in angular momentum loss rate and evolutionary timescale by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the complexity of the magnetic field can drastically alter stellar spin-down rates. We explore the effects of orbital separation and magnetic field configuration on mass and angular momentum loss rates through 3-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We present the results of a study of cataclysmic variable orbital evolution including these new ingredients.

  3. Variable Spin-Down in the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14 and Correlations with Burst Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Finger, Mark H.; Thompson, Christopher; Duncan, Robert C.; Hurley, Kevin; Swank, Jean; Murakami, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array observation of the pulsed emission from SGR 1900+14 during September 1996, June-October 1998, and early 1999. Using these measurements and results reported elsewhere. we construct a period history of this source for 2.5 years. We find significant deviations from a steady spin-down trend during quiescence and the burst active interval. Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) observations of the burst emission are presented and correlations between the burst activity and spin-down rate of SGR 1900 + 14 are discussed. We find an 80 day interval during the summer of 1998 when the average spin-down rate is larger than the rate elsewhere by a factor of about 2.3. This enhanced spin-down may, be the result of a discontinuous spin-down event or "braking glitch" at the time of the giant flare on 27 August 1998. Furthermore find a large discrepancy between the pulsar period and average spin-down rate in X-rays as compared to radio observation for December 1998 and January 1999.

  4. Variable Spin-Down in the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14 and Correlations with Burst Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; VanParadijs, Jan; Finger, Mark H.; Thompson, Christopher; Duncan, Robert C.; Hurley, Kevin; Strohmayer, Tod; Swank, Jean; Murakami, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array observations of the pulsed emission from SGR 1900+ 14 during 1996 September, 1998 June-October, and early 1999. Using these measurements and results reported elsewhere, we construct a period history of this source for 2.5 yr. We find significant deviations from a steady spin-down trend during quiescence and the burst active interval. Burst and Transient Source Experiment observations of the burst emission are presented and correlations between the burst activity and spin-down rate of SGR 1900+14 are discussed. We find an 80 day interval during the summer of 1998 when the average spin-down rate is larger than the rate elsewhere by a factor approximately 2.3. This enhanced spin-down may be the result of a discontinuous spin-down event or "braking glitch" at the time of the giant flare on 1998 August 27. Furthermore, we find a large discrepancy between the pulsar period and average spin-down rate in X-rays as compared to radio observations for 1998 December and 1999 January.

  5. Interfacial mass transfer to a cylinder endwall during spin-up/spin-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrousse, Mark F.; Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The local rate of mass transfer to the bottom endwall of a large aspect ratio cylinder was measured during spin-up/spin-down. The local mass transfer rate was a strong function radial position along the endwall. At the center during spin-up from rest, the maximum enhancement in mass transfer occurred after the Ekman time scale and before the viscous time scale. At the center during spin-down to rest, a stagnation vortex formed, causing the mass transfer rate to decay and then increase back to the original value of the order of the viscous time scale. Away from the center a much more complicated pattern was observed, but spin-up and spin-down were similar. Two peaks in mass transfer rate occurred for an Ekman number over 0.0074. Alternating spin-up and spin-down with a short period caused the center of the endwall to experience a nearly sinusoidal variation in mass transfer with the frequency equal to the forcing frequency. Near the edge the frequency was twice the forcing frequency.

  6. Studying stellar spin-down with Zeeman-Doppler magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Hébrard, É. M.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.; BCool Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic activity and rotation are known to be intimately linked for low-mass stars. Understanding rotation evolution over the stellar lifetime is therefore an important goal within stellar astrophysics. In recent years, there has been increased focus on how the complexity of the stellar magnetic field affects the rate of angular-momentum loss from a star. This is a topic that Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that is capable of reconstructing the large-scale magnetic field topology of a star, can uniquely address. Using a potential field source surface model, we estimate the open flux, mass-loss rate and angular-momentum-loss rates for a sample of 66 stars that have been mapped with ZDI. We show that the open flux of a star is predominantly determined by the dipolar component of its magnetic field for our choice of source surface radius. We also show that, on the main sequence, the open flux, mass-loss and angular-momentum-loss rates increase with decreasing Rossby number. The exception to this rule is stars less massive than 0.3 M⊙. Previous work suggests that low-mass M dwarfs may possess either strong, ordered and dipolar fields or weak and complex fields. This range of field strengths results in a large spread of angular-momentum-loss rates for these stars and has important consequences for their spin-down behaviour. Additionally, our models do not predict a transition in the mass-loss rates at the so-called wind-dividing line noted from Lyα studies.

  7. On the Dramatic Spin-up/Spin-Down Torque Reversals in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Mathew; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    Dramatic torque reversals between spin-up and spin-down have been observed in half of the persistent X-ray pulsars monitored by the Burst and Transient Space Experiment (BATSE) all-sky monitor on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Theoretical models developed to explain early pulsar timing data can explain spin-down torques via a disk-magnetosphere interaction if the star nearly corotates with the inner accretion disk. To produce the observed BATSE torque reversals, however, these equilibrium models require the disk to alternate between two mass accretion rates, with M+/- producing accretion torques of similar magnitude but always of opposite sign. Moreover, in at least one pulsar (GX 1+4) undergoing secular spin-down, the neutron star spins down faster during brief (approximately 20 day) hard X-ray flares-this is opposite the correlation expected from standard theory, assuming that BATSE pulsed flux increases with mass accretion rate. The 10 day to 10 yr intervals between torque reversals in these systems are much longer than any characteristic magnetic or viscous timescale near the inner disk boundary and are more suggestive of a global disk phenomenon. We discuss possible explanations of the observed torque behavior. Despite the preferred sense of rotation defined by the binary orbit, the BATSE observations are surprisingly consistent with an earlier suggestion for GX 1+4: the disks in these systems somehow alternate between episodes of prograde and retrograde rotation. We are unaware of any mechanism that could produce a stable retrograde disk in a binary undergoing Roche lobe overflow, but such flip-flop behavior does occur in numerical simulations of wind-fed systems. One possibility is that the disks in some of these binaries are fed by an X-ray-excited wind.

  8. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2014-01-20

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n {sub rm} ≤ 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  9. The Long-term Post-outburst Spin Down and Flux Relaxation of Magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.

    2014-05-01

    The magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606 entered an outburst phase in 2011 July. Previous X-ray studies of its post-outburst rotational evolution yielded inconsistent measurements of the spin-inferred magnetic field. Here we present the timing behavior and flux relaxation from over two years of Swift, RXTE, and Chandra observations following the outburst. We find that the ambiguity in previous timing solutions was due to enhanced spin down that resembles an exponential recovery following a glitch at the outburst onset. After fitting out the effects of the recovery, we measure a long-term spin-down rate of \\dot{\

  10. A Magnetar Wind Nebula: the Spin-down-Powered Wind is not Enough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Gelfand, Joseph; Younes, George A.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Kust Harding, Alice; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huppenkothen, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars are a small class of slowly-rotating (P~2-12 s) highly magnetized (surface dipole fields ~10^{14}-10^{15} G) that show a variety of bursting activity, powered by the decay of their super-strong magnetic field. While many rotation-powered pulsars are surrounded by a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by their spin-down MHD wind (the prime example being the Crab nebula), only now has the first magnetar wind nebula (MWN) been discovered in X-rays, around Swift J1834.9-0846. We have analyzed this system in detail to see what can be learned from it. We find good evidence that unlike normal PWNe, this MWN cannot be powered by its spin-down MHD wind alone. A considerable contribution to the MWN energy should come from a different source, most likely sporadic outflows associated with the magnetar's bursting activity. This suggests that the MWN may serve as a calorimeter, and provide a new and robust estimate for the magnetar's long-term mean energy output rate in outflows. We also discuss other interesting aspects of this system.

  11. Beating the Spin-down Limit on Gravitational Wave Emission from the Vela Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, N.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parameswaran, A.; Pardi, S.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Podkaminer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Salit, M.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shihan Weerathunga, T.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szokoly, G. P.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Turner, L.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Buchner, S.; Hotan, A.; Palfreyman, J.

    2011-08-01

    We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, 1.9 × 10-24 and 2.2 × 10-24, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of 2.1 × 10-24, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect spin-down limit of 3.3 × 10-24 for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of ~10-3. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and the wave polarization angles are unknown.

  12. Torque Reversal and Spin-Down of the Accretion-Powered Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto L.; Bildsten, L.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Koh, D. T.; Prince, T. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Finger, M. H.; Scott, D. M.; Wilson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    Over 5 yr of hard X-ray (20-60 keV) monitoring of the 7.66 s accretion-powered pulsar 4U 1626-67 with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE large-area detectors has revealed that the neutron star is now steadily spinning down, in marked contrast to the steady spin-up and spin-down torques differ by only 15% with the neutron star spin changing on a timescale |v/v| approximately equals 5000 yr in both states. The current spin-down rate is itself decreasing on a timescale |v/v| approximately equals 26 yr. The long-term timing history shows small-amplitude variations on a 4000 day timescale, which are probably due to variations in the mass transfer rate. The pulsed 20-60 keV emission from 4U 1626-67 is well-fitted by a power-law spectrum with photon index gamma = 4.9 and a typical pulsed intensity of 1.5 x 10(exp -10) ergs cm (exp -2)s(exp -1). The low count rates with BATSE prohibited us from constraining the reported 42 minute binary orbit, but we can rule out long-period orbits in the range 2 days < or = P(orb) < or = 900 days. We compare the long-term torque behavior of 4U 1626-67 to other disk-fed accreting pulsars and discuss the implications of our results for the various theories of magnetic accretion torques. The abrupt change in the sign of the torque is difficult to reconcile with the extremely smooth spin-down now observed. The strength of the torque noise in 4U 1626-67, approximately 10(exp -22) Hz(exp 2)s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1), is the smallest ever measured for an accreting X-ray pulsar, and it is comparable to the timing noise seen in young radio pulsars. We close by pointing out that the core temperature and external torque (the two parameters potentially relevant to internal sources of timing noise) of an accreting neutron star are also comparable to those of young radio pulsars.

  13. Comparing models of the periodic variations in spin-down and beamwidth for PSR B1828-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, G.; Jones, D. I.; Prix, R.

    2016-05-01

    We build a framework using tools from Bayesian data analysis to evaluate models explaining the periodic variations in spin-down and beamwidth of PSR B1828-11. The available data consist of the time-averaged spin-down rate, which displays a distinctive double-peaked modulation, and measurements of the beamwidth. Two concepts exist in the literature that are capable of explaining these variations; we formulate predictive models from these and quantitatively compare them. The first concept is phenomenological and stipulates that the magnetosphere undergoes periodic switching between two metastable states as first suggested by Lyne et al. The second concept, precession, was first considered as a candidate for the modulation of B1828-11 by Stairs et al. We quantitatively compare models built from these concepts using a Bayesian odds ratio. Because the phenomenological switching model itself was informed by these data in the first place, it is difficult to specify appropriate parameter-space priors that can be trusted for an unbiased model comparison. Therefore, we first perform a parameter estimation using the spin-down data, and then use the resulting posterior distributions as priors for model comparison on the beamwidth data. We find that a precession model with a simple circular Gaussian beam geometry fails to appropriately describe the data, while allowing for a more general beam geometry provides a good fit to the data. The resulting odds between the precession model (with a general beam geometry) and the switching model are estimated as 102.7±0.5 in favour of the precession model.

  14. Open clusters as laboratories for stellar spin-down and magnetic activity decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Agueros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2017-01-01

    The oldest open clusters within 250 pc of the Sun, the Hyades and Praesepe, are important benchmarks for calibrating stellar properties such as rotation and magnetic activity. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at ~600 Myr. The repurposed Kepler mission, K2, has allowed us to measure rotation periods for dozens of Hyads and hundreds of Praesepe members, including the first periods measured for fully convective Hyads. These data have enabled new tests of models describing the evolution of stellar rotation; discrepancies with these models imply that we still do not fully understand how magnetic fields affect stellar spin-down. I will present rotation periods measured for 48 Hyads and 699 Praesepe members with K2, along with associated Halpha and X-ray fluxes. I will also show how we can compare the dependence of H-alpha and X-ray emission on rotation in order to test theories of magnetic field topology and stellar dynamos. These tests inform models of stellar wind-driven angular momentum loss and the age-rotation-activity relation.

  15. CONSTRAINING THE SPIN-DOWN TIMESCALE OF THE WHITE DWARF PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiangcun; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Justham and Di Stefano et al. proposed that the white dwarf progenitor of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) may have to spin down before it can explode. As the white dwarf spin-down timescale is not well known theoretically, here we try to constrain it empirically (within the framework of this spin-down model) for progenitor systems that contain a giant donor and for which circumbinary material has been detected after the explosion: we obtain an upper limit of a few 10{sup 7}yr. Based on the study of Di Stefano and Kilic, this means that it is too early to rule out the existence of a surviving companion in SNR 0509–67.5.

  16. THE SPIN-DOWN OF SWIFT J1822.3-1606: A NEW GALACTIC MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect

    Livingstone, M. A.; Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2011-12-20

    On 2011 July 14, a new magnetar candidate, Swift J1822.3-1606, was identified via a rate trigger on the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope. Here we present an initial analysis of the X-ray properties of the source, using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Swift, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, spanning 2011 July 16-October 8. We measure a precise spin period of P = 8.43771968(6) s and a spin-down rate of P-dot =2.54(22) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13}, at MJD 55761.0, corresponding to an inferred surface dipole magnetic field of B = 4.7(2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, the second lowest thus far measured for a magnetar, though similar to those of 1E 2259+586 and several high-magnetic field radio pulsars. We show that the flux decay in the 1-10 keV band is best fit by a double exponential with timescales of 9 {+-} 1 and 55 {+-} 9 days. The pulsed count rate decay in the 2-10 keV band, by contrast, is better fit by a single exponential decay with timescale 15.9 {+-} 0.2 days. After increasing from {approx}35% for {approx}20 days after the onset of the outburst, the pulsed fraction in the 2-10 keV band remained constant at {approx}45%. We argue that these properties confirm this source to be a new member of the class of objects known as magnetars. We consider the distribution of magnetar periods and inferred dipole magnetic field strengths, showing that the former appears flat in the 2-12 s range, while the latter appears peaked in the 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} G range.

  17. The Spin-down of Swift J1822.3-1606: A New Galactic Magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingstone, M. A.; Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2011-12-01

    On 2011 July 14, a new magnetar candidate, Swift J1822.3-1606, was identified via a rate trigger on the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope. Here we present an initial analysis of the X-ray properties of the source, using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Swift, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, spanning 2011 July 16-October 8. We measure a precise spin period of P = 8.43771968(6) s and a spin-down rate of \\dot{P}=2.54(22)\\times 10^{-13}, at MJD 55761.0, corresponding to an inferred surface dipole magnetic field of B = 4.7(2) × 1013 G, the second lowest thus far measured for a magnetar, though similar to those of 1E 2259+586 and several high-magnetic field radio pulsars. We show that the flux decay in the 1-10 keV band is best fit by a double exponential with timescales of 9 ± 1 and 55 ± 9 days. The pulsed count rate decay in the 2-10 keV band, by contrast, is better fit by a single exponential decay with timescale 15.9 ± 0.2 days. After increasing from ~35% for ~20 days after the onset of the outburst, the pulsed fraction in the 2-10 keV band remained constant at ~45%. We argue that these properties confirm this source to be a new member of the class of objects known as magnetars. We consider the distribution of magnetar periods and inferred dipole magnetic field strengths, showing that the former appears flat in the 2-12 s range, while the latter appears peaked in the 1014-1015 G range.

  18. GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SPIN-DOWN AND STALLING LOWER LIMITS ON THE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY OF THE ACCRETED MOUNTAIN IN A MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vigelius, M.; Melatos, A.

    2010-07-01

    The electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar is limited by the observed spin-down rate of binary radio millisecond pulsars (BRMSPs) and the spins and X-ray fluxes of accreting millisecond pulsars (AMSPs). We find {eta}{>=}10{sup -28} s ({tau}{sub SD}/1 Gyr){sup -0.8} (where {tau}{sub SD} is the spin-down age) for BRMSPs and {eta}{>=}10{sup -25} s ( M-dot{sub a}/ M-dot{sub E}){sup 0.6} (where M-dot{sub a} and M-dot{sub E} are the actual and Eddington accretion rates) for AMSPs. These limits are inferred assuming that the mountain attains a steady state, where matter diffuses resistively across magnetic flux surfaces but is replenished at an equal rate by infalling material. The mountain then relaxes further resistively after accretion ceases. The BRMSP spin-down limit approaches the theoretical electron-impurity resistivity at temperatures {approx_gt}10{sup 5} K for an impurity concentration of {approx}0.1, while the AMSP stalling limit falls 2 orders of magnitude below the theoretical electron-phonon resistivity for temperatures above 10{sup 8} K. Hence, BRMSP observations are already challenging theoretical resistivity calculations in a useful way. Next-generation gravitational-wave interferometers will constrain {eta} at a level that will be competitive with electromagnetic observations.

  19. (S)Pinning down protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, Micha Ben Achim; Erlendsson, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein molecules are highly diverse communication platforms and their interaction repertoire stretches from atoms over small molecules such as sugars and lipids to macromolecules. An important route to understanding molecular communication is to quantitatively describe their interactions. These types of analyses determine the amounts and proportions of individual constituents that participate in a reaction as well as their rates of reactions and their thermodynamics. Although many different methods are available, there is currently no single method able to quantitatively capture and describe all types of protein reactions, which can span orders of magnitudes in affinities, reaction rates, and lifetimes of states. As the more versatile technique, solution NMR spectroscopy offers a remarkable catalogue of methods that can be successfully applied to the quantitative as well as qualitative descriptions of protein interactions. In this review we provide an easy‐access approach to NMR for the non‐NMR specialist and describe how and when solution state NMR spectroscopy is the method of choice for addressing protein ligand interaction. We describe very briefly the theoretical background and illustrate simple protein–ligand interactions as well as typical strategies for measuring binding constants using NMR spectroscopy. Finally, this review provides examples of caveats of the method as well as the options to improve the outcome of an NMR analysis of a protein interaction reaction. PMID:28019676

  20. Spin Down of Pulsations in the Cooling Tail of an X-ray Burst from 4U 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery with the proportional counter array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of a decrease in the frequency of X-ray brightness oscillations in the cooling tail of an X-ray burst from 4U 1636-53. This is the first direct evidence for a spin down of the pulsations seen during thermonuclear bursts. We find that the spin down episode is correlated with the appearance in this burst of an extended tail of emission with a decay timescale much longer than is seen in other bursts from 4U 1636-53 in the same set of observations. We present both time resolved energy and variability spectra during this burst and compare them with results from a second burst which shows neither a spin down episode nor an extended tail. A spectral evolution study of the "spin down" burst reveals a secondary signature of weak radius expansion, not seen in other bursts, and correlated with the spin down episode, which may indicate a secondary thermonuclear energy release. We interpret the spin down episode in the context of an angular momentum conserving shell, which is reexpanded and therefore spun down by an additional thermonuclear energy release which could also explain the extended X-ray tail.

  1. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  2. Neutrino cooling and spin-down of rapidly rotating compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Sandalski, Stou

    2010-11-15

    The gravitational-wave instability of r modes in rapidly rotating compact stars is believed to spin them down to angular frequencies {Omega}{approx}0.1{Omega}{sub Kepler} soon after their birth in a supernova. We point out that the r-mode perturbation also impacts the neutrino cooling and viscosity in hot compact stars via processes that restore weak equilibrium. We illustrate this fact with a simple model of spin-down due to gravitational-wave emission in compact stars composed entirely of three-flavor degenerate quark matter (a strange quark star). Nonequilibrium neutrino cooling of this oscillating fluid matter is quantified. Our results imply that a consistent treatment of the thermal and spin-frequency evolution of a young and hot compact star is a requisite in estimating the persistence of gravitational waves from such a source.

  3. The long-term post-outburst spin down and flux relaxation of magnetar swift J1822.3–1606

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.

    2014-05-01

    The magnetar Swift J1822.3–1606 entered an outburst phase in 2011 July. Previous X-ray studies of its post-outburst rotational evolution yielded inconsistent measurements of the spin-inferred magnetic field. Here we present the timing behavior and flux relaxation from over two years of Swift, RXTE, and Chandra observations following the outburst. We find that the ambiguity in previous timing solutions was due to enhanced spin down that resembles an exponential recovery following a glitch at the outburst onset. After fitting out the effects of the recovery, we measure a long-term spin-down rate of ν-dot =(−3.0 ± 0.3)×10{sup −16} s{sup –2} which implies a dipolar magnetic field of 1.35 × 10{sup 13} G, lower than all previous estimates for this source. We also consider the post-outburst flux evolution, and fit it with both empirical and crustal cooling models. We discuss the flux relaxation in the context of both crustal cooling and magnetospheric relaxation models.

  4. Dissipation, energy transfer, and spin-down luminosity in 2.5D PIC simulations of the pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2015-05-01

    We perform 2.5D axisymmetric simulations of the pulsar magnetosphere (aligned dipole rotator) using the charge conservative, relativistic, electromagnetic particle in cell code PICSAR. Particle in cell codes are a powerful tool to use for studying the pulsar magnetosphere, because they can handle the force-free and vacuum limits and provide a self-consistent treatment of magnetic reconnection. In the limit of dense plasma throughout the magnetosphere, our solutions are everywhere in the force-free regime except for dissipative regions at the polar caps, in the current layers, and at the Y-point. These dissipative regions arise self-consistently, since we do not have any explicit dissipation in the code. A minimum of ≈15-20 per cent of the electromagnetic spin-down luminosity is transferred to the particles inside 5 light cylinder radii. However, the particles can carry as much as ≳ 50 per cent of the spin-down luminosity if there is insufficient plasma in the outer magnetosphere to screen the component of electric field parallel to the magnetic field. In reality, the component of the spin-down luminosity carried by the particles could be radiated as gamma-rays, but high-frequency synchrotron emission would need to be implemented as a sub-grid process in our simulations and is not present for the current suite of runs. The value of the spin-down luminosity in our simulations is within ≈10 per cent of the force-free value, and the structure of the electromagnetic fields in the magnetosphere is on the whole consistent with the force-free model.

  5. Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum hydrodynamics of degenerated electrons: Spin-electron acoustic wave appearance.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-03-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model of charged spin-1/2 particles contains physical quantities defined for all particles of a species including particles with spin-up and with spin-down. Different populations of states with different spin directions are included in the spin density (the magnetization). In this paper I derive a QHD model, which separately describes spin-up electrons and spin-down electrons. Hence electrons with different projections of spins on the preferable direction are considered as two different species of particles. It is shown that the numbers of particles with different spin directions do not conserve. Hence the continuity equations contain sources of particles. These sources are caused by the interactions of the spins with the magnetic field. Terms of similar nature arise in the Euler equation. The z projection of the spin density is no longer an independent variable. It is proportional to the difference between the concentrations of the electrons with spin-up and the electrons with spin-down. The propagation of waves in the magnetized plasmas of degenerate electrons is considered. Two regimes for the ion dynamics, the motionless ions and the motion of the degenerate ions as the single species with no account of the spin dynamics, are considered. It is shown that this form of the QHD equations gives all solutions obtained from the traditional form of QHD equations with no distinction of spin-up and spin-down states. But it also reveals a soundlike solution called the spin-electron acoustic wave. Coincidence of most solutions is expected since this derivation was started with the same basic equation: the Pauli equation. Solutions arise due to the different Fermi pressures for the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons in the magnetic field. The results are applied to degenerate electron gas of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals in the external magnetic field. The dispersion of the spin-electron acoustic waves in the partially spin

  6. Oblique propagation of longitudinal waves in magnetized spin-1/2 plasmas: Independent evolution of spin-up and spin-down electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A. Kuz’menkov, L.S.

    2015-10-15

    We consider quantum plasmas of electrons and motionless ions. We describe separate evolution of spin-up and spin-down electrons. We present corresponding set of quantum hydrodynamic equations. We assume that plasmas are placed in an uniform external magnetic field. We account different occupation of spin-up and spin-down quantum states in equilibrium degenerate plasmas. This effect is included via equations of state for pressure of each species of electrons. We study oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We show that instead of two well-known waves (the Langmuir wave and the Trivelpiece–Gould wave), plasmas reveal four wave solutions. New solutions exist due to both the separate consideration of spin-up and spin-down electrons and different occupation of spin-up and spin-down quantum states in equilibrium state of degenerate plasmas.

  7. ON THE SPIN-DOWN AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1207.4-5209

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V. E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.edu

    2011-06-01

    We analyze all of the archival X-ray timing data from the years 2000-2008 on the weakly magnetized central compact object (CCO) pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209 in an attempt to measure its dipole magnetic field strength via spin-down. because most of these observations were not planned for the purpose of phase-coherent timing, the resulting ephemeris is not unique, but is restricted to two comparably good timing solutions that correspond to B{sub s} = 9.9 x 10{sup 10} G or 2.4 x 10{sup 11} G, respectively, assuming dipole spin-down. One of these should be the correct value and the other one an alias. There are no spinning-up solutions. The smaller value of B{sub s} is close to the surface field of 8 x 10{sup 10} G that is measured independently from the unique absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of 1E 1207.4-5209, assuming that the lowest-energy line at 0.7 keV is the electron-cyclotron fundamental. We suggest that 1E 1207.4-5209 has the strongest magnetic field among CCOs, which would account for the unique presence of its cyclotron absorption spectrum, while other CCOs likely have even weaker fields for which the cyclotron fundamental falls below the observable soft X-ray band.

  8. The spin-down rate of Swift J1822.3-1606 finally measured: confirmation as magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.

    2011-09-01

    Data from monitoring observations of magnetar-candidate Swift J1822.3-1606 with RXTE PCA covering a time span of about 10 weeks (MJD 55758-55826) since its discovery on July 14, 2011 (ATEL #3488; GCN #12159) have been used to construct an accurate phase-coherent timing solution. Barycentered pulse arrival times (ToA's; see ATEL #3493 for the adopted source location) have been obtained by a cross-correlation method with a high-statistics pulse-profile template.

  9. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Tong, H.; Yan, W. M.; Yuan, J. P.; Wang, N.; Xu, R. X.

    2014-06-10

    Intermittent pulsars are part-time radio pulsars. They have higher slow down rates in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate of the neutron star. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841–0500, and PSR J1832+0029) allows their magnetic fields and inclination angles to be calculated simultaneously. The theoretical braking indices of intermittent pulsars are also given. In the pulsar wind model, the density of the particle wind can always be the Goldreich-Julian density. This may ensure that different on states of intermittent pulsars are stable. The duty cycle of particle wind can be determined from timing observations. It is consistent with the duty cycle of the on state. Inclination angle and braking index observations of intermittent pulsars may help to test different models of particle acceleration. At present, the inverse Compton scattering induced space charge limited flow with field saturation model can be ruled out.

  10. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  11. Are ultralong gamma-ray bursts powered by black holes spinning down?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are violent explosions, coming from cosmological distances. They are detected in gamma-rays (also X-rays, UV, optical, radio) almost every day, and have typical durations of a few seconds to a few minutes. Some GRBs have been reported with extraordinary durations of 104 s, the so-called ultralong GRBs. It has been debated whether these form a new distinct class of events or whether they are similar to long GRBs. According to Blandford & Znajek, the spin energy of a rotating black hole can be extracted electromagnetically, should the hole be endowed with a magnetic field supported by electric currents in a surrounding disc. We argue that this can be the case for the central engines of GRBs and we show that the duration of the burst depends on the magnetic flux accumulated on the event horizon of the black hole. We thus estimate the surface magnetic field of a possible progenitor star, and we conclude that an ultralong GRB may originate from a progenitor star with a relatively low magnetic field.

  12. A Laboratory Exercise with Related Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    A laboratory experiment, based on a simple electric circuit that can be used to demonstrate the existence of real-world "related rates" problems, is outlined and an equation for voltage across the capacitor terminals during discharge is derived. The necessary materials, setup methods, and experimental problems are described. A student laboratory…

  13. Climatology tuned reflectivity-rain rate relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Atlas, David

    1989-01-01

    The climatologically-tuned relationships between reflectivity, Z, and rain rate, R, are examined. A method is presented which selects the Z-R relation that assures that the values of R are weighted according to their climatological frequency of occurrence. The method is an extension of the approach suggested by Calheiros and Zawadski (1987). Also, consideration is given to the method of optimizing Z-R relations by matching hourly gage and radar-deduced rain amounts proposed by Smith et al. (1975). These two methods are described and applied to data from Germany and from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment. The differences in the Z-R relations obtained using the two approaches are discussed.

  14. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more than 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  15. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more that 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  16. X-ray measurement of the spin-down of CalverA: A radio- and gamma-ray-quiet pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot =(3.19± 0.08)×10{sup −15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot =6.1×10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ{sub c}≡P/2 P-dot =2.9×10{sup 5} yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 4.4 × 10{sup 11} G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot . Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  17. "Molecular Clock" Analogs: A Relative Rates Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Although molecular clock theory is a commonly discussed facet of evolutionary biology, undergraduates are rarely presented with the underlying information of how this theory is examined relative to empirical data. Here a simple contextual exercise is presented that not only provides insight into molecular clocks, but is also a useful exercise for…

  18. Feedback Functions, Optimization, and the Relation of Response Rate to Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Paul L.; McDowell, Jack J.; Dallery, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    The present experiment arranged a series of inverted U-shaped feedback functions relating reinforcer rate to response rate to test whether responding was consistent with an optimization account or with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate such as linear system theory's rate equation or Herrnstein's hyperbola. Reinforcer rate…

  19. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster.

    PubMed

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L; Latham, David W; Mathieu, Robert D

    2015-01-29

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars.

  20. Feedback Functions, Optimization, and the Relation of Response Rate to Reinforcer Rate

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Paul L; McDowell, Jack J; Dallery, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    The present experiment arranged a series of inverted U-shaped feedback functions relating reinforcer rate to response rate to test whether responding was consistent with an optimization account or with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate such as linear system theory's rate equation or Herrnstein's hyperbola. Reinforcer rate was arranged according to a quadratic equation with a maximum at a unique response rate. The experiment consisted of two phases, during which 6 Long Evans rats lever pressed for food. In the first phase of the experiment, the rats responded on six fixed-interval-plus-quadratic-feedback schedules, and in the second phase the rats responded on three variable-interval-plus-quadratic-feedback schedules. Responding in both phases was inconsistent with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate. Instead, different response rates were obtained at equivalent reinforcer rates. Responding did vary directly with the vertex of the feedback function in both phases, a finding consistent with optimization of reinforcer rate. The present results suggest that the feedback function relating reinforcer rate to response rate imposed by a reinforcement schedule can be an important determinant of behavior. Furthermore, the present experiment illustrates the benefit of arranging feedback functions to investigate assumptions about the variables that control schedule performance. PMID:16602376

  1. Pulse Phase Dependence of Low Energy Emission Lines in an X-ray pulsar 4U 1626-67 during its spin-up and spin-down phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Aru; Paul, Biswajit; Dewangan, Gulab Chand

    2016-07-01

    We will present the results obtained from the new observation of an ultra-compact X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67, carried out with the XMM-Newton observatory. 4U 1626-67, a unique accretion powered pulsar underwent two torque reversals since its discovery in 1977. Pulse phase resolved spectroscopy of this source performed using the data from the XMM-Newton observatory during its spin-down phase revealed the dependence of the emission lines on the pulse phase. O VII emission line at 0.569 keV showed the maximum variation by factor of 4. These variations were interpreted due to warps in the accretion disk (Beri et al. 2015). Radiation pressure induced warping is also believed to be the cause for spin-down. In light of this possible explanation for spin-down torque reversal we expect different line variability during the spin-up phase. We will discuss the implications of the results obtained after performing pulse phase resolved spectroscopy using data from the EPIC-pn during the current spin-up phase. Detailed study of the prominent Neon and Oxygen line complexes with the high resolution Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) on-board XMM-Newton will also be presented.

  2. RELATIVE DISSOLUTION RATES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS USED AT AWE.

    PubMed

    Miller, T J; Bingham, D; Cockerill, R; Waldren, S; Moth, N

    2016-09-01

    A simple in vitro dissolution test was used to provide a semi-quantitative comparison of the relative dissolution rates of samples of radioactive materials used at Atomic Weapons Establishment in a lung fluid surrogate (Ringer's solution). A wide range of dissolution rates were observed for aged legacy actinides, freshly produced actinide alloys and actinides from waste management operations.

  3. Calculus students' ability to solve geometric related-rates problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Tami

    2000-09-01

    This study assessed the ability of university students enrolled in an introductory calculus course to solve related-rates problems set in geometric contexts. Students completed a problem-solving test and a test of performance on the individual steps involved in solving such problems. Each step was characterised as primarily relying on procedural knowledge or conceptual understanding. Results indicated that overall performance on the geometric related-rates problems was poor. The poorest performance was on steps linked to conceptual understanding, specifically steps involving the translation of prose to geometric and symbolic representations. Overall performance was most strongly related to performance on the procedural steps.

  4. Inflow rate, a time-symmetric observable obeying fluctuation relations.

    PubMed

    Baiesi, Marco; Falasco, Gianmaria

    2015-10-01

    While entropy changes are the usual subject of fluctuation theorems, we seek fluctuation relations involving time-symmetric quantities, namely observables that do not change sign if the trajectories are observed backward in time. We find detailed and integral fluctuation relations for the (time-integrated) difference between entrance rate and escape rate in mesoscopic jump systems. Such inflow rate, which is even under time reversal, represents the discrete-state equivalent of the phase-space contraction rate. Indeed, it becomes minus the divergence of forces in the continuum limit to overdamped diffusion. This establishes a formal connection between reversible deterministic systems and irreversible stochastic ones, confirming that fluctuation theorems are largely independent of the details of the underling dynamics.

  5. Component duration and relative response rates in multiple schedules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todorov, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a multiple variable-interval 30-sec, variable interval 90-sec schedule with each component presented alternately for an equal duration. This duration of exposure was varied from 5 to 300 sec. The rate of response in the variable-interval 30-sec component relative to the rate of response in the variable-interval 90-sec component was studied. Results are plotted and discussed.

  6. Oxygen consumption of cycle ergometry is nonlinearly related to work rate and pedal rate.

    PubMed

    Londeree, B R; Moffitt-Gerstenberger, J; Padfield, J A; Lottmann, D

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an equation to predict the oxygen cost of cycle ergometry. Forty subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test on three occasions at 50, 70, or 90 rpm in a counterbalanced order. Work rate was incremented every 5 or 6 min when steady rate values were achieved. To ensure accurate work rates, ergometer resistance was calibrated and flywheel revolutions were electronically measured. Oxygen consumption was measured with a computer interfaced system which provided results every minute. Oxygen consumption (mL.min-1) was the dependent variable, and independent variables were work rate (WR in kgm.min-1), pedal rate (rpm), weight (Kg), and gender (males, 0; females, 1). The following nonlinear equation was selected; VO2 = 0.42.WR1.2 + 0.00061.rpm3 + 6.35.Wt + 0.1136.RPM50.WR-0.10144.RPM90-WR-52-Gender, R2 = 0.9961, Sy.x = 106 mL.min-1, where RPM50: 50 rpm = 1, and RPM90: 90 rpm = 1, else = 0. It was concluded that the oxygen cost of cycle ergometry is nonlinearly related to work rate and pedal rate, linearly related to weight, and that females use less oxygen for a particular work rate.

  7. Do Dogs Know Related Rates Rather than Optimization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perruchet, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Although dogs seemingly follow the optimal path where they get to a ball thrown into the water, they certainly do not know the minimization function proposed in the calculus books. Trading the optimization problem for a related rates problem leads to a mathematically identical solution, which, it is argued here, is a more plausible model for the…

  8. Phonation related rate coding and recruitment in the genioglossus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, K.R.; Porfirio, D.J.; Bailey, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Motor unit (MU) recruitment was assessed in two muscles with similar muscle fiber type compositions and that participate in skilled movements: the tongue muscle, genioglossus (GG) and the hand muscle, first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Our primary objectives were to determine in the framework of a voluntary movement whether muscle force is regulated in tongue as it is in limb i.e., via processes of rate coding and recruitment. Recruitment in the two muscles was assessed within each subject in the context of ramp force (FDI) and in the tongue (GG) during vowel production and specifically, in the context of ramp increases in loudness, and subsequently expressed relative to the maximal. The principle findings of the study are that the general rules of recruitment and rate coding hold true for both GG and FDI and second, that average firing rates, firing rates at recruitment and peak firing rates in GG are significantly higher than for FDI (P <0.001) despite tasks performed across comparable force ranges (∼2-40% of max). The higher firing rates observed in the tongue within the context of phonation may be a function of that muscle's dual role as (prime) mover and hydrostatic support element. PMID:25899868

  9. Heart Rate Variability in Sleep-Related Migraine without Aura

    PubMed Central

    Vollono, Catello; Gnoni, Valentina; Testani, Elisa; Dittoni, Serena; Losurdo, Anna; Colicchio, Salvatore; Di Blasi, Chiara; Mazza, Salvatore; Farina, Benedetto; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This is an observational study aimed to investigate the activity of autonomic nervous system during sleep in patients with sleep-related migraine. Methods: Eight consecutive migraineurs without aura were enrolled (6 women and 2 men), aged 30 to 62 years (mean 48.1 ± 9.3 years). Inclusion criteria were: high frequency of attacks (> 5 per month) and occurrence of more than 75% of the attacks during sleep causing an awakening. Patients were compared with a control group of 55 healthy subjects (23 men and 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0 years), and with a further control group of 8 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patient and controls underwent polysomnography and heart rate variability analysis. Results: A significant reduction of the LF/HF ratio during N2 and N3 sleep stages was observed in migraineurs compared with controls. No differences in sleep macrostructure were observed; cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) time and CAP rate were lower in migraineurs than in controls. Conclusions: These findings indicate a peculiar modification of the autonomic balance during sleep in sleep-related migraine. The reduction of LF/HF ratio in NREM sleep was observed in controls, but it was quantitatively much more evident in migraineurs. Changes in LF/HF could be consequent to an autonomic unbalance which could manifest selectively (or alternatively become more evident) during sleep. These findings, together with the reduction in CAP rate, could be an expression of reduced arousability during sleep in patients with sleep-related migraine. The simultaneous involvement of the autonomic, arousal, and pain systems might suggest involvement of the hypothalamic pathways. Citation: Vollono C; Gnoni V; Testani E; Dittoni S; Losurdo A; Colicchio S; Di Blasi C; Mazza S; Farina B; Della Marca G. Heart rate variability in sleep-related migraine without aura. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(7):707-714. PMID:23853566

  10. Relations between convergence rates in Schatten p-norms

    SciTech Connect

    Albini, Paolo; Toigo, Alessandro; Umanita, Veronica

    2008-01-15

    In quantum estimation theory and quantum tomography, the quantum state obtained by sampling converges to the ''true'' unknown density matrix under topologies that are different from the natural notion of distance in the space of quantum states, i.e., the trace class norm. In this paper, we address such problem, finding relations between the rates of convergence in the Schatten p-norms and in the trace class norm.

  11. Component duration and relative response rates in multiple schedules1

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, João Claudio

    1972-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a multiple variable-interval 30-sec, variable-interval 90-sec schedule with each component presented alternately for an equal (on the average) duration. This average duration of exposure to each component was varied from 5 to 300 sec. The main concern was with rate of response in the variable-interval 30-sec component relative to rate of response in the variable-interval 90-sec component. In all cases, rate of response was higher in the variable-interval 30 sec component, but the discrepancy in the rate produced by the two schedules tended to be greatest when the duration of component presentation was brief. The mean proportion of responses emitted during the variable-interval 30-sec component (responses in variable-interval 30-sec component divided by total responses) varied from about 0.60 to 0.71, where 0.75 would be expected on the basis of a matching rule, and 0.59 was that obtained by Lander and Irwin (1968). These results are in agreement with data reported by Shimp and Wheatley (1971) from a similar experiment. PMID:16811566

  12. Measuring task-related changes in heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Moses, Ziev B; Luecken, Linda J; Eason, James C

    2007-01-01

    Small beat-to-beat differences in heart rate are the result of dynamic control of the cardiovascular system by the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been positively correlated with both mental and physical health. While many studies measure HRV under rest conditions, few have measured HRV during stressful situations. We describe an experimental protocol designed to measure baseline, task, and recovery values of HRV as a function of three different types of stressors. These stressors involve an attention task, a cold pressor test, and a videotaped speech presentation. We found a measurable change in heart rate in participants (n=10) during each task (all p's < 0.05). The relative increase or decrease from pre-task heart rate was predicted by task (one-way ANOVA, p= 0.0001). Spectral analysis of HRV during the attention task revealed consistently decreased measures of both high (68+/-7%, mean+/-S.E.) and low (62+/-13%) frequency HRV components as compared to baseline. HRV spectra for the cold pressor and speech tasks revealed no consistent patterns of increase or decrease from baseline measurements. We also found no correlation in reactivity measures between any of our tasks. These findings suggest that each of the tasks in our experimental design elicits a different type of stress response in an individual. Our experimental approach may prove useful to biobehavioral researchers searching for factors that determine individual differences in responses to stress in daily life.

  13. WHAT SETS THE INITIAL ROTATION RATES OF MASSIVE STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Anna L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    The physical mechanisms that set the initial rotation rates in massive stars are a crucial unknown in current star formation theory. Observations of young, massive stars provide evidence that they form in a similar fashion to their low-mass counterparts. The magnetic coupling between a star and its accretion disk may be sufficient to spin down low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to well below breakup at the end stage of their formation when the accretion rate is low. However, we show that these magnetic torques are insufficient to spin down massive PMS stars due to their short formation times and high accretion rates. We develop a model for the angular momentum evolution of stars over a wide range in mass, considering both magnetic and gravitational torques. We find that magnetic torques are unable to spin down either low-mass or high-mass stars during the main accretion phase, and that massive stars cannot be spun down significantly by magnetic torques during the end stage of their formation either. Spin-down occurs only if massive stars' disk lifetimes are substantially longer or their magnetic fields are much stronger than current observations suggest.

  14. SHAPING THE DUST MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Gall, Christa; Michałowski, Michał J. E-mail: cgall@phys.au.dk

    2014-02-20

    There is a remarkably tight relation between the observationally inferred dust masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, M {sub dust} ∝ SFR{sup 1.11}. Here we extend the M {sub dust}-SFR relation to the high end and show that it bends over at very large SFRs (i.e., dust masses are lower than predicted for a given SFR). We identify several distinct evolutionary processes in the diagram: (1) a star-bursting phase in which dust builds up rapidly at early times. The maximum attainable dust mass in this process is the cause of the bend-over of the relation. A high dust-formation efficiency, a bottom-light initial mass function, and negligible supernova shock dust destruction are required to produce sufficiently high dust masses. (2) A quiescent star-forming phase in which the subsequent parallel decline in dust mass and SFR gives rise to the M {sub dust}-SFR relation, through astration and dust destruction. The dust-to-gas ratio is approximately constant along the relation. We show that the power-law slope of the M {sub dust}-SFR relation is inversely proportional to the global Schmidt-Kennicutt law exponent (i.e., ∼0.9) in simple chemical evolution models. (3) A quenching phase which causes star formation to drop while the dust mass stays roughly constant or drops proportionally. Combined with merging, these processes, as well as the range in total baryonic mass, give rise to a complex population of the diagram which adds significant scatter to the original M {sub dust}-SFR relation. (4) At very high redshifts, a population of galaxies located significantly below the local relation is predicted.

  15. Heart rate variability related to effort at work.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Arja; Mets, Terhi; Martinmäki, Kaisu; Mauno, Saija; Kinnunen, Ulla; Rusko, Heikki

    2011-11-01

    Changes in autonomic nervous system function have been related to work stress induced increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Our purpose was to examine whether various heart rate variability (HRV) measures and new HRV-based relaxation measures are related to self-reported chronic work stress and daily emotions. The relaxation measures are based on neural network modelling of individual baseline heart rate and HRV information. Nineteen healthy hospital workers were studied during two work days during the same work period. Daytime, work time and night time heart rate, as well as physical activity were recorded. An effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire was used to assess chronic work stress. The emotions of stress, irritation and satisfaction were assessed six times during both days. Seventeen subjects had an ERI ratio over 1, indicating imbalance between effort and reward, that is, chronic work stress. Of the daily emotions, satisfaction was the predominant emotion. The daytime relaxation percentage was higher on Day 2 than on Day 1 (4 ± 6% vs. 2 ± 3%, p < 0.05) and the night time relaxation (43 ± 30%) was significantly higher than daytime or work time relaxation on the both Days. Chronic work stress correlated with the vagal activity index of HRV. However, effort at work had many HRV correlates: the higher the work effort the lower daytime HRV and relaxation time. Emotions at work were also correlated with work time (stress and satisfaction) and night time (irritation) HRV. These results indicate that daily emotions at work and chronic work stress, especially effort, is associated with cardiac autonomic function. Neural network modelling of individual heart rate and HRV information may provide additional information in stress research in field conditions.

  16. Determination of relative growth rates of natural quartz crystals

    PubMed

    Ihinger; Zink

    2000-04-20

    Although the theory describing crystal growth in the geological environment is well established, there are few quantitative studies that delimit the absolute time involved in the growth of natural crystals. The actual mechanisms responsible for the variation in size and shape of individual crystal faces are, in fact, not well understood. Here we describe a micro-infrared spectroscopic study of a single, gem-quality quartz crystal that allows us to measure the size, shape and relative growth rate of each of the crystal faces that are active throughout its growth history. We demonstrate that the abundances of hydrogen-bearing impurities can serve as 'speedometers' to monitor the growth rate of advancing crystal faces. Our technique can be applied to crystals from a variety of geological environments to determine their growth histories. Within the electronics industry, the technique might facilitate the production of defect-free synthetic crystals required for high-quality resonators and, ultimately, might allow determination of the absolute time involved in geological processes such as the crystallization of magmas, fluid flow in metamorphism and the sealing of open cracks in earthquake rupture zones.

  17. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  18. Hemodialysis catheter-related infection: rates, risk factors and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sahli, Farida; Feidjel, Razika; Laalaoui, Rima

    2016-07-13

    The main complication of central venous catheter (CVC) in hemodialysis is infection. Identifying CVC related infection (CVC-RI) risk factors and causative micro-organisms is important for setting prevention policies. There were no data regarding CVC-RI in hemodialysis in Algeria. To determine rates of CVC-RI in hemodialysis in Setif university hospital, risk factors and causative microorganisms, we conducted a prospective study from November 2014 to May 2015 involving patients with CVC in hemodialysis. Micro-organisms isolated from semi quantitative culture of CVC and blood culture were identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility using the automated MicroScan system (DADE Behring, Sacramento, CA, USA). Chi-square test was performed to compare demographic and clinical variables (age, sex, comorbidities, duration of CVC, insertion site) in the groups of patients with and without CVC-RI. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. All analyses were performed using SPSS V17 for Windows statistical package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). 94 patients and 152 CVC procedures were analyzed. 34 CVC-RI were documented with an incidence of 16.6 per 1000 CVC-days. Incidence of CVC related bloodstream infection (CVC-RBI) was 10.8 per 1000 CVC-days. Independent risk factors associated with CVC-RI were diabetes (P=0.01) and duration of catheterization (P= 0.01). Causative micro-organisms were: Klebsiella pneumoniae 26.5%, coagulase-negative staphylococci 23.5% and Staphylococcus aureus 23.5%. Micro-organisms were multidrug-resistant (MDR). Mortality was statistically associated to inadequate antibiotic therapy. The duration of CVC should be reduced by creation of fistulas. More compliance to hygiene measure is needed for decreasing CVC-RI and resistance rate.

  19. Scaling Relations of Galactic Winds with Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The galactic scale outflows generated by nuclear starbursts consist of a multiphase medium where each phase has a distinct velocity depending on the characteristics of the starburst. Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydrodynamical simulations we probe the outflow velocity of the hot, warm, and neutral gas entrained in a galactic wind. By varying the star formation rate (SFR) in our simulations, we find no correlation between the outflow velocity of the hot gas with the SFR, but we do find a correlation between the outflow velocity of both warm and neutral gas with the SFR. The scaling relation between outflow velocity and SFR only holds for low SFR until the scaling relation abruptly flattens at a SFR determined by the mass loading of the starburst. The outflow velocity of the hot gas only depends on the mass loading of the starburst and not the SFR. For low SFRs the difference between the velocity of cold gas, as measured by absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas, may be 5-7 times lower than the velocity of the hot, highly ionized gas. The difference in velocity between the cold and hot gas for higher SFRs depends on the mass loading factor of the starburst. Thus the measured velocities of neutral or low ionized gas cannot be used to estimate the outflow velocity of the hot gas without determining the mass loading of the starburst.

  20. An Optimal Relation of Radar Reflectivity to Lightning Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thunderstorms separate charge. Most places they lift positive charge or lower negative, a few places they lift negative or lower positive. The electrical generator is stronger in some parts of the cloud than in others. Our long term goal is to map this generator. Cloud physicists tell us that uncharged ice and water particles become charged by collision, and that the charge transferred depends on size, temperature and humidity. There is still some disagreement about exactly how the charge transferred depends on size, temperature, and humidity. In principle, if we knew this ice physics, and also knew the distribution of particles everywhere in the storm, and the winds everywhere and the temperature and humidity everywhere, then we could compute everywhere the electrical power of the thunderstorm generator. In practice it is difficult to know all these things, particularly the distribution of particles, so it is difficult to use real thunderstorms to falsify cloud electrification theories. We here take one small step towards computing that map of electrical generator power, by relating radar reflectivity profiles of 2000 storms to lightning flash rates of those storms. This small step by itself doesn't falsify any existing electrification theories; it merely places weak constraints on the relation of electric generator power to cloud ice.

  1. Relative rates and features of musculoskeletal complications in adult sicklers.

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, Jean; Atangana, Réné; Techa, André; Monny-Lobe, Marcel; Sosso, Maurice; Hoffmeyer, Pierre

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively look for the relative rates and features of musculoskeletal complications in a sample of adult homozygous SS sicklers in Yaoundé. During a 3-year period, known homozygous SS sicklers aged sixteen years or more, with suspicion or evidence of locomotor system disease, including leg ulcer, were consecutively investigated through complete medical history, clinical examination, full blood count, C-reactive protein, standard radiographs of the area of complaint, and, when necessary, CT scan and pus analysis. Those patients with no definite diagnosis were excluded. The study group comprised 84 patients aged 16 to 51 years (mean age: 22 years), with a male/female ratio of 0.75. Four of them (4.5%) were older than 40 years. Thirty five (41.6%) presented a total of 50 lesions of aseptic osteonecrosis, which were located in the hips in 25 cases (50%), in the lumbar spine in 20 cases (40%), in the humeral head in four cases (10%) and in the talar body in one case. The hip necrosis was grade I in 6 cases, grade II in four, grade III in 11 and terminal in four. Multiple sites of necrosis were observed in six patients. Nineteen (22.6%) of the sicklers came on with 36 malleolar ulcers, more frequently in males (sex ratio: 5/1) and 28 (78%) located on the medial side. Fifteen sites of osteomyelitis were noted in 14 patients (17.8%) and septic arthritis in six (7%). Less frequent complications were impingement syndrome, gout osteoarthropathy, stress fracture, subtalar fusion, knee osteoarthritis, tendonitis of the anterior tibialis, and recurrent dislocation of the patella. All patients were managed conventionally, except for advanced aseptic necrosis in which the indication for arthroplasty was delayed till the terminal stage. As suggested by another recent report from Senegal, efforts should be made to improve the life expectancy of sicklers in Sub-Saharan African countries, by acting on education, social and medical care

  2. Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Guido D; Gentine, Pierre

    2013-04-16

    The ability to predict terrestrial evapotranspiration (E) is limited by the complexity of rate-limiting pathways as water moves through the soil, vegetation (roots, xylem, stomata), canopy air space, and the atmospheric boundary layer. The impossibility of specifying the numerous parameters required to model this process in full spatial detail has necessitated spatially upscaled models that depend on effective parameters such as the surface vapor conductance (C(surf)). C(surf) accounts for the biophysical and hydrological effects on diffusion through the soil and vegetation substrate. This approach, however, requires either site-specific calibration of C(surf) to measured E, or further parameterization based on metrics such as leaf area, senescence state, stomatal conductance, soil texture, soil moisture, and water table depth. Here, we show that this key, rate-limiting, parameter can be estimated from an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and E. The relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than would occur for increased or decreased evaporation rates, suggesting that land-atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance. It is found to hold over a wide range of climate conditions (arid-humid) and limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, energy). With this relation, estimates of E and C(surf) can be obtained globally from widely available meteorological measurements, many of which have been archived since the early 1900s. In conjunction with precipitation and stream flow, long-term E estimates provide insights and empirical constraints on projected accelerations of the hydrologic cycle.

  3. Afterhyperpolarization-firing rate relation of turtle spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, E K; Stuart, D G; McDonagh, J C; Hornby, T G; Reinking, R M

    2005-02-01

    This study addressed the afterhyperploarization-firing rate relationship of unanesthetized turtle spinal motoneurons and interneurons. The afterhyperploarization of their solitary action potential at rheobase was compared to that during the cells' minimum and maximum firing rates. Like previous mammalian findings, afterhyperpolarization duration and area at rheobase were 32 and 19% less for high- versus low-threshold motoneurons. Contrariwise, maximum firing rate was two times less for the high-threshold group. Other new findings were that for high- versus low-threshold interneurons, afterhyperpolarization duration and area were 25 and 95% less, and maximum firing rate 21% higher for the high-threshold group. For combined motoneurons versus interneurons, there were no differences in afterhyperpolarization duration and area at rheobase, whereas maximum firing rate was 265% higher for the interneurons. For high-threshold motoneurons alone, there were significant associations between minimum firing rate and afterhyperpolarization duration and area measured at rheobase. In summary, this study showed that (1) the afterhyperploarization values of both turtle spinal motoneurons and interneurons at rheobase provided little indication of their corresponding values at the cells' minimum and maximum firing states, and (2) the evolution of afterhyperploarization from rheobase to maximum firing state differed both qualitatively and quantitatively for motoneurons versus interneurons.

  4. Age-Related Differences in Speech Rate Perception Do Not Necessarily Entail Age-Related Differences in Speech Rate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffner, Christopher C.; Newman, Rochelle S.; Dilley, Laura C.; Idsardi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A new literature has suggested that speech rate can influence the parsing of words quite strongly in speech. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between younger adults and older adults in the use of context speech rate in word segmentation, given that older adults perceive timing information differently from younger…

  5. Bouts of responding: the relation between bout rate and the rate of variable-interval reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Shull, Richard L; Grimes, Julie A; Bennett, J Adam

    2004-01-01

    By nose poking a lighted key, rats obtained food pellets on either a variable-interval schedule of reinforcement or a schedule that required an average of four additional responses after the end of tile variable-interval component (a tandem variable-interval variable-ratio 4 schedule). With both schedule types, the mean variable interval was varied between blocks of sessions from 16 min to 0.25 min. Total rate of key poking increased similarly as a function of the reinforcer rate for the two schedule types, but response rate was higher with than without the four-response requirement. Analysis of log survivor plots of interresponse times showed that key poking occurred in bouts. The rate of initiating bouts increased as a function of reinforcer rate but was either unaffected or was decreased by adding the four-response requirement. Within-bout response rate was insensitive to reinforcer rate and only inconsistently affected by the four-response requirement. For both kinds of schedule, the ratio of bout time to between-bout pause time was approximately a power function of reinforcer rate, with exponents above and below 1.0. PMID:15113134

  6. Relational Responding Modulates and Reverses Affective Ratings in Evaluative Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Macquet, Benjamin; Charley, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments explored relational responding in evaluative conditioning. In Experiment 1, the participants were trained with a computer task to make relational responses by putting CSs of different sizes in boxes in order of size. Subsequently they were instructed that these different sized CSs represented different intensities of hypothetical…

  7. CREME96 and Related Error Rate Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the rate of occurrence of single event effects (SEEs) in space requires knowledge of the radiation environment and the response of electronic devices to that environment. Several analytical models have been developed over the past 36 years to predict SEE rates. The first error rate calculations were performed by Binder, Smith and Holman. Bradford and Pickel and Blandford, in their CRIER (Cosmic-Ray-Induced-Error-Rate) analysis code introduced the basic Rectangular ParallelePiped (RPP) method for error rate calculations. For the radiation environment at the part, both made use of the Cosmic Ray LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra calculated by Heinrich for various absorber Depths. A more detailed model for the space radiation environment within spacecraft was developed by Adams and co-workers. This model, together with a reformulation of the RPP method published by Pickel and Blandford, was used to create the CR ME (Cosmic Ray Effects on Micro-Electronics) code. About the same time Shapiro wrote the CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program) based on the RPP method published by Bradford. It was the first code to specifically take into account charge collection from outside the depletion region due to deformation of the electric field caused by the incident cosmic ray. Other early rate prediction methods and codes include the Single Event Figure of Merit, NOVICE, the Space Radiation code and the effective flux method of Binder which is the basis of the SEFA (Scott Effective Flux Approximation) model. By the early 1990s it was becoming clear that CREME and the other early models needed Revision. This revision, CREME96, was completed and released as a WWW-based tool, one of the first of its kind. The revisions in CREME96 included improved environmental models and improved models for calculating single event effects. The need for a revision of CREME also stimulated the development of the CHIME (CRRES/SPACERAD Heavy Ion Model of the Environment) and MACREE (Modeling and

  8. Relating reconnection rate, exhaust structure and effective resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2014-03-01

    The magnetic reconnection structure consists of a central diffusion region (CDR) and a cone or wedge shaped reconnection exhaust containing accelerated plasma flows and electromagnetic fluctuations. We predict here the relationship among the exhaust half-cone angle (θe), the half width (w) of the CDR, the outflow velocity Vo, and the effective resistivity (ηeff), which includes the effects of all the nonideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. The effective resistivity is defined as the ratio of reconnection electric field Erec to the current density Jy at the X point and it essentially represents the loss of momentum from the current-carrying plasma particles due to scattering by waves, their inertia or outflux from the CDR. The relation is checked against relevant results previously reported from laboratory experiments, space observations, and simulations, showing excellent agreement. The relation can be used for estimating the ad-hoc effective resistivity often used in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of reconnection.

  9. Relating reconnection rate, exhaust structure and effective resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra

    2014-03-15

    The magnetic reconnection structure consists of a central diffusion region (CDR) and a cone or wedge shaped reconnection exhaust containing accelerated plasma flows and electromagnetic fluctuations. We predict here the relationship among the exhaust half-cone angle (θ{sub e}), the half width (w) of the CDR, the outflow velocity V{sub o}, and the effective resistivity (η{sub eff}), which includes the effects of all the nonideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. The effective resistivity is defined as the ratio of reconnection electric field E{sub rec} to the current density J{sub y} at the X point and it essentially represents the loss of momentum from the current-carrying plasma particles due to scattering by waves, their inertia or outflux from the CDR. The relation is checked against relevant results previously reported from laboratory experiments, space observations, and simulations, showing excellent agreement. The relation can be used for estimating the ad-hoc effective resistivity often used in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of reconnection.

  10. Modeling relative frost weathering rates at geomorphic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Alan W.; Marshall, Jill A.; Roering, Joshua J.

    2016-11-01

    amplitudes, with a broad maximum centered on a mean annual temperature near the threshold required for crack growth. Warmer mean annual temperatures lead to less damage because of the reduction in time during which it is cold enough for cracking, whereas colder mean annual temperatures are accompanied by reduced water supply due to the temperature dependence of permeability. All of the controlling parameters in our model are tied explicitly to physical properties that can in principle be measured independently, which suggests promise for informing geomorphic interpretations of the role of frost weathering in evolving landforms and determining erosion rates.

  11. Protostellar spin-down: a planetary lift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, J.; Cébron, D.

    2015-11-01

    When they first appear in the HR diagram, young stars rotate at a mere 10 per cent of their break-up velocity. They must have lost most of the angular momentum initially contained in the parental cloud, the so-called angular momentum problem. We investigate here a new mechanism by which large amounts of angular momentum might be shed from young stellar systems, thus yielding slowly rotating young stars. Assuming that planets promptly form in circumstellar discs and rapidly migrate close to the central star, we investigate how the tidal and magnetic interactions between the protostar, its close-in planet(s), and the inner circumstellar disc can efficiently remove angular momentum from the central object. We find that neither the tidal torque nor the variety of magnetic torques acting between the star and the embedded planet are able to counteract the spin-up torques due to accretion and contraction. Indeed, the former are orders of magnitude weaker than the latter beyond the corotation radius and are thus unable to prevent the young star from spinning up. We conclude that star-planet interaction in the early phases of stellar evolution does not appear as a viable alternative to magnetic star-disc coupling to understand the origin of the low angular momentum content of young stars.

  12. Relative Cooling Rates of Meteoritic Fe-Ni Metal Determined from Kamacite-Taenite Interface Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Yang, J.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2013-09-01

    The validity of the kamacite/taenite interface method to obtain relative metallorgaphic cooling rates was reinvestigated. Strong support is found for the 50 fold variation in cooling rate across the IVA chemical group.

  13. Comparison of the Sputter Rates of Oxide Films Relative to the Sputter Rate of SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Droubay, Timothy C.; Kim, J.; Lee, B.; Mathews, C.; Opila, R. L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Stickle, William F.; Wallace, Robert; Wright, B. S.

    2010-09-02

    Because of the increasing technological importance of oxide films for a variety of applications, there is a growing interest in knowing the sputter rates for a wide variety of oxides. To support needs of users of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User facility as well as our research programs, we have made a series of measurements of the sputter rates for oxide films that have been grown by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE), pulsed laser deposition (PLD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), electrochemical oxidation, or sputter deposition. The sputter rates for these oxide films were determined in comparison to the sputter rates for thermally grown SiO2, a common sputter rate reference material. The film thicknesses and densities of these films were usually measured using x-ray reflectivity (XRR). These samples were mounted in an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system or an Auger electron spectrometer for sputtering measurements using argon ion sputtering. Although the primary objective was to determine relative sputter rates at a fixed angle, the measurements were also used to determine: i) the angle dependence of the relative sputter rates; ii) the energy dependence of the relative sputter rates; and iii) the extent of ion beam reduction for the various oxides. Materials examined include: SiO2 (reference films), Al2O3, CeO2, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, HfO2, ITO (In-Sn-oxide) Ta2O5, TiO2 (anatase and rutile) and ZnO. We find that the sputter rates for the oxides can vary up to a factor of two (usually slower) from that observed for SiO2. The ratios of sputter rates to SiO2 appear to be relatively independent of ion beam energy for the range of 1kV to 4 kV and for incident angles of less than 50º. As expected, the ion beam reduction of the oxides varies with the sputter angle. These studies demonstrate that we can usually obtain sputter rate reproducibility better than 5% for similar oxide films.

  14. Autonomic responses to heat pain: Heart rate, skin conductance, and their relation to verbal ratings and stimulus intensity.

    PubMed

    Loggia, Marco L; Juneau, Mylène; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2011-03-01

    In human pain experiments, as well as in clinical settings, subjects are often asked to assess pain using scales (eg, numeric rating scales). Although most subjects have little difficulty in using these tools, some lack the necessary basic cognitive or motor skills (eg, paralyzed patients). Thus, the identification of appropriate nonverbal measures of pain has significant clinical relevance. In this study, we assessed heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and verbal ratings in 39 healthy male subjects during the application of twelve 6-s heat stimuli of different intensities on the subjects' left forearm. Both HR and SC increased with more intense painful stimulation. However, HR but not SC, significantly correlated with pain ratings at the group level, suggesting that HR may be a better predictor of between-subject differences in pain than is SC. Conversely, changes in SC better predicted variations in ratings within a given individual, suggesting that it is more sensitive to relative changes in perception. The differences in findings derived from between- and within-subject analyses may result from greater within-subject variability in HR. We conclude that at least for male subjects, HR provides a better predictor of pain perception than SC, but that data should be averaged over several stimulus presentations to achieve consistent results. Nevertheless, variability among studies, and the indication that gender of both the subject and experimenter could influence autonomic results, lead us to advise caution in using autonomic or any other surrogate measures to infer pain in individuals who cannot adequately report their perception. Skin conductance is more sensitive to detect within-subject perceptual changes, but heart rate appears to better predict pain ratings at the group level.

  15. The relation between auditory-nerve temporal responses and perceptual rate integration in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle L; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L; Goehring, Jenny L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine auditory-nerve temporal response properties and their relation to psychophysical threshold for electrical pulse trains of varying rates ("rate integration"). The primary hypothesis was that better rate integration (steeper slope) would be correlated with smaller decrements in ECAP amplitude as a function of stimulation rate (shallower slope of the amplitude-rate function), reflecting a larger percentage of the neural population contributing more synchronously to each pulse in the train. Data were obtained for 26 ears in 23 cochlear-implant recipients. Electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) amplitudes were measured in response to each of 21 pulses in a pulse train for the following rates: 900, 1200, 1800, 2400, and 3500 pps. Psychophysical thresholds were obtained using a 3-interval, forced-choice adaptive procedure for 300-ms pulse trains of the same rates as used for the ECAP measures, which formed the rate-integration function. For each electrode, the slope of the psychophysical rate-integration function was compared to the following ECAP measures: (1) slope of the function comparing average normalized ECAP amplitude across pulses versus stimulation rate ("adaptation"), (2) the rate that produced the maximum alternation depth across the pulse train, and (3) rate at which the alternating pattern ceased (stochastic rate). Results showed no significant relations between the slope of the rate-integration function and any of the ECAP measures when data were collapsed across subjects. However, group data showed that both threshold and average ECAP amplitude decreased with increased stimulus rate, and within-subject analyses showed significant positive correlations between psychophysical thresholds and mean ECAP response amplitudes across the pulse train. These data suggest that ECAP temporal response patterns are complex and further study is required to better understand the relative contributions of adaptation

  16. Lightning rates relative to tornadic storm evolution on 22 May 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgorman, Donald R.; Burgess, Donald W.; Mazur, Vladislav; Rust, W. David; Taylor, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Lightning and Doppler radar data for two tornadic storms in Oklahoma on May 22, 1981 are used to analyze ground flash rates relative to the time of tornadoes. It is found that the ground flash rates had no obvious relationship with the tornado times, although the stroke rate in both storms was greatest after the tornadic stage ended. The variations in the cyclone shear and the intracloud flash rates within 10 km of the mesocyclone region are examined. The results suggest that most tornadic storms have an increase in total flash rates near the time of the tornado and that this increase is often dominated by intracloud flashes.

  17. Relative rate studies of the reactions of chlorine atoms with simple alkanes and the chlorinated methanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, L.; Lee, J.J.; Neavyn, R.

    1995-12-01

    The reactions of chlorine atoms with organics are of interest because atomic chlorine is a potential tropospheric oxidant. Relative rate constants for the reaction of pairs of simple alkanes (ethane/propane, ethane/n-butane, and isobutane/n-butane) and the chlorinated methanes (chloromethane, dichloromethane, and chloroform relative to methane) were measured, using the photolysis of Cl{sub 2} as the source of chlorine atoms and following the loss of the organics by GC-FID. The ratios of the relative rate constants were in excellent agreement with the literature except for ethane/n-butane, where our results are approximately 20% lower than recently published values, and for chloroform/methane, where our value is approximately 50% higher than the values recommended by JPL and JPCRD. Our results will be compard to previously published relative rate studies as well as to the results of absolute rate constant studies, and the differences will be discussed.

  18. Increased Fall-Related Mortality Rates in New Mexico, 1999–2005

    PubMed Central

    Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Landen, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective In 2000, fall injuries affected 30% of U.S. residents aged ≥65 years and cost $19 billion. In 2005, New Mexico (NM) had the highest fall-related mortality rate in the United States. We described factors associated with these elevated fall-related mortality rates. Methods To better understand the epidemiology of fatal falls in NM, we used state and national (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System) vital records data for 1999–2005 to identify unintentional falls that were the underlying cause of death. We calculated age-adjusted mortality rates, rate ratios (RRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by sex, ethnicity, race, and year. Results For 1999–2005 combined, NM's fall-related mortality rate (11.7 per 100,000 population) was 2.1 times higher than the U.S. rate (5.6 per 100,000 population). Elevated RRs persisted when stratified by sex (male RR=2.0, female RR=2.2), ethnicity (Hispanic RR=2.5, non-Hispanic RR=2.1), race (white RR=2.0, black RR=1.7, American Indian RR=2.3, and Asian American/Pacific Islander RR=3.1), and age (≥50 years RR=2.0, <50 years RR=1.2). Fall-related mortality rates began to increase exponentially at age 50 years, which was 15 years younger than the national trend. NM non-Hispanic individuals had the highest demographic-specific fall-related mortality rate (11.8 per 100,000 population, 95% CI 11.0, 12.5). NM's 69.5% increase in fall-related mortality rate was approximately twice the U.S. increase (31.9%); the increase among non-Hispanic people (86.2%) was twice that among Hispanic people (43.5%). Conclusions NM's fall-related mortality rate was twice the U.S. rate; exhibited a greater increase than the U.S. rate; and persisted across sex, ethnicity, and race. Fall-related mortality disproportionately affects a relatively younger population in NM. Characterizing fall etiology will assist in the development of effective prevention measures. PMID:22043102

  19. Dose- and Rate-Dependent Effects of Cocaine on Striatal Firing Related to Licking

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chengke; Mittler, Taliah; Duke, Dawn C.; Zhu, Yun; Pawlak, Anthony P.; West, Mark O.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the role of striatal mechanisms in cocaine-induced stereotyped licking, we investigated the acute effects of cocaine on striatal neurons in awake, freely moving rats before and after cocaine administration (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg). Stereotyped licking was induced only by the high dose. Relative to control (saline), cocaine reduced lick duration and concurrently increased interlick interval, particularly at the high dose, but it did not affect licking rhythm. Firing rates of striatal neurons phasically related to licking movements were compared between matched licks before and after injection, minimizing any influence of sensorimotor variables on changes in firing. Both increases and decreases in average firing rate of striatal neurons were observed after cocaine injection, and these changes exhibited a dose-dependent pattern that strongly depended on predrug firing rate. At the middle and high doses relative to the saline group, the average firing rates of slow firing neurons were increased by cocaine, resulting from a general elevation of movement-related firing rates. In contrast, fast firing neurons showed decreased average firing rates only in the high-dose group, with reduced firing rates across the entire range for these neurons. Our findings suggest that at the high dose, increased phasic activity of slow firing striatal neurons and simultaneously reduced phasic activity of fast firing striatal neurons may contribute, respectively, to the continual initiation of stereotypic movements and the absence of longer movements. PMID:17991811

  20. Seasonal Variations of Indoor Microbial Exposures and Their Relation to Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Air Exchange Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael; Gustavsen, Sine; Hansen, Erik Wind

    2012-01-01

    Indoor microbial exposure has been related to adverse pulmonary health effects. Exposure assessment is not standardized, and various factors may affect the measured exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of selected microbial exposures and their associations with temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates in Danish homes. Airborne inhalable dust was sampled in five Danish homes throughout the four seasons of 1 year (indoors, n = 127; outdoors, n = 37). Measurements included culturable fungi and bacteria, endotoxin, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, total inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m3) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m3). Indoor bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m3) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m3). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass of inhalable dust and number of particles. Temperature and air exchange rates were positively associated with fungi and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and negatively with bacteria and the total inflammatory potential. Although temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates were significantly associated with several indoor microbial exposures, they could not fully explain the observed seasonal variations when tested in a mixed statistical model. In conclusion, the season significantly affects indoor microbial exposures, which are influenced by temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. PMID:23001651

  1. Seasonal variations of indoor microbial exposures and their relation to temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mika; Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael; Gustavsen, Sine; Hansen, Erik Wind; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2012-12-01

    Indoor microbial exposure has been related to adverse pulmonary health effects. Exposure assessment is not standardized, and various factors may affect the measured exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of selected microbial exposures and their associations with temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates in Danish homes. Airborne inhalable dust was sampled in five Danish homes throughout the four seasons of 1 year (indoors, n = 127; outdoors, n = 37). Measurements included culturable fungi and bacteria, endotoxin, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, total inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m(3)) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m(3)). Indoor bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m(3)) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m(3)). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass of inhalable dust and number of particles. Temperature and air exchange rates were positively associated with fungi and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and negatively with bacteria and the total inflammatory potential. Although temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates were significantly associated with several indoor microbial exposures, they could not fully explain the observed seasonal variations when tested in a mixed statistical model. In conclusion, the season significantly affects indoor microbial exposures, which are influenced by temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates.

  2. The pattern of mammalian evolution and the relative rate of molecular evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Easteal, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The rates of nucleotide substitution at four genes in four orders of eutherian mammals are compared in relative rate tests using marsupial orthologs for reference. There is no evidence of systematic variation in evolutionary rate among the orders. The sequences are used to reconstruct the phylogeny of the orders using maximum likelihood, parsimony and compatibility methods. A branching order of rodent then ungulate then primate and lagomorph is overwhelmingly indicated. The nodes of the nucleotide based cladograms are widely separated in relation to the total lengths of the branches. The assumption of a star phylogeny that underlies Kimura's test for molecular evolutionary rate variation is shown to be invalid for eutherian mammals. Excess variance in nucleotide or amino acid differences between mammalian orders, above that predicted by neutral theory is explained better by variation in divergence time than by variation in evolutionary rate.

  3. Mental workload measurement: Event-related potentials and ratings of workload and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biferno, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Event-related potentials were elicited when a digitized word representing a pilot's call-sign was presented. This auditory probe was presented during 27 workload conditions in a 3x3x3 design where the following variables were manipulated: short-term load, tracking task difficulty, and time-on-task. Ratings of workload and fatigue were obtained between each trial of a 2.5-hour test. The data of each subject were analyzed individually to determine whether significant correlations existed between subjective ratings and ERP component measures. Results indicated that a significant number of subjects had positive correlations between: (1) ratings of workload and P300 amplitude, (2) ratings of workload and N400 amplitude, and (3) ratings of fatigue and P300 amplitude. These data are the first to show correlations between ratings of workload or fatigue and ERP components thereby reinforcing their validity as measures of mental workload and fatigue.

  4. Abnormalities in Automatic Processing of Illness-Related Stimuli in Self-Rated Alexithymia

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Laura; Pintzinger, Nina M.; Tran, Ulrich S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate abnormalities in automatic information processing related to self- and observer-rated alexithymia, especially with regard to somatization, controlling for confounding variables such as depression and affect. Sample 89 healthy subjects (60% female), aged 19–71 years (M = 32.1). 58 subjects were additionally rated by an observer. Measures Alexithymia (self-rating: TAS-20, observer rating: OAS); automatic information processing (priming task including verbal [illness-related, negative, positive, neutral] and facial [negative, positive, neutral] stimuli); somatoform symptoms (SOMS-7T); confounders: depression (BDI), affect (PANAS). Results Higher self-reported alexithymia scores were associated with lower reaction times for negative (r = .19, p < .10) and positive (r = .26, p < .05) verbal primes when the target was illness-related. Self-reported alexithymia was correlated with number (r = .42, p < .01) and intensity of current somatoform symptoms (r = .36, p < .01), but unrelated to observer-rated alexithymia (r = .11, p = .42). Discussion Results indicate a faster allocation of attentional resources away from task-irrelevant information towards illness-related stimuli in alexithymia. Considering the close relationship between alexithymia and somatization, these findings are compatible with the theoretical view that alexithymics focus strongly on bodily sensations of emotional arousal. A single observer rating (OAS) does not seem to be an adequate alexithymia-measure in community samples. PMID:26090893

  5. Relative rates for plasma homo- and copolymerizations of olefins in a homologous series of fluorinated ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the rate of plasma polymerization, or deposition rate, of a given monomer depends on various plasma process parameters, e.g., monomer flow rate, pressure, power, frequency (DC, rf or microwave), location of the substrate in the reactor, reactor geometry or configuration, and temperature. In contrast, little work has been done to relate deposition rates to monomer structures for a homologous series of monomers where the rates are obtained under identical plasma process parameters. For the particular series of fluorinated ethylenes (C2HxF4-x; x = 0-4), deposition rates were reported for ethylene (ET), vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), but for plasma polymerizations carried out under different discharge conditions, e.g., pressure, current density, and electrode temperature. Apparently, relative deposition rates were reported for only two members of that series (ET, x = 4, and TFE, x = 0) for which the plasma polymerizations were conducted under identical conditions. We now present relative deposition rates for both homopolymerizations and copolymerizations of the entire series of fluorinated ethylenes (x = 0-4). Our interest in such rates stems from prior work on the plasma copolymerization of ET and TFE in which it was found that the deposition rates for the plasma copolymers, when plotted versus mol % TFE in the ET/TFE feed stock, followed a concave-downward curve situated above the straight line joining the deposition rates for the plasma homopolymers. This type of plot (observed also for an argon-ET/TFE plasma copolymerization) indicated a positive interaction between ET and TFE such that each monomer apparently "sensitized" the plasma copolymerization of the other. Since the shape of that plot is not altered if mol % TFE is replaced by F/C, the fluorine-to-carbon ratio, this paper aims (1) to show how the relative deposition rates for plasma copolymers drawn from all pairs of monomers in the C2HxF4-x series

  6. Gender- and age-related differences in heart rate dynamics: are women more complex than men?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S. M.; Goldberger, A. L.; Pincus, S. M.; Mietus, J.; Lipsitz, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study aimed to quantify the complex dynamics of beat-to-beat sinus rhythm heart rate fluctuations and to determine their differences as a function of gender and age. BACKGROUND. Recently, measures of heart rate variability and the nonlinear "complexity" of heart rate dynamics have been used as indicators of cardiovascular health. Because women have lower cardiovascular risk and greater longevity than men, we postulated that there are important gender-related differences in beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics. METHODS. We analyzed heart rate dynamics during 8-min segments of continuous electrocardiographic recording in healthy young (20 to 39 years old), middle-aged (40 to 64 years old) and elderly (65 to 90 years old) men (n = 40) and women (n = 27) while they performed spontaneous and metronomic (15 breaths/min) breathing. Relatively high (0.15 to 0.40 Hz) and low (0.01 to 0.15 Hz) frequency components of heart rate variability were computed using spectral analysis. The overall "complexity" of each heart rate time series was quantified by its approximate entropy, a measure of regularity derived from nonlinear dynamics ("chaos" theory). RESULTS. Mean heart rate did not differ between the age groups or genders. High frequency heart rate power and the high/low frequency power ratio decreased with age in both men and women (p < 0.05). The high/low frequency power ratio during spontaneous and metronomic breathing was greater in women than men (p < 0.05). Heart rate approximate entropy decreased with age and was higher in women than men (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. High frequency heart rate spectral power (associated with parasympathetic activity) and the overall complexity of heart rate dynamics are higher in women than men. These complementary findings indicate the need to account for gender-as well as age-related differences in heart rate dynamics. Whether these gender differences are related to lower cardiovascular disease risk and greater longevity in

  7. Reconstruction of high frame rate image sequences in biomechanical related areas.

    PubMed

    Costa, Monica; Soares, Salviano; Barroso, Joao

    2010-01-01

    Regular video cameras shoot normally at 25/30 frames per second (fps). Actually there are available in the market equipments that allow us to acquire video at 1.000.000 fps. When we observe a video sequence it becomes noticeable that great part of the information remains unchanged regardless of the bit rate or frame rate used. One origin of discontinuity in video signals is directly related to movement. Several areas use high frame rate images to analyze and comprehend certain events or effects, biomechanical engineering is one of them. Biomechanics engineering studies the mechanics of a living body, especially the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure. Some examples are athlete assessment, were images are capture and then the acquired parameters are analyzed. This article describes a new methodology to decrease the space needed to store high frame rate image sequences in the specific case of biomechanical related areas.

  8. The solar cycle variation of the rates of CMEs and related activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, David F.

    1991-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are an important aspect of the physics of the corona and heliosphere. This paper presents results of a study of occurrence frequencies of CMEs and related activity tracers over more than a complete solar activity cycle. To properly estimate occurrence rates, observed CME rates must be corrected for instrument duty cycles, detection efficiencies away from the skyplane, mass detection thresholds, and geometrical considerations. These corrections are evaluated using CME data from 1976-1989 obtained with the Skylab, SMM and SOLWIND coronagraphs and the Helios-2 photometers. The major results are: (1) the occurrence rate of CMEs tends to track the activity cycle in both amplitude and phase; (2) the corrected rates from different instruments are reasonably consistent; and (3) over the long term, no one class of solar activity tracer is better correlated with CME rate than any other (with the possible exception of type II bursts).

  9. Are smoking and passive smoking related with heart rate variability in male adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Renata Melo; Farah, Breno Quintella; Santos, Carolina da Franca Bandeira Ferreira; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relation between smoking and passive smoking with heart rate variability parameters in male adolescents. Methods The sample consisted of 1,152 males, aged 14 and 19 years. Data related to smoking and passive smoking were collected using a questionnaire. RR intervals were obtained by a heart rate monitor, on supine position, for 10 minutes. After collecting the RR intervals, time (standard deviation of all RR intervals, root mean square of the squared differences between adjacent normal RR intervals and the percentage of adjacent intervals over 50ms) and frequency domains (low and high frequency and sympathovagal balance) parameters of heart rate variability were obtained. Results No significant differences between smoker and nonsmoker adolescents were observed in heart rate variability parameters (p>0.05). Similarly, heart rate variability parameters did not show significant difference between exposed and not exposed to passive smoking (p>0.05). Conclusion Cigarette smoking and passive smoking are not related to heart rate variability in adolescence. PMID:25993065

  10. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  11. Relative Rates for Plasma Homo- and Copolymerizations of Olefins in a Homologous Series of Fluorinated Ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The relative rates of plasma (co)polymerizations of ethylene, vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (VF(sub x); x = 0-4, respectively) were determined in an rf, capacitively coupled, tubular reactor with external electrodes using identical plasma parameters. The averages of deposition rates obtained by both microgravimetry and ellipsometry were plotted versus the F/C ratios of the monomers or monomer blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub x)(x = 1-3) and 20 monomer blends were all located above a straight line joining the rates for VF(sub 0) and VF(sub 4), following a concave-downward plot of deposition rate versus F/C ratio similar to that reported previously for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 4) blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub m)/VF(sub n) blends (m = 3 or 4; n = 0-2) were all greater than expected for non-interacting monomers; those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 2) and VF(sub 1)/VF(sub 2) blends were all lower than expected; while those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 1) and VF(sub 3)/VF(sub 4) blends fen on a straightline plot versus F/C ratio, indicative of apparent non-interaction between monomers. The mechanisms for plasma (co)polymerizations of VF(sub x) monomers responsible for the wide range of relative deposition rates remain to be elucidated.

  12. New test of general relativity - Measurement of de Sitter geodetic precession rate for lunar perigee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, Bruno; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Bender, Peter L.

    1987-01-01

    According to general relativity, the calculated rate of motion of lunar perigee should include a contribution of 19.2 msec/yr from geodetic precession. It is shown that existing analyses of lunar-laser-ranging data confirm the general-relativistic rate for geodetic precession with respect to the planetary dynamical frame. In addition, the comparison of earth-rotation results from lunar laser ranging and from VLBI shows that the relative drift of the planetary dynamical frame and the extragalactic VLBI reference frame is small. The estimated accuracy is about 10 percent.

  13. Relative rates of AIDS among racial/ethnic groups by exposure categories.

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, H. W.; Turner, J. F.; Moolchan, E. T.; Cadet, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The relative rates of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were calculated among racial/ethnic populations using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)/Surveillance reports assuming that racial/ethnic distributions reflect that of the US Census Data from 1990. For comparison, a rate of 1 was assigned to whites in each calculation. The overall relative rates were whites--1, African Americans--4.7, Hispanics--3, Asian/Pacific Islanders--0.4, and Native Americans--0.5. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome surveillance data show higher rates of AIDS for African Americans and Hispanics compared with whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. The relative rates for African Americans and Hispanics compared with whites were highest for injecting drug users, heterosexual contact, and pediatric patients. These results led us to explore possible explanations for increased AIDS reporting in African Americans and Hispanics. We then explored available national datasets regarding those variables. The analyses indicate that variables such as access and receptivity to HIV prevention and treatment efforts, race/ethnicity, sexual behaviors, sexually transmitted diseases, socioeconomic status, and substance abuse interact in a complex fashion to influence HIV transmission and progression to AIDS in affected communities. PMID:10063784

  14. The Effect of Changes in Relative Humidity on the Hydration Rate of Pachuca Obsidian

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The effect of relative humidity on the hydration rate of obsidian and other glasses has been debated since the early work of (I. Friedman, R. Smith, Am. Antiquity 25 (1960) 476). While more recent work has been in general agreement that a relative humidity dependence does exist, hydration profiles as a function of relative humidity have not been obtained. In this paper we present the results of a study in which samples of Pachuca obsidian were hydrated for approximately 5 days at 150 C at relative humidities ranging from 21% to 100%, and the resultant profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The results suggest that the hydration rate is, indeed, a function of relative humidity, but for the relative humidity levels commonly observed in most soils the effects on hydration dating are expected to be relatively small. In addition, analysis of the surface values as sorption isotherms and comparisons with nitrogen sorption isotherms suggests that water is relatively strongly bound to the obsidian surface. By assuming a situation in which the 'surface' refers to active centers within the glass we have shown that an adsorption model provides a useful approach to modeling the diffusive process.

  15. Community Colleges and Labor Market Conditions: How Does Enrollment Demand Change Relative to Local Unemployment Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Orians, Erica Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study uses fixed-effects panel data techniques to estimate the elasticity of community college enrollment demand relative to local unemployment rates. The findings suggest that community college enrollment demand is counter-cyclical to changes in the labor market, as enrollments rise during periods of weak economic conditions. Using national…

  16. Citation Rate of Highly-Cited Papers in 100 Kinesiology-Related Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    This study extended previous research on several citation-based bibliometric variables for highly cited articles in a large (N = 100) number of journals related to Kinesiology. Total citations and citation rate of the 30 most highly cited articles in each journal were identified by searchers of "Google Scholar (GS)". Other major…

  17. 13 CFR 120.1060 - Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information. 120.1060 Section 120.1060 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision §...

  18. Response-Time Variability Is Related to Parent Ratings of Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Martin, Cristina Dominguez; Mairena, Maria Angeles; Di Martino, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Isquith, Peter K.; Gioia, Gerard; Petkova, Eva; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD are often characterized as inconsistent across many contexts. ADHD is also associated with deficits in executive function. We examined the relationships between response time (RT) variability on five brief computer tasks to parents' ratings of ADHD-related features and executive function in a group of children with…

  19. An estimator for the relative entropy rate of path measures for stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opper, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    We address the problem of estimating the relative entropy rate (RER) for two stochastic processes described by stochastic differential equations. For the case where the drift of one process is known analytically, but one has only observations from the second process, we use a variational bound on the RER to construct an estimator.

  20. Alcohol-Related Vehicular Death Rates for College Students in the Commonwealth of Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James; Bauerle, Jennifer; Keller, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Determine rate of college student alcohol-related vehicular traffic fatalities in Virginia during 2007. Participants: Undergraduates at colleges and universities in Virginia. Methods: Institutions with membership in the American College Health Association were invited to participate in a survey. Data collected from institutional reports…

  1. Understanding and Producing the Reduced Relative Construction: Evidence from Ratings, Editing and Corpora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; McRae, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Two rating studies demonstrate that English speakers willingly produce reduced relatives with internal cause verbs (e.g., "Whisky fermented in oak barrels can have a woody taste"), and judge their acceptability based on factors known to influence ambiguity resolution, rather than on the internal/external cause distinction. Regression analyses…

  2. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  3. Is the Physical Availability of Alcohol and Illicit Drugs Related to Neighborhood Rates of Child Maltreatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freisthler, Bridget; Needell, Barbara; Gruenewald, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the availability of alcohol and illicit drugs (as measured by alcohol outlet density and police incidents of drug sales and possessions) is related to neighborhood rates of child abuse and neglect, controlling for other neighborhood demographic characteristics. Method: Data from substantiated reports of child…

  4. Relation of Course, Instructor, and Student Characteristics to Dimensions of Student Ratings of Teaching Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckert, Teresa M.; Latier, Amanda; Ringwald, Amy; Silvey, Brenna

    2006-01-01

    This research investigated the relation of course, instructor, and student characteristics to student ratings of teaching effectiveness, both overall and within the dimensions of pedagogical skill, rapport with students, difficulty appropriateness, and course value/learning. Interest in the course content, expected grades, satisfaction with the…

  5. Application of Content Validity Methods to the Development of a Job-Related Performance Rating Criterion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distefano, M. K., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrated the use of quantitative content validity procedures in the development of a job-related behavioral rating scale criterion for entry-level psychiatric aides. Found that 78 of 83 items were significantly job-relevant using the computation procedures of both Lawshe and Aiken. (JAC)

  6. Background seismicity rate at subduction zones linked to slab-bending-related hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tomoaki; Ide, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Tectonic properties strongly control variations in seismicity among subduction zones. In particular, fluid distribution in subduction zones influences earthquake occurrence, and it varies among subduction zones due to variations in fluid sources such as hydrated oceanic plates. However, the relationship between variations in fluid distribution and variations in seismicity among subduction zones is unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into 111 regions and estimate background seismicity rates using the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We demonstrate that background seismicity rate correlates to the amount of bending of the incoming oceanic plate, which in turn is related to the hydration of oceanic plates via slab-bending-related faults. Regions with large bending may have high-seismicity rates because a strongly hydrated oceanic plate causes high pore fluid pressure and reduces the strength of the plate interface. We suggest that variations in fluid distribution can also cause variations in seismicity in subduction zones.

  7. Relations between the development of patterns of sleeping heart rate and body temperature in infants.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S A; Pratt, C; Wailoo, M P

    2001-09-01

    Overnight patterns of rectal temperature and heart rate were recorded from 119 normal infants at weekly intervals from 7 to about 16 weeks of age. All data were collected in the infants' own homes. As previously reported, different infants developed an adult-like night time rectal temperature pattern abruptly at different ages. When heart rate data were collated by age, there was an apparently gradual fall in sleeping heart rate from 7 to about 14 weeks of age. This was, however, an artefact of data collation. Individual infants showed abrupt falls in heart rate at the time that the adult-like body temperature pattern appeared, but this occurred at different ages in different babies, so when data were collated cross sectionally, an apparently gradual fall resulted. The relation between the developmental changes in sleeping heart rate and rectal temperature was different in boys and girls, with girls showing a more abrupt and greater change in heart rate at the time of development of the adult-like body temperature pattern. Infants whose parents smoked had significantly lower heart rates once the adult-like body temperature pattern had appeared.

  8. Response rate viewed as engagement bouts: effects of relative reinforcement and schedule type.

    PubMed Central

    Shull, R L; Gaynor, S T; Grimes, J A

    2001-01-01

    The rate of a reinforced response is conceptualized as a composite of engagement bouts (visits) and responding during visits. Part I of this paper describes a method for estimating the rate of visit initiations and the average number of responses per visit from log survivor plots: the proportion) of interresponse times (IRTs) longer than some elapsed time (log scale) plotted as a function of elapsed time. In Part 2 the method is applied to IRT distributions from rats that obtained food pellets by nose poking a lighted key under various multiple schedules of reinforcement. As expected, total response rate increased as a function of (a) increasing the rate of reinforcement (i.e., variable-interval [VI] 4 min vs. VI 1 mi), (b) increasing the amount of the reinforcer (one food pellet vs. four pellets), (c) increasing the percentage of reinforcers that were contingent on nose poking (25% vs. 100%), and (d) requiring additional responses after the end of the VI schedule (i.e., adding a tandem variable-ratio [VR] 9 requirement). The first three of these variables (relative reinforcement) increased the visit-initiation rate. The tandem VR, in contrast, increased the number of responses per visit. Thus, variables that have similar effects on total response rate can be differentiated based on their effects on the componemts of response rate. PMID:11453618

  9. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; Evans, N. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Davis, T.; Papovich, C. J.; van den Bosch, R.; Iono, D.; Yun, M.; VIXENS Team

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. By comparing H-alpha, Pa-alpha and 24um data to CO(1-0), CO(2-1), HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find discrepancies from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  10. Co/Ni ratios at taenite/kamacite interfaces and relative cooling rates in iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Hoppe, Peter

    2012-05-01

    We report a pilot study of a new technique to use the distribution of Co between kamacite and taenite to infer relative cooling rates of iron meteorites; data of Widge and Goldstein (1977) showed that the distribution is temperature dependent. A plot of the logarithm of the double ratio [(Co/Ni)kamacite/(Co/Ni)taenite] (abbreviated Rαγ) against inverse temperature yields a linear equation showing that the ratio ranges from ˜2.5 at 1080 K to ˜30 at 710 K. Thus, a measurement of Rαγ in the kamacite and taenite near the interface offers information about relative cooling rates; the higher Rαγ, the lower the cooling rate. A major advantage of this technique is that it is mainly affected by the final (low-temperature) cooling rate, just before the sample cooled to the blocking temperature where diffusion became insignificant. To test this method we used the NanoSIMS ion probe to measure Rαγ in two IVA and two IIIAB irons; members of each pair differ by large factors in elemental composition and in published metallographic cooling rates (Yang and Goldstein, 2006; Yang et al., 2008). Despite differing by a factor of 25 in estimated metallographic cooling rate, the two IVA irons showed similar Rαγ values of ˜22. If experimental uncertainties are considered this implies that, at low temperatures, their cooling rates differ by less than a factor of 5 with 95% confidence, i.e., significantly less than the range in metallographic cooling rates. In contrast, the IIIAB irons have different ratios; Rαγ in Haig is 29 whereas that in Cumpas, with a reported cooling rate 4.5 times lower, is 22, the opposite of that expected from the published cooling rates. A reevaluation of the Yang-Goldstein IIIAB data set shows that Haig has anomalous metallographic properties. We suggest that both the high Rαγ in Haig and the systematically low taenite central Ni contents are the result of impact-produced fractures in the taenite that allowed equilibration with kamacite down to

  11. Enhanced Atlantic sea-level rise relative to the Pacific under high carbon emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasting, J. P.; Dunne, J. P.; Stouffer, R. J.; Hallberg, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal expansion of the ocean in response to warming is an important component of historical sea-level rise. Observational studies show that the Atlantic and Southern oceans are warming faster than the Pacific Ocean. Here we present simulations using a numerical atmospheric-ocean general circulation model with an interactive carbon cycle to evaluate the impact of carbon emission rates, ranging from 2 to 25 GtC yr-1, on basin-scale ocean heat uptake and sea level. For simulations with emission rates greater than 5 GtC yr-1, sea-level rise is larger in the Atlantic than Pacific Ocean on centennial timescales. This basin-scale asymmetry is related to the shorter flushing timescales and weakening of the overturning circulation in the Atlantic. These factors lead to warmer Atlantic interior waters and greater thermal expansion. In contrast, low emission rates of 2 and 3 GtC yr-1 will cause relatively larger sea-level rise in the Pacific on millennial timescales. For a given level of cumulative emissions, sea-level rise is largest at low emission rates. We conclude that Atlantic coastal areas may be particularly vulnerable to near-future sea-level rise from present-day high greenhouse gas emission rates.

  12. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    GLENNIE, ELIZABETH; BONNEAU, KARA; VANDELLEN, MICHELLE; DODGE, KENNETH A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. Purpose/Objective/Focus This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Research Design Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time—that is, between one year’s achievement and the subsequent year’s dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. Findings/Results This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved

  13. Implementation of strain rate sensitive material properties into impact related problems

    SciTech Connect

    Laubscher, R.F.; Merwe, P. van der

    1995-12-31

    Strain rate sensitivity is discussed in general. A general strain rate sensitive constitutive model is then derived with a yield criterion for an isotropic hardening material incorporating a modified version of the Cowper Symonds equation. Experimental data for 10 different metals ranging from carbon steels to titanium alloys are fitted to this constitutive model. It is shown that with this relatively simple model a good agreement can be achieved between the constitutive model and the experimental data for most metals. The manner in which this constitutive model may be used in design is discussed along with its incorporation into numerical methods such as finite elements.

  14. Vulnerability of Louisiana's coastal wetlands to present-day rates of relative sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Krista L; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E; Fernandes, Anjali M

    2017-03-14

    Coastal Louisiana has lost about 5,000 km(2) of wetlands over the past century and concern exists whether remaining wetlands will persist while facing some of the world's highest rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR). Here we analyse an unprecedented data set derived from 274 rod surface-elevation table-marker horizon stations, to determine present-day surface-elevation change, vertical accretion and shallow subsidence rates. Comparison of vertical accretion rates with RSLR rates at the land surface (present-day RSLR rates are 12±8 mm per year) shows that 65% of wetlands in the Mississippi Delta (SE Louisiana) may keep pace with RSLR, whereas 58% of the sites in the Chenier Plain (SW Louisiana) do not, rendering much of this area highly vulnerable to RLSR. At least 60% of the total subsidence rate occurs within the uppermost 5-10 m, which may account for the higher vulnerability of coastal Louisiana wetlands compared to their counterparts elsewhere.

  15. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2014-03-01

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

  16. Vulnerability of Louisiana's coastal wetlands to present-day rates of relative sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Krista L.; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.; Fernandes, Anjali M.

    2017-03-01

    Coastal Louisiana has lost about 5,000 km2 of wetlands over the past century and concern exists whether remaining wetlands will persist while facing some of the world's highest rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR). Here we analyse an unprecedented data set derived from 274 rod surface-elevation table-marker horizon stations, to determine present-day surface-elevation change, vertical accretion and shallow subsidence rates. Comparison of vertical accretion rates with RSLR rates at the land surface (present-day RSLR rates are 12+/-8 mm per year) shows that 65% of wetlands in the Mississippi Delta (SE Louisiana) may keep pace with RSLR, whereas 58% of the sites in the Chenier Plain (SW Louisiana) do not, rendering much of this area highly vulnerable to RLSR. At least 60% of the total subsidence rate occurs within the uppermost 5-10 m, which may account for the higher vulnerability of coastal Louisiana wetlands compared to their counterparts elsewhere.

  17. Evolution of cultural traits occurs at similar relative rates in different world regions

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Thomas E.; Mace, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental issue in understanding human diversity is whether or not there are regular patterns and processes involved in cultural change. Theoretical and mathematical models of cultural evolution have been developed and are increasingly being used and assessed in empirical analyses. Here, we test the hypothesis that the rates of change of features of human socio-cultural organization are governed by general rules. One prediction of this hypothesis is that different cultural traits will tend to evolve at similar relative rates in different world regions, despite the unique historical backgrounds of groups inhabiting these regions. We used phylogenetic comparative methods and systematic cross-cultural data to assess how different socio-cultural traits changed in (i) island southeast Asia and the Pacific, and (ii) sub-Saharan Africa. The relative rates of change in these two regions are significantly correlated. Furthermore, cultural traits that are more directly related to external environmental conditions evolve more slowly than traits related to social structures. This is consistent with the idea that a form of purifying selection is acting with greater strength on these more environmentally linked traits. These results suggest that despite contingent historical events and the role of humans as active agents in the historical process, culture does indeed evolve in ways that can be predicted from general principles PMID:25297866

  18. The influence of fatigue-induced increase in relative work rate on temperature regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kacin, Alan; Golja, Petra; Tipton, Michael J; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2008-05-01

    Heat-loss responses during steady-load exercise are affected by an increase in relative work rate induced by muscle ischaemia or hypoxaemia. The present study investigated whether progressive increases in perception of exertion and relative oxygen uptake %VO2peak which occur during prolonged steady-load exercise as a result of progressively increased peripheral fatigue, might also affect the regulation of heat loss responses and hence the exercise-induced increase in mean body temperature. Ten male subjects first performed a ramp-test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer to evaluate their initial peak oxygen uptake (Control VO2peak). On a separate day, 120 min of cycling at constant power output corresponding to 60% of Control VO2peak was performed in thermoneutral environment (Ta = 23 degrees C, RH = 50%, wind speed = 5 m s(-1)). This was immediately followed by another maximal performance test (Fatigue VO2peak). During prolonged exercise, median (range) rating of perceived exertion for whole-body (RPEwb) increased (P < 0.01) from initial 3.5 (1-5) to 5.5 (5-9) at the end of exercise. Fatigue VO2peak and peak power output were 9 (5) and 10 (5)% lower (P < 0.01) when compared to control values. At the onset of exercise, heat production, mechanical efficiency, heat loss and mean body temperature increased towards asymptotic values, thereafter remained constant throughout the 120 min exercise, despite the concomitant progressive increase in relative work rate, as reflected in increased RPEwb and relative oxygen uptake. It is thus concluded that the increase in relative work rate induced predominantly by peripheral muscle fatigue affects neither the level of increase in mean body temperature nor the regulation of heat loss responses during prolonged steady-load exercise.

  19. Linear rate-equilibrium relations arising from ion channel-bilayer energetic coupling

    PubMed Central

    Greisen, Per; Lum, Kevin; Ashrafuzzaman, Md.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Lundbæk, Jens A.

    2011-01-01

    Linear rate-equilibrium (RE) relations, also known as linear free energy relations, are widely observed in chemical reactions, including protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, and channel gating. Despite the widespread occurrence of linear RE relations, the principles underlying the linear relation between changes in activation and equilibrium energy in macromolecular reactions remain enigmatic. When examining amphiphile regulation of gramicidin channel gating in lipid bilayers, we noted that the gating process could be described by a linear RE relation with a simple geometric interpretation. This description is possible because the gating process provides a well-understood reaction, in which structural changes in a bilayer-embedded model protein can be studied at the single-molecule level. It is thus possible to obtain quantitative information about the energetics of the reaction transition state and its position on a spatial coordinate. It turns out that the linear RE relation for the gramicidin monomer-dimer reaction can be understood, and the quantitative relation between changes in activation energy and equilibrium energy can be interpreted, by considering the effects of amphiphiles on the changes in bilayer elastic energy associated with channel gating. We are not aware that a similar simple mechanistic explanation of a linear RE relation has been provided for a chemical reaction in a macromolecule. RE relations generally should be useful for examining how amphiphile-induced changes in bilayer properties modulate membrane protein folding and function, and for distinguishing between direct (e.g., due to binding) and indirect (bilayer-mediated) effects. PMID:21768343

  20. Growth rates are related to production efficiencies in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Heflin, L E; Gibbs, V K; Jones, W T; Makowsky, R; Lawrence, A L; Watts, S A

    2013-09-01

    Growth rates of newly-metamorphosed urchins from a single spawning event (three males and three females) were highly variable, despite being held en masse under identical environmental and nutritional conditions. As individuals reached ~5 mm diameter (0.07-0.10 g wet weight), they were placed in growth trials (23 dietary treatments containing various nutrient profiles). Elapsed time from the first individual entering the growth trials to the last individual entering was 121 days (N = 170 individuals). During the five-week growth trials, urchins were held individually and proffered a limiting ration to evaluate growth rate and production efficiency. Growth rates among individuals within each dietary treatment remained highly variable. Across all dietary treatments, individuals with an initially high growth rate (entering the study first) continued to grow at a faster rate than those with an initially low growth rate (entering the study at a later date), regardless of feed intake. Wet weight gain (ranging from 0.13 -3.19 g, P < 0.0001, R(2) = 0.5801) and dry matter production efficiency (ranging from 25.2-180.5%, P = 0.0003, R(2) = 0.6162) were negatively correlated with stocking date, regardless of dietary treatment. Although canalization of growth rate during en masse early post-metamorphic growth is possible, we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in growth rates are, in part, the result of differences (possibly genetic) in production efficiencies of individual Lytechinus variegatus. That is, some sea urchins are more efficient in converting feed to biomass. We further hypothesize that this variation may have evolved as an adaptive response to selective pressure related to food availability.

  1. Growth rates are related to production efficiencies in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, L.E.; Gibbs, V.K.; Jones, W.T.; Makowsky, R.; Lawrence, A.L.; Watts, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Growth rates of newly-metamorphosed urchins from a single spawning event (three males and three females) were highly variable, despite being held en masse under identical environmental and nutritional conditions. As individuals reached ~5 mm diameter (0.07–0.10 g wet weight), they were placed in growth trials (23 dietary treatments containing various nutrient profiles). Elapsed time from the first individual entering the growth trials to the last individual entering was 121 days (N = 170 individuals). During the five-week growth trials, urchins were held individually and proffered a limiting ration to evaluate growth rate and production efficiency. Growth rates among individuals within each dietary treatment remained highly variable. Across all dietary treatments, individuals with an initially high growth rate (entering the study first) continued to grow at a faster rate than those with an initially low growth rate (entering the study at a later date), regardless of feed intake. Wet weight gain (ranging from 0.13 −3.19 g, P < 0.0001, R2 = 0.5801) and dry matter production efficiency (ranging from 25.2–180.5%, P = 0.0003, R2 = 0.6162) were negatively correlated with stocking date, regardless of dietary treatment. Although canalization of growth rate during en masse early post-metamorphic growth is possible, we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in growth rates are, in part, the result of differences (possibly genetic) in production efficiencies of individual Lytechinus variegatus. That is, some sea urchins are more efficient in converting feed to biomass. We further hypothesize that this variation may have evolved as an adaptive response to selective pressure related to food availability. PMID:25435593

  2. Degree of mutual ornamentation in birds is related to divorce rate.

    PubMed Central

    Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Many bird species have ornaments that are expressed equally in both sexes. I use comparative analysis to investigate why some monomorphic birds are highly ornamented, whereas others are drab. The results show a significant positive association between the degree of mutual ornamentation and divorce rate. This result is robust to the removal of the effects of phylogeny, site fidelity, residency, coloniality, nest type, mortality, body size and body-size dimorphism. The level of extra-pair paternity was not related to the degree of mutual ornamentation. I argue that these results are compatible with a process of mutual sexual selection, in which both sexes compete for access to mates. The coupled evolution of ornamentation and divorce rate, from the probable ancestral state of a high degree of ornamentation and a low divorce rate, appears to result mainly from a loss of ornamentation under mate fidelity. PMID:12964980

  3. Relative patterns and rates of evolution in heron nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, F H; Jones, C E; McCracken, K G

    2000-03-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data from 15 species of herons (Aves: Ardeidae), representing 13 genera, were compared with DNA hybridization data of single-copy nuclear DNA (scnDNA) from the same species in a taxonomic congruence assessment of heron phylogeny. The two data sets produced a partially resolved, completely congruent estimate of phylogeny with the following basic structure: (Tigrisoma, Cochlearius, (((Zebrilus, (Ixobrychus, Botaurus)), (((Ardea, Casmerodius), Bubulcus), ((Egretta thula, Egretta caerulea, Egretta tricolor), Syrigma), Butorides, Nycticorax, Nyctanassa)))). Because congruence indicated similar phylogenetic information in the two data sets, we used the relatively unsaturated DNA hybridization distances as surrogates of time to examine graphically the patterns and rates of change in cytochrome b distances. Cytochrome b distances were computed either from whole sequences or from partitioned sequences consisting of transitions, transversions, specific codon site positions, or specific protein-coding regions. These graphical comparisons indicated that unpartitioned cytochrome b has evolved at 5-10 times the rate of scnDNA. Third-position transversions appeared to offer the most useful sequence partition for phylogenetic analysis because of their relatively fast rate of substitution (two times that of scnDNA) and negligible saturation. We also examined lineage-based rates of evolution by comparing branch length patterns between the nuclear and cytochrome b trees. The degree of correlation in corresponding branch lengths between cytochrome b and DNA hybridization trees depended on DNA sequence partitioning. When cytochrome b sequences were not partitioned, branch lengths in the cytochrome b and DNA hybridization trees were not correlated. However, when cytochrome b sequences were reduced to third-position transversions (i.e., unsaturated, relatively fast changing data), branch lengths were correlated. This finding suggests that lineage

  4. The impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates: global data review

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Maki; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Ferronato, Angela Esposito; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates in countries that implemented universal vaccination against the disease. Data source: We identified countries that implemented universal vaccination against varicella at the http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/schedules site of the World Health Organization and selected articles in Pubmed describing the changes (pre/post-vaccination) in the varicella-related hospitalization rates in these countries, using the Keywords "varicella", "vaccination/vaccine" and "children" (or) "hospitalization". Publications in English published between January 1995 and May 2015 were included. Data synthesis: 24 countries with universal vaccination against varicella and 28 articles describing the impact of the vaccine on varicella-associated hospitalizations rates in seven countries were identified. The US had 81.4%–99.2% reduction in hospitalization rates in children younger than four years, 6–14 years after the onset of universal vaccination (1995), with vaccination coverage of 90%; Uruguay: 94% decrease (children aged 1–4 years) in six years, vaccination coverage of 90%; Canada: 93% decrease (age 1–4 years) in 10 years, coverage of 93%; Germany: 62.4% decrease (age 1–4 years) in 8 years, coverage of 78.2%; Australia: 76.8% decrease (age 1–4 years) in 5 years, coverage of 90%; Spain: 83.5% decrease (age <5 years) in four years, coverage of 77.2% and Italy 69.7%–73.8% decrease (general population), coverage of 60%–95%. Conclusions: The publications showed variations in the percentage of decrease in varicella-related hospitalization rates after universal vaccination in the assessed countries; the results probably depend on the time since the implementation of universal vaccination, differences in the studied age group, hospital admission criteria, vaccination coverage and strategy, which does not allow direct comparison between data. PMID

  5. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda; Evans, Neal J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Blanc, Guillermo; Davis, Timothy; Papovich, Casey; van den Bosch, Remco; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.

    2015-08-01

    We highlight first results from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from VIXENS. By comparing Hα, Paα, and 24μm images to CO(2→1), CO(3→2), HCN(1→0), HCO+(1→0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find that the SFR-gas relations for Arp 299 are discrepant from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  6. A Novel Method for Extracting Respiration Rate and Relative Tidal Volume from Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory F.; Gatto, Rodolfo G.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In psychophysiological research, measurement of respiration has been dependent on transducers having direct contact with the participant. The current study provides empirical data demonstrating that a noncontact technology, infrared video thermography, can accurately estimate breathing rate and relative tidal volume across a range of breathing patterns. Video tracking algorithms were applied to frame-by-frame thermal images of the face to extract time series of nostril temperature and to generate breath-by-breath measures of respiration rate and relative tidal volume. The thermal indices of respiration were contrasted with criterion measures collected with inductance plethysmography. The strong correlations observed between the technologies demonstrate the potential use of facial video thermography as a noncontact technology to monitor respiration. PMID:21214587

  7. Heart rate-left ventricular ejection time relations - Variations during postural change and cardiovascular challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, V. Q.; Spodick, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on healthy human subjects to determine HR-LVET (Heart Rate-Left Ventricular Ejection Time) regression relations in different postures, including tilt, and during isometric exercise. The subjects were tested in the resting state in supine and sitting positions, during isometric handgrip in supine and sitting positions and during 70 deg headup tilt. The recordings included a bipolar electrocardiogram and a right external carotid pulse curve. Comparison of the HR-LVET relation for the conditions under analysis revealed differences among the respective regression equations, which can be explained by the well-established differences in stroke volume and ejection rate among these states. These differences appear to account for the fact that under conditions in which stroke volume variations should be the major determinant, slopes will be similar but intercepts will vary. Since substantial differences among intercepts are observed, caution should be exercised whenever the intercept factor is used to predict LVET for HR.

  8. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  9. Temperature and rainfall are related to fertility rate after spring artificial insemination in small ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abecia, J. A.; Arrébola, F.; Macías, A.; Laviña, A.; González-Casquet, O.; Benítez, F.; Palacios, C.

    2016-10-01

    A total number of 1092 artificial inseminations (AIs) performed from March to May were documented over four consecutive years on 10 Payoya goat farms (36° N) and 19,392 AIs on 102 Rasa Aragonesa sheep farms (41° N) over 10 years. Mean, maximum, and minimum ambient temperatures, mean relative humidity, mean solar radiation, and total rainfall on each insemination day were recorded. Overall, fertility rates were 58 % in goats and 45 % in sheep. The fertility rates of the highest and lowest deciles of each of the meteorological variables indicated that temperature and rainfall had a significant effect on fertility in goats. Specifically, inseminations that were performed when mean (68 %), maximum (68 %), and minimum (66 %) temperatures were in the highest decile, and rainfall was in the lowest decile (59 %), had a significantly ( P < 0.0001) higher proportion of does that became pregnant than did the ewes in the lowest decile (56, 54, 58, and 49 %, respectively). In sheep, the fertility rates of the highest decile of mean (62 %), maximum (62 %), and minimum (52 %) temperature, RH (52 %), THI (53 %), and rainfall (45 %) were significantly higher ( P < 0.0001) than were the fertility rates among ewes in the lowest decile (46, 45, 45, 45, 46, and 43 %, respectively). In conclusion, weather was related to fertility in small ruminants after AI in spring. It remains to be determined whether scheduling the dates of insemination based on forecasted temperatures can improve the success of AI in goats and sheep.

  10. Investigation of Organic Compound Reactivity in Liquid and Frozen Aqueous Systems Using Relative Rate Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurek, L.; Grannas, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that snow and ice are highly reactive media where photochemical reactions occur. These reactions can have important consequences for the environment, including the production of organic compounds, halogens and nitrogen oxides that impact surface boundary layer chemistry. Laboratory-based studies have shown that the nature of the sample and the physical location of solutes play a large role in determining the reactivity of a particular compound. During the freezing of aqueous solutions, most solute molecules become excluded from the ice crystal lattice, increasing their apparent concentrations as they accumulate in liquid-like layers, micropockets, and microveins within the ice (freeze-concentration effect). In an effort to better understand how the physicochemical properties of solutes may impact reactivity in frozen solutions, we have examined the relative reaction rates of various organic compounds with hydroxyl radical in both liquid and frozen conditions. Solutions containing two target organic compounds and hydrogen peroxide were made in liquid and frozen phases, and then irradiated using a Q-Panel 340 lamp to simulate natural sunlight. Relative rates of reaction were then obtained for the two compounds in both liquid and ice conditions. In most cases the reactions proceeded more quickly in liquid samples, and the relative rates of reaction were different in liquid and frozen conditions. We will discuss the potential role of a compound's physicochemical properties and the influence of the physical nature of the sample with respect to observed reactivity differences.

  11. Conscientiousness mediates the relation between perceived parental socialisation and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Roberts, Brent W; Hoshino, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The pathways between parenting behaviours, personality and physical health have all been separately studied. Prior research has paid little attention to the indirect effects of personality in the path between parenting behaviours and better health. The purpose of this study was to explore the mediational effects of conscientiousness on the relationships between parental socialisation of responsibility and self-rated health, and to examine potential age differences in this mediational pathway. In total, 736 female and 749 male members across Japan participated in this study. They were divided into three groups by age category: younger-, middle-aged and older-aged. Conscientiousness and health were concurrently rated, while parental socialisation of responsibility was retrospectively assessed. Our analyses revealed that parental socialisation of responsibility is positively associated with conscientiousness and self-rated health, that conscientiousness is positively associated with self-rated health, and that conscientiousness fully mediated the effect of parental socialisation of responsibility on self-rated health. The mediational links were consistent across younger, middle-aged and older-aged cohorts. Our findings suggest that greater parental socialisation of responsibility relates to higher conscientiousness, and consequently healthier adults. These findings imply that parental behaviours could be a plausible target for intervention to foster the development of conscientiousness and better health.

  12. A parametric study of the behavior of the angular momentum vector during spin rate changes of rigid body spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    During a spin-up or spin-down maneuver of a spinning spacecraft, it is usual to have not only a constant body-fixed torque about the desired spin axis, but also small undesired constant torques about the transverse axes. This causes the orientation of the angular momentum vector to change in inertial space. Since an analytic solution is available for the angular momentum vector as a function of time, this behavior can be studied for large variations of the dynamic parameters, such as the initial spin rate, the inertial properties and the torques. As an example, the spin-up and spin-down maneuvers of the Galileo spacecraft was studied and as a result, very simple heuristic solutions were discovered which provide very good approximations to the parametric behavior of the angular momentum vector orientation.

  13. The Association between Work-Related Rumination and Heart Rate Variability: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Cropley, Mark; Plans, David; Morelli, Davide; Sütterlin, Stefan; Inceoglu, Ilke; Thomas, Geoff; Chu, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between perseverative cognition in the form of work-related rumination, and heart rate variability (HRV). We tested the hypothesis that high ruminators would show lower vagally mediated HRV relative to low ruminators during their leisure time. Individuals were classified as being low (n = 17) or high ruminators (n = 19), using the affective scale on the work-related rumination measure. HRV was assessed using a wrist sensor band (Microsoft Band 2). HRV was sampled between 8 pm and 10 pm over three workday evenings (Monday to Wednesday) while individuals carried out their normal evening routines. Compared to the low ruminators, high affective ruminators demonstrated lower HRV in the form of root mean square successive differences (RMSSDs), relative to the low ruminators, indicating lower parasympathetic activity. There was no significant difference in heart rate, or activity levels between the two groups during the recording periods. The current findings of this study may have implications for the design and delivery of interventions to help individuals unwind post work and to manage stress more effectively. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

  14. The Association between Work-Related Rumination and Heart Rate Variability: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Cropley, Mark; Plans, David; Morelli, Davide; Sütterlin, Stefan; Inceoglu, Ilke; Thomas, Geoff; Chu, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between perseverative cognition in the form of work-related rumination, and heart rate variability (HRV). We tested the hypothesis that high ruminators would show lower vagally mediated HRV relative to low ruminators during their leisure time. Individuals were classified as being low (n = 17) or high ruminators (n = 19), using the affective scale on the work-related rumination measure. HRV was assessed using a wrist sensor band (Microsoft Band 2). HRV was sampled between 8 pm and 10 pm over three workday evenings (Monday to Wednesday) while individuals carried out their normal evening routines. Compared to the low ruminators, high affective ruminators demonstrated lower HRV in the form of root mean square successive differences (RMSSDs), relative to the low ruminators, indicating lower parasympathetic activity. There was no significant difference in heart rate, or activity levels between the two groups during the recording periods. The current findings of this study may have implications for the design and delivery of interventions to help individuals unwind post work and to manage stress more effectively. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed. PMID:28197087

  15. p53 mutations associated with aging-related rise in cancer incidence rates.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    TP53's role as guardian of the genome diminishes with age, as the probability of mutation increases. Previous studies have shown an association between p53 gene mutations and cancer. However, the role of somatic TP53 mutations in the steep rise in cancer rates with aging has not been investigated at a population level. This relationship was quantified using the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) TP53 and GLOBOCAN cancer databases. The power function exponent of the cancer rate was calculated for 5-y age-standardized incidence or mortality rates for up to 25 cancer sites occurring in adults of median age 42 to 72 y. Linear regression analysis of the mean percentage of a cancer's TP53 mutations and the corresponding cancer exponent was conducted for four populations: worldwide, Japan, Western Europe, and the United States. Significant associations (P ≤ 0.05) were found for incidence rates but not mortality rates. Regardless of the population studied, positive associations were found for all cancer sites, with more significant associations for solid tumors, excluding the outlier prostate cancer or sex-related tumors. Worldwide and Japanese populations yielded P values as low as 0.002 and 0.005, respectively. For the United States, a significant association was apparent only when analysis utilized the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. This study found that TP53 mutations accounts for approximately one-quarter and one-third of the aging-related rise in the worldwide and Japanese incidence of all cancers, respectively. These significant associations between TP53 mutations and the rapid rise in cancer incidence with aging, considered with previously published literature, support a causal role for TP53 according to the Bradford-Hill criteria. However, questions remain concerning the contribution of TP53 mutations to neoplastic development and the role of factors such as genetic instability, obesity, and gene deficiencies other

  16. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ˜130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%-55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  17. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants’ personality traits as described in the ‘Big Five Inventory’ (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits

  18. Genome Size Evolution in Relation to Leaf Strategy and Metabolic Rates Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Knight, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims It has been proposed that having too much DNA may carry physiological consequences for plants. The strong correlation between DNA content, cell size and cell division rate could lead to predictable morphological variation in plants, including a negative relationship with leaf mass per unit area (LMA). In addition, the possible increased demand for resources in species with high DNA content may have downstream effects on maximal metabolic efficiency, including decreased metabolic rates. Methods Tests were made for genome size-dependent variation in LMA and metabolic rates (mass-based photosynthetic rate and dark respiration rate) using our own measurements and data from a plant functional trait database (Glopnet). These associations were tested using two metrics of genome size: bulk DNA amount (2C DNA) and monoploid genome size (1Cx DNA). The data were analysed using an evolutionary framework that included a regression analysis and independent contrasts using a phylogenetic tree with estimates of molecular diversification times. A contribution index for the LMA data set was also calculated to determine which divergences have the greatest influence on the relationship between genome size and LMA. Key Results and Conclusions A significant negative association was found between bulk DNA amount and LMA in angiosperms. This was primarily a result of influential divergences that may represent early shifts in growth form. However, divergences in bulk DNA amount were positively associated with divergences in LMA, suggesting that the relationship may be indirect and mediated through other traits directly related to genome size. There was a significant negative association between genome size and metabolic rates that was driven by a basal divergence between angiosperms and gymnosperms; no significant independent contrast results were found. Therefore, it is concluded that genome size-dependent constraints acting on metabolic efficiency may not exist within

  19. Recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins and related risk factors*

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Fernanda; Santamaría, Jesus Rodriguez; Garbers, Luiz Eduardo Fabricio de Melo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The best way to approach surgically removed basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins is a controversial issue. Some authors believe that the more appropriate treatment is an immediate reoperation while others prefer a periodic follow up. The rates of recurrence are variable in literature, between 10% and 67%. OBJECTIVE To define the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive margins after surgery. Secondarily, identify morphological aspects that can suggest a more frequent tumoral recurrence. METHODS This was a retrospective and observational study made by analysis of medical records of 487 patients between January 2003 and December 2009 in Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná (HC-UFPR). From 402 basal cell carcinomas surgically treated, 41 fulfilled inclusion criteria and were evaluated for five years or more. Recurrence rate of these tumors was analyzed in all patients and clinical characteristics such as sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, ulceration, and histological type were evaluated in order to find if they were related to more common tumoral recurrence. RESULTS The rate of positive margins after surgery was 12.18%. There were five cases of tumoral recurrence in the observation group and three cases in the re-excision group. Tumor size, site, histological type, ulceration and type of positive margin did not differ statistically between groups. It was not possible to consider if these factors were important in recurrence rates. STUDY LIMITATIONS Ideally, a prospective study with a larger sample would be more accurate. CONCLUSION The treatment of choice in basal cell carcinoma with positive margins must be individualized to reduce recurrence rates. PMID:28225958

  20. Calculation of relative glomerular filtration rate and correlation with delayed technetium-99m DMSA imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Kipper, M.; Witztum, K.

    1986-01-01

    The relative renal uptake of Tc-99m DMSA was compared with the relative glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in ten patients with serum creatinines ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 mg/dl. Relative GFR was based on the renal uptake of Tc-99m DTPA determined by two methods: 1) integrating the counts from 1 to 3 minutes postinjection and correcting for background. 2) Totalizing the individual renal counts in a single 15-second frame from 2:45 minutes to 3:00 minutes postinjection and correcting for background. The two methods of determining relative DTPA uptake showed excellent correlation, r = 0.98. Relative DMSA uptake determined at 24 hours post-injection using computer-assisted regions of interest showed excellent correlation with the relative GFR determined by either the integral or single-frame method, r = 0.98. The addition of background subtraction for the DMSA images at 24 hours did not improve the correlation.

  1. Predicting organic hydrogen atom transfer rate constants using the Marcus cross relation

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical reactions that involve net hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are ubiquitous in chemistry and biology, from the action of antioxidants to industrial and metalloenzyme catalysis. This report develops and validates a procedure to predict rate constants for HAT reactions of oxyl radicals (RO•) in various media. Our procedure uses the Marcus cross relation (CR) and includes adjustments for solvent hydrogen-bonding effects on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reactions. Kinetic solvent effects (KSEs) are included by using Ingold’s model, and thermodynamic solvent effects are accounted for by using an empirical model developed by Abraham. These adjustments are shown to be critical to the success of our combined model, referred to as the CR/KSE model. As an initial test of the CR/KSE model we measured self-exchange and cross rate constants in different solvents for reactions of the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical and the hydroxylamine 2,2′-6,6′-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-ol. Excellent agreement is observed between the calculated and directly determined cross rate constants. We then extend the model to over 30 known HAT reactions of oxyl radicals with OH or CH bonds, including biologically relevant reactions of ascorbate, peroxyl radicals, and α-tocopherol. The CR/KSE model shows remarkable predictive power, predicting rate constants to within a factor of 5 for almost all of the surveyed HAT reactions. PMID:20215463

  2. Relations between rate of negative reinforcement and the persistence of task completion.

    PubMed

    Romani, Patrick W; Ringdahl, Joel E; Wacker, David P; Lustig, Nicole H; Vinquist, Kelly M; Northup, John; Kane, Alexandra M; Carrion, Deva P

    2016-03-01

    Research has shown that differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) can be an effective intervention to address problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement emitted by young children. However, few studies have evaluated the variables that are related to long-term maintenance (i.e., persistence) of treatment effects. Research on behavioral persistence predicts that the rate of reinforcement provided for a target behavior is correlated with its persistence when challenged. There were 2 purposes of the current investigation. First, we evaluated the effects of the rate of negative reinforcement on the persistence of task completion. Second, we applied the findings regarding rate of reinforcement to a treatment context for 3 participants who engaged in destructive behavior that was reinforced by escape from demands. Results were evaluated within a multielement design and indicated that the rate of negative reinforcement had a moderate influence on the persistence of task completion. These results contribute to the existing literature by extending analyses of persistence to treatment contexts.

  3. Proliferation rates of bovine primary muscle cells relate to liveweight and carcase weight in cattle.

    PubMed

    Coles, Chantal A; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina P; Siddell, Jason P; Greenwood, Paul L; White, Jason D; McDonagh, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Muscling in cattle is largely influenced by genetic background, ultimately affecting beef yield and is of major interest to the beef industry. This investigation aimed to determine whether primary skeletal muscle cells isolated from different breeds of cattle with a varying genetic potential for muscling differ in their myogenic proliferative capacity. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the Longissimus muscle (LM) of 6 month old Angus, Hereford and Wagyu X Angus cattle. Cells were assessed for rate of proliferation and gene expression of PAX7, MYOD, MYF5, and MYOG. Proliferation rates were found to differ between breeds of cattle whereby myoblasts from Angus cattle were found to proliferate at a greater rate than those of Hereford and Wagyu X Angus during early stages of growth (5-20 hours in culture) in vitro (P < 0.05). The proliferation rates of myoblasts during early stages of culture in vitro were also found to be positively related to the liveweight and carcase weight of cattle (P < 0.05). Gene expression of MYF5 was also found to be significantly down-regulated in WagyuX compared with Angus cattle (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that early events during myogenesis are important for determining liveweight and caracase weights in cattle.

  4. The rate of handedness conversion and related factors in left-handed children.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ling-fu

    2007-03-01

    The rate of handedness conversion was 2.7% to 11.8% in prior studies based on the total population including innately right-handed people. However, the conversion rate of innately left-handed people has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the percentage of handedness conversion in children who are innately left-handed. The data in the present study showed that 59.3% (121/211) of left-handed children had been forced to convert to right-handedness. Current handedness was also reported by 114 of the 121 informants, and the rates of right-, left-, and mixed-handedness were 56.1% (64/114), 26.3% (30/114), and 17.5% (20/114) respectively. More than half had successfully changed from left to right. Some variables, especially the educational level of the parents and the child's grade level, were related to this conversion intention. The children whose parents had less education were more likely to be forced to change handedness. Additionally, the rate of handedness conversion in younger children was lower than in older children. However, even for the children whose parents had higher education, or for the children who were younger, there was a high percentage (45.7% and 41.8% respectively) who had changed their handedness. Therefore, preventing the possible side effects for children who have undergone hand conversion should be emphasised in the future.

  5. Proliferation Rates of Bovine Primary Muscle Cells Relate to Liveweight and Carcase Weight in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Chantal A.; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina P.; Siddell, Jason P.; Greenwood, Paul L.; White, Jason D.; McDonagh, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Muscling in cattle is largely influenced by genetic background, ultimately affecting beef yield and is of major interest to the beef industry. This investigation aimed to determine whether primary skeletal muscle cells isolated from different breeds of cattle with a varying genetic potential for muscling differ in their myogenic proliferative capacity. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the Longissimus muscle (LM) of 6 month old Angus, Hereford and Wagyu X Angus cattle. Cells were assessed for rate of proliferation and gene expression of PAX7, MYOD, MYF5, and MYOG. Proliferation rates were found to differ between breeds of cattle whereby myoblasts from Angus cattle were found to proliferate at a greater rate than those of Hereford and Wagyu X Angus during early stages of growth (5–20 hours in culture) in vitro (P < 0.05). The proliferation rates of myoblasts during early stages of culture in vitro were also found to be positively related to the liveweight and carcase weight of cattle (P < 0.05). Gene expression of MYF5 was also found to be significantly down-regulated in WagyuX compared with Angus cattle (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that early events during myogenesis are important for determining liveweight and caracase weights in cattle. PMID:25875203

  6. A Needs Assessment of Health Issues Related to Maternal Mortality Rates in Afghanistan: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Naim, Ali; Feldman, Robert; Sawyer, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Maternal death rates in Afghanistan were among the highest in the world during the reign of the Taliban. Although these figures have improved, current rates are still alarming. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a needs assessment of the major health issues related to the high maternal mortality rates in Afghanistan. In-depth interviews were conducted with managerial midwives, clinical midwives, and mothers. Results of the interviews indicate that the improvement in the maternal mortality rate may be attributed to the increase in the involvement of midwives in the birthing process. However, barriers to decreasing maternal mortality still exist. These include transportation, access to care, and sociocultural factors such as the influence of the husband and mother-in-law in preventing access to midwives. Therefore, any programs to decrease maternal mortality need to address infrastructure issues (making health care more accessible) and sociocultural factors (including husbands and mother-in-laws in maternal health education). However, it should be noted that these findings are based on a small pilot study to help develop a larger scale need assessment.

  7. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J{sup ′}/η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ′} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  8. Implication of base heart rate in autonomic nervous function, blood pressure and health-related QOL.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yasuko; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Matsushita, Kei; Tamura, Kouichi; Kihara, Minoru; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Tochikubo, Osamu; Umemura, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Increased resting heart rate (HR) and increased sympathetic nervous activity are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Recently, base heart rate (HRo: minimum stable HR during sleep) has been reported to relate to cardiac stroke volume and age. However, little is known about the relevance of HRo. The aim of our study was to evaluate how HRo is associated with HR variability (HRV), blood pressure and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in healthy subjects. A total of 139 volunteers participated in this study that measured 24-hr HR, HRV, and blood pressure. HRo was estimated from the trendgram and the histogram of HR during the nighttime (sleep) period, and calculated as the 1% lowest value of its integral. HRQOL was assessed by Medical Outcome Study Short-Forum 36-Item Health Survey. Sympathetic nervous activity (ratio of low frequency to high frequency component: LF/HF) and parasympathetic nervous activity (high frequency component: HF) were calculated by ECG monitoring. HRo was positively correlated with 24-hr LF/HF and nighttime LF/HF. HRo was negatively correlated with 24-hr HF and nighttime HF. Moreover, HRo was positively correlated with the scores of social functioning and role-physical. Using multivariate analysis, HRo is related to LF/HF, body mass index, and the score of social functioning (HRQOL). HRo may be a useful indicator for assessing sympathetic nervous activity and HRQOL in normotensive healthy subjects.

  9. Heart rate variability in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: relation to disease severity and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, G.; Goldman, J. H.; Keeling, P. J.; Reardon, M.; McKenna, W. J.; Malik, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical importance of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Time domain analysis of 24 hour HRV was performed in 64 patients with DCM, 19 of their relatives with left ventricular enlargement (possible early DCM), and 33 healthy control subjects. RESULTS: Measures of HRV were reduced in patients with DCM compared with controls (P < 0.05). HRV parameters were similar in relatives and controls. Measures of HRV were lower in DCM patients in whom progressive heart failure developed (n = 28) than in those who remained clinically stable (n = 36) during a follow up of 24 (20) months (P = 0.0001). Reduced HRV was associated with NYHA functional class, left ventricular end diastolic dimension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, and peak exercise oxygen consumption (P < 0.05) in all patients. DCM patients with standard deviation of normal to normal RR intervals calculated over the 24 hour period (SDNN) < 50 ms had a significantly lower survival rate free of progressive heart failure than those with SDNN > 50 ms (P = 0.0002, at 12 months; P = 0.0001, during overall follow up). Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that SDNN < 50 ms identified, independently of other clinical variables, patients who were at increased risk of developing progressive heart failure (P = 0.0004). CONCLUSIONS: HRV is reduced in patients with DCM and related to disease severity. HRV is clinically useful as an early non-invasive marker of DCM deterioration. PMID:9068391

  10. Dependence of the firearm-related homicide rate on gun availability: a mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, the relationship between the legal availability of guns and the firearm-related homicide rate has been debated. It has been argued that unrestricted gun availability promotes the occurrence of firearm-induced homicides. It has also been pointed out that gun possession can protect potential victims when attacked. This paper provides a first mathematical analysis of this tradeoff, with the goal to steer the debate towards arguing about assumptions, statistics, and scientific methods. The model is based on a set of clearly defined assumptions, which are supported by available statistical data, and is formulated axiomatically such that results do not depend on arbitrary mathematical expressions. According to this framework, two alternative scenarios can minimize the gun-related homicide rate: a ban of private firearms possession, or a policy allowing the general population to carry guns. Importantly, the model identifies the crucial parameters that determine which policy minimizes the death rate, and thus serves as a guide for the design of future epidemiological studies. The parameters that need to be measured include the fraction of offenders that illegally possess a gun, the degree of protection provided by gun ownership, and the fraction of the population who take up their right to own a gun and carry it when attacked. Limited data available in the literature were used to demonstrate how the model can be parameterized, and this preliminary analysis suggests that a ban of private firearm possession, or possibly a partial reduction in gun availability, might lower the rate of firearm-induced homicides. This, however, should not be seen as a policy recommendation, due to the limited data available to inform and parameterize the model. However, the model clearly defines what needs to be measured, and provides a basis for a scientific discussion about assumptions and data.

  11. Dependence of the Firearm-Related Homicide Rate on Gun Availability: A Mathematical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, the relationship between the legal availability of guns and the firearm-related homicide rate has been debated. It has been argued that unrestricted gun availability promotes the occurrence of firearm-induced homicides. It has also been pointed out that gun possession can protect potential victims when attacked. This paper provides a first mathematical analysis of this tradeoff, with the goal to steer the debate towards arguing about assumptions, statistics, and scientific methods. The model is based on a set of clearly defined assumptions, which are supported by available statistical data, and is formulated axiomatically such that results do not depend on arbitrary mathematical expressions. According to this framework, two alternative scenarios can minimize the gun-related homicide rate: a ban of private firearms possession, or a policy allowing the general population to carry guns. Importantly, the model identifies the crucial parameters that determine which policy minimizes the death rate, and thus serves as a guide for the design of future epidemiological studies. The parameters that need to be measured include the fraction of offenders that illegally possess a gun, the degree of protection provided by gun ownership, and the fraction of the population who take up their right to own a gun and carry it when attacked. Limited data available in the literature were used to demonstrate how the model can be parameterized, and this preliminary analysis suggests that a ban of private firearm possession, or possibly a partial reduction in gun availability, might lower the rate of firearm-induced homicides. This, however, should not be seen as a policy recommendation, due to the limited data available to inform and parameterize the model. However, the model clearly defines what needs to be measured, and provides a basis for a scientific discussion about assumptions and data. PMID:23923062

  12. Temperature and rainfall are related to fertility rate after spring artificial insemination in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Abecia, J A; Arrébola, F; Macías, A; Laviña, A; González-Casquet, O; Benítez, F; Palacios, C

    2016-10-01

    A total number of 1092 artificial inseminations (AIs) performed from March to May were documented over four consecutive years on 10 Payoya goat farms (36° N) and 19,392 AIs on 102 Rasa Aragonesa sheep farms (41° N) over 10 years. Mean, maximum, and minimum ambient temperatures, mean relative humidity, mean solar radiation, and total rainfall on each insemination day were recorded. Overall, fertility rates were 58 % in goats and 45 % in sheep. The fertility rates of the highest and lowest deciles of each of the meteorological variables indicated that temperature and rainfall had a significant effect on fertility in goats. Specifically, inseminations that were performed when mean (68 %), maximum (68 %), and minimum (66 %) temperatures were in the highest decile, and rainfall was in the lowest decile (59 %), had a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher proportion of does that became pregnant than did the ewes in the lowest decile (56, 54, 58, and 49 %, respectively). In sheep, the fertility rates of the highest decile of mean (62 %), maximum (62 %), and minimum (52 %) temperature, RH (52 %), THI (53 %), and rainfall (45 %) were significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than were the fertility rates among ewes in the lowest decile (46, 45, 45, 45, 46, and 43 %, respectively). In conclusion, weather was related to fertility in small ruminants after AI in spring. It remains to be determined whether scheduling the dates of insemination based on forecasted temperatures can improve the success of AI in goats and sheep.

  13. Short-Term Heart Rate Recovery is Related to Aerobic Fitness in Elite Intermittent Sport Athletes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew M; Brickson, Stacey L; Prawda, Evan R; Sanfilippo, Jenifer L

    2017-04-01

    Watson, AM, Brickson, SL, Prawda, ER, and Sanfilippo, JL. Short-term heart rate recovery is related to aerobic fitness in elite intermittent sport athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1055-1061, 2017-Although heart rate recovery (HRR) has been suggested as a measure of fitness, minimal data exist among athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine if HRR is related to aerobic fitness in elite athletes and whether this relationship is influenced by sex or body composition. Eighty-four collegiate athletes (45 male athletes) underwent body fat percentage (BF%) determination by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and maximal treadmill testing followed by 5 minutes of recovery. V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and heart rate (HRmax) were determined, and HRR was calculated as a percentage of HRmax at 10 seconds, 30 seconds, and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes after test completion. After stratifying by sex, participants were grouped as high fit or low fit based on V[Combining Dot Above]O2max median split. Heart rate recovery was compared between sexes and fitness level at each time point. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of HRR using V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, BF%, and sex as covariates. Heart rate recovery did not differ significantly between sexes and was faster among high-fit participants at 10 and 30 seconds, but at no other time. V[Combining Dot Above]O2max was significantly correlated with HRR at 10 and 30 seconds (r = -0.34, p < 0.001 and r = -0.28, p = 0.008) only. After controlling for BF% and sex, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max remained significantly associated with HRR at 10 seconds (p = 0.007) but not at 30 seconds (p = 0.067) or any time thereafter. Aerobic capacity is related to faster HRR during the first 30 seconds only, suggesting that only very short term HRR should be used as a measure of aerobic fitness in intermittent sport athletes.

  14. Negative Trends in Transport-related Mortality Rates in Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Vecerek, Vladimir; Voslarova, Eva; Conte, Francesca; Vecerkova, Lenka; Bedanova, Iveta

    2016-12-01

    The high incidence of deaths during transport for slaughter is associated with poor welfare and represents a considerable loss to the poultry industry. In the period from 2009 to 2014, all shipments of broiler chickens to poultry processing plants were monitored in the Czech Republic and the numbers of chickens transported and those dying as a result of their transport were recorded and analysed. Overall transport-related mortality of broiler chickens transported for slaughter in the Czech Republic was 0.37%. It ranged from 0.31% to 0.72%, the increase approximately corresponding to the increasing transport distance. Statistically highly significant (p<0.001) differences were found when comparing transport-related mortality rates in individual seasons of the year. The greatest mortality (0.55%) was associated with transports carried out in winter months whereas the lowest death losses (0.30%) were found in chickens transported for slaughter in summer months. Our study revealed greater transport-related mortality rates in broiler chickens transported for slaughter in the Czech Republic than expected when considering earlier studies. The most pronounced increases were found in transports for shorter distances and in winter months. However, an increase was found at all transport distances monitored except for distances exceeding 300 km and all seasons except for summer. Furthermore, a general increasing tendency in chicken losses during the monitored period was found. The particularly alarming finding is that the mortality of broiler chickens being transported to processing plants has been showing a long-term increasing tendency over the last two decades. Further research should focus on the identification of specific factors leading to such high and growing mortality rates and developing practical guidelines to improve the welfare of the birds in transit accordingly.

  15. Negative Trends in Transport-related Mortality Rates in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vecerek, Vladimir; Voslarova, Eva; Conte, Francesca; Vecerkova, Lenka; Bedanova, Iveta

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of deaths during transport for slaughter is associated with poor welfare and represents a considerable loss to the poultry industry. In the period from 2009 to 2014, all shipments of broiler chickens to poultry processing plants were monitored in the Czech Republic and the numbers of chickens transported and those dying as a result of their transport were recorded and analysed. Overall transport-related mortality of broiler chickens transported for slaughter in the Czech Republic was 0.37%. It ranged from 0.31% to 0.72%, the increase approximately corresponding to the increasing transport distance. Statistically highly significant (p<0.001) differences were found when comparing transport-related mortality rates in individual seasons of the year. The greatest mortality (0.55%) was associated with transports carried out in winter months whereas the lowest death losses (0.30%) were found in chickens transported for slaughter in summer months. Our study revealed greater transport-related mortality rates in broiler chickens transported for slaughter in the Czech Republic than expected when considering earlier studies. The most pronounced increases were found in transports for shorter distances and in winter months. However, an increase was found at all transport distances monitored except for distances exceeding 300 km and all seasons except for summer. Furthermore, a general increasing tendency in chicken losses during the monitored period was found. The particularly alarming finding is that the mortality of broiler chickens being transported to processing plants has been showing a long-term increasing tendency over the last two decades. Further research should focus on the identification of specific factors leading to such high and growing mortality rates and developing practical guidelines to improve the welfare of the birds in transit accordingly. PMID:26954219

  16. Relation of Total and Cardiovascular Death Rates to Climate System, Temperature, Barometric Pressure, and Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bryan G; Qualls, Clifford; Kloner, Robert A; Laskey, Warren K

    2015-10-15

    A distinct seasonal pattern in total and cardiovascular death rates has been reported. The factors contributing to this pattern have not been fully explored. Seven locations (average total population 71,354,000) were selected where data were available including relatively warm, cold, and moderate temperatures. Over the period 2004 to 2009, there were 2,526,123 all-cause deaths, 838,264 circulatory deaths, 255,273 coronary heart disease deaths, and 135,801 ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) deaths. We used time series and multivariate regression modeling to explore the association between death rates and climatic factors (temperature, dew point, precipitation, barometric pressure), influenza levels, air pollution levels, hours of daylight, and day of week. Average seasonal patterns for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths were very similar across the 7 locations despite differences in climate. After adjusting for multiple covariates and potential confounders, there was a 0.49% increase in all-cause death rate for every 1°C decrease. In general, all-cause, circulatory, coronary heart disease and STEMI death rates increased linearly with decreasing temperatures. The temperature effect varied by location, including temperature's linear slope, cubic fit, positional shift on the temperature axis, and the presence of circulatory death increases in locally hot temperatures. The variable effect of temperature by location suggests that people acclimatize to local temperature cycles. All-cause and circulatory death rates also demonstrated sizable associations with influenza levels, dew point temperature, and barometric pressure. A greater understanding of how climate, temperature, and barometric pressure influence cardiovascular responses would enhance our understanding of circulatory and STEMI deaths.

  17. A radiobiological model for the relative biological effectiveness of high-dose-rate 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Melhus, Christopher S; Zinkin, Heather D; Stapleford, Liza J; Evans, Krista E; Wazer, David E; Odlozilíková, Anna

    2005-09-01

    While there is significant clinical experience using both low- and high-dose-rate 252Cf brachytherapy, there are minimal data regarding values for the neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with both modalities. The aim of this research was to derive a radiobiological model for 252Cf neutron RBE and to compare these results with neutron RBE values used clinically in Russia. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was used as the basis to characterize cell survival after irradiation, with identical cell killing rates (S(N) = S(gamma)) between 252Cf neutrons and photons used for derivation of RBE. Using this equality, a relationship among neutron dose and LQ radiobiological parameter (i.e., alpha(N), beta(N), alpha(gamma), beta(gamma)) was obtained without the need to specify the photon dose. These results were used to derive the 252Cf neutron RBE, which was then compared with Russian neutron RBE values. The 252Cf neutron RBE was determined after incorporating the LQ radiobiological parameters obtained from cell survival studies with fast neutrons and teletherapy photons. For single-fraction high-dose-rate neutron doses of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Gy, the total biologically equivalent doses were 1.8, 3.4, 4.7 and 6.0 RBE Gy with 252Cf neutron RBE values of 3.2, 2.9, 2.7 and 2.5, respectively. Using clinical data for late-responding reactions from 252Cf, Russian investigators created an empirical model that predicted high-dose-rate 252Cf neutron RBE values ranging from 3.6 to 2.9 for similar doses and fractionation schemes and observed that 252Cf neutron RBE increases with the number of treatment fractions. Using these relationships, our results were in general concordance with high-dose-rate 252Cf RBE values obtained from Russian clinical experience.

  18. Differential relations between heart rate and skin conductance, and public speaking anxiety.

    PubMed

    Croft, Rodney J; Gonsalvez, Craig J; Gander, Joanne; Lechem, Lisa; Barry, Robert J

    2004-09-01

    The present pilot study tested whether the lack of consistent findings of relations between autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and non-clinical levels of public speaking anxiety (PSA) can be explained by methodology. An ambulatory protocol was utilised to test whether the interaction of belief structure with each of an undergraduate student speaker's heart rate and skin conductance level predicted state speech anxiety better than their linear summation. Results suggest that in a non-clinical population, the interaction of ANS activity and belief structure is an important determinant of PSA, and may account for variable findings in the literature.

  19. Growth Rate and Relocation Movements of Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) Nestlings in Relation to Age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Gunnar R.; Chalfoun, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    Relocation by dependent young is a survival strategy that occurs among a wide range of taxa. The Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) lays its eggs on bare substrate and, once hatched, nestlings may relocate to new sites daily. We located and monitored eight Common Nighthawk nests in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, quantified inter-use-site distances in relation to nestling age, and calculated a nestling growth rate curve. Common Nighthawk nestlings grow in a nearly linear fashion. Nestlings moved up to 48 m in a single day and larger, older nestlings tended to move greater distances between daily use-sites.

  20. An Examination of Sunspot Number Rates of Growth and Decay in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of annual sunspot number averages, sunspot number rates of growth and decay are examined relative to both minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences using cycles 12 through present, the most reliably determined sunspot cycles. Indeed, strong correlations are found for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences years in advance. As applied to predicting sunspot minimum for cycle 24, the next cycle, its minimum appears likely to occur in 2006, especially if it is a robust cycle similar in nature to cycles 17-23.

  1. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N = 162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD. PMID

  2. Dynamical relations for left ventricular ejection - Flow rate, momentum, force and impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Selzer, R. H.; Gordon, D. G.; Ledbetter, D. C.; Crawford, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to quantitatively evaluate left ventricular volume flow rate, momentum, force and impulse derived from application of conservation principles for mass and momentum of blood within the ventricle during the ejection phase. An automated digital image processing system was developed and applied to left ventricular angiograms which are computer processed and analyzed frame by frame to determine the dynamical relations by numerical methods. The initial experience with force and impulse has indicated that neither quantity seemed to be a sensitive indicator of coronary artery disease as evaluated by qualitative angiography for the particular patient group studied. Utilization of the dynamical relations in evaluating human left ventricular performance requires improved means of measurement and interpretation of clinical studies.

  3. The relation between gravity rate of change and vertical displacement in previously glaciated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Anders; Milne, Glenn; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Ågren, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The rate of change of surface gravity, g˙, and vertical deformation rate of the solid surface, u˙, are two observables of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). They contribute with different information on the same phenomenon. Their relation contains information of the underlying physics and a trustworthy relation allows to combine these observations to strengthen the overall observational accuracy of the phenomenon. In this paper we investigate the predicted relation between g˙ and u˙ in previously glaciated areas. We use the normal mode approach for one dimensional earth models and solutions of the sea level equation with time-dependent coastline geometry. Numerical predictions of g˙ and u˙ are computed for Laurentia, Fennoscandia and the British Isles respectively, using six different earth models. Within each region a linear trend is then fitted using the relation g˙ = Cu˙ +g˙0. The estimated C and g˙0 differ more between the regions than between different earth models within each region. For Fennoscandia C ≈ -0.163 μGal/mm and for Laurentia C ≈ -0.152 μGal/mm. Maximum residuals between the linear trend and spatially varying model predictions of g˙ are 0.04 μGal/yr in Fennoscandia and 0.17 μGal/yr in Laurentia. For the British Isles the results are harder to interpret, mainly since this region is located on the zero uplift isoline of Fennoscandia. In addition, we show temporal variation of the relation since the last glacial maximum till present-day. The temporal and spatial variation of the relation between g˙ and u˙ can be explained by (i) the elastic respectively viscous proportion of the total signal and (ii) the spectral composition of the regional signal. Additional local effects, such as the Newtonian attraction and elastic deformation from local sea level changes, are examined in a case study for six stations in the Nordic absolute gravity network. The influence of these local effects on the relation between g˙ and u˙ is negligible

  4. Season of Birth Is Related to Child Retention Rates, Achievement, and Rate of Diagnosis of Specific LD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Roy P.; Foels, Patricia; Clanton, Greg; Moon, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    A sizable literature has demonstrated that the achievement of children in early elementary school is related to their season of birth: Those born in summer typically perform less well than those born in the fall. A small literature indicates that more children diagnosed with specific learning disabilities (SLD) are born in the summer. We have…

  5. The influence of weather conditions on the relative incident rate of fishing vessels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Pelot, Ronald P; Hilliard, Casey

    2009-07-01

    There is a long history of studying the relationship between weather and maritime activities. This article analyzes the link between relative incident rate (RIR) and general weather factors within certain gridded areas and time periods. The study area, which encompasses a broad extent of Atlantic Canadian waters, includes fishing incidents recorded by the Canadian Coast Guard from 1997 to 1999. Methodologies used for traffic track generation in a geographical information system and aggregation of all relevant weather data needed for the statistical analyses are presented. Ultimately, a regression tree was built to illustrate the relationship between incident rate and the following six weather factors: wave height; sea surface temperature; air temperature; ice concentration; fog presence; and precipitation. Results from the regression tree reveal that the RIR defined as (incident number per area-day)/(traffic amount per area-day) across grid cells with incidents, increases as the weather conditions deteriorate in a general way, and the concentration of ice has the biggest influence on the magnitude of incident rates for a given level of traffic exposure. The results from this analysis may assist administrators of maritime traffic, especially those associated with fishing activities, through a better understanding of the influence on RIR of certain weather conditions within given areas in specific time periods.

  6. Enclosure fire hazard analysis using relative energy release criteria. [burning rate and combustion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    A method for predicting the probable course of fire development in an enclosure is presented. This fire modeling approach uses a graphic plot of five fire development constraints, the relative energy release criteria (RERC), to bound the heat release rates in an enclosure as a function of time. The five RERC are flame spread rate, fuel surface area, ventilation, enclosure volume, and total fuel load. They may be calculated versus time based on the specified or empirical conditions describing the specific enclosure, the fuel type and load, and the ventilation. The calculation of these five criteria, using the common basis of energy release rates versus time, provides a unifying framework for the utilization of available experimental data from all phases of fire development. The plot of these criteria reveals the probable fire development envelope and indicates which fire constraint will be controlling during a criteria time period. Examples of RERC application to fire characterization and control and to hazard analysis are presented along with recommendations for the further development of the concept.

  7. The Relative Rate of LGRB Formation as a Function of Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. F.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are preferentially formed in low-metallicity environments. However, the magnitude of this effect and its functional dependence on metallicity have not been well characterized. In our previous paper, we compared the metallicity distribution of LGRB host galaxies to that of star-forming galaxies in the local universe. Here we build upon this work by in effect dividing one distribution by the other, and thus directly determine the relative rate of LGRB formation as a function of metallicity in the low-redshift universe. We find a dramatic cutoff in LGRB formation above a metallicity of {log}({{O}}/{{H}})+12≈ 8.3 in the KK04 scale, with LGRBs forming between 10 and 50 times more frequently per unit star formation below this cutoff than above. Furthermore, our data suggest that the rate of LGRB formation per unit star formation continues to fall above this break. We estimate that the LGRB formation rate per unit star formation may drop by as much as a factor of 100 between one-third solar and solar metallicity.

  8. Future projections of child oral-related hospital admission rates in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Alla; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2016-01-11

    This study aimed to project the hospital admission rates of Western Australian children for oral conditions, with a particular focus on dental caries, embedded and impacted teeth, and pulp and periapical conditions through to the year 2026. Two methods were used to generate projection data through to the year 2026, using the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Dataset for the period 1999-2000 to 2008-2009. The projected admission rate increase in those children aged 14 years and younger from 2000 to 2026 was 43%. The admission rates are expected to more than double over time (7317 cases in 2026 compared to only 3008 cases in 2000) for those children living in metropolitan areas. Dental caries, embedded and impacted teeth, and pulp and periapical conditions will remain the top (mostly) preventable causes of admission throughout this time. Anticipating the future burden of oral-related hospital admissions in children, in terms of expected numbers of cases, is vital for optimising the resource allocation for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment. A concerted effort will be required by policymakers and oral healthcare communities to effect substantial change for the future.

  9. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for molybdenum under high-rate deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.R.; Maudlin, P.J.; Gray, G.T. III

    1998-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys have received increased interest in recent years for ballistic applications. The stress-strain behavior of several molybdenums possessing various compositions, manufacturing sources, and the degree of pre-straining, were investigated as a function of temperature from 77 to 1,273 K, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress was found to be sensitive to the test temperature and strain rate, however, the strain hardening remained rate-insensitive. The constitutive response of a powder-metallurgy molybdenum was also investigated; similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally wrought processed molybdenums were achieved. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong and the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models were evaluated and fit for the various Mo-based materials. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications were examined. The differences between the three models are demonstrated using model comparisons to Taylor cylinder validation experiments.

  10. Seasonal predator removal relative to hatch rate of duck nests in waterfowl production areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Sovada, M.A.; Shaffer, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    These authors report that hatch rates of duck nests were related to removal of predators from waterfowl production areas. Cost effectiveness of such efforts is questioned. The prairie pothole region (PPR) is the primary breeding ground of several species of North American ducks (Bellrose 1980). Much habitat of breeding ducks in the PPR has been destroyed or degraded by intensive agriculture (e.g., Kiel et al. 1972, Bellrose 1980, Sugden and Beyersbergen 1984, Boyd 1985), resulting in high predation rates on duck nests (Sargeant and Raveling 1992). Because of predation, hatch rate (HR) of duck nests in Waterfowl Production Areas (WPA's) in the PPR is often less than the 15-20% suggested for stability of populations of the 5 most common species of dabbling ducks (e.g., Cowardin et al. 1985, Greenwood 1986, Klett et al. 1988, Greenwood et al. 1990). Managers seek ways to reduce depredations of duck clutches in WPA's, but little information is available concerning effects of predator removal. We evaluated seasonal (spring and early summer) removal of predators from WPA's in Minnesota and North Dakota. Our objectives were to compare HR in uplands of WPA's with and without predators removed and to determine functional aspects of conducting predator removal.

  11. Do cognitive interventions alter the rate of age-related cognitive change?

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    There has recently been a great deal of interest in cognitive interventions, particularly when applied in older adults with the goal of slowing or reversing age-related cognitive decline. Although seldom directly investigated, one of the fundamental questions concerning interventions is whether the intervention alters the rate of cognitive change, or affects the level of certain cognitive measures with no effect on the trajectory of change. This question was investigated with a very simple intervention consisting of the performance of three versions (treatment) or one version (control) of the relevant cognitive tests at an initial occasion. Participants were retested at intervals ranging from less than 1 to 12 years, which allowed rates of change to be examined in the control and treatment groups. Although the intervention can be considered modest, participants in the treatment group had about .25 standard deviations less negative cognitive change over an interval of approximately three years than those in the control group, which is comparable to effect sizes reported with more intensive interventions. However, there were no interactions of the intervention with length of the interval between occasions, and thus there was no evidence that the intervention affected the course of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:26478640

  12. Defensive Traits in Young Pine Trees Cluster into Two Divergent Syndromes Related to Early Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Sampedro, Luis; Zas, Rafael; Pearse, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    The combination of defensive traits leads to the evolution of 'plant defense syndromes' which should provide better protection against herbivores than individual traits on their own. Defense syndromes can be generally driven by plant phylogeny and/or biotic and abiotic factors. However, we lack a solid understanding of (i) the relative importance of shared evolution vs. convergence due to similar ecological conditions and (ii) the role of induced defense strategies in shaping defense syndromes. We investigate the relative roles of evolutionary and ecological factors shaping the deployment of pine defense syndromes including multiple constitutive and induced chemical defense traits. We performed a greenhouse experiment with seedlings of eighteen species of Pinaceae family, and measured plant growth rate, constitutive chemical defenses and their inducibility. Plant growth rate, but not phylogenetic relatedness, determined the deployment of two divergent syndromes. Slow-growing pine species living in harsh environments where tissue replacement is costly allocated more to constitutive defenses (energetically more costly to produce than induced). In contrast, fast-growing species living in resource-rich habitats had greater inducibility of their defenses, consistent with the theory of constitutive-induced defense trade-offs. This study contributes to a better understanding of evolutionary and ecological factors driving the deployment of defense syndromes.

  13. Defensive Traits in Young Pine Trees Cluster into Two Divergent Syndromes Related to Early Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Sampedro, Luis; Zas, Rafael; Pearse, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    The combination of defensive traits leads to the evolution of ‘plant defense syndromes’ which should provide better protection against herbivores than individual traits on their own. Defense syndromes can be generally driven by plant phylogeny and/or biotic and abiotic factors. However, we lack a solid understanding of (i) the relative importance of shared evolution vs. convergence due to similar ecological conditions and (ii) the role of induced defense strategies in shaping defense syndromes. We investigate the relative roles of evolutionary and ecological factors shaping the deployment of pine defense syndromes including multiple constitutive and induced chemical defense traits. We performed a greenhouse experiment with seedlings of eighteen species of Pinaceae family, and measured plant growth rate, constitutive chemical defenses and their inducibility. Plant growth rate, but not phylogenetic relatedness, determined the deployment of two divergent syndromes. Slow-growing pine species living in harsh environments where tissue replacement is costly allocated more to constitutive defenses (energetically more costly to produce than induced). In contrast, fast-growing species living in resource-rich habitats had greater inducibility of their defenses, consistent with the theory of constitutive-induced defense trade-offs. This study contributes to a better understanding of evolutionary and ecological factors driving the deployment of defense syndromes. PMID:27028433

  14. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h {sup –1} Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  15. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO and nitrite scavenging: implications for transfusion-related toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Barnum, Scott R; Weinberg, Jordan A; Lancaster, Jack R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-09-15

    Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to RBCs (red blood cells). It has been suggested that these changes have potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion-related toxicities. However, the mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leucodepleted RBCs results in cells that inhibit NO (nitric oxide) signalling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from haemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that the consumption rates of NO increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4-fold comparing 42-day-old with 0-day-old RBCs. These results are probably due to the formation of smaller RBCs with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBCs to affect NO formation via deoxygenated RBC-mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBCs did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole-blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBCs stored for >25 days, but not with younger RBCs. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBCs and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage-lesion-related transfusion risk.

  16. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO- and Nitrite scavenging: Implications for transfusion related toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y.; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Barnum, Scott R.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to the RBC. It has been suggested that these changes have a potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion related toxicities. However, mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leukodepleted RBC result in cells that inhibit nitric oxide (NO)-signaling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from hemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that NO-consumption rates increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4 fold with 42d old vs. 0d RBC. These results are likely due to the formation of smaller RBC with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBC to affect NO-formation via deoxygenated RBC mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBC did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBC stored for >25d, but not with younger RBC. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBC and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage lesion-related transfusion risk PMID:22720637

  17. Subjective rating of weak tactile stimuli is parametrically encoded in event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Auksztulewicz, Ryszard; Blankenburg, Felix

    2013-07-17

    Neural signatures of somatosensory awareness have often been studied by examining EEG responses to hardly detectable stimuli. Previous reports consistently showed that event-related potentials (ERPs) measured over early somatosensory cortex diverge for detected and missed perithreshold stimuli at 80-100 ms after stimulus onset. So far, however, all previous studies have operationalized somatosensory awareness as binary stimulus detection. Here, we investigated whether ERP components attributed to neuronal activity in early somatosensory cortices would parametrically reflect subjective ratings of stimulus awareness. EEG (64 channel) was recorded in human participants (N = 20), with perithreshold electrical stimulation applied to the left median nerve. Participants indicated perceptibility on a continuous visual rating scale, and stimulation intensity was readjusted in each block to a perithreshold level. The aim of the analysis was to investigate which brain areas reflect the subsequent perceptual awareness ratings parametrically, and how early such parametric effects occur. Parametric ERP effects were found as early as 86 ms after stimulus onset. This parametric modulation of ERP amplitude was source localized to secondary somatosensory cortex, and attributed to feedforward processing between primary and secondary somatosensory cortex by means of dynamic causal modeling (DCM). Furthermore, later in the analysis window, the subjective rating of stimuli correlated with the amplitude of the N140 component and with a broadly distributed P300 component. By DCM modeling, these late effects were explained in terms of recurrent processing within the network of somatosensory and premotor cortices. Our results indicate that early neural activity in the somatosensory cortex can reflect the subjective quality of tactile perception.

  18. Exploring the Role of Galaxy Morphology in the Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Anthony; Rafelski, Marc; Scarlata, Claudia; Pacifici, Camilla; Henry, Alaina L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Elmegreen, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate (M-Z-SFR) fundamental relation reveals the underlying physics behind galaxy evolution: the mechanics of gas inflow, outflow, and the formation of stars are intimately connected. At higher redshift, we observe galaxies which are believed to be more actively accreting from the cosmic web, and as a result bright star-forming clumps are expected to form due to the increased gravitational instability of the galactic medium. We investigate these “clumpy” galaxies in context of their location on the M-Z-SFR plane to search for evidence of metal-poor gas inflows as predicted by theoretical models, and to help us understand how galaxies form and change at a higher redshift (1.3 < z < 2.2). We use the CANDELS survey to examine the morphological structure of star forming regions utilizing the high resolution of space-based HST imaging. We create stamps in their rest-frame UV light to investigate recent star formation and visually classify the morphology of the galaxies. We also utilize stellar population fits of the photometric data to determine properties such as mass and star formation rate. From the grism data of the 3D-HST survey, we select 1861 galaxies based on the strong detection of the [OIII_5007] line, and determine metallicity through the line-diagnostic R_23 using [OIII_5007], [OII_3727] and H_beta. We improve these results through the stacking of spectra to remove a sample bias of requiring strong detections on weak emission lines. Using mass, star formation rate, and metallicity we compare the location of clumpy galaxies on the fundamental plane to investigate possible diminished metallicity and heightened star formation rate compared to the remainder of the sample. This will enable us to better understand the theoretical underpinnings of gas accretion and galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  19. Age-Related Differences of Organism-Specific Peritonitis Rates: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Nagaaki; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Aoe, Mari; Chikamori, Masatomo; Honda, Tomoko; Ikenouchi, Ayako; Miura, Rika; Sugahara, Mai; Furuse, Satoshi; Saito, Katsunori; Mise, Naobumi

    2016-12-01

    Peritonitis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, but its incidence and the distribution of causative organisms vary widely between institutions and age groups. This study was performed to investigate the recent status and risk factors of PD-related peritonitis and to clarify differences between age groups. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 119 PD patients treated at our department between January 2002 and January 2013. We calculated both overall and organism-specific peritonitis rates and also analyzed risk factors. Sixty-three episodes of peritonitis occurred during 261.5 patient-years for an incident rate of 0.24 episodes/patient-year. Multivariate analysis showed that older age (≥65 years) and hypoalbuminemia (<3.0 g/dL) were associated with an increased risk of peritonitis (P = 0.035 and P = 0.029, respectively). In elderly patients (≥65 years old), the rate of peritonitis due to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was 0.17 and 0.08 episodes/patient-year, respectively, and Gram-positive peritonitis was markedly more frequent than in younger patients (<65 years old). In particular, there was a high frequency of Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis in elderly patients (0.09 episodes/patient-year) and it had a poor outcome. At our department, the risk of peritonitis was increased in older patients and patients with hypoalbuminemia. The distribution of causative organisms was markedly different between age groups and analysis of organism-specific peritonitis rates helped to identify current problems with our PD program.

  20. Medication-related problem type and appearance rate in ambulatory hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Harold J; Drayer, Debra K; Muther, Richard S

    2003-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk for medication-related problems (MRP). The MRP number, type, and appearance rate over time in ambulatory HD patients has not been investigated. Methods Randomly selected HD patients were enrolled to receive monthly pharmaceutical care visits. At each visit, MRP were identified through review of the patient chart, electronic medical record, patient interview, and communications with other healthcare disciplines. All MRP were categorized by type and medication class. MRP appearance rate was determined as the number of MRP identified per month/number of months in study. The number of MRP per patient-drug exposures were determined using: {[(number of patients) × (mean number of medications)]/(number of months of study)} /number of MRP identified. Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation or percentages. Results Patients were 62.6 ± 15.9 years old, had 6.4 ± 2.0 comorbid conditions, were taking 12.5 ± 4.2 medications, and 15.7 ± 7.2 doses per day at baseline. Medication-dosing problems (33.5%), adverse drug reactions (20.7%), and an indication that was not currently being treated (13.5%) were the most common MRP. 5,373 medication orders were reviewed and a MRP was identified every 15.2 medication exposures. Overall MRP appearance rate was 0.68 ± 0.46 per patient per month. Conclusion MRP continue to occur at a high rate in ambulatory HD patients. Healthcare providers taking care of HD patients should be aware of this problem and efforts to avoid or resolve MRP should be undertaken at all HD clinics. PMID:14690549

  1. Controlling the relative rates of adlayer formation and removal during etching in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Nicholas Colvin Masi

    Laser desorption (LD) of the adlayer coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and plasma induced emission (PIE) of desorbed adsorbates is used to investigate the relative rates of chlorination and sputtering during the etching of Si in inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas. Such an analysis is a two-fold process: surface analysis and plasma characterization. Surface analysis of Si etching using LD-LIF and LD-PIE techniques combined with etch rate measurements have revealed that the coverage of SiCl2 and etch rate increases and coverage of Si decreases abruptly for a chlorine fraction of 75% and ion energy of 80 eV. The precise Cl2 fraction for which these abrupt changes occur increases with an increase in ion energy. These changes may be caused by local chemisorption-induced reconstruction of Si <100>. Furthermore, the chlorination and sputtering rates are increased by ˜ an order of magnitude as the plasma is changed from Ar-dominant to Cl-dominant. Characterization of the plasma included determination of the dominant ion in Cl2 plasmas using LIF and a Langmuir probe and measurement of the absolute densities of Cl2, Cl, Cl+, and At + in Cl2-Ar discharges using optical emission actinometry. These studies reveal that Cl+ is the dominant positive ion in the H-mode and the dissociation of Cl2 to Cl increases with an increase in Ar fraction due to an increase in electron temperature. Furthermore, for powers exceeding 600 W, the neutral to ion flux ratio is strongly dependent on Cl2 fraction and is attributed mostly to the decrease in Cl density. Such dependence of the flux ratio on Cl2 fraction is significant in controlling chlorination and sputtering rates not only for Si etching, but for etching other key technological materials. ICP O2 discharges were also studied for low-kappa polymeric etch applications. These studies reveal that the electron temperature is weakly dependent on rf power and O2 dissociation is low (˜2%) at the maximum rf power density of 5.7 Wcm

  2. Relative growth rate variation of evergreen and deciduous savanna tree species is driven by different traits

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Kyle W.; Poorter, Lourens; Bongers, Frans; Borghetti, Fabian; Jacobs, Loes; van Langevelde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant relative growth rate (RGR) depends on biomass allocation to leaves (leaf mass fraction, LMF), efficient construction of leaf surface area (specific leaf area, SLA) and biomass growth per unit leaf area (net assimilation rate, NAR). Functional groups of species may differ in any of these traits, potentially resulting in (1) differences in mean RGR of groups, and (2) differences in the traits driving RGR variation within each group. We tested these predictions by comparing deciduous and evergreen savanna trees. Methods RGR, changes to biomass allocation and leaf morphology, and root non-structural carbohydrate reserves were evaluated for juveniles of 51 savanna species (34 deciduous, 17 evergreen) grown in a common garden experiment. It was anticipated that drivers of RGR would differ between leaf habit groups because deciduous species have to allocate carbohydrates to storage in roots to be able to flush leaves again, which directly compromises their LMF, whereas evergreen species are not subject to this constraint. Key Results Evergreen species had greater LMF and RGR than deciduous species. Among deciduous species LMF explained 27 % of RGR variation (SLA 34 % and NAR 29 %), whereas among evergreen species LMF explained between 2 and 17 % of RGR variation (SLA 32–35 % and NAR 38–62 %). RGR and LMF were (negatively) related to carbohydrate storage only among deciduous species. Conclusions Trade-offs between investment in carbohydrate reserves and growth occurred only among deciduous species, leading to differences in relative contribution made by the underlying components of RGR between the leaf habit groups. The results suggest that differences in drivers of RGR occur among savanna species because these have different selected strategies for coping with fire disturbance in savannas. It is expected that variation in the drivers of RGR will be found in other functional types that respond differently to particular disturbances. PMID

  3. On the Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate Relation for Galaxies at z˜2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Samir; Lee, Janice C.; Davé, Romeel; Dickinson, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that the local mass-metallicity (M*-Z) relation depends on the specific star formation rate (sSFR). Whether such a dependence exists at higher redshifts, and whether the resulting M*-Z-SFR relation is redshift invariant, is debated. We re-examine these issues by applying the non-parametric techniques of Salim et al. to ˜130 z˜ 2.3 galaxies with N2 and O3 measurements from Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS). We find that the KBSS M*-Z relation depends on sSFR at intermediate masses where such dependence exists locally. KBSS and SDSS galaxies of the same mass and sSFR (“local analogs”) are similarly offset in the BPT diagram relative to the bulk of local star-forming galaxies, and thus we posit that metallicities can be compared self-consistently at different redshifts as long as the masses and sSFRs of the galaxies are similar. We find that the M*-Z-SFR relation of z˜ 2 galaxies is consistent with the local one at {log}{M}*\\lt 10, but is offset up to -0.25 dex at higher masses, so it is altogether not redshift invariant. This high-mass offset could arise from a bias that [O iii]-based, high-redshift spectroscopic surveys have against high-metallicity galaxies, but additional evidence disfavors this possibility. We identify three causes for the reported discrepancy between N2 and O3N2 metallicities at z˜ 2: (1) a smaller offset that is also present for SDSS galaxies, which we remove with new N2 calibration, (2) a genuine offset due to differing ISM condition, which is also present in local analogs, and (3) an additional offset due to unrecognized active galactic nucleus contamination.

  4. Relative contribution of articular cartilage's constitutive components to load support depending on strain rate.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, J M Párraga; Wilson, W; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage is considered a biphasic material in which the solid is composed of proteoglycans and collagen. In biphasic tissue, the hydraulic pressure is believed to bear most of the load under higher strain rates and its dissipation due to fluid flow determines creep and relaxation behavior. In equilibrium, hydraulic pressure is zero and load bearing is transferred to the solid matrix. The viscoelasticity of the collagen network also contributes to its time-dependent behavior, and the osmotic pressure to load bearing in equilibrium. The aim of the present study was to determine the relative contributions of hydraulic pressure, viscoelastic collagen stress, solid matrix stiffness and osmotic pressure to load carriage in cartilage under transient and equilibrium conditions. Unconfined compression experiments were simulated using a fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic model of articular cartilage, including water, fibrillar viscoelastic collagen and non-fibrillar charged glycosaminoglycans. The relative contributions of hydraulic and osmotic pressures and stresses in the fibrillar and non-fibrillar network were evaluated in the superficial, middle and deep zone of cartilage under five different strain rates and after relaxation. Initially upon loading, the hydraulic pressure carried most of the load in all three zones. The osmotic swelling pressure carried most of the equilibrium load. In the surface zone, where the fibers were loaded in tension, the collagen network carried 20 % of the load for all strain rates. The importance of these fibers was illustrated by artificially modifying the fiber architecture, which reduced the overall stiffness of cartilage in all conditions. In conclusion, although hydraulic pressure dominates the transient behavior during cartilage loading, due to its viscoelastic nature the superficial zone collagen fibers carry a substantial part of the load under transient conditions. This becomes increasingly important with higher strain rates. The

  5. Rates and relative risk of hospital admission among women in violent intimate partner relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Kernic, M A; Wolf, M E; Holt, V L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the history of hospitalization among women involved in violent intimate relationships. METHODS: In this 1-year retrospective cohort study, female residents of King County, Washington, who were aged 18 to 44 years and who had filed for a protection order were compared with nonabused women in the same age group. Outcome measures included overall and diagnosis-specific hospital admission rates and relative risk of hospitalization associated with abuse. RESULTS: Women known to be exposed to a violent intimate relationship were significantly more likely to be hospitalized with any diagnosis (age-specific relative risks [RRs] ranging from 1.2 to 2.1), psychiatric diagnoses (RR = 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8, 4.6), injury and poisoning diagnoses (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.8), digestive system diseases (RR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3, 2.9), and diagnoses of assault (RR = 4.9, 95% CI = 1.1, 22.1) or attempted suicide (RR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.2) in the year before filing a protection order. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed an increased relative risk of both overall and diagnosis-specific hospitalizations among abused women. Intimate partner violence has a significant impact on women's health and use of health care. PMID:10983199

  6. Breastfeeding rates and factors related to cessation in a military population.

    PubMed

    Bales, Karrn; Washburn, John; Bales, James

    2012-12-01

    Evidence continues to accumulate showing the benefits of breastfeeding to infants, mothers, and society as a whole. However, breastfeeding success rates nationwide have consistently fallen short of recommendations set forth by the American Academy of Pediatrics. There are several potential barriers to successful breastfeeding, and many of these could be magnified in the demanding careers of military members and their families. We surveyed 254 women at a regional military medical facility, both active duty members and dependents of active duty members, regarding their ability to successfully breastfeed their infants. We found that American Academy of Pediatrics target goals in this population as a whole were indeed nearly met at this facility, but also found that active duty members and those who encountered military-related difficulty fell well short of these goals. These findings suggest potential barriers to breastfeeding success that warrant further study from the U.S. Department of Defense.

  7. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  8. Possible relations between general population suicide rates and societal crime: a cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajit; Bhandarkar, Ritesh

    2008-10-01

    Crime may be associated with a less structured society, less social integration, and feelings of less security and greater distress among citizens, which characteristics may lead to mental illness and subsequent suicide. Therefore, a cross-national analysis examining the association of general population suicide rates with percent of males and females in the population victimised by different categories of crime was undertaken using cross-national data from the World Health Organization and United Nations for 42 countries. Spearman correlations were generally weak and not statistically significant. Those values were at variance with the study's hypothesis and may be explained by several factors, including methodological issues. Individual-level case-control or cohort studies of suicides and attempted suicides in the general population may permit exploration of the relation of general population suicides with experience and percent by nations of being victimised by crime.

  9. Tide-related biological rhythm in the oxygen consumption rate of ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea uncinata).

    PubMed

    Leiva, Félix P; Niklitschek, Edwin J; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-07-01

    The effects of tidal height (high and low), acclimation to laboratory conditions (days in captivity) and oxygen level (hypoxia and normoxia) were evaluated in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea uncinata We evaluated the hypothesis that N. uncinata reduces its OCR during low tide and increases it during high tide, regardless of oxygen level or acclimation. Additionally, the existence of an endogenous rhythm in OCR was explored, and we examined whether it synchronized with tidal, diurnal or semidiurnal cycles. Unexpectedly, high OCRs were observed at low tide, during normoxia, in non-acclimated animals. Results from a second, longer experiment under normoxic conditions suggested the presence of a tide-related metabolic rhythm, a response pattern not yet demonstrated for a burrowing decapod. Although rhythms persisted for only 2 days after capture, their period of 12.8 h closely matched the semidiurnal tidal cycle that ghost shrimp confront inside their burrows.

  10. Vertex evoked potentials in a rating-scale detection task: Relation to signal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vertex evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing in an auditory detection task with rating scale responses. Three values of a priori probability of signal presentation were tested. The amplitudes of the N1 and P3 components of the vertex potential associated with correct detections of the signal were found to be systematically related to the strictness of the response criterion and independent of variations in a priori signal probability. No similar evoked potential components were found associated with signal absent judgements (misses and correct rejections) regardless of the confidence level of the judgement or signal probability. These results strongly support the contention that the form of the vertex evoked response is closely correlated with the subject's psychophysical decision regarding the presence or absence of a threshold level signal.

  11. Calibrating the Decline Rate - Peak Luminosity Relation for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Bert W.; Pruzhinskaya, Maria V.; Thijsse, Barend J.

    2015-08-01

    The correlation between peak luminosity and rate of decline in luminosity for Type I supernovae was first studied by B. W. Rust [Ph.D. thesis, Univ. of Illinois (1974) ORNL-4953] and Yu. P. Pskovskii [Sov. Astron., 21 (1977) 675] in the 1970s. Their work was little-noted until Phillips rediscovered the correlation in 1993 [ApJ, 413 (1993) L105] and attempted to derive a calibration relation using a difference quotient approximation Δm15(B) to the decline rate after peak luminosity Mmax(B). Numerical differentiation of data containing measuring errors is a notoriously unstable calculation, but Δm15(B) remains the parameter of choice for most calibration methods developed since 1993. To succeed, it should be computed from good functional fits to the lightcurves, but most workers never exhibit their fits. In the few instances where they have, the fits are not very good. Some of the 9 supernovae in the Phillips study required extinction corrections in their estimates of the Mmax(B), and so were not appropriate for establishing a calibration relation. Although the relative uncertainties in his Δm15(B) estimates were comparable to those in his Mmax(B) estimates, he nevertheless used simple linear regression of the latter on the former, rather than major-axis regression (total least squares) which would have been more appropriate.Here we determine some new calibration relations using a sample of nearby "pure" supernovae suggested by M. V. Pruzhinskaya [Astron. Lett., 37 (2011) 663]. Their parent galaxies are all in the NED collection, with good distance estimates obtained by several different methods. We fit each lightcurve with an optimal regression spline obtained by B. J. Thijsse's spline2 [Comp. in Sci. & Eng., 10 (2008) 49]. The fits, which explain more that 99% of the variance in each case, are better than anything heretofore obtained by stretching "template" lightcurves or fitting combinations of standard lightcurves. We use the fits to compute estimates of

  12. Varying relative degradation rates of oil in different forms and environments revealed by ramped pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, Matthew A; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-09-16

    Degradation of oil contamination yields stabilized products by removing and transforming reactive and volatile compounds. In contaminated coastal environments, the processes of degradation are influenced by shoreline energy, which increases the surface area of the oil as well as exchange between oil, water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients. Here, a ramped pyrolysis carbon isotope technique is employed to investigate thermochemical and isotopic changes in organic material from coastal environments contaminated with oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oiled beach sediment, tar ball, and marsh samples were collected from a barrier island and a brackish marsh in southeast Louisiana over a period of 881 days. Stable carbon ((13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotopic data demonstrate a predominance of oil-derived carbon in the organic material. Ramped pyrolysis profiles indicate that the organic material was transformed into more stable forms. Our data indicate relative rates of stabilization in the following order, from fastest to slowest: high energy beach sediments > low energy beach sediments > marsh > tar balls. Oil was transformed most rapidly where shoreline energy and the rates of oil dispersion and exchange with water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients were greatest. Still, isotope data reveal persistence of oil.

  13. Longevity, growth rate and related traits among strains of Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Soliman, M H; Lints, F A

    1975-01-01

    Longevity of eight laboratory strains of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, with various geographic backgrounds, was studied under constant laboratory conditions of 33 degrees C and 70% relative humidity in standard medium (95% whole wheat flour and 5% dried yeast) during a period of 227 days starting from the egg stage. The eggs were collected from the same parents, first a few days after emergence and afterwards at intervals of 13, 9, 10 and 11 days. Mean survival time (MST) was found to be strain-specified. It ranges from 128.6 days for KJ (Kyoto, Japan) to 174.2 days for ES (Edinburgh, Scotland). MST was highly correlated with the percentage of adults alive after 227 days, which did not change the ranking order of strain longevity. Parental age had no effect on longevity. The mean adult longevity of the strains was correlated with the available data on adult weight, growth rate, viability and productivity. There was no relationship between adult weight and longevity. LIfe span was found to depend on growth rate (measured as 13-day larval weight), percent viability (from 13-day larvae to adulthood) and productivity. Developmental time was also found to influence adult life span within certain limits (two extreme strains deviated). The data suggest that ageing and death in T. castaneum is under genetic control and support the idea that ageing, allied to development, is genetically controlled.

  14. Does seed mass drive the differences in relative growth rate between growth forms?

    PubMed

    Houghton, Jennie; Thompson, Ken; Rees, Mark

    2013-07-07

    The idea that herbaceous plants have higher relative growth rates (RGRs) compared with woody plants is fundamental to many of the most influential theories in plant ecology. This difference in growth rate is thought to reflect systematic variation in physiology, allocation and leaf construction. Previous studies documenting this effect have, however, ignored differences in seed mass. As woody species often have larger seeds and RGR is negatively correlated with seed mass, it is entirely possible the lower RGRs observed in woody species is a consequence of having larger seeds rather than different growth strategies. Using a synthesis of the published literature, we explored the relationship between RGR and growth form, accounting for the effects of seed mass and study-specific effects (e.g. duration of study and pot volume), using a mixed-effects model. The model showed that herbaceous species do indeed have higher RGRs than woody species, and that the difference was independent of seed mass, thus at all seed masses, herbaceous species on average grow faster than woody ones.

  15. HIV in the Leather Community: Rates and Risk-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, David A.; Seal, David W.; Rintamaki, Lance; Rieger, Gerulf

    2014-01-01

    There exist many subcultures of men who have sex with men (MSM), all with differing values and health behaviors. The Leathermen comprise one such subculture, which is characterized by a heightened valuation of hypersexuality and adherence to sexual control dynamics (i.e., submission and dominance). No previous research has specifically examined this community for differences in sexual health (e.g., HIV rates) and sexual health behaviors (e.g., condom use). We conducted a large survey of men (N = 1,554) at one leather and non-leather event, collecting data from 655 Submissives, Dominants, Switches, and non-orienting Leathermen. Leathermen were 61% more likely to be HIV-positive than non-Leathermen. Decreased condom use found in HIV-positive Leathermen (relative to HIV-positive non-Leathermen) was a potential factor contributing to heightened HIV rates. Universal low condom use in Submissives engaging in receptive, and Dominants engaging in insertive, anal intercourse was an additional trend that potentially contributed to increased numbers of HIV-positive Leathermen. Our recommendation is for heightened awareness of the risks associated with sex among Leathermen, especially unprotected anal intercourse with sero-uncertain Submissives. PMID:19904599

  16. Water relations and leaf growth rate of three Agropyron genotypes under water stress.

    PubMed

    García, María G; Busso, Carlos A; Polci, Pablo; García Girou, Norberto L; Echenique, Viviana

    2002-12-01

    The effects of water stress on leaf water relations and growth are reported for three perennial tussock grass genotypes under glasshouse conditions. Studies were performed in genotypes El Palmar INTA and Selección Anguil of Agropyron scabrifolium (Döell) Parodi, and El Vizcachero of A. elongatum (Host) Beauv. Agropyron scabrifolium El Palmar INTA is native to a region with warm-temperate and humid climate without a dry season, and an average annual precipitation of 900 mm. Agropyron scabrifolium Selección Anguil comes from a region with a sub-humid, dry to semiarid climate and a mean annual precipitation of 600 mm. Agropyron elongatum is a widespread forage in semiarid Argentina with well-known water stress resistance. A mild water stress treatment was imposed slowly; plants reached a minimum pre-dawn leaf water potential of about -1.83 MPa by day 21 after watering was withheld. In all genotypes, water stress led to a reduction of leaf growth. There was a tendency for a greater epicuticular wax accumulation on water-stressed plants of A. scabrifolium Selección Anguil and A. elongatum than on those of A. scabrifolium El Palmar INTA. This may have contributed to obtain greater turgor pressures and relative water contents in the first two than in the later genotype. In turn, this may have contributed to determine smaller leaf growth rate reductions in A. scabrifolium Selección Anguil and A. elongatum than in A. scabrifolium El Palmar INTA under water stress. This study demonstrated variation in water stress resistance between genotypes in A. scabrifolium, and between A. scabrifolium Selección Anguil and A. elongatum versus A. scabrifolium El Palmar INTA, which was related to their differential responses in water relations.

  17. 77 FR 73456 - Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Army Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy...: Reference: TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy. Background: The following FRA policy applies to... increases in diesel fuel prices. Miscellaneous: A copy of the TR-12 FRA Policy can be accessed via the...

  18. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from {minus}196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ``pure`` tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of {var_epsilon} = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited.

  19. Intolerance of uncertainty and startle potentiation in relation to different threat reinforcement rates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Brian; Nelson, Brady D; Jackson, Felicia; Hajcak, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning research on threat predictability has primarily examined the impact of temporal (i.e., timing) predictability on the startle reflex. However, there are other key features of threat that can vary in predictability. For example, the reinforcement rate (i.e., frequency) of threat is a crucial factor underlying fear learning. The present study examined the impact of threat reinforcement rate on the startle reflex and self-reported anxiety during a fear conditioning paradigm. Forty-five participants completed a fear learning task in which the conditioned stimulus was reinforced with an electric shock to the forearm on 50% of trials in one block and 75% of trials in a second block, in counter-balanced order. The present study also examined whether intolerance of uncertainty (IU), the tendency to perceive or experience uncertainty as stressful or unpleasant, was associated with the startle reflex during conditions of low (50%) vs. high (75%) reinforcement. Results indicated that, across all participants, startle was greater during the 75% relative to the 50% reinforcement condition. IU was positively correlated with startle potentiation (i.e., increased startle response to the CS+ relative to the CS-) during the 50%, but not the 75%, reinforcement condition. Thus, despite receiving fewer electric shocks during the 50% reinforcement condition, individuals with high IU uniquely demonstrated greater defense system activation when impending threat was more uncertain. The association between IU and startle was independent of state anxiety. The present study adds to a growing literature on threat predictability and aversive responding, and suggests IU is associated with abnormal responding in the context of uncertain threat.

  20. Carcass composition, bone mechanical properties, and meat quality traits in relation to growth rate in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gondret, F; Larzul, C; Combes, S; de Rochambeau, H

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize correlated responses in carcass composition, bone mechanical properties, and meat quality indicators to divergent selection for growth rate. Rabbits from low (LOW) or high (HIGH) lines divergently selected over five generations on 63-d BW and a control group (CONT) were used. Rabbits were slaughtered at an average BW of 2,306 +/- 65 g, corresponding to 63, 58, or 52 d of age in LOW (n = 41), CONT (n = 43), and HIGH (n = 44) groups, respectively. Postweaning ADG and G:F increased (P < 0.001) in the order LOW < CONT < HIGH groups. The lengths of the tibia and femur in rabbit legs decreased (P < 0.001) with increasing growth rate. Tibia and femur bone intrinsic stiffness, as assessed by a three-point flexure test, followed the order (P < 0.001) of HIGH < CONT < LOW groups. At the same BW, HIGH rabbits and CONT rabbits showed many similarities for dressing percent, carcass composition, and color and chemical composition of muscles or meat parts. In contrast, carcass yield and the relative proportion of hind part were 3% greater (P < 0.01) in LOW rabbits than in CONT and HIGH rabbits. The meat-to-bone ratio in the hind leg was 11% greater (P < 0.001) in the LOW group compared with the CONT and HIGH groups. Yellow color index and moisture content in LM, a fast-twitch glycolytic muscle, were lower (P < 0.05) in LOW rabbits than in HIGH rabbits, but ultimate pH, WHC, and cooking loss did not differ between the two growth-selected lines. Ultimate pH in semitendinosus, a mixed slow- and fast-twitch oxidoglycolytic muscle, was less (P < 0.001) in HIGH rabbits than in CONT and LOW rabbits. However, lactate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities in this muscle (n = 21 per group), assessed at the time of slaughter as markers of glycolytic and oxidative capacities, respectively, did not differ among groups. Growth rate did not modify mean cross-sectional area and type frequency of myofibers in semitendinosus muscle

  1. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  2. Characterization of tropical precipitation using drop size distribution and rain rate-radar reflectivity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saurabh; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of precipitation is important for proper interpretation of rain information from remotely sensed data. Rain attenuation and radar reflectivity (Z) depend directly on the drop size distribution (DSD). The relation between radar reflectivity/rain attenuation and rain rate (R) varies widely depending upon the origin, topography, and drop evolution mechanism and needs further understanding of the precipitation characteristics. The present work utilizes 2 years of concurrent measurements of DSD using a ground-based disdrometer at five diverse climatic conditions in Indian subcontinent and explores the possibility of rain classification based on microphysical characteristics of precipitation. It is observed that both gamma and lognormal distributions are performing almost similar for Indian region with a marginally better performance by one model than other depending upon the locations. It has also been found that shape-slope relationship of gamma distribution can be a good indicator of rain type. The Z-R relation, Z = ARb, is found to vary widely for different precipitation systems, with convective rain that has higher values of A than the stratiform rain for two locations, whereas the reverse is observed for the rest of the three locations. Further, the results indicate that the majority of rainfall (>50%) in Indian region is due to the convective rain although the occurrence time of convective rain is low (<10%).

  3. We should be using nonlinear indices when relating heart-rate dynamics to cognition and mood

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hayley; Benton, David

    2015-01-01

    Both heart rate (HR) and brain functioning involve the integrated output of a multitude of regulatory mechanisms, that are not quantified adequately by linear approximations such as means and standard deviations. It was therefore considered whether non-linear measures of HR complexity are more strongly associated with cognition and mood. Whilst resting, the inter-beat (R-R) time series of twenty-one males and twenty-four females were measured for five minutes. The data were summarised using time, frequency and nonlinear complexity measures. Attention, memory, reaction times, mood and cortisol levels were assessed. Nonlinear HR indices captured additional information, enabling a greater percentage of the variance in behaviour to be explained. On occasions non-linear indices were related to aspects for behaviour, for example focused attention and cortisol production, when time or frequency indices were not. These effects were sexually dimorphic with HR complexity being more strongly associated with the behaviour of females. It was concluded that nonlinear rather than linear methods of summarizing the HR times series offers a novel way of relating brain functioning and behaviour. It should be considered whether non-linear measures of HR complexity can be used as a biomarker of the integrated functioning of the brain. PMID:26565560

  4. Relative in vitro growth rates of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) - the most rapidly growing higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, P; Adelmann, K; Zimmer, S; Schmidt, C; Appenroth, K-J

    2015-01-01

    Relative growth rates (RGR), doubling times (DT) and relative weekly yields (RY) of 39 clones (ecotypes) from 13 species representing all five genera of duckweeds were determined under standardised cultivation conditions. RGR ranged overall from 0.153 to 0.519 day(-1) , DT from 1.34 to 4.54 days and RY from 2.9 to 37.8 week(-1) . The RGR and RY data can be compared directly to other published findings to only a limited extent on account of missing clonal designations for and limited accessibility to previously investigated clones, as well as the use of different data denominators. However, they are consistent with the published results of other comparative duckweed studies of similar scope in showing that RGR does not vary primarily at the level of the genus or species, but rather reflects the adaptation of individual clones to specific local conditions. The RGR data support the widely held assumption that duckweeds can grow faster than other higher plants and that they can thus surpass land-based agricultural crops in productivity. Duckweeds are highly promising for the production of biomass for nutrition and energy, but extensive clonal comparison will be required to identify the most suitable isolates for this purpose.

  5. Offenders, Judges, and Officers Rate the Relative Severity of Alternative Sanctions Compared to Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nathan T.; May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work suggests that offenders rate several alternatives as more severe than imprisonment. We build on this literature by comparing punishment exchange rates generated by criminal court judges with rates generated by offenders and their supervising officers. Findings reveal that none of the three groups rates prison as the most severe…

  6. Association of Diabetes Related Complications with Heart Rate Variability among a Diabetic Population in the UAE

    PubMed Central

    Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Al-Angari, Haitham M.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Almahmeed, Wael; Al Safar, Habiba S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular, macrovascular and neurological complications are the key causes of morbidity and mortality among type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of cardiac autonomic function of diabetic patients in relation to three types of diabetes-related complications. ECG recordings were collected and analyzed from 169 T2DM patients in supine position who were diagnosed with nephropathy (n = 55), peripheral neuropathy (n = 64) and retinopathy (n = 106) at two hospitals in the UAE. Comparison between combinations of patients with complications and a control diabetic group (CONT) with no complication (n = 34) was performed using time, frequency and multi-lag entropy measures of heart rate variability (HRV). The results show that these measures decreased significantly (p<0.05) depending on the presence and type of diabetic complications. Entropy, (median, 1st- 3rd interquartile range) for the group combining all complications (1.74,1.37–2.09) was significantly lower than the corresponding values for the CONT group (1.77, 1.39–2.24) with lag-1 for sequential beat-to-beat changes. Odds ratios (OR) from the entropy analysis further demonstrated a significantly higher association with the combination of retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy versus CONT (OR: 1.42 at lag 8) and an even OR for the combination of retinopathy and nephropathy (OR: 2.46 at lag 8) compared to the other groups with complications. Also, the OR of low frequency power to high frequency power ratio (LF/HF) showed a higher association with these diabetic-related complications compared to CONT, especially for the patient group combining all complications (OR: 4.92). This study confirms that the type of microvascular or peripheral neuropathy complication present in T2DM patients have different effects on heart rate entropy, implying disorders of multi-organ connectivity are directly associated with autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Clinical

  7. Development rates of two Xenopsylla flea species in relation to air temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, B R; Khokhlova, I S; Fielden, L J; Burdelova, N V

    2001-09-01

    The rate of development of immature fleas, Xenopsylla conformis Wagner and Xenopsylla ramesis Rothschild (Siphonaptera: Xenopsyllidae) was studied in the laboratory at 25 degrees C and 28 degrees C with 40, 55, 75 and 92% relative humidity (RH). These fleas are separately associated with the host jird Meriones crassus Sundevall in different microhabitats of the Ramon erosion cirque, Negev Highlands, Israel. This study of basic climatic factors in relation to flea bionomics provides the basis for ecological investigations to interpret reasons for paratopic local distributions of these two species of congeneric fleas on the same host. Both air temperature and RH were positively correlated with duration of egg and larval stages in both species. Change of humidity between egg and larval environments did not affect duration of larval development at any temperature. At each temperature and RH, the eggs and larvae of X. ramesis did not differ between males and females in the duration of their development, whereas female eggs and larvae of X. conformis usually developed significantly faster than those of males. For both species, male pupae developed slower than female pupae at the same air temperature and RH. Air temperature, but not RH, affected the duration of pupal development. At each humidity, duration of the pupal stage was significantly longer at 25 degrees C than at 28 degrees C: 15.3+/-1.7 vs. 11.7+/-1.2 days in X. conformis; 14.1+/-2.0 vs. 11.5+/-1.7 days in X. ramesis, with a significantly shorter pupal period of the latter species at 25 degrees C. These limited interspecific bionomic contrasts in relation to basic climatic factors appear insufficient to explain the differential habitat distributions of X. conformis and X. ramesis.

  8. The radio continuum-star formation rate relation in WSRT sings galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer E-mail: v.heesen@soton.ac.uk E-mail: heald@astron.nl E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based Σ{sub SFR} maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R{sub int}=0.78±0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR}, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (Σ{sub SFR}){sub RC}∝(Σ{sub SFR}){sub hyb}{sup 0.63±0.25}, implying that data points with high Σ{sub SFR} are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low Σ{sub SFR}. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio R of

  9. The interplay between aerobic metabolism and antipredator performance: vigilance is related to recovery rate after exercise.

    PubMed

    Killen, Shaun S; Reid, Donald; Marras, Stefano; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    When attacked by a predator, fish respond with a sudden fast-start motion away from the threat. Although this anaerobically-powered swimming necessitates a recovery phase which is fueled aerobically, little is known about links between escape performance and aerobic traits such as aerobic scope (AS) or recovery time after exhaustive exercise. Slower recovery ability or a reduced AS could make some individuals less likely to engage in a fast-start response or display reduced performance. Conversely, increased vigilance in some individuals could permit faster responses to an attack but also increase energy demand and prolong recovery after anaerobic exercise. We examined how AS and the ability to recover from anaerobic exercise relates to differences in fast-start escape performance in juvenile golden gray mullet at different acclimation temperatures. Individuals were acclimated to either 18, 22, or 26°C, then measured for standard and maximal metabolic rates and AS using intermittent flow respirometry. Anaerobic capacity and the time taken to recover after exercise were also assessed. Each fish was also filmed during a simulated attack to determine response latency, maximum speed and acceleration, and turning rate displayed during the escape response. Across temperatures, individuals with shorter response latencies during a simulated attack are those with the longest recovery time after exhaustive anaerobic exercise. Because a short response latency implies high preparedness to escape, these results highlight the trade-off between the increased vigilance and metabolic demand, which leads to longer recovery times in fast reactors. These results improve our understanding of the intrinsic physiological traits that generate inter-individual variability in escape ability, and emphasize that a full appreciation of trade-offs associated with predator avoidance and energy balance must include energetic costs associated with vigilance and recovery from anaerobic exercise.

  10. Growth rates of North Sea macroalgae in relation to temperature, irradiance and photoperiod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, M. D.; Lüning, K.

    1980-03-01

    Three eulittoral algae (Ulva lactuca, Porphyra umbilicalis, Chondrus crispus) and one sublittoral alga (Laminaria saccharina) from Helgoland (North Sea) were cultivated in a flow-through system at different temperatures, irradiances and daylengths. In regard to temperature there was a broad optimum at 10 15° C, except in P. umbilicalis, which grew fastest at 10 °C. A growth peak at this temperature was also found in four of 17 other North Sea macroalgae, for which the growth/temperature response was studied, whereas 13 of these species exhibited a growth optimum at 15 °C, or a broad optimum at 10 15 °C. Growth was light-saturated in U. lactuca, L. saccharina and C. crispus at photon flux densities above 70 µE m-2s-1, but in P. umbilicalis above 30 µE m-2s-1. Growth rate did not decrease notably in the eulittoral species after one week in relatively strong light (250 µE m-2s-1), but by about 50 % in the case of the sublittoral L. saccharina, as compared with growth under weak light conditions (30 µE m-2s-1). In contrast, chlorophyll content decreased in the sublittoral as well as in the eulittoral species, and the greatest change in pigment content occurred in the range 30 70 µE m-2s-1. Growth rate increased continuously up to photoperiods of 24 h light per day in L. saccharina and C. crispus, whereas daylength saturation occurred at photoperiods of more than 16 h light per day in U. lactuca and P. umbilicalis.

  11. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  12. The interplay between aerobic metabolism and antipredator performance: vigilance is related to recovery rate after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Shaun S.; Reid, Donald; Marras, Stefano; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    When attacked by a predator, fish respond with a sudden fast-start motion away from the threat. Although this anaerobically-powered swimming necessitates a recovery phase which is fueled aerobically, little is known about links between escape performance and aerobic traits such as aerobic scope (AS) or recovery time after exhaustive exercise. Slower recovery ability or a reduced AS could make some individuals less likely to engage in a fast-start response or display reduced performance. Conversely, increased vigilance in some individuals could permit faster responses to an attack but also increase energy demand and prolong recovery after anaerobic exercise. We examined how AS and the ability to recover from anaerobic exercise relates to differences in fast-start escape performance in juvenile golden gray mullet at different acclimation temperatures. Individuals were acclimated to either 18, 22, or 26°C, then measured for standard and maximal metabolic rates and AS using intermittent flow respirometry. Anaerobic capacity and the time taken to recover after exercise were also assessed. Each fish was also filmed during a simulated attack to determine response latency, maximum speed and acceleration, and turning rate displayed during the escape response. Across temperatures, individuals with shorter response latencies during a simulated attack are those with the longest recovery time after exhaustive anaerobic exercise. Because a short response latency implies high preparedness to escape, these results highlight the trade-off between the increased vigilance and metabolic demand, which leads to longer recovery times in fast reactors. These results improve our understanding of the intrinsic physiological traits that generate inter-individual variability in escape ability, and emphasize that a full appreciation of trade-offs associated with predator avoidance and energy balance must include energetic costs associated with vigilance and recovery from anaerobic exercise

  13. A Computational Study on the Relation between Resting Heart Rate and Atrial Fibrillation Hemodynamics under Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Anselmino, Matteo; Scarsoglio, Stefania; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Aims Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR) target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model. Methods The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task—MET) and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running), considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR—SHR—simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR—HHR—simulations). To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI)—the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations—was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8). Results Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77), while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56). Conclusions The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase. PMID:28076389

  14. Temperature-dependent, relative-rate study of the reactions of 1- and 2-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Cassanelli, P.; Cox, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    Alkoxyl radicals (RO\\cdot) are important intermediates in the chains of free radical reactions that constitute the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Generally there are a number of different reaction pathways available to alkoxyl radicals and, depending on conditions of temperature and the structure of RO\\cdot, these may be in competition. The major reactions of RO\\cdot are (1) reaction with O_2 to yield a carbonyl product and a hydroperoxy, HO_2, radical, (2) decomposition to yield a carbonyl product and a radical fragment, and (3) isomerisation via a six-membered transition state to yield a d-hydroxylated radical species. Thus the chemistry of alkoxyl radicals determines the atmospheric impact of the oxidation of a given VOC, in terms of the immediate effects of closed-shell products, and as a result of the further chemistry of free radical products. HO_2 can react with NO to yield photolabile NO_2 (and hence contribute to photochemical ozone formation), and organic radical fragments act to propagate the oxidation chain of reactions. As ozone has been identified to be an important greenhouse gas in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region it is important to understand how temperature affects the relative rates of reactions (1) to (3), and thus how the presence of VOCs in the UTLS region affects the coupled chemistries of HO_x and O_3. In the present study, we have looked at the reactions of 1- and 2-butoxyl radicals (formed in the reaction of OH with butane) in terms of the relative rates of their bimolecular reactions with O_2 (1) and unimolecular processes (2,3). The two butoxyl radicals were studied separately and were formed directly from the photolysis of 1- or 2-butylnitrite. Experiments were carried out using a metre-long photochemical flow cell made of quartz. The temperature of the cell could be controlled and for the experiments carried out in the present study was operated between about 250 and 340 K. Reactant

  15. Terminology and Methodology Related to the Use of Heart Rate Responsivity in Infancy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodcock, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Methodological problems in measuring and interpreting infantile heart rate reactivity in research are discussed. Various ways of describing cardiac activity are listed. Attention is given to the relationship between resting state and heart rate responsivity. (Author/WY)

  16. Peer Ratings of Aggression: Relation to Social Skills, Behavior Problems, and Friendships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Ruth; Vaughn, Sharon

    This study examined the aggressive behaviors of children through peer ratings to teacher ratings of problem behaviors and social skills and peer ratings of friendship. Peer data are valid measures and may be more accurate than teacher or self measures because peers are more likely to be present when aggression occurs. This study examines a peer…

  17. Effectiveness Ratings of Counselors by Coached Clients Related to Attractiveness-Fitness Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Rated normal-weight and overweight male and female counselors on perceived cognitive effectiveness, warmth and empathy, leadership qualities, and global counseling effectiveness. Although all counselors were rated as competent, both male and female counselors who were overweight were rated as less able in all areas tested. (Author)

  18. Factoring vs linear modeling in rate estimation: a simulation study of relative accuracy.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, G; Greenland, S

    1998-07-01

    A common strategy for modeling dose-response in epidemiology is to transform ordered exposures and covariates into sets of dichotomous indicator variables (that is, to factor the variables). Factoring tends to increase estimation variance, but it also tends to decrease bias and thus may increase or decrease total accuracy. We conducted a simulation study to examine the impact of factoring on the accuracy of rate estimation. Factored and unfactored Poisson regression models were fit to follow-up study datasets that were randomly generated from 37,500 population model forms that ranged from subadditive to supramultiplicative. In the situations we examined, factoring sometimes substantially improved accuracy relative to fitting the corresponding unfactored model, sometimes substantially decreased accuracy, and sometimes made little difference. The difference in accuracy between factored and unfactored models depended in a complicated fashion on the difference between the true and fitted model forms, the strength of exposure and covariate effects in the population, and the study size. It may be difficult in practice to predict when factoring is increasing or decreasing accuracy. We recommend, therefore, that the strategy of factoring variables be supplemented with other strategies for modeling dose-response.

  19. Elevated rates of testosterone-related disorders in women with autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Ingudomnukul, Erin; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Knickmeyer, Rebecca

    2007-05-01

    The androgen theory of autism proposes that autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are in part due to elevated fetal testosterone (FT) levels, which are positively correlated with a number of autistic traits and inversely correlated with social development and empathy. A medical questionnaire was completed by n=54 women with ASC, n=74 mothers of children with ASC, and n=183 mothers of typically developing children to test whether women with ASC have an increased rate of testosterone-related medical conditions, and to see whether mothers of children with ASC show similar abnormalities, as part of the 'broader autism phenotype'. Compared to controls, significantly more women with ASC reported (a) hirsutism, (b) bisexuality or asexuality, (c) irregular menstrual cycle, (d) dysmenorrhea, (e) polycystic ovary syndrome, (f) severe acne, (g) epilepsy, (h) tomboyism, and (i) family history of ovarian, uterine, and prostate cancers, tumors, or growths. Compared to controls, significantly more mothers of ASC children reported (a) severe acne, (b) breast and uterine cancers, tumors, or growths, and (c) family history of ovarian and uterine cancers, tumors, or growths. These results suggest current hormone abnormalities in women with ASC and their mothers. Direct investigations of serum testosterone levels and genetic susceptibility to high testosterone production or sensitivity in women with ASC would illuminate the origin of these conditions. The relationship between FT and current testosterone levels also needs to be clarified. The present results may be relevant to understanding the increased male risk to developing autism.

  20. Global stability of a transport-related infection model with general incidence rate in two heterogeneous cities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Liu, Xianning

    2014-12-01

    To further understand the effects of travel on disease spread, a transport-related infection model with general incidence rate in two heterogeneous cities is proposed and analyzed. Some analytical results on the global stability of equilibria (including disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium) are obtained. The explicit formula for the basic reproduction number R0 is derived and it is proved to be a threshold for disease spread. To reveal how incidence rate and travel rate influence the disease spread, effects of general incidence rate and travel rate on the dynamics of system are shown via numeric simulations.

  1. The Relation Between Accretion Rate And Jet Power in X-Ray Luminous Elliptical Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steven W.; Dunn, R.J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; Reynolds, C.S.; /Maryland U.

    2006-03-10

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of nine nearby, X-ray luminous elliptical galaxies with good optical velocity dispersion measurements, we show that a tight correlation exists between the Bondi accretion rates calculated from the observed gas temperature and density profiles and estimated black hole masses, and the power emerging from these systems in relativistic jets. The jet powers, which are inferred from the energies and timescales required to inflate cavities observed in the surrounding X-ray emitting gas, can be related to the accretion rates using a power law model of the form log (P{sub Bondi}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) = A + B log (P{sub jet}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}), with A = 0.62 {+-} 0.15 and B = 0.77 {+-} 0.18. Our results show that a significant fraction of the energy associated with the rest mass of material entering the Bondi accretion radius (2.4{sub -0.7}{sup +1.0} per cent, for P{sub jet} = 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) eventually emerges in the relativistic jets. Our results have significant implications for studies of accretion, jet formation and galaxy formation. The observed tight correlation suggests that the Bondi formulae provide a reasonable description of the accretion process in these systems, despite the likely presence of magnetic pressure and angular momentum in the accreting gas. The similarity of the P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} values argues that a significant fraction of the matter entering the accretion radius flows down to regions close to the black holes, where the jets are presumably formed. The tight correlation between P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} also suggests that the accretion flows are approximately stable over timescales of a few million years. Our results show that the black hole ''engines'' at the hearts of large elliptical galaxies and groups feed back sufficient energy to stem cooling and star formation, leading naturally to the observed exponential cut off at the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function.

  2. Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease: Pedaling Rate Is Related to Changes in Motor Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Erik B.; Frankemolle, Anneke M.M.; Penko, Amanda; Phillips, Michael D.; Lowe, Mark J.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Forced-rate lower-extremity exercise has recently emerged as a potential safe and low-cost therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The efficacy is believed to be dependent on pedaling rate, with rates above the subjects' voluntary exercise rates being most beneficial. In this study, we use functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to further elucidate the mechanism underlying this effect. Twenty-seven PD patients were randomized to complete 8 weeks of forced-rate exercise (FE) or voluntary-rate exercise (VE). Exercise was delivered using a specialized stationary bicycle, which can augment patients' voluntary exercise rates. The FE group received assistance from the cycle. Imaging was conducted at baseline, end of therapy, and after 4 weeks of follow-up. Functional connectivity (FC) was determined via seed-based correlation analysis, using activation-based seeds in the primary motor cortex (M1). The change in FC after exercise was compared using linear correlation with pedaling rate. Results of the correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between pedaling rate and change in FC from the most affected M1 to the ipsilateral thalamus. This effect persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. These results indicate that a plausible mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of high-rate exercise in PD is that it improves thalamo-cortical connectivity. PMID:26414696

  3. Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease: Pedaling Rate Is Related to Changes in Motor Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chintan; Beall, Erik B; Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Penko, Amanda; Phillips, Michael D; Lowe, Mark J; Alberts, Jay L

    2016-02-01

    Forced-rate lower-extremity exercise has recently emerged as a potential safe and low-cost therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The efficacy is believed to be dependent on pedaling rate, with rates above the subjects' voluntary exercise rates being most beneficial. In this study, we use functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to further elucidate the mechanism underlying this effect. Twenty-seven PD patients were randomized to complete 8 weeks of forced-rate exercise (FE) or voluntary-rate exercise (VE). Exercise was delivered using a specialized stationary bicycle, which can augment patients' voluntary exercise rates. The FE group received assistance from the cycle. Imaging was conducted at baseline, end of therapy, and after 4 weeks of follow-up. Functional connectivity (FC) was determined via seed-based correlation analysis, using activation-based seeds in the primary motor cortex (M1). The change in FC after exercise was compared using linear correlation with pedaling rate. Results of the correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between pedaling rate and change in FC from the most affected M1 to the ipsilateral thalamus. This effect persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. These results indicate that a plausible mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of high-rate exercise in PD is that it improves thalamo-cortical connectivity.

  4. Relative Metallographic Cooling Rates: Can They be Measured Using Co/Ni Ratios at Taenite/Kamacite Interfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Yang, J.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2012-09-01

    The relative cooling rates of IVA and IIIAB irons obtained recently by Wasson and Hoppe must be treated with much caution as they were obtained with inadequate spatial resloution and a flowed phase diagram and methodology.

  5. Decreases in Smoking-Related Cancer Mortality Rates Are Associated with Birth Cohort Effects in Korean Men.

    PubMed

    Jee, Yon Ho; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jong-Keun; Oh, Chang-Mo

    2016-12-05

    Background: This study aimed to examine trends in smoking-related cancer mortality rates and to investigate the effect birth cohort on smoking-related cancer mortality in Korean men. Methods: The number of smoking-related cancer deaths and corresponding population numbers were obtained from Statistics Korea for the period 1984-2013. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to detect changes in trends in age-standardized mortality rates. Birth-cohort specific mortality rates were illustrated by 5 year age groups. Results: The age-standardized mortality rates for oropharyngeal decreased from 2003 to 2013 (annual percent change (APC): -3.1 (95% CI, -4.6 to -1.6)) and lung cancers decreased from 2002 to 2013 (APC -2.4 (95% CI -2.7 to -2.2)). The mortality rates for esophageal declined from 1994 to 2002 (APC -2.5 (95% CI -4.1 to -0.8)) and from 2002 to 2013 (APC -5.2 (95% CI -5.7 to -4.7)) and laryngeal cancer declined from 1995 to 2013 (average annual percent change (AAPC): -3.3 (95% CI -4.7 to -1.8)). By the age group, the trends for the smoking-related cancer mortality except for oropharyngeal cancer have changed earlier to decrease in the younger age group. The birth-cohort specific mortality rates and age-period-cohort analysis consistently showed that all birth cohorts born after 1930 showed reduced mortality of smoking-related cancers. Conclusions: In Korean men, smoking-related cancer mortality rates have decreased. Our findings also indicate that current decreases in smoking-related cancer mortality rates have mainly been due to a decrease in the birth cohort effect, which suggest that decrease in smoking rates.

  6. Decreases in Smoking-Related Cancer Mortality Rates Are Associated with Birth Cohort Effects in Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Yon Ho; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jong-Keun; Oh, Chang-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine trends in smoking-related cancer mortality rates and to investigate the effect birth cohort on smoking-related cancer mortality in Korean men. Methods: The number of smoking-related cancer deaths and corresponding population numbers were obtained from Statistics Korea for the period 1984–2013. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to detect changes in trends in age-standardized mortality rates. Birth-cohort specific mortality rates were illustrated by 5 year age groups. Results: The age-standardized mortality rates for oropharyngeal decreased from 2003 to 2013 (annual percent change (APC): −3.1 (95% CI, −4.6 to −1.6)) and lung cancers decreased from 2002 to 2013 (APC −2.4 (95% CI −2.7 to −2.2)). The mortality rates for esophageal declined from 1994 to 2002 (APC −2.5 (95% CI −4.1 to −0.8)) and from 2002 to 2013 (APC −5.2 (95% CI −5.7 to −4.7)) and laryngeal cancer declined from 1995 to 2013 (average annual percent change (AAPC): −3.3 (95% CI −4.7 to −1.8)). By the age group, the trends for the smoking-related cancer mortality except for oropharyngeal cancer have changed earlier to decrease in the younger age group. The birth-cohort specific mortality rates and age-period-cohort analysis consistently showed that all birth cohorts born after 1930 showed reduced mortality of smoking-related cancers. Conclusions: In Korean men, smoking-related cancer mortality rates have decreased. Our findings also indicate that current decreases in smoking-related cancer mortality rates have mainly been due to a decrease in the birth cohort effect, which suggest that decrease in smoking rates. PMID:27929405

  7. Observations on the relation between alcohol absorption and the rate of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S

    1981-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is absorbed slowly from the stomach and rapidly from the small intestine, and the rate of its absorption depends on the rate of gastric emptying. When gastric emptying is fast, the absorption of alcohol is fast. When gastric emptying is slow the absorption of alcohol is delayed and peak blood alcohol concentrations are reduced. Alterations of the gastric emptying rate, which may have a physiologic, pharmacologic or pathologic cause, markedly influence the rate of alcohol absorption. The gastric emptying rate makes an important contribution to inter- and intraindividual variations in the rate of alcohol absorption and therefore the timing and magnitude of the acute intoxicating effect of an oral dose of alcohol. PMID:7459787

  8. Do Small Rural High Schools Differ from Larger Schools in Relation to Absentee Rates in Physical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagestad, Pal; Ranes, Vebjorn; Welde, Boye

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were twofold: (a) to investigate how school size affects absentee rates in physical education (PE) and (b) to examine the experiences of students and teachers at a small rural high school in relation to attendance in PE at their school. The absentee rates in PE among all students (N = 6928 students) in a county in Norway were…

  9. Tri-Axial Accelerometry and Heart Rate Telemetry: Relation and Agreement with Behavioral Observation in Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Philip W.; Beveridge, Sandy K.; Clocksin, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    The relation and agreement of tri-axial accelerometry and heart rate telemetry in measuring moderate to vigorous physical activity were examined in association to behavioral observation during 1st- and 2nd-grade physical education. In Study 1, physical activity measures of heart rate and behavioral observation were collected on 346 participants…

  10. Relations between Perceived Competence, Importance Ratings, and Self-Worth among African American School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Leslie K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how domain-specific importance ratings affect relations between perceived competence and self-worth among African American school-age children. Importance ratings have been found to affect the strength of the relationship between perceived competence and self-worth and have implications for…

  11. On the variable timing behavior of PSR B0540-69: an almost excellent example to study the pulsar braking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Fei-Fei; Ou, Zi-Wei; Tong, Hao

    2016-05-01

    PSR B0540-69 has a braking index measurement in its persistent state: n = 2.129 ± 0.012. Recently, it has been reported to have changes in its spin-down state: a sudden 36% increase in the spin-down rate. Combining the persistent state braking index measurement with different spin-down states, PSR B0540-69 is more powerful than intermittent pulsars in constraining pulsar spin-down models. The pulsar wind model is applied to explain the variable timing behavior of PSR B0540-69. The braking index of PSR B0540-69 in its persistent state results from the combined effect of magnetic dipole radiation and particle wind. The particle density reflects the magnetospheric activity in real-time and may be responsible for the changing spin-down behavior. Corresponding to the 36% increase in the spin-down rate of PSR B0540-69, the relative increase in the particle density is 88% in the vacuum gap model. The braking index calculated with the model in the new state is n = 1.79. Future observations that measure the braking index of PSR B0540-69 in the new spin-down state will be very powerful in distinguishing between different pulsar spin-down models and different particle acceleration models in the wind braking scenario. The variable timing behavior of PSR J1846-0258 is also understandable in the pulsar wind model.

  12. Photon dose rates from spent fuel assemblies with relation to self-protection (Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    Photon dose rates as a function of fission product decay times have been calculated for spent fuel assemblies typical of MTR-type research and test reactors. Based upon these dose rates, the length of time that a spent fuel assembly will be self-protecting (dose rate greater than 100 rem/h at 1 m in air) can be estimated knowing the mass of fuel burned, the fraction of fuel burned, and the fuel assembly specific power density.

  13. Differences in Hispanic Access and Success Rates for Health-Related Studies in Texas Health-Related Institutions: A Multiyear, Statewide Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Shelley M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine Hispanic student access and success in health-related degrees by examining enrollment and graduation rates over a period of 13 years. Archival data were obtained from the THECB consisting of the number of Hispanic students enrolled and number of degrees awarded in the health-related degrees at…

  14. A Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing relative sea level: from raw data to rates of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Niamh; Kemp, Andrew C.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Parnell, Andrew C.

    2016-02-01

    We present a Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing the continuous and dynamic evolution of relative sea-level (RSL) change with quantified uncertainty. The reconstruction is produced from biological (foraminifera) and geochemical (δ13C) sea-level indicators preserved in dated cores of salt-marsh sediment. Our model is comprised of three modules: (1) a new Bayesian transfer (B-TF) function for the calibration of biological indicators into tidal elevation, which is flexible enough to formally accommodate additional proxies; (2) an existing chronology developed using the Bchron age-depth model, and (3) an existing Errors-In-Variables integrated Gaussian process (EIV-IGP) model for estimating rates of sea-level change. Our approach is illustrated using a case study of Common Era sea-level variability from New Jersey, USA We develop a new B-TF using foraminifera, with and without the additional (δ13C) proxy and compare our results to those from a widely used weighted-averaging transfer function (WA-TF). The formal incorporation of a second proxy into the B-TF model results in smaller vertical uncertainties and improved accuracy for reconstructed RSL. The vertical uncertainty from the multi-proxy B-TF is ˜ 28 % smaller on average compared to the WA-TF. When evaluated against historic tide-gauge measurements, the multi-proxy B-TF most accurately reconstructs the RSL changes observed in the instrumental record (mean square error = 0.003 m2). The Bayesian hierarchical model provides a single, unifying framework for reconstructing and analyzing sea-level change through time. This approach is suitable for reconstructing other paleoenvironmental variables (e.g., temperature) using biological proxies.

  15. A Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing relative sea level: from raw data to rates of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, N.; Kemp, A. C.; Horton, B. P.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a holistic Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing the continuous and dynamic evolution of relative sea-level (RSL) change with fully quantified uncertainty. The reconstruction is produced from biological (foraminifera) and geochemical (δ13C) sea-level indicators preserved in dated cores of salt-marsh sediment. Our model is comprised of three modules: (1) A Bayesian transfer function for the calibration of foraminifera into tidal elevation, which is flexible enough to formally accommodate additional proxies (in this case bulk-sediment δ13C values), (2) A chronology developed from an existing Bchron age-depth model, and (3) An existing errors-in-variables integrated Gaussian process (EIV-IGP) model for estimating rates of sea-level change. We illustrate our approach using a case study of Common Era sea-level variability from New Jersey. USA We develop a new Bayesian transfer function (B-TF), with and without the δ13C proxy and compare our results to those from a widely-used weighted-averaging transfer function (WA-TF). The formal incorporation of a second proxy into the B-TF model results in smaller vertical uncertainties and improved accuracy for reconstructed RSL. The vertical uncertainty from the multi-proxy B-TF is ∼ 28 % smaller on average compared to the WA-TF. When evaluated against historic tide-gauge measurements, the multi-proxy B-TF most accurately reconstructs the RSL changes observed in the instrumental record (MSE = 0.003 m2). The holistic model provides a single, unifying framework for reconstructing and analysing sea level through time. This approach is suitable for reconstructing other paleoenvironmental variables using biological proxies.

  16. Interannual variability of the atmospheric CO2 growth rate: relative contribution from precipitation and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zeng, N.; Wang, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interannual variability (IAV) in atmospheric CO2 growth rate (CGR) is closely connected with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. However, sensitivities of CGR to temperature and precipitation remain largely uncertain. This paper analyzed the relationship between Mauna Loa CGR and tropical land climatic elements. We find that Mauna Loa CGR lags precipitation by 4 months with a correlation coefficient of -0.63, leads temperature by 1 month (0.77), and correlates with soil moisture (-0.65) with zero lag. Additionally, precipitation and temperature are highly correlated (-0.66), with precipitation leading by 4-5 months. Regression analysis shows that sensitivities of Mauna Loa CGR to temperature and precipitation are 2.92 ± 0.20 Pg C yr-1 K-1 and -0.46 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1 100 mm-1, respectively. Unlike some recent suggestions, these empirical relationships favor neither temperature nor precipitation as the dominant factor of CGR IAV. We further analyzed seven terrestrial carbon cycle models, from the TRENDY project, to study the processes underlying CGR IAV. All models capture well the IAV of tropical land-atmosphere carbon flux (CFTA). Sensitivities of the ensemble mean CFTA to temperature and precipitation are 3.18 ± 0.11 Pg C yr-1 K-1 and -0.67 ± 0.04 Pg C yr-1 100 mm-1, close to Mauna Loa CGR. Importantly, the models consistently show the variability in net primary productivity (NPP) dominates CGR, rather than soil respiration. Because NPP is largely driven by precipitation, this suggests a key role of precipitation in CGR IAV despite the higher CGR correlation with temperature. Understanding the relative contribution of CO2 sensitivity to precipitation and temperature has important implications for future carbon-climate feedback using such "emergent constraint".

  17. Baroreflex sensitivity assessment and heart rate variability: relation to maneuver and technique.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Sosa, S; Gaitán-González, M J; González-Camarena, R; Yáñez-Suárez, Oscar

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, we examined two baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) issues that remain uncertain: the differences among diverse BRS assessment techniques and the association between BRS and vagal outflow. Accordingly, the electrocardiogram and non-invasive arterial pressure were recorded in 27 healthy subjects, during supine with and without controlled breathing, standing, exercise, and recovery conditions. Vagal outflow was estimated by heart rate variability indexes, whereas BRS was computed by alpha-coefficient, transfer function, complex demodulation in low- and high-frequency bands, and by sequence technique. Our results indicated that only supine maneuvers showed significantly greater BRS values over the high frequency than in the low-frequency band. For maneuvers at the same frequency region, supine conditions presented a larger number of significant differences among techniques. The plots between BRS and vagal measures depicted a funnel-shaped relationship with significant log-log correlations (r=0.880-0.958). Very short latencies between systolic pressure and RR interval series in high-frequency band and strong log-log correlations between frequency bands were found. Higher variability among different baroreflex measurements was associated with higher level of vagal outflow. Methodological assumptions for each technique seem affected by non-baroreflex variation sources, and a modified responsiveness of vagal motoneurons due to distinct stimulation levels for each maneuver was suggested. Thus, highest vagal outflows corresponded to greatest BRS values, with maximum respiratory effect for the high-frequency band values. In conclusion, BRS values and differences across the tested techniques were strongly related to the vagal outflow induced by the maneuvers.

  18. Catch rates relative to angler party size with implications for monitoring angler success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Angler catch rates often are used to monitor angler success, assess the need for additional management actions, and evaluate the effectiveness of management practices. Potential linkages between catch rate and angler party size were examined to assess how party size might affect the use of catch rate as an index of angler success in recreational fisheries. Data representing 22,355 completed interviews conducted at access points in lakes and reservoirs throughout Mississippi during 1987-2003 were analyzed. Total party catch was not proportional to total party effort; thus, catch rate decreased as party size increased. Depending on the taxa targeted, the average catch rate per angler decreased 40-50% between parties of one and parties of two, although subsequent decreases were less substantial. Because party size accounted for a considerable portion of the variability in catch rate over time and space, failure to remove this variability weakens the manager's ability to detect differences or changes in catch rates. Therefore, the use of catch rates to monitor fisheries may be inappropriate unless party size is taken into account. Party size may influence the angler's ability to catch fish through a variety of processes, including partitioning a limited number of catchable fish among members of a party and party composition. When catch rates are used to estimate total catch rather than to index angler success, party size is not a concern.

  19. How is the rate of climatic-niche evolution related to climatic-niche breadth?

    PubMed

    Fisher-Reid, M Caitlin; Kozak, Kenneth H; Wiens, John J

    2012-12-01

    The rate of climatic-niche evolution is important to many research areas in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology, including responses of species to global climate change, spread of invasive species, speciation, biogeography, and patterns of species richness. Previous studies have implied that clades with higher rates of climatic-niche evolution among species should have species with narrower niche breadths, but there is also evidence suggesting the opposite pattern. However, the relationships between rate and breadth have not been explicitly analyzed. Here, we examine the relationships between the rate of climatic-niche evolution and climatic-niche breadth using phylogenetic and climatic data for 250 species in the salamander family Plethodontidae, a group showing considerable variation in both rates of climatic-niche evolution and climatic-niche breadths. Contrary to some expectations, we find no general relationship between climatic-niche breadth and the rate of climatic-niche evolution. Climatic-niche breadths for some ecologically important climatic variables considered separately (temperature seasonality and annual precipitation) do show significant relationships with the rate of climatic-niche evolution, but rates are faster in clades in which species have broader (not narrower) niche breadths. In summary, our results show that narrower niche breadths are not necessarily associated with faster rates of niche evolution.

  20. Structure/property relations of aluminum under varying rates and stress states

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Matthew T; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Whittington, Wilburn R; Solanki, Kiran N

    2010-11-19

    In this work we analyze the plasticity, damage, and fracture characteristics of three different processed aluminum alloys (rolled 5083-H13, cast A356-T6, and extruded 6061-T6) under varying stress states (tension, compression, and torsion) and strain rates (0.001/, 1/s., and 1000/s). The stress state difference had more of a flow stress effect than the applied strain rates for those given in this study (0.001/sec up to 1000/sec). The stress state and strain rate also had a profound effect on the damage evolution of each aluminum alloy. Tension and torsional straining gave much greater damage nucleation rates than compression. Although the damage of all three alloys was found to be void nucleation dominated, the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys incurred void damage via micron scale particles where the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy incurred void damage from two scales, micron-scale particles and nanoscale precipitates. Having two length scales of particles that participated in the damage evolution made the 6061-T6 incur a strain rate sensitive damage rate that was different than the other two aluminum alloys. Under tension, as the strain rate increased, the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy's void nucleation rate decreased, but the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys void nucleation rate increased.

  1. Social connections, immigration-related factors, and self-rated physical and mental health among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ta, Van M

    2009-06-01

    Focusing on Asian Americans, this study examines how self-rated physical and mental health depends on the layered social connections (including 4 types: family cohesion, relative support, friend support, and neighborhood cohesion), socioeconomic status, and immigration-related factors (including nativity, length of residence in the U.S., and proficiency of the English language). It draws on the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study, a nationally representative household survey of Latino and Asian Americans. Findings of this study include: (1) there are significant differences in self-rated physical health among Asian Americans of different national origin, but their self-rated physical health differences diminish after indicators of socioeconomic status and immigration-related factors are considered; (2) four types of social connections are all related to the self-rated physical and mental health of Asian Americans, but the patterns of the associations as well as the mechanisms linking the associations vary; and (3) family cohesion has independent and direct effects on both self-rated physical and mental health over and above controls and mediators, whereas the effects of other social connection measures are partially mediated by socioeconomic status and immigration-related factors. In sum, this study indicates the significant effects of social connections, socioeconomic status, and immigration-related factors on the self-rated physical and mental health of Asian Americans.

  2. [Age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Ligulidae) plerocercoids and probability of its usage for the calculation of host death rate].

    PubMed

    Pronin, N M; Pronina, S V

    2014-01-01

    Results of special parasitological dissections of roach samples from catches with the same fishing gear and at the same station (Monakhovo Cove, Chivyrkui Bay of the Lake Baikal) and at the same time in different years (1998-2002) are given. Stability of age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalisis in different years with the maximum of prevalence and mean abundance in fish of 3+ age, and the following sharp decrease in these rates in elder age groups, was revealed. Basing on prevalence decreasing of a single roach generation, the rate of fish mortality during its growth from age group 3+ to 4+ was estimated as 15.9-20.7%.

  3. Assessment of daily profiles of ADHD and ODD symptoms, and symptomatology related to ADHD medication, by parent and teacher ratings.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Dieter; Görtz-Dorten, Anja; Rothenberger, Aribert; Döpfner, Manfred

    2011-10-01

    DAYAS is a new two-part rating scale that assesses: (1) ADHD and ODD symptoms (externalising symptom ratings) and (2) symptomatology potentially related to ADHD medication (potentially medication-related symptoms) in real-world settings at different time periods throughout a normal school day. Data from a proof-of-concept study and two observational trials (Medikinet(®) retard [methylphenidate] and the Equasym XL(®) [methylphenidate] OBSEER study) evaluated: (1) validity of weekly externalising symptom ratings using DAYAS, in place of daily ratings; (2) reliability and internal consistency of DAYAS ratings for externalising symptoms and potentially medication-related symptoms; and (3) convergent and divergent validity of the externalising symptom ratings with existing validated scales. From the proof-of-concept study, daily scores by period of day and during the whole day correlated strongly with equivalent weekly scores (r = 0.83-0.92). Internal consistency of externalising symptom rating scales calculated from pooled data were acceptable or good by period of day (Cronbach's alpha = 0.68-0.90) and very high for whole day scores (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88-0.95). Internal consistency of the rating scale for potentially medication-related symptoms was also good for both teacher and parent ratings. From OBSEER data, correlations between FBB-ADHD total symptom scores and ratings on both parent and teacher versions of DAYAS were high (r = 0.73 and r = 0.84, respectively). Correlations between DAYAS and SDQ were highest for the SDQ subscales hyperactivity and conduct problems and substantially lower for pro-social behaviour, peers and emotional problems. The DAYAS rating scale had good internal consistency, and DAYAS scores correlated well with existing validated scales and the SDQ subscales hyperactivity and conduct problems. Weekly DAYAS scores (whole day and by period of day) could be considered a suitable replacement for daily assessment scores.

  4. Problem Behavior and Heart Rate Reactivity in Adopted Adolescents: Longitudinal and Concurrent Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimmel, Nicole; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie; De Geus, Eco J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined resting heart rate and heart rate variability and reactivity to a stressful gambling task in adopted adolescents with aggressive, delinquent, or internalizing behavior problems and adopted adolescents without behavior problems (total N=151). Early-onset delinquent adolescents showed heart rate…

  5. Understanding the Declining Canadian Homicide Rate: A Test of Holinger's Relative Cohort Size Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenaars, Antoon A.; Lester, David

    2004-01-01

    Homicide rates in Canada have shown a decline since 1975, but there has been little empirical study of this trend. P. Holinger (1987) predicted and confirmed that the size of the cohort aged 15-24 in the United States population was associated with the rise and fall of the homicide rate in that country. This study was designed to test this…

  6. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennie, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Kara; vanDellen, Michelle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding…

  7. Research on Mail Surveys: Response Rates and Methods in Relation to Population Group and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.; Green, Kathy

    The purpose of this review was to look for trends across time in response rates and variables studied for published mail surveys and to compare response rates and variables studied for different target populations. Studies were identified in databases in four fields: education, psychology, business and marketing, and sociology. A total of 225…

  8. Teacher Education Follow-up Surveys: Variables Related to Response Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.

    This study of teacher education graduate follow-up surveys examined the relationship between response rate and number of graduates, questionnaire length, and follow-up contacts. Also, the study investigated survey practices differentiating between surveys which had high and low return rates in such areas as number of follow-up contacts,…

  9. Rate constants and temperature dependences for the reactions of hydroxyl radical with several halogenated methanes, ethanes, and propanes by relative rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants of 15 OH reactions with halogen-substituted alkanes, C1 to C3, were studied using a relative rate technique in the temperature range 283-403 K. Compounds studied were CHF2Cl (22), CHF2Br (22B), CH3F (41), CH2F2 (32), CHF3 (23), CHClFCCl2F (122a), CHCl2CF3 (123), CHClFCF3 (124), CH3CF3 (143a), CH3CH2F (161), CF3CHFCF3 (227ea), CF3CH2CF3 (236fa), CF3CHFCHF2 (236ea), and CHF2CF2CH2F (245ca). Using CH4, CH3CCl3, CF3CF2H, and C2H6 as primary reference standards (JPL 92-20 rate constants), absolute rate constants are derived. Results are in good agreement with previous experimental results for six of the compounds studied, including CHF2Cl, CHF2Br, CH2F2, CH3CF3, CHFClCFCl2, and CF3CHFCF3. For the remainder the relative rate constants are lower than those derived from experiments in which OH loss was used to measure the reaction rate. Comparisons of the derived Arrhenius A factors with previous literature transition-state calculations show order of magnitude agreement in most cases. However, the experimental A factors show a much closer proportionality to the number of H atoms in the molecule than is evident from the transition state calculations. For most of the compounds studied, an A factor of (8 +/- 3)E-13 cm(exp 3)/(molecule s) per C-H bond is observed. A new measurement of the ratio k(CH3CCl3)/k(CH4) is reported that is in good agreement with previous data.

  10. Ratings of managerial skill requirements: comparison of age- and job-related factors.

    PubMed

    Avolio, B J; Waldman, D A

    1989-12-01

    This article examines how individual characteristics (age, experience) and organizational characteristics (department, level) influence the skill requirements rated as being important for managerial jobs. One hundred ninety-seven managerial employees completed a survey composed of 20 skill dimensions pertinent to supervisory positions in the mining industry. Organizational level and departmental affiliation were correlated with job skill importance ratings. Ratings of skill importance were also correlated with the age of the person being rated, years of experience, and the age of the rater. As predicted, correlations with ratee age varied across different skill dimensions. This study has implications for fair employment practices to the degree that raters base evaluations of a job on the age of incumbents vs. job relevant characteristics.

  11. Components of the cannabinoid system in the dorsal periaqueductal gray are related to resting heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Seagard, Jeanne L.; Hopp, Francis A.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether variations in endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) are associated with baseline autonomic nerve activity, heart rate, and blood pressure. Blood pressure was recorded telemetrically in rats, and heart rate and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were determined. Natural variations from animal to animal provided a range of baseline values for analysis. Transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components in the dPAG were analyzed, and endocannabinoid content and catabolic enzyme activity were measured. Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased anandamide content and with decreased activity of the anandamide-hydrolyzing enzyme and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and it was negatively correlated with transcript levels of both FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a catabolic enzyme for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Autonomic tone and heart rate, but not blood pressure, were correlated to levels of FAAH mRNA. In accordance with these data, exogenous anandamide in the dPAG of anesthetized rats increased heart rate. These data indicate that in the dPAG, anandamide, a FAAH-regulated lipid, contributes to regulation of baseline heart rate through influences on autonomic outflow. PMID:27280429

  12. Photon dose rates from spent fuel assemblies with relation to self- protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    Photon dose rates as a function of fission product decay times have been calculated for spent fuel assemblies typical of MTR-type research and test reactors. Based upon these dose rates, the length of time that a spent fuel assembly will be self-protecting (dose rate greater than 100 rem/h at 1 m in air) can be estimated knowing the mass of fuel burned, the fraction of fuel burned, and the fuel assembly specific power density. The calculated dose rates cover 20 years of fission product decay, spent fuel with up to 80% {sup 235}U burnup and assembly power densities ranging from 0.089 to 2.857 MW/kg{sup 235}U. Most of the results are unshielded dose rates at 1 m in air with some shielded dose rates at 40 cm in water. Dose rate sensitivity estimates have been evaluated for a variety of MTR fuel assembly designs and for uncertainties in both the physical and analytical models of the fuel assemblies.

  13. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  14. Correlation of mutagenic assessment of Houston air particulate extracts in relation to lung cancer mortality rates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.D.; Connor, T.H.; MacDonald, E.J.; Trieff, N.M.; Legator, M.S.; MacKenzie, K.W. Jr.; Dobbins, J.G.

    1982-08-01

    Air particulate extracts from a series of solvents were tested in the Ames mutagen detection system and were found to be mutagenic in varying degrees as a function of the particulate collection site in Houston, Texas. The mutagenicity level at seven sites was compared with age-adjusted mortality rates in the same areas. Significant correlation was found with the lung cancer mortality rates but not with mortality rates for other causes. These findings support the hypothesis of a contribution of urban air particulate to the lung cancer rates. Furthermore, these findings suggest that an index of the mutagenicity of air particulate is a more powerful measure of the human health hazard of air pollution than the traditional indices of particulate concentration.

  15. Relation between gastric emptying rate and energy intake in children compared with adults.

    PubMed Central

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Geypens, B J; Hiele, M I; Rutgeerts, P J

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of gastric emptying rate of solids in children is difficult because the available methods are either invasive or induce a substantial radiation burden. In this study the newly developed 13C octanoic acid breath test was used to examine the gastric emptying rate of solids and milk in healthy children and to compare gastric emptying in children and adults. Fifteen healthy children and three groups of nine healthy adults were studied, using three different test meals labelled with 50 mg of 13C octanoic acid: a low caloric pancake (150 kcal), a high caloric pancake (250 kcal), and 210 ml of milk (134 kcal). Breath samples were taken before and at regular intervals after ingestion of the test meal, and analysed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The gastric emptying parameters were derived from the 13CO2 excretion curves by non-linear regression analysis. No significant difference was found between children and adults in the emptying rate of the low caloric solid test meal. In children as well as in adults, increasing the energy content of the solid meal resulted in a significantly slower emptying rate. The milk test meal, however, was emptied at a faster rate in adults and at slower rate in children compared with the low caloric solid test meal. Moreover, the emptying rate of milk in children was significantly slower than in adults. In conclusion, a similar gastric emptying rate of solids but a slower emptying of full cream milk was shown in children of school age compared with adults, using the non-radioactive 13C octanoic acid breath test. PMID:7883214

  16. Heart rate in Palaemon northropi (Rankin) in relation to acute changes in thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, C.J.; Wingard, C.; Kitakis, F. )

    1991-03-15

    The Glass Shrimp (Palaemon northropi), common to shallow water/tide pool environs of Atlantic waters, was examined in a series of experiments whereby the temperature-dependence of steady-state heart rate was assessed after acute, controlled changed in their thermal environment. Collection site, tide pool variations averaged 17.2-31.6C/24 hr. period. Accordingly, steady-state heart rates were determined at 5, 15, 25, and 30C by using both timed, optical recording and impedance methods. Mean values obtained were 88bpm (5C), 181 bpm(15C), 236bpm(25C), and 52bpm(30C). Calculated Q{sub 10} determinations ranged from the limits of 1.3 to 2.1 excluding the highest temperature state used. Specimens used averaged 0.62gm wet body weight, and no significant difference between males and gravid females was found. Additionally, the impedance method employed allowed for more precise rate determinations at high heart rates: at the lower heart rates, there was no difference between optically-timed vs. impedance method. Measurement at 30C characteristically showed a severe depression of heart rate, and high mortality after determinations. It is concluded that in situ field survival of Palaemon northropi may involve a time-dependence and/or other mechanisms whereby upper environmental temperatures may be abated.

  17. The influence of strain rate dependency on the structure-property relations of porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Prabhu, Raj; Liao, Jun; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Williams, Lakiesha N

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the internal microstructure evolution of porcine brain during mechanical deformation. Strain rate dependency of porcine brain was investigated under quasi-static compression for strain rates of 0.00625, 0.025, and 0.10 s(-1). Confocal microscopy was employed at 15, 30, and 40% strain to quantify microstructural changes, and image analysis was implemented to calculate the area fraction of neurons and glial cells. The nonlinear stress-strain behavior exhibited a viscoelastic response from the strain rate sensitivity observed, and image analysis revealed that the mean area fraction of neurons and glial cells increased according to the applied strain level and strain rate. The area fraction for the undamaged state was 7.85 ± 0.07%, but at 40% strain the values were 11.55 ± 0.35%, 13.30 ± 0.28%, and 19.50 ± 0.14% for respective strain rates of 0.00625, 0.025, and 0.10 s(-1). The increased area fractions were a function of the applied strain rate and were attributed to the compaction of neural constituents and the stiffening tissue response. The microstructural variations in the tissue were linked to mechanical properties at progressive levels of compression in order to generate structure-property relationships useful for refining current FE material models.

  18. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie; Renzini, Alvio

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  19. Variation in calcification rate of Acropora downingi relative to seasonal changes in environmental conditions in the northeastern Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajed Samiei, Jahangir; Saleh, Abolfazl; Shirvani, Arash; Sheijooni Fumani, Neda; Hashtroudi, Mehri; Pratchett, Morgan Stuart

    2016-12-01

    There is a strong interest in understanding how coral calcification varies with changing environmental conditions, especially given the projected changes in temperature and aragonite saturation due to climate change. This study explores in situ variation in calcification rates of Acropora downingi in the northeastern Persian Gulf relative to seasonal changes in temperature, irradiance and aragonite saturation state ( Ω arag). Calcification rates of A. downingi were highest in the spring and lowest in the winter, and intra-annual variation in calcification rate was significantly related to temperature ( r 2 = 0.30) and irradiance ( r 2 = 0.36), but not Ω arag ( r 2 = 0.02). Seasonal differences in temperature are obviously confounded by differences in other environmental conditions and vice versa. Therefore, we used published relationships from experimental studies to establish which environmental parameter(s) (temperature, irradiance, and/or Ω arag) placed greatest constraints on calcification rate (relative to the maximum spring rate) in each season. Variation in calcification rates was largely attributable to seasonal changes in irradiance and temperature (possibly 57.4 and 39.7% respectively). Therefore, we predict that ocean warming may lead to increased rates of calcification during winter, but decelerate calcification during spring, fall and especially summer, resulting in net deceleration of calcification for A. downingi in the Persian Gulf.

  20. The forward rate of binding of surface-tethered reactants: effect of relative motion between two surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, K C; Hammer, D A

    1999-01-01

    The reaction of molecules confined to two dimensions is of interest in cell adhesion, specifically for the reaction between cell surface receptors and substrate-bound ligand. We have developed a model to describe the overall rate of reaction of species that are bound to surfaces under relative motion, such that the Peclet number is order one or greater. The encounter rate between reactive species is calculated from solution of the two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation. The probability that each encounter will lead to binding depends on the intrinsic rate of reaction and the encounter duration. The encounter duration is obtained from the theory of first passage times. We find that the binding rate increases with relative velocity between the two surfaces, then reaches a plateau. This plateau indicates that the increase in the encounter rate is counterbalanced by the decrease in the encounter duration as the relative velocity increases. The binding rate is fully described by two dimensionless parameters, the Peclet number and the Damköhler number. We use this model to explain data from the cell adhesion literature by incorporating these rate laws into "adhesive dynamics" simulations to model the binding of a cell to a surface under flow. Leukocytes are known to display a "shear threshold effect" when binding selectin-coated surfaces under shear flow, defined as an increase in bind rate with shear; this effect, as calculated here, is due to an increase in collisions between receptor and ligand with increasing shear. The model can be used to explain other published data on the effect of wall shear rate on the binding of cells to surfaces, specifically the mild decrease in binding within a fixed area with increasing shear rate. PMID:10049312

  1. The Relations Between HSG Proven Tubal Occlusion, Stimulated Intrauterine Insemination and Pregnancy Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yetkin Yıldırım, Gonca; Orta Korkut, Ahu; Köroğlu, Nadiye; Susan Türkgeldi, Lale

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tubal factor infertility is one of the main causes of female infertility. Although its sensitivity is low, hysterosalpingography (HSG) is remains the first-line method for evaluating tubal patency. Aims: To compare pregnancy rates in patients with HSG proven proximal or distal unilateral tubal occlusion, and unexplained infertility undergoing both controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and intrauterine insemination (IUI). Study Design: Case control study. Methods: In total, 237 patients undergoing ovulation induction (OI) with gonadotropins and IUI were divided into two groups and evaluated. Study group consisted 59 patients with HSG proven unilateral tubal pathology, and 178 patients with unexplained infertility taken as control subjects. Cumulative pregnancy rate was the primary endpoint. Results: Cumulative pregnancy rates after three cycles of OI and IUI were 15.25% in study group and 20.79% in control group. Pregnancy rates between two groups were not statistically significant. Although, pregnancy rates in patients with proximal tubal occlusion (21.8%) were higher than in those with distal tubal occlusion (7.4%), the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study data shows that, regardless of the HCG proven occlusion area, COS and IUI might be a preferred treatment modality in patient with unilateral tubal occlusion. PMID:28251025

  2. Effectiveness of traffic-related elements in tree bark and pollen abortion rates for assessing air pollution exposure on respiratory mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Amato-Lourenço, Luís F; Moreira, Tiana C L; Silva, Douglas R Rocha; Vieira, Bruna D; Mauad, Thais; Saiki, Mitiko; Saldiva, Paulo H Nascimento

    2017-02-01

    The majority of epidemiological studies correlate the cardiorespiratory effects of air pollution exposure by considering the concentrations of pollutants measured from conventional monitoring networks. The conventional air quality monitoring methods are expensive, and their data are insufficient for providing good spatial resolution. We hypothesized that bioassays using plants could effectively determine pollutant gradients, thus helping to assess the risks associated with air pollution exposure. The study regions were determined from different prevalent respiratory death distributions in the Sao Paulo municipality. Samples of tree flower buds were collected from twelve sites in four regional districts. The genotoxic effects caused by air pollution were tested through a pollen abortion bioassay. Elements derived from vehicular traffic that accumulated in tree barks were determined using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Mortality data were collected from the mortality information program of Sao Paulo City. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the concentrations of elements accumulated in tree barks. Pearson correlation and exponential regression were performed considering the elements, pollen abortion rates and mortality data. PCA identified five factors, of which four represented elements related to vehicular traffic. The elements Al, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn showed a strong correlation with mortality rates (R(2)>0.87) and pollen abortion rates (R(2)>0.82). These results demonstrate that tree barks and pollen abortion rates allow for correlations between vehicular traffic emissions and associated outcomes such as genotoxic effects and mortality data.

  3. Age-related disappearance of Mayer-like heart rate waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarisch, W. R.; Ferguson, J. J.; Shannon, R. P.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of age on the principal spectral components of heart rate obtained immediately after passive upright tilt was investigated in human subjects who underwent a 60-deg tilt over 9 sec. Two groups were examined, the first of which consisting of healthy male subjects aged 22-26 years, while the second was comprised of subjects aged 65-84 years on no medication; radiograms were recorded continuously beginning just prior to tilt until 3 min posttilt. The results of spectral analysis showed that elderly subjects did not exhibit the Mayer-like heart rate waves (the 0.07-0.09 Hz oscillations) that were present in the spectra of young subjects immediately after passive upright tilt. The findings are consistent with the concept of a 'dysautonomia of aging'. It is suggested that postural stress testing with spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations may provide a useful way of assessing physiologic vs chronologic age.

  4. Relation between the location of elements in the periodic table and various organ-uptake rates.

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Ando, I; Hiraki, T; Hisada, K

    1989-01-01

    Fifty four elements and 65 radioactive compounds were examined to determine the organ uptake rates for rats 3, 24 and 48 h after i.v. injection of these compounds. They were prepared as carrier free nuclides, or containing a small amount of stable nuclide. Generally speaking, behaviors of K, Rb, Cs and Tl in all the organs were very similar to one another, but they differed from that of Na. Bivalent hard acids were avidly taken up into bone; therefore, uptake rates in soft tissues were very small. Hard acids of tri-, quadri- and pentavalence which were taken up into the soft tissue organs decreased more slowly from these organs than other ions. Soft acids such as Hg2+ were bound very firmly to the component in the kidney. Anions (with few exceptions), GeCl4 and SbCl3 were rapidly excreted in urine, so that the uptake rates in organs were low.

  5. The Influence of Relatives on the Efficiency and Error Rate of Familial Searching

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Murphy, Erin; Song, Yun S.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of adopting the criteria used by the state of California, as described by Myers et al. (2011), for conducting familial searches. We carried out a simulation study of randomly generated profiles of related and unrelated individuals with 13-locus CODIS genotypes and YFiler® Y-chromosome haplotypes, on which the Myers protocol for relative identification was carried out. For Y-chromosome sharing first degree relatives, the Myers protocol has a high probability () of identifying their relationship. For unrelated individuals, there is a low probability that an unrelated person in the database will be identified as a first-degree relative. For more distant Y-haplotype sharing relatives (half-siblings, first cousins, half-first cousins or second cousins) there is a substantial probability that the more distant relative will be incorrectly identified as a first-degree relative. For example, there is a probability that a first cousin will be identified as a full sibling, with the probability depending on the population background. Although the California familial search policy is likely to identify a first degree relative if his profile is in the database, and it poses little risk of falsely identifying an unrelated individual in a database as a first-degree relative, there is a substantial risk of falsely identifying a more distant Y-haplotype sharing relative in the database as a first-degree relative, with the consequence that their immediate family may become the target for further investigation. This risk falls disproportionately on those ethnic groups that are currently overrepresented in state and federal databases. PMID:23967076

  6. The Effects of a Local Negative Feedback Function between Choice and Relative Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas; Marr, M. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Four pigeons were trained on two-key concurrent variable-interval schedules with no changeover delay. In Phase 1, relative reinforcers on the two alternatives were varied over five conditions from 0.1 to 0.9. In Phases 2 and 3, we instituted a molar feedback function between relative choice in an interreinforcer interval and the probability of…

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes related to daughter pregnancy rate in Holstein cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT: Previously, a candidate gene approach identified 40 SNPs associated with daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) in dairy bulls. We evaluated 39 of these SNPs for relationship to DPR in a separate population of Holstein cows grouped on their predicted transmitting ability for DPR: <= -1 (n=1266) a...

  8. Relative Reaction Rates of Sulfamic Acid and Hydroxylamine with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes a study of comparative reaction rates where the reductant is in excess, as in the 1B bank in the Purex process. The results of this work apply to planned plant tests to partially substitute HAN for the ferrous sulfamate reductant in the Purex 1B bank.

  9. Age-Adjustment and Related Epidemiology Rates in Education and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, John D.; Kruckman, Laurence; George, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    A quick review of introductory textbooks reveals that while gerontology authors and instructors introduce some aspect of demography and epidemiology data, there is limited focus on age adjustment or other important epidemiology rates. The goal of this paper is to reintroduce a variety of basic epidemiology strategies such as incidence, prevalence,…

  10. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity:…

  11. RN Students' Ratings and Opinions Related to the Importance of Certain Clinical Teacher Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viverais-Dresler, Gloria; Kutschke, Myrtle

    2001-01-01

    Registered nurses in a bachelor's degree program (n=56) rated the following as important clinical teacher behaviors: evaluation, professional competence, interpersonal relationship, and teaching ability. They valued teachers who were approachable, fair, open, and honest and who fostered mutual respect. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  12. Age of Entrance Into the First Grade as Related to Rate of Scholastic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilika, Joseph

    The influence of age of entrance to first grade on subsequent rate of scholastic development was tested in this longitudinal investigation. Forty-one pairs of boys and forty-nine pairs of girls, matched according to sex, intelligence, and socioeconomic status, were subjects. The mean chronological age of late entrants was 81 months, opposed to 72…

  13. Relative Reinforcer Rates and Magnitudes Do Not Control Concurrent Choice Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliffe, Douglas; Davison, Michael; Landon, Jason

    2008-01-01

    One assumption of the matching approach to choice is that different independent variables control choice independently of each other. We tested this assumption for reinforcer rate and magnitude in an extensive parametric experiment. Five pigeons responded for food reinforcement on switching-key concurrent variable-interval variable-interval…

  14. RELATIVE RATE CONSTANTS OF CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE LIST PESTICIDES WITH HYDROXYL RADICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to establish the rate constants for the reactions of selected pesticides listed on the US EPA Contaminant Candidate List, with UV and hydroxyl radicals (·OH). Batch experiments were conducted in phosphate buffered solution at pH 7. All pestici...

  15. Relation between the location of elements in the periodic table and tumor-uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Ando, I; Hiraki, T; Hisada, K

    1985-01-01

    The bipositive ions and anions, with few exceptions, indicated a low tumor uptake rate. On the other hand, compounds of Hg, Au and Bi, which have a strong binding power to protein, showed a high tumor uptake rate. As Hg2+, Au+ and Bi3+ are soft acids according to the classification of Lewis acids, it was thought that these ions would bind strongly to soft bases (R-SH, R-S-) present in tumor tissue. For many hard acids such as 85Sr2+, 67Ga3+, 181Hf4+, and 95Nb5+, tumor uptake rates are shown as a function of ionic potentials (valency/ionic radii) of the metal ions. Considering the present data and previously reported results, it was presumed that hard acids of trivalence, quadrivalence and pentavalence would replace calcium in the calcium salts of hard bases (calcium salts of acid mucopolysaccharides, etc.). Ionic potentials of alkaline metals and Tl were small, but the tumor-uptake rate of these elements indicated various values. As Ge and Sb are bound by covalent bonds to chloride, GeCl4 and SbCl3 behaved differently from many metallic compounds in tumor tissue.

  16. Self- Versus Parent-Ratings of Industriousness, Affect, and Life Satisfaction in Relation to Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Gerard J.; Davies, Janet E.; MacCann, Carolyn; Roberts, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents consult with schools on how to help their children succeed, but schools rarely consult with parents, even though most parents have considerable expertise concerning their children's thoughts, feelings, and abilities. Aims: This study compares the prediction of academic achievement from self- and parent-ratings of feelings…

  17. Parasite infection rates of impala (Aepyceros melampus) in fenced game reserves in relation to reserve characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.

    2004-01-01

    Under certain conditions reserves can pose a threat to wildlife conservation by increasing the transmission of parasites and pathogens. In this study, I investigated associations between reserve characteristics including area, density and species richness and parasite infection rates in impala (Aepyceros melampus). Using coprological methods to measure gastrointestinal parasitism rates of impala inhabiting five fully or partially fenced game reserves in central Kenya, I found that bovid species richness was correlated with parasite taxa richness across reserves, and that prevalence rates of multi-host strongyle nematodes were higher in reserves with more species. In addition, reserve size was also implicated as a potential predictor of infection risk. Overall, these results suggest that wildlife inhabiting highly diverse and small reserves may suffer from higher than normal rates of infection. Given the potential debilitating effects increases in parasitism can have on wildlife, these results underscore the importance of considering parasite transmission dynamics in the management of small, fenced protected areas. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  19. Germination rate of Phyllospadix japonicus seeds relative to storage methods and periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Im; Lee, Kun-Seop; Son, Min Ho

    2014-03-01

    To determine the optimal storage method and longest possible storage period of Phyllospadix japonicus seeds, we examined post-storage germination rates using different storage methods and periods for P. japonicus seeds harvested in Korean coastal waters. P. japonicus seeds are classified as recalcitrant seeds with an average moisture content of 45.4%. Germination rates of P. japonicus seeds stored in seawater at 4 °C, seawater at room temperature with air supply, and an aquarium with continuous seawater circulation ranged from 35.0% to 43.5%, whereas seeds stored in seawater at 30°C, a refrigerator at -20°C, and a desiccator at room temperature did not germinate. Seeds stored at 4°C maintained germination rates of 72.5˜73.0% until 30 days of storage, but showed rapidly decreasing germination rates after 60 days and no germination after 180 days. Since few studies have investigated seed storage of P. japonicus, these results will serve as useful data for seed-based P. japonicus habitat restoration.

  20. Signs of oral dryness in relation to salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity and dry mouth complaints

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Najat MA

    2007-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the signs of oral dryness in relation to different salivary variables and to correlate subjective complaints of oral dryness with salivary flow rate. Methods 312 unmedicated healthy individuals belonging to three age groups, (6–11, 12–17, and 18–40 years) were examined clinically for signs of oral dryness. Resting and stimulated saliva were collected to determine flow rate, pH and buffering capacity. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on subjective sensation of dry mouth. Results Dry lip and dry mucosa were present in 37.5% and 3.2% of the sample respectively. The proportion of subjects who complained of oral dryness (19%) showed a stimulated salivary flow rate significantly lower than non complainers. Dry lip was significantly related to low resting flow rate but pH and buffering capacity did not show any significant relation to dry lip. Dry mucosa was not related to any of the above mentioned parameters. Conclusion The finding that the stimulated salivary flow rate was reduced in subjects complaining of dry mouth is of great clinical relevance, since the reduction is expected to be reflected in compromising various salivary functions. PMID:17996105

  1. Spin-Down of the North Atlantic Subpolar Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.; Rhines, P. B.

    2004-01-01

    Dramatic changes have occurred in the mid-to-high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean as evidenced by TOPEX/Poseidon observations of sea surface height (SSH) in the subpolar gyre and the Gulf Stream. Analysis of altimeter data shows that subpolar SSH has increased during the 1990s and the geostrophic velocity derived from altimeter data shows a decline in the gyre circulation. Direct current-meter observations in the boundary current of the Labrador Sea support the trend in the 199Os, and, together with hydrographic data show that in the mid-late 1990s the trend extends deep in the water column. We find that buoyancy forcing over the northern North Atlantic has a dynamic effect consistent with the altimeter data and hydrographic observations: a weak thermohaline forcing and the subsequent decay of the domed structure of the subpolar isopycnals would give rise to the observed anticyclonic circulation trend.

  2. Spin-down of radio millisecond pulsars at genesis.

    PubMed

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2012-02-03

    Millisecond pulsars are old neutron stars that have been spun up to high rotational frequencies via accretion of mass from a binary companion star. An important issue for understanding the physics of the early spin evolution of millisecond pulsars is the impact of the expanding magnetosphere during the terminal stages of the mass-transfer process. Here, I report binary stellar evolution calculations that show that the braking torque acting on a neutron star, when the companion star decouples from its Roche lobe, is able to dissipate >50% of the rotational energy of the pulsar. This effect may explain the apparent difference in observed spin distributions between x-ray and radio millisecond pulsars and help account for the noticeable age discrepancy with their young white dwarf companions.

  3. Spin-Down of Radio Millisecond Pulsars at Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauris, Thomas M.

    2012-02-01

    Millisecond pulsars are old neutron stars that have been spun up to high rotational frequencies via accretion of mass from a binary companion star. An important issue for understanding the physics of the early spin evolution of millisecond pulsars is the impact of the expanding magnetosphere during the terminal stages of the mass-transfer process. Here, I report binary stellar evolution calculations that show that the braking torque acting on a neutron star, when the companion star decouples from its Roche lobe, is able to dissipate >50% of the rotational energy of the pulsar. This effect may explain the apparent difference in observed spin distributions between x-ray and radio millisecond pulsars and help account for the noticeable age discrepancy with their young white dwarf companions.

  4. The spin down of the radio pulsars: Braking index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Gurevich, A. V.; Istomin, Ya. N.

    1991-01-01

    Presently, the value of the retardation dP/dt is well known for most radio pulsars. It is negative for all cases except one and is of the order of 10(exp -15). That single case is when the pulsar, which is located in the star globular system, can have a considerable acceleration leading to the opposite sign of P'= dP/dt due to the Doppler effect. Careful measurements of the period, P, also allow one to determine the variation of this retardation with the course of time- P'' = d(exp 2)P/dt(exp 2). The results of these measurements are usually represented in the form of the dimensionless retardation index n = omega'' omega/omega(exp 2)= 2 - P''P/P(exp 2) (omega is the angular velocity). The data for 21 pulsars are given. The parameter, n, is strongly undetermined both in value and sign in all cases except for four pulsars. Changes of the rotation period, P, and the inclination angle, chi, the angle between the axes of rotation and the magnetic moment are caused by two processes: the regular retardation and nutation due to deviation from the strict spherical shape of the neutron star. Losses which are caused by the currents flowing in the magnetosphere of the neutron star and by being closed on the star surface are considered. Such losses are critical for the neutron star magnetosphere which is full of dense plasma. Since the radio emission is generated in the dense plasma of the polar magnetosphere, then practically all radio pulsars are retarded by the current mechanism. The formula for the braking index is presented along with other aspects of the investigation.

  5. Situational bandwidth and the criterion-related validity of assessment center ratings: is cross-exercise convergence always desirable?

    PubMed

    Speer, Andrew B; Christiansen, Neil D; Goffin, Richard D; Goff, Maynard

    2014-03-01

    This research examines the relationship between the construct and criterion-related validity of assessment centers (ACs) based on how convergence of dimension ratings across AC exercises affects their ability to predict managerial performance. According to traditional multitrait-multimethod perspective, a high degree of convergence represents more reliable measurement and has the potential for better validity. In contrast, the concept of situational bandwidth suggests that behavior assessed under a dissimilar set of circumstances should result in a more comprehensive assessment of a candidate's tendencies even though ratings are less likely to show high convergence. To test these opposing viewpoints, data from 3 operational ACs were obtained along with experts' evaluations of exercise characteristics and supervisors' ratings of candidates' managerial performance. Across the 3 samples, AC ratings taken from exercises with dissimilar demands had higher estimates of criterion-related validity than ratings taken from similar exercises, even though the same dimension-different exercise correlations were substantially higher between similar exercises. Composites of ratings high in convergence did not emerge as better predictors of managerial performance, and validity particularly suffered when derived from ratings that converged as a result of exercises with similar demands. Implications for AC design are discussed.

  6. Relations between response trajectories on the continuous performance test and teacher-rated problem behaviors in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Allan, Darcey M; Lonigan, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    Although both the continuous performance test (CPT) and behavior rating scales are used in both practice and research to assess inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors, the correlations between performance on the CPT and teachers' ratings are typically only small-to-moderate. This study examined trajectories of performance on a low target-frequency visual CPT in a sample of preschool children and how these trajectories were associated with teacher-ratings of problem behaviors (i.e., inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity [H/I], and oppositional/defiant behavior). Participants included 399 preschool children (mean age = 56 months; 49.4% female; 73.7% White/Caucasian). An attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale was completed by teachers, and the CPT was completed by the preschoolers. Results showed that children's performance across 4 temporal blocks on the CPT was not stable across the duration of the task, with error rates generally increasing from initial to later blocks. The predictive relations of teacher-rated problem behaviors to performance trajectories on the CPT were examined using growth curve models. Higher rates of teacher-reported inattention and H/I were uniquely associated with higher rates of initial omission errors and initial commission errors, respectively. Higher rates of teacher-reported overall problem behaviors were associated with increasing rates of omission but not commission errors during the CPT; however, the relation was not specific to 1 type of problem behavior. The results of this study indicate that the pattern of errors on the CPT in preschool samples is complex and may be determined by multiple behavioral factors. These findings have implications for the interpretation of CPT performance in young children.

  7. Relations between Response Trajectories on the Continuous Performance Test and Teacher-Rated Problem Behaviors in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Darcey M.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Although both the Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and behavior rating scales are used in both practice and research to assess inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors, the correlations between performance on the CPT and teachers' ratings are typically only small-to-moderate. This study examined trajectories of performance on a low target-frequency visual CPT in a sample of preschool children and how these trajectories were associated with teacher-ratings of problem behaviors (i.e., inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity [H/I], and oppositional/defiant behavior). Participants included 399 preschool children (Mean age = 56 months; 49.4% female; 73.7% White/Caucasian). An ADHD-rating scale was completed by teachers, and the CPT was completed by the preschoolers. Results showed that children's performance across four temporal blocks on the CPT was not stable across the duration of the task, with error rates generally increasing from initial to later blocks. The predictive relations of teacher-rated problem behaviors to performance trajectories on the CPT were examined using growth curve models. Higher rates of teacher-reported inattention and H/I were uniquely associated with higher rates of initial omission errors and initial commission errors, respectively. Higher rates of teacher-reported overall problem behaviors were associated with increasing rates of omission but not commission errors during the CPT; however, the relation was not specific to one type of problem behavior. The results of this study indicate that the pattern of errors on the CPT in preschool samples is complex and may be determined by multiple behavioral factors. These findings have implications for the interpretation of CPT performance in young children. PMID:25419645

  8. Spike synchronization and firing rate in a population of motor cortical neurons in relation to movement direction and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Grammont, F; Riehle, A

    2003-05-01

    We studied the dynamics of precise spike synchronization and rate modulation in a population of neurons recorded in monkey motor cortex during performance of a delayed multidirectional pointing task and determined their relation to behavior. We showed that at the population level neurons coherently synchronized their activity at various moments during the trial in relation to relevant task events. The comparison of the time course of the modulation of synchronous activity with that of the firing rate of the same neurons revealed a considerable difference. Indeed, when synchronous activity was highest, at the end of the preparatory period, firing rate was low, and, conversely, when the firing rate was highest, at movement onset, synchronous activity was almost absent. There was a clear tendency for synchrony to precede firing rate, suggesting that the coherent activation of cell assemblies may trigger the increase in firing rate in large groups of neurons, although it appeared that there was no simple parallel shifting in time of these two activity measures. Interestingly, there was a systematic relationship between the amount of significant synchronous activity within the population of neurons and movement direction at the end of the preparatory period. Furthermore, about 400 ms later, at movement onset, the mean firing rate of the same population was also significantly tuned to movement direction, having roughly the same preferred direction as synchronous activity. Finally, reaction time measurements revealed a directional preference of the monkey with, once again, the same preferred direction as synchronous activity and firing rate. These results lead us to speculate that synchronous activity and firing rate are cooperative neuronal processes and that the directional matching of our three measures--firing rate, synchronicity, and reaction times--might be an effect of behaviorally induced network cooperativity acquired during learning.

  9. Relation of rate of urine production to oxygen tension in small-for-gestational-age fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, K H; Peters, M T; Vyas, S; Rabinowitz, R; Rosen, D J; Campbell, S

    1990-02-01

    Hourly fetal urine production rate was determined by real-time ultrasonography immediately before cordocentesis for blood gas analysis in 27 small-for-gestational-age fetuses at 20 to 37 weeks' gestation; in 14 cases there was associated oligohydramnios. The values were compared with those of 101 appropriate-for-gestational-age fetuses. The hourly fetal urine production rate was significantly lower in the small-for-gestational-age fetuses than in the appropriate-for-gestational-age fetuses. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the degree of decrease in urine production and both the degree of fetal hypoxemia and the degree of fetal smallness. There was no significant difference between the oligohydramnios and nonoligohydramnios groups in either the degree of decrease in urine production or the degree of fetal hypoxemia.

  10. Simple model relating recombination rates and non-proportional light yield in scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Bizarri, Gregory; Singh, Jai; Vasil'ev, Andrey N.; Williams, Richard T.

    2008-09-24

    We present a phenomenological approach to derive an approximate expression for the local light yield along a track as a function of the rate constants of different kinetic orders of radiative and quenching processes for excitons and electron-hole pairs excited by an incident {gamma}-ray in a scintillating crystal. For excitons, the radiative and quenching processes considered are linear and binary, and for electron-hole pairs a ternary (Auger type) quenching process is also taken into account. The local light yield (Y{sub L}) in photons per MeV is plotted as a function of the deposited energy, -dE/dx (keV/cm) at any point x along the track length. This model formulation achieves a certain simplicity by using two coupled rate equations. We discuss the approximations that are involved. There are a sufficient number of parameters in this model to fit local light yield profiles needed for qualitative comparison with experiment.

  11. Possible relation of suicide rates of elderly with societal crime: a cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajit

    2008-02-01

    There are few studies examining the relationship between elderly suicides and societal crime. Therefore, a cross-national study examining the relationship between suicide rates of elderly persons and the percentage of the population victimised by different categories of crime was undertaken by using cross-national data from the World Health Organisation and United Nations databases. The main finding was a negative correlation between suicide rates in elderly men age 75+ years and women in both the elderly age-bands with the percentage of the population victimised by the crime of robbery. The findings were at variance with the study's hypothesis and may be explained by several factors, including methodological issues. Individual-level case-control or cohort studies of suicides and attempted suicides by elderly persons are suggested to examine the relationship of suicides by elderly and experience of being victimised by crime.

  12. Understanding and producing the reduced relative construction: Evidence from ratings, editing and corpora

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Mary; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; McRae, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Tworating studies demonstrate that English speakers willingly produce reduced relatives with internal cause verbs (e.g., Whisky fermented in oak barrels can have a woody taste), and judge their acceptability based on factors known to influence ambiguity resolution, rather than on the internal/external cause distinction. Regression analyses demonstrate that frequency of passive usage predicts reduced relative frequency in corpora, but internal/external cause status does not. The authors conclude that reduced relatives with internal cause verbs are rare because few of these verbs occur in the passive. This contrasts with the claim in McKoon and Ratcliff (McKoon, G., & Ratcliff, R. (2003). Meaning through syntax: Language comprehension and the reduced relative clause construction. Psychological Review, 110, 490–525) that reduced relatives like The horse raced past the barn fell are rare and, when they occur, incomprehensible, because the meaning of the reduced relative construction prohibits the use of a verb with an internal cause event template. PMID:22162904

  13. Rates and Mechanisms of Complexation Reactions of Cations with Crown Ethers and Related Macrocycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-23

    as stability constants and entropies of solvation t, be of paramount importance. Complexation rate constants alone seldom disclose a great deal more...sample equilibrium to assure detectability of the reaction. Disadvantages include 1) the need for high solute concentrations in order to detect small...ultrasonic techniques. In principle, the stability constants of macrocycles complexing various cations can be deduced from the amplitudes of the experimental

  14. Simulation of Rate-Related (Dead-Time) Losses In Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.G.; Norman, P.I.; Leadbeater, T.W.; Croft, S.; Philips, S.

    2008-07-01

    Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting (PNMC) based on Multiplicity Shift Register (MSR) electronics (a form of time correlation analysis) is a widely used non-destructive assay technique for quantifying spontaneously fissile materials such as Pu. At high event rates, dead-time losses perturb the count rates with the Singles, Doubles and Triples being increasingly affected. Without correction these perturbations are a major source of inaccuracy in the measured count rates and assay values derived from them. This paper presents the simulation of dead-time losses and investigates the effect of applying different dead-time models on the observed MSR data. Monte Carlo methods have been used to simulate neutron pulse trains for a variety of source intensities and with ideal detection geometry, providing an event by event record of the time distribution of neutron captures within the detection system. The action of the MSR electronics was modelled in software to analyse these pulse trains. Stored pulse trains were perturbed in software to apply the effects of dead-time according to the chosen physical process; for example, the ideal paralysable (extending) and non-paralysable models with an arbitrary dead-time parameter. Results of the simulations demonstrate the change in the observed MSR data when the system dead-time parameter is varied. In addition, the paralysable and non-paralysable models of deadtime are compared. These results form part of a larger study to evaluate existing dead-time corrections and to extend their application to correlated sources. (authors)

  15. Correlation between relative growth rate and specific leaf area requires associations of specific leaf area with nitrogen absorption rate of roots.

    PubMed

    Osone, Yoko; Ishida, Atsushi; Tateno, Masaki

    2008-07-01

    Close correlations between specific leaf area (SLA) and relative growth rate (RGR) have been reported in many studies. However, theoretically, SLA by itself has small net positive effect on RGR because any increase in SLA inevitably causes a decrease in area-based leaf nitrogen concentration (LNCa), another RGR component. It was hypothesized that, for a correlation between SLA and RGR, SLA needs to be associated with specific nitrogen absorption rate of roots (SAR), which counteracts the negative effect of SLA on LNCa. Five trees and six herbs were grown under optimal conditions and relationships between SAR and RGR components were analyzed using a model based on balanced growth hypothesis. SLA varied 1.9-fold between species. Simulations predicted that, if SAR is not associated with SLA, this variation in SLA would cause a47% decrease in LNCa along the SLA gradient, leading to a marginal net positive effect on RGR. In reality, SAR was positively related to SLA, showing a 3.9-fold variation, which largely compensated for the negative effect of SLA on LNCa. Consequently, LNCa values were almost constant across species and a positive SLA-RGR relationship was achieved. These results highlight the importance of leaf-root interactions in understanding interspecific differences in RGR.

  16. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Electromagnetic waves arise in many areas of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. Aims: We numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Methods: Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited for such artificial singularities that are related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object rotates like a star, for example, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study, such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. Results: To study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity and quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we computed the spin-down luminosity expected for these stars and compared it to the classical or non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical results. Conclusions: Quantum electrodynamics leads to an irrelevant change in the spin-down luminosity even for a magnetic field of about the critical value of 4.4 × 109 T. Therefore the braking index remains close to its value for a point dipole in vacuum, namely n = 3. The same conclusion holds for a general-relativistic quantum electrodynamically corrected force-free magnetosphere.

  17. Ascidian Mitogenomics: Comparison of Evolutionary Rates in Closely Related Taxa Provides Evidence of Ongoing Speciation Events

    PubMed Central

    Griggio, Francesca; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Iannelli, Fabio; Justy, Fabienne; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Xavier, Turon; Pesole, Graziano; Douzery, Emmanuel J.P.; Mastrototaro, Francesco; Gissi, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ascidians are a fascinating group of filter-feeding marine chordates characterized by rapid evolution of both sequences and structure of their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Moreover, they include several model organisms used to investigate complex biological processes in chordates. To study the evolutionary dynamics of ascidians at short phylogenetic distances, we sequenced 13 new mitogenomes and analyzed them, together with 15 other available mitogenomes, using a novel approach involving detailed whole-mitogenome comparisons of conspecific and congeneric pairs. The evolutionary rate was quite homogeneous at both intraspecific and congeneric level, and the lowest congeneric rates were found in cryptic (morphologically undistinguishable) and in morphologically very similar species pairs. Moreover, congeneric nonsynonymous rates (dN) were up to two orders of magnitude higher than in intraspecies pairs. Overall, a clear-cut gap sets apart conspecific from congeneric pairs. These evolutionary peculiarities allowed easily identifying an extraordinary intraspecific variability in the model ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, where most pairs show a dN value between that observed at intraspecies and congeneric level, yet consistently lower than that of the Ciona intestinalis cryptic species pair. These data suggest ongoing speciation events producing genetically distinct B. schlosseri entities. Remarkably, these ongoing speciation events were undetectable by the cox1 barcode fragment, demonstrating that, at low phylogenetic distances, the whole mitogenome has a higher resolving power than cox1. Our study shows that whole-mitogenome comparative analyses, performed on a suitable sample of congeneric and intraspecies pairs, may allow detecting not only cryptic species but also ongoing speciation events. PMID:24572017

  18. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2.

  19. Soil bacterial and fungal community dynamics in relation to Panax notoginseng death rate in a continuous cropping system

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Linlin; Xu, Jiang; Feng, Guangquan; Li, Xiwen; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Notoginseng (Panax notoginseng), a valuable herbal medicine, has high death rates in continuous cropping systems. Variation in the soil microbial community is considered the primary cause of notoginseng mortality, although the taxa responsible for crop failure remains unidentified. This study used high-throughput sequencing methods to characterize changes in the microbial community and screen microbial taxa related to the death rate. Fungal diversity significantly decreased in soils cropped with notoginseng for three years. The death rate and the fungal diversity were significantly negatively correlated, suggesting that fungal diversity might be a potential bioindicator of soil health. Positive correlation coefficients revealed that Burkholderiales, Syntrophobacteraceae, Myrmecridium, Phaeosphaeria, Fusarium, and Phoma were better adapted to colonization of diseased plants. The relative abundance of Fusarium oxysporum (R = 0.841, P < 0.05) and Phaeosphaeria rousseliana (R = 0.830, P < 0.05) were positively associated with the death rate. F. oxysporum was a pathogen of notoginseng root-rot that caused seedling death. Negative correlation coefficients indicated that Thermogemmatisporaceae, Actinosynnemataceae, Hydnodontaceae, Herpotrichiellaceae, and Coniosporium might be antagonists of pathogens, and the relative abundance of Coniosporium perforans was negatively correlated with the death rate. Our findings provide a dynamic overview of the microbial community and present a clear scope for screening beneficial microbes and pathogens of notoginseng. PMID:27549984

  20. Examining the relation between ratings of executive functioning and academic achievement: findings from a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Lisa B; Veleiro, Alberto; Siu, Angela F Y; Mohammadi, Hiwa

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relation between academic performance and ratings of executive functioning in children aged 6-11 from four countries: Sweden, Spain, Iran, and China. Ratings of executive functioning were made by both parents and teachers using the Childhood Executive Functioning Inventory (CHEXI). The results showed that the Chinese sample was generally rated as having more executive deficits compared to the other samples. The finding that executive functioning deficits are exacerbated in China is most likely the result of cultural biases. Boys were generally rated as having poorer executive functioning compared to girls, except in Iran where parents, but not teachers, rated girls as having poorer executive functioning compared to boys. However, this opposite pattern of results found for Iran is not likely to reflect true gender differences in executive functioning. Despite some differences in the levels of executive functioning across countries, both the inhibition and working memory subscales of the CHEXI were related to academic achievement in all four countries, except for CHEXI parent ratings in China. Altogether, the results indicate that the CHEXI may be used as a screening measure for early academic difficulties, although cultural biases clearly have to be taken into consideration.

  1. The Power of Implicit Social Relation in Rating Prediction of Social Recommender Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reafee, Waleed; Salim, Naomie; Khan, Atif

    2016-01-01

    The explosive growth of social networks in recent times has presented a powerful source of information to be utilized as an extra source for assisting in the social recommendation problems. The social recommendation methods that are based on probabilistic matrix factorization improved the recommendation accuracy and partly solved the cold-start and data sparsity problems. However, these methods only exploited the explicit social relations and almost completely ignored the implicit social relations. In this article, we firstly propose an algorithm to extract the implicit relation in the undirected graphs of social networks by exploiting the link prediction techniques. Furthermore, we propose a new probabilistic matrix factorization method to alleviate the data sparsity problem through incorporating explicit friendship and implicit friendship. We evaluate our proposed approach on two real datasets, Last.Fm and Douban. The experimental results show that our method performs much better than the state-of-the-art approaches, which indicates the importance of incorporating implicit social relations in the recommendation process to address the poor prediction accuracy. PMID:27152663

  2. Fulfilling the Promise of Early Intervention: Factors Related to Rates of Delivered IFSP Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanek, Thomas T.

    2001-01-01

    This response to an article evaluating Indiana's early intervention service delivery (EC 628 669) identifies implications of the study including: service intensity is relatively light; service location and context and the process of Individualized Family Service Plan formulation should be examined; implementation should be treated as an…

  3. Teacher Ratings of the Achievement-Related Classroom Behaviors of Maltreated and Non-maltreated Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyome, Nancy Dodge

    1994-01-01

    Study investigated ways maltreated children (MC) differ from nonmaltreated children in regard to achievement-related classroom behaviors. MC exhibited less classroom behavior positively linked with academic achievement than did nonmaltreated public assistance children (PAC). MC, though, paralleled PAC in most behaviors negatively linked with…

  4. Automated Semantic Indices Related to Cognitive Function and Rate of Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakhomov, Serguei V. S.; Hemmy, Laura S.; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study is to introduce a fully automated, computational linguistic technique to quantify semantic relations between words generated on a standard semantic verbal fluency test and to determine its cognitive and clinical correlates. Cognitive differences between patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are…

  5. Facial and Full-Length Ratings of Attractiveness Related to the Social Interactions of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory J.

    1985-01-01

    Aggressive and prosocial peer interactions were observed in 38 preschool-age children. Attractive girls received more prosocial and fewer aggressive advances than unattractive girls. There was no differential treatment of boys related to attractiveness. Results are discussed in relationship to possible developmental implications and their parallel…

  6. [On the relation between encounter rate and population density: Are classical models of population dynamics justified?].

    PubMed

    Nedorezov, L V

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic model of migrations on a lattice and with discrete time is considered. It is assumed that space is homogenous with respect to its properties and during one time step every individual (independently of local population numbers) can migrate to nearest nodes of lattice with equal probabilities. It is also assumed that population size remains constant during certain time interval of computer experiments. The following variants of estimation of encounter rate between individuals are considered: when for the fixed time moments every individual in every node of lattice interacts with all other individuals in the node; when individuals can stay in nodes independently, or can be involved in groups in two, three or four individuals. For each variant of interactions between individuals, average value (with respect to space and time) is computed for various values of population size. The samples obtained were compared with respective functions of classic models of isolated population dynamics: Verhulst model, Gompertz model, Svirezhev model, and theta-logistic model. Parameters of functions were calculated with least square method. Analyses of deviations were performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Lilliefors test, Shapiro-Wilk test, and other statistical tests. It is shown that from traditional point of view there are no correspondence between the encounter rate and functions describing effects of self-regulatory mechanisms on population dynamics. Best fitting of samples was obtained with Verhulst and theta-logistic models when using the dataset resulted from the situation when every individual in the node interacts with all other individuals.

  7. Calibration of silicone rubber passive samplers: experimental and modeled relations between sampling rate and compound properties.

    PubMed

    Rusina, Tatsiana P; Smedes, Foppe; Koblizkova, Martina; Klanova, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Sampling rates (Rs) for silicone rubber (SR) passive samplers were measured under two different hydrodynamic conditions. Concentrations were maintained in the aqueous phase by continuous equilibration with SR sheets of a large total surface area which had been spiked with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and/or polychlorinated biphenyls. Test sheets made of the same SR but of much smaller surface area were used to measure the uptake rate. Measured Rs values decreased with increasing passive sampler-water partition coefficient (Kpw) according to Rs approximately Kpw(-0.08) under both hydrodynamic conditions. This decrease is not significantly different from modeled values if the uncertainty of the diffusion coefficients in water is included. Modeling also confirmed that uptake of the test compounds under the experimental conditions was entirely controlled by diffusion in the water phase. A model using Rs approximately M(-0.47) is suggested for extrapolation of Rs estimated from the dissipation of performance reference compounds to target compounds in a higher hydrophobicity range.

  8. RN students' ratings and opinions related to the importance of certain clinical teacher behaviors.

    PubMed

    Viverais-Dresler, G; Kutschke, M

    2001-01-01

    Clinical teachers make a necessary and valuable contribution to clinical nursing courses with non-RN learners. This contribution is often not considered necessary in degree nursing programs with an RN student population. This study describes the perceptions of RN students and the importance they attach to certain clinical teacher behaviors. Fifty-six participants in a distance education baccalaureate nursing program completed a questionnaire, including a rating scale and open-ended questions. Based on the mean values, items were ranked in importance. Sample quotes were provided to elaborate on the highest and lowest-ranked items. Participants rated the four categories in descending order of importance: Evaluation, Professional Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Teaching Ability. The top items gave the profile of a teacher who is approachable, fair, open, honest, and who creates mutual respect. The findings support a clinical teacher for RN learners. The data also reflect similarities and differences with findings of studies with non-RN student participants. The findings of this study provide information, not available in the literature, regarding clinical teacher behaviors of significance to RN students.

  9. Comparison of the relative dissipation rates of endosulfan pesticide residues between oolong and green tea.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Ma, X; Tu, Y

    2008-01-01

    The dissipation behaviour of endosulfan in dry made-tea leaves of oolong and green tea was compared to establish whether there was any difference in dissipation rates between the two teas. The dissipation of endosulfan in oolong and green tea corresponded with a first-order kinetics curve. The average half-life of endosulfan (n = 12) was 1.60 +/- 0.44 days in green tea and 2.01 +/- 0.55 days in oolong tea, showing a statistically significant difference, and indicating that the dissipation of the pesticide was significantly slower in oolong tea than that in green tea. Although the initial levels of residual endosulfan were lower in oolong tea, due to the slower dissipation rate, the residues 5-7 days after application were higher in oolong than in green tea. It is suggested that the minimum interval between endosulfan application and tea leaf harvesting is 7 days for green tea and 10 days for oolong tea in the case where the maximum residue limit of endosulfan in made-tea is fixed as 10 mg kg(-1).

  10. Self-Rated Health in Relation to Rape and Mental Health Disorders in a National Sample of College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinzow, Heidi M.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; McCauley, Jenna L.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to employ a multivariate approach to examine the correlates of self-rated health in a college sample of women, with particular emphasis on sexual assault history and related mental health outcomes. Participants: A national sample of 2,000 female college students participated in a structured phone interview…

  11. INVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AIR VELOCITY, AND AMPLIFICATION ON THE EMISSION RATES OF FUNGAL SPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the impact of relative humidity (RH), air velocity, and surface growth on the emission rates of fungal spores from the surface of contaminated material. Although the results show a complex interaction of factors, we have determined, for this limited data set,...

  12. Response Styles in Rating Scales: Simultaneous Modeling of Content-Related Effects and the Tendency to Middle or Extreme Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutz, Gerhard; Berger, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity in response styles can affect the conclusions drawn from rating scale data. In particular, biased estimates can be expected if one ignores a tendency to middle categories or to extreme categories. An adjacent categories model is proposed that simultaneously models the content-related effects and the heterogeneity in response styles.…

  13. Separating arterial and venous-related components of photoplethysmographic signals for accurate extraction of oxygen saturation and respiratory rate.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    We propose an algorithm for separating arterial and venous-related signals using second-order statistics of red and infrared signals in a blind source separation technique. The separated arterial signal is used to compute accurate arterial oxygen saturation. We have also introduced an algorithm for extracting the respiratory pattern from the extracted venous-related signal. In addition to real-time monitoring, respiratory rate is also extracted. Our experimental results from multiple subjects show that the proposed separation technique is extremely useful for extracting accurate arterial oxygen saturation and respiratory rate. Specifically, the breathing rate is extracted with average root mean square deviation of 1.89 and average mean difference of -0.69.

  14. Statistical Considerations in Designing Tests of Mine Detection Systems: II - Measures Related to the False Alarm Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, K.M.

    1998-08-01

    The rate at which a mine detection system falsely identifies man-made or natural clutter objects as mines is referred to as the system's false alarm rate (FAR). Generally expressed as a rate per unit area or time, the FAR is one of the primary metrics used to gauge system performance. In this report, an overview is given of statistical methods appropriate for the analysis of data relating to FAR. Techniques are presented for determining a suitable size for the clutter collection area, for summarizing the performance of a single sensor, and for comparing different sensors. For readers requiring more thorough coverage of the topics discussed, references to the statistical literature are provided. A companion report addresses statistical issues related to the estimation of mine detection probabilities.

  15. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada: a trend analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weichenthal, Scott; Wong, Joan; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Dugandzic, Rose; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of mortality and morbidity from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada has received little attention. Our objective was to evaluate trends in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada. Methods Age- and sex-standardized mortality (1981–2009) and hospital admission (1995–2010) rates by age group, sex and site of carbon monoxide exposure were calculated for each province and for all of Canada. We quantified the long-term trends by calculating the average annual percent change. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of carbon monoxide poisoning across age groups, sex and month of occurrence. Results In Canada, there were 1808 unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning deaths between 1981 and 2009 and 1984 admissions to hospital between 1995 and 2010. Average annual decreases of 3.46% (95% confidence interval [CI] –4.59% to –2.31%) and 5.83% (95% CI –7.79% to –3.83%) were observed for mortality and hospital admission rates, respectively. Mortality (IRR 5.31, 95% CI 4.57 to 6.17) and hospital admission (IRR 2.77, 95% CI 2.51 to 3.03) rates were elevated in males compared with females. Decreased trends in the rates were observed for all sites of carbon monoxide exposure, but the magnitude of this decrease was lowest in residential environments. Deaths and admissions to hospital were most frequent from September to April, with peaks in December and January. Interpretation Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada have declined steadily. Continued efforts should focus on reducing carbon monoxide poisoning during the cooler months and in residential environments. PMID:26389101

  16. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress.

  17. Catchment-scale distribution of radiocesium air dose rate in a mountainous deciduous forest and its relation to topography.

    PubMed

    Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Koarashi, Jun; Takeuchi, Erina; Tsuduki, Katsunori; Nishimura, Syusaku; Matsunaga, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    A large number of air dose rate measurements were collected by walking through a mountainous area with a small gamma-ray survey system, KURAMA-II. The data were used to map the air dose rate of a mountainous deciduous forest that received radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Measurements were conducted in a small stream catchment (0.6 km(2) in area) in August and September 2013, and the relationship between air dose rates and the mountainous topography was examined. Air dose rates increased with elevation, indicating that more radiocesium was deposited on ridges, and suggesting that it had remained there for 2.5 y with no significant downslope migration by soil erosion or water drainage. Orientation in relation to the dominant winds when the radioactive plume flowed to the catchment also strongly affected the air dose rates. Based on our continuous measurements using the KURAMA-II, we describe the variation in air dose rates in a mountainous forest area and suggest that it is important to consider topography when determining sampling points and resolution to assess the spatial variability of dose rates and contaminant deposition.

  18. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  19. Relation of Heart Rate and its Variability during Sleep with Age, Physical Activity, and Body Composition in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Herzig, David; Eser, Prisca; Radtke, Thomas; Wenger, Alina; Rusterholz, Thomas; Wilhelm, Matthias; Achermann, Peter; Arhab, Amar; Jenni, Oskar G; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea H; Munsch, Simone; Puder, Jardena J; Schmutz, Einat A; Stülb, Kerstin; Zysset, Annina E; Kriemler, Susi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have claimed a positive effect of physical activity and body composition on vagal tone. In pediatric populations, there is a pronounced decrease in heart rate with age. While this decrease is often interpreted as an age-related increase in vagal tone, there is some evidence that it may be related to a decrease in intrinsic heart rate. This factor has not been taken into account in most previous studies. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between physical activity and/or body composition and heart rate variability (HRV) independently of the decline in heart rate in young children. Methods: Anthropometric measurements were taken in 309 children aged 2-6 years. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were collected over 14-18 h comprising a full night and accelerometry over 7 days. HRV was determined of three different night segments: (1) over 5 min during deep sleep identified automatically based on HRV characteristics; (2) during a 20 min segment starting 15 min after sleep onset; (3) over a 4-h segment between midnight and 4 a.m. Linear models were computed for HRV parameters with anthropometric and physical activity variables adjusted for heart rate and other confounding variables (e.g., age for physical activity models). Results: We found a decline in heart rate with increasing physical activity and decreasing skinfold thickness. HRV parameters decreased with increasing age, height, and weight in HR-adjusted regression models. These relationships were only found in segments of deep sleep detected automatically based on HRV or manually 15 min after sleep onset, but not in the 4-h segment with random sleep phases. Conclusions: Contrary to most previous studies, we found no increase of standard HRV parameters with age, however, when adjusted for heart rate, there was a significant decrease of HRV parameters with increasing age. Without knowing intrinsic heart rate correct interpretation of HRV in growing children is

  20. Relation of Heart Rate and its Variability during Sleep with Age, Physical Activity, and Body Composition in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, David; Eser, Prisca; Radtke, Thomas; Wenger, Alina; Rusterholz, Thomas; Wilhelm, Matthias; Achermann, Peter; Arhab, Amar; Jenni, Oskar G.; Kakebeeke, Tanja H.; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S.; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea H.; Munsch, Simone; Puder, Jardena J.; Schmutz, Einat A.; Stülb, Kerstin; Zysset, Annina E.; Kriemler, Susi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have claimed a positive effect of physical activity and body composition on vagal tone. In pediatric populations, there is a pronounced decrease in heart rate with age. While this decrease is often interpreted as an age-related increase in vagal tone, there is some evidence that it may be related to a decrease in intrinsic heart rate. This factor has not been taken into account in most previous studies. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between physical activity and/or body composition and heart rate variability (HRV) independently of the decline in heart rate in young children. Methods: Anthropometric measurements were taken in 309 children aged 2–6 years. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were collected over 14–18 h comprising a full night and accelerometry over 7 days. HRV was determined of three different night segments: (1) over 5 min during deep sleep identified automatically based on HRV characteristics; (2) during a 20 min segment starting 15 min after sleep onset; (3) over a 4-h segment between midnight and 4 a.m. Linear models were computed for HRV parameters with anthropometric and physical activity variables adjusted for heart rate and other confounding variables (e.g., age for physical activity models). Results: We found a decline in heart rate with increasing physical activity and decreasing skinfold thickness. HRV parameters decreased with increasing age, height, and weight in HR-adjusted regression models. These relationships were only found in segments of deep sleep detected automatically based on HRV or manually 15 min after sleep onset, but not in the 4-h segment with random sleep phases. Conclusions: Contrary to most previous studies, we found no increase of standard HRV parameters with age, however, when adjusted for heart rate, there was a significant decrease of HRV parameters with increasing age. Without knowing intrinsic heart rate correct interpretation of HRV in growing children is

  1. Responses of plant growth rate to nitrogen supply: a comparison of relative addition and N interruption treatments.

    PubMed

    Walker, R L; Burns, I G; Moorby, J

    2001-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of uptake of nitrate and the availability of internal N reserves on growth rate in times of restricted supply, and examines the extent to which the response is mediated by the different pools of N (nitrate N, organic N and total N) in the plant. Hydroponic experiments were carried out with young lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) to compare responses to either an interruption in external N supply or the imposition of different relative N addition rate (RAR) treatments. The resulting relationships between whole plant relative growth rate (RGR) and N concentration varied between linear and curvilinear (or possibly bi-linear) forms depending on the treatment conditions. The relationship was curvilinear when the external N supply was interrupted, but linear when N was supplied by either RAR methods or as a supra-optimal external N supply. These differences resulted from the ability of the plant to use external sources of N more readily than their internal N reserves. These results show that when sub-optimal sources of external N were available, RGR was maintained at a rate which was dependent on the rate of nitrate uptake by the roots. Newly acquired N was channelled directly to the sites of highest demand, where it was assimilated rapidly. As a result, nitrate only tended to accumulate in plant tissues when its supply was essentially adequate. By comparison, plants forced to rely solely on their internal reserves were never able to mobilize and redistribute N between tissues quickly enough to prevent reductions in growth rate as their tissue N reserves declined. Evidence is presented to show that the rate of remobilization of N depends on the size and type of the N pools within the plant, and that changes in their rates of remobilization and/or transfer between pools are the main factors influencing the form of the relationship between RGR and N concentration.

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase in Pfiesteria piscicida and its growth rate-related expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Senjie; Zhang, Huan

    2003-01-01

    A full-length cDNA (1,434 bp) of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), a key molecule of a signal transduction cascade, was isolated from the estuarine heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. This cDNA (Ppmapk1) encoded a protein (PpMAPK1) of 428 amino acid residues that shared about 30 to 40% amino acid similarity with MAPKs in other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PpMAPK1 was tightly clustered with MAPK3 in protozoans. Using reverse transcription-PCR, expression of this gene was evaluated for P. piscicida cultures grown under different conditions. While salinity shock, heat shock, starvation, and a subsequent encounter with prey did not appear to affect expression of this gene, Ppmapk1 expression level was correlated with growth rate, suggesting involvement of this gene in the regulation of cell proliferation in the organism.

  3. Two part condenser for varying the rate of condensing and related method

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2007-12-11

    A heat transfer apparatus, such as a condenser, is provided. The apparatus includes a first component with a first heat transfer element that has first component inlet and outlet ports through which a first fluid may pass. A second component is also included and likewise has a second heat transfer element with second component inlet and outlet ports to pass a second fluid. The first component has a body that can receive a third fluid for heat transfer with the first heat transfer element. The first and second components are releasably attachable with one another so that when attached both the first and second heat transfer elements effect heat transfer with the third fluid. Attachment and removal of the first and second components allows for the heat transfer rate of the apparatus to be varied. An associated method is also provided.

  4. The relative efficiency of time-to-threshold and rate of change in longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Donohue, M C; Gamst, A C; Thomas, R G; Xu, R; Beckett, L; Petersen, R C; Weiner, M W; Aisen, P

    2011-09-01

    Randomized, placebo-controlled trials often use time-to-event as the primary endpoint, even when a continuous measure of disease severity is available. We compare the power to detect a treatment effect using either rate of change, as estimated by linear models of longitudinal continuous data, or time-to-event estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. We propose an analytic inflation factor for comparing the two types of analyses assuming that the time-to-event can be expressed as a time-to-threshold of the continuous measure. We conduct simulations based on a publicly available Alzheimer's disease data set in which the time-to-event is algorithmically defined based on a battery of assessments. A Cox proportional hazards model of the time-to-event endpoint is compared to a linear model of a single assessment from the battery. The simulations also explore the impact of baseline covariates in either analysis.

  5. The role of physical activity and heart rate variability for the control of work related stress.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Laís; Rodrigues, Fábio B; Souza, Jeniffer W S; Campbell, Carmen S G; Leicht, Anthony S; Boullosa, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are often used as tools to reduce stress and therefore the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Meanwhile, heart rate variability (HRV) has been utilized to assess both stress and PA or exercise influences. The objective of the present review was to examine the current literature in regards to workplace stress, PA/exercise and HRV to encourage further studies. We considered original articles from known databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge) over the last 10 years that examined these important factors. A total of seven studies were identified with workplace stress strongly associated with reduced HRV in workers. Longitudinal workplace PA interventions may provide a means to improve worker stress levels and potentially cardiovascular risk with mechanisms still to be clarified. Future studies are recommended to identify the impact of PA, exercise, and fitness on stress levels and HRV in workers and their subsequent influence on cardiovascular health.

  6. Volumes, rates and related hazards of Etna's 2007-2010 eruptions (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Behncke, Boris; Fornaciai, Alessandro; Favalli, Massimiliano; Ganci, Gaetana; Mazzarini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Digital comparison of two LiDAR-based digital elevation models of the summit area and eastern flank of Mount Etna (Italy), acquired in June 2007 and September 2010, were used to quantify with high accuracy the volumes of eruptive products (lava and pyroclastics) emitted in this time interval. During this period, Etna's activity was characterized by a classical sequence of summit paroxysms followed by a voluminous effusive eruption on the upper east flank (May 2008-July 2009). We integrated the total volume difference resulting from the subtraction of the 2007 DEM from the 2010 DEM with individual, well-constrained volumes of eruptive products based on data from field and aerial surveys to attribute more precise volumes to events that have until now remained poorly constrained. The total volume of 2007-2010 eruptive products is ~86 million cubic meter, by far the largest proportion (~73.6 million cubic meter) of which is represented by the lava flows of the 2008-2009 flank eruption. In spite of being one of the longest-standing flank eruptions of Etna of the past ~350 years, its mean effusion rate of 2 cubic meter per second was rather low. The survey also reveals the unusually high lava volume (~5.8 million cubic meter) of the paroxysmal episode of 10 May 2008, which preceded the flank outbreak by three days, and which was emplaced within four hours at an average rate of ~400 cubic meter per second, the flow front stopping at a distance of 6.2 km from the source vent. With a slightly longer duration of this eruptive episode, that lava flow might have come rather close to the outskirts of the nearby town of Zafferana Etnea.

  7. Capture-recapture-adjusted prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes are related to social deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A A; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V; Bellis, M A

    1999-12-01

    We examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation in one urban district in Liverpool from October 1995 to September 1996 inclusive. This area has a stable Caucasian population of 176, 682. Lists were made of all known diabetics attending six different medical points of contact during the year, and were condensed and aggregated to eliminate duplicates. From postcode data, each patient was assigned to residence in one of the 14 electoral wards in the district, for which demographic structure and standardized measures of social deprivation were known (Townsend index). The crude period prevalences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes were estimated for each ward. Crude prevalence data were then corrected by applying capture-recapture (CR) techniques to the different patient datasets to allow for undercount. The crude period prevalence (95%CI) of diabetes was 1.5% (1.4-1.5%), or 2585/176, 682. The mean age of people with diabetes was not significantly different between electoral wards. The crude period prevalence of type 2 diabetes within individual wards ranged from 0.4% (0.3-0.6%) in the least deprived area to 4.1% (3.6-4.6%) in the most deprived area. The corresponding range of CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes was from 3.2% (2.8-3.6%) to 6.7% (6.1-7.4%), and there was strong correlation between both crude and CR-adjusted prevalence and social deprivation in each ward (r=0.76, p<0.001 for crude; and r=0. 49, p<0.005 for CR-adjusted prevalence). There was no correlation between the crude or CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 1 diabetes and Townsend index (r=0.14, p=NS). This strong correlation between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation has important implications for the planning of health-care delivery.

  8. Relation of prenatal diagnosis with one-year survival rate for infants with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, Lydia K; Ehrlich, Alexandra; Stauffer, Nanci; Samai, Cyrus; Kogon, Brian; Oster, Matthew E

    2014-03-15

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defects (CHDs) is increasingly common, but it is still unclear whether it translates to improved postoperative outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all infants (aged <1 year) who underwent surgery for CHDs from 2006 to 2011 at a single institution. Primary outcomes were in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates. Secondary outcomes were readmission within 30 days of discharge, postoperative length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, unplanned reoperation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use. We used chi-square analyses, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and adjusted Cox proportional hazards models to compare outcomes. Of the 1,642 patients with CHDs, 539 (33%) were diagnosed prenatally. Patients with prenatal diagnoses were of a younger age and less weight at the time of surgery, had greater Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery scores, and were more likely to be white, to have an identified syndrome, or to be born at term. Compared with those diagnosed postnatally, those diagnosed prenatally had a significantly higher unadjusted 1-year mortality rate (11% vs 5.5%, respectively, p = 0.03). Controlling for weight, surgical severity, race, age at surgery, prematurity, and the presence or absence of genetic syndrome, patients with prenatal diagnoses had significantly greater mortality at 1 year (adjusted hazard ratio 1.5, p = 0.03), as well as significantly longer intensive care unit and hospital stays. Infants with CHDs diagnosed prenatally had worse outcomes compared with those diagnosed postnatally. Prenatal diagnosis likely captures patients with more severe phenotypes within given surgical risk categories and even within diagnoses and thus may be an important prognostic factor when counseling families.

  9. Characterization of the ion cathode fall region in relation to the growth rate in plasma sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmero, A.; van Hattum, E. D.; Rudolph, H.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    2007-02-01

    In plasma-assisted magnetron sputtering, the ion cathode fall region is the part of the plasma where the DC electric field and ion current evolve from zero to their maximum values at the cathode. These quantities are straightforwardly related to the deposition rate of the sputtered material. In this work we derive simple relations for the measurable axially averaged values of the ion density and the ion current at the ion cathode fall region and relate them with the deposition rate. These relations have been tested experimentally in the case of an argon plasma in a magnetron sputtering system devoted to depositing amorphous silicon. Using a movable Langmuir probe, the profiles of the plasma potential and ion density were measured along an axis perpendicularly to the cathode and in front of the so-called race-track. The deposition rate of silicon, under different conditions of pressure and input power, has been found to compare well with those determined with the relations derived.

  10. Small impact craters in the lunar regolith - Their morphologies, relative ages, and rates of formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.; Boyce, J.M.; Hahn, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparently, there are two types of size-frequency distributions of small lunar craters (???1-100 m across): (1) crater production distributions for which the cumulative frequency of craters is an inverse function of diameter to power near 2.8, and (2) steady-state distributions for which the cumulative frequency of craters is inversely proportional to the square of their diameters. According to theory, cumulative frequencies of craters in each morphologic category within the steady-state should also be an inverse function of the square of their diameters. Some data on frequency distribution of craters by morphologic types are approximately consistent with theory, whereas other data are inconsistent with theory. A flux of crater producing objects can be inferred from size-frequency distributions of small craters on the flanks and ejecta of craters of known age. Crater frequency distributions and data on the craters Tycho, North Ray, Cone, and South Ray, when compared with the flux of objects measured by the Apollo Passive Seismometer, suggest that the flux of objects has been relatively constant over the last 100 m.y. (within 1/3 to 3 times of the flux estimated for Tycho). Steady-state frequency distributions for craters in several morphologic categories formed the basis for estimating the relative ages of craters and surfaces in a system used during the Apollo landing site mapping program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The relative ages in this system are converted to model absolute ages that have a rather broad range of values. The range of values of the absolute ages are between about 1/3 to 3 times the assigned model absolute age. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  11. Determination of tropical deforestation rates and related carbon losses from 1990 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Achard, Frédéric; Beuchle, René; Mayaux, Philippe; Stibig, Hans-Jürgen; Bodart, Catherine; Brink, Andreas; Carboni, Silvia; Desclée, Baudouin; Donnay, François; Eva, Hugh D; Lupi, Andrea; Raši, Rastislav; Seliger, Roman; Simonetti, Dario

    2014-08-01

    We estimate changes in forest cover (deforestation and forest regrowth) in the tropics for the two last decades (1990-2000 and 2000-2010) based on a sample of 4000 units of 10 ×10 km size. Forest cover is interpreted from satellite imagery at 30 × 30 m resolution. Forest cover changes are then combined with pan-tropical biomass maps to estimate carbon losses. We show that there was a gross loss of tropical forests of 8.0 million ha yr(-1) in the 1990s and 7.6 million ha yr(-1) in the 2000s (0.49% annual rate), with no statistically significant difference. Humid forests account for 64% of the total forest cover in 2010 and 54% of the net forest loss during second study decade. Losses of forest cover and Other Wooded Land (OWL) cover result in estimates of carbon losses which are similar for 1990s and 2000s at 887 MtC yr(-1) (range: 646-1238) and 880 MtC yr(-1) (range: 602-1237) respectively, with humid regions contributing two-thirds. The estimates of forest area changes have small statistical standard errors due to large sample size. We also reduce uncertainties of previous estimates of carbon losses and removals. Our estimates of forest area change are significantly lower as compared to national survey data. We reconcile recent low estimates of carbon emissions from tropical deforestation for early 2000s and show that carbon loss rates did not change between the two last decades. Carbon losses from deforestation represent circa 10% of Carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the last decade (2000-2010). Our estimates of annual removals of carbon from forest regrowth at 115 MtC yr(-1) (range: 61-168) and 97 MtC yr(-1) (53-141) for the 1990s and 2000s respectively are five to fifteen times lower than earlier published estimates.

  12. Determination of tropical deforestation rates and related carbon losses from 1990 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Frédéric; Beuchle, René; Mayaux, Philippe; Stibig, Hans-Jürgen; Bodart, Catherine; Brink, Andreas; Carboni, Silvia; Desclée, Baudouin; Donnay, François; Eva, Hugh D; Lupi, Andrea; Raši, Rastislav; Seliger, Roman; Simonetti, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We estimate changes in forest cover (deforestation and forest regrowth) in the tropics for the two last decades (1990–2000 and 2000–2010) based on a sample of 4000 units of 10 ×10 km size. Forest cover is interpreted from satellite imagery at 30 × 30 m resolution. Forest cover changes are then combined with pan-tropical biomass maps to estimate carbon losses. We show that there was a gross loss of tropical forests of 8.0 million ha yr−1 in the 1990s and 7.6 million ha yr−1 in the 2000s (0.49% annual rate), with no statistically significant difference. Humid forests account for 64% of the total forest cover in 2010 and 54% of the net forest loss during second study decade. Losses of forest cover and Other Wooded Land (OWL) cover result in estimates of carbon losses which are similar for 1990s and 2000s at 887 MtC yr−1 (range: 646–1238) and 880 MtC yr−1 (range: 602–1237) respectively, with humid regions contributing two-thirds. The estimates of forest area changes have small statistical standard errors due to large sample size. We also reduce uncertainties of previous estimates of carbon losses and removals. Our estimates of forest area change are significantly lower as compared to national survey data. We reconcile recent low estimates of carbon emissions from tropical deforestation for early 2000s and show that carbon loss rates did not change between the two last decades. Carbon losses from deforestation represent circa 10% of Carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the last decade (2000–2010). Our estimates of annual removals of carbon from forest regrowth at 115 MtC yr−1 (range: 61–168) and 97 MtC yr−1 (53–141) for the 1990s and 2000s respectively are five to fifteen times lower than earlier published estimates. PMID:24753029

  13. Radionuclides in the adriatic sea and related dose-rate assessment for marine biota.

    PubMed

    Petrinec, Branko; Strok, Marko; Franic, Zdenko; Smodis, Borut; Pavicic-Hamer, Dijana

    2013-01-01

    Artificial and natural radionuclides were determined in the Adriatic Sea in the seawater and sediment samples in the period from 2007 to 2011. The sampling areas were coastal waters of Slovenia, Croatia and Albania, together with the deepest part of the Adriatic in South Adriatic Pit and Otranto strait. Sampling locations were chosen to take into account all major geological and geographical features of this part of the Adriatic Sea and possible coastal influences. After initial sample preparation steps, samples were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. In the seawater ⁴⁰K activity concentrations were in the range from 6063 to 10519 Bq m⁻³, ¹³⁷Cs from 1.6 to 3.8 Bq m⁻³, ²²⁶Ra from 23 to 31 Bq m⁻³, ²²⁸Ra from 1 to 25 Bq m⁻³ and ²³⁸U from 64 to 490 Bq m⁻³. The results of sediment samples showed that ⁴⁰K was in the range from 87 to 593 Bq kg⁻¹, ¹³⁷Cs from 0.8 to 7.3 Bq kg⁻¹, ²²⁶Ra from 18 to 35 Bq kg⁻¹, ²²⁸Ra from 4 to 29 Bq kg⁻¹ and ²³⁸U from 14 to 120 Bq kg⁻¹. In addition, the ERICA Assessment Tool was used for the assessment of dose rates for reference marine organisms using the activity concentrations of the determined radionuclides in seawater. The assessment showed that for the most of the organisms, the dose rates were within the background levels, indicating that the determined values for seawater does not pose a significant risk for the most of marine biota. In the study, the results are critically discussed and compared with other similar studies worldwide. Generally, the activity concentrations of the examined radionuclides did not differ from those reported for the rest of the Mediterranean Sea.

  14. Relative Importance of Climate Variables to Population Vital Rates: A Quantitative Synthesis for the Lesser Prairie-Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Fuhlendorf, Samuel D.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect temperature and precipitation means and extremes, which can affect population vital rates. With the added complexity of accounting for both means and extremes, it is important to understand whether one aspect is sufficient to predict a particular vital rate or if both are necessary. To compare the predictive ability of climate means and extremes with geographic, individual, and habitat variables, we performed a quantitative synthesis on the vital rates of lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidictinus) across their geographic range. We used an information theoretic approach to rank models predicting vital rates. We were able to rank climate models for three vital rates: clutch size, nest success, and subadult/adult seasonal survival. Of these three vital rates, a climate model was never the best predictor even when accounting for potentially different relationships between climate variables and vital rates between different ecoregions. Clutch size and nest success were both influenced by nesting attempt with larger clutches and greater success for first nesting attempts than second nesting attempts. Clutch size also increased with latitude for first nesting attempts but decreased with latitude for second nesting attempts. This resulted in similar clutch sizes for first and second nest attempts at southern latitudes but larger clutches for first nest attempts than second nest attempts at northern latitudes. Survival was greater for subadults than adults, but there were few estimates of subadult survival for comparison. Our results show that individual characteristics and geographic variables are better for predicting vital rates than climate variables. This may due to low samples sizes, which restricted our statistical power, or lack of precision in climate estimates relative to microclimates actually experienced by individuals. Alternatively, relationships between climate variables and vital rates may be constrained by time

  15. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  16. Early marine growth in relation to marine-stage survival rates for Alaska sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farley, Edward V.; Murphy, J.M.; Adkison, Milo D.; Eisner, L.B.; Helle, J.H.; Moss, J.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that larger juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, have higher marine-stage survival rates than smaller juvenile salmon. We used scales from returning adults (33 years of data) and trawl samples of juveniles (n = 3572) collected along the eastern Bering Sea shelf during August through September 2000-02. The size of juvenile sockeye salmon mirrored indices of their marine-stage survival rate (e.g., smaller fish had lower indices of marine-stage survival rate). However, there was no relationship between the size of sockeye salmon after their first year at sea, as estimated from archived scales, and brood-year survival size was relatively uniform over the time series, possibly indicating size-selective mortality on smaller individuals during their marine residence. Variation in size, relative abundance, and marine-stage survival rate of juvenile sockeye salmon is likely related to ocean conditions affecting their early marine migratory pathways along the eastern Bering Sea shelf.

  17. Highway crash rates and age-related driver limitations: Literature review and evaluation of data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P.S.; Young, J.R.; Lu, An

    1993-08-01

    American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a larger proportion of older individuals in the population. Moreover, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort a decade ago. However, they continue to take shorter trips than younger drivers and they avoid driving during congested hours. This recent demographic transformation in our society, the graying of America, coupled with the increasing mobility of the older population impose a serious highway safety issue that cannot be overlooked. Some of the major concerns are the identification of ``high-risk`` older drivers and the establishment of licensing guidelines and procedures that are based on conclusive scientific evidence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) objectives in this project can be characterized by the following tasks: Review and evaluate the 1980 American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) licensing guidelines. Determine whether the license restriction recommended in the 1980 AAMVA and NHTSA guidelines was based on scientific evidence or on judgement of medical advisors. Identify in the scientific literature any medical conditions which are found to be highly associated with highway crashes, and which are not mentioned in the 1980 guidelines. Summarize States` current licensing practices for drivers with age-related physical and mental limitations. Identify potential data sources to establish conclusive evidence on age-related functional impairments and highway crashes.

  18. Higher arterial catheter-related infection rates in femoral than in dorsalis pedis access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Jiménez, A; Jiménez, J J; Iribarren, J L; Martínez, J; Naranjo, C; Santacreu, R; Martín, M M; Mora, M L

    2010-04-01

    Although there are many studies on arterial catheter-related infection (ACRI) there is little information on the relative risks associated with different catheter access sites. In previous studies we have shown a higher incidence of ACRI in femoral than in radial access sites. This prospective observational study was designed to compare the incidence of ACRI in patients on an intensive care unit with femoral versus dorsalis pedis access sites. We compared 1085 femoral arterial catheters inserted for a cumulative 6497 days with 174 dorsalis pedis catheters inserted for a cumulative 1050 days. We detected 33 cases of ACRI in the femoral access group (11 with bacteraemia and 22 with line site infection; 5.08 infections per 1000 catheter-days) but none in the dorsalis pedis access group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding age, sex, Acute Physiological Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, diagnosis, previous arterial catheter insertion, use of mechanical ventilation, use of antimicrobials or catheter duration. Regression analysis showed a higher incidence of ACRI for femoral than for dorsalis pedis access sites (odds ratio: 7.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.37-infinite; P=0.01). These results suggest that dorsalis pedis arterial access should be used in preference to femoral arterial access in order to reduce the risk of ACRI.

  19. Relations between adolescent ratings of Rothbart's temperament questionnaire and the HEXACO personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Ann H; Brook, Christina; Dane, Andrew V; Marini, Zopito A; Volk, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, individual differences have been assessed using temperament measures for infants and children, and personality measures for adults. We chose to explore both temperament and personality to see whether a convergence exists specifically during adolescence. A sample of 225 adolescents completed Rothbart's Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised (EATQ-R), a 4-factor temperament scale, and the HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised (HEXACO PI-R), a 6-factor personality scale. As hypothesized, we found significant relations between the 2 measures. However, there were some important differences between the 2 measures regarding Honesty-Humility, Openness, and Frustration that highlight the unique contributions of both instruments to understanding and measuring adolescent individual differences. As there is a relatively scant history of measuring temperament or personality in adolescence, it is sometimes difficult for researchers to decide which instrument is most appropriate. The results reported here suggest that either the EATQ-R or the HEXACO PI-R could be appropriate, depending on the specific research questions being asked.

  20. Quantifying Knick Point Migration Rates Related to the Messinian Crisis. The Case of the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Pucher, Christoph; Robl, Jörg; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Messinian crisis is a temporally well-constrained period between 5.3 my and 5.9 my, when the strait of Gibraltar was tectonically closed and the Mediterranean Sea had consequently desiccated. This dramatic base level drop by about 1500 vertical meters had a profound influence on the geomorphic evolution of the major drainages surrounding the Mediterranean basin. In particular, it caused substantial knickpoints in the major rivers including the Rhone, the Ebro, the Po and the Nile. While the knickpoints of the Rhone and Ebro have been studied previously and the knickpoints created by the Po may lie today underneath the Po plains, the knickpoint and its migration along the Nile has not been studied and would have migrated along its current river channel. In this contribution we focus on numerical modelling of the knickpoint migration in the Nile and use our modelling results in comparison with the present day morphological analyses of the river to constrain absolute migration rates. We suspect that the first Nile cataract near Assuan, some 1000 km upstream of today's river mouth may be the relict of the Messinian salinity crisis making it to one of the fastest migrating knickpoints in the world.

  1. Diurnal Changes of Zooplankton Community Reduction Rate at Lake Outlets and Related Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Czerniawski, Robert; Sługocki, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    The reduced zooplankton abundance at the outlet sections of lakes depends on the occurrence of preying fry. Therefore, light conditions can play a major role in the drift of zooplankton along river outlets. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of diurnal light conditions on the decline of zooplankton densities at lake outlets. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) levels were measured to determine their effect on the rate of reduced zooplankton abundance. Cladocerans and copepods showed a significantly greater reduction in abundance than rotifers and nauplii. A significant positive relationship was observed between the PAR levels and the reduced abundance of Asplanchna sp., small cladocerans, large cladocerans and Copepoda at the lake outlets. Among the rotifers, small pelagic rotifers drifted the farthest at all hours of the day. Large crustaceans, especially the large cladocerans and copepodites and adult copepods, had the lowest chance of dispersing over a wide area. Our results indicate that light conditions play an important role in the reduction of zooplankton abundance at lake outlets and have an indirect influence on the downstream food web. PMID:27392017

  2. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during increased permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-03-05

    The initial equilibration of /sup 125/I-labelled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw heel skin of anesthetized rabbits. Bradykinin (0.3 ..mu..g/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery. A second group of rabbits served as control. Following bradykinin, prenodal popliteal lymph flow was 4 times control flow. The lymph-to-plasma concentration ratios for total protein and albumin were, respectively, 60% and 50% larger than control. Tissue albumin concentration was twice control. After reaching a steady, elevated lymph flow, tracer albumin was infused to maintain plasma activity constant for 3 hrs. The plasma volume in tissue samples was measured using /sup 131/I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity was 3 times greater than control. In the control group, plasma albumin equilibrated more rapidly with lymph than with tissue (p < 0.05). Following bradykinin, extravascular specific activity was 4 times control, resulting in lymph and tissue equilibrating with plasma at similar rates. Thus, increasing capillary permeability causes the extravascular albumin mass to behave as if distributed in a single compartment.

  3. General probability-matched relations between radar reflectivity and rain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wolff, David B.; Atlas, David

    1993-01-01

    An improved method for transforming radar-observed reflectivities Ze into rain rate R is presented. The method is based on a formulation of a Ze-R function constrained such that (1) the radar-retrieved pdf of R and all of its moments are identical to those determined from the gauges over a sufficiently large domain, and (2) the fraction of the time that it is raining above a low but still has an accurately measurable rain intensity is identical for both the radar and for simultaneous measurements of collocated gauges on average. Data measured by a 1.65-deg beamwidth C-band radar and 22 gauges located in the vicinity of Darwin, Australia, are used. The resultant Ze-R functions show a strong range dependence, especially for the rain regimes characterized by strong reflectivity gradients and substantial attenuation. The application of these novel Ze-R functions to the radar data produces excellent matches to the gauge measurements without any systematic bias.

  4. Distribution of vectors, transmission indices and microfilaria rates of subperiodic Wuchereria bancrofti in relation to village ecotypes in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Samarawickrema, W A; Kimura, E; Spears, G F; Penaia, L; Sone, F; Paulson, G S; Cummings, R F

    1987-01-01

    Aedes polynesiensis and Ae. samoanus biting densities and Wuchereria bancrofti infection and infective rates were studied in 47 villages throughout the islands of Samoa Upolu, Manono and Savaii during 1978-79, and microfilaria (mf) rates were surveyed in 28 of the villages. The mf rate was correlated with both infection and infective rates of Ae. polynesiensis in Upolu, but not of Ae. samoanus. In Upolu, Ae. polynesiensis was apparently the major vector. It was relatively more abundant in more cultivated and populated areas, along the northern coast of Upolu, except Apia town area. In Savaii, Ae. samoanus predominated over Ae. polynesiensis except in "plantation" villages. Relatively high biting densities and rates of infection and infectivity indicated that Ae. samoanus was not less important than Ae. polynesiensis as a vector in Savaii. Ae. samoanus preferred natural vegetation, in contrast to Ae. polynesiensis which was found near human habitations in cultivated land. There was no difference between the biting densities of Ae. polynesiensis in "coastal" and "inland" villages, indicating that crab holes (numerous only in some coastal villages) may not influence the density of Ae. polynesiensis. Higher mf rates were associated with villages where Ae. polynesiensis, rather than Ae. samoanus, was dominant, indicating that Ae. polynesiensis was generally a more efficient vector. In the former villages, the difference in mf rates between males and females was smaller than in the latter, probably reflecting a difference in biting habits of the vectors. Ae. polynesiensis infections were recorded in plantations over 2 km from any village, suggesting that both habitats were foci of transmission.

  5. Peritraumatic Behavior Questionnaire - Observer Rated: Validation of the objective version of a measure for combat-related peritraumatic stress

    PubMed Central

    Agorastos, Agorastos; Angkaw, Abigail C; Johnson, Heather E; Hansen, Christian J; Cook, Camille V; Baker, Dewleen G

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the first third-person-rated measure assessing combat-related peritraumatic stress symptoms and evaluate its psychometric properties and war-zone applicability. METHODS: The valid assessment of peritraumatic symptoms in the theater of military operations represents a significant challenge in combat-related, mental health research, which mainly relies on retrospective, subjective self-report ratings. This longitudinal observational study used data from actively deployed troops to correlate third-person observer ratings of deployment peritraumatic behaviors [Peritraumatic Behavior Questionnaire - Observer Rated (PBQ-OR)] collected on a bi-monthly basis with post-deployment (1-wk follow-up) ratings of the previously validated PBQ self-rate version (PBQ-SR), and (3-mo follow-up) clinician assessed and self-report posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, PTSD Checklist). Cronbach’s alpha (α) and correlation coefficients were calculated to assess internal reliability and concurrent validity respectively. RESULTS: Eight hundred and sixty male Marines were included in this study after signing informed consents at pre-deployment (mean age 23.2 ± 2.6 years). Although our findings were limited by an overall sparse return rate of PBQ-OR ratings, the main results indicate satisfactory psychometric properties with good internal consistency for the PBQ-OR (α = 0.88) and high convergent and concurrent validity with 1-wk post-deployment PBQ-SR ratings and 3-mo posttraumatic stress symptoms. Overall, later PBQ-OR report date was associated with higher correlation between PBQ-OR and post-deployment measures. Kappa analysis between PBQ-OR and PBQ-SR single items, showed best agreement in questions relating of mortal peril, desire for revenge, and experience of intense physical reactions. Logistic regression demonstrated satisfactory predictive validity of PBQ-OR total score with respect to PTSD caseness (OR = 1.0513; 95%CI

  6. Relative feeding rates on free and particle-bound bacteria by freshwater macrozooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, S.A.; Maccubbin, A.E.

    1985-09-01

    Feeding suspensions of equivalent particle spectra were assembled with either free-living (< 1.0 ..mu..m) or attached bacteria specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Clearance (ml ind/sup -1/ d/sup -1/) of attached bacteria was 3-29 x that of free bacteria for the cladocerans Acantholeberis, Chydorus, and Eubosmina. Pseudosida and Ceriodaphnia showed weaker discrimination or no selection, indicating a lower size threshold for filtration in these species. Feeding suspensions composed of isolated free bacteria yielded significantly higher or lower estimates of grazing than free bacteria with the full complement of particles, depending on species. Relative clearance (attached:free) tended to increase with body size within a species and varied for different particle environments. Bacteria associated with large particles may increase detrital energy flow to consumers in eutrophic environments.

  7. Predicting Fluctuating Rates of Hospitalizations in Relation to Influenza Epidemics and Meteorological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Batton-Hubert, Mireille; Sarazin, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In France, rates of hospital admissions increase at the peaks of influenza epidemics. Predicting influenza-associated hospitalizations could help to anticipate increased hospital activity. The purpose of this study is to identify predictors of influenza epidemics through the analysis of meteorological data, and medical data provided by general practitioners. Methods Historical data were collected from Meteo France, the Sentinelles network and hospitals’ information systems for a period of 8 years (2007–2015). First, connections between meteorological and medical data were estimated with the Pearson correlation coefficient, Principal component analysis and classification methods (Ward and k-means). Epidemic states of tested weeks were then predicted for each week during a one-year period using linear discriminant analysis. Finally, transition probabilities between epidemic states were calculated with the Markov Chain method. Results High correlations were found between influenza-associated hospitalizations and the variables: Sentinelles and emergency department admissions, and anti-correlations were found between hospitalizations and each of meteorological factors applying a time lag of: -13, -12 and -32 days respectively for temperature, absolute humidity and solar radiation. Epidemic weeks were predicted accurately with the linear discriminant analysis method; however there were many misclassifications about intermediate and non-epidemic weeks. Transition probability to an epidemic state was 100% when meteorological variables were below: 2°C, 4 g/m3 and 32 W/m2, respectively for temperature, absolute humidity and solar radiation. This probability was 0% when meteorological variables were above: 6°C, 5.8g/m3 and 74W/m2. Conclusion These results confirm a good correlation between influenza-associated hospitalizations, meteorological factors and general practitioner’s activity, the latter being the strongest predictor of hospital activity. PMID

  8. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically <0.1 wt %). The excess Mg was taken up by the calcite grains in between, stabilizing them and causing a few volume percent rodlike relicts of Mg-enriched calcite (up to 10 wt % MgO) to be left behind by the advancing reaction front. The aragonite growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  9. Study of psychosocial parameters related to the survival rate of renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, J G; Clermont, M J; Robitaille, P; Plante, A; Jéquier, J C; Godbout, C; Guertin, M C; Beaulieu, M A; Sarrazin, F

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of intelligence, schooling, psychomotor, emotional, and social status on renal graft survival in children. Sixty-two cadaver renal transplant recipients were evaluated retrospectively and the influence of sex, age, weight, and the use of cyclosporin A (CyA) on the success rate of the graft from 1 to 5 years later was analyzed. Psychological and social scores were devised and included as factors predictive of survival of the graft. Univariate analysis showed that the following variables predicted renal graft survival: the use of CyA (P = 0.0002), pre-transplant dialysis (P = 0.04), weight at the time of transplantation (P = 0.072), and psychological scores (P = 0.064). Association analysis demonstrated that pre-transplantation dialysis was only a chance association and therefore the parameter was discarded. Multivariate analysis showed that the predictive parameters were the use of CyA, sex, weight in kilograms, and the psychological score. An equation was then derived from variables that predict the probability that a specific patient's graft will survive more than t months. This equation is the estimated survival distribution function and is as follow: S (t) = Exp {-Exp[-(0.8882x1 - 1.827x2 + 0.037x3 - 0.1746x4) + ln t - 4.7862]} where S (t) = the survival at t months post transplantation, x1 = sex (male 1, female 2), x2 = CyA (yes 1, no 2), x3 = weight in kilograms, and x4 = psychological score. The major impact of psychological factors on renal graft survival was surprising.

  10. Dose-effect relation of interstitial low-dose-rate radiation (Ir192) in an animal tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Ruifrok, A.C.; Levendag, P.C.; Lakeman, R.F.; Deurloo, I.K.; Visser, A.G. )

    1990-01-01

    One way to deliver high doses of radiation to deep seated tumors without damaging the surrounding tissue is by interstitial techniques. This is commonly applied clinically; however, biological data of tumor response to interstitial low-dose-rate gamma irradiation are scarce. Therefore, we have studied the response of rhabdomyosarcoma R1 tumors implanted in the flanks of female Wag/Rij rats using an interstitial Ir192 afterloading system. A template was developed by which four catheters can be implanted in a square geometry with a fixed spacing. Subsequently four Ir192 wires of 2 cm length each are inserted. For dose prescription the highest isodose enveloping the tumor volume was chosen. Interstitial irradiation was performed using tumor volumes of 1500-2000 mm3. A range of minimum tumor doses of 20 up to 115 Gy were given at a mean dose-rate of 48 cGy/hr. Dose-effect relations were obtained from tumor growth curves and tumor cure data, and compared to data from external irradiation. The dose required for 50% cures with interstitial irradiation (TCD50) appears to be 95 +/- 9 Gy. The TCD50 for low-dose-rate interstitial gamma irradiation is 1.5 times the TCD50 for single dose external X ray irradiation at high dose rates, but is comparable to the TCD50 found after fractionated X ray irradiation at high dose rate. Sham treatment of the tumors had no effect on the time needed to reach twice the treatment volume. The growth rate of tumors regrowing after interstitial radiotherapy is not markedly different from the growth rate of untreated (control) tumors (volume doubting time 5.6 +/- 1 day), in contrast to the decreased growth rate after external X ray irradiation.

  11. Relative Contributions of Geothermal Pumping and Long-Term Earthquake Rate to Seismicity at California Geothermal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, D. A.; Jackson, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In a tectonically active area, a definitive discrimination between geothermally-induced and tectonic earthquakes is difficult to achieve. We focus our study on California's 11 major geothermal fields: Amedee, Brawley, Casa Diablo, Coso, East Mesa, The Geysers, Heber, Litchfield, Salton Sea, Susanville, and Wendel. The Geysers geothermal field is the world's largest geothermal energy producer. California's Department of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources provides field-wide monthly injection and production volumes for each of these sites, which allows us to study the relationship between geothermal pumping activities and seismicity. Since many of the geothermal fields began injecting and producing before nearby seismic stations were installed, we use smoothed seismicity since 1932 from the ANSS catalog as a proxy for tectonic earthquake rate. We examine both geothermal pumping and long-term earthquake rate as factors that may control earthquake rate. Rather than focusing only on the largest earthquake, which is essentially a random occurrence in time, we examine how M≥4 earthquake rate density (probability per unit area, time, and magnitude) varies for each field. We estimate relative contributions to the observed earthquake rate of M≥4 from both a long-term earthquake rate (Kagan and Jackson, 2010) and pumping activity. For each geothermal field, respective earthquake catalogs (NCEDC and SCSN) are complete above at least M3 during the test period (which we tailor to each site). We test the hypothesis that the observed earthquake rate at a geothermal site during the test period is a linear combination of the long-term seismicity and pumping rates. We use a grid search to determine the confidence interval of the weighting parameters.

  12. Exposure Error Masks The Relationship Between Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Helen H.; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Objective We examined whether more precise exposure measures would better detect associations between traffic-related pollution, elemental carbon (EC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and HRV. Methods Repeated 24-h personal and ambient PM2.5, EC, and NO2 were measured for 30 people living in Atlanta, GA. The association between HRV and either ambient concentrations or personal exposures was examined using linear mixed effects models. Results Ambient PM2.5, EC, and NO2 and personal PM2.5 were not associated with HRV. Personal EC and NO2 measured 24-h prior to HRV was associated with decreased rMSSD, PNN50, and HF and with increased LF/HF. RMSSD decreased by 10.97% (95% CI: -18.00,-3.34) for an IQR change in personal EC (0.81 ug/m3). Conclusions Results indicate decreased vagal tone in response to traffic pollutants, which can best be detected with precise personal exposure measures. PMID:20595912

  13. Low cancer rates in Hispanic women related to social and economic factors.

    PubMed

    Newell, G R; Mills, P K

    1986-01-01

    Differences in the occurrence of three common types of cancer among Hispanic compared to Anglo women are presented. These are cancers of the breast, colon, and lung, which together account for about half of all newly diagnosed cancers in the U.S. Differences occur in at least three different geographic areas, Texas, New Mexico, and Los Angeles. These cancer differences are presented in the light of some social and economic differences between Hispanic and Anglo women. Among them are several indicators of social class or economic development, fertility patterns, urban-rural differences, migration status and dietary habits resulting in different nutritional status between the two groups. Although a dietary hypothesis is attractive to explain the differences in breast and colon cancers, it is by no means proved. The magnitude of the differences in these cancers, coupled with their frequency of occurrence in the population, make them important sources for future study. The differences strongly suggest the existence of protective factors associated with ethnic-related life styles of Hispanic women.

  14. Foraging rates of larval dragonfly colonists are positively related to habitat isolation: results from a landscape-level experiment.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Shannon J; Brodin, Tomas; Hammond, John

    2010-03-01

    There is increasing evidence of intraspecific variation in dispersal behavior. Individual differences in dispersal behavior may be correlated with other traits that determine the impact individuals have on patches they colonize. We established habitat patches-artificial pools-across a landscape, and these pools were naturally colonized by dragonfly larvae. Larvae were collected from pools at different levels of isolation and held under common lab conditions for 5 months. We then compared larval foraging rates. Foraging rate was positively related to habitat isolation, and colonists from the most isolated artificial pools had significantly higher foraging rates than individuals from the least isolated pools. Our results indicate that spatial patterns in colonist behavior can develop across a landscape independent of species-level dispersal limitation. This finding suggests that studies of community structure across space should include an assessment of the distribution of phenotypes as well as species-level dispersal limitation patterns.

  15. Relation between growth rate and structure of graphene grown in a 4″ showerhead chemical vapor deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Bekdüz, B; Beckmann, Y; Meier, J; Rest, J; Mertin, W; Bacher, G

    2017-04-07

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene on copper is controlled by a complex interplay of substrate preparation, substrate temperature, pressure and flow of reactive gases. A large variety of recipes have been suggested in literature, often quite specific to the reactor, which is being used. Here, we report on a relation between growth rate and quality of graphene grown in a scalable 4″ CVD reactor. The growth rate is varied by substrate pre-treatment, chamber pressure, and methane to hydrogen (CH4:H2) ratio, respectively. We found that at lower growth rates graphene grains become hexagonal rather than randomly shaped, which leads to a reduced defect density and a sheet resistance down to 268 Ω/sq.

  16. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P.; Escala, A.; Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  17. Maximum growth rates and possible life strategies of different bacterioplankton groups in relation to phosphorus availability in a freshwater reservoir.

    PubMed

    Simek, Karel; Hornák, Karel; Jezbera, Jan; Nedoma, Jirí; Vrba, Jaroslav; Straskrábová, Viera; Macek, Miroslav; Dolan, John R; Hahn, Martin W

    2006-09-01

    We investigated net growth rates of distinct bacterioplankton groups and heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) communities in relation to phosphorus availability by analysing eight in situ manipulation experiments, conducted between 1997 and 2003, in the canyon-shaped Rímov reservoir (Czech Republic). Water samples were size-fractionated and incubated in dialysis bags at the sampling site or transplanted into an area of the reservoir, which differed in phosphorus limitation (range of soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations--SRP, 0.7-96 microg l-1). Using five different rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, net growth rates of the probe-defined bacterial groups and HNF assemblages were estimated and related to SRP using Monod kinetics, yielding growth rate constants specific for each bacterial group. We found highly significant differences among their maximum growth rates while insignificant differences were detected in the saturation constants. However, the latter constants represent only tentative estimates mainly due to insufficient sensitivity of the method used at low in situ SRP concentrations. Interestingly, in these same experiments HNF assemblages grew significantly faster than any bacterial group studied except for a small, but abundant cluster of Betaproteobacteria (targeted by the R-BT065 probe). Potential ecological implications of different growth capabilities for possible life strategies of different bacterial phylogenetic lineages are discussed.

  18. Relation between annoyance and single-number quantities for rating heavy-weight floor impact sound insulation in wooden houses.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jongkwan; Sato, Hiroshi; Kurakata, Kenji; Hiramitsu, Atsuo; Tanaka, Manabu; Hirota, Tomohito

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the relation between annoyance and single-number quantities to rate heavy-weight floor impact sound insulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the subjective response of annoyance resulting from heavy-weight floor impact sounds recorded in wooden houses. Stimuli had two typical spectra and their modified versions, which simulate the precise change in frequency response resulting from insulation treatments. Results of the first experiment showed that the Zwicker's percentile loudness (N(5)) was the quantity to rate most well annoyance of heavy-weight impact sound over a wide sound level range. The second experiment revealed that arithmetic average (L(iFavg,Fmax)) of octave-band sound pressure levels measured using the time constant "fast" and Zwicker's percentile loudness (N(5)) much better described annoyance by the precise change in the sound spectrum attributable to insulation treatments than Japanese standardized single-number quantities (L(i,Fmax,r), L(iA,Fmax), and L(i,Fmax,Aw)) do. Japanese standardized single-number quantities using the A-weighting curve as a rating curve were found to be excessively influenced by the 63 Hz octave-band sound level and have the great sound level-dependences in the relation with subjective ratings.

  19. Organic solvents vapor pressure and relative humidity effects on the phase transition rate of α and β forms of tegafur.

    PubMed

    Petkune, Sanita; Bobrovs, Raitis; Actiņš, Andris

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relative humidity (RH) and solvent vapor pressure effects on the phase transition dynamics between tegafur polymorphic forms that do not form hydrates and solvates. The commercially available α and β modifications of 5-fluoro-1-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)-uracil, known as the antitumor agent tegafur, were used as model materials for this study. While investigating the phase transitions of α and β tegafur under various partial pressures of methanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and water vapor, it was determined that the phase transition rate increased in the presence of solvent vapors, even though no solvates were formed. By increasing the relative air humidity from 20% to 80%, the phase transition rate constant of α and β tegafur was increased about 60 times. After increasing the partial pressure of methanol, n-propanol, or n-butanol vapor, the phase transition rate constant did not change, but the extent of phase transformation was increased. In the homologous row of n-alcohols, the phase transition rate constant decreased with increasing carbon chain length. The dependence of phase transformation extent versus the RH corresponded to the polymolecular adsorption isotherm with a possible capillary condensation effect.

  20. Dose-effect relation of interstitial low-dose-rate radiation (Ir192) in an animal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ruifrok, A C; Levendag, P C; Lakeman, R F; Deurloo, I K; Visser, A G

    1990-01-01

    One way to deliver high doses of radiation to deep seated tumors without damaging the surrounding tissue is by interstitial techniques. This is commonly applied clinically; however, biological data of tumor response to interstitial low-dose-rate gamma irradiation are scarce. Therefore, we have studied the response of rhabdomyosarcoma R1 tumors implanted in the flanks of female Wag/Rij rats using an interstitial Ir192 afterloading system. A template was developed by which four catheters can be implanted in a square geometry with a fixed spacing. Subsequently four Ir192 wires of 2 cm length each are inserted. For dose prescription the highest isodose enveloping the tumor volume was chosen. Interstitial irradiation was performed using tumor volumes of 1500-2000 mm3. A range of minimum tumor doses of 20 up to 115 Gy were given at a mean dose-rate of 48 cGy/hr. Dose-effect relations were obtained from tumor growth curves and tumor cure data, and compared to data from external irradiation. The dose required for 50% cures with interstitial irradiation (TCD50) appears to be 95 +/- 9 Gy. The TCD50 for low-dose-rate interstitial gamma irradiation is 1.5 times the TCD50 for single dose external X ray irradiation at high dose rates, but is comparable to the TCD50 found after fractionated X ray irradiation at high dose rate. Sham treatment of the tumors had no effect on the time needed to reach twice the treatment volume. The growth rate of tumors regrowing after interstitial radiotherapy is not markedly different from the growth rate of untreated (control) tumors (volume doubting time 5.6 +/- 1 day), in contrast to the decreased growth rate after external X ray irradiation. It is argued that the absence of a clear tumor bed effect may be explained by some sparing of the stroma by the low-dose-rate of the interstitial irradiation per se as well as by the physical dose distribution of the interstitial Ir192 sources, giving a relative low dose of radiation to the surrounding

  1. DNS assessment of relation between mean reaction and scalar dissipation rates in the flamelet regime of premixed turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaevich Lipatnikov, Andrei; Nishiki, Shinnosuke; Hasegawa, Tatsuya

    2015-05-01

    The linear relation between the mean rate of product creation and the mean scalar dissipation rate, derived in the seminal paper by K.N.C. Bray ['The interaction between turbulence and combustion', Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Vol. 17 (1979), pp. 223-233], is the cornerstone for models of premixed turbulent combustion that deal with the dissipation rate in order to close the reaction rate. In the present work, this linear relation is straightforwardly validated by analysing data computed earlier in the 3D Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of three statistically stationary, 1D, planar turbulent flames associated with the flamelet regime of premixed combustion. Although the linear relation does not hold at the leading and trailing edges of the mean flame brush, such a result is expected within the framework of Bray's theory. However, the present DNS yields substantially larger (smaller) values of an input parameter cm (or K2 = 1/(2cm - 1)), involved by the studied linear relation, when compared to the commonly used value of cm = 0.7 (or K2 = 2.5). To gain further insight into the issue and into the eventual dependence of cm on mixture composition, the DNS data are combined with the results of numerical simulations of stationary, 1D, planar laminar methane-air flames with complex chemistry, with the results being reported in terms of differently defined combustion progress variables c, i.e. the normalised temperature, density, or mole fraction of CH4, O2, CO2 or H2O. Such a study indicates the dependence of cm both on the definition of c and on the equivalence ratio. Nevertheless, K2 and cm can be estimated by processing the results of simulations of counterpart laminar premixed flames. Similar conclusions were also drawn by skipping the DNS data, but invoking a presumed beta probability density function in order to evaluate cm for the differently defined c's and various equivalence ratios.

  2. Heavy smoking rate trends and related factors in Korean occupational groups: analysis of KNHANES 2007–2012 data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Guen; Pang, Do-Dam; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Jang, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study was designed to investigate the smoking and heavy smoking trends and identify possible related factors among Korean male workers from 2007 to 2012 by occupational groups. Methods The data were derived from the fourth (2007–2009) and fifth (2010–2012) waves of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Occupational groups were categorised into three groups, which were non-manual, manual and service and sales groups. Age-adjusted prevalence rates of smoking and heavy smoking (>20 cigarettes/day) in men aged 25–64 years were calculated. Factors associated with heavy smoking were investigated using logistic regression analyses. Results Smoking rate in manual workers decreased gradually over time (p for trend <0.0001). Smoking rate was higher in manual than non-manual workers, but the difference reduced over time (p for trend <0.0001). Heavy smoking rate decreased from 2007 to 2012 (p for trend <0.0001). Heavy smoking rate was higher in manual than non-manual workers; however, this difference increased over time. Stress, depressive mood and long working hours (≥60 h/week) were associated with heavy smoking. Conclusions Antismoking policy should focus on current and heavy smokers. Workplace antismoking programmes should consider working hours and stress, especially in manual workers. PMID:26563212

  3. Analysis of changes in relative elemental growth rate patterns in the elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots upon gravistimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis is an important system for studying root physiology, the localized growth patterns of its roots have not been well defined, particularly during tropic responses. In order to characterize growth rate profiles along the apex of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh (ecotype Columbia) we applied small charcoal particles to the root surface and analyzed their displacement during growth using an automated video digitizer system with custom software for tracking the markers. When growing vertically, the maximum elongation rate occurred 481 +/- 50 microns back from the extreme tip of the root (tip of root cap), and the elongation zone extended back to 912 +/- 137 microns. The distal elongation zone (DEZ) has previously been described as the apical region of the elongation zone in which the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) is < or = 30% of the peak rate in the central elongation zone. By this definition, our data indicate that the basal limit of the DEZ was located 248 +/- 30 microns from the root tip. However, after gravistimulation, the growth patterns of the root changed. Within the first hour of graviresponse, the basal limit of the DEZ and the position of peak REGR shifted apically on the upper flank of the root. This was due to a combination of increased growth in the DEZ and growth inhibition in the central elongation zone. On the lower flank, the basal limit of the DEZ shifted basipetally as the REGR decreased. These factors set up the gradient of growth rate across the root, which drives curvature.

  4. Left ventricular long axis tissue Doppler systolic velocity is independently related to heart rate and body size

    PubMed Central

    Peverill, Roger E.; Chou, Bon; Donelan, Lesley

    2017-01-01

    Background The physiological factors which affect left ventricular (LV) long-axis function are not fully defined. We investigated the relationships of resting heart rate and body size with the peak velocities and amplitudes of LV systolic and early diastolic long axis motion, and also with long-axis contraction duration. Methods Two groups of adults free of cardiac disease underwent pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging at the septal and lateral mitral annular borders. Group 1 (n = 77) were healthy subjects <50 years of age and Group 2 (n = 65) were subjects between 40–80 years of age referred for stress echocardiography. Systolic excursion (SExc), duration (SDur) and peak velocity (s') and early diastolic excursion (EDExc) and peak velocity (e') were measured. Results SExc was not correlated with heart rate, height or body surface area (BSA) for either LV wall in either group, but SDur was inversely correlated with heart rate for both walls and both groups, and after adjustment for heart rate, males in both groups had a shorter septal SDur. Septal and lateral s` were independently and positively correlated with SExc, heart rate and height in both groups, independent of sex and age. There were no correlations of heart rate, height or BSA with either e` or EDExc for either wall in either group. Conclusion Heart rate and height independently modify the relationship between s` and SExc, but neither are related to EDExc or e`. These findings suggest that s` and SExc cannot be used interchangeably for the assessment of LV long-axis contraction. PMID:28288162

  5. Suicide rate in relation to the Human Development Index and other health related factors: A global ecological study from 91 countries.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Salman; Armanmehr, Vajihe; Nematollahi, Shahrzad; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh

    2017-02-07

    There has been no worldwide ecological study on suicide as a global major public health problem. This study aimed to identify the variations in suicide specific rates using the Human Development Index (HDI) and some health related variables among countries around the world. In this ecological study, we obtained the data from the World Bank Report 2013. The analysis was restricted to 91 countries for which both the epidemiologic data from the suicide rates and HDI were available. Overall, the global prevalence of suicide rate was 10.5 (95% confidence intervals: 8.8, 12.2) per 100,000 individuals, which significantly varied according to gender (16.3 in males vs. 4.6 in females, p<0.001) and different levels of human development (11.64/100,000 individuals in very high development countries, 7.93/100,000 individuals in medium development countries, and 13.94/100,000 individuals in high development countries, p=0.004). In conclusion, the suicide rate varies greatly between countries with different development levels. Our findings also suggest that male gender and HDI components are associated with an increased risk of suicide behaviors. Hence, detecting population subgroups with a high suicide risk and reducing the inequality of socioeconomic determinants are necessary to prevent this disorder around the world.

  6. Heart rate changes in relation to cosmic ray intensity variability: A wide investigation in different latitudes and longitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromichalaki, Helen; Safaraly-Oghlu Babayev, Elchin; -Christina Papailiou, Maria; Dimitrova, Svetla; Kudela, Karel; Stetiarova, Jana; Giannaropoulou, Elisavet; Loucas, Panayiotis

    The increased number of recent studies over the last years, regarding the possible effect of geomagnetic disturbances and cosmic ray intensity variations may have on human physiological parameters (such as heart rate, arterial diastolic and systolic blood pressure, etc) suggests that biological objects and, particularly, human health are potentially affected by solar activity and related geophysical changes. Different scientific groups from Azerbaijan (Baku), Bulgaria (Sofia), Greece (Athens) and Slovakia (Kosice) have conducted relevant researches, separately or in cooperation with each another, using medical data from 1994 to 2008. The results of collaborative study of human heart rate changes in relation to cosmic ray intensity variations are presented in this paper. Heart rate data were digitally registered: 1) for seven functionally healthy persons on working days (including Saturdays) during experiments at the Laboratory of Heliobiology located at the Medical Centre INAM, Baku, for the time period from July 15, 2006 to March 3, 2008; 2) for 86 healthy volunteers of the Solar -Terrestrial Laboratory of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia on every working day during the autumn and spring in years of maximal solar activity, from October 1, 2001 to November 9, 2001 and from April 8, 2002 to May 28, 2002; 3) for 225 persons with no cardiac symptoms or hospital admission, of the cardiological clinic of the KAT Hospital in Athens, for the time period from 2002 to 2006; and 4) for 4018 Slovak aviators during the time period from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 2002. It should be noted that considered period covers different phases of solar activity cycles and is characterized by such time intervals of strong solar and geomagnetic activity as October -November 2003, November 2004, January and July 2005 and December 2006. The statistical methods were applied to establish a statistical significance of the effect of cosmic ray intensity variations on heart rate

  7. LOSS Revisited. II. The Relative Rates of Different Types of Supernovae Vary between Low- and High-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graur, Or; Bianco, Federica B.; Modjaz, Maryam; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Smith, Nathan

    2017-03-01

    In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope (SE) supernova (SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses ≲ {10}10 {M}ȯ . Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ∼3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host about nine times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia seem to be ∼30% more common in low-mass galaxies, making these galaxies better sources for homogeneous SN Ia cosmology samples. The relative rates of SNe IIb are consistent in both low- and high-mass galaxies. The same is true for broad-line SNe Ic, although our sample includes only two such objects. The results presented here are in tension with a similar analysis from the Palomar Transient Factory, especially as regards SNe IIb.

  8. Examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates in male youth ice-hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lemez, S; Baker, J; Horton, S; Wattie, N; Weir, P

    2014-12-01

    The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey players from ages 10 to 15 years (n = 14 325). In Study 1, dropout was highest among players born in quartiles three and four [χ(2) (3) = 16.32, P < 0.05; w = 0.06], while Study 2 found dropped out players to have less movement between competition levels compared to retained players. This study confirms a relationship between relative age and dropout from ice-hockey and adds further depth to our understanding of this persistent phenomenon.

  9. Effect of the presence of trophectoderm vesicles on blastocyst in relation to in vitro hatching, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage rates.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yasuhisa; Matsui, Yuki; Iizumi, Ayaka; Tsuchiya, Syoutarou; Kaneko, Yumi; Sato, Kazufumi; Ozaki, Tomoya; Araki, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Mitsuru

    2016-10-01

    Trophectoderm vesicles (TVs) are observed in some blastocysts that penetrate cells from the zona pellucida to the outer margin. Therefore, we compared this incidence in relation to hatching, pregnancy, and miscarriage rates between conventional in vitro fertilization (c-IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Vitrified/warmed blastocysts (n = 112) were derived from surplus embryos. The blastocysts were then observed using time-lapse cinematography to resolve the relationship between hatching and implantation. Another study was conducted that comprised 681 embryo transfer cycles in 533 patients who received a single vitrified/warmed blastocyst from our clinic. The incidence of TV was significantly higher in embryos inseminated by ICSI compared with c-IVF [ICSI: 51/56 (91 %); c-IVF: 25/56 (45 %); P < 0.01]. The successful hatching rate was significantly lower in ICSI than in c-IVF [ICSI: 11/56 (20 %); c-IVF: 29/56 (52 %); P < 0.01]. In addition, the hatching rate was significantly lower when TVs were present (14/76; 18 %) than in non-TV embryos (26/36; 72 %) (P < 0.01). In regard to the clinical study results, no significant differences were found between the groups in the pregnancy rate (TV present group: 107/183, 58.5 %; TV absent group: 273/498, 54.8 %) and miscarriage rate (TV present group: 21/107, 19.6 %; TV absent group: 53/273, 19.4 %). In vivo, we hypothesized that hatching and hatched would occur naturally by assisting protease action in the uterus; therefore, these results suggest that the presence of TV has no effect on pregnancy rates in the clinical setting.

  10. Differences in proleptic and epicormic shoot structures in relation to water deficit and growth rate in almond trees (Prunus dulcis)

    PubMed Central

    Negrón, Claudia; Contador, Loreto; Lampinen, Bruce D.; Metcalf, Samuel G.; Guédon, Yann; Costes, Evelyne; DeJong, Theodore M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Shoot characteristics differ depending on the meristem tissue that they originate from and environmental conditions during their development. This study focused on the effects of plant water status on axillary meristem fate and flowering patterns along proleptic and epicormic shoots, as well as on shoot growth rates on ‘Nonpareil’ almond trees (Prunus dulcis). The aims were (1) to characterize the structural differences between proleptic and epicormic shoots, (2) to determine whether water deficits modify shoot structures differently depending on shoot type, and (3) to determine whether shoot structures are related to shoot growth rates. Methods A hidden semi-Markov model of the axillary meristem fate and number of flower buds per node was built for two shoot types growing on trees exposed to three plant water status treatments. The models segmented observed shoots into successive homogeneous zones, which were compared between treatments. Shoot growth rates were calculated from shoot extension measurements made during the growing season. Key Results Proleptic shoots had seven successive homogeneous zones while epicormic shoots had five zones. Shoot structures were associated with changes in growth rate over the season. Water deficit (1) affected the occurrence and lengths of the first zones of proleptic shoots, but only the occurrence of the third zone was reduced in epicormic shoots; (2) had a minor effect on zone flowering patterns and did not modify shoot or zone composition of axillary meristem fates; and (3) reduced growth rates, although patterns over the season were similar among treatments. Conclusions Two meristem types, with different latency durations, produced shoots with different growth rates and distinct structures. Differences between shoot type structure responses to water deficit appeared to reflect their ontogenetic characteristics and/or resource availability for their development. Tree water deficit appeared to stimulate

  11. Relating the Diversity, Abundance, and Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Communities to Nitrification Rates in the Coastal Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolar, B. B.; Smith, J. M.; Chavez, F.; Francis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting first step of nitrification, is an important link between reduced (ammonia) and oxidized (nitrate) nitrogen, and controls the relative distribution of these forms of inorganic nitrogen. This process is catalyzed via the ammonia monooxygenase enzyme of both ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Archaea (AOA); the α subunit of this enzyme is encoded by the amoA gene and has been used as the molecular marker to detect this process. In the ocean, AOA are typically 10-1000 times more and are likely more active than AOB, and thus are key players in the marine nitrogen cycle. Monterey Bay is a dynamic site to study nitrification, as seasonal upwelling brings deep water and nutrients into surface waters, which can promote phytoplankton blooms and impact biogeochemical processes such as the nitrogen cycle. We have sampled two sites within Monterey Bay bimonthly for two years as part of the ongoing Monterey Bay Time Series (MBTS) to quantify AOA genes, transcripts, and nitrification rates. Two ecotypes of AOA are routinely found in Monterey Bay - the 'shallow' water column A (WCA) and 'deep' water column B (WCB) clades, which are thought to have distinct physiological properties and can be distinguished based on the amoA gene sequence. Previous work has shown a strong relationship between nitrification rates in Monterey Bay with the abundance of WCA amoA genes and transcripts. Additionally, we found a correlation between the relative abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA reads (as % of total) and the absolute abundance of AOA amoA genes (determined via qPCR) in Monterey Bay and the California Current System. AOA 16S rRNA gene abundances in turn correlated significantly with changes in nitrification rate with depth, while the relative abundance of genes and transcripts binned to a single AOA (Nitrosopumilus maritimus) was not significantly correlated to nitrification rate. Further analysis of the sequenced AOA

  12. Gender differences in age-related decline in glomerular filtration rates in healthy people and chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Since men with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progress faster than women, an accurate assessment of CKD progression rates should be based on gender differences in age-related decline of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in healthy individuals. Methods A Chinese sample population from a stratified, multistage, and clustered CKD screening study was classified into healthy, at-risk, and CKD groups. The gender differences in estimated GFR (eGFR) and age-related eGFR decline were calculated for each group after controlling for blood pressure, fasting glucose levels, serum lipids levels, education level, and smoking status. After referencing to the healthy group, gender-specific multivariate-adjusted rates of decline in eGFR and differences in the rates of decline were calculated for both CKD and at-risk groups. Results The healthy, at-risk, and CKD groups consisted of 4569, 7434, and 1573 people, respectively. In all the 3 groups, the multivariate-adjusted eGFRs in men were lower than the corresponding eGFRs in women. In addition, in the healthy and at-risk groups, the rates of decline in eGFR in men were lower than the corresponding rates of decline in women (healthy group: 0.51 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 vs. 0.74 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 and at-risk group: 0.60 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 vs. 0.73 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1). However, in the CKD group, the rates of decline in eGFR in men were similar to those in women (0.96 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 vs. 0.91 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1). However, after referencing to the healthy group, the rates of decline in eGFR in men in the at-risk and CKD groups were greater faster than the corresponding rates in women (at-risk group: 0.10 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 vs. -0.03 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 and CKD group: 0.44 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1 vs. 0.15 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2·yr-1). Conclusion To accurately assess gender differences in CKD progression rates, gender differences in age-related decline in GFR should be considered

  13. The dose rate dependence of synthetic diamond detectors in the relative dosimetry of high-energy electron therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, N.; Nam, T. L.; Derry, T. E.; Mhlanga, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluation of the linear response of a radiation detector with absorbed dose rate should be of paramount importance in clinical dosimetry. As modelled by Fowler, electrical conductivity, σ, of a solid-state detector and absorbed dose rate, Dr, are related by σ~DrΔ where Δ is the linearity index. The detector is thus independent of dose rate if Δ is unity. This contribution investigates and evaluates the dependence of Δ of synthetic diamond detectors of various types on therapy electron energy and its influence in relative electron dosimetry with the aim of selecting a suitable crystal. The study was conducted initially on one HPHT and eight CVD synthesised diamonds of optical grade (OG) and detector grade (DG) qualities using 6-14 MeV electron therapy beams. For quality control, the diamond specimens were characterised by Raman spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR). Values of Δ ranging between 0.79 and 1.03 were obtained for all the nine diamond detectors at 1000 V/cm for 7 and 12 MeV electron beams. Whereas the Δ values of the HPHT diamond were found not to vary with the electron energies, those of three CVD samples of a given class varied with the electron energies within 2%. In addition, a very strong variation of about 9% was observed for two OG crystals of another class. The Δ values were found to decrease with increasing dose rate and there was a tendency for the Δ values to change with defect levels present within the crystals. Due to the independence of the HPHT diamond's Δ values on electron energy and its better stability of response to radiation, a small-size HPHT crystal was then evaluated of its potential applications in small radiation fields. Relative dose distributions measured with the diamond probe on exposure to 6, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams between 1×1 cm2 and 10×10 cm2 fields were compared with those obtained with reference ion chambers and a Dosimetry Diode E. The results showed that with careful selection of a suitable

  14. Natural Selection and Recombination Rate Variation Shape Nucleotide Polymorphism Across the Genomes of Three Related Populus Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Street, Nathaniel R; Scofield, Douglas G; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2016-03-01

    A central aim of evolutionary genomics is to identify the relative roles that various evolutionary forces have played in generating and shaping genetic variation within and among species. Here we use whole-genome resequencing data to characterize and compare genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism, site frequency spectrum, and population-scaled recombination rates in three species of Populus: Populus tremula, P. tremuloides, and P. trichocarpa. We find that P. tremuloides has the highest level of genome-wide variation, skewed allele frequencies, and population-scaled recombination rates, whereas P. trichocarpa harbors the lowest. Our findings highlight multiple lines of evidence suggesting that natural selection, due to both purifying and positive selection, has widely shaped patterns of nucleotide polymorphism at linked neutral sites in all three species. Differences in effective population sizes and rates of recombination largely explain the disparate magnitudes and signatures of linked selection that we observe among species. The present work provides the first phylogenetic comparative study on a genome-wide scale in forest trees. This information will also improve our ability to understand how various evolutionary forces have interacted to influence genome evolution among related species.

  15. Longitudinal Assessment of Self-Harm Statements of Youth in Foster Care: Rates, Reporters, and Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Joy; Hambrick, Erin P; Tunno, Angela M; Jackson, Yo; Spangler, Amanda; Kanine, Rebecca M

    2015-12-01

    Self-harm in youth is a risk factor related to mental health and future morbidity, yet, relatively little is known about the rates and course of self-harm in youth residing in foster care. This study examined self-harm talk in foster youth based on caregiver and child report for 135 children between the ages of 8- and 11-years old. Longitudinal data on course of self-harm talk from both youth and caregivers also are provided. Caregivers identified that 24% of youth participants had disclosed a desire to die or to hurt themselves. Youth self-report revealed that 21% of children indicated a desire for self-harm, and rates of self-harm from both reporters decreased over time. While overall rates were similar across reporters, findings show discrepancies between youth self-report and caregiver report within individuals. Also, caregivers for youth in residential facilities were more likely to report youth self-harm talk than caregivers from foster home settings.

  16. Longitudinal assessment of self-harm statements of youth in foster care: Rates, reporters, and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Joy; Hambrick, Erin P.; Tunno, Angela M.; Jackson, Yo; Spangler, Amanda; Kanine, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Self-harm in youth is a risk factor related to mental health and future morbidity, yet, relatively little is known about the rates and course of self-harm in youth residing in foster care. This study examined self-harm talk in foster youth based on caregiver and child report for 135 children between the ages of 8- and 11-years old. Longitudinal data on course of self-harm talk from both youth and caregivers also are provided. Caregivers identified that 24% of youth participants had disclosed a desire to die or to hurt themselves. Youth self-report revealed that 21% of children indicated a desire for self-harm, and rates of self-harm from both reporters decreased over time. While overall rates were similar across reporters, findings show discrepancies between youth self-report and caregiver report within individuals. Also, caregivers for youth in residential facilities were more likely to report youth self-harm talk than caregivers from foster home settings. PMID:25534966

  17. Variability in scale growth rates of chum salmon ( Oncorhynchus keta) in relation to climate changes in the late 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyunju; Kim, Suam; Seong, Kibeik; Kang, Sukyung

    2006-02-01

    Fish scales were used to investigate the interannual variability in chum salmon growth rates at specific ages in relation to climatic/environmental changes during the 1980s-1990s. Scales were obtained from adult salmon returning to the east coast of Korea between 1984 and 1998. Assuming proportionality between scale size increments and fish length, distances between scale annuli were regarded as the growth conditions in different habitat areas with respect to the life stages of chum salmon. In estuarine and coastal areas, growth rates of fingerling salmon were higher in the 1990s than in the 1980s. Zooplankton abundance off the east coast of Korea increased after the late 1980s, which may have provided favorable growth conditions for young salmon in the 1990s. Growth of juvenile chum salmon during the first summer (Okhotsk Sea) was relatively stable, and neither SST nor zooplankton biomass fluctuated significantly during the study period. However, in the Bering Sea, salmon growth rates between age-2 and age-4 (i.e. ocean-phase immature salmon) were higher in the 1980s than in the 1990s. Variability in salmon growth in the Bering Sea was correlated to zooplankton biomass. These results suggest that the climate regime shift of 1988/1989 in the subarctic North Pacific affected salmon growth mediated by changes of zooplankton biomass, revealing a bottom-up process.

  18. Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens. PMID:27551749

  19. Residential Surrounding Greenness, Self-Rated Health and Interrelations with Aspects of Neighborhood Environment and Social Relations.

    PubMed

    Orban, Ester; Sutcliffe, Robynne; Dragano, Nico; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    Previous research suggests that green environments positively influence health. Several underlying mechanisms have been discussed; one of them is facilitation of social interaction. Further, greener neighborhoods may appear more aesthetic, contributing to satisfaction and well-being. Aim of this study was to analyze the association of residential surrounding greenness with self-rated health, using data from 4480 women and men aged 45-75 years that participated in the German population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study. We further aimed to explore the relationships of greenness and self-rated health with the neighborhood environment and social relations. Surrounding greenness was measured using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) within 100 m around participants' residence. As a result, we found that with higher greenness, poor self-rated health decreased (adjusted OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.82-0.98; per 0.1 increase in NDVI), while neighborhood satisfaction (1.41, 1.23-1.61) and neighborhood social capital (1.22, 1.12-1.32) increased. Further, we observed inverse associations of neighborhood satisfaction (0.70, 0.52-0.94), perceived safety (0.36, 0.22-0.60), social satisfaction (0.43, 0.31-0.58), and neighborhood social capital (0.53, 0.44-0.64) with poor self-rated health. These results underline the importance of incorporating green elements into neighborhoods for health-promoting urban development strategies.

  20. Nasolabial appearance in adults with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate: Relation between professional and lay rating and patients' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mani, Maria R; Semb, Gunvor; Andlin-Sobocki, Anna

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relation between professional and lay rating and patients' satisfaction with nasolabial appearance in adults with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). A cross-sectional population study, long-term follow-up with controls matched for age and sex was performed. All patients with complete UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 (n = 109), treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden were invited and 83 (76%) agreed to participate. Follow-up was 20-47 years after primary lip surgery. An age- and sex-matched control group of 65 people were evaluated in the same way. Ratings from professional and lay panels of cropped photographs using a 5 point categorical scale for 4 features of the nasolabial appearance and the satisfaction with appearance questionnaire (SWA) for self-assessment were used. Professional and lay ratings correlated positively but the professionals consistently rated nasolabial appearance as better than did the lay panel (p < 0.001). Self-assessment of nasolabial appearance with the SWA (by patients and controls) did not correlate with the judgement of lay or professional panels. Judgement of nasolabial appearance in adults with repaired UCLP differs among professionals, lay people, and patients. This should be considered when deciding about secondary surgical treatment of signs of clefts.

  1. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, B. Ian; Yuan, Xin; Santangelo, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov. PMID:27599104

  2. The rate and magnitude of atmospheric pressure change that aggravate pain-related behavior of nerve injured rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun; Obata, Kouei; Mizumura, Kazue

    2011-05-01

    Complaints of patients with chronic pain may increase when the weather changes. The exact mechanism for weather change-induced pain has not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that artificially lowering barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with neuropathic pain [chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spinal nerve ligation (SNL)]. In the present study, we examined the rate and magnitude of LP that aggravates neuropathic pain. We measured pain-related behaviors [number of paw lifts to von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation] in awake rats after SNL or CCI surgery, and found that rates of decompression ≥5 hPa/h and ≥10 hPa/h and magnitudes of decompression ≥5 hPa and ≥10 hPa augmented pain-related behaviors in SNL and CCI rats, respectively. These results indicate that LP within the range of natural weather patterns augments neuropathic pain in rats, and that SNL rats are more sensitive to LP than CCI rats.

  3. Mutation Rates and Discriminating Power for 13 Rapidly-Mutating Y-STRs between Related and Unrelated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Carla; Pesci, Valeria; Barbieri, Chiara; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Pagani, Luca; Ayub, Qasim; Ferri, Gianmarco; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Pelotti, Susi

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly Mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs) were recently introduced in forensics in order to increase the differentiation of Y-chromosomal profiles even in case of close relatives. We estimate RM Y-STRs mutation rates and their power to discriminate between related individuals by using samples extracted from a wide set of paternal pedigrees and by comparing RM Y-STRs results with those obtained from the Y-filer set. In addition, we tested the ability of RM Y-STRs to discriminate between unrelated individuals carrying the same Y-filer haplotype, using the haplogroup R-M269 (reportedly characterised by a strong resemblance in Y-STR profiles) as a case study. Our results, despite confirming the high mutability of RM Y-STRs, show significantly lower mutation rates than reference germline ones. Consequently, their power to discriminate between related individuals, despite being higher than the one of Y-filer, does not seem to improve significantly the performance of the latter. On the contrary, when considering R-M269 unrelated individuals, RM Y-STRs reveal significant discriminatory power and retain some phylogenetic signal, allowing the correct classification of individuals for some R-M269-derived sub-lineages. These results have important implications not only for forensics, but also for molecular anthropology, suggesting that RM Y-STRs are useful tools for exploring subtle genetic variability within Y-chromosomal haplogroups. PMID:27802306

  4. Large-Scale Variation in Forest Carbon Turnover Rate and its Relation to Climate - Remote Sensing vs. Global Vegetation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhais, N.; Thurner, M.; Beer, C.; Forkel, M.; Rademacher, T. T.; Santoro, M.; Tum, M.; Schmullius, C.

    2015-12-01

    While vegetation productivity is known to be strongly correlated to climate, there is a need for an improved understanding of the underlying processes of vegetation carbon turnover and their importance at a global scale. This shortcoming has been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which we recently have been able to overcome by a biomass dataset covering northern boreal and temperate forests originating from radar remote sensing. Based on state-of-the-art products on biomass and NPP, we are for the first time able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests. The implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current global vegetation models. In contrast to our observation-based findings, investigated models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well to observation-based NPP, simulated vegetation carbon stocks are severely biased compared to our biomass dataset. Current limitations lead to considerable uncertainties in the estimated vegetation carbon turnover, contributing substantially to the forest feedback to climate change. Our results are the basis for improving mortality concepts in global vegetation models and estimating their impact on the land carbon balance.

  5. Mutation Rates and Discriminating Power for 13 Rapidly-Mutating Y-STRs between Related and Unrelated Individuals.

    PubMed

    Boattini, Alessio; Sarno, Stefania; Bini, Carla; Pesci, Valeria; Barbieri, Chiara; De Fanti, Sara; Quagliariello, Andrea; Pagani, Luca; Ayub, Qasim; Ferri, Gianmarco; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Pelotti, Susi

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly Mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs) were recently introduced in forensics in order to increase the differentiation of Y-chromosomal profiles even in case of close relatives. We estimate RM Y-STRs mutation rates and their power to discriminate between related individuals by using samples extracted from a wide set of paternal pedigrees and by comparing RM Y-STRs results with those obtained from the Y-filer set. In addition, we tested the ability of RM Y-STRs to discriminate between unrelated individuals carrying the same Y-filer haplotype, using the haplogroup R-M269 (reportedly characterised by a strong resemblance in Y-STR profiles) as a case study. Our results, despite confirming the high mutability of RM Y-STRs, show significantly lower mutation rates than reference germline ones. Consequently, their power to discriminate between related individuals, despite being higher than the one of Y-filer, does not seem to improve significantly the performance of the latter. On the contrary, when considering R-M269 unrelated individuals, RM Y-STRs reveal significant discriminatory power and retain some phylogenetic signal, allowing the correct classification of individuals for some R-M269-derived sub-lineages. These results have important implications not only for forensics, but also for molecular anthropology, suggesting that RM Y-STRs are useful tools for exploring subtle genetic variability within Y-chromosomal haplogroups.

  6. Heart Rate Variability Moderates the Association Between Separation-Related Psychological Distress and Blood Pressure Reactivity Over Time.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Hasselmo, Karen; Sbarra, David A

    2016-08-01

    Divorce is a stressor associated with long-term health risk, though the mechanisms of this effect are poorly understood. Cardiovascular reactivity is one biological pathway implicated as a predictor of poor long-term health after divorce. A sample of recently separated and divorced adults (N = 138) was assessed over an average of 7.5 months to explore whether individual differences in heart rate variability-assessed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia-operate in combination with subjective reports of separation-related distress to predict prospective changes in cardiovascular reactivity, as indexed by blood pressure reactivity. Participants with low resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia at baseline showed no association between divorce-related distress and later blood pressure reactivity, whereas participants with high respiratory sinus arrhythmia showed a positive association. In addition, within-person variation in respiratory sinus arrhythmia and between-persons variation in separation-related distress interacted to predict blood pressure reactivity at each laboratory visit. Individual differences in heart rate variability and subjective distress operate together to predict cardiovascular reactivity and may explain some of the long-term health risk associated with divorce.

  7. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian; Yuan, Xin; Anderson, James M; Santangelo, George M

    2016-09-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov.

  8. On the variation of the sun's X ray background flux and its relation to the sun's flaring rate, energetic event rate, and the solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Daily averages of the sun's X-ray background flux as measured by the GOES satellite are combined to yield monthly means and 'smoothed' monthly means (12-month moving averages) for the interval January 1986 through May 1992 (minimum rise, maximum, and initial decline of solar cycle 22). These averages are then compared directly to the sun's optical flaring rate, energetic event rate, and the usual markers of the solar cycle (e.g., sunspot number, total corrected sunspot area, and 10.7-cm solar radio flux, number of groups, and number of spots). The results of this analysis support previous findings that there exists a remarkably close positive relationship between the optical flaring rate and the X-ray background flux rate (the independent variable), and that the X-ray background flux rate can be used as a proxy for the solar cycle. Additionally, this study has found that a strong positive relationship exists between the energetic event rate and the X-ray background flux rate (the independent variable), and that the lag between the maxima of the rates of optical flaring and X-ray background flux reported for cycle 21 did not recur for cycle 22.

  9. The Roles of Mutation, Selection, and Expression in Determining Relative Rates of Evolution in Mitochondrial versus Nuclear Genomes.

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Sloan, Daniel B

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotes rely on proteins encoded by the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which interact within multisubunit complexes such as oxidative-phosphorylation enzymes. Although selection is thought to be less efficient on the asexual mt genome, in bilaterian animals the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) is lower in mt- compared with nuclear-encoded OXPHOS subunits, suggesting stronger effects of purifying selection in the mt genome. Because high levels of gene expression constrain protein sequence evolution, one proposed resolution to this paradox is that mt genes are expressed more highly than nuclear genes. To test this hypothesis, we investigated expression and sequence evolution of mt and nuclear genes from 84 diverse eukaryotes that vary in mt gene content and mutation rate. We found that the relationship between mt and nuclear ω values varied dramatically across eukaryotes. In contrast, transcript abundance is consistently higher for mt genes than nuclear genes, regardless of which genes happen to be in the mt genome. Consequently, expression levels cannot be responsible for the differences in ω Rather, 84% of the variance in the ratio of ω values between mt and nuclear genes could be explained by differences in mutation rate between the two genomes. We relate these findings to the hypothesis that high rates of mt mutation select for compensatory changes in the nuclear genome. We also propose an explanation for why mt transcripts consistently outnumber their nuclear counterparts, with implications for mitonuclear protein imbalance and aging.

  10. Gas-phase reaction of methyl isothiocyanate and methyl isocyanate with hydroxyl radicals under static relative rate conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhou; Hebert, Vincent R; Miller, Glenn C

    2014-02-26

    Gaseous methyl isothiocyanate (MITC), the principal breakdown product of the soil fumigant metam sodium (sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate), is an inhalation exposure concern to persons living near treated areas. Inhalation exposure also involves gaseous methyl isocyanate (MIC), a highly reactive and toxic transformation product of MITC. In this work, gas-phase hydroxyl (OH) radical reaction rate constants of MITC and MIC have been determined using a static relative rate technique under controlled laboratory conditions. The rate constants obtained are 15.36 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MITC and 3.62 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MIC. The average half-lives of MITC and MIC in the atmosphere are estimated to be 15.7 and 66.5 h, respectively. The molar conversion of MITC to MIC for OH radical reactions is 67% ± 8%, which indicates that MIC is the primary product of the MITC-OH reaction in the gas phase.

  11. Influence of the superposition approximation on calculated effective dose rates from galactic cosmic rays at aerospace-related altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Kyle

    2015-07-01

    The superposition approximation was commonly employed in atmospheric nuclear transport modeling until recent years and is incorporated into flight dose calculation codes such as CARI-6 and EPCARD. The useful altitude range for this approximation is investigated using Monte Carlo transport techniques. CARI-7A simulates atmospheric radiation transport of elements H-Fe using a database of precalculated galactic cosmic radiation showers calculated with MCNPX 2.7.0 and is employed here to investigate the influence of the superposition approximation on effective dose rates, relative to full nuclear transport of galactic cosmic ray primary ions. Superposition is found to produce results less than 10% different from nuclear transport at current commercial and business aviation altitudes while underestimating dose rates at higher altitudes. The underestimate sometimes exceeds 20% at approximately 23 km and exceeds 40% at 50 km. Thus, programs employing this approximation should not be used to estimate doses or dose rates for high-altitude portions of the commercial space and near-space manned flights that are expected to begin soon.

  12. Dancing bees tune both duration and rate of waggle-run production in relation to nectar-source profitability.

    PubMed

    Seeley, T D; Mikheyev, A S; Pagano, G J

    2000-09-01

    For more than 50 years, investigators of the honey bee's waggle dance have reported that richer food sources seem to elicit longer-lasting and livelier dances than do poorer sources. However, no one had measured both dance duration and liveliness as a function of food-source profitability. Using video analysis, we found that nectar foragers adjust both the duration (D) and the rate (R) of waggle-run production, thereby tuning the number of waggle runs produced per foraging trip (W, where W= DR) as a function of food-source profitability. Both duration and rate of waggle-run production increase with rising food-source profitability. Moreover, we found that a dancing bee adjusts the rate of waggle-run production (R) in relation to food-source profitability by adjusting the mean duration of the return-phase portion of her dance circuits. This finding raises the possibility that bees can use return-phase duration as an index of food-source profitability. Finally, dances having different levels of liveliness have different mean durations of the return phase, indicating that dance liveliness can be quantified in terms of the time interval between consecutive waggle runs.

  13. Sex steroid binding protein receptor (SBP-R) is related to a reduced proliferation rate in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Catalano, M G; Comba, A; Fazzari, A; Benedusi-Pagliano, E; Sberveglieri, M; Revelli, A; Massobrio, M; Frairia, R; Fortunati, N

    1997-02-01

    In the last years, an increasing amount of studies described a membrane receptor for the Sex Steroid Binding Protein (SBP) on several androgen-estrogen dependent tissues. One of the suggested biological roles of the interaction between SBP and its receptor seems to be a negative control of the E2 induced proliferation of human breast cancer cells through the cAMP pathway. In the present work, SBP membrane receptor was evaluated on human breast cancer specimens with a radio-binding assay. Each tissue sample was also evaluated for ER and PGR status. Cytosol Thymidine Kinase levels were measured in tissue samples in order to evaluate cell proliferation rate. SBP binding to membranes of ER +/PGR + samples was time and temperature dependent, specific and at high affinity. In addition, SBP recognized on breast cancer membranes two sites at different affinity, as previously described for other human tissues and cultured cells. Membrane SBP-R was detected in a significantly higher number of samples positive for both ER and PGR than in negative samples. SBP-R positive samples showed a significantly lower proliferation rate than SBP-R negative samples as demonstrated by TK activity. The present study contains evidences for the existence of a specific membrane receptor for SBP in breast cancer sample membranes and the presence of SBP-R seems to be strictly related to a lower proliferation rate of the sample.

  14. Self-rated Health in Relation to Rape and Mental Health Disorders in a National Sample of College Women

    PubMed Central

    Zinzow, Heidi; Amstadter, Ananda B.; McCauley, Jenna L.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to employ a multivariate approach to examine the correlates of self-rated health in a college sample of women, with particular emphasis on sexual assault history and related mental health outcomes. Participants A national sample of 2,000 female college students participated in a structured phone interview between January and June, 2006. Methods Interview modules assessed demographics, posttraumatic stress disorder, major depressive episode, substance use, rape experiences, and physical health. Results Logistic regression analyses showed that poor self-rated health was associated with low income (OR = 2.70), lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (OR = 2.47), lifetime major depressive episode (OR = 2.56), past year illicit drug use (OR = 2.48), and multiple rape history (OR = 2.25). Conclusions These findings highlight the need for university mental health and medical service providers to assess for rape history, and to diagnose and treat related psychiatric problems in order to reduce physical morbidity. PMID:21823953

  15. Early heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures predict posttraumatic stress disorder – a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Suendermann, Oliver; Ehlers, Anke; Boellinghaus, Inga; Gamer, Matthias; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Trauma survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) report heightened physiological responses to a wide range of stimuli. It has been suggested that associative learning and stimulus generalization play a key role in the development of these symptoms. Some studies have found that trauma survivors with PTSD show greater physiological responses to individualized trauma reminders in the initial weeks after trauma than those without PTSD. This study investigated whether heart rate and skin conductance responses (HRR, SCR) to standardized trauma-related pictures at 1 month after the trauma predict chronic PTSD. METHOD Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N=166) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post- trauma while their HRR and SCR were recorded. PTSD symptoms were assessed with structured clinical interviews at 1 and 6 months; self-reports of fear responses and dissociation during trauma were obtained soon after the trauma. RESULTS At 1 month, trauma survivors with PTSD showed greater HRR to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, but not to general threat or neutral pictures. HRR to trauma-related pictures predicted PTSD severity at 1 and 6 months, and were related to fear and dissociation during trauma. SCR was not related to PTSD. CONCLUSION HRR to standardized trauma reminders at 1 month after the trauma differentiate between trauma survivors with and without PTSD, and predict chronic PTSD. Results are consistent with a role of associative learning in PTSD and suggest that early stimulus generalization may be an indicator of risk for chronic PTSD. PMID:20124426

  16. Assimilation of xylem-transported CO2 is dependent on transpiration rate but is small relative to atmospheric fixation.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Jasper; McGuire, Mary Anne; Aubrey, Doug P; Teskey, Robert O; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-05-01

    The effect of transpiration rate on internal assimilation of CO2 released from respiring cells has not previously been quantified. In this study, detached branches of Populus deltoides were allowed to take up (13)CO2-labelled solution at either high (high label, HL) or low (low label, LL) (13)CO2 concentrations. The uptake of the (13)CO2 label served as a proxy for the internal transport of respired CO2, whilst the transpiration rate was manipulated at the leaf level by altering the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) of the air. Simultaneously, leaf gas exchange was measured, allowing comparison of internal CO2 assimilation with that assimilated from the atmosphere. Subsequent (13)C analysis of branch and leaf tissues revealed that woody tissues assimilated more label under high VPD, corresponding to higher transpiration, than under low VPD. More (13)C was assimilated in leaf tissue than in woody tissue under the HL treatment, whereas more (13)C was assimilated in woody tissue than in leaf tissue under the LL treatment. The ratio of (13)CO2 assimilated from the internal source to CO2 assimilated from the atmosphere was highest for the branches under the HL and high VPD treatment, but was relatively small regardless of VPD×label treatment combination (up to 1.9%). These results showed that assimilation of internal CO2 is highly dependent on the rate of transpiration and xylem sap [CO2]. Therefore, it can be expected that the relative contribution of internal CO2 recycling to tree carbon gain is strongly dependent on factors controlling transpiration, respiration, and photosynthesis.

  17. Diastolic time – frequency relation in the stress echo lab: filling timing and flow at different heart rates

    PubMed Central

    Bombardini, Tonino; Gemignani, Vincenzo; Bianchini, Elisabetta; Venneri, Lucia; Petersen, Christina; Pasanisi, Emilio; Pratali, Lorenza; Alonso-Rodriguez, David; Pianelli, Mascia; Faita, Francesco; Giannoni, Massimo; Arpesella, Giorgio; Picano, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    A cutaneous force-frequency relation recording system based on first heart sound amplitude vibrations has been recently validated. Second heart sound can be simultaneously recorded in order to quantify both systole and diastole duration. Aims 1- To assess the feasibility and extra-value of operator-independent, force sensor-based, diastolic time recording during stress. Methods We enrolled 161 patients referred for stress echocardiography (exercise 115, dipyridamole 40, pacing 6 patients). The sensor was fastened in the precordial region by a standard ECG electrode. The acceleration signal was converted into digital and recorded together with ECG signal. Both systolic and diastolic times were acquired continuously during stress and were displayed by plotting times vs. heart rate. Diastolic filling rate was calculated as echo-measured mitral filling volume/sensor-monitored diastolic time. Results Diastolic time decreased during stress more markedly than systolic time. At peak stress 62 of the 161 pts showed reversal of the systolic/diastolic ratio with the duration of systole longer than diastole. In the exercise group, at 100 bpm HR, systolic/diastolic time ratio was lower in the 17 controls (0.74 ± 0.12) than in patients (0.86 ± 0.10, p < 0.05 vs. controls). Diastolic filling rate increased from 101 ± 36 (rest) to 219 ± 92 ml/m2* s-1 at peak stress (p < 0.5 vs. rest). Conclusion Cardiological systolic and diastolic duration can be monitored during stress by using an acceleration force sensor. Simultaneous calculation of stroke volume allows monitoring diastolic filling rate. Stress-induced "systolic-diastolic mismatch" can be easily quantified and is associated to several cardiac diseases, possibly expanding the spectrum of information obtainable during stress. PMID:18426559

  18. How Elephant Seals (Mirounga leonina) Adjust Their Fine Scale Horizontal Movement and Diving Behaviour in Relation to Prey Encounter Rate

    PubMed Central

    Jouma’a, Joffrey; Picard, Baptiste; Guinet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the diving behaviour of diving predators in relation to concomitant prey distribution could have major practical applications in conservation biology by allowing the assessment of how changes in fine scale prey distribution impact foraging efficiency and ultimately population dynamics. The southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina, hereafter SES), the largest phocid, is a major predator of the southern ocean feeding on myctophids and cephalopods. Because of its large size it can carry bio-loggers with minimal disturbance. Moreover, it has great diving abilities and a wide foraging habitat. Thus, the SES is a well suited model species to study predator diving behaviour and the distribution of ecologically important prey species in the Southern Ocean. In this study, we examined how SESs adjust their diving behaviour and horizontal movements in response to fine scale prey encounter densities using high resolution accelerometers, magnetometers, pressure sensors and GPS loggers. When high prey encounter rates were encountered, animals responded by (1) diving and returning to the surface with steeper angles, reducing the duration of transit dive phases (thus improving dive efficiency), and (2) exhibiting more horizontally and vertically sinuous bottom phases. In these cases, the distance travelled horizontally at the surface was reduced. This behaviour is likely to counteract horizontal displacement from water currents, as they try to remain within favourable prey patches. The prey encounter rate at the bottom of dives decreased with increasing diving depth, suggesting a combined effect of decreased accessibility and prey density with increasing depth. Prey encounter rate also decreased when the bottom phases of dives were spread across larger vertical extents of the water column. This result suggests that the vertical aggregation of prey can regulate prey density, and as a consequence impact the foraging success of SESs. To our knowledge, this is one of

  19. Sleep-Wake Differences in Relative Regional Cerebral Metabolic Rate for Glucose among Patients with Insomnia Compared with Good Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Daniel B.; Karim, Helmet T.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Hasler, Brant P.; Wilckens, Kristine A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Rosario, Bedda L.; Kupfer, David J.; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H.; Franzen, Peter L.; Nofzinger, Eric A.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The neurobiological mechanisms of insomnia may involve altered patterns of activation across sleep-wake states in brain regions associated with cognition, self-referential processes, affect, and sleep-wake promotion. The objective of this study was to compare relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) in these brain regions across wake and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep states in patients with primary insomnia (PI) and good sleeper controls (GS). Methods: Participants included 44 PI and 40 GS matched for age (mean = 37 y old, range 21–60), sex, and race. We conducted [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography scans in PI and GS during both morning wakefulness and NREM sleep at night. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for group (PI vs. GS) by state (wake vs. NREM sleep) interactions in relative rCMRglc. Results: Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc were found in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior/superior parietal lobules, left lingual/fusiform/occipital gyri, and right lingual gyrus. All clusters were significant at Pcorrected < 0.05. Conclusions: Insomnia was characterized by regional alterations in relative glucose metabolism across NREM sleep and wakefulness. Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc suggest that insomnia is associated with impaired disengagement of brain regions involved in cognition (left frontoparietal), self-referential processes (precuneus/posterior cingulate), and affect (left middle frontal, fusiform/lingual gyri) during NREM sleep, or alternatively, to impaired engagement of these regions during wakefulness. Citation: Kay DB, Karim HT, Soehner AM, Hasler BP, Wilckens KA, James JA, Aizenstein HJ, Price JC, Rosario BL, Kupfer DJ, Germain A, Hall MH, Franzen PL, Nofzinger EA, Buysse DJ. Sleep-wake differences in relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose among

  20. Herbivory and relative growth rates of Pieris rapae are correlated with host constitutive salicylic acid and flowering time.

    PubMed

    Lariviere, Andrew; Limeri, Lisa B; Meindl, George A; Traw, M Brian

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of plants with exogenous salicylic acid (SA) improves resistance to many bacterial pathogens, but can suppress resistance to insect herbivores. While plants vary naturally in constitutive SA, whether such differences are predictive of resistance to insect herbivores has not been studied previously. We examined the possible role of this endogenous SA in structuring the interactions between the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, and ten hosts in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Because P. rapae has multiple generations that utilize different hosts across the year, we included five spring-flowering mustards and five summer-flowering mustards that co-occur in ruderal habitats in upstate New York. Under common garden conditions, the spring flowering mustards (Capsella bursa-pastoris, Draba verna, Cardamine impatiens, Barbarea vulgaris, and Arabidopsis thaliana) were significantly more resistant to P. rapae, supporting 42 % less herbivory (P = 0.015) and 64 % lower relative growth rates (P = 0.007), relative to the summer flowering mustards (Sisymbrium altissimum, Brassica nigra, Sinapis arvense, Lepidium campestre, and Arabis canadensis). Leaf total constitutive SA explained significant variation in larval herbivory (R (2)  = 75.3 %, P = 0.007) and relative growth rates (R (2)  = 59.4 %, P = 0.043). The three species with the lowest levels of constitutive SA (Capsella bursa-pastoris, Draba verna, and Cardamine impatiens) were the most resistant to larvae. Barbarea vulgaris and Arabis canadensis were notable exceptions, exhibiting high SA concentrations and intermediate resistance to P. rapae. These results suggest a curvilinear relationship between leaf constitutive SA and the herbivory by P. rapae, and they provide some insight into the ecology and possible management of this economically important crop pest.

  1. Effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced on workdays and weekends.

    PubMed

    Vahle-Hinz, Tim; Bamberg, Eva; Dettmers, Jan; Friedrich, Niklas; Keller, Monika

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the lagged effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced during both workdays and weekends. Fifty employees participated in a diary study. Multilevel and regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between work stress measured at the end of a workday, work-related rumination measured during the evening, and restful sleep measured the following morning. Work stress, measured as the mean of 2 consecutive workdays, was substantially but not significantly related to restful sleep on weekends. Work stress was unrelated to nocturnal heart rate variability. Work-related rumination was related to restful sleep on weekends but not on workdays. Additionally, work-related rumination on weekends was positively related to nocturnal heart rate variability during the night between Saturday and Sunday. No mediation effects of work stress on restful sleep or nocturnal heart rate variability via work-related rumination were confirmed.

  2. Daily supplementation with ghrelin improves in vitro bovine blastocysts formation rate and alters gene expression related to embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, Eleni; Periquesta, Eva; Messinis, Ioannis E; Tsiligianni, Theodora; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Amiridis, Georgios S

    2014-03-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide having regulatory role in the reproductive system functionality, acting mainly at central level. Because the expression of ghrelin system (ghrelin and its receptor) has been detected in the bovine ovary, the objectives of the present study were to investigate whether ghrelin can affect the developmental potential of in vitro-produced embryos, and to test their quality in terms of relative abundance of various genes related to metabolism, apoptosis and oxidation. In the first experiment, in vitro-produced zygotes were cultured in the absence (control [C]) and in the presence of three concentrations of acylated ghrelin (200 pg/mL [Ghr200], 800 pg/mL [Ghr800]; and 2000 pg/mL [Ghr2000]); blastocyst formation rates were examined on Days 7, 8, and 9. In the second experiment, only the 800 pg/mL dose of ghrelin was used. Zygotes were produced as in experiment 1 and 24 hours post insemination they were divided into 4 groups; in two groups (C; without ghrelin; Ghr800 with ghrelin), embryos were cultured without medium replacement; in the remaining two groups (Control N and GhrN), the culture medium was daily renewed. A pool of Day-7 blastocysts were snap frozen for relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, implantation, and apoptosis. In experiment 3, embryos were produced as in experiment 2, but in the absence of serum (semi-defined culture medium). In experiment 1, no differences were detected between C, Ghr200, and Ghr2000, although fewer blastocysts were produced in group Ghr800 compared with C. In experiment 2, the lowest blastocysts yield was found in Ghr800, whereas daily renewal of ghrelin (Ghr800N) resulted to increased blastocysts formation rate, which on Day 7 was the highest among groups (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocysts yield. Significant differences were detected in various relative mRNA abundance, giving an overall final notion that embryos produced in the

  3. Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, David B.; Fisher, Brad L.

    2011-01-01

    Space-borne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multi-satellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation, climate studies, and validation of model forecasts of precipitation. This study employs four years (2003-2006) of satellite data to assess the relative performance and skill of SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), AMSR-E (Aqua) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) in estimating surface rainfall based on direct instantaneous comparisons with ground-based rain estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The relative performance of each of these satellite estimates is examined via comparisons with space- and time-coincident GV radar-based rain rate estimates. Because underlying surface terrain is known to affect the relative performance of the satellite algorithms, the data for MELB was further stratified into ocean, land and coast categories using a 0.25deg terrain mask. Of all the satellite estimates compared in this study, TMI and AMSR-E exhibited considerably higher correlations and skills in estimating/observing surface precipitation. While SSM/I and AMSU-B exhibited lower correlations and skills for each of the different terrain categories, the SSM/I absolute biases trended slightly lower than AMSR-E over ocean, where the observations from both emission and scattering channels were used in the retrievals. AMSU-B exhibited the least skill relative to GV in all of the relevant statistical categories, and an anomalous spike was observed in the probability distribution functions near 1.0 mm/hr. This statistical artifact appears to be related to attempts by algorithm developers to include some lighter rain rates, not easily detectable by its scatter-only frequencies. AMSU

  4. Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, David B.; Fisher, Brad L.

    2010-01-01

    Space-borne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multi-satellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation, climate studies, and validation of model forecasts of precipitation. This study employs four years (2003-2006) of satellite data to assess the relative performance and skill of SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), AMSR-E (Aqua) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) in estimating surface rainfall based on direct instantaneous comparisons with ground-based rain estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The relative performance of each of these satellite estimates is examined via comparisons with space- and time-coincident GV radar-based rain rate estimates. Because underlying surface terrain is known to affect the relative performance of the satellite algorithms, the data for MELB was further stratified into ocean, land and coast categories using a 0.25 terrain mask. Of all the satellite estimates compared in this study, TMI and AMSR-E exhibited considerably higher correlations and skills in estimating/observing surface precipitation. While SSM/I and AMSU-B exhibited lower correlations and skills for each of the different terrain categories, the SSM/I absolute biases trended slightly lower than AMSRE over ocean, where the observations from both emission and scattering channels were used in the retrievals. AMSU-B exhibited the least skill relative to GV in all of the relevant statistical categories, and an anomalous spike was observed in the probability distribution functions near 1.0 mm/hr. This statistical artifact appears to be related to attempts by algorithm developers to include some lighter rain rates, not easily detectable by its scatter-only frequencies. AMSU-B, however

  5. The evolving star formation rate: M⋆ relation and sSFR since z ≃ 5 from the VUDS spectroscopic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasca, L. A. M.; Le Fèvre, O.; Hathi, N. P.; Schaerer, D.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Lemaux, B. C.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; de la Torre, S.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; Koekemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Pforr, J.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2015-09-01

    We study the evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) - stellar mass (M⋆) relation and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) since a redshift z ≃ 5.5 using 2435 (4531) galaxies with highly reliable spectroscopic redshifts in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS). It is the first time that these relations can be followed over such a large redshift range from a single homogeneously selected sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. The log (SFR) - log (M⋆) relation for SFGs remains roughly linear all the way up to z = 5, but the SFR steadily increases at fixed mass with increasing redshift. We find that for stellar masses M⋆ ≥ 3.2 × 109M⊙ the SFR increases by a factor of ~13 between z = 0.4 and z = 2.3. Weextend this relation up to z = 5, finding an additional increase in SFR by a factor of 1.7 from z = 2.3 to z = 4.8 for masses M⋆ ≥ 1010M⊙. We observe a turn-off in the SFR-M⋆ relation at the highest mass end up to a redshift z ~ 3.5. We interpret this turn-off as the signature of a strong on-going quenching mechanism and rapid mass growth. The sSFR increases strongly up to z ~ 2, but it grows much less rapidly in 2

  6. Topographic form of the Coast Ranges of the Cascadia Margin in relation ot coastal uplift rates and plate subduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Engebretson, David C.; Mitchell, Clifton E.; Ticknor, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The Coast Ranges of the Cascadia margin are overriding the subducted Juan de Fuca/Gorda plate. We investigate the extent to which the latitudinal change in attributes related to the subduction process. These attributes include the varibale age of the subducted slab that underlies the Coast Ranges and average vertical crustal velocities of the western margin of the Coast Rnages for two markedly different time periods, the last 45 years and the last 100 kyr. These vertical crustal velocities are computed from the resurveying of highway bech marks and from the present elevation of shore platforms that have been uplifted in the late Quaternary, respectively. Topogarphy of the Coast Ranges is in part a function of the age and bouyancy of the underlying subducted plate. This is evident in the fact that the two highest topographic elements of the Coast Rnages, the Klamath Mountains and the Olympic Mountains, are underlain by youngest subducted oceanic crust. The subducted Blanco Fracture Zone in southernmost Oregon is responsible for an age discontinuity of subducted crust under the Klamath Mountains. The norhtern terminus of hte topographically higher Klamaths is offset to the north relative to the position of the underlying Blanco Fracture Zone, teh offset being in the direction of migration of the farcture zone, as dictated by relative plate motions. Vertical crustal velocities at the coast, derived from becnh mark surveys, are as much as an order of magnitude greater than vertical crustal velocities derived from uplifted shore platforms. This uplift rate discrepancy indicates that strain is accumulating on the plate margin, to be released during the next interplate earthquake. In a latitudinal sense, average Coast Rnage topography is relatively high where bench mark-derived, short-term vertical crustal velocities are highest. Becuase the shore platform vertical crustal velocities reflect longer-term, premanent uplift, we infer that a small percentage of the

  7. Efficacy of Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation on Parotid Saliva Flow Rate in Relation to Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Manu; M Raju, Srinivasa; S Mohan, Raviprakash; Tomar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Treatment with salivary substitutes and stimulation of salivary flow by either mechanical or pharmacologic methods has side effects and only provides symptomatic relief but no long-lasting results. Purpose To assess the effectiveness of extraoral transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) as a mean of stimulating salivary function in healthy adult subjects; as well as to determine the gender and age-dependent changes in salivary flow rates of unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva. Materials and Method Hundred patients were divided into two groups; Group I aged 20-40 and Group II aged ≥ 60 years. The TENS electrode pads were externally placed on the skin overlying the parotid glands. Unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva was collected for 5 minutes each by using standardized collection techniques. Results Eighty seven of 100 subjects demonstrated increased salivary flow when stimulated via the TENS unit. Ten experienced no increase and 3 experienced a decrease. The mean unstimulated salivary flow rate was 0.01872 ml/min in Group I and 0.0088 ml/min in Group II. The mean stimulated salivary flow rate was 0.03084 ml/min (SD= 0.01248) in Group I, and 0.01556 ml/min (SD 0.0101) in Group II. After stimulation, the amount of salivary flow increased significantly in both groups (p< 0.001). Statistical comparison of the two groups revealed them to be significantly different (p< 0.001), with Group I producing more saliva. Gender-wise, no statistically significant difference was seen among the subjects in Group I (p = 0.148), and those in Group II (p= 0.448). Out of 12 subjects with 0 baseline flows, 7 continued to have no flow. Five subjects observed side effects, although minimal and transient. Conclusion The TENS unit was effective in increasing parotid gland salivary flow in healthy subjects. There was age-related but no gender-related variability in parotid salivary flow rate. PMID:27602390

  8. Predicting the visitation of carcasses by carrion-related insects under different rates of degree-day accumulation.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Gaétan

    2009-03-10

    Common assumptions in forensic entomology are that insects visit and colonize carcasses following a predictable sequence, and that this succession varies among seasons. However, currently available evidence for insect succession on decomposing bodies is essentially descriptive and, to our knowledge, the fine-scale predictability of insect succession with respect to seasons has never been confirmed statistically. In this study, we test these assumptions through the sampling of carrion-related insects attracted to pig carcasses. The study was carried out during the summer and fall of 2006 in rural fields of New Brunswick, Canada. Of the five species of carrion-related insects with high enough occurrence on carcasses to allow modelling, three showed predictable occurrence with respect to degree-day accumulation and seasonal effects. This demonstrates that the occurrence probability of some carrion-related insects on carcasses can be estimated from meteorological records even across seasons with different rates of degree-day accumulation. As opposed to the prevailing idea that adult insects are not reliable for post-mortem interval estimation, the adults of some species exhibited a specific pattern of visitation that could be determined and used in forensic investigations. It is stressed, however, that the statistical predictability of species occurrence must be assessed before any species is considered as a post-mortem interval indicator.

  9. Sex differences in relative foot length and perceived attractiveness of female feet: relationships among anthropometry, physique, and preference ratings.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Fisher, Maryanne L; Rupp, Barbara; Lucas, Deanna; Fessler, Daniel M T

    2007-06-01

    Foot size proportionate to stature is smaller in women than in men, and small feet apparently contribute to perceived physical attractiveness of females. This exploratory study investigated the sex difference in relative foot length and interrelations among foot length, physique, and foot preference ratings in samples from Austria and Canada, each comprised of 75 men and 75 women. The findings included the following lines of evidence: the sex difference in relative foot length replicated in both data sets; the magnitude of this sex effect was large. Relative foot length was smaller in young, nulliparous, and slim women. Pointed-toe and high-heel shoes were more likely worn by smaller, lighter, and slimmer women. Men reported liking women's feet in general more than vice versa. A vast majority of both men and women favored small feet in women, but large feet in men. One's own foot size appeared to correspond to evaluations of attractiveness; particularly, women with small feet preferred small feet in women in general. The preference for small feet in women was convergent across different methods of evaluating attractiveness. Directions for investigations in this emerging field of research on physical attractiveness are discussed.

  10. Relational scaffolding of school motivation: developmental continuities in students' and parents' ratings of the importance of school goals.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, B J; Zhou, R M

    2001-03-01

    The authors investigated whether parents and students are consistent, over grade levels, in the importance they assign to school goals. Elementary and high school students (n = 178) and their parents (n = 130) completed a questionnaire addressing the personal importance of students' school goals, defined in terms of school success. Parent-child consistencies in the rating patterns of school goals over grade levels were more common than were inconsistencies. These developmental consistencies support the position that students' school goals are embedded within the parent-child relationship (J. Youniss, 1980; J. Youniss & J. Smollar, 1985) and are scaffolded within it (J. S. Bruner, 1975; L. S. Vygotsky, 1978). Potential sources of relational and phenotypic influences on school goals are discussed, as is the need for effective friendship management and school performance in high school.

  11. Relative contributions of mercury bioavailability and microbial growth rate on net methylmercury production by anaerobic mixed cultures†

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H.; Deshusses, Marc A.; Porter, Kaitlyn A.; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-01-01

    Monomethylmercury (MeHg) is produced in many aquatic environments by anaerobic microorganisms that take up and methylate inorganic forms of Hg(II). Net methylation of Hg(II) appears to be correlated with factors that affect the activity of the anaerobic microbial community and factors that increase the bioavailability of Hg(II) to these organisms. However, the relative importance of one versus the other is difficult to elucidate even though this information can greatly assist remediation efforts and risk assessments. Here, we investigated the effects of Hg speciation (dissolved Hg and nanoparticulate HgS) and microbial activity on the net production of MeHg using two mixed microbial cultures that were enriched from marine sediments under sulfate reducing conditions. The cultures were amended with dissolved Hg (added as a dissolved nitrate salt) and nanoparticulate HgS, and grown under different carbon substrate concentrations. The results indicated that net mercury methylation was the highest for cultures incubated in the greatest carbon substrate concentration (60 mM) compared to incubations with less carbon (0.6 and 6 mM), regardless of the form of mercury amended. Net MeHg production in cultures exposed to HgS nanoparticles was significantly slower than in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg; however, the difference diminished with slower growing cultures with low carbon addition (0.6 mM). The net Hg methylation rate was found to correlate with sulfate reduction rate in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg, while methylation rate was roughly constant for cultures exposed to nanoparticulate HgS. These results indicated a potential threshold of microbial productivity: below this point net MeHg production was limited by microbial activity, regardless of Hg bioavailability. Above this threshold of productivity, Hg speciation became a contributing factor towards net MeHg production. PMID:26211614

  12. Relative contributions of mercury bioavailability and microbial growth rate on net methylmercury production by anaerobic mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Deshusses, Marc A; Porter, Kaitlyn A; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-09-01

    Monomethylmercury (MeHg) is produced in many aquatic environments by anaerobic microorganisms that take up and methylate inorganic forms of Hg(II). Net methylation of Hg(II) appears to be correlated with factors that affect the activity of the anaerobic microbial community and factors that increase the bioavailability of Hg(II) to these organisms. However, the relative importance of one versus the other is difficult to elucidate even though this information can greatly assist remediation efforts and risk assessments. Here, we investigated the effects of Hg speciation (dissolved Hg and nanoparticulate HgS) and microbial activity on the net production of MeHg using two mixed microbial cultures that were enriched from marine sediments under sulfate reducing conditions. The cultures were amended with dissolved Hg (added as a dissolved nitrate salt) and nanoparticulate HgS, and grown under different carbon substrate concentrations. The results indicated that net mercury methylation was the highest for cultures incubated in the greatest carbon substrate concentration (60 mM) compared to incubations with less carbon (0.6 and 6 mM), regardless of the form of mercury amended. Net MeHg production in cultures exposed to HgS nanoparticles was significantly slower than in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg; however, the difference diminished with slower growing cultures with low carbon addition (0.6 mM). The net Hg methylation rate was found to correlate with sulfate reduction rate in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg, while methylation rate was roughly constant for cultures exposed to nanoparticulate HgS. These results indicated a potential threshold of microbial productivity: below this point net MeHg production was limited by microbial activity, regardless of Hg bioavailability. Above this threshold of productivity, Hg speciation became a contributing factor towards net MeHg production.

  13. Hazard regression model and cure rate model in colon cancer relative survival trends: are they telling the same story?

    PubMed

    Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Bossard, Nadine; Belot, Aurelien; Jooste, Valérie; Launoy, Guy; Remontet, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Hazard regression models and cure rate models can be advantageously used in cancer relative survival analysis. We explored the advantages and limits of these two models in colon cancer and focused on the prognostic impact of the year of diagnosis on survival according to the TNM stage at diagnosis. The analysis concerned 9,998 patients from three French registries. In the hazard regression model, the baseline excess death hazard and the time-dependent effects of covariates were modelled using regression splines. The cure rate model estimated the proportion of 'cured' patients and the excess death hazard in 'non-cured' patients. The effects of year of diagnosis on these parameters were estimated for each TNM cancer stage. With the hazard regression model, the excess death hazard decreased significantly with more recent years of diagnoses (hazard ratio, HR 0.97 in stage III and 0.98 in stage IV, P < 0.001). In these advanced stages, this favourable effect was limited to the first years of follow-up. With the cure rate model, recent years of diagnoses were significantly associated with longer survivals in 'non-cured' patients with advanced stages (HR 0.95 in stage III and 0.97 in stage IV, P < 0.001) but had no significant effect on cure (odds ratio, OR 0.99 in stages III and IV, P > 0.5). The two models were complementary and concordant in estimating colon cancer survival and the effects of covariates. They provided two different points of view of the same phenomenon: recent years of diagnosis had a favourable effect on survival, but not on cure.

  14. Source of nitrogen associated with recovery of relative growth rate in Arabidopsis thaliana acclimated to sustained cold treatment.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Lindsey J; Sherlock, David J; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-06-01

    To determine (1) whether acclimation of carbon metabolism to low temperatures results in recovery of the relative growth rate (RGR) of plants in the cold and (2) the source of N underpinning cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we supplied plants with a nutrient solution labelled with (15) N and subjected them to a temperature shift (from 23 to 5 °C). Whole-plant RGR of cold-treated plants was initially less than 30% of that of warm-maintained control plants. After 14 d, new leaves with a cold-acclimated phenotype emerged, with the RGR of cold-treated plants increasing by 50%; there was an associated recovery of root RGR and doubling of the net assimilation rate (NAR). The development of new tissues in the cold was supported initially by re-allocation of internal sources of N. In the longer term, the majority (80%) of N in the new leaves was derived from the external solution. Hence, both the nutrient status of the plant and the current availability of N from external sources are important in determining recovery of growth at low temperature. Collectively, our results reveal that both increased N use efficiency and increases in nitrogen content per se play a role in the recovery of carbon metabolism in the cold.

  15. The evolving relation between star formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO survey since z = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Russell; Vaccari, Mattia; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass, M*, relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy (SFG) sample in the XMM-LSS field to z ˜ 3.0 using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and M* and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift probability-distribution-function uncertainty. Applying an SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalization of the SFR-M* relation out to z ˜ 3 and a roughly constant slope of (SFR ∝ M_*^{α }) α = 0.69 ± 0.02 to z ˜ 1.7. We find this increases close to unity towards z ˜ 2.65. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-M* relation between 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 at the high-mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR ∝ (1 + z)2.60 at log10(M*/M⊙) ˜ 10.5, out to z ≲ 2.4 with an observed flattening beyond z ˜ 2 with increased stellar mass. Comparing to a range of simulations we find the analytical scaling relation approaches, that invoke an equilibrium model, a good fit to our data, suggesting that a continual smooth accretion regulated by continual outflows may be a key driver in the overall growth of SFGs.

  16. Ethnic differences in smoking rate, nicotine dependence, and cessation-related variables among adult smokers in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Thaddeus A; Pokhrel, Pallav

    2012-12-01

    This study tests hypotheses concerning ethnic disparities in daily cigarette smoking rates, nicotine dependence, cessation motivation, and knowledge and past use of cessation methods (e.g., counseling) and products (e.g., nicotine patch) in a multiethnic sample of smokers in Hawaii. Previous research has revealed significant differences in smoking prevalence among Native Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Caucasians in Hawaii. However, no study has examined differences in dependence and cessation-related knowledge and practices among smokers representing these ethnic groups. Participants were recruited through newspaper advertisement as part of a larger smoking cessation intervention study. Participants (N = 919; M age = 45.6, SD = 12.7; 48 % women) eligible to participate provided self-report data through mail and telephone. Participants included 271 self-identified Native Hawaiians, 63 Filipinos, 316 Caucasians, 145 "East Asians" (e.g., Japanese, Chinese), and 124 "other" (e.g., Hispanic, African-American). Pair-wise comparisons of means, controlling for age, gender, income, education, and marital status, indicated that Native Hawaiian smokers reported significantly higher daily smoking rates and higher levels of nicotine dependence compared to East Asians. Native Hawaiian smokers reported significantly lower motivation to quit smoking than Caucasians. Further, Filipino and Native Hawaiian smokers reported lesser knowledge of cessation methods and products, and less frequent use of these methods and products than Caucasians. The results suggest that Native Hawaiian and Filipino smokers could be underserved with regard to receiving cessation-related advice, and may lack adequate access to smoking cessation products and services. In addition, cessation interventions tailored for Native Hawaiian smokers could benefit from a motivational enhancement component.

  17. Decadal-scale rates of reef erosion following El Niño-related mass coral mortality.

    PubMed

    Roff, George; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Mumby, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    As the frequency and intensity of coral mortality events increase under climate change, understanding how declines in coral cover may affect the bioerosion of reef frameworks is of increasing importance. Here, we explore decadal-scale rates of bioerosion of the framework building coral Orbicella annularis by grazing parrotfish following the 1997/1998 El Niño-related mass mortality event at Long Cay, Belize. Using high-precision U-Th dating and CT scan analysis, we quantified in situ rates of external bioerosion over a 13-year period (1998-2011). Based upon the error-weighted average U-Th age of dead O. annularis skeletons, we estimate the average external bioerosion between 1998 and 2011 as 0.92 ± 0.55 cm depth. Empirical observations of herbivore foraging, and a nonlinear numerical response of parrotfish to an increase in food availability, were used to create a model of external bioerosion at Long Cay. Model estimates of external bioerosion were in close agreement with U-Th estimates (0.85 ± 0.09 cm). The model was then used to quantify how rates of external bioerosion changed across a gradient of coral mortality (i.e., from few corals experiencing mortality following coral bleaching to complete mortality). Our results indicate that external bioerosion is remarkably robust to declines in coral cover, with no significant relationship predicted between the rate of external bioerosion and the proportion of O. annularis that died in the 1998 bleaching event. The outcome was robust because the reduction in grazing intensity that follows coral mortality was compensated for by a positive numerical response of parrotfish to an increase in food availability. Our model estimates further indicate that for an O. annularis-dominated reef to maintain a positive state of reef accretion, a necessity for sustained ecosystem function, live cover of O. annularis must not drop below a ~5-10% threshold of cover.

  18. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  19. Voluntary wheel running in mice increases the rate of neurogenesis without affecting anxiety-related behaviour in single tests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role played by adult neurogenesis in anxiety is not clear. A recent study revealed a surprising positive correlation between increased anxiety and elevated neurogenesis following chronic voluntary wheel running and multiple behavioural testing in mice, suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is involved in the genesis of anxiety. To exclude the possible confounding effect of multiple testing that may have occurred in the aforementioned study, we assessed (1) the effects of mouse voluntary wheel running (14 vs. 28 days) on anxiety in just one behavioural test; the open field, and (2), using different markers, proliferation, differentiation, survival and maturation of newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus immediately afterwards. Effects of wheel running on anxiety-related behaviour were confirmed in a separate batch of animals tested in another test of anxiety, the light/dark box test. Results Running altered measures of locomotion and exploration, but not anxiety-related behaviour in either test. 14 days running significantly increased proliferation, and differentiation and survival were increased after both running durations. 28 day running mice also exhibited an increased rate of maturation. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between the amount of proliferation, but not maturation, and anxiety measures in the open field of the 28 day running mice. Conclusions Overall, this evidence suggests that without repeated testing, newly born mature neurons may not be involved in the genesis of anxiety per se. PMID:22682077

  20. MS4A6A genotypes are associated with the atrophy rates of Alzheimer's disease related brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Hui-Fu; Wan, Yu; Sun, Fu-Rong; Tan, Chen-Chen; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A, member 6A (MS4A6A) has been identified as susceptibility loci of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by several recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whereas little is known about the potential roles of these variants in the brain structure and function of AD. In this study, we included a total of 812 individuals from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. Using multiple linear regression models, we found MS4A6A genotypes were strongly related to atrophy rate of left middle temporal (rs610932: Pc = 0.017, rs7232: Pc = 0.022), precuneus (rs610932: Pc = 0.015) and entorhinal (rs610932, Pc = 0.022) on MRI in the entire group. In the subgroup analysis, MS4A6A SNPs were significantly accerlated the percentage of volume loss of middle temporal, precuneus and entorhinal, especially in the MCI subgroup. These findings reveal that MS4A6A genotypes affect AD specific brain structures which supported the possible role of MS4A6A polymorphisms in influencing AD-related neuroimaging phenotypes. PMID:27244883

  1. Estimation of calcium and phosphorus content in growing and finishing pigs: whole empty body components and relative accretion rates.

    PubMed

    Pettey, L A; Cromwell, G L; Jang, Y D; Lindemann, M D

    2015-01-01

    Two comparative serial-slaughter experiments were conducted to determine whole empty body (WEB) composition and accretion rates of Ca and P in 18 to 109 kg BW pigs to provide information for modeling of these nutrients for growth. Both studies were conducted with 5 sets of 5 littermate barrows which were allotted to 5 slaughter groups in each study (Exp. 1: 18, 27, 36, 45, and 54 kg BW; Exp. 2: 36, 54, 73, 91, and 109 kg BW). Pigs were fed corn-soybean meal-based diets fortified with minerals and vitamins in 2 dietary phases in Exp. 1 (Phase 1: 18 to 36 kg BW; Phase 2: 36 to 54 kg BW) and 3 dietary phases in Exp. 2 (Phase 2: 36 to 54 kg BW; Phase 3: 54 to 78 kg BW; and Phase 4: 78 to 109 kg BW). At the predetermined BW, pigs were slaughtered and separated into body components of hair, hooves, blood, head, viscera, and carcass. The carcass was split along the dorsal midline and the left carcass side was ground for chemical analysis. Whole empty body weight averaged 93.6% and 94.0% of live BW in Exp. 1 and Exp. 2, respectively. As WEB weight increased in both experiments, the percentage carcass of the WEB linearly (P < 0.05) increased, the percentage viscera linearly (P < 0.05) decreased, and the mass (g) of N, ash, Ca, and P in the WEB increased linearly (R(2) = 0.98). The concentration (g/kg) of P in the WEB of 18 to 54 kg pigs increased from 4.30 to 4.57 (linear; P < 0.05) and for Ca increased from 5.13 to 5.66 (linear; P < 0.05). In Exp. 2, P concentration was not related to WEB weight and Ca concentration increased quadratically (P < 0.05). The relative accretion rate of N to P was 1.00 (R(2) = 0.99) in the pigs from 18 to 54 kg. In conclusion, these results indicate that compositional changes as BW increases are strongly related to P retention and that the quantification of WEB P and relationships of WEB P to other chemical components in the body may be useful for modeling purposes in growing and finishing pigs.

  2. Centenarian Rates and Life Expectancy Related to the Death Rates of Multiple Sclerosis, Asthma, and Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children.

    PubMed

    Lens-Pechakova, Lilia S

    2016-02-01

    The autoimmune diseases are among the 10 leading causes of death for women and the number two cause of chronic illness in America as well as a predisposing factor for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Patients of some autoimmune diseases have shown a shorter life span and are a model of accelerated immunosenescence. Conversely, centenarians are used as a model of successful aging and have shown several immune parameters that are better preserved and lower levels of autoantibodies. The study reported here focused on clarifying the connection between longevity and some autoimmune and allergic diseases in 29 developed Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, because multidisciplinary analyses of the accelerated or delayed aging data could show a distinct relationship pattern, help to identify common factors, and determine new important factors that contribute to longevity and healthy aging. The relationships between the mortality rates data of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from one side and centenarian rates (two sets) as well as life expectancy data from the other side were assessed using regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients. The data obtained correspond to an inverse linear correlation with different degrees of linearity. This is the first observation of a clear tendency of diminishing centenarian rates or life expectancy in countries having higher death rates of asthma, MS, and RA and a higher incidence of T1D in children. The conclusion is that most probably there are common mechanistic pathways and factors affecting the above diseases and at the same time but in the opposite direction the processes of longevity. Further study, comparing genetic data, mechanistic pathways, and other factors connected to autoimmune diseases with those of longevity could clarify the processes involved, so as to promote longevity and limit the expansion of those

  3. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Influence of the total gas flow rate on high rate growth microcrystalline silicon films and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Yan; Hou, Guo-Fu; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Wei, Chang-Chun; Li, Gui-Jun; Zhang, De-Kun; Chen, Xin-Liang; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Ying; Geng, Xin-Hua

    2009-08-01

    This paper reports that high-rate-deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells was performed by very-high-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. These solar cells, whose intrinsic μc-Si:H layers were prepared by using a different total gas flow rate (Ftotal), behave much differently in performance, although their intrinsic layers have similar crystalline volume fraction, opto-electronic properties and a deposition rate of ~ 1.0 nm/s. The influence of Ftotal on the micro-structural properties was analyzed by Raman and Fourier transformed infrared measurements. The results showed that the vertical uniformity and the compact degree of μc-Si:H thin films were improved with increasing Ftotal. The variation of the microstructure was regarded as the main reason for the difference of the J-V parameters. Combined with optical emission spectroscopy, we found that the gas temperature plays an important role in determining the microstructure of thin films. With Ftotal of 300 sccm, a conversion efficiency of 8.11% has been obtained for the intrinsic layer deposited at 8.5 Å/s (1 Å = 0.1 nm).

  4. Sperm chromatin structure assay results after swim-up are related only to embryo quality but not to fertilization and pregnancy rates following IVF.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Hong; Shi, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Qin; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Sun, Yi-Juan; Feng, Yun

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) results after swim-up are related to fertilization rates, embryo quality and pregnancy rates following in vitro fertilization (IVF). A total of 223 couples undergoing IVF in our hospital from October 2008 to September 2009 were included in this study. Data on the IVF process and sperm chromatin structure assay results were collected. Fertilization rate, embryo quality and IVF success rates of different DNA fragmentation index (DFI) subgroups and high DNA stainability (HDS) subgroups were compared. There were no significant differences in fertilization rate, clinical pregnancy or delivery rates between the DFI and HDS subgroups. However, the group with abnormal DFI had a lower good embryo rate. So, we concluded that the SCSA variables, either DFI or HDS after swim-up preparation, were not valuable in predicting fertilization failure or pregnancy rate, but an abnormal DFI meant a lower good embryo rate following IVF.

  5. High Caesarean section rate in rural China: is it related to health insurance (New Co-operative Medical Scheme)?

    PubMed

    Long, Qian; Klemetti, Reija; Wang, Yang; Tao, Fangbiao; Yan, Hong; Hemminki, Elina

    2012-08-01

    The epidemic of Caesarean section (CS) is worldwide, and it has been argued that it is mainly due to non-medical factors, including healthcare financing patterns. We investigated the use of CS in rural China and the related factors, particularly health insurance in the form of the New Co-operative Medical Scheme introduced in 2003. A cross-sectional survey of women who gave birth in 2008-2009 was conducted in five rural counties in central and western China. Of the 5049 new mothers, 73% were interviewed. The association between health insurance coverage and self-reported CS (divided into emergency and non-emergency CS) were examined by cross-tabulation and logistic regression, adjusting for maternal age, education, occupation, household income, previous abortions, parity and type of birth health facility. We found that 46% of all births (3550) were CSs, with 13% having an emergency and 33% a non-emergency CS. Women reported that half of the non-emergency CSs were recommended by a doctor and half were requested by themselves. In those counties with mid-range CS rates (28%-63%), health insurance coverage was associated with having CS, and particularly with having non-emergency CS. In those counties with the highest (82%) and lowest (13%) rate, there was no statistically significant association. The findings suggest that health insurance coverage may have facilitated the overuse of CS. Further studies are needed to develop appropriate interventions to reduce non-medically indicated CS, focussing on payment mechanisms, healthcare provider practice patterns, and maternal requests.

  6. THE GAS PHASE MASS METALLICITY RELATION FOR DWARF GALAXIES: DEPENDENCE ON STAR FORMATION RATE AND HI GAS MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola

    2015-10-20

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR{sub SFR}) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR{sub HI}). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMR{sub SFR} and FMR{sub HI} across the stellar mass range 10{sup 6.6}–10{sup 8.8} M{sub ⊙}, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMR{sub SFR} (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR{sub SFR} is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10{sup −2.4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR{sub HI}. We also find that the FMR{sub HI} is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FML{sub SFR}) and HI-gas mass (FML{sub HI}). We find that the FML{sub HI} relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FML{sub HI} relation is not improved over the FMR{sub HI} scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMR{sub HI} is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation.

  7. Restored river corridors: first results on the effects of flow variability on vegetation cuttings survival rate and related root architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, N.; Perona, P.; Jiang, Z.; Burlando, P.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding and predicting the evolution of river alluvial bed forms toward a vegetated or a non-vegetated morphology have important implications for restored river corridors and the related ecosystem functioning (see also Schäppi et al, this session). Vegetation recruitment and growth on non-cohesive material of river corridors, such as gravel bars and islands of braided river, depend on the ability of roots to develop and anchor efficiently such to resist against flow erosion. In this work, we study the interannual morphological evolution of a gravel bar island, the survival rate and the growth of a number of plots with different density and orientation of transplanted cuttings (Salix Alba), the space and time dynamics of which depend on erosion and deposition processes due to floods. Our purpose is to identify island locations where the hydrodynamic conditions are more suitable for plants germination, growth and survival in relation to the river hydrograph statistics. This information is a first step to build a stochastic model able to predict the future evolution and progress of the restoration action of the investigated river reach. We focus at the main island of River Thur at Niederneunforn (Canton Thurgau, Switzerland), the restoration success of which is investigated from a mechanistic viewpoint in the research project "REstored CORridor Dynamics" (www.record.ethz.ch). Accordingly, we analyze two recent Digital Elevation Models (1 year difference), which were first corrected to account for the river bathymetry, and then we compare them in order to extract relevant interannual morphological changes. Using a two dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model we simulate several flow conditions ranging from the minimum recorded flow up to the one that completely inundates the island. Hence, we build inundation maps of the island that we associate to the frequency and the submergence duration of every area. We then correlate such results to the observed survival

  8. Associations between Heart Rate Variability Parameters and Housing- and Individual-Related Variables in Dairy Cows Using Canonical Correspondence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Levente; Kézér, Fruzsina Luca; Bakony, Mikolt; Hufnágel, Levente; Tőzsér, János; Jurkovich, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between heart rate variability (HRV) parameters and some housing- and individual-related variables using the canonical correspondence analysis (CCOA) method in lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. We collected a total of 5200 5-min interbeat interval (IBI) samples from 260 animals on five commercial dairy farms [smaller-scale farms with 70 (Farm 1, n = 50) and 80 cows per farm (Farm 2, n = 40), and larger-scale farms with 850 (Farm 3, n = 66), 1900 (Farm 4, n = 60) and 1200 (Farm 5, n = 45) cows. Dependent variables included HRV parameters, which reflect the activity of the autonomic nervous system: heart rate (HR), the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) in IBIs, the standard deviation 1 (SD1), the high frequency (HF) component of HRV and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and the HF parameter (LF/HF). Explanatory variables were group size, space allowance, milking frequency, parity, daily milk yield, body condition score, locomotion score, farm, season and physical activity (lying, lying and rumination, standing, standing and rumination and feeding). Physical activity involved in standing, feeding and in rumination was associated with HRV parameters, indicating a decreasing sympathetic and an increasing vagal tone in the following order: feeding, standing, standing and rumination, lying and rumination, lying. Objects representing summer positioned close to HR and LF and far from SD1, RMSSD and HF indicate a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal activity. Objects representing autumn, spring and winter associated with increasing vagal activity, in this order. Time-domain measures of HRV were associated with most of the housing- and individual-related explanatory variables. Higher HR and lower RMSSD and SD1 were associated with higher group size, milking frequency, parity and milk yield, and low space allowance. Higher parity and milk yield were associated with higher sympathetic activity as well (higher LF

  9. Aging-Related Correlation between Serum Sirtuin 1 Activities and Basal Metabolic Rate in Women, but not in Men

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sirtuin (SIRT) is a main regulator of metabolism and lifespan, and its importance has been implicated in the prevention against aging-related diseases. The purpose of this study was to identify the pattern of serum SIRT1 activity according to age and sex, and to investigate how serum SIRT1 activity is correlated with other metabolic parameters in Korean adults. The Biobank of Jeju National University Hospital, a member of the Korea Biobank Network, provided serum samples from 250 healthy adults. Aging- and metabolism-related factors were analyzed in serum, and the data were compared by the stratification of age and sex. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) decreased with age and was significantly lower in men in their fifties and older and in women in their forties and older compared with twenties in men and women, respectively. SIRT1 activities were altered by age and sex. Especially, women in their thirties showed the highest SIRT1 activities. Correlation analysis displayed that SIRT1 activity is positively correlated with serum triglyceride (TG) in men, and with waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and serum TG in women. And, SIRT1 activity was negatively correlated with aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase ratio in women (r = −0.183, p = 0.039). Positive correlation was observed between SIRT1 activity and BMR in women (r = 0.222, p = 0.027), but not in men. Taken together, these findings suggest the possibility that serum SIRT1 activities may be utilized as a biomarker of aging. In addition, positive correlation between SIRT1 activity and BMR in women suggests that serum SIRT1 activity may reflect energy expenditure well in human. PMID:28168178

  10. High neurological complication rates for extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion and related techniques: A review of safety concerns

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are frequent reports of lumbosacral plexus and other neurological injuries occurring with extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIF) and other related lateral lumbar techniques. Methods: This review focuses on the new neurological deficits (e.g. lumbosacral plexus, root injuries) that occur following minimally invasive surgery (MIS) XLIF and other related lateral lumbar techniques. Results: A review of multiple articles revealed the following ranges of new postoperative neurological complications for XLIF procedures: plexus injuries 13.28%; sensory deficits 0–75% (permanent in 62.5%); motor deficits 0.7–33.6%; anterior thigh pain 12.5–25%. Of interest, in a study by Lykissas et al., the frequency of long-term neural injury following lateral lumber interbody fusion (LLIF) with BMP-2 (72 patients) was much higher than for LLIF performed with autograft/allograft (72 patients). The addition of bone morphogenetic protein led to persistent sensory deficits in 29 vs. 20 without BMP; persistent motor deficits in 35 with vs. 17 without BMP; and persistent anterior thigh/groin pain in 8 with vs. 0 without BMP. They should also have noted the unacceptably high incidence of neural injury occurring with LLIF alone without BMP. Conclusion: This review highlights the high risk of neural injury (up to 75% for sensory, 33.6% for motor, and an overall plexus injury rate of 13.28%) utilizing the XLIF and other similar lateral lumbar approaches. With such extensive neurological injuries, is the XLIF really safe, and should it still be performed? PMID:27843679

  11. A Comparative Study of Two Presentations of Rate Controlled Audio Instruction in Relation to Certain Student Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarenpa, Dennis Edward

    Experiments measured the effectiveness and efficiency of audio tape recordings using "time-compressed speech" compared to those using normal recording rates in an audio-tutorial system. The experimental tapes were compressed to 60 percent of the original rate of delivery. Results showed that the rate of speech made no difference in the students'…

  12. Phenolic compounds and related enzymes are not rate-limiting in browning development of fresh-cut potatoes.

    PubMed

    Cantos, Emma; Tudela, Juan Antonio; Gil, María Isabel; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2002-05-08

    The effect of minimal processing on polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and phenolic compounds was studied in five potato cultivars (Agria, Cara, Liseta, Monalisa, and Spunta). Minimal processing caused an overall increase in PPO, POD, and PAL activities. The isoform pattern of PPO was the same for all of the cultivars before and after processing. No latent PPO was detected. The isoperoxidase pattern was approximately the same among cultivars. An increase in POD activity was related to the specific induction of an acidic isoperoxidase. PAL showed an induction pattern characterized by the presence of a maximum peak of activity after 4 days of processing for all of the cultivars. The sequence of browning susceptibility of potato cultivars was as follows: Monalisa > Spunta > Liseta > Cara > Agria. Browning development was only partially correlated to PAL activity (only during the first 4 days after wounding). However, this correlation could not explain the above sequence of browning susceptibility. Minimal processing caused an increase of chlorogenic acid, whereas tyrosine content remained unchanged. In summary, no significant correlation was found between either rate or degree of browning and any other biochemical and physiological attribute investigated (PPO, POD, hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid content, and initial phenolics content as well as total and individual phenolics accumulation).

  13. Experimental determination of carbonation rate in Portland cement at 25°C and relatively high CO2 partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Montegrossi, Giordano; Huet, Bruno; Virgili, Giorgio; Orlando, Andrea; Vaselli, Orlando; Marini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the alteration of Portland class G Cement at ambient temperature under a relatively high CO2 partial pressure through suitably designed laboratory experiments, in which cement hydration and carbonation are taken into account separately. First, the hydration process was carried out for 28 days to identify and quantify the hydrated solid phases formed. After the completion of hydration, accompanied by partial carbonation under atmospheric conditions, the carbonation process was investigated in a stirred micro-reactor (Parr instrument) with crushed cement samples under 10 bar or more of pure CO2(g) and MilliQ water adopting different reaction times. The reaction time was varied to constrain the reaction kinetics of the carbonation process and to investigate the evolution of secondary solid phases. Chemical and mineralogical analyses (calcimetry, chemical composition, SEM and X-ray Powder Diffraction) were carried out to characterize the secondary minerals formed during cement hydration and carbonation. Water analyses were also performed at the end of each experimental run to measure the concentrations of relevant solutes. The specific surface area of hydrated cement was measured by means of the BET method to obtain the rates of cement carbonation. Experimental outcomes were simulated by means of the PhreeqC software package. The obtained results are of interest to understand the comparatively fast cement alteration in CO2 production wells with damaged casing.

  14. Structure of zirconium alloy oxides formed in pure water studied with synchrotron radiation and optical microscopy: relation to corrosion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazbayhan, Aylin; Motta, Arthur T.; Comstock, Robert J.; Sabol, George P.; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study was undertaken of oxides formed in 360 °C water on four Zr-based alloys (Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO™, Zr-2.5%Nb and Zr-2.5%Nb-0.5%Cu) in an effort to relate oxide structure to corrosion performance. Micro-beam X-ray diffraction was used along with transmitted light optical microscopy to obtain information about the structure of these oxides as a function of distance from the oxide-metal interface. Optical microscopy revealed a layered oxide structure in which the average layer thickness was inversely proportional to the post-transition corrosion rate. The detailed diffraction studies showed an oxide that contained both tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO 2, with a higher fraction of tetragonal oxide near the oxide-metal interface, in a region roughly corresponding to one oxide layer. Evidence was seen also of a cyclic variation of the tetragonal and monoclinic oxide across the oxide thickness with a period of the layer thickness. The results also indicate that the final grain size of the tetragonal phase is smaller than that of the monoclinic phase and the monoclinic grain size is smaller in Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO than in the other two alloys. These results are discussed in terms of a model of oxide growth based on the periodic breakdown and reconstitution of a protective layer. ZIRLO is a trademark of Westinghouse Electric Co.

  15. Relation between physical exertion and heart rate variability characteristics in professional cyclists during the Tour of Spain

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, C; Jurca, R; Church, T; Chicharro, J; Hoyos, J; Lucia, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Continued exposure to prolonged periods of intense exercise may unfavourably alter neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and cardiovascular function. Objective: To examine the relation between quantifiable levels of exertion (TRIMPS) and resting heart rate (HR) and resting supine heart rate variability (HRV) in professional cyclists during a three week stage race. Method: Eight professional male cyclists (mean (SEM) age 27 (1) years, body mass 65.5 (2.3) kg, and maximum rate of oxygen consumption (V·O2MAX) 75.6 (2.2) ml/kg/min) riding in the 2001 Vuelta a España were examined for resting HR and HRV on the mornings of day 0 (baseline), day 10 (first rest day), and day 17 (second rest day). The rest days followed stages 1–9 and 10–15 respectively. HR was recorded during each race stage, and total HR time was categorised into a modified, three phase TRIMPS schema. These phases were based on standardised physiological laboratory values obtained during previous V·O2MAX testing, where HR time in each phase (phase I = light intensity and less than ventilatory threshold (VT; ∼70% V·O2MAX); phase II = moderate intensity between VT and respiratory compensation point (RCP; ∼90% V·O2MAX); phase III = high intensity (>RCP)) was multiplied by exertional factors of 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Results: Multivariate analysis of variance showed that total TRIMPS for race stages 1–9 (2466 (90)) were greater than for stages 10–15 (2055 (65)) (p<0.0002). However, TRIMPS/day were less for stages 1–9 (274 (10)) than for stages 10–15 (343 (11)) (p<0.01). Despite a trend to decline, no difference in supine resting HR was found between day 0 (53.2 (1.8) beats/min), day 10 (49.0 (2.8) beats/min), and day 17 (48.0 (2.6) beats/min) (p = 0.21). Whereas no significant group mean changes in HR or HRV indices were noted during the course of the race, significant inverse Pearson product-moment correlations were observed between all HRV indices relative to total TRIMPS and

  16. Functional Response (FR) and Relative Growth Rate (RGR) Do Not Show the Known Invasiveness of Lemna minuta (Kunth)

    PubMed Central

    Boets, Pieter; Goethals, Peter L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing travel and trade threatens biodiversity as it increases the rate of biological invasions globally, either by accidental or intentional introduction. Therefore, avoiding these impacts by forecasting invasions and impeding further spread is of utmost importance. In this study, three forecasting approaches were tested and combined to predict the invasive behaviour of the alien macrophyte Lemna minuta in comparison with the native Lemna minor: the functional response (FR) and relative growth rate (RGR), supplemented with a combined biomass-based nutrient removal (BBNR). Based on the idea that widespread invasive species are more successful competitors than local, native species, a higher FR and RGR were expected for the invasive compared to the native species. Five different nutrient concentrations were tested, ranging from low (4 mgN.L-1 and 1 mgP.L-1) to high (70 mgN.L-1 and 21 mgP.L-1). After four days, a significant amount of nutrients was removed by both Lemna spp., though significant differences among L. minor and L. minuta were only observed at lower nutrient concentrations (lower than 17 mgN.L-1 and 6 mgP.L-1) with higher nutrient removal exerted by L. minor. The derived FR did not show a clear dominance of the invasive L. minuta, contradicting field observations. Similarly, the RGR ranged from 0.4 to 0.6 d-1, but did not show a biomass-based dominance of L. minuta (0.5 ± 0.1 d-1 versus 0.63 ± 0.09 d-1 for L. minor). BBNR showed similar results as the FR. Contrary to our expectations, all three approaches resulted in higher values for L. minor. Consequently, based on our results FR is sensitive to differences, though contradicted the expectations, while RGR and BBNR do not provide sufficient power to differentiate between a native and an invasive alien macrophyte and should be supplemented with additional ecosystem-based experiments to determine the invasion impact. PMID:27861603

  17. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of 2...

  18. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of 2...

  19. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of 2...

  20. Investigation of the Association Between Alcohol Outlet Density and Alcohol-Related Hospital Admission Rates in England: Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, John; Green, Mark; Strong, Mark; Pearson, Tim; Meier, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background Availability of alcohol is a major policy issue for governments, and one of the availability factors is the density of alcohol outlets within geographic areas. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the association between alcohol outlet density and hospital admissions for alcohol-related conditions in a national (English) small area level ecological study. Methods This project will employ ecological correlation and cross-sectional time series study designs to examine spatial and temporal relationships between alcohol outlet density and hospital admissions. Census units to be used in the analysis will include all Lower and Middle Super-Output Areas (LSOAs and MSOAs) in England (53 million total population; 32,482 LSOAs and 6781 MSOAs). LSOAs (approximately 1500 people per LSOA) will support investigation at a fine spatial resolution. Spatio-temporal associations will be investigated using MSOAs (approximately 7500 people per MSOA). The project will use comprehensive coverage data on alcohol outlets in England (from 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2013) from a commercial source, which has estimated that the database includes 98% of all alcohol outlets in England. Alcohol outlets may be classified into two broad groups: on-trade outlets, comprising outlets from which alcohol can be purchased and consumed on the premises (eg, pubs); and off-trade outlets, in which alcohol can be purchased but not consumed on the premises (eg, off-licenses). In the 2010 dataset, there are 132,989 on-trade and 51,975 off-trade outlets. The longitudinal data series will allow us to examine associations between changes in outlet density and changes in hospital admission rates. The project will use anonymized data on alcohol-related hospital admissions in England from 2003 to 2013 and investigate associations with acute (eg, admissions for injuries) and chronic (eg, admissions for alcoholic liver disease) harms. The investigation will include the examination of conditions that

  1. Bone density and amenorrhea in ballet dancers are related to a decreased resting metabolic rate and lower leptin levels.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Becky A; Warren, Michelle P; Dominguez, Jennifer E; Wang, Jack; Heymsfield, Steven B; Pierson, Richard N

    2002-06-01

    Osteopenia, which is correlated with amenorrhea and poor nutritional habits, has been well documented in elite ballet dancers. Estrogen replacement therapy and recovery from amenorrhea have not been associated with normalization of bone density. Thus, the osteopenia may be related to changes brought about by chronic dieting or other factors, such as a hypometabolic state induced by poor nutrition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of chronic dieting and resting metabolic rate (RMR) to amenorrhea and bone density. RMR, bone density, eating disorder assessments, leptin levels, and complete menstrual and medical histories were determined in 21 elite ballet dancers and in 27 nondancers (age, 20-30 yr). No significant correlations were found between high EAT26 scores, a measure of disordered eating, and RMR, bone densities, body weight, body fat, or fat-free mass. However, when RMR was adjusted for fat-free mass (FFM), a significant positive correlation was found between RMR/FFM and bone density in both the arms (P < 0.001) and spine (P < 0.05) in ballet dancers, but not in the normal controls. The dancers also demonstrated significantly higher EAT scores (22.9 +/- 10.3 vs. 4.1 +/- 2.4; P < 0.001) and lower RMR/FFM ratios (30.0 +/- 2.2 vs. 32.05 +/- 2.8; P < 0.01). The only variable to predict lower RMR/FFM in the entire sample was ever having had amenorrhea; this group had significantly higher EAT scores (18.0 +/- 13.5 vs. 10.3 +/- 10.2; P < 0.05), lower leptin levels (4.03 +/- 0.625 vs. 7.10 +/- 4.052; P < 0.05), and lower bone mineral density in the spine (0.984 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.10 +/- 0.13; P < 0.05) and arm (0.773 +/- 0.99 vs. 0.818 +/- 0.01; P < 0.05). We hypothesize that the correlation between low RMR and lower leptin levels and bone density may be more strongly related to nutritional habits in ballet dancers, causing significant depression of RMR, particularly for those with a history of amenorrhea.

  2. Two-Body Orbit Expansion Due to Time-Dependent Relative Acceleration Rate of the Cosmological Scale Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    By phenomenologically assuming a slow temporal variation of the percent acceleration rate S̈S -1 of the cosmic scale factor S(t), it is shown that the orbit of a local binary undergoes a secular expansion. To first order in the power expansion of S̈S -1 around the present epoch t0, a non-vanishing shift per orbit (Δr) of the two-body relative distance r occurs for eccentric trajectories. A general relativistic expression, which turns out to be cubic in the Hubble parameter H0 at the present epoch, is explicitly calculated for it in the case of matter-dominated epochs with Dark Energy. For a highly eccentric Oort comet orbit with period Pb ≈ 31 Myr, the general relativistic distance shift per orbit turns out to be of the order of (Δr) ≈ 70 km. For the Large Magellanic Cloud, assumed on a bound elliptic orbit around the Milky Way, the shift per orbit is of the order of (Δr) ≈ 2-4 pc. Our result has a general validity since it holds in any cosmological model admitting the Hubble law and a slowly varying S̈S-1(t). More generally, it is valid for an arbitrary Hooke-like extra-acceleration whose "elastic" parameter κ is slowly time-dependent, irrespectively of the physical mechanism which may lead to it. The coefficient κ1 of the first-order term of the power expansion of κ(t) can be preliminarily constrained in a model-independent way down to a κ1 ≤ 2 x 10-13 year-3 level from latest Solar System's planetary observations. The radial velocities of the double lined spectroscopic binary ALPHA Cen AB yield κ1 ≤ 10-8 year-3.

  3. Clinical characteristics related to worsening of motor function assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale in the elderly population.

    PubMed

    Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Lerche, Stefanie; Behnke, Stefanie; Godau, Jana; Gaenslen, Alexandra; Pausch, Christoph; Fassbender, Klaus; Brockmann, Kathrin; Srulijes, Karin; Huber, Heiko; Wurster, Isabel; Berg, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence that nigrostriatal pathology may at least partly underlie mild Parkinsonian signs. We evaluated whether an increase in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III) could be predicted by the presence of risk and prodromal markers for neurodegenerative diseases in elderly individuals without those diseases. Therefore, we analyzed the UPDRS-III score and various risk and prodromal markers known to antecede neurodegenerative diseases in a population-based cohort comprising 807 individuals free of neurodegenerative diseases at baseline. After 5 years, eight persons (1.0 %) were diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Of those, seven (87.5 %) had motor worsening ≥3 points on the UPDRS-III from baseline to follow-up, one had two points increase. Of the 788 people without PD, 568 (72.1 %) showed no increase in the UPDRS-III scale, 220 (27.9 %) had ≥1 point increase and out of these 104 (13.2 %) had an increase of ≥3 points in the UPDRS-III score after 5 years. We identified an age >60 years (relative risk, RR = 1.7; confidence interval, CI 1.3-2.1) and the occurrence of ≥2 risk factors (RR = 1.5; CI 1.2-1.9) as possible predictors of motor progression. After 5 years, individuals with an increase in the UPDRS-III score had more often a one-sided reduced arm swing (p < 0.001) and identified less odors in the Sniffin' sticks test (p < 0.041) than persons with stable motor performance. Our data support the assumption that progression of Parkinsonian signs assessed by the UPDRS-III parallels the development of prodromal markers for neurodegenerative diseases in the elderly population.

  4. Oceanic transform fault earthquake nucleation process and source scaling relations - A numerical modeling study with rate-state friction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.; Behn, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    We use a three-dimensional strike-slip fault model in the framework of rate and state-dependent friction to investigate earthquake behavior and scaling relations on oceanic transform faults (OTFs). Gabbro friction data under hydrothermal conditions are mapped onto OTFs using temperatures from (1) a half-space cooling model, and (2) a thermal model that incorporates a visco-plastic rheology, non-Newtonian viscous flow and the effects of shear heating and hydrothermal circulation. Without introducing small-scale frictional heterogeneities on the fault, our model predicts that an OTF segment can transition between seismic and aseismic slip over many earthquake cycles, consistent with the multimode hypothesis for OTF ruptures. The average seismic coupling coefficient χ is strongly dependent on the ratio of seismogenic zone width W to earthquake nucleation size h*; χ increases by four orders of magnitude as W/h* increases from ~ 1 to 2. Specifically, the average χ = 0.15 +/- 0.05 derived from global OTF earthquake catalogs can be reached at W/h* ≈ 1.2-1.7. The modeled largest earthquake rupture area is less than the total seismogenic area and we predict a deficiency of large earthquakes on long transforms, which is also consistent with observations. Earthquake magnitude and distribution on the Gofar (East Pacific Rise) and Romanche (equatorial Mid-Atlantic) transforms are better predicted using the visco-plastic model than the half-space cooling model. We will also investigate how fault gouge porosity variation during an OTF earthquake nucleation phase may affect the seismic wave velocity structure, for which up to 3% drop was observed prior to the 2008 Mw6 Gofar earthquake.

  5. Estimation of Activity Related Energy Expenditure and Resting Metabolic Rate in Freely Moving Mice from Indirect Calorimetry Data

    PubMed Central

    Van Klinken, Jan Bert; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Willems Van Dijk, Ko

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a main determinant of total energy expenditure (TEE) and has been suggested to play a key role in body weight regulation. However, thus far it has been challenging to determine what part of the expended energy is due to activity in freely moving subjects. We developed a computational method to estimate activity related energy expenditure (AEE) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in mice from activity and indirect calorimetry data. The method is based on penalised spline regression and takes the time dependency of the RMR into account. In addition, estimates of AEE and RMR are corrected for the regression dilution bias that results from inaccurate PA measurements. We evaluated the performance of our method based on 500 simulated metabolic chamber datasets and compared it to that of conventional methods. It was found that for a sample time of 10 minutes the penalised spline model estimated the time-dependent RMR with 1.7 times higher accuracy than the Kalman filter and with 2.7 times higher accuracy than linear regression. We assessed the applicability of our method on experimental data in a case study involving high fat diet fed male and female C57Bl/6J mice. We found that TEE in male mice was higher due to a difference in RMR while AEE levels were similar in both groups, even though female mice were more active. Interestingly, the higher activity did not result in a difference in AEE because female mice had a lower caloric cost of activity, which was likely due to their lower body weight. In conclusion, TEE decomposition by means of penalised spline regression provides robust estimates of the time-dependent AEE and RMR and can be applied to data generated with generic metabolic chamber and indirect calorimetry set-ups. PMID:22574139

  6. The Rate of Age-Related Olfactory Decline Among the General Popul