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Sample records for relativistic antihydrogen atoms

  1. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  2. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {anti H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment`s results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  3. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, Glenn Delfosse, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for /bar Ho production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e+e/sp- pair creation near a nucleus with the e+ being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  4. Production of relativistic antihydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, Charles T.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    1994-04-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms, the bound state (p¯e+), can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton that passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus of charge Z will create e+e- pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound rather than a continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is calculated to be ~4Z2 pb for antiproton momenta above 6 GeV/c. The gas target of Fermilab Accumulator experiment E760 has already produced ~34 unobserved antihydrogen atoms, and a sample of ~760 is expected in 1995 from the successive experiment E835. No other source of antihydrogen exists. A simple method for detecting relativistic antihydrogen is proposed and a method outlined of measuring the antihydrogen Lamb shift to ~1%.

  5. Production of relativistic antihydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, C.T.; Brodsky, S.J. ); Schmidt, I. )

    1994-04-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms, the bound state ([ital [bar p]e][sup +]), can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton that passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus of charge [ital Z] will create [ital e][sup +][ital e[minus

  6. Production of relativistic anti-hydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture and measurement of the Lamb shift

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, C.T.; Brodsky, S.J.; Schmidt, I.

    1992-09-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms-the bound state ({bar p}e{sup +}){minus} can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton which passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus will create e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound instead of continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is roughly I Z{sup 2} pb for antiproton momenta above 6 GeV/c. A sample of 200 antihydrogen atoms in a low-emittance, neutral beam will be made in 1994 as an accidental byproduct of Fermilab experiment E760. We describe a simple experiment, Fermilab Proposal P862, which can detect this beam, and outline how a sample of a few-10{sup 4} atoms can be used to measure the antihydrogen Lamb shift to 1%.

  7. Production of relativistic antihydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture and measurement of the Lamb shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, Charles T.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    1993-12-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms — the bound state (bar pe+) — can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton which passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus will create e+e- pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound instead of continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is roughly 3 Z 2 pb for antiproton momenta about 6 GeV/ c. A sample of 600 antihydrogen atoms in a low-emittance, neutral beam will be made in 1995 as an accidental byproduct of Fermilab experiment E760. We describe a simple experiment, Fermilab Proposal P862, which can detect this beam, and outline how a sample of a few-104 atoms can be used to measure the antihydrogen Lamb shift to 1 %.

  8. Production of relativistic anti-hydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture and measurement of the Lamb shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, C. T.; Brodsky, S. J.; Schmidt, I.

    1992-09-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms - the bound state (bar-p)e(+) - can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton which passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus will create e(+)e(-) pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound instead of continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is roughly 1 Z(exp 2) pb for antiproton momenta above 6 GeV/c. A sample of 200 antihydrogen atoms in a low-emittance, neutral beam will be made in 1994 as an accidental byproduct of Fermilab experiment E760. We describe a simple experiment, Fermilab Proposal P862, which can detect this beam, and outline how a sample of a few 10(exp 4) atoms can be used to measure the antihydrogen Lamb shift to 1 percent.

  9. Observation of Atomic Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, G.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mandelkern, M.; Schultz, J.; Zioulas, G.; Christian, D.C.; Munger, C.T.

    1998-04-01

    We report the background-free observation of atomic antihydrogen, produced by interactions of an antiproton beam with a hydrogen gas jet target in the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. We measure the cross section of the reaction {ovr p}p{r_arrow}{ovr H}e{sup {minus}}p for {ovr p} beam momenta between 5203 and 6232 MeV/c to be 1.12{plus_minus}0.14{plus_minus}0.09 pb. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Proposal for the Detection of Relativistic Anti-Hydrogen Atoms Produced by Pair Production with Positron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, Charles T

    2003-07-14

    The authors propose to detect the first antihydrogen atoms. The integrated luminosity expected in 1994 of 200 pb{sup -1} for {bar p}p annihilation in the E760 hydrogen gas target will produce a sample of 10{sup 3} antihydrogen atoms. These atoms exit the accumulator in a low emittance, neutral beam which will be detected by an apparatus set up in the gap between the accumulator and debuncher rings. They believe the antihydrogen can be detected with essentially unit efficiency and zero background; the total cost of the project is roughly $300 K. The proponents expect to share costs. They request only a few shifts of protons to make a hydrogen beam with which to calibrate their apparatus, but the experiment is otherwise wholly parasitic on E760 and needs no new beam time.

  11. Measuring the antihydrogen Lamb shift with a relativistic antihydrogen beam

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, G.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mandelkern, M.; Schultz, J.; Takei, G.; Zioulas, G.; Christian, D.C.; Munger, C.T.

    1998-06-01

    We propose an experiment to measure the Lamb shift and fine structure (the intervals 2s{sub 1/2}{minus}2p{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 1/2}{minus}2p{sub 3/2}) in antihydrogen. A sample of 10000 antihydrogen atoms at a momentum of 8.85GeV/c suffices to measure the Lamb shift to 5{percent} and the fine structure to 1{percent}. Atomic collisions excite antihydrogen atoms to states with n=2; field ionization in a Lorentz-transformed laboratory magnetic field then prepares a particular n=2 state, and is used again to analyze that state after it is allowed to oscillate in a region of zero field. This experiment is feasible at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Resonant spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, Leonti; Solovyev, Dmitri

    2003-07-01

    The spectra of the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in the presence of an external electric field are compared. It is shown that the nonresonant corrections to the transition frequency may contain terms linear in the electric field. The existence of these terms does not violate space and time parity and leads to a difference in the resonant spectroscopic measurements for the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field.

  13. Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Ivan

    1997-03-15

    CERN announced in January 1996 the detection of the first eleven atoms of antimatter ever produced. The experiment was based on a method proposed earlier by S. Brodsky, C. Munger and I. Schmidt, and which furthermore predicted exactly the number of atoms that were detected for the particular conditions of the experiment. The study of antihydrogen affords science the opportunity to continue research on the symmetry between matter and antimatter. In this talk the importance of antihydrogen as a basic physical system is discussed. Different production methods that have been tried in the past are briefly presented, and the method that was used in the CERN experiment is analyzed in detail. It consists in producing antihydrogen by circulating a beam of an antiproton ring through an internal gas target. In the Coulomb field of a nucleus, an electron-positron pair is created, and antihydrogen will form when the positron is created in a bound rather that a continuum state about the antiproton. The theoretical calculation of the production cross section is presented in detail. A discussion of the detection systems used both in the CERN experiment and in another similar experiment that is right now underway at Fermilab are also given. Finally I present and discuss possible future experiments using antihydrogen, including the measurement of the antihydrogen Lamb shift.

  14. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  15. Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Collier, M J T; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fine, K S; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Holzscheiter, M H; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lindelöf, D; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Marchesotti, M; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rochet, J; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Variola, A; Watson, T L; van der Werf, D P

    2002-10-01

    A theoretical underpinning of the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions is CPT invariance, which requires that the laws of physics be invariant under the combined discrete operations of charge conjugation, parity and time reversal. Antimatter, the existence of which was predicted by Dirac, can be used to test the CPT theorem-experimental investigations involving comparisons of particles with antiparticles are numerous. Cold atoms and anti-atoms, such as hydrogen and antihydrogen, could form the basis of a new precise test, as CPT invariance implies that they must have the same spectrum. Observations of antihydrogen in small quantities and at high energies have been reported at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and at Fermilab, but these experiments were not suited to precision comparison measurements. Here we demonstrate the production of antihydrogen atoms at very low energy by mixing trapped antiprotons and positrons in a cryogenic environment. The neutral anti-atoms have been detected directly when they escape the trap and annihilate, producing a characteristic signature in an imaging particle detector. PMID:12368849

  16. Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Collier, M J T; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fine, K S; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Holzscheiter, M H; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lindelöf, D; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Marchesotti, M; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rochet, J; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Variola, A; Watson, T L; van der Werf, D P

    2002-10-01

    A theoretical underpinning of the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions is CPT invariance, which requires that the laws of physics be invariant under the combined discrete operations of charge conjugation, parity and time reversal. Antimatter, the existence of which was predicted by Dirac, can be used to test the CPT theorem-experimental investigations involving comparisons of particles with antiparticles are numerous. Cold atoms and anti-atoms, such as hydrogen and antihydrogen, could form the basis of a new precise test, as CPT invariance implies that they must have the same spectrum. Observations of antihydrogen in small quantities and at high energies have been reported at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and at Fermilab, but these experiments were not suited to precision comparison measurements. Here we demonstrate the production of antihydrogen atoms at very low energy by mixing trapped antiprotons and positrons in a cryogenic environment. The neutral anti-atoms have been detected directly when they escape the trap and annihilate, producing a characteristic signature in an imaging particle detector.

  17. Antihydrogen atom in external electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, L.; Sharipov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical comparison of the behavior of the antihydrogen (H) and hydrogen (H) atoms in external electric and magnetic fields is made. It is shown that observable differences arise in the spectroscopic properties of H and H atoms in parallel electric and magnetic fields of the order of 475 V/cm and 0.12 T, respectively.

  18. Formation of Antihydrogen Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic field traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2008-08-08

    It is shown that several features of antihydrogen production in nested Penning traps can be described with accurate and efficient Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that cold deeply-bound Rydberg states of antihydrogen (H-bar) are produced in three-body capture in the ATRAP experiments and an additional formation mechanism -Rydberg charge transfer-, particular to the nested Penning trap geometry, is responsible for the observed fast (hot) H-bar atoms. Detailed description of the numerical propagation technique for following extreme close encounters is given. An analytic derivation of the power law behavior of the field ionization spectrum is provided.

  19. First measurement of the velocity of slow antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Speck, A; Storry, C H; LeSage, D; Guise, N; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Pittner, H; Walz, J; Hänsch, T W; Comeau, D; Hessels, E A

    2004-08-13

    The speed of antihydrogen atoms is deduced from the fraction that passes through an oscillating electric field without ionizing. The weakly bound atoms used for this first demonstration travel about 20 times more rapidly than the average thermal speed of the antiprotons from which they form, if these are in thermal equilibrium with their 4.2 K container. The method should be applicable to much more deeply bound states, which may well be moving more slowly, and should aid the quest to lower the speed of the atoms as required if they are to be trapped for precise spectroscopy.

  20. Slow Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Le Sage, D.; Guise, N.; Larochelle, P.C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Pittner, H.; Herrmann, M.; Walz, J.; Haensch, T.W.

    2004-10-20

    Slow antihydrogen is now produced by two different production methods. In Method I, large numbers of H atoms are produced during positron-cooling of antiprotons within a nested Penning trap. In a just-demonstrated Method II, lasers control the production of antihydrogen atoms via charge exchange collisions. Field ionization detection makes it possible to probe the internal structure of the antihydrogen atoms being produced - most recently revealing atoms that are too tightly bound to be well described by the guiding center atom approximation. The speed of antihydrogen atoms has recently been measured for the first time. After the requested overview, the recent developments are surveyed.

  1. Formation of antihydrogen atoms and ions in a strongly magnetized plasma: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.; Hu, S.X.; Mazevet, S.; Collins, L.A.

    2005-10-15

    Formation of antihydrogen atoms in a magnetized plasma of positrons and antiprotons is explicitly demonstrated in a molecular dynamics simulation. The parameters chosen are compatible with the experimental setup. We employ a special, adaptive time step symplectic integrator to perform full dynamics simulation, without using the guiding center approximation, for very long times (of the order of {mu}s). The large number of antihydrogen atoms formed allows detailed statistical analysis and distributions for the binding energy, pseudomomentum, sizes, and other quantities that characterize these atoms. We also find that a significantly smaller number of antihydrogen positive ions form during the free expansion of the plasma.

  2. Rearrangement and annihilation in antihydrogen-atom scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsell, Svante

    2008-08-08

    I review some results for annihilation and rearrangement processes in low-energy antihydrogen-hydrogen and antihydrogen-helium scattering. For the strong nuclear force results using a {delta}-function potential are compared to a scattering length approach. It is found that the {delta}-function potential does not give correct annihilation cross sections in the case of antihydrogen-helium scattering. Problem associated with the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for rearrangement calculations are reviewed.

  3. Progress towards antihydrogen production by the reaction of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, M.; Laricchia, G.; Deutch, B.I.

    1995-03-01

    An experiment aimed at producing antihydrogen atoms by the reaction of cold antiprotons stored in a Penning trap with injected ground state positronium atoms is described. The apparatus developed in an attempt to observe the charge conjugate reaction using proton projectiles is discussed. Technically feasible upgrades to this apparatus are identified which may allow, in conjunction with the PS200 trap, antihydrogen production at LEAR.

  4. Quantum beats in hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field.

    PubMed

    Labzowsky, L; Sharipov, V

    2004-04-01

    An effect of quantum beats that arises due to the coherent excitation of 2s and 2p states of hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field is described. It is shown that the quantum beat signal contains terms linear in electric field, i.e., is of opposite sign for the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms. The conditions for the observation of this effect are discussed.

  5. Search for Laser-Induced Formation of Antihydrogen Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Ejsing, A. M.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n=11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO{sub 2} continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  6. Search for laser-induced formation of antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Ejsing, A M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Posada, L G C; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Telle, H H; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n = 11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO2 continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  7. New techniques for trapping antiprotons, positrons, and antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Y.

    2005-10-26

    A large number of antiprotons have been accumulated, cooled, compressed, and extracted for the first time. This was accomplished combining the AD(Antiproton Decelerator), the RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) and an MRT (Multi-Ring Trap) installed in a 2.5T solenoid. Some 1.2 x 106 antiprotons were stably stored per one AD shot, which was {approx}50 times better in the accumulation efficiency than conventional methods with thick degrader foils. The trapped antiprotons were then cooled by a preloaded electron plasma({approx} 108/cm3), radially compressed by a rotating electric field, and then extracted from the MRT as mono-energetic DC beams of 10-500eV. A similar system with much higher electron density({approx} 1011/cm3) has enabled a new positron accumulation, the efficiency of which is 360e+/s/mCi, some {approx}30 times better than previous UHV compatible schemes. With these ingredients, a cusp trap is under development, which could synthesize and at the same time trap spin-polarized antihydrogen atoms in their ground states.

  8. A theoretical survey of formation of antihydrogen atoms in a Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.

    2007-08-02

    Numerous antihydrogen atoms are created at CERN, by ATRAP and ATHENA experiments, by bringing together positrons and antiprotons in a magnetic Penning trap. Most of these atoms are created in exotic, highly excited states, such that the magnetic forces on positrons are greater than the Coulomb attraction of antiprotons. This paper presents an overview of the recent progress made toward theoretical understanding of the complicated dynamics which leads to the formation and detection of antihydrogen atoms. There is no formal difference between the plasmas described here and normal, electron-proton, matter plasmas, except the reversed sign of electrical charges. The next generation of experiments need to bring the antihydrogen atoms to the ground state and to cool them to sub-milliKelvin temperature. Only then, high resolution spectroscopy can expose differences between matter and antimatter due to CPT violations. Suggestions are made for possible pathways toward this goal.

  9. Mirror symmetry, chiral symmetry breaking, and antihydrogen states in natural atomic H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooydonk, G.

    2002-10-01

    Molecular band spectra reveal a left-right symmetry for atoms [Van Hooydonk, Spectrochim. Acta A 56, 2273 (2000)]. Intra-atomic left-right symmetry points to antiatom states and, to make sense, this must also show in line spectra. H Lyman ns singlets show a mirror plane at quantum number n0=1/2π. A symmetry-breaking oscillator (1-1/2π/n)2 means that some of these n states are antihydrogenic. This view runs ahead of CERN's antiproton decelerator project on antihydrogen.

  10. Trapped Antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2012-03-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, is made entirely of antiparticles and is believed to be stable. It is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. Low energy (Kelvin scale) antihydrogen has been produced at CERN since 2002. I will describe the experiment which has recently succeeded in trapping antihydrogen in a cryogenic Penning trap for times up to approximately 15 minutes.

  11. Cold collisions of atomic hydrogen with antihydrogen atoms: An optical potential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zygelman, B.; Saenz, Alejandro; Froelich, P.; Jonsell, S.

    2004-04-01

    We present a theory that describes the interaction of hydrogen atoms with antihydrogen at subkelvin temperatures. The formalism includes a nonlocal complex optical potential, whose imaginary component describes the breakup of the H-H-bar complex into positronium and protonium fragments. Using ab inito methods, we construct the imaginary part of the optical potential and calculate the cross sections for fragmentation in ultracold collisions of H and H-bar. We find a 35% reduction in the value of the scattering length from that obtained in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We estimate the lifetimes for quasibound states of this complex to fragment into a protonium-positronium pair.

  12. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen. PMID:21085118

  13. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen.

  14. Simulations of antihydrogen formation

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, F.

    2004-08-01

    The results of simulations of antihydrogen formation in a Penning trap are reported. The antihydrogen atoms are formed by three-body capture. We find that the arrested nature of the three-body capture in the trap greatly reduces the expected binding energy of the antihydrogen. Typically, the formed antihydrogen has larger velocity along the magnetic field than across the field and a binding energy below k{sub B}T.

  15. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-03-15

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10{sup -16}-10{sup -4} a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature.

  16. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  17. Feasibility of antihydrogen atom containment in helium: a problem of electron-positron correlation investigated by the Monte Carol method

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the interaction potential between the helium atom and the antihydrogen atom was performed for the purpose of determining the feasibility of antihydrogen atom containment. The interaction potential showed an energy barrier to collapse of this system. A variational estimate of the height of this energy barrier and estimates of lifetime with respect to electron-positron annihilation were determined by the Variational Monte Carlo method. This calculation allowed for an improvement over an SCF result through the inclusion of explicit correlation factors in the trial wave function. An estimate of the correlation energy of this system was determined by the Green's Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) method.

  18. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  19. Pipkin Award Talk: Rydberg Charge Exchange: A Method for Producing Rydberg Positronium and Antihydrogen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2003-05-01

    Antihydrogen production via two-stage charge exchange(E.A.Hessels, D.M. Homan and M.J. Cavagnero, Phys. Rev. A. 57), (1998) 1668. may provide extremely cold antimatter atoms that can be trapped for spectroscopic studies. Positrons(J. Estrada, T. Roach, J.N. Tan, P. Yesley, and G. Gabrielse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84), (2000) 859. and antiprotons(G. Gabrielse, N. S. Bowden, P. Oxley, A. Speck, C. H. Storry, J. N. Tan, M. Wessels, D. Grozonka, W. Oelert, G. Schepers, T. Sefzick, J. Walz, H. Pittner, T. W. Hansch, E. A. Hessels, Phys. Lett. B 548), (2002) 140-145., both cooled to 4 K and loaded into adjacent wells of a Penning trap, provide the basic components. Laser-excited Rydberg cesium atoms are passed through the cloud of trapped positrons and charge exchange with the positrons to form Rydberg states of positronium. These positronium atoms have been observed and are studied by ionizing them and counting the resulting positrons. State analysis of the positronium is obtained by varying the electric field used to ionize the atoms. Large numbers of positronium atoms are produced and their binding energies are found to be similar to that of the incoming Rydberg cesium atoms. A second charge exchange is proposed, in which the neutral positronium travels a short distance to an adjacent antiproton cloud. The result of this second charge exchange would be antihydrogen atoms. The apparatus to test this second charge exchange has already been constructed and preliminary studies have already been made.

  20. Cooling by spontaneous decay of highly excited antihydrogen atoms in magnetic traps.

    PubMed

    Pohl, T; Sadeghpour, H R; Nagata, Y; Yamazaki, Y

    2006-11-24

    An efficient cooling mechanism of magnetically trapped, highly excited antihydrogen (H) atoms is presented. This cooling, in addition to the expected evaporative cooling, results in trapping of a large number of H atoms in the ground state. It is found that the final fraction of trapped atoms is insensitive to the initial distribution of H magnetic quantum numbers. Expressions are derived for the cooling efficiency, demonstrating that magnetic quadrupole (cusp) traps provide stronger cooling than higher order magnetic multipoles. The final temperature of H confined in a cusp trap is shown to depend as approximately 2.2T(n0)n(0)(-2/3) on the initial Rydberg level n0 and temperature T(n0).

  1. Cooling by Spontaneous Decay of Highly Excited Antihydrogen Atoms in Magnetic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Nagata, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-11-24

    An efficient cooling mechanism of magnetically trapped, highly excited antihydrogen (H) atoms is presented. This cooling, in addition to the expected evaporative cooling, results in trapping of a large number of H atoms in the ground state. It is found that the final fraction of trapped atoms is insensitive to the initial distribution of H magnetic quantum numbers. Expressions are derived for the cooling efficiency, demonstrating that magnetic quadrupole (cusp) traps provide stronger cooling than higher order magnetic multipoles. The final temperature of H confined in a cusp trap is shown to depend as {approx}2.2T{sub n{sub 0}}n{sub 0}{sup -2/3} on the initial Rydberg level n{sub 0} and temperature T{sub n{sub 0}}.

  2. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  3. Antihydrogen in a bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Michael; Eriksson, Stefan; Aled Isaac, C.; Madsen, Niels; van der Werf, Dirk Peter

    2013-03-01

    We describe recent experiments at CERN in which antihydrogen, an atom made entirely of antimatter, has been held in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and subjected to microwave radiation to induce a resonant quantum transition in the anti-atom. We discuss how this, the first experiment to observe an interaction between an antihydrogen atom and a photon, was achieved. We provide some background to antimatter physics and cover aspects of the current motivation for our experiments.

  4. Antihydrogen-hydrogen elastic scattering at thermal energies using an atomic-orbital technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab; Ghosh, A.S.

    2003-05-01

    In view of the recent interest in the trapping of antihydrogen atom H(bar sign), at very low temperatures, H-bar-H scattering has been investigated at low incident energies using a close-coupling model with the basis set H-bar(1s,2s,2p-bar)+H(1s,2s,2p-bar). The predicted s-wave elastic phase shifts, scattering length, and effective range are in a good agreement with the other recent predictions of Jonsell et al. and of Armour and Chamberlain. The results indicate that the atomic orbital expansion model is suitable to study the H-bar-H scattering at ultracold temperatures.

  5. Spatial distribution of cold antihydrogen formation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, N; Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2005-01-28

    Antihydrogen is formed when antiprotons are mixed with cold positrons in a nested Penning trap. We present experimental evidence, obtained using our antihydrogen annihilation detector, that the spatial distribution of the emerging antihydrogen atoms is independent of the positron temperature and axially enhanced. This indicates that antihydrogen is formed before the antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium with the positron plasma. This result has important implications for the trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen.

  6. ATRAP - Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Grzonka, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Lesage, D.; Levitt, B.; Speck, A.; Haensch, T.W.

    2005-10-26

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen.For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP.

  7. Antihydrogen Trapped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowe[1], Paul

    2011-05-01

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time. Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome. The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained. These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating. The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures,, where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried. The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time.

  8. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  9. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  10. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  11. GRASP: General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, I. P.; McKenzie, B. J.; Norrington, P. H.; Mayers, D. F.; Pyper, N. C.

    2016-09-01

    GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) calculates atomic structure, including energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes; it is a fully relativistic code based on the jj coupling scheme.

  12. Formation of low-energy antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; ATHENA Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invariance. The author describes plans to trap antiprotons and positrons in a combined Penning trap and to form a significant number of cold antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen.

  13. Antihydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola

    2008-08-08

    Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

  14. Antihydrogen for tests of CPT and Lorentz invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    1999-01-15

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invarianz. We describe our plans to form a significant number of cold antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen.

  15. Antihydrogen for tests of CPT and Lorentz invariance

    SciTech Connect

    ATHENA collaboration

    1999-01-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invarianz. We describe our plans to form a significant number of cold antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Cooling of Antihydrogen and Antiprotons to Ultracold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, J.; Kellerbauer, A.

    2005-10-26

    We discuss laser cooling of antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap down to the millikelvin range using radiation at Lyman-alpha. This is very important to suppress residual Zeeman shifts and broadenings in future high-resolution laser-spectroscopy of antihydrogen. Even colder antihydrogen temperatures in the sub-millikelvin range are desirable for experiments on antimatter gravity. We discuss novel methods to obtain antihydrogen atoms at these ultracold temperatures.

  17. General Relativistic Effects in Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-03-17

    Atom interferometry is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. We begin by explaining the non-relativistic calculation of the phase shift in an atom interferometer and deriving its range of validity. From this we develop a method for calculating the phase shift in general relativity. This formalism is then used to find the relativistic effects in an atom interferometer in a weak gravitational field for application to laboratory tests of general relativity. The potentially testable relativistic effects include the non-linear three-graviton coupling, the gravity of kinetic energy, and the falling of light. We propose experiments, one currently under construction, that could provide a test of the principle of equivalence to 1 part in 10{sup 15} (300 times better than the present limit), and general relativity at the 10% level, with many potential future improvements. We also consider applications to other metrics including the Lense-Thirring effect, the expansion of the universe, and preferred frame and location effects.

  18. Quenching of para-H{sub 2} with an ultracold antihydrogen atom H{sub 1s}

    SciTech Connect

    Sultanov, Renat A.; Guster, Dennis; Adhikari, Sadhan K.

    2010-02-15

    In this work we report the results of calculation for quantum-mechanical rotational transitions in molecular hydrogen, H{sub 2}, induced by an ultracold ground-state antihydrogen atom H{sub 1s}. The calculations are accomplished using a nonreactive close-coupling quantum-mechanical approach. The H{sub 2} molecule is treated as a rigid rotor. The total elastic-scattering cross section {sigma}{sub el}({epsilon}) at energy {epsilon}, state-resolved rotational transition cross sections {sigma}{sub jj}{sup '}({epsilon}) between states j and j{sup '}, and corresponding thermal rate coefficients k{sub jj}{sup '}(T) are computed in the temperature range 0.004 K < or approx. T < or approx. 4 K. Satisfactory agreement with other calculations (variational) has been obtained for {sigma}{sub el}({epsilon}).

  19. Electron-cooled accumulation of 4 × 109 positrons for production and storage of antihydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Skinner, T. D. G.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Gabrielse, G.; Hamley, C. D.; Jones, N.; Marable, K.; Tardiff, E.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Zielinski, M.; ATRAP Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Four billion positrons (e+) are accumulated in a Penning-Ioffe trap apparatus at 1.2 K and <6 × 10-17 Torr. This is the largest number of positrons ever held in a Penning trap. The e+ are cooled by collisions with trapped electrons (e-) in this first demonstration of using e- for efficient loading of e+ into a Penning trap. The combined low temperature and vacuum pressure provide an environment suitable for antihydrogen (\\bar{{{H}}}) production, and long antimatter storage times, sufficient for high-precision tests of antimatter gravity and of CPT.

  20. Detection of Cold Antihydrogen Annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.

    2005-10-26

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition between the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.The experimental studies are performed at two separate installations, ATRAP-I, a system with severe space limitation, where routinely antihydrogen was produced and ATRAP-II, which will start full operation within the next AD running period. ATRAP-II includes a much larger solenoid allowing the installation of an extended detection system as well as an optimized Ioffe trap. The antihydrogen annihilation detector system consists of several layers of scintillating fibers, counts the antihydrogen atoms and determines the annihilation vertex of the atoms. This diagnostic element will allow to optimize the production of cold antihydrogen sufficiently to permit the optical observations and measurements.Measurements are in progress to check the performance and specifications of the antihydrogen annihilation detector. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations concerning the track reconstruction have been started and will be continued using the program GEANT4.

  1. Advances in antihydrogen physics.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Mike; Van der Werf, Dirk Peter

    2015-01-01

    The creation of cold antihydrogen atoms by the controlled combination of positrons and antiprotons has opened up a new window on fundamental physics. More recently, techniques have been developed that allow some antihydrogen atoms to be created at low enough kinetic energies that they can be held inside magnetic minimum neutral atom traps. With confinement times of many minutes possible, it has become feasible to perform experiments to probe the properties of the antiatom for the first time. We review the experimental progress in this area, outline some of the motivation for studying basic aspects of antimatter physics and provide an outlook of where we might expect this field to go in the coming years.

  2. Far-infrared Rydberg-Rydberg transitions in a magnetic field: Deexcitation of antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzels, A.; Guertler, A.; Noordam, L. D.; Robicheaux, F.

    2006-06-15

    The dynamics of (de)excitation between highly excited Rydberg states (15antihydrogen is produced in high n states in a strong magnetic field with a wide distribution of m. Our measurements and calculations suggest that deexcitation stimulated by infrared photons is not an efficient method for accelerating cascade to the ground state.

  3. Towards antihydrogen trapping and spectroscopy at ALPHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Spectroscopy of antihydrogen has the potential to yield high-precision tests of the CPT theorem and shed light on the matter-antimatter imbalance in the Universe. The ALPHA antihydrogen trap at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator aims to prepare a sample of antihydrogen atoms confined in an octupole-based Ioffe trap and to measure the frequency of several atomic transitions. We describe our techniques to directly measure the antiproton temperature and a new technique to cool them to below 10 K. We also show how our unique position-sensitive annihilation detector provides us with a highly sensitive method of identifying antiproton annihilations and effectively rejecting the cosmic-ray background.

  4. The ATHENA antihydrogen experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, K. S.

    1999-12-10

    The ATHENA experiment is being built at CERN to produce and trap neutral antihydrogen. Here we give an overview of the plans to produce antihydrogen. The experiment must 1) trap the antiprotons produced by the CERN accelerators, 2) produce and trap positrons, 3) combine the two charge species into antihydrogen, and finally 4) detect the presence of the antihydrogen. In this paper we discuss how we intend to accomplish each of these steps.

  5. The ASACUSA CUSP: an antihydrogen experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, N.; Ulmer, S.; Murtagh, D. J.; Van Gorp, S.; Nagata, Y.; Diermaier, M.; Federmann, S.; Leali, M.; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Michishio, K.; Mizutani, T.; Mohri, A.; Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M.; Radics, B.; Sakurai, S.; Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Torii, H. A.; Venturelli, L.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-11-01

    In order to test CPT symmetry between antihydrogen and its counterpart hydrogen, the ASACUSA collaboration plans to perform high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen atom in-flight. We have developed an apparatus ("cusp trap") which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and multiple ring electrodes. For the preparation of slow antiprotons and positrons, Penning-Malmberg type traps were utilized. The spectrometer line was positioned downstream of the cusp trap. At the end of the beamline, an antihydrogen beam detector was located, which comprises an inorganic Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) single-crystal scintillator housed in a vacuum duct and surrounding plastic scintillators. A significant fraction of antihydrogen atoms flowing out the cusp trap were detected.

  6. Synthesis of cold antihydrogen in a cusp trap.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Y; Kuroda, N; Michishio, K; Kim, C H; Higaki, H; Nagata, Y; Kanai, Y; Torii, H A; Corradini, M; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Venturelli, L; Zurlo, N; Fujii, K; Ohtsuka, M; Tanaka, K; Imao, H; Nagashima, Y; Matsuda, Y; Juhász, B; Mohri, A; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-10

    We report here the first successful synthesis of cold antihydrogen atoms employing a cusp trap, which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and a stack of multiple ring electrodes. This success opens a new path to make a stringent test of the CPT symmetry via high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms.

  7. Synthesis of Cold Antihydrogen in a Cusp Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Kuroda, N.; Kim, C. H.; Torii, H. A.; Fujii, K.; Ohtsuka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Michishio, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Higaki, H.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2010-12-10

    We report here the first successful synthesis of cold antihydrogen atoms employing a cusp trap, which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and a stack of multiple ring electrodes. This success opens a new path to make a stringent test of the CPT symmetry via high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms.

  8. Positron plasma diagnostics and temperature control for antihydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lindelöf, D; Rizzini, E Lodi; Macrí, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P

    2003-08-01

    Production of antihydrogen atoms by mixing antiprotons with a cold, confined, positron plasma depends critically on parameters such as the plasma density and temperature. We discuss nondestructive measurements, based on a novel, real-time analysis of excited, low-order plasma modes, that provide comprehensive characterization of the positron plasma in the ATHENA antihydrogen apparatus. The plasma length, radius, density, and total particle number are obtained. Measurement and control of plasma temperature variations, and the application to antihydrogen production experiments are discussed.

  9. Bremsstrahlung spectra from atoms and ions at low relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonina, N. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1999-09-01

    Analytic expressions for bremsstrahlung spectra from neutral atoms and ions, including the polarizational bremsstrahlung contribution in a stripped atom approximation, are developed for electron scattering at energies of 10-2000 keV. A modified Elwert factor and a simple higher Born correction are used for the Coulomb spectrum, with ordinary bremsstrahlung screening effects in ions and atoms adequately characterized in the non-relativistic Born approximation. In parallel with the development of this analytic description, new numerical results are obtained for ordinary bremsstrahlung from ions and from bare nuclei, appreciably extending the available data set which can be used to study dependences on element, ionicity, energy and the fraction of incident energy radiated. The accuracy of predictions with the analytic expressions is then determined by comparison with the full numerical relativistic partial-wave results for ordinary bremsstrahlung and with non-relativistic numerical results in the Born approximation or in partial waves for the polarizational amplitude.

  10. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  11. Hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    PubMed

    Froelich; Jonsell; Saenz; Zygelman; Dalgarno

    2000-05-15

    Matter-antimatter interactions are investigated using hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions as an example. Cross sections for elastic scattering and for the antihydrogen loss (either through the rearrangement reaction, resulting in formation of protonium and positronium according to H+&Hmacr;-->p&pmacr;+e(+)e(-), or via annihilation in flight) are calculated for the first time in a fully quantum mechanical approach. Implications for experiments intending to trap and cool antihydrogen are discussed.

  12. Workshop on foundations of the relativistic theory of atomic structure

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    The conference is an attempt to gather state-of-the-art information to understand the theory of relativistic atomic structure beyond the framework of the original Dirac theory. Abstracts of twenty articles from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  13. Relativistic Effects in the Photoionization of Very Heavy Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.

    2015-05-01

    At very high Z relativistic interactions become important contributors to even the qualitative nature of atomic properties. To explore the extent of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of a very heavy atom, a theoretical study of nobelium (Z = 102) has been performed using the relativistic random phase approximation (RRPA) methodology. In order to determine which features in the photoionization cross section are due to relativity, calculations using the (nonrelativistic) random phase approximation with exchange method (RPAE) are performed for comparison. With the inclusion of inter-channel coupling some relativistic effects are amplified or diminished. To distinguish which relativistic effects are native to the orbital of interest or a product of inter-channel coupling, calculations have been performed with and without coupling for comparison. Aside from significant splitting and shifts of threshold, induced effects on subshells not strongly affected by relativity directly, e.g. outer shells, by inner subshells that are strongly affected, occur via changes in screening and inter-channel coupling.

  14. Atomic frequency standard relativistic Doppler shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Reinhardt, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to measure possible space anisotropy as it would effect the frequency of a cesium atomic beam standard clock in a laboratory on earth due to motion relative to external coordinate frames. The cesium frequency was measured as a function of orientation with respect to an atomic hydrogen maser standard. Over a period of 34 days 101 measurements were made. The results are consistent with a conclusion that no general orientation dependance attributable to spacial anisotropy was observed. It is shown that both the airplane clock results, and the null results for the atomic beam clock, are consistent with Einstein general or special relativity, or with the Lorentz transformations alone.

  15. Physics with antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Poth, H.

    1986-10-15

    A cooled and stored antiproton beam of high intensity promises to be the best method for forming an intense anti-hydrogen beam. How this can be accomplished using the electron cooling technique will be discussed and eventual experiments with antihydrogen described.

  16. First antihydrogen production within a combined Penning-Ioffe trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, David Anthony

    The long-term goal of the ATRAP collaboration is to perform precision laser spectroscopy on antihydrogen, the simplest atom made entirely of antimatter. Comparing this to the hydrogen spectrum would be a direct test of CPT invariance. Antihydrogen has been produced by ATRAP both during the positron cooling of antiprotons and by a laser-controlled charge-exchange process. Antihydrogen spectroscopy will first require confining the atoms produced in a Penning ion trap within the magnetic confining field of a superimposed Ioffe trap. A new experimental zone was established at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator, and a combined Penning-Ioffe trap was constructed for the trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen. Significant advances were made in the methods of accumulating the constituent particles necessary for antihydrogen formation, including a factor of 400 improvement of the positron loading rate using buffer-gas accumulation, the demonstration of a new electron loading method via the photoelectric effect using UV laser pulses, and efficient antiproton trapping using magnetic fields that were much lower than previously demonstrated, as required to maximize antihydrogen trapping depths. The loss of particles from the Penning trap caused by the radial magnetic field of a quadrupole-Ioffe trap was measured, and found to be suitably low for antihydrogen production. Following this, antihydrogen production in a combined Penning-Ioffe trap was demonstrated for the first time. A new method of antihydrogen production via positron-cooling of antiprotons was utilized that prolonged the interaction time of the positrons and antiprotons, while minimizing the mixing-energy of the antiprotons. Larger amounts of antihydrogen were produced in the presence of the Ioffe field than without it, assuaging reasonable fears that the magnetic confining field would restrict antihydrogen formation. Searches for antihydrogen confined in the magnetic trap yielded null results, likely due to the

  17. Background-free observation of cold antihydrogen with field-ionization analysis of its states.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Bowden, N S; Oxley, P; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Tan, J N; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2002-11-18

    A background-free observation of cold antihydrogen atoms is made using field ionization followed by antiproton storage, a detection method that provides the first experimental information about antihydrogen atomic states. More antihydrogen atoms can be field ionized in an hour than all the antimatter atoms that have been previously reported, and the production rate per incident high energy antiproton is higher than ever observed. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the antihydrogen is formed via three-body recombination.

  18. Formation of antihydrogen by the charge-transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.

    1995-10-01

    The cross sections for antihydrogen formation in the {ital n}=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 levels from antiproton-positronium collisions are computed in the unitarized Born approximation (UBA). Twenty-seven physical states of antihydrogen (1{ital s}{r_arrow}7{ital h}) and ten physical states (1{ital s}{r_arrow}4{ital f}) of positronium are included in the UBA basis. The peak cross section for antihydrogen formation from excited positronium targets is much larger than that from a ground-state positronium target at low incident energies. The high-{ital n} antihydrogen levels make a significant contribution to the total antihydrogen formation cross section, especially for incident positronium atoms in the Ps({ital n}=3) and Ps({ital n}=4) levels.

  19. Numerical-parameterized relativistic optimized effective potential for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, E.; Gálvez, F. J.; Maldonado, P.; Sarsa, A.

    2007-08-01

    A numerical-parameterized solution of the relativistic optimized effective potential equations for atoms is proposed. The analytic continuation method is used to solve the single-particle Dirac equation. This method provides an accurate solution and allows for a straightforward use of the logarithmic transformation. The equations are solved within both a single and a multi-configurational framework. The single-configuration results for the ground state of the noble gases from Ne to Rn are compared with those obtained from a fully numerical solution of the relativistic optimized effective potential equations as well as with the Dirac-Hartree-Fock results. The performance of the multi-configuration version of the method is illustrated by studying a number of excited states of the carbon and iron atoms.

  20. Tests of CPT, Lorentz invariance and the WEP with antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; ATHENA Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invariance. Equally well, such a system could be used for searches of violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) at high precision. The author describes his plans to form a significant number of cold, trapped antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen and comment on possible first experiments.

  1. Detecting Antihydrogen: The Challenges and the Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Makoto C.

    2005-10-19

    ATHENA's first detection of cold antihydrogen atoms relied on their annihilation signatures in a sophisticated particle detector. We will review the features of the ATHENA detector and its applications in trap physics. The detector for a new experiment ALPHA will have considerable challenges due to increased material thickness in the trap apparatus as well as field non-uniformity. Our studies indicate that annihilation vertex imaging should be still possible despite these challenges. An alternative method for trapped antihydrogen, via electron impact ionization, will be also discussed.

  2. Hydrogen-Antihydrogen Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, P.; Jonsell, S.; Saenz, A.; Zygelman, B.; Dalgarno, A.

    2000-05-15

    Matter-antimatter interactions are investigated using hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions as an example. Cross sections for elastic scattering and for the antihydrogen loss (either through the rearrangement reaction, resulting in formation of protonium and positronium according to H+H(bar sign){yields}p p(bar sign)+e{sup +}e{sup -} , or via annihilation in flight) are calculated for the first time in a fully quantum mechanical approach. Implications for experiments intending to trap and cool antihydrogen are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Antihydrogen production and precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The study of CPT invariance with the highest achievable precision in all particle sectors is of fundamental importance for physics. Equally important is the question of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. In recent years, impressive progress has been achieved in capturing antiprotons in specially designed Penning traps, in cooling them to energies of a few milli-electron volts, and in storing them for hours in a small volume of space. Positrons have been accumulated in large numbers in similar traps, and low energy positron or positronium beams have been generated. Finally, steady progress has been made in trapping and cooling neutral atoms. Thus the ingredients to form antihydrogen at rest are at hand. Once antihydrogen atoms have been captured at low energy, spectroscopic methods can be applied to interrogate their atomic structure with extremely high precision and compare it to its normal matter counterpart, the hydrogen atom. Especially the 1S-2S transition, with a lifetime of the excited state of 122 msec and thereby a natural linewidth of 5 parts in 10{sup 16}, offers in principle the possibility to directly compare matter and antimatter properties at a level of 1 part in 10{sup 16}.

  4. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  5. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  6. Formation of ground and excited states of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Nahar, S.N.; Wadehra, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    Differential and integrated cross sections for the formation of antihydrogen by the impact of intermediate-energy (20--500 keV) antiprotons on positronium are calculated using the first Born approximation. The calculations are carried out for the formation of antihydrogen in ground and various excited electronic states (n = 1--3) when positronium, the target atom, is in the ground state, and for the formation of antihydrogen in the ground state when the positronium is in various excited electronic states (n = 1--2). The 1/n/sup 3/ behavior for the capture cross sections is used to calculate the total (that is, all states added together) integrated cross sections. The cross sections for the formation of antihydrogen presented here are obtained from those for the formation of positronium by the impact of positrons on hydrogen atoms by using charge invariance and the principle of detailed balance.

  7. Relativistic Corrections to the Bohr Model of the Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, David W.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a simple means for extending the Bohr model to include relativistic corrections using a derivation similar to that for the non-relativistic case, except that the relativistic expressions for mass and kinetic energy are employed. (Author/GS)

  8. Atomic electron energies including relativistic effects and quantum electrodynamic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic electron energies have been calculated relativistically. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all orbitals in all atoms with 2 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. These results will serve for detailed comparison of calculations based on other approaches. The magnitude of quantum electrodynamic corrections is exhibited quantitatively for each state.

  9. Gravitational quantum states of Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A. Yu.; Froelich, P.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.

    2011-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of the motion of the antihydrogen atom (H) in the gravitational field of Earth above a material surface. We predict that the H atom, falling in the gravitational field of Earth above a material surface, would settle into long-lived quantum states. We point out a method of measuring the difference in the energy of H in such states. The method allows for spectroscopy of gravitational levels based on atom-interferometric principles. We analyze the general feasibility of performing experiments of this kind. We point out that such experiments provide a method of measuring the gravitational force (Mg) acting on H and that they might be of interest in the context of testing the weak equivalence principle for antimatter.

  10. Relativistic heavy-atom effects on heavy-atom nuclear shieldings.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Romero, Rodolfo H; Gómez, Sergio S; Aucar, Gustavo A; Vaara, Juha

    2006-11-14

    The principal relativistic heavy-atom effects on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensor of the heavy atom itself (HAHA effects) are calculated using ab initio methods at the level of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. This is the first systematic study of the main HAHA effects on nuclear shielding and chemical shift by perturbational relativistic approach. The dependence of the HAHA effects on the chemical environment of the heavy atom is investigated for the closed-shell X(2+), X(4+), XH(2), and XH(3) (-) (X=Si-Pb) as well as X(3+), XH(3), and XF(3) (X=P-Bi) systems. Fully relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for comparison. It is necessary in the Breit-Pauli approach to include the second-order magnetic-field-dependent spin-orbit (SO) shielding contribution as it is the larger SO term in XH(3) (-), XH(3), and XF(3), and is equally large in XH(2) as the conventional, third-order field-independent spin-orbit contribution. Considering the chemical shift, the third-order SO mechanism contributes two-thirds of the difference of approximately 1500 ppm between BiH(3) and BiF(3). The second-order SO mechanism and the numerically largest relativistic effect, which arises from the cross-term contribution of the Fermi contact hyperfine interaction and the relativistically modified spin-Zeeman interaction (FC/SZ-KE), are isotropic and practically independent of electron correlation effects as well as the chemical environment of the heavy atom. The third-order SO terms depend on these factors and contribute both to heavy-atom shielding anisotropy and NMR chemical shifts. While a qualitative picture of heavy-atom chemical shifts is already obtained at the nonrelativistic level of theory, reliable shifts may be expected after including the third-order SO contributions only, especially when calculations are carried out at correlated level. The FC/SZ-KE contribution to shielding is almost completely produced in the s orbitals of the heavy atom

  11. Relativistic heavy-atom effects on heavy-atom nuclear shieldings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantto, Perttu; Romero, Rodolfo H.; Gómez, Sergio S.; Aucar, Gustavo A.; Vaara, Juha

    2006-11-01

    The principal relativistic heavy-atom effects on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensor of the heavy atom itself (HAHA effects) are calculated using ab initio methods at the level of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. This is the first systematic study of the main HAHA effects on nuclear shielding and chemical shift by perturbational relativistic approach. The dependence of the HAHA effects on the chemical environment of the heavy atom is investigated for the closed-shell X2+, X4+, XH2, and XH3- (X =Si-Pb) as well as X3+, XH3, and XF3 (X =P-Bi) systems. Fully relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for comparison. It is necessary in the Breit-Pauli approach to include the second-order magnetic-field-dependent spin-orbit (SO) shielding contribution as it is the larger SO term in XH3-, XH3, and XF3, and is equally large in XH2 as the conventional, third-order field-independent spin-orbit contribution. Considering the chemical shift, the third-order SO mechanism contributes two-thirds of the difference of ˜1500ppm between BiH3 and BiF3. The second-order SO mechanism and the numerically largest relativistic effect, which arises from the cross-term contribution of the Fermi contact hyperfine interaction and the relativistically modified spin-Zeeman interaction (FC/SZ-KE), are isotropic and practically independent of electron correlation effects as well as the chemical environment of the heavy atom. The third-order SO terms depend on these factors and contribute both to heavy-atom shielding anisotropy and NMR chemical shifts. While a qualitative picture of heavy-atom chemical shifts is already obtained at the nonrelativistic level of theory, reliable shifts may be expected after including the third-order SO contributions only, especially when calculations are carried out at correlated level. The FC/SZ-KE contribution to shielding is almost completely produced in the s orbitals of the heavy atom, with values diminishing with the principal

  12. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  13. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suitemore » can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.« less

  14. A source of antihydrogen for in-flight hyperfine spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, N.; Ulmer, S.; Murtagh, D. J.; Van Gorp, S.; Nagata, Y.; Diermaier, M.; Federmann, S.; Leali, M.; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Michishio, K.; Mizutani, T.; Mohri, A.; Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M.; Radics, B.; Sakurai, S.; Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Torii, H. A.; Venturelli, L.; Wu¨nschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Antihydrogen, a positron bound to an antiproton, is the simplest antiatom. Its counterpart—hydrogen—is one of the most precisely investigated and best understood systems in physics research. High-resolution comparisons of both systems provide sensitive tests of CPT symmetry, which is the most fundamental symmetry in the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. Any measured difference would point to CPT violation and thus to new physics. Here we report the development of an antihydrogen source using a cusp trap for in-flight spectroscopy. A total of 80 antihydrogen atoms are unambiguously detected 2.7 m downstream of the production region, where perturbing residual magnetic fields are small. This is a major step towards precision spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using Rabi-like beam spectroscopy. PMID:24448273

  15. Cold antihydrogen: a new frontier in fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Niels

    2010-08-13

    The year 2002 heralded a breakthrough in antimatter research when the first low energy antihydrogen atoms were produced. Antimatter has inspired both science and fiction writers for many years, but detailed studies have until now eluded science. Antimatter is notoriously difficult to study as it does not readily occur in nature, even though our current understanding of the laws of physics have us expecting that it should make up half of the universe. The pursuit of cold antihydrogen is driven by a desire to solve this profound mystery. This paper will motivate the current effort to make cold antihydrogen, explain how antihydrogen is currently made, and how and why we are attempting to trap it. It will also discuss what kind of measurements are planned to gain new insights into the unexplained asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the universe.

  16. A source of antihydrogen for in-flight hyperfine spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Ulmer, S; Murtagh, D J; Van Gorp, S; Nagata, Y; Diermaier, M; Federmann, S; Leali, M; Malbrunot, C; Mascagna, V; Massiczek, O; Michishio, K; Mizutani, T; Mohri, A; Nagahama, H; Ohtsuka, M; Radics, B; Sakurai, S; Sauerzopf, C; Suzuki, K; Tajima, M; Torii, H A; Venturelli, L; Wünschek, B; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N; Higaki, H; Kanai, Y; Lodi Rizzini, E; Nagashima, Y; Matsuda, Y; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, Y

    2014-01-01

    Antihydrogen, a positron bound to an antiproton, is the simplest antiatom. Its counterpart-hydrogen--is one of the most precisely investigated and best understood systems in physics research. High-resolution comparisons of both systems provide sensitive tests of CPT symmetry, which is the most fundamental symmetry in the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. Any measured difference would point to CPT violation and thus to new physics. Here we report the development of an antihydrogen source using a cusp trap for in-flight spectroscopy. A total of 80 antihydrogen atoms are unambiguously detected 2.7 m downstream of the production region, where perturbing residual magnetic fields are small. This is a major step towards precision spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using Rabi-like beam spectroscopy.

  17. Possible mechanism for enhancing the trapping and cooling of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, C. L.; Zagury, N.; Robicheaux, F.

    2009-10-15

    We propose a usage of microwave radiation in a magnetic trap for improving the cooling and trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms which are initially produced in high magnetic moment states. Inducing transitions toward lower magnetic moments near the turning points of the atom in the trap, followed by spontaneous emission, should enhance the number of trappable atoms. We present results of simulations based on a typical experimental condition of the antihydrogen experiments at CERN. This technique should also be applicable to other trapped high magnetic moment Rydberg atoms.

  18. Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1993-07-01

    A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed.

  19. Whispering gallery states of neutrons and anti-hydrogen atoms and their applications to fundamental and surface physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2013-03-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It is intensively used and explored due to its numerous crucial applications. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for neutrons and (anti)atoms. For (anti)matter waves, it includes a new feature: a massive particle is settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. In this talk, we present the first observation of the quantum whispering-gallery effect for matter particles (cold neutrons) 1-2. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to recently discovered gravitational quantum states of neutrons3. These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a quantum state. Deeply bound long-living states are weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited short-living states are very sensitive to the wall nuclear potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. Analogous phenomena could be measured with atoms and anti-atoms 4-5.

  20. The grasp2K relativistic atomic structure package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; He, X.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes grasp2K, a general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package. It is a modification and extension of the GRASP92 package by [F.A. Parpia, C. Froese Fischer, I.P. Grant, Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249]. For the sake of continuity, two versions are included. Version 1 retains the GRASP92 formats for wave functions and expansion coefficients, but no longer requires preprocessing and more default options have been introduced. Modifications have eliminated some errors, improved the stability, and simplified interactive use. The transition code has been extended to cases where the initial and final states have different orbital sets. Several utility programs have been added. Whereas Version 1 constructs a single interaction matrix for all the J's and parities, Version 2 treats each J and parity as a separate matrix. This block structure results in a reduction of memory use and considerably shorter eigenvectors. Additional tools have been developed for this format. The CPU intensive parts of Version 2 have been parallelized using MPI. The package includes a "make" facility that relies on environment variables. These make it easier to port the application to different platforms. The present version supports the 32-bit Linux and ibmSP environments where the former is compatible with many Unix systems. Descriptions of the features and the program/data flow of the package will be given in some detail in this report. Program summaryProgram title: grasp2K Catalogue identifier: ADZL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 213 524 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 328 588 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran and C Computer: Intel

  1. Coupling of (ultra-) relativistic atomic nuclei with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, M.; Ganciu, M.

    2013-11-15

    The coupling of photons with (ultra-) relativistic atomic nuclei is presented in two particular circumstances: very high electromagnetic fields and very short photon pulses. We consider a typical situation where the (bare) nuclei (fully stripped of electrons) are accelerated to energies ≃ 1 TeV per nucleon (according to the state of the art at LHC, for instance) and photon sources like petawatt lasers ≃ 1 eV-radiation (envisaged by ELI-NP project, for instance), or free-electron laser ≃ 10 keV-radiation, or synchrotron sources, etc. In these circumstances the nuclear scale energy can be attained, with very high field intensities. In particular, we analyze the nuclear transitions induced by the radiation, including both one- and two-photon proceses, as well as the polarization-driven transitions which may lead to giant dipole resonances. The nuclear (electrical) polarization concept is introduced. It is shown that the perturbation theory for photo-nuclear reactions is applicable, although the field intensity is high, since the corresponding interaction energy is low and the interaction time (pulse duration) is short. It is also shown that the description of the giant nuclear dipole resonance requires the dynamics of the nuclear electrical polarization degrees of freedom.

  2. The Screening Effect in Electromagnetic Production of Electron Positron Pairs in Relativistic Nucleus-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jianshi; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Strayer, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the screening effects of the atomic electrons in the electromagnetic production of electron-positron pairs in relativistic nucleus-atom collisions for fixed target experiments. Our results are contrasted with those obtained in bare collisions, with particular attention given to its dependence on the beam energy and the target atom.

  3. Relativistic many-body perturbation theory for general open-shell multiplet states of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Koc, Konrad

    1996-06-01

    A relativistic many-body perturbation theory, which accounts for relativistic and electron-correlation effects for general open-shell multiplet states of atoms and molecules, is developed and implemented with analytic basis sets of Gaussian spinors. The theory retains the essential aspects of Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory by employing the relativistic single-Fock-operator method of Koc and Ishikawa [Phys. Rev. A 49, 794 (1994)] for general open-shell systems. Open-shell Dirac-Fock and relativistic many-body perturbation calculations are reported for the ground and low-lying excited states of Li, B2+, Ne7+, and Ca11+.

  4. Relativistic atomic data for Rb-like tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2016-05-01

    Accurate calculations of the atomic properties of Rb-like W37+ are needed for studying high energy density plasma as well as for magnetic fusion applications. In this work, we have calculated energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for [Ni] 4s2 4p6 nl , [Ni] 4s2 4p5 4l' nl (l' = d , f , n = 4-7), [Ni] 4 s 4p6 4l' nl ,(l' = d , f , n =4-7), [Ni] 4s2 4p5 5l' nl (n = 5-7), and [Ni] 4 s 4p6 46l' nl (n =6-7) states in Rb-like tungsten (W37+) using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory and the Hartree-Fock-relativistic method. Branching ratios and intensity factors were calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients were determined for the [Ni] 4s2 4p6 nl (n=4-7) singly excited states, as well as for the [Ni] 4s2 4p5 4 dnl , [Ni] 4s2 4p5 4 fnl , [Ni] 4 s 4p6 4 dnl , [Ni] 4 s 24p6 4 fnl , (n = 4-6), and [Ni] 4s2 4p5 5l' 5 l doubly excited nonautoionizing states. Contributions from the [Ni] 4 s 24p6 4 fnl (n = 6 - 7), [Ni] 4s2 4p5 5l' nl (n = 5 - 6), and [Ni] 4s2 4p5 6l' nl n = 6 - 7) doubly excited autoionizing states are evaluated numerically. Contributions from high-n states (n <= 200) were determined by using a scaling procedure and found to be very important for high temperatures. This research was supported by DOE under the NNSA Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984. Work at LLNL was performed under auspices of the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Radiationless transitions to atomic M 1,2,3 shells - Results of relativistic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Mark, H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiationless transitions filling vacancies in atomic M1, M2, and M3 subshells have been calculated relativistically with Dirac-Hartree-Slater wave functions for ten elements with atomic numbers 67-95. Results are compared with those of nonrelativistic calculations and experiment. Relativistic effects are found to be significant. Limitations of an independent-particle model for the calculation of Coster-Kronig rates are noted.

  6. Antimatter Plasmas in a Multipole Trap for Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Chapman, S.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Boston, A.; Chartier, M.; Nolan, P.; Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Telle, H. H.; Werf, D. P. van der

    2007-01-12

    We have demonstrated storage of plasmas of the charged constituents of the antihydrogen atom, antiprotons and positrons, in a Penning trap surrounded by a minimum-B magnetic trap designed for holding neutral antiatoms. The neutral trap comprises a superconducting octupole and two superconducting, solenoidal mirror coils. We have measured the storage lifetimes of antiproton and positron plasmas in the combined Penning-neutral trap, and compared these to lifetimes without the neutral trap fields. The magnetic well depth was 0.6 T, deep enough to trap ground state antihydrogen atoms of up to about 0.4 K in temperature. We have demonstrated that both particle species can be stored for times long enough to permit antihydrogen production and trapping studies.

  7. Antimatter plasmas in a multipole trap for antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Telle, H H; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2007-01-12

    We have demonstrated storage of plasmas of the charged constituents of the antihydrogen atom, antiprotons and positrons, in a Penning trap surrounded by a minimum-B magnetic trap designed for holding neutral antiatoms. The neutral trap comprises a superconducting octupole and two superconducting, solenoidal mirror coils. We have measured the storage lifetimes of antiproton and positron plasmas in the combined Penning-neutral trap, and compared these to lifetimes without the neutral trap fields. The magnetic well depth was 0.6 T, deep enough to trap ground state antihydrogen atoms of up to about 0.4 K in temperature. We have demonstrated that both particle species can be stored for times long enough to permit antihydrogen production and trapping studies.

  8. Trapped antihydrogen in its ground state.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kalra, R; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D W; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J

    2012-03-16

    Antihydrogen atoms (H¯) are confined in an Ioffe trap for 15-1000 s-long enough to ensure that they reach their ground state. Though reproducibility challenges remain in making large numbers of cold antiprotons (p¯) and positrons (e(+)) interact, 5±1 simultaneously confined ground-state atoms are produced and observed on average, substantially more than previously reported. Increases in the number of simultaneously trapped H¯ are critical if laser cooling of trapped H¯ is to be demonstrated and spectroscopic studies at interesting levels of precision are to be carried out.

  9. Strongly magnetized antihydrogen and its field ionization.

    PubMed

    Vrinceanu, D; Granger, B E; Parrott, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Cederbaum, L; Mody, A; Tan, J; Gabrielse, G

    2004-04-01

    Internal orbits of experimentally analyzed antihydrogen (H) atoms depend as much on an external magnetic field as on the Coulomb force. A circular "guiding center atom" model is used to understand their field ionization. This useful model, assumed in the theory of three-body H recombination so far, ignores the important coupling between internal and center-of-mass motion. A conserved pseudomomentum, effective potential, saddle point analysis, and numerical simulation show where the simple model is valid and classify the features of the general case, including "giant dipole states."

  10. Antihydrogen Production within a Penning-Ioffe Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Le Sage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Speck, A.; George, M. C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Carew, A.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Walz, J.

    2008-03-21

    Slow antihydrogen (H) is produced within a Penning trap that is located within a quadrupole Ioffe trap, the latter intended to ultimately confine extremely cold, ground-state H atoms. Observed H atoms in this configuration resolve a debate about whether positrons and antiprotons can be brought together to form atoms within the divergent magnetic fields of a quadrupole Ioffe trap. The number of detected H atoms actually increases when a 400 mK Ioffe trap is turned on.

  11. Molecular-dynamics simulations of cold antihydrogen formation in strongly magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Vrinceanu, D; Mazevet, S; Collins, L A

    2005-10-14

    Employing a high-order symplectic integrator and an adaptive time-step algorithm, we perform molecular-dynamics simulations of antihydrogen formation, in a cold plasma confined by a strong magnetic field, over time scales of microseconds. Sufficient positron-antiproton recombination events occur to allow a statistical analysis for various properties of the formed antihydrogen atoms. Giant-dipole states are formed in the initial stage of recombination. In addition to neutral atoms, we also observe antihydrogen positive ions (H(+)), in which two positrons simultaneously bind to an antiproton.

  12. Relaxation of antihydrogen from Rydberg to ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Eric M.; Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2006-10-18

    Atoms formed in highly-magnetized, cryogenic Penning trap plasmas, such as those used in the Athena and ATRAP antihydrogen experiments, form in the guiding-center atom regime. In this regime, the positron orbit is well described by classical guiding-center drift dynamics. Electromagnetic radiation from such atoms is minimal, and energy loss is accomplished primarily through collisions between the atom and free positrons. With Fokker-Planck theory and Monte-Carlo simulation, we calculate the mean energy change an ensemble of such atoms experiences after the atom has been formed. Using this result, we show that the bulk of atoms formed in antihydrogen experiments do not relax out of the guiding-center regime to binding energies where radiation can become important.

  13. Relativistic effects on atomic and molecular properties of the heaviest elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.; Bastug, T.

    2007-10-01

    Interaction of superheavy element 112 and its homolog Hg with inert and gold surfaces was studied on the basis of atomic and molecular fully-relativistic (4-component) DFT electronic structure calculations. Performance of additional non-relativistic calculations allowed one to demonstrate the role and magnitude of relativistic effects on adsorption energies and bond distances of the studied systems. For example, on quartz, element 112 will be stronger adsorbed than Hg by about 5 kJ/mol (or at 5 degrees higher temperatures) due to the stronger van der Waals interaction. This is caused by the relativistically contracted smallest atomic radius of element 112. Non-relativistically, the trend would be opposite. On surface of gold, element 112 will be about 20 kJ/mol weaker adsorbed than Hg (i.e., it will be deposited at about 100 degrees lower temperatures than Hg). Such a decrease in Δ Hads comes at the account of the weaker interaction of the relativistically stabilized 7s1/2(112) orbital with valence orbitals of gold. Still, the relatively large adsorption energy of element 112 is indicative that it is a transition metal forming intermetallic compounds with Au and other metals due to the involvement of the relativistically destabilized 6d orbitals. The influence of relativistic effects on the adsorption energy depends, however, on the adsorption position.

  14. Simulations of plasma confinement in an antihydrogen trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, K.; Fajans, J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2007-10-15

    The three-dimensional particle-in-cell (3-D PIC) simulation code WARP is used to study positron confinement in antihydrogen traps. The magnetic geometry is close to that of a UC Berkeley experiment conducted, with electrons, as part of the ALPHA collaboration (W. Bertsche et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 796, 301 (2005)). In order to trap antihydrogen atoms, multipole magnetic fields are added to a conventional Malmberg-Penning trap. These multipole fields must be strong enough to confine the antihydrogen, leading to multipole field strengths at the trap wall comparable to those of the axial magnetic field. Numerical simulations reported here confirm recent experimental measurements of reduced particle confinement when a quadrupole field is added to a Malmberg-Penning trap. It is shown that, for parameters relevant to various antihydrogen experiments, the use of an octupole field significantly reducesthe positron losses seen with a quadrupole field. A unique method for obtaining a 3-D equilibrium of the positrons in the trap with a collisionless PIC code was developed especially for the study of the antihydrogen trap; however, it is of practical use for other traps as well.

  15. Simulations of plasma confinement in an antihydrogen trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, K.; Fajans, J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2007-10-15

    The three-dimensional particle-in-cell (3-D PIC) simulation code WARP is used to study positron confinement in antihydrogen traps. The magnetic geometry is close to that of a UC Berkeley experiment conducted, with electrons, as part of the ALPHA collaboration [W. Bertsche et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 796, 301 (2005)]. In order to trap antihydrogen atoms, multipole magnetic fields are added to a conventional Malmberg-Penning trap. These multipole fields must be strong enough to confine the antihydrogen, leading to multipole field strengths at the trap wall comparable to those of the axial magnetic field. Numerical simulations reported here confirm recent experimental measurements of reduced particle confinement when a quadrupole field is added to a Malmberg-Penning trap. It is shown that, for parameters relevant to various antihydrogen experiments, the use of an octupole field significantly reduces the positron losses seen with a quadrupole field. A unique method for obtaining a 3-D equilibrium of the positrons in the trap with a collisionless PIC code was developed especially for the study of the antihydrogen trap; however, it is of practical use for other traps as well.

  16. ANTIHYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND PRECISION SPECTROSCOPY WITH ATHENA/AD-1

    SciTech Connect

    M. HOLZSCHEITER; C. AMSLER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    CPT invariance is a fundamental property of quantum field theories in flat space-time. Principal consequences include the predictions that particles and their antiparticles have equal masses and lifetimes, and equal and opposite electric charges and magnetic moments. It also follows that the fine structure, hyperfine structure, and Lamb shifts of matter and antimatter bound systems should be identical. It is proposed to generate new stringent tests of CPT using precision spectroscopy on antihydrogen atoms. An experiment to produce antihydrogen at rest has been approved for running at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We describe the fundamental features of this experiment and the experimental approach to the first phase of the program, the formation and identification of low energy antihydrogen.

  17. Hyperfine transitions in ultracold hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A. Yu.; Froelich, P.

    2009-07-15

    We consider the hyperfine transitions in ultracold collisions of hydrogen (H) and antihydrogen (H) atoms. The cross sections for transitions between various spin states are calculated. We show that hyperfine transitions in H-H collisions are basically driven by the strong force between proton and antiproton.

  18. Software for relativistic atomic structure theory: The grasp project at oxford

    SciTech Connect

    Parpia, F.A.; Grant, I.P. )

    1991-08-05

    GRASP is an acronym for General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The objective of the GRASP project at Oxford is to produce user-friendly state-of-the-art multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) software packages for rleativistic atomic structure theory.

  19. Progress toward cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Estrada, J.; Peil, S.; Roach, T.; Tan, J. N.; Yesley, P.

    1999-12-10

    The production and study of cold antihydrogen will require the manipulation of dense and cold, single component plasmas of antiprotons and positrons. The undertaking will build upon the experience of the nonneutral plasma physics community. Annihilations of the antimatter particles in the plasmas can be imaged, offering unique diagnostic opportunities not available to this community when electrons and protons are used. The techniques developed by our TRAP collaboration to capture and cool antiprotons will certainly be used by our expanded ATRAP collaboration, and by the competing ATHENA Collaboration, both working at the nearly completed AD facility of CERN. We recently demonstrated a new techniques for accumulating cold positrons directly into a cryogenic vacuum system. The closest we have come to low energy antihydrogen so far is to confine cold positrons and cold antiprotons within the same trap structure and vacuum container. Finally, we mention that stored electrons have been cooled to 70 mK, the first time that elementary particles have been cooled below 4 K. In such an apparatus it should be possible to study highly magnetized plasmas of electrons or positrons at this new low temperature.

  20. Relativistic corrections for screening effects on the energies of hydrogen-like atoms embedded in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poszwa, A.; Bahar, M. K.

    2015-01-15

    The influence of relativistic and plasma screening effects on energies of hydrogen-like atoms embedded in plasmas has been studied. The Dirac equation with a more general exponential cosine screened potential has been solved numerically and perturbatively, by employing the direct perturbation theory. Properties of spectra corresponding to bound states and to different sets of the potential parameters have been studied both in nonrelativistic and relativistic approximations. Binding energies, fine-structure splittings, and relativistic energy shifts have been determined as functions of parameters of the potential. The results have been compared with the ones known from the literature.

  1. Laser-assisted antihydrogen formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Sinha, C.

    2006-08-15

    Laser-assisted antihydrogen (H) formation cross sections (differential and total) for collisions of antiprotons with positronium (Ps) are studied in the framework of the eikonal approximation for two geometries, when the field polarization is parallel (parallel{sup L}) or perpendicular (perpendicular{sup r}) to the incident Ps momentum. The variations of the H formation cross sections with respect to the field strength and the laser photon energy are studied for the multiphoton (absorption and emission) processes. The contribution of the atomic (both Ps and H) dressing terms to the enhancement of the H formation cross section is studied for both the geometries (parallel{sup L} and (perpendicular{sup r}). The most important prediction from the present work is the enhancement of the field-free (FF) H formation cross sections particularly at lower incident energies when the system (Ps+p) is irradiated by a single mode, linearly polarized laser, the enhancement being more pronounced for a wider range of incident energy in the perpendicular{sup r} geometry than in the parallel{sup L} one.

  2. Interaction of ultracold antihydrogen with a conducting wall

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A. Yu.; Froelich, P.; Zygelman, B.

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the interaction of ultracold antihydrogen with a conducting surface, focusing on the phenomenon of quantum reflection. We calculate the reflection probability as a function of incident atom energy. We find that, for ground-state H atoms (with T<10{sup -5} K), the probability of reflection is R{approx_equal}1-kb, where k is the momentum of the atom and b=2174.0 a.u. is a constant determined solely by the van der Waals-Casimir tail of the atom-wall interaction. We show that quantum reflection, which suppresses the direct contact of ultracold atoms with the surface, allows for the possibility of confinement and storage of sufficiently cold antihydrogen atoms. We calculate the lifetime of H atoms enclosed in between solid walls. We develop a theory of H in a waveguide and propose some applications, notably the measurement of retardation corrections in the long-range component of the antiatom-wall potential. We demonstrate the existence of quantized states for antihydrogen atoms falling onto conducting surface in the gravitational field of Earth. We calculate the lifetime of ultracold H in its lowest gravitational state and obtain {tau}=(Mgb/2h){sup -1}{approx_equal}0.1 s, where Mg is a gravitational force acting on the antiatom. We propose that measurement of this lifetime may provide a new test for the gravitational properties of antimatter.

  3. Cold Antihydrogen at ATHENA: Experimental Observation and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, C. L.; Amoretti, M.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hangst, J. S.; Hayano, R. S.; Johnson, I.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macri, M.; Madsen, N.; Mitchard, D. R. J.; Montagna, P.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; van der Werf, D. P.; Yamazaki, Y.; Athena Collaboration

    2005-05-01

    Antihydrogen atoms may become the easiest and most precise way to probe deeply into tests of violation of the CPT (charge conjugation, parity, time reversal) symmetry and the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). We review the first production of cold antihydrogen atoms within the ATHENA/AD-1 experiment at CERN, its motivations and studies henceforth. The ATHENA success was followed almost immediately by the ATRAP group. From the initial claim of production of tens of thousand of these exotic species — by the mixing of cold and trapped positrons and antiprotons — we have evolved to better understand and control the system. The joint production for 2002 and 2003 has been re-evaluated to about one million antiatoms. We have performed cooling efficiency studies of antiprotons within the positron cloud; developed ways to excite and heat the positron cloud, and probe its number, density and temperature in situ; developed antiproton and antihydrogen imaging tomography. We have also been able to gather information on the velocity of the formed antiatoms. A large uncertainty and lack of control remains over the formation process — as revealed by its measured temperature dependence — and the quantum number distribution of the population. We discuss various aspects of our findings below as well as future prospects for physics tests with antihydrogen.

  4. Solid-state continuous Lyman-alpha source for laser-cooling of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, Jochen; Beyer, Thomas; Kolbe, Daniel; Markert, Frank; Muellers, Andreas; Scheid, Martin

    2008-08-08

    Cooling antihydrogen atoms is important for future experiments both to test the fundamental CPT symmetry by high-resolution laser spectroscopy and also to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Laser-cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1 S-2 P transition at the wavelength of Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Ongoing work to set up a solid-state continuous-wave laser source at Lyman-alpha is described.

  5. Effect of positron space charge on operation of an antihydrogen trap.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, C A

    2007-07-01

    Experimental conditions have recently been reported [G. Andresen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023402 (2007)] that are relevant to the prospect of trapping antihydrogen atoms. An analysis of the experimental conditions indicates that positron space charge can have an important effect. The fraction of antiprotons that have an energy suitable for antihydrogen trapping can be reduced by drifts caused by the presence of positron space charge.

  6. Potential Energy Curves for Excited States of the Hydrogen-Antihydrogen System

    SciTech Connect

    Sharipov, V.; Labzowsky, L.; Plunien, G.

    2006-09-08

    The potential energy curves for the hydrogen-antihydrogen (HH) system in states with a leptonic orbital angular momentum projection {lambda}=0, 1, 2, 6, and 30 are presented. Within the framework of the adiabatic picture, explicitly correlated Gaussians are used as basis functions which describe accurately the hydrogen-antihydrogen interaction. The critical internuclear distances where the system transforms into positronium and protonium atoms are found. Adiabatic corrections to the potential energy curves are also estimated.

  7. Effect of positron space charge on operation of an antihydrogen trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C. A.

    2007-07-15

    Experimental conditions have recently been reported [G. Andresen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023402 (2007)] that are relevant to the prospect of trapping antihydrogen atoms. An analysis of the experimental conditions indicates that positron space charge can have an important effect. The fraction of antiprotons that have an energy suitable for antihydrogen trapping can be reduced by drifts caused by the presence of positron space charge.

  8. Potential energy curves for excited states of the hydrogen-antihydrogen system.

    PubMed

    Sharipov, V; Labzowsky, L; Plunien, G

    2006-09-01

    The potential energy curves for the hydrogen-antihydrogen (HH) system in states with a leptonic orbital angular momentum projection Lambda=0, 1, 2, 6, and 30 are presented. Within the framework of the adiabatic picture, explicitly correlated Gaussians are used as basis functions which describe accurately the hydrogen-antihydrogen interaction. The critical internuclear distances where the system transforms into positronium and protonium atoms are found. Adiabatic corrections to the potential energy curves are also estimated.

  9. Antiproton Confinement in a Penning-Ioffe Trap for Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Le Sage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Kuljanishvili, I.; McConnell, R.; Wrubel, J.; Esser, F. M.; Glueckler, H.; Hansen, G.; Schillings, J.; Schmitt, M.; Soltner, H.; Grzonka, D.; Martin, S.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.

    2007-03-16

    Antiprotons (p) remain confined in a Penning trap, in sufficient numbers to form antihydrogen (H) atoms via charge exchange, when the radial field of a quadrupole Ioffe trap is added. This first demonstration with p suggests that quadrupole Ioffe traps can be superimposed upon p and e{sup +} traps to attempt the capture of H atoms as they form, contrary to conclusions of previous analyses.

  10. Antiproton confinement in a Penning-Ioffe trap for antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Kolthammer, W S; Kuljanishvili, I; McConnell, R; Wrubel, J; Esser, F M; Glückler, H; Grzonka, D; Hansen, G; Martin, S; Oelert, W; Schillings, J; Schmitt, M; Sefzick, T; Soltner, H; Zhang, Z; Comeau, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Speck, A; Nillius, F; Walz, J; Hänsch, T W

    2007-03-16

    Antiprotons (p[over]) remain confined in a Penning trap, in sufficient numbers to form antihydrogen (H[over ) atoms via charge exchange, when the radial field of a quadrupole Ioffe trap is added. This first demonstration with p[over] suggests that quadrupole Ioffe traps can be superimposed upon p[over] and e(+) traps to attempt the capture of H[over] atoms as they form, contrary to conclusions of previous analyses.

  11. Relativistic calculation of atomic M-shell ionization by protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Mark, H.

    1983-01-01

    Relativistic plane-wave Born-approximation calculations of cross sections for M-shell ionization of Ho-67, Au-79, U-92 by protons with incident energies from 0.05 to 1 MeV are reported. Dirac-Hartree-Slater wave functions were employed and binding-energy change and Coulomb deflection were taken into account. Associated X-ray production cross sections were also computed. Results are compared with previous theoretical predictions and with experimental data. Definite improvement in the theory has been attained by the use of realistic wave functions and consistent inclusion of the effects of relativity.

  12. Collaborative Research: Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Plasma Physics of Antihydrogen Generation and Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2013-03-29

    Ever since Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter in 1928, it has excited our collective imagination. Seventy-four years later, two collaborations at CERN, ATHENA and ATRAP, created the first slow antihydrogen. This was a stunning achievement, but the most important antimatter experiments require trapped, not just slow, antihydrogen. The velocity, magnetic moment, and internal energy and state of the antihydrogen depend strongly on how it is formed. To trap antihydrogen, physicists face two broad challenges: (1) Understanding the behavior of the positron and antiprotons plasmas from which the antihydrogen is synthesized; and (2) Understanding the atomic processes by which positrons and antiprotons recombine. Recombination lies on the boundary between atomic and plasma physics, and cannot be studied properly without employing tools from both fields. The proposed collaborative research campaign will address both of these challenges. The collaboration members have unique experience in the relevant fields of experimental and theoretical non-neutral plasma physics, numerical modeling, nonlinear dynamics and atomic physics. This expertise is not found elsewhere amongst antihydrogen researchers. The collaboration members have strong ties already, and seek to formalize them with this proposal. Three of the four PIs are members of the ALPHA collaboration, an international collaboration formed by most of the principal members of the ATHENA collaboration.

  13. An experimental limit on the charge of antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Vendeiro, Z; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I; Charman, A E

    2014-06-03

    The properties of antihydrogen are expected to be identical to those of hydrogen, and any differences would constitute a profound challenge to the fundamental theories of physics. The most commonly discussed antiatom-based tests of these theories are searches for antihydrogen-hydrogen spectral differences (tests of CPT (charge-parity-time) invariance) or gravitational differences (tests of the weak equivalence principle). Here we, the ALPHA Collaboration, report a different and somewhat unusual test of CPT and of quantum anomaly cancellation. A retrospective analysis of the influence of electric fields on antihydrogen atoms released from the ALPHA trap finds a mean axial deflection of 4.1 ± 3.4 mm for an average axial electric field of 0.51 V mm(-1). Combined with extensive numerical modelling, this measurement leads to a bound on the charge Qe of antihydrogen of Q=(-1.3 ± 1.1 ± 0.4) × 10(-8). Here, e is the unit charge, and the errors are from statistics and systematic effects.

  14. An experimental limit on the charge of antihydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C.Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Vendeiro, Z.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of antihydrogen are expected to be identical to those of hydrogen, and any differences would constitute a profound challenge to the fundamental theories of physics. The most commonly discussed antiatom-based tests of these theories are searches for antihydrogen-hydrogen spectral differences (tests of CPT (charge-parity-time) invariance) or gravitational differences (tests of the weak equivalence principle). Here we, the ALPHA Collaboration, report a different and somewhat unusual test of CPT and of quantum anomaly cancellation. A retrospective analysis of the influence of electric fields on antihydrogen atoms released from the ALPHA trap finds a mean axial deflection of 4.1±3.4 mm for an average axial electric field of 0.51 V mm−1. Combined with extensive numerical modelling, this measurement leads to a bound on the charge Qe of antihydrogen of Q=(−1.3±1.1±0.4) × 10−8. Here, e is the unit charge, and the errors are from statistics and systematic effects. PMID:24892800

  15. Two-species mixing in a nested Penning trap for antihydrogen trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C. A.; Weathers, D. L.

    2008-08-15

    There exists an international quest to trap neutral antimatter in the form of antihydrogen for scientific study. One method that is being developed for trapping antihydrogen employs a nested Penning trap. Such a trap serves to mix positrons and antiprotons so as to produce low energy antihydrogen atoms. Mixing is achieved when the confinement volumes of the two species overlap one another. In the work presented here, a theoretical understanding of the mixing process is developed by analyzing a mixing scheme that was recently reported [G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113001 (2008)]. The results indicate that positron space charge or collisions among antiprotons may substantially reduce the fraction of antiprotons that have an energy suitable for antihydrogen trapping.

  16. Antimatter plasmas and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, R.G.; Surko, C.M.

    1997-05-01

    Recent successes in confining antimatter in the form of positron and antiproton plasmas have created new scientific and technological opportunities. Plasma techniques have been the cornerstone of experimental work in this area, and this is likely to be true for the foreseeable future. Work by a number of groups on trapping antimatter plasmas is summarized, and an overview of the promises and challenges in this field is presented. Topics relating to positron plasmas include the use of positrons to study the unique properties of electron{endash}positron plasmas, the interaction between positrons and ordinary matter, and the laboratory modeling of positron-annihilation processes in interstellar media. The availability of cold, trapped antiprotons and positrons makes possible the production of neutral antimatter in the form of antihydrogen. This is expected to enable precise comparisons of the properties of matter and antimatter, including tests of fundamental symmetries and the measurement of the interaction of antimatter with gravity. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy. Progress report, July 20, 1987--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, H.C.

    1989-06-01

    With the HIRAB (High Resolution Atomic Beam) building, the photodetachment experiments at LAMPF was able to continue. The 1988 runs provided data to complement that of 1986 on effects of electric fields on photodetachment cross section of H{sup -} and interaction of thin foils with relativistic H{sup -} ions. The first multiphoton detachment of H{sup -} was observed. In each of these experiments, a high-powered laser beam was allowed to intersect the relativistic ion beam; the photon energy in the barycentric system is Doppler shifted, and the laser may thus effectively be tuned (through up to a decade) by changing the angle of intersection of the 2 beams.

  18. Electron plasmas as a diagnostic tool for hyperfine spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, T.; Thompson, R. I.; Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Fajans, J.; Little, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Rasmussen, C. O.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M.; Charlton, M.; and others

    2013-03-19

    Long term magnetic confinement of antihydrogen atoms has recently been demonstrated by the ALPHA collaboration at CERN, opening the door to a range of experimental possibilities. Of particular interest is a measurement of the antihydrogen spectrum. A precise comparison of the spectrum of antihydrogen with that of hydrogen would be an excellent test of CPT symmetry. One prime candidate for precision CPT tests is the ground-state hyperfine transition; measured in hydrogen to a precision of nearly one part in 10{sup 12}. Effective execution of such an experiment with trapped antihydrogen requires precise knowledge of the magnetic environment. Here we present a solution that uses an electron plasma confined in the antihydrogen trapping region. The cyclotron resonance of the electron plasma is probed with microwaves at the cyclotron frequency and the subsequent heating of the electron plasma is measured through the plasma quadrupole mode frequency. Using this method, the minimum magnetic field of the neutral trap can be determined to within 4 parts in 10{sup 4}. This technique was used extensively in the recent demonstration of resonant interaction with the hyperfine levels of trapped antihydrogen atoms.

  19. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.

    2004-06-01

    Within the framework of the coplanar binary geometry where it is justified to use plane wave solutions for the study of the (e,2e) reaction and in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field, we introduce as a first step the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 1 where we take into account only the relativistic dressing of the incident and scattered electrons. Then, we introduce the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 2 where we take totally into account the relativistic dressing of the incident, scattered, and ejected electrons. We then compare the corresponding triple differential cross sections for laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact both for the nonrelativistic and the relativistic regime.

  20. Dissolution of relativistic atoms into negative energy states

    SciTech Connect

    Broyles, A.A.

    1989-05-15

    The problem of atomic dissolution by means of decay to the negative energy continuum is discussed. The derivation of the one-electron central-field Hamiltonian from quantum electrodynamics is made as an example. It is found that the operators that project the Coulomb interaction into positive and negative energy states of the Dirac noninteracting Hamiltonian cause the eigenstates of the atomic Hamiltonian to break up into two sets. One set is expandable in the positive energy noninteracting states, and this set propagates forward in time. The other set is expandable in terms of the negative energy noninteracting states and propagates backward in time. There is, therefore, no danger that transitions will occur from the forward propagating eigenstates into the negative continuum with continued propagation in the forward direction, regardless of the magnitude of the nuclear charge.

  1. Antihydrogen production within a Penning-Ioffe trap.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Wrubel, J; Speck, A; George, M C; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zhang, Z; Carew, A; Comeau, D; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Walz, J

    2008-03-21

    Slow antihydrogen (H) is produced within a Penning trap that is located within a quadrupole Ioffe trap, the latter intended to ultimately confine extremely cold, ground-state H[over ] atoms. Observed H[over ] atoms in this configuration resolve a debate about whether positrons and antiprotons can be brought together to form atoms within the divergent magnetic fields of a quadrupole Ioffe trap. The number of detected H atoms actually increases when a 400 mK Ioffe trap is turned on.

  2. New Interpretations of Measured Antihydrogen Velocities and Field Ionization Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Gabrielse, G.

    2006-10-06

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, showing that cold antihydrogen (H) atoms are produced when antiprotons (p) are gently heated in the side wells of a nested Penning trap. The observed H with high energies, that had seemed to indicate otherwise, are instead explained by a surprisingly effective charge-exchange mechanism. We shed light on the previously measured field-ionization spectrum, and reproduce both the characteristic low-field power law as well as the enhanced H production at higher fields. The latter feature is shown to arise from H atoms too deeply bound to be described as guiding center atoms, atoms with internally chaotic motion.

  3. Fundamental symmetry tests with antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    The prospects for testing CPT invariance and the weak equivalence principle (WEP) for antimatter with spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen are discussed. The potential precisions of these tests are compared with those from other measurements. The arguments involving energy conservation, the behavior of neutral kaons in a gravitational field and the equivalence principle for antiparticles are reviewed in detail.

  4. Fundamental symmetry tests with antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    The prospects for testing CPT invariance and the weak equivalence principle (WEP) for antimatter with spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen are discussed. The potential precisions of these tests are compared with those from other measurements. The arguments involving energy conservation, the behavior of neutral kaons in a gravitational field and the equivalence principle for antiparticles are reviewed in detail.

  5. Driven production of cold antihydrogen and the first measured distribution of antihydrogen states.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Bowden, N S; Oxley, P; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Tan, J N; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2002-12-01

    Cold antihydrogen is produced when antiprotons are repeatedly driven into collisions with cold positrons within a nested Penning trap. Efficient antihydrogen production takes place during many cycles of positron cooling of antiprotons. A first measurement of a distribution of antihydrogen states is made using a preionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. Surviving antihydrogen is stripped in an ionization well that captures and stores the freed antiproton for background-free detection.

  6. Around-the-World Atomic Clocks: Predicted Relativistic Time Gains.

    PubMed

    Hafele, J C; Keating, R E

    1972-07-14

    During October 1971, four cesium beam atomic clocks were flown on regularly scheduled commercial jet flights around the world twice, once eastward and once westward, to test Einstein's theory of relativity with macroscopic clocks. From the actual flight paths of each trip, the theory predicts that the flying clocks, compared with reference clocks at the U.S. Naval Observatory, should have lost 40 +/- 23 nanoseconds during the eastward trip, and should have gained 275 +/- 21 nanoseconds during the westward trip. The observed time differences are presented in the report that follows this one.

  7. Around-the-World Atomic Clocks: Observed Relativistic Time Gains.

    PubMed

    Hafele, J C; Keating, R E

    1972-07-14

    Four cesium beam clocks flown around the world on commercial jet flights during October 1971, once eastward and once westward, recorded directionally dependent time differences which are in good agreement with predictions of conventional relativity theory. Relative to the atomic time scale of the U.S. Naval Observatory, the flying clocks lost 59 +/- 10 nanoseconds during the eastward trip and gained 273 +/- 7 nanoseconds during the westward trip, where the errors are the corresponding standard deviations. These results provide an unambiguous empirical resolution of the famous clock "paradox" with macroscopic clocks.

  8. Progress in Laser Cooling of Antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamley, C.; Gabrielse, G.; George, M.; Glowacz, B.; Grzonka, D.; Hessels, E.; Jones, N.; Lee, S. A.; Marable, K.; Marshall, M.; Meisenhelder, C.; Morrison, T.; Oelert, W.; Rasor, C.; Ronald, S. R.; Sefzick, T.; Skinner, T.; Storry, C.; Tardiff, E.; Weel, M.; Yost, D.; Zielinski, M.; Atrap Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen promises to be one of the most stringent tests to date of CPT symmetry. Multiple groups at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility are endeavoring to perform precision spectroscopy on the 1S-2S two photon transition in antihydrogen for comparison to hydrogen precision measurements. For trapped antihydrogen the necessary overlapped Penning and Ioffe-Pritchard traps have a large bias and gradient contributing to significant spread due to Zeeman shifts as the antihydrogen orbits in the magnetic trap. The ATRAP collaboration is working on laser cooling of antihydrogen on the 121 nm Lyman alpha line (1S-2P) in order to reduce this spread for more precise 1S-2S spectroscopy. Here we report on the ATRAP collaboration's progress in laser cooling of antihydrogen.

  9. Antihydrogen Production, Trapping, and Antimatter Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajans, Joel

    2009-09-16

    Since 2002, experiments at CERN have been producing slow, but untrapped, antihydrogen. The ultimate goal of these experiments is to test CPT and the gravitational interactions of matter and antimatter. Most schemes to perform CPT and gravity tests require trapped antihydrogen, but trapping antihydrogen is much more difficult than merely synthesizing it. The principle problems that must be solved before we can trap are how to cool the antiprotons, and how to keep them cold during the synthesis process. While we have already learned how to cool antiprotons by ten orders of magnitude, we must cool them by four more orders of magnitude, a scale set by the relative size of the potentials of the antimatter plasmas from which the antiatoms are synthesized compared to the antihydrogen trap well depth. In this talk, I will discuss antihydrogen synthesis and some of the techniques we are developing to control the energy of the resultant antihydrogen.

  10. New version: GRASP2K relativistic atomic structure package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Bieroń, J.; Fischer, C. Froese; Grant, I. P.

    2013-09-01

    A revised version of GRASP2K [P. Jönsson, X. He, C. Froese Fischer, I.P. Grant, Comput. Phys. Commun. 177 (2007) 597] is presented. It supports earlier non-block and block versions of codes as well as a new block version in which the njgraf library module [A. Bar-Shalom, M. Klapisch, Comput. Phys. Commun. 50 (1988) 375] has been replaced by the librang angular package developed by Gaigalas based on the theory of [G. Gaigalas, Z.B. Rudzikas, C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 30 (1997) 3747, G. Gaigalas, S. Fritzsche, I.P. Grant, Comput. Phys. Commun. 139 (2001) 263]. Tests have shown that errors encountered by njgraf do not occur with the new angular package. The three versions are denoted v1, v2, and v3, respectively. In addition, in v3, the coefficients of fractional parentage have been extended to j=9/2, making calculations feasible for the lanthanides and actinides. Changes in v2 include minor improvements. For example, the new version of rci2 may be used to compute quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections only from selected orbitals. In v3, a new program, jj2lsj, reports the percentage composition of the wave function in LSJ and the program rlevels has been modified to report the configuration state function (CSF) with the largest coefficient of an LSJ expansion. The bioscl2 and bioscl3 application programs have been modified to produce a file of transition data with one record for each transition in the same format as in ATSP2K [C. Froese Fischer, G. Tachiev, G. Gaigalas, M.R. Godefroid, Comput. Phys. Commun. 176 (2007) 559], which identifies each atomic state by the total energy and a label for the CSF with the largest expansion coefficient in LSJ intermediate coupling. All versions of the codes have been adapted for 64-bit computer architecture. Program SummaryProgram title: GRASP2K, version 1_1 Catalogue identifier: ADZL_v1_1 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZL_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library

  11. The ALPHA Experiment: A Cold Antihydrogen Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, W.; Chapman, S.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Gomberoff, K.; Wurtele, J.; Boston, A.; Chartier, M.; Nolan, P.; Page, R.D.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Madsen, N.; Cesar, C.L.; Miranda, D.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M.; Joergensen, L.V.; Telle, H.H.; Werf, D.P. van der

    2005-10-26

    The ALPHA experiment aims to trap antihydrogen as the next crucial step towards a precise CPT test, by a spectroscopic comparison of antihydrogen with hydrogen. The experiment will retain the salient techniques developed by the ATHENA collaboration during the previous phase of antihydrogen experiments at the antiproton decelerator (AD) at CERN. The collaboration has identified the key problems in adding a neutral antiatom trap to the previously developed experimental configuration. The solutions identified by ALPHA are described in this paper.

  12. Resonant phenomena in antihydrogen-hydrogen scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A. Yu.; Froelich, P.

    2008-02-15

    We present a treatment of cold hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions based on the asymptotic properties of atom-antiatom interactions. We derive general formulas for the elastic and inelastic cross sections and for the scattering lengths and analyze their sensitivity to the parameters characterizing the inelasticity of the collision process. Given the inelasticity, we obtain bounds for the complex scattering length. We investigate the influence of strong nuclear forces and the isotope effects in HH and DH collisions and demonstrate enhancement of these effects due to the presence of the near-threshold narrow HH (DH) states. The values of the elastic and inelastic cross sections with simultaneous account of rearrangement and strong forces are presented. General expressions for the (complex) energies of the near-threshold HH states are obtained.

  13. Reformulation of the relativistic conversion between coordinate time and atomic time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The relativistic conversion between coordinate time and atomic time is reformulated to allow simpler time calculations relating analysis in solar system barycentric coordinates (using coordinate time) with earth-fixed observations (measuring 'earth-bound' proper time or atomic time). After an interpretation in terms of relatively well-known concepts, this simplified formulation, which has a rate accuracy of about 10 to the minus 15th, is used to explain the conventions required in the synchronization of a worldwide clock network and to analyze two synchronization techniques - portable clocks and radio interferometry. Finally, pertinent experimental tests of relativity are briefly discussed in terms of the reformulated time conversion.

  14. Nuclear electric dipole moment with relativistic effects in Xe and Hg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Sachiko; Fujita, Takehisa; Asaga, Tomoko

    2007-03-15

    The atomic electric dipole moment (EDM) is evaluated by considering the relativistic effects as well as nuclear finite size effects in Xe and Hg atomic systems. Due to Schiff's theorem, the first order perturbation energy of EDM is canceled out by the second order perturbation energy for the point nucleus. The nuclear finite size effects arising from the intermediate atomic excitations may be finite for deformed nucleus but it is extremely small. The finite size contribution of the intermediate nuclear excitations in the second order perturbation energy is completely canceled by the third order perturbation energy. As the results, the finite contribution to the atomic EDM comes from the first order perturbation energy of relativistic effects, and it amounts to around 0.3 and 0.4 percents of the neutron EDM d{sub n} for Xe and Hg, respectively, though the calculations are carried out with a simplified single-particle nuclear model. From this relation in Hg atomic system, we can extract the neutron EDM which is found to be just comparable with the direct neutron EDM measurement.

  15. New interpretations of measured antihydrogen velocities and field ionization spectra.

    PubMed

    Pohl, T; Sadeghpour, H R; Gabrielse, G

    2006-10-01

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, showing that cold antihydrogen (H) atoms are produced when antiprotons (p) are gently heated in the side wells of a nested Penning trap. The observed H with high energies, that had seemed to indicate otherwise, are instead explained by a surprisingly effective charge-exchange mechanism. We shed light on the previously measured field-ionization spectrum, and reproduce both the characteristic low-field power law as well as the enhanced H production at higher fields. The latter feature is shown to arise from H toms too deeply bound to be described as guiding center atoms, atoms with internally chaotic motion.

  16. Antihydrogen formation from antiprotons in a pure positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Eric M.; Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2009-01-15

    This paper investigates the evolution in binding energy of antihydrogen atoms formed from stationary antiprotons located within a strongly magnetized positron plasma. Three-body recombination and a collisional cascade to deeper binding, limited by a kinetic bottleneck at a binding energy of 4T, dominate the initial antihydrogen formation process. A classical Monte-Carlo simulation is used to determine the collisional transition rate between atomic binding energies, using the drift approximation for initial conditions that allow it, and full dynamics for initial conditions resulting in chaotic motion. These transition rates are employed in determining mean energy-loss rates for an ensemble of atoms, as well as in a numerical solution of the master equation to find the rate at which atoms are formed over a range of binding energies. The highly excited atoms formed by this process separate into guiding-center drift atoms and chaotic atoms. The phase-space distributions of the atoms are investigated, along with their implications for magnetic confinement and radiative energy loss. Estimates of radiative energy loss indicate that radiation is unimportant for guiding-center atoms, but increases rapidly near the chaotic regime, taking over as the dominant energy-loss process for parameters typical of recent experiments. Furthermore, the fraction of low-magnetic field seekers is considerably larger than suggested by estimates of the magnetic moment based on guiding-center dynamics, due to effects associated with chaos.

  17. Exotic hollow atom states pumped by relativistic laser plasma in a radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Nigel; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Dance, R. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. L.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Colgan, J.

    2013-10-01

    In high-spectral resolution experiments with the petawatt Vulcan laser, strong x-ray radiation of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from aluminium targets was observed at high laser contrast, for intensities of 3 × 1020 Wcm-2 and micron thick targets. These spectral observations are interpreted using detailed atomic kinetics calculations suggesting these exotic hollow atom states occur at near solid density and are driven by an intense polychromatic x-ray field. We estimate that this x-ray radiation field has energy in the kilovolt range and has an intensity exceeding 1018 Wcm-2. The field may arise through relativistic electron Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the electrostatic fields at the target surface.

  18. Interplay of relativistic and nonrelativistic transport in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Romanovsky, Igor; Landman, Uzi

    2015-01-01

    Graphene's isolation launched explorations of fundamental relativistic physics originating from the planar honeycomb lattice arrangement of the carbon atoms, and of potential technological applications in nanoscale electronics. Bottom-up fabricated atomically-precise segmented graphene nanoribbons, SGNRs, open avenues for studies of electrical transport, coherence, and interference effects in metallic, semiconducting, and mixed GNRs, with different edge terminations. Conceptual and practical understanding of electric transport through SGNRs is gained through nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) conductance calculations and a Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. The continuum model reproduces the NEGF results, including optical Dirac Fabry-Prot (FP) equidistant oscillations for massless relativistic carriers in metallic armchair SGNRs, and an unequally-spaced FP pattern for mixed armchair-zigzag SGNRs where carriers transit from a relativistic (armchair) to a nonrelativistic (zigzag) regime. This provides a unifying framework for analysis of coherent transport phenomena and interpretation of forthcoming experiments in SGNRs. PMID:25599915

  19. Interplay of relativistic and nonrelativistic transport in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Romanovsky, Igor; Landman, Uzi

    2015-01-20

    Graphene's isolation launched explorations of fundamental relativistic physics originating from the planar honeycomb lattice arrangement of the carbon atoms, and of potential technological applications in nanoscale electronics. Bottom-up fabricated atomically-precise segmented graphene nanoribbons, SGNRs, open avenues for studies of electrical transport, coherence, and interference effects in metallic, semiconducting, and mixed GNRs, with different edge terminations. Conceptual and practical understanding of electric transport through SGNRs is gained through nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) conductance calculations and a Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. The continuum model reproduces themore » NEGF results, including optical Dirac Fabry-Pérot (FP) equidistant oscillations for massless relativistic carriers in metallic armchair SGNRs, and an unequally-spaced FP pattern for mixed armchair-zigzag SGNRs where carriers transit from a relativistic (armchair) to a nonrelativistic (zigzag) regime. This provides a unifying framework for analysis of coherent transport phenomena and interpretation of forthcoming experiments in SGNRs.« less

  20. Interplay of relativistic and nonrelativistic transport in atomically precise segmented graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Romanovsky, Igor; Landman, Uzi

    2015-01-20

    Graphene's isolation launched explorations of fundamental relativistic physics originating from the planar honeycomb lattice arrangement of the carbon atoms, and of potential technological applications in nanoscale electronics. Bottom-up fabricated atomically-precise segmented graphene nanoribbons, SGNRs, open avenues for studies of electrical transport, coherence, and interference effects in metallic, semiconducting, and mixed GNRs, with different edge terminations. Conceptual and practical understanding of electric transport through SGNRs is gained through nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) conductance calculations and a Dirac continuum model that absorbs the valence-to-conductance energy gaps as position-dependent masses, including topological-in-origin mass-barriers at the contacts between segments. The continuum model reproduces the NEGF results, including optical Dirac Fabry-Pérot (FP) equidistant oscillations for massless relativistic carriers in metallic armchair SGNRs, and an unequally-spaced FP pattern for mixed armchair-zigzag SGNRs where carriers transit from a relativistic (armchair) to a nonrelativistic (zigzag) regime. This provides a unifying framework for analysis of coherent transport phenomena and interpretation of forthcoming experiments in SGNRs.

  1. Measuring the gravitational free-fall of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J.; Aghion, S.; Ahlén, O.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A. S.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Canali, C.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Derking, J. H.; Domizio, S. Di; Noto, L. Di; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Haider, S.; Hogan, S. D.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Knecht, A.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lehner, S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V. A.; Merkt, F.; Moia, F.; Nebbia, G.; Nédélec, P.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Pacifico, N.; Petráček, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Regenfus, C.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Scampoli, P.; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Špaček, M.; Testera, G.; Trezzi, D.; Vaccarone, R.; Widmann, E.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-05-01

    Antihydrogen holds the promise to test, for the first time, the universality of free-fall with a system composed entirely of antiparticles. The AEgIS experiment at CERN's antiproton decelerator aims to measure the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter by measuring the deflection of a beam of antihydrogen in the Earths gravitational field ( overline {{g}}). The principle of the experiment is as follows: cold antihydrogen atoms are synthesized in a Penning-Malberg trap and are Stark accelerated towards a moiré deflectometer, the classical counterpart of an atom interferometer, and annihilate on a position sensitive detector. Crucial to the success of the experiment is the spatial precision of the position sensitive detector. We propose a novel free-fall detector based on a hybrid of two technologies: emulsion detectors, which have an intrinsic spatial resolution of 50 nm but no temporal information, and a silicon strip / scintillating fiber tracker to provide timing and positional information. In 2012 we tested emulsion films in vacuum with antiprotons from CERN's antiproton decelerator. The annihilation vertices could be observed directly on the emulsion surface using the microscope facility available at the University of Bern. The annihilation vertices were successfully reconstructed with a resolution of 1-2 μmon the impact parameter. If such a precision can be realized in the final detector, Monte Carlo simulations suggest of order 500 antihydrogen annihilations will be sufficient to determine overline {{g}}with a 1 % accuracy. This paper presents current research towards the development of this technology for use in the AEgIS apparatus and prospects for the realization of the final detector.

  2. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Little, A.; So, C.; Zhmoginov, A.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Isaac, C. A.; Madsen, N.; Napoli, S. C.; Shields, C. R.; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2013-04-15

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms are commonly produced by mixing antiprotons and positrons stored in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap, which was achieved in ALPHA by an autoresonant excitation of the antiprotons, injecting them into the positron plasma. In this work, a hybrid numerical model is developed to simulate antiproton and positron dynamics during the mixing process. The simulation is benchmarked against other numerical and analytic models, as well as experimental measurements. The autoresonant injection scheme and an alternative scheme are compared numerically over a range of plasma parameters which can be reached in current and upcoming antihydrogen experiments, and the latter scheme is seen to offer significant improvement in trapping yield as the number of available antiprotons increases.

  3. Relativistic correlating basis sets for lanthanide atoms from Ce to Lu.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Masahiro; Noro, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Eisaku; Osanai, You; Koga, Toshikatsu

    2006-03-01

    Contracted Gaussian-type function (CGTF) sets for the description of the 4f subshell correlation and of the 6s and 5d subshell correlation are developed for lanthanide atoms from Ce to Yb. Also prepared are basis sets for the 5d orbitals, which are vacant in the ground states of most lanthanide atoms but are essential in molecular environments. In addition, correlating CGTF sets for the 4f subshell correlation are supplemented for the Lu atom. A segmented contraction scheme is employed for their compactness and efficiency. Contraction coefficients and exponents are determined by minimizing the deviation from accurate natural orbitals generated from configuration interaction calculations that include relativistic effects through the third-order Douglas-Kroll approximation. All-electron and model core potential calculations with the present correlating sets are performed on the ground state of the diatomic CeO molecule. The calculated spectroscopic constants are in good agreement with experimental values. PMID:16419148

  4. The AEgIS experiment at CERN for the measurement of antihydrogen gravity acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scampoli, Paola; Storey, James

    2014-05-01

    The Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) experiment is conducted by an international collaboration based at CERN whose aim is to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen in the local field of the Earth, with Δg/g = 1% precision as a first achievement. The idea is to produce cold (100 mK) antihydrogen (\\bar H) through a pulsed charge exchange reaction by overlapping clouds of antiprotons, from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and positronium atoms inside a Penning trap. The antihydrogen has to be produced in an excited Rydberg state to be subsequently accelerated to form a beam. The deflection of the antihydrogen beam can then be measured by using a moiré deflectometer coupled to a position sensitive detector to register the impact point of the anti-atoms through the vertex reconstruction of their annihilation products. After being approved in late 2008, AEgIS started taking data in a commissioning phase in 2012. This paper presents an outline of the experiment with a brief overview of its physics motivation and of the state-of-the-art of the g measurement on antimatter. Particular attention is given to the current status of the emulsion-based position detector needed to measure the \\bar H sag in AEgIS.

  5. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Charman, A. E.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, L. T.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms- of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10-21e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  6. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Charman, A E; Eriksson, S; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2016-01-21

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10(-21)e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  7. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Charman, A E; Eriksson, S; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2016-01-21

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10(-21)e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement. PMID:26791725

  8. Rydberg states of the hydrogen-antihydrogen quasimolecule

    SciTech Connect

    Sharipov, V.; Labzowsky, L.; Plunien, G.

    2006-05-15

    A description of the excited lepton states of the hydrogen-antihydrogen quasimolecule is presented. Potential energy curves and the leptonic part of the wave functions corresponding to a variety of such states are calculated within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation employing the Ritz variational principle. Nonadiabatic corrections to the leptonic potentials are also obtained. Basis functions are constructed as products of explicitly correlated Gaussians and spherical harmonics which describe correctly the motion of leptons with arbitrary orbital angular momentum projection onto the molecular (internuclear) axis. The hadronic part of the wave function for each leptonic level of the hydrogen-antihydrogen system is calculated by solving the Schroedinger equation with the obtained leptonic potentials. Corresponding solutions are generated utilizing precise B-spline representations. Employing leptonic and hadronic parts of the wave function the electron-positron and proton-antiproton annihilation rates are computed for a number of quasimolecular states. The decay rates of the hydrogen-antihydrogen system into separate positronium and protonium atoms are also estimated for the quasimolecular levels under consideration.

  9. On the choice of the electron-electron potential in relativistic atomic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sucher, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the calculation of relativistic effects in the structure of many-electron atoms there are two popular choice for the operator V used to represent the electron-electron interaction. One of these, V(I), is associated with the use of the Coulomb gauge propagator for photons; the other, V(II), is associated with the use of the Feynman gauge propagator. In contrast to V(I), the nonperturbative use of V(II) leads to energy levels which are already incorrect in order (alpha exp 4)m. This fact provides a quantitative argument for preferring V(I) to V(II).

  10. Relativistic effects in photoionization time delay near the Cooper minimum of noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Soumyajit; Mandal, Ankur; Jose, Jobin; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Kheifets, A. S.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-01

    Time delay of photoemission from valence n s , n p3 /2 , and n p1 /2 subshells of noble-gas atoms is theoretically scrutinized within the framework of the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. The focus is on the variation of time delay in the vicinity of the Cooper minima in photoionization of the outer subshells of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, where the corresponding dipole matrix element changes its sign while passing through a node. It is revealed that the presence of the Cooper minimum in one photoionization channel has a strong effect on time delay in other channels. This is shown to be due to interchannel coupling.

  11. Introduction of a fully relativistic capable basis set in the ab initio orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Patrick Ryan

    Large simulation cell sizes, relativistic effects, and the need to correctly model excited state properties are major impediments to the accurate prediction of the optical properties of candidate materials for solid-state laser crystal and luminescent applications. To overcome these challenges, new methods must be created to improve the electron orbital wavefunction and interactions. In this work, a method has been developed to create new analytical four-component, fully-relativistic and single-component scalar relativistic descriptions of the atomic orbital wave functions from Grasp2K numerically represented atomic orbitals. In addition, adapted theory for the calculation of the relativistic kinetic energy contribution to Hamiltonian which bypasses directly solving the Dirac equation has been explicated. The orbital description improvements are tested against YAG, YBCO, SnO2 and BiF3. The improvements to the basis set reflect an improvement in both computational speed and accuracy.

  12. Numerical study of relativistic frequency shift for the cold-atom clock experiment in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lambert, S. B.

    2007-02-01

    This paper is motivated by the development of several space missions using an Earth-orbit laser-cooled atomic clock, providing a time-keeping accuracy of the order of 10-16 10-18 in fractional frequency. We focus here on a particular part of the future data processing, namely the relativistic effects on frequency shift. These effects appear to be numerous and intricate, and it is important to precisely quantify their order of magnitude. Obviously, at this level of accuracy, a detailed analysis of all natural or artificial potential sources of error is required, and such a study is still missing at this time. We present here a numerical study of one-way relativistic frequency shifts of orders 1/c2, 1/c3 and 1/c4. These shifts are computed in the case of the ACES mission, i.e. a clock aboard the International Space Station and passing above a mid-latitude observing site. We obtain orders of magnitude for all interesting relativistic effects. We show that the influence on frequency shift of the mass quadrupole moment J2 of the Earth at the order 1/c3 has an amplitude around 10-18, below the expected sensitivity of ACES but close to the one of future missions such as RACE.

  13. A combined sextupole-Malmberg-Penning trap for cold non neutral plasmas and anti-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Testera, G.; Amoretti, M.; Farinon, S.; Zavatarelli, S.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Doser, M.

    2006-10-18

    This work reports experimental data obtained with electrons stored in a Penning-Malmberg trap surrounded by a sextupole radial magnetic field. This trap geometry is one of the candidates for trapping antihydrogen atoms in the place where they are produced starting from cold antiprotons and positrons or positronium. The measurements show that electron plasmas with parameters matching the range used for positrons and electrons in the anti-hydrogen experiments (number of particles ranging from few 106 up to several 107 and densities of the order of 108 - 109 cm-3, radius of the order of 1-2 mm) can be transported with 100 % efficiency in a trap region that simultaneously confines completely the charged particles and the neutral anti-hydrogen in the radial plane. Inside this trap plasma storage times of the order of several tens of seconds up to some hundreds of seconds are measured. The plasma storage times are consistent with those needed for anti-hydrogen production; however the increase of the plasma temperature due to the expansion could prevent to get trappable antihydrogen.

  14. Antihydrogen from merged plasmas - cold enough to trap?

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Niels

    2006-10-18

    The merging of antiprotons with a positron plasma is the predominant and highest efficient method for cold antihydrogen formation used to date. We present experimental evidence that this method has serious disadvantages for producing antihydrogen cold enough to be trapped. Antihydrogen is neutral but may be trapped in a magnetic field minimum. However, the depth of such traps are of order 1 K, shallow compared to the kinetic energies in current antihydrogen experiments. Studying the spatial distribution of the antihydrogen emerging from the ATHENA positron plasma we have, by comparison with a simple model, extracted information about the temperature of the antihydrogen formed. We find that antihydrogen is formed before thermal equilibrium is attained between the antiprotons and the positrons, and thus that further positron cooling may not be sufficient for producing antihydrogen cold enough to be trapped. We discuss the implications for trapping of antihydrogen in a magnetic trap, important for ongoing work by the ALPHA collaboration.

  15. Experimental limit on the ratio of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan; Charman, Andrew; Zhmoginov, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    Physicists have long wondered if the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. While there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist, i.e., that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. By searching for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap, we have determined that we can reject ratios of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen greater than about 100 at a statistical significance level of 5%. A similar search places somewhat lower limits on a negative gravitational mass, i.e., on antigravity.

  16. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpha Collaboration; Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2013-04-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5% worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime.

  17. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5%; worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime. PMID:23653197

  18. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Charman, A E; Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2013-01-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5%; worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime.

  19. Temporally controlled modulation of antihydrogen production and the temperature scaling of antiproton-positron recombination.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M C; Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate temporally controlled modulation of cold antihydrogen production by periodic RF heating of a positron plasma during antiproton-positron mixing in a Penning trap. Our observations have established a pulsed source of atomic antimatter, with a rise time of about 1 s, and a pulse length ranging from 3 to 100 s. Time-sensitive antihydrogen detection and positron plasma diagnostics, both capabilities of the ATHENA apparatus, allowed detailed studies of the pulsing behavior, which in turn gave information on the dependence of the antihydrogen production process on the positron temperature T. Our data are consistent with power law scaling T (-1.1+/-0.5) for the production rate in the high temperature regime from approximately 100 meV up to 1.5 eV. This is not in accord with the behavior accepted for conventional three-body recombination.

  20. Helium-antihydrogen interaction: the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curve.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Krzysztof; Chojnacki, Henryk

    2002-04-22

    The interaction of atomic antihydrogen with helium has been studied within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The linear combination of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions was used as the ansatz for the wave function of light particles. The potential energy curve with the minimum at 3.63 bohr and the barrier at 2.42 bohr has been obtained.

  1. Mesoporous materials for antihydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Consolati, Giovanni; Ferragut, Rafael; Galarneau, Anne; Di Renzo, Francesco; Quasso, Fiorenza

    2013-05-01

    Antimatter is barely known by the chemist community and this article has the vocation to explain how antimatter, in particular antihydrogen, can be obtained, as well as to show how mesoporous materials could be used as a further improvement for the production of antimatter at very low temperatures (below 1 K). The first experiments with mesoporous materials highlighted in this review show very promising and exciting results. Mesoporous materials such as mesoporous silicon, mesoporous material films, pellets of MCM-41 and silica aerogel show remarkable features for antihydrogen formation. Yet, the characteristics for the best future mesoporous materials (e.g. pore sizes, pore connectivity, shape, surface chemistry) remain to be clearly identified. For now among the best candidates are pellets of MCM-41 and aerogel with pore sizes between 10 and 30 nm, possessing hydrophobic patches on their surface to avoid ice formation at low temperature. From a fundamental standpoint, antimatter experiments could help to shed light on open issues, such as the apparent asymmetry between matter and antimatter in our universe and the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. To this purpose, basic studies on antimatter are necessary and a convenient production of antimatter is required. It is exactly where mesoporous materials could be very useful.

  2. Prospects of CPT tests using antiprotonic helium and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2005-10-19

    Testing CPT to the highest possible precision using the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms (a neutral three-body system consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron) is the current goal of ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. The present status and future prospects are discussed in the first half of the talk. Our program will be extended in the future to include the microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen. The physics motivations and possible measurement schemes are presented in the second half.

  3. Relativistic correlating basis sets for actinide atoms from 90Th to 103Lr.

    PubMed

    Noro, Takeshi; Sekiya, Masahiro; Osanai, You; Koga, Toshikatsu; Matsuyama, Hisashi

    2007-12-01

    For 14 actinide atoms from (90)Th to (103)Lr, contracted Gaussian-type function sets are developed for the description of correlations of the 5f, 6d, and 7s electrons. Basis sets for the 6d orbitals are also prepared, since the orbitals are important in molecular environments despite their vacancy in the ground state of some actinides. A segmented contraction scheme is employed for the compactness and efficiency. Contraction coefficients and exponents are so determined as to minimize the deviation from accurate natural orbitals of the lowest term arising from the 5f(n-1)6d(1)7s(2) configuration. The spin-free relativistic effects are considered through the third-order Douglas-Kroll approximation. To test the present correlating sets, all-electron calculations are performed on the ground state of (90)ThO molecule. The calculated spectroscopic constants are in excellent agreement with experimental values.

  4. A fully relativistic approach for calculating atomic data for highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong Lin; Fontes, Christopher J; Sampson, Douglas H

    2009-01-01

    We present a review of our fully relativistic approach to calculating atomic data for highly charged ions, highlighting a research effort that spans twenty years. Detailed discussions of both theoretical and numerical techniques are provided. Our basic approach is expected to provide accurate results for ions that range from approximately half ionized to fully stripped. Options for improving the accuracy and range of validity of this approach are also discussed. In developing numerical methods for calculating data within this framework, considerable emphasis is placed on techniques that are robust and efficient. A variety of fundamental processes are considered including: photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation, electron-impact ionization, autoionization, electron capture, photoionization and photorecombination. Resonance contributions to a variety of these processes are also considered, including discussions of autoionization, electron capture and dielectronic recombination. Ample numerical examples are provided in order to illustrate the approach and to demonstrate its usefulness in providing data for large-scale plasma modeling.

  5. Laplace-transformed atomic orbital-based Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for relativistic two-component Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Helmich-Paris, Benjamin; Repisky, Michal; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-07-01

    We present a formulation of Laplace-transformed atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) energies for two-component Hamiltonians in the Kramers-restricted formalism. This low-order scaling technique can be used to enable correlated relativistic calculations for large molecular systems. We show that the working equations to compute the relativistic MP2 energy differ by merely a change of algebra (quaternion instead of real) from their non-relativistic counterparts. With a proof-of-principle implementation we study the effect of the nuclear charge on the magnitude of half-transformed integrals and show that for light elements spin-free and spin-orbit MP2 energies are almost identical. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of separation of charge distributions on the Coulomb and exchange energy contributions, which show the same long-range decay with the inter-electronic/atomic distance as for non-relativistic MP2. A linearly scaling implementation is possible if the proper distance behavior is introduced to the quaternion Schwarz-type estimates as for non-relativistic MP2.

  6. Laplace-transformed atomic orbital-based Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for relativistic two-component Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Helmich-Paris, Benjamin; Repisky, Michal; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-07-01

    We present a formulation of Laplace-transformed atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) energies for two-component Hamiltonians in the Kramers-restricted formalism. This low-order scaling technique can be used to enable correlated relativistic calculations for large molecular systems. We show that the working equations to compute the relativistic MP2 energy differ by merely a change of algebra (quaternion instead of real) from their non-relativistic counterparts. With a proof-of-principle implementation we study the effect of the nuclear charge on the magnitude of half-transformed integrals and show that for light elements spin-free and spin-orbit MP2 energies are almost identical. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of separation of charge distributions on the Coulomb and exchange energy contributions, which show the same long-range decay with the inter-electronic/atomic distance as for non-relativistic MP2. A linearly scaling implementation is possible if the proper distance behavior is introduced to the quaternion Schwarz-type estimates as for non-relativistic MP2. PMID:27394099

  7. Laplace-transformed atomic orbital-based Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for relativistic two-component Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich-Paris, Benjamin; Repisky, Michal; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-07-01

    We present a formulation of Laplace-transformed atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) energies for two-component Hamiltonians in the Kramers-restricted formalism. This low-order scaling technique can be used to enable correlated relativistic calculations for large molecular systems. We show that the working equations to compute the relativistic MP2 energy differ by merely a change of algebra (quaternion instead of real) from their non-relativistic counterparts. With a proof-of-principle implementation we study the effect of the nuclear charge on the magnitude of half-transformed integrals and show that for light elements spin-free and spin-orbit MP2 energies are almost identical. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of separation of charge distributions on the Coulomb and exchange energy contributions, which show the same long-range decay with the inter-electronic/atomic distance as for non-relativistic MP2. A linearly scaling implementation is possible if the proper distance behavior is introduced to the quaternion Schwarz-type estimates as for non-relativistic MP2.

  8. GRASP92: a package for large-scale relativistic atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parpia, F. A.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    Program summaryTitle of program: GRASP92 Catalogue identifier: ADCU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADCU_v1_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: no Programming language used: Fortran Computer: IBM POWERstation 320H Operating system: IBM AIX 3.2.5+ RAM: 64M words No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 65 224 No of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 409 198 Distribution format: tar.gz Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADCU_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic spectra—atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative decay rates—using a 'fully relativistic' approach. Solution method: Atomic orbitals are assumed to be four-component spinor eigenstates of the angular momentum operator, j=l+s, and the parity operator Π=βπ. Configuration state functions (CSFs) are linear combinations of Slater determinants of atomic orbitals, and are simultaneous eigenfunctions of the atomic electronic angular momentum operator, J, and the atomic parity operator, P. Lists of CSFs are either explicitly prescribed by the user or generated from a set of reference CSFs, a set of subshells, and rules for deriving other CSFs from these. Approximate atomic state functions (ASFs) are linear combinations of CSFs. A variational functional may be constructed by combining expressions for the energies of one or more ASFs. Average level (AL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of all possible ASFs that may be constructed from a set of CSFs; the number of ASFs is then the same as the number, n, of CSFs. Optimal level (OL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of some subset of ASFs; the GRASP92 package is optimized for this latter class of functionals. The composition of an ASF in terms

  9. Analysis of time-dependent effects when operating nested-well plasma traps for achieving antihydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Dolliver, D. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    1999-12-10

    In the work reported, time-dependent effects are considered which affect the prospect of getting two oppositely signed plasmas to overlap the same region while trapped within a solenoidal magnetic field. Parameters that are relevant to future experimental attempts at producing cold antihydrogen atoms using nested-well plasma traps are considered. It is found that the timescale over which an overlap remains, without changing the electrode voltages, can be much larger than the timescale over which the overlap plasma recombines. Hence, it does not appear necessary to use time-dependent electrode voltages to maintain the overlap while antihydrogen atoms are being produced.

  10. Phase dependent loading of Bloch bands and quantum simulation of relativistic wave equation predictions with ultracold atoms in variably shaped optical lattice potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Weitz, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The dispersion relation of ultracold atoms in variably shaped optical lattices can be tuned to resemble that of a relativistic particle, i.e. be linear instead of the usual nonrelativistic quadratic dispersion relation of a free atom. Cold atoms in such a lattice can be used to carry out quantum simulations of relativistic wave equation predictions. We begin this article by describing a Raman technique that allows to selectively load atoms into a desired Bloch band of the lattice near a band crossing. Subsequently, we review two recent experiments with quasirelativistic rubidium atoms in a bichromatic lattice, demonstrating the analogues of Klein tunnelling and Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms, respectively.

  11. Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic shieldings of rare-gas atoms and halogen in hydrogen halides within relativistic polarization propagator theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sergio S.; Maldonado, Alejandro; Aucar, Gustavo A.

    2005-12-01

    In this work an analysis of the electronic origin of relativistic effects on the isotropic dia- and paramagnetic contributions to the nuclear magnetic shielding σ(X ) for noble gases and heavy atoms of hydrogen halides is presented. All results were obtained within the 4-component polarization propagator formalism at different level of approach [random-phase approximation (RPA) and pure zeroth-order approximation (PZOA)], by using a local version of the DIRAC code. From the fact that calculations of diamagnetic contributions to σ within RPA and PZOA approaches for HX(X =Br,I,At) and rare-gas atoms are quite close each to other and the finding that the diamagnetic part of the principal propagator at the PZOA level can be developed as a series [S(Δ)], it was found that there is a branch of negative-energy "virtual" excitations that contribute with more than 98% of the total diamagnetic value even for the heavier elements, namely, Xe, Rn, I, and At. It contains virtual negative-energy molecular-orbital states with energies between -2mc2 and -4mc2. This fact can explain the excellent performance of the linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) scheme for elements up to the fifth row in the Periodic Table. An analysis of the convergency of S(Δ ) and its physical implications is given. It is also shown that the total contribution to relativistic effects of the innermost orbital (1s1/2) is by far the largest. For the paramagnetic contributions results at the RPA and PZOA approximations are similar only for rare-gas atoms. On the other hand, if the mass-correction contributions to σp are expressed in terms of atomic orbitals, a different pattern is found for 1s1/2 orbital contributions compared with all other s-type orbitals when the whole set of rare-gas atoms is considered.

  12. A sensitive detection method for high resolution spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen, hydrogen and other trapped species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz Cesar, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    A method for detection of the weak 1s-2s laser excitation of a few trapped antihydrogen atoms is described. It involves the typical antihydrogen trapping environment that combines a magnetic trap for the atoms as well as a Penning trap for its constituent particles. By photoionization of the excited state the photoion can be kept in a weak Penning trap and at a suitable time be ejected towards a charged particle detector such as a microchannel plate or a channel electron multiplier. Since it does not rely on annihilation, the method is also suitable for trapped hydrogen and may find application with other species when a weak transition to a metastable state is intended and only a few trapped atoms or molecules are available.

  13. Leptonic annihilation in hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, P.; Eriksson, S.; Jonsell, S.; Saenz, A.; Zygelman, B.; Dalgarno, A.

    2004-08-01

    We consider the question of competition between leptonic and hadronic annihilation in matter-antimatter interaction. The rate of direct positron-electron annihilation in cold hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions has been calculated. The presence of leptonic annihilation introduces an absorptive, imaginary component to the hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering length; this component is 1.4x10{sup -4} a.u. for the singlet state of the leptonic spins, and 1.2x10{sup -7} a.u. for the triplet state. Leptonic annihilation is shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude slower than proton-antiproton annihilation.

  14. Antihydrogen (\\overline{H}) and muonic antihydrogen (\\overline{H}_{\\mu }) formation in low energy three-charge-particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Renat A.; Guster, D.

    2013-11-01

    A few-body formalism is applied for computation of two different three-charge-particle systems. The first system is a collision of a slow antiproton, \\overline{p}, with a positronium atom: Ps=(e+e-)—a bound state of an electron and a positron. The second problem is a collision of \\overline{p} with a muonic muonium atom, i.e. true muonium—a bound state of two muons one positive and one negative: Psμ = (μ+μ-). The total cross section of the following two reactions: \\overlinep+(e^+e^-) \\rightarrow \\overline{H} + e^- and \\overlinep+(\\mu ^+\\mu ^-) \\rightarrow \\overline{H}_{\\mu } + \\mu ^-, where \\overline{H}=(\\overlinepe^+) is antihydrogen and \\overline{H}_{\\mu }=(\\overlinep\\mu ^+) is a muonic antihydrogen atom, i.e. a bound state of \\overline{p} and μ+, are computed in the framework of a set of coupled two-component Faddeev-Hahn-type (FH-type) equations. Unlike the original Faddeev approach the FH-type equations are formulated in terms of only two but relevant components: Ψ1 and Ψ2, of the system's three-body wave function Ψ, where Ψ = Ψ1 + Ψ2. In order to solve the FH-type equations Ψ1 is expanded in terms of the input channel target eigenfunctions, i.e. in this work in terms of, for example, the (μ+μ-) atom eigenfunctions. At the same time Ψ2 is expanded in terms of the output channel two-body wave functions, that is in terms of \\overline{H}_{\\mu } atom eigenfunctions. Additionally, a convenient total angular momentum projection is performed. Results for better known low energy μ- transfer reactions from one hydrogen isotope to another hydrogen isotope in the cycle of muon catalyzed fusion (μCF) are also computed and presented.

  15. Compression of antiproton clouds for antihydrogen trapping.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; El Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  16. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2008-05-23

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  17. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    PubMed

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  18. Many-electron relativistic calculation and interpretation of atomic processes in time dependent heavy-ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thies, B.; Sepp, W.-D.; Fricke, B.

    1989-07-01

    The time dependence of a heavy-ion-atom collision system is solved via a set of coupled channel equations using energy eigen-values and matrix elements from a self-consistent field relativistic molecular many-electron Dirac-Fock-Slater calculation. Within this independent particle model we give a full many-particle interpretation by performing a small number of single-particle calculations. First results for the P( b) curves for the Ne K-hole excitation for the systems F 8+-Ne and F 6+-Ne as examples are discussed.

  19. Adiabatic formation of quasibound states of antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Correa, C E; Correa, J R; Ordonez, C A

    2005-10-01

    The classical trajectory of an initially unbound positron within the electric field of an antiproton and a uniform magnetic field is simulated in three dimensions. Several simulations are run incorporating experimental parameters used for antihydrogen production, which has been achieved by two different groups [M. Amoretti, Nature (London) 419, 456 (2002); G. Gabrielse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 213401 (2002)]. The simulations indicate that temporary bound states of antihydrogen can form at positive energies, where the energy of the system is defined to be zero when the positron and antiproton are at rest with infinite separation. Such quasibound states, which form only when the magnetic field is present, are typically smaller than in a dimension perpendicular to the magnetic field. An analytical model is developed for a formation cross section, and it is found that quasibound states may form more frequently than stable Rydberg states.

  20. Adiabatic formation of quasibound states of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, C.E.; Correa, J.R.; Ordonez, C.A.

    2005-10-01

    The classical trajectory of an initially unbound positron within the electric field of an antiproton and a uniform magnetic field is simulated in three dimensions. Several simulations are run incorporating experimental parameters used for antihydrogen production, which has been achieved by two different groups [M. Amoretti et al., Nature (London) 419, 456 (2002); G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 213401 (2002)]. The simulations indicate that temporary bound states of antihydrogen can form at positive energies, where the energy of the system is defined to be zero when the positron and antiproton are at rest with infinite separation. Such quasibound states, which form only when the magnetic field is present, are typically smaller than 0.4 {mu}m in a dimension perpendicular to the magnetic field. An analytical model is developed for a formation cross section, and it is found that quasibound states may form more frequently than stable Rydberg states.

  1. Formation of antihydrogen in p -Ps collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S.; Sinha, C.; Sil, N.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Cross sections for antihydrogen formation for the process {ital {bar p}}+Ps{r arrow}{bar H}+{ital e} have been calculated utilizing the charge-conjugation and time-reversal invariance as suggested by Humberston {ital et} {ital al}. (J. Phys. B 20, L25 (1987)). Calculations are performed in the framework of the eikonal approximation for a wide range of antiproton energy (20--11 000 keV).

  2. Two methods for the production of antihydrogen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ispirian, K.A.; Ispirian, R.K.

    1994-10-01

    The possibility for obtaining antihydrogen beams at the antiproton storage rings in the head-on collisions of antiprotons with synchrotron radiation photons is considered. As a second method, it is proposed that an insertion in which the antiprotons are accompanied with positrons be added; their recombination results in antihydrogen production. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Relativistic effects on interchannel coupling in atomic photoionization: The photoelectron angular distribution of Xe 5s

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O.; Manson, S. T.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Focke, P.; Wang, H.; Sellin, I. A.; Lindle, D. W.

    2001-08-01

    Measurements of the photoelectron angular-distribution asymmetry parameter {beta} for Xe 5s photoionization have been performed in the 80--200 eV photon-energy region. The results show a substantial deviation from the nonrelativistic value of {beta}=2 and provide a clear signature of significant relativistic effects in interchannel coupling.

  4. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, H.C.

    1990-12-31

    This year major advances have been made in 3 areas: high-lying, doubly-excited resonance states in the H{sup -}, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with thin carbon foils, and multiphoton photodetachment. We plan to pursue these studies further.

  5. Antihydrogen Relaxation from High-n to Ground State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, E. M.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2006-10-01

    We explore the rate at which magnetized, high-n Rydberg pairs formed in antihydrogen experiments relax to deep binding. While the theoretical three-body recombination rate scales favorably with low temperature (νTBRnb^3 (n v b^2 ) T-9/2), pairs form with binding energies ɛ near the (low) thermal level. Such atoms have classical drift orbits with negligible radiation. Collisions propel a cascade to deeper binding, but theory and simulation show an atom is unlikely to reach a radiating regime before it escapes the trap. However, simulations show that the energy-loss rate does not decrease as rapidly with increasing ɛ as previously expected. We also discuss the mean magnetic moment of guiding-center atoms, and energy loss from adiation at deep binding, based on the classical Larmour formula and a presumption of stochastic orbits. G. Gabrielse, N.S. Bowden, P. Oxley, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 213401 (2002) M. Amoretti, C. Amsler, G. Bonomi, et al., Nature (London) 419, 456 (2002). ME. Glinsky and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1279 (1991). R. Robicheaux and J.D. Hanson, Phys. Rev. A 69, 010701 (2004). E.M. Bass and D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1240 (2004).

  6. Relativistic all-order calculations of In I and Sn II atomic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2007-08-15

    We use all-order relativistic many-body perturbation theory to study 5s{sup 2}nl configurations of In I and Sn II. Energies, E1 amplitudes, and hyperfine constants are calculated using all-order method, which accounts for single and double excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions. A comprehensive review of experimental and theoretical studies of In I and Sn II properties is given. Our results are compared with other studies were available.

  7. First laser-controlled antihydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Storry, C H; Speck, A; Le Sage, D; Guise, N; Gabrielse, G; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Pittner, H; Herrmann, M; Walz, J; Hänsch, T W; Comeau, D; Hessels, E A

    2004-12-31

    Lasers are used for the first time to control the production of antihydrogen (H ). Sequential, resonant charge exchange collisions are involved in a method that is very different than the only other method used so far-producing slow H during positron cooling of antiprotons in a nested Penning trap. Two attractive features are that the laser frequencies determine the H binding energy, and that the production of extremely cold H should be possible in principle-likely close to what is needed for confinement in a trap, as needed for precise laser spectroscopy.

  8. Multiple ionization and capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhof, W.E.; Anholt, R.; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Gould, H.; Feinberg, B.; McDonald, R.J.; Wegner, H.E.; Thieberger, P.

    1987-02-01

    We show that in relativistic heavy-ion collisions the independent electron model can be used to predict cross sections for multiple inner-shell ionization and capture in a single collision. Charge distributions of 82- to 200-MeV/amu Xe and 105- to 955-MeV/amu U ion beams emerging from thin solid targets were used to obtain single- and multiple-electron stripping and capture cross sections. The probabilities of stripping electrons from the K, L, or M shells were calculated using the semiclassical approximation and Dirac hydrogenic wavefunctions. For capture, a simplified model for electron capture was uded. The data generally agree with theory.

  9. Symmetric eikonal model for projectile-electron excitation and loss in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voitkiv, A. B.; Najjari, B.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2010-08-15

    At impact energies > or approx. 1 GeV/u the projectile-electron excitation and loss occurring in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms is already strongly influenced by the presence of atomic electrons. To treat these processes in collisions with heavy atoms we generalize the symmetric eikonal model, used earlier for considerations of electron transitions in ion-atom collisions within the scope of a three-body Coulomb problem. We show that at asymptotically high collision energies this model leads to an exact transition amplitude and is very well suited to describe the projectile-electron excitation and loss at energies above a few GeV/u. In particular, by considering a number of examples we demonstrate advantages of this model over the first Born approximation at impact energies of {approx}1-30 GeV/u, which are of special interest for atomic physics experiments at the future GSI facilities.

  10. The energy spectrum of scattered particles in the K-shell ionization of medium heavy atoms by relativistic electrons and positrons with exchange effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, S.

    2008-08-01

    The energy spectrum of scattered particles in the K-shell ionization of medium to heavy atoms by relativistic electrons and positrons with exchange effects has been calculated for various kinematic conditions. In this calculation, the final state is described by a non-relativistic multiple-scattering wavefunction of Das and Seal (1993a Phys. Rev. A 47 2978; 1998 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 2355) multiplied by suitable spinors. Exchange effects in the atomic K-shell ionization of 47Ag atoms by relativistic electrons show better agreement with the available experimental data. The peaks are very similar to those observed in the relativistic K-shell ionization of 47Ag atoms by electrons at 500 keV energy (Schule and Nakel 1982 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15 L639). Some other theoretical computational results are also presented here for comparison. Experimental verification of the present results for higher incident energies and other theoretical calculations by similar wavefunction theories will be interesting.

  11. Electron correlation and relativistic effects in atomic structure calculations of Th+, Th2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. K.; Prasad, Rajendra; Datta, Sambhu N.; Chandra, P.

    2012-10-01

    Relativistic two-component ab initio calculations through second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) transformation are performed on Th+ and Th2+ ions. Spin-orbit-free calculations are done at SA-CASSCF and MS-CASPT2 levels. Spin-orbit coupled states are studied using effective mean-field operator. Spin-orbit states of Th+, below 23 000 cm-1 are compared with experimental values. Relative separations between various energy levels depend on the amount of electron correlation included in the calculation. For Th2+, spin-orbit energy levels below 20 000 cm-1 agree well with the experimental levels. Transition properties of several spin-orbit states in case of Th2+ ion are predicted.

  12. Tests of Lorentz Symmetry with Penning Traps and Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Neil

    2005-10-26

    Possibilities for testing Lorentz symmetry using precision experiments with antiprotons in Penning traps and with antihydrogen spectroscopy are reviewed. Estimates of bounds on relevant coefficients for Lorentz violation in the Standard-Model Extension (SME) are considered.

  13. Relativistic geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum metrology enables new applications in geodesy, including relativistic geodesy. The recent progress in optical atomic clocks and in long-distance frequency transfer by optical fiber together pave the way for using measurements of the gravitational frequency redshift for geodesy. The remote comparison of frequencies generated by calibrated clocks will allow for a purely relativistic determination of differences in gravitational potential and height between stations on Earth surface (chronometric leveling). The long-term perspective is to tie potential and height differences to atomic standards in order to overcome the weaknesses and inhomogeneity of height systems determined by classical spirit leveling. Complementarily, gravity measurements with atom interferometric setups, and satellite gravimetry with space borne laser interferometers allow for new sensitivities in the measurement of the Earth's gravity field.

  14. A Scheme To Produce The Antihydrogen Ion H-bar{sup +} For Gravity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, P.; Liszkay, L.; Carty, M.; Curtoni, A.; Delferrierre, O.; Rey, J.-M.; Sauce, Y.; Boilot, J.-P.; Corbel, C.; Crivelli, P.; Etienne, M.; Walcarius, A.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.; Hassan, M.; Mohri, A.; Saitoh, H.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-08

    We propose to use the charge exchange reaction of antiprotons with positronium atoms in order to produce antihydrogen atoms, H-bar, and H-bar{sup +} ions. The ions can be cooled down to {mu}K temperatures and then ionized to recover an ultra slow neutral H-bar atom. Its acceleration is then measured by time of flight. Results on the conversion of slow positrons into positronium are presented. This is a first step towards the creation of a dense cloud of positronium atoms to be used as a target for the antiprotons. The source of positrons is based on a 6 MeV industrial electron linac with 0.2 mA average current to be installed in CEA-Saclay. Equipped with a tungsten target and a moderator, it is aimed at producing rates of order 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} slow positrons.

  15. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Heavy Ions and Hadronic Atomic Systems: Spectra and Energy Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O.; Gurnitskaya, E.; Loboda, A.; Sukharev, D.

    2009-03-09

    The levels energies and energy shifts are calculated for superheavy Li-like ions and some kaonic atoms on the basis of the gauge-invariant QED perturbation theory (PT) with an account of nuclear, exchange-correlation and radiative effects.

  16. Simple loss scaling laws for quadrupoles and higher-order multipoles used in antihydrogen traps

    SciTech Connect

    Fajans, J.; Bertsche, W.; Burke, K.; Deutsch, A.; Chapman, S. F.; Gomberoff, K.; Wurtele, J. S.; Werf, D. P. van der

    2006-10-18

    Simple scaling laws strongly suggest that for antihydrogen relevant parameters, quadrupole magnetic fields will transport particles into, or near to, the trap walls. Consequently quadrupoles are a poor choice for antihydrogen trapping. Higher order multipoles lead to much less transport.

  17. Artificially Structured Boundary For Antihydrogen Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    It may be possible to confine antiprotons using an artificially structured boundary, as part of a process for synthesizing antihydrogen. An artificially structured boundary is defined at present as one that produces a spatially periodic static field, such that the spatial period and range of the field is much smaller than the dimensions of a cloud, plasma or beam of charged particles that is confined by the boundary. A modified Kingdon trap could employ an artificially structured boundary at the location of inner electrodes. The artificially structured boundary would produce a multipole magnetic field that keeps confined particles from reaching the inner electrodes. The magnetic field would be sufficiently short in range to affect the particle trajectories only in close proximity to the inner electrodes. The conditions for producing such a magnetic field have been assessed. The results indicate that the magnetic field must be an octupole or higher order field.

  18. Non-Neutral Plasma Confinement In A Cusp-Trap And Possible Application To Anti-Hydrogen Beam Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohri, Akihiro; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Nakai, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2005-10-19

    A new scheme for synthesizing antihydrogen by trapping positrons and antiprotons in a field consisting of a magnetic quadrupole and an electric octupole (cusp -trap) is now under investigation. The total electric field of the octupole with the space charge of a nonneutral plasma composed of particles of the same sign of charge, i.e., positrons or mixture of electrons and antiprotons, is expected to form a potential well for particles of the opposite sign of charge. Particles trapped in the well are mixed with the present dense particles, where positrons and antiprotons will combine to produce antihydrogen atoms. A considerable fraction of antihydrogen atoms in low-field seeking states will be transported outside as a beam.Experiments on electron confinement in the cusp-trap were carried out in a strong magnetic quadrupole (3.8T at the maximum on the axis). The confinement time reached 400s for the trapped electron number N0= 3.6x107. The time decreased with N0 but it was still about 100s for N0= 1.6x108.An electron plasma initially formed around the zero-field point rapidly expanded and settled down onto a quasi-stable state. Cross-sectional density profiles had shapes like a high volcano with a big crater. Analysis of the density profile shows that a potential well for oppositely charged particles (positive ions in this case) is probably formed inside the trapped electrons.

  19. Relativistic spectrum of hydrogen atom in the space-time non-commutativity

    SciTech Connect

    Moumni, Mustafa; BenSlama, Achour; Zaim, Slimane

    2012-06-27

    We study space-time non-commutativity applied to the hydrogen atom and its phenomenological effects. We find that it modifies the Coulomb potential in the Hamiltonian and add an r{sup -3} part. By calculating the energies from Dirac equation using perturbation theory, we study the modifications to the hydrogen spectrum. We find that it removes the degeneracy with respect to the total angular momentum quantum number and acts like a Lamb shift. Comparing the results with experimental values from spectroscopy, we get a new bound for the space-time non-commutative parameter.

  20. Neutral-atom electron binding energies from relaxed-orbital relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater calculations for Z between 2 and 106

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K.-N.; Aoyagi, M.; Mark, H.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.

    1976-01-01

    Electron binding energies in neutral atoms have been calculated relativistically, with the requirement of complete relaxation. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first-order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all elements with atomic numbers ranging from 2 to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. Binding energies including relaxation are listed for all electrons in all atoms over the indicated range of atomic numbers. A self-energy correction is included for the 1s, 2s, and 2p(1/2) levels. Results for selected atoms are compared with energies calculated by other methods and with experimental values.

  1. Reappraisal of nuclear quadrupole moments of atomic halogens via relativistic coupled cluster linear response theory for the ionization process.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rajat K; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Mahapatra, Uttam Sinha

    2013-11-27

    The coupled cluster based linear response theory (CCLRT) with four-component relativistic spinors is employed to compute the electric field gradients (EFG) of (35)Cl, (79)Br, and (127)I nuclei. The EFGs resulting from these calculations are combined with experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCC) to determine the nuclear quadrupole moments (NQM), Q of the halide nuclei. Our estimated NQMs [(35)Cl = -81.12 mb, (79)Br = 307.98 mb, and (127)I = -688.22 mb] agree well with the new atomic values [(35)Cl = -81.1(1.2), (79)Br = 302(5), and (127)I = -680(10) mb] obtained via Fock space multireference coupled cluster method with the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian. Although our estimated Q((79)Br) value deviates from the accepted reference value of 313(3) mb, it agrees well with the recently recommended value, Q((79)Br) = 308.7(20) mb. Good agreement with current reference data indicates the accuracy of the proposed value for these halogen nuclei and lends credence to the results obtained via CCLRT approach. The electron affinities yielded by this method with no extra cost are also in good agreement with experimental values, which bolster our belief that the NQMs values for halogen nuclei derived here are reliable.

  2. Two-stage Rydberg charge exchange: An efficient method for production of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hessels, E.A.; Homan, D.M.; Cavagnero, M.J.

    1998-03-01

    An efficient method for production of cold antihydrogen ({bar H}) is proposed. Alkali-metal atoms laser excited to a Rydberg state are charge exchanged with cold trapped positrons, producing Rydberg states of positronium. In a second Rydberg-state charge exchange, the positronium atoms give up their Rydberg positrons to cold trapped antiprotons, producing Rydberg states of {bar H}. These {bar H} atoms soon decay down to the ground state, and, because they are cold, could be trapped in a magnetic trap. The efficiency of the process results from the extremely large cross sections for Rydberg charge exchange. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations indicate an {bar H} instantaneous production rate of 10{sup 6}/s. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  4. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, J. R.; Hedlof, R. M.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-10-15

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  5. Strong nuclear force in cold antihydrogen-helium collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsell, S.; Froelich, P.; Eriksson, S.; Strasburger, K.

    2004-12-01

    We calculate cross sections for elastic scattering and annihilation in antihydrogen-helium collisions at low energies. The calculations are based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and incorporate the effects of the strong interaction through a scattering length approach. We find that the strong nuclear force not only causes significant annihilation, but also cannot be neglected in the elastic channel. In the zero energy limit we obtain the scattering length a=-7.69-3.80i a.u. for ground state antihydrogen-helium collisions. Annihilation is found to dominate over elastic scattering up to a temperature about 3 K. Loosely bound metastable antihydrogen-helium states are also investigated, and it is found that a number of relatively long-lived states with up to three units of angular momentum exist.

  6. Proof that the hydrogen-antihydrogen molecule is unstable.

    PubMed

    Gridnev, D K; Greiner, Carsten

    2005-06-10

    In the framework of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics we derive a necessary condition for four Coulomb charges (m1(+), m2(-), m3(+), m4(-)), where all masses are assumed finite, to form the stable system. The obtained stability condition is physical and is expressed through the required minimal ratio of Jacobi masses. In particular, this provides the rigorous proof that hydrogen-antihydrogen and muonium-antimuonium molecules and hydrogen-positron-muon systems are unstable. It also proves that replacing hydrogen in the hydrogen-antihydrogen molecule with its heavier isotopes does not make the molecule stable. These are the first rigorous results on the instability of these systems.

  7. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Funakoshi, R.; Hayano, R. S.; Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D. P. van der; Doser, M.

    2007-07-15

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5{<=}{alpha} < or approx. 80) and densities (1.5x10{sup 8}{<=}n < or approx. 7x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) within a short duration (25 s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  8. Measurement and simulations of hollow atom X-ray spectra of solid-density relativistic plasma created by high-contrast PW optical laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Colgan, J.; Dance, R. J.; Abdallah, J.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. L.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2013-09-01

    K-shell spectra of solid Al excited by petawatt picosecond laser pulses have been investigated at the Vulcan PW facility. Laser pulses of ultrahigh contrast with an energy of 160 J on the target allow studies of interactions between the laser field and solid state matter at 1020 W/cm2. Intense X-ray emission of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from thin aluminum foils is observed from optical laser plasma for the first time. Specifically for 1.5 μm thin foil targets the hollow atom yield dominates the resonance line emission. It is suggested that the hollow atoms are predominantly excited by the impact of X-ray photons generated by radiation friction to fast electron currents in solid-density plasma due to Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the transverse plasma fields. Numerical simulations of Al hollow atom spectra using the ATOMIC code confirm that the impact of keV photons dominates the atom ionization. Our estimates demonstrate that solid-density plasma generated by relativistic optical laser pulses provide the source of a polychromatic keV range X-ray field of 1018 W/cm2 intensity, and allows the study of excited matter in the radiation-dominated regime. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atom radiation is found to be a powerful tool to study the properties of high-energy density plasma created by intense X-ray radiation.

  9. Cryogenic Particle Accumulation In ATRAP And The First Antihydrogen Production Within A Magnetic Gradient Trap For Neutral Antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Storry, C. H.; Carew, A.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E. A.; Weel, M.; George, M. C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; LeSage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Speck, A.; Markert, F.

    2008-08-08

    ATRAP has made many important improvements since CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was restarted in 2006. These include substantial increases in the number of positrons (e{sup +}) and antiprotons (Pbars) used to make antihydrogen (Hbar) atoms, a new technique for loading electrons (e{sup -}) that are used to cool Pbars and e{sup +}, implementation of a completely new, larger and more robust apparatus in our second experimental zone and the inclusion of a quadrupole Ioffe trap intended to trap the coldest Hbar atoms produced. Using this new apparatus we have produced large numbers of Hbar atoms within a Penning trap that is located within this quadrupole Ioffe trap using a new technique which shows promise for producing even colder atoms. These observed Hbar atoms resolve a debate about whether positrons and antiprotons can be brought together to form atoms within the divergent magnetic fields of a quadrupole Ioffe trap.

  10. Relativistic effects for the reaction Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6: Prediction of the mean bond energy, atomization energy, and existence of the first organometallic transactinide superheavy hexacarbonyl Sg(CO)6.

    PubMed

    Malli, Gulzari L

    2015-02-14

    Our ab initio all-electron fully relativistic Dirac-Fock (DF) and nonrelativistic (NR) Hartree-Fock calculations predict the DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction: Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6 as -7.39 and -6.96 eV, respectively, i.e., our calculated ground state total DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction product Sg(CO)6 are lower by 7.39 and 6.96 eV than the total DF and NR ground state energies of the reactants, viz., one Sg atom plus six CO molecules, respectively. Our calculated DF relativistic and NR atomization energies (Ae) are 65.23 and 64.82 eV, respectively, and so the contribution of relativistic effects to the Ae of ∼0.40 eV is marginal. The Sg-C and C-O optimized bond distances for the octahedral geometry as calculated in our DF (NR) calculations are 2.151 (2.318 Å) and 1.119 (1.114 Å), respectively. The BSSE correction calculated using the DIRAC code ∼14 kcal/mol. The relativistic DF and NR mean energies predicted by us are 118.8 and 111.9 kJ/mol, respectively, and the contribution of ∼7 kJ/mol due to relativistic effects to the mean energy of Sg(CO)6 is negligible. Ours are the first calculations of the relativistic effects for the atomization energy, mean bond energy, and energy of the reaction for possible formation of Sg(CO)6, and both our relativistic DF and the NR treatments clearly predict for the first time the existence of hexacarbonyl of the transactinide superheavy element seaborgium Sg. In conclusion, relativistic effects are not significant for Sg(CO)6.

  11. Relativistic effects for the reaction Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6: Prediction of the mean bond energy, atomization energy, and existence of the first organometallic transactinide superheavy hexacarbonyl Sg(CO)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malli, Gulzari L.

    2015-02-01

    Our ab initio all-electron fully relativistic Dirac-Fock (DF) and nonrelativistic (NR) Hartree-Fock calculations predict the DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction: Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6 as -7.39 and -6.96 eV, respectively, i.e., our calculated ground state total DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction product Sg(CO)6 are lower by 7.39 and 6.96 eV than the total DF and NR ground state energies of the reactants, viz., one Sg atom plus six CO molecules, respectively. Our calculated DF relativistic and NR atomization energies (Ae) are 65.23 and 64.82 eV, respectively, and so the contribution of relativistic effects to the Ae of ˜0.40 eV is marginal. The Sg-C and C-O optimized bond distances for the octahedral geometry as calculated in our DF (NR) calculations are 2.151 (2.318 Å) and 1.119 (1.114 Å), respectively. The BSSE correction calculated using the DIRAC code ˜14 kcal/mol. The relativistic DF and NR mean energies predicted by us are 118.8 and 111.9 kJ/mol, respectively, and the contribution of ˜7 kJ/mol due to relativistic effects to the mean energy of Sg(CO)6 is negligible. Ours are the first calculations of the relativistic effects for the atomization energy, mean bond energy, and energy of the reaction for possible formation of Sg(CO)6, and both our relativistic DF and the NR treatments clearly predict for the first time the existence of hexacarbonyl of the transactinide superheavy element seaborgium Sg. In conclusion, relativistic effects are not significant for Sg(CO)6.

  12. Relativistic effects for the reaction Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO){sub 6}: Prediction of the mean bond energy, atomization energy, and existence of the first organometallic transactinide superheavy hexacarbonyl Sg(CO){sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Malli, Gulzari L.

    2015-02-14

    Our ab initio all-electron fully relativistic Dirac–Fock (DF) and nonrelativistic (NR) Hartree-Fock calculations predict the DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction: Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO){sub 6} as −7.39 and −6.96 eV, respectively, i.e., our calculated ground state total DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction product Sg(CO){sub 6} are lower by 7.39 and 6.96 eV than the total DF and NR ground state energies of the reactants, viz., one Sg atom plus six CO molecules, respectively. Our calculated DF relativistic and NR atomization energies (Ae) are 65.23 and 64.82 eV, respectively, and so the contribution of relativistic effects to the Ae of ∼0.40 eV is marginal. The Sg–C and C–O optimized bond distances for the octahedral geometry as calculated in our DF (NR) calculations are 2.151 (2.318 Å) and 1.119 (1.114 Å), respectively. The BSSE correction calculated using the DIRAC code ∼14 kcal/mol. The relativistic DF and NR mean energies predicted by us are 118.8 and 111.9 kJ/mol, respectively, and the contribution of ∼7 kJ/mol due to relativistic effects to the mean energy of Sg(CO){sub 6} is negligible. Ours are the first calculations of the relativistic effects for the atomization energy, mean bond energy, and energy of the reaction for possible formation of Sg(CO){sub 6}, and both our relativistic DF and the NR treatments clearly predict for the first time the existence of hexacarbonyl of the transactinide superheavy element seaborgium Sg. In conclusion, relativistic effects are not significant for Sg(CO){sub 6}.

  13. CPT and Lorentz Tests in Hydrogen and Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, R.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Russell, N.

    1999-03-01

    Signals for CPT and Lorentz violation at the Planck scale may arise in hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy. We show that certain 1S-2S and hyperfine transitions can exhibit theoretically detectable effects unsuppressed by any power of the fine-structure constant. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Antihydrogen formation in collisions of positronium with antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humberston, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    Antihydrogen, consisting of a positron orbiting around an antiproton, is the simplest few body system consisting entirely of antimatter and as such is of considerable importance in providing additional tests of the validity of charge conjugation invariance. In addition, the nature of the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter might more readily be investigated for an electrically neutral system than one which is charged. Before such studies can be undertaken the antihydrogen must, of course, be produced by attachment of a positron to an antipositron. Several production mechanisms have been proposed, the two most favored of which are radiative capture (spontaneous or stimulated) and charge exchange in positronium-antiproton collisions. The cross section for radiative capture is very much less than that for charge exchange, so that it might be thought that the latter process is greatly to be preferred. Various calculations of the cross section for the charge exchange process are briefly reviewed.

  15. Antihydrogen Formation via Antiproton Scattering with Excited Positronium.

    PubMed

    Kadyrov, A S; Rawlins, C M; Stelbovics, A T; Bray, I; Charlton, M

    2015-05-01

    Utilizing the two-center convergent close-coupling method, we find a several order of magnitude enhancement in the formation of antihydrogen via antiproton scattering with positronium in an excited state over the ground state. The effect is greatest at the lowest energies considered, which encompass those achievable in experiment. This suggests a practical approach to creating neutral antimatter for testing its interaction with gravity and for spectroscopic measurements.

  16. Quenching of antihydrogen gravitational states by surface charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. Yu; Kupriyanova, E. A.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of the quenching of antihydrogen quantum states near the surface of a material in the Earth's gravitational field by local charges randomly distributed along a mirror surface. The quenching reduces the probability of quantum reflection because of the additional atom–charge interaction, and thus the nonadiabatic transitions to excited gravitational states. Our approach is suitable when accounting for quenching caused by any kind of additional interaction with a characteristic range much smaller than the typical gravitational state wavelength.

  17. Laser-Controlled Antihydrogen Production by Two-Stage Charge Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Storry, C.H.; Comeau, D.; George, M.; Hessels, E.A.; Guise, N.; Levitt, B.; Le Sage, D.; Speck, A.; Gabrielse, G.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Pittner, H.; Herrmann, M.; Walz, J.; Haensch, T.W.

    2005-10-26

    Our ATRAP collaboration has now demonstrated a second technique for antihydrogen (H-bar) production. Lasers are used for the first time to control the production of H-baratoms in our cryogenic apparatus at CERN. As suggested in ref. [2] and first reported in ref. [1], lasers excite a thermal beam of cesium (Cs) atoms to a Rydberg state. In a first charge exchange collision one of these laser-excited Cs atoms (Cs*) and a cold e+ produces positronium (Ps). Our measurements at Harvard([3]) and at CERN([1]) confirm CTMC simulations([2]) that the laser-selected binding energy in the Cs atom is preserved by the collision and results in Ps with the selected binding energy. A second charge exchange is between one of these Ps atoms and a trapped p-bar. H-baris produced by this second collision and is expected to again have the same binding energy. One advantage of this technique as discussed in ref. [2] is that the H-barproduced is expected to be extremely cold, at the temperature of the trapped p-bar, allowing for possible confinement of the H-baratoms in a magnetic trap.

  18. De-Excitation of High-Rydberg Antihydrogen in a Strongly Magnetized Pure Positron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, E. M.

    2005-10-01

    The rate at which highly excited atoms relax to deeper binding is found with classical theories and simulations. This rate relates to antihydrogen formation experiments where such atoms are formed in pure-positron, Penning trap plasmas.ootnotetextG.Gabrielse, N.S. Bowden, P. Oxley, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 213401 (2002); M. Amoretti, C. Amsler, G. Bonomi, et al., Nature (London) 419, 456 (2002). The analysis concerns atoms that have passed the kinetic bottleneck at binding energy ɛ 4kT.ootnotetextM.E. Glinsky and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1279 (1991). Energy loss caused by collisions between atoms and plasma positrons is calculated in two ways: For close collisions, a molecular dynamics simulation gives the energy loss; for large-impact parameter collisions, theoretical expressions based on Fokker-Planck theory are employed.ootnotetextEric M. Bass and Daniel H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1240 (2004). For a finite magnetic field, the energy loss rate scales as 1/ɛ, just as for infinite field,^2 but with a larger coefficient. A statistical description of energy loss by radiation and Stark mixing will also be discussed.

  19. Effects of extreme magnetic quadrupole fields on penning traps and the consequences for antihydrogen trapping.

    PubMed

    Fajans, J; Bertsche, W; Burke, K; Chapman, S F; van der Werf, D P

    2005-10-01

    Measurements on electrons confined in a Penning trap show that extreme quadrupole fields destroy particle confinement. Much of the particle loss comes from the hitherto unrecognized ballistic transport of particles directly into the wall. The measurements scale to the parameter regime used by ATHENA and ATRAP to create antihydrogen, and suggest that quadrupoles cannot be used to trap antihydrogen.

  20. Effects of Extreme Magnetic Quadrupole Fields on Penning Traps and the Consequences for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fajans, J.; Bertsche, W.; Burke, K.; Chapman, S.F.; Werf, D.P. van der

    2005-10-07

    Measurements on electrons confined in a Penning trap show that extreme quadrupole fields destroy particle confinement. Much of the particle loss comes from the hitherto unrecognized ballistic transport of particles directly into the wall. The measurements scale to the parameter regime used by ATHENA and ATRAP to create antihydrogen, and suggest that quadrupoles cannot be used to trap antihydrogen.

  1. Relativistic effects in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsimirskii, K.B.

    1995-11-01

    Relativistic effects become apparent when the velocity of the electron is arbitrarily close to the speed of light (137 au) without actually attaining it (in heavy atoms of elements at the end of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table). At the orbital level, the relativistic effect is apparent in the radial contraction of penetrating s and p shells, expansion of nonpenetrating d and f shells, and the spin-orbit splitting of p-,d-, and f-shells. The appearance of a relativistic effect is indicated in the variation in the electronic configurations of the atoms in the Periodic Table, the appearance of new types of closed electron shells (6s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 6p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 7s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 5d{sub 3/2}{sup 4}), the stabilization of unstable oxidation states of heavy elements, the characteristic variation in the ionization enthalpies of heavy atoms, their electron affinity, hydration energies, redox potentials, and optical electronegativities. In the spectra of coordination compounds, a relativistic effect is observed when comparing the position of the charge transfer bands in analogous compounds, the parameters characterizing the ligand field strength (10Dq), the interatomic distances and angles in compounds of heavy elements. A relativistic effect is also apparent in the ability of heavy metals to form clusters and superclusters. Relativistic corrections also affect other properties of heavy metal compounds (force constants, dipole moments, biological activity, etc.).

  2. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations for atoms with one valence electron based on altering hydrogenlike or Dirac-Fock spin orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głowacki, Leszek

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations using hydrogenlike or Dirac-Fock spin orbitals of the transition from the ground state to some n p1 /2 , n p3 /2 low-lying excited states for the alkali metals are presented. In these calculations each virtual spin orbital corresponds to a unique noninteger atomic number determined iteratively using the virtual-particle model. The virtual-particle model based on "condensed-space" idea is here adopted to many electron systems consisting of a single valence electron and the core. The transition energy and the oscillator strength values were computed for sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium. Both hydrogenlike and Dirac-Fock basis functions have been used in the computations for comparison.

  3. Relativistic general-order coupled-cluster method for high-precision calculations: Application to the Al{sup +} atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kallay, Mihaly; Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Visscher, Lucas

    2011-03-15

    We report the implementation of a general-order relativistic coupled-cluster method for performing high-precision calculations of atomic and molecular properties. As a first application, the black-body radiation shift of the Al{sup +} clock has been estimated precisely. The computed shift relative to the frequency of the 3s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{sup e}{yields}3s3p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup o} clock transition given by (-3.66{+-}0.60)x10{sup -18} calls for an improvement over the recent measurement with a reported result of (-9{+-}3)x10{sup -18}[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 070802 (2010)].

  4. Relativistic Effects on Chemical Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how anomalous chemical properties may be explained by considering relativistic effects. Traces development of the relativistic wave equation (Dirac equation) starting with the Borh treatment of the hydrogen atom and discusses major consequences of the Dirac equation. Suggests that these topics receive greater attention in the…

  5. Relativistic Gravity Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen; Schäfer, Gerhard

    17 readable articles give a thorough and self-contained overview of recent developments in relativistic gravity research. The subjects covered are: gravitational lensing, the general relativistic n-body problem, observable effects in the solar system, gravitational waves and their interferometric detection, very-long-baseline interferometry, international atomic time, lunar laserranging measurements, measurement of the gravitomagnetic field of the Earth, fermion and boson stars and black holes with hair, rapidly rotating neutron stars, matter wave interferometry, and the laboratory test of Newton's law of gravity. Any scientist interested in experimentally or observatio- nally oriented relativistic gravity will read the book with profit. In addition, it is perfectly suited as a complementary text for courses on general relativity and relativistic astrophysics.

  6. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons for the production of trappable antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.; Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Friesen, T.; Hydomako, R.; and others

    2013-03-19

    We describe the implementation of evaporative cooling of charged particles in the ALPHA apparatus. Forced evaporation has been applied to cold samples of antiprotons held in Malmberg-Penning traps. Temperatures on the order of 10 K were obtained, while retaining a significant fraction of the initial number of particles. We have developed a model for the evaporation process based on simple rate equations and applied it succesfully to the experimental data. We have also observed radial re-distribution of the clouds following evaporation, explained by simple conservation laws. We discuss the relevance of this technique for the recent demonstration of magnetic trapping of antihydrogen.

  7. Excited states of the helium-antihydrogen system.

    PubMed

    Sharipov, Vasily; Labzowsky, Leonti N; Plunien, Günter

    2007-03-01

    Potential energy curves for excited leptonic states of the helium-antihydrogen system are calculated within the Ritz variational approach. An explicitly correlated ansatz for the leptonic wave function is employed describing accurately the motion of the leptons (two electrons and positron) in the field of the helium nucleus and of the antiproton with an arbitrary orbital angular momentum projection Lambda onto the internuclear axis. Results for Lambda=0, 1, and 30 are presented. For quasibound states with large values of Lambda and rotational quantum numbers J>Lambda no annihilation and rearrangement decay channels occur; i.e., they are metastable.

  8. Relativistic Configuration Interaction calculations of the atomic properties of selected transition metal positive ions; Ni II, V II and W II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalmoneam, Marwa Hefny

    Relativistic Configuration Interaction (RCI) method has been used to investigate atomic properties of the singly ionized transition metals including Nickel (Ni II), Vanadium (V II), and Tungsten (W II). The methodology of RCI computations was also improved. Specifically, the method to shift the energy diagonal matrix of the reference configurations was modified which facilitated including the effects of many electronic configurations that used to be difficult to be included in the energy matrix and speeded-up the final calculations of the bound and continuum energy spectrum. RCI results were obtained for three different cases: i. Atomic moments and polarizabilities of Ni II; ii. Hyperfine structure constants of V II; iii. Lifetime, Lande g-values, and Oscillator strength of W II. Four atomic quantities of Ni II were calculated; scalar dipole polarizability, off-diagonal electric dipole polarizability, non-adiabatic scalar dipole polarizability, and quadrupole polarizability of Ni II. These quantities appear as effective parameters in an effective potential model. These quantities are computed for the first time. The two hyperfine structure (HFS) constants ; magnetic dipole interaction constant, A, and the electric quadrupole interaction constant, B, have been calculated for the V II 3d4, 3d3 4s, and 3d 2 4s2 J=1 to 5 even parity states . Analysis of the results shows the sum of HFS A of nearby energy levels to be conserved. The Lande g-value and the vector composition percentages for all the wavefunctions of those configurations have also been calculated. RCI results are in good agreement with most of the available experimental data. Lifetimes of 175 decay branches in W II have been calculated. Also, Lande g-values have been calculated for all measured W II odd parity levels J=1/2-11/2. The RCI oscillator strengths and branching fraction values of the lowest 10 energy levels for each odd parity J are presented. The calculated results are only in semi

  9. Atomic physics of relativistic high contrast laser-produced plasmas in experiments on Leopard laser facility at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Faenov, A. Y.; Safronova, U. I.; Wiewior, P.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Wilcox, P.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Osborne, G. C.; Chalyy, O.; Paudel, Y.

    2012-06-01

    The results of the recent experiments focused on study of x-ray radiation from multicharged plasmas irradiated by relativistic (I > 1019 W/cm2) sub-ps laser pulses on Leopard laser facility at NTF/UNR are presented. These shots were done under different experimental conditions related to laser pulse and contrast. In particular, the duration of the laser pulse was 350 fs or 0.8 ns and the contrast was varied from high (10-7) to moderate (10-5). The thin laser targets (from 4 to 750 μm) made of a broad range of materials (from Teflon to iron and molybden to tungsten and gold) were utilized. Using the x-ray diagnostics including the high-precision spectrometer with resolution R ˜ 3000 and a survey spectrometer, we have observed unique spectral features that are illustrated in this paper. Specifically, the observed L-shell spectra for Fe targets subject to high intensity lasers (˜1019 W/cm2) indicate electron beams, while at lower intensities (˜1016 W/cm2) or for Cu targets there is much less evidence for an electron beam. In addition, K-shell Mg features with dielectronic satellites from high-Rydberg states, and the new K-shell F features with dielectronic satellites including exotic transitions from hollow ions are highlighted.

  10. Velocity space scattering coefficients with applications in antihydrogen recombination studies

    PubMed

    Chang; Ordonez

    2000-12-01

    An approach for calculating velocity space friction and diffusion coefficients with Maxwellian field particles is developed based on a kernel function derived in a previous paper [Y. Chang and C. A. Ordonez, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2947 (1999)]. The original fivefold integral expressions for the coefficients are reduced to onefold integrals, which can be used for any value of the Coulomb logarithm. The onefold integrals can be further reduced to standard analytical expressions by using a weak coupling approximation. The integral expression for the friction coefficient is used to predict a time scale that describes the rate at which a reflecting antiproton beam slows down within a positron plasma, while both species are simultaneously confined by a nested Penning trap. The time scale is used to consider the possibility of achieving antihydrogen recombination within the trap. The friction and diffusion coefficients are then used to derive an expression for calculating the energy transfer rate between antiprotons and positrons. The expression is employed to illustrate achieving antihydrogen recombination while taking into account positron heating by the antiprotons. The effect of the presence of an electric field on recombination is discussed.

  11. Comment on 'Laser-assisted formation of antihydrogen'

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, James S.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent paper, Whitehead, McCann, and Shimamura [Phys. Rev. A 64, 023401 (2001)] presented classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations of the effects of laser fields on the cross section for antihydrogen formation in collisions of antiprotons with positronium. They also use the same method to calculate the photoionization rate of isolated positronium in a strong field. The purpose of this Comment is to point out (i) the criteria for validity of the quasiclassical approximation are not satisfied for all the conditions used; (ii) some of their numerical results do not agree with the values obtained with a corroborated code; (iii) the ambiguity of a cross section when the target can ionize even before the projectile arrives; and (iv) the essential effect of quantum-mechanical tunneling on the strong-field ionization rate. A recently published method allowing tunneling in a CTMC calculation [J. S. Cohen, Phys. Rev. A 64, 043412 (2001)] is used for (iv). It is concluded that the laser effect on formation of antihydrogen may be much greater than that found by Whitehead et al., but the pulse must be better characterized for quantitative predictions.

  12. Effect of Irregularities in the Earth's Rotation on Relativistic Shifts in Frequency and Time of Earthbound Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, V. F.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Pasynok, S. L., S. L.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of irregularities in the earth's rotation (precession and nutation of the earth's axis of rotation, oscillations in the modulus of the angular velocity, periodic deviations in the line of the poles, and the angular momentum of the globe) on the frequency and time of high-stability atomic clocks are examined in terms of the theory of relativity. It is shown that the relative shift in frequency and time owing to these effects can exceed 5×10-16.

  13. Positronium, antihydrogen, light, and the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.

    2016-07-01

    While discussing a certain generic difference in effects of gravity on particles and antiparticles, various neutral particles (i.e. the particles which are identical with their antiparticles) could be a perfect probe. One such neutral particles is the positronium atom, which has been available for precision experiments for a few decades. The other important neutral particle is the photon. Behavior of light in the presence of a gravitational field has been the key both to build and develop the theory of general relativity and to verify it experimentally. The very idea of antigravity for antimatter strongly contradicts both the principles of general relativity and its experimentally verified consequences. Consideration of existing experimental results on photons and positrons makes antigravity impossible and leads to a conclusion that the deviation of the ratio of acceleration of the free fall of particles and antiparticles cannot exceed the level of 1× {10}-5.

  14. Formation Of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Testera, G.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Zavatarelli, S.; Belov, A. S.; Gninenko, S. N.; Matveev, V. A.; Bonomi, G.; Fontana, A.; Rotondi, A.; Zenoni, A.; Boscolo, I.; Brambilla, N.; Castelli, F.; Cialdi, S.; Formaro, L.; Gervasini, A.; Giammarchi, M. G.; Vairo, A.

    2008-08-08

    The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

  15. Large-scale relativistic calculations of ionization energies and total binding energies of all atoms and positive atomic ions with nuclear charge Z = 1-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Froese Fischer, Charlotte; Reader, Joseph; Indelicato, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The latest versions of advanced multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock atomic codes, MCDFGME and Grasp2K, are used to calculate ionization energies (IE) and total binding energies of all atomic systems. Comparison with experiment and other benchmark data shows an excellent accuracy achieved in these calculations for H-, He-, and Li-like ions. In particular, our results for H-like ions with Z >2, obtained with the MCDFGME code, are the most accurate available today. For multi-electron ions, we combine the accurate single-configuration MCDFGME calculations with the correlation-difference energy (difference between the multiconfiguration and single-configuration total energies) calculated with Grasp2K. This approach results in a dramatically improved agreement of calculated IEs with experiment (less than 0.7 eV on average) for all systems, excluding those involving open f-shells. The most probable ground states are found for most systems, leaving questionable only about 100 out of total 6105 considered systems.

  16. Construction and Operational Experience with a Superconducting Octupole Used to Trap Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer P.; Escallier, J.; Marone, A.; Parker, B.

    2011-09-06

    A superconducting octupole magnet has seen extensive service as part of the ALPHA experiment at CERN. ALPHA has trapped antihydrogen, a crucial step towards performing precision measurements of anti-atoms. The octupole was made at the Direct Wind facility by the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnet was wound with a six-around-one NbTi cable about 1 mm in diameter. It is about 300 mm long, with a radius of 25 mm and a peak field at the conductor of 4.04 T. Specific features of the magnet, including a minimal amount of material in the coil and coil ends with low multipole content, were advantageous to its use in ALPHA. The magnet was operated for six months a year for five years. During this time it underwent about 900 thermal cycles (between 4K and 100K). A novel operational feature is that during the course of data-taking the magnet was repeatedly shut off from its 950 A operating current. The magnet quenches during the shutoff, with a decay constant of 9 ms. Over the course of the five years, the magnet was deliberately quenched many thousands of times. It still performs well.

  17. Compact cryogenic system with mechanical cryocoolers for antihydrogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, M; Mohri, A; Kanai, Y; Enomoto, Y; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a compact cryogenic system which cools a vacuum chamber housing multi-ring trap electrodes (MRTs) of an antihydrogen synthesis trap using mechanical cryocoolers to achieve background pressure less than 10(-12) Torr. The vacuum chamber and the cryocoolers are thermally connected by copper strips of 99.9999% in purity. All components are installed within a diametric gap between the MRT of phi108 mm and a magnet bore of phi160 mm. An adjusting mechanism is prepared to align the MRT axis to the magnet axis. The vacuum chamber was successfully cooled down to 4.0 K after 14 h of cooling with heat load of 0.8 W.

  18. Development and Testing of a Positron Accumulator for Antihydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. T. Collier; L. V. Jorgensen; O. I. Meshkov; D. P. van der Werf; M. Charlton

    1999-12-31

    A positron accumulator based on a modified Penning-Malmberg trap has been constructed and undergone preliminary testing prior to being shipped to CERN in Geneva where it will be a part of an experiment to synthesize low-energy antihydrogen. It utilizes nitrogen buffer gas to cool and trap a continuous beam of positrons emanating from a {sup 22}Na radioactive source. A solid neon moderator slows the positrons from the source down to epithermal energies of a few eV before being injected into the trap. It is estimated that around 10{sup 8} positrons can be trapped and cooled to ambient temperature within 5 minutes in this scheme using a 10 mCi source.

  19. Development and testing of a positron accumulator for antihydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, M. J. T.; Joergensen, L. V.; Werf, D. P. van der; Charlton, M.; Meshkov, O. I.

    1999-12-10

    A positron accumulator based on a modified Penning-Malmberg trap has been constructed and undergone preliminary testing prior to being shipped to CERN in Geneva where it will be a part of an experiment to synthesize low-energy antihydrogen. It utilises nitrogen buffer gas to cool and trap a continuous beam of positrons emanating from a {sup 22}Na radioactive source. A solid neon moderator slows the positrons from the source down to epithermal energies of a few eV before being injected into the trap. It is estimated that around 10{sup 8} positrons can be trapped and cooled to ambient temperature within 5 minutes in this scheme using a 10 mCi source.

  20. Measuring the Free Fall of Antihydrogen with Emulsion Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistillo, C.

    2014-06-01

    The AEgIS experiment at CERN is designed to perform the first direct measurement of gravitational interaction between antimatter and matter by detecting the fall of a horizontally accelerated cold antihydrogen beam in the Earth's gravitational field. The spatial resolution of the position sensitive detector is a key issue for the success of the experiment. For this reason, the employment of emulsion film detectors is being considered and an intense R&D is being conducted to define the use of this technology in the AEgIS apparatus. We present the results of test beams conducted in 2012, when emulsion film detectors were directly exposed to a ˜ 100 keV antiproton beam and annihilation vertices successfully reconstructed with a few micrometers resolution. The prospects for the realization of the final detector are also presented.

  1. Relativistic formulation of the Voigt profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wcisło, P.; Amodio, P.; Ciuryło, R.; Gianfrani, L.

    2015-02-01

    The relativistic formulation of the Voigt profile is reported for the spontaneous emission from an atomic or molecular cloud, in coincidence with a given spectral line. We considered the simultaneous occurrence of homogeneous broadening and thermal broadening, this latter being determined by the relativistic Doppler effect. Our formula for the relativistic Voigt profile reproduces those characterizing the two available limit cases, namely, the relativistic Gaussian profile and the classical Voigt convolution. The relativistic deformation of the Voigt profile was carefully quantified at different temperatures, in the case of the molecular hydrogen spectrum.

  2. High-resolution electron spin resonance spectroscopy of XeF* in solid argon. The hyperfine structure constants as a probe of relativistic effects in the chemical bonding properties of a heavy noble gas atom.

    PubMed

    Misochko, Eugenii Ya; Akimov, Alexander V; Goldschleger, Ilya U; Tyurin, Danil A; Laikov, Dimitri N

    2005-01-15

    Xenon fluoride radicals were generated by solid-state chemical reactions of mobile fluorine atoms with xenon atoms trapped in Ar matrix. Highly resolved electron spin resonance spectra of XeF* were obtained in the temperature range of 5-25 K and the anisotropic hyperfine parameters were determined for magnetic nuclei 19F, 129Xe, and 131Xe using naturally occurring and isotopically enriched xenon. Signs of parallel and perpendicular hyperfine components were established from analysis of temperature changes in the spectra and from numerical solutions of the spin Hamiltonian for two nonequivalent magnetic nuclei. Thus, the complete set of components of hyperfine- and g-factor tensors of XeF* were obtained: 19F (Aiso=435, Adip=1249 MHz) and 129Xe (Aiso=-1340, Adip=-485 MHz); g(parallel)=1.9822 and g(perpendicular)=2.0570. Comparison of the measured hyperfine parameters with those predicted by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations indicates, that relativistic DFT gives true electron spin distribution in the 2Sigma+ ground-state, whereas nonrelativistic theory underestimates dramatically the electron-nuclear contact Fermi interaction (Aiso) on the Xe atom. Analysis of the obtained magnetic-dipole interaction constants (Adip) shows that fluorine 2p and xenon 5p atomic orbitals make a major contribution to the spin density distribution in XeF*. Both relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations give close magnetic-dipole interaction constants, which are in agreement with the measured values. The other relativistic feature is considerable anisotropy of g-tensor, which results from spin-orbit interaction. The orbital contribution appears due to mixing of the ionic 2Pi states with the 2Sigma+ ground state, and the spin-orbit interaction plays a significant role in the chemical bonding of XeF*.

  3. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  4. Decay channels and decay rates for the hydrogen-antihydrogen quasimolecule

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, L.; Sharipov, V.; Prozorov, A.; Plunien, G.; Soff, G.

    2005-08-15

    Calculations of leptonic and hadronic annihilation rates in the hydrogen-antihydrogen molecule are presented. Both the leptonic potential and leptonic wave function are evaluated within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation employing the Ritz variational principle. Nonadiabatic corrections to the leptonic potential are also obtained. Explicitly correlated Gaussians are employed as basis functions, which describe accurately the hydrogen-antihydrogen interaction. Given the leptonic potential the hadronic part of the wave function for each molecular level of the hydrogen-antihydrogen quasimolecule is calculated by solving the corresponding Schroedinger equation by means of precise B-spline representations. The decay rates of the quasimolecule into separate positronium and protonium systems are estimated for a number of molecular levels. Utilizing the leptonic and hadronic wave functions the leptonic- and hadronic-annihilation rates for different molecular levels are computed.

  5. Two-component Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field method with relativistic effective core potential revisited: theory, implementation, and applications to spin-orbit splitting of lower p-block atoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2013-10-01

    The relativistic two-component complete active space self-consistent field theory in Kramers restricted formalism (KRCASSCF) through the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential is implemented into the KPACK package. This paper continues the development previously reported [Y. S. Kim and Y. S. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 12169 (2003)] and extends the theory by means of adding time-reversal symmetry into the relevant expressions so as to complete the course of theoretical development. We retained the usage of elementary spinor excitation operator for defining the spinor rotation operator and derived the gradient and Hessian in simpler forms than previously found. To eliminate redundant computation resulting from repeating sums in the derivatives, a suitable decomposition method is proposed, which also facilitates the implementation. The two-step near second-order approach is employed for convergence. The present implementation is applicable for both closed- and open-shell systems and is used to calculate the atoms of lower p-block. The results for 5p and 6p are in good agreement with the experiments, and those for 7p are comparable to multi-reference configuration interaction results, showing that KRCASSCF is a versatile tool for the relativistic electronic structure calculation of molecules containing moderate-weight through superheavy elements.

  6. Compton Effect with Non-Relativistic Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    In deducing the change of wavelength of x-rays scattered by atomic electrons, one normally makes use of relativistic kinematics for electrons. However, recoiling energies of the electrons are of the order of a few keV which is less than 0.2% of their rest energies. Hence the authors may ask whether relativistic formulae are really necessary. In…

  7. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  8. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  9. Towards measuring the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen - a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerzopf, C.; Capon, A. A.; Diermaier, M.; Dupré, P.; Higashi, Y.; Kaga, C.; Kolbinger, B.; Leali, M.; Lehner, S.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Murtagh, D. J.; Nagata, Y.; Radics, B.; Simon, M. C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Ulmer, S.; Vamosi, S.; Gorp, S. van; Zmeskal, J.; Breuker, H.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kuroda, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report the successful commissioning and testing of a dedicated field-ioniser chamber for measuring principal quantum number distributions in antihydrogen as part of the ASACUSA hyperfine spectroscopy apparatus. The new chamber is combined with a beam normalisation detector that consists of plastic scintillators and a retractable passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector.

  10. Antihydrogen formation by collisions of antiprotons with positronium in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J.; Lutz, H. O.; Sidky, E. Y.; Roller-Lutz, Z.

    2003-08-01

    Using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method, we calculated the charge-transfer cross section for antiprotons colliding with Rydberg positronium, leading to antihydrogen formation. The results show a significant influence of an externally applied magnetic field which causes a reduction of the cross section.

  11. Motion of guiding center drift atoms in the electric and magnetic field of a Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, S.G.; O'Neil, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    The ApparaTus for High precision Experiment on Neutral Antimatter and antihydrogen TRAP collaborations have produced antihydrogen atoms by recombination in a cryogenic antiproton-positron plasma. This paper discusses the motion of the weakly bound atoms in the electric and magnetic field of the plasma and trap. The effective electric field in the moving frame of the atom polarizes the atom, and then gradients in the field exert a force on the atom. An approximate equation of motion for the atom center of mass is obtained by averaging over the rapid internal dynamics of the atom. The only remnant of the atom internal dynamics that enters this equation is the polarizability for the atom. This coefficient is evaluated for the weakly bound and strongly magnetized (guiding center drift) atoms understood to be produced in the antihydrogen experiments. Application of the approximate equation of motion shows that the atoms can be trapped radially in the large space charge field near the edge of the positron column. Also, an example is presented for which there is full three-dimensional trapping, not just radial trapping. Even untrapped atoms follow curved trajectories, and such trajectories are discussed for the important class of atoms that reach a field ionization diagnostic. Finally, the critical field for ionization is determined as an upper bound on the range of applicability of the theory.

  12. Relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Laser cooling of atoms and molecules with ultrafast pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, D.

    2006-06-15

    We propose a laser cooling method for atomic species whose level structure makes traditional laser cooling difficult. For instance, laser cooling of hydrogen requires single-frequency vacuum-ultraviolet light, while multielectron atoms need single-frequency light at many widely separated frequencies. These restrictions can be eased by laser cooling on two-photon transitions with ultrafast pulse trains. Laser cooling of hydrogen, antihydrogen, and many other species appears feasible, and extension of the technique to molecules may be possible.

  14. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  15. Polarization and trapping of weakly bound atoms in penning trap fields.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, S G; O'Neil, T M

    2004-06-18

    The ATHENA and ATRAP groups at CERN recently reported the production of weakly bound antihydrogen atoms in a non-neutral positron-antiproton plasma. This Letter derives an equation of motion for weakly bound atoms in the electric and magnetic fields of the plasma and trap. The atoms are polarized by the electric field and can be trapped radially in the edge region of the plasma where the electric field is maximum.

  16. Hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy for studies of CPT and Lorentz symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, V. Alan; Russell, Neil

    1999-01-15

    A theoretical study of possible signals for CPT and Lorentz violation arising in hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy is described. The analysis uses a CPT- and Lorentz-violating extension of quantum electrodynamics, obtained from a general Lorentz-violating extension of the minimal standard model with both CPT-even and CPT-odd terms. Certain 1S-2S transitions and hyperfine Zeeman lines exhibit effects at leading order in small CPT-violating couplings.

  17. Hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy for studies of CPT and Lorentz symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, R.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Russell, N.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical study of possible signals for CPT and Lorentz violation arising in hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy is described. The analysis uses a CPT- and Lorentz-violating extension of quantum electrodynamics, obtained from a general Lorentz-violating extension of the minimal standard model with both CPT-even and CPT-odd terms. Certain 1S-2S transitions and hyperfine Zeeman lines exhibit effects at leading order in small CPT-violating couplings. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck G; Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wang, Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6 a.u. and a barrier rising at r 5 a.u.

  19. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-12-01

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, m, and gravitational, mg, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no confirmation for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear - current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits - 65 relativistic electrons and positrons coming from the absence of the vacuum Cherenkov radiation at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and stability of photons at the Tevatron collider in presence of the annual variations of the solar gravitational potential. Our result clearly rules out the speculated antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS), we also predict the bounds 1 - 4 ×10-7

  20. Relativistic fluid dynamics. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anile, A. M.; Choquet-Bruhat, Y.

    Contents: 1. Covariant theory of conductivity in ideal fluid or solid media (B. Carter). 2. Hamiltonian techniques for relativistic fluid dynamics and stability theory (D. D. Holm). 3. Covariant fluid mechanics and thermodynamics: an introduction (W. Israel). 4. Relativistic plasmas (H. Weitzner). 5. An improved relativistic warm plasma model (A. M. Anile, S. Pennisi). 6. Relativistic extended thermodynamics II (I. Müller). 7. Relativistic extended thermodynamics: general assumptions and mathematical procedure (T. Ruggeri). 8. Relativistic hydrodynamics and heavy ion reactions (D. Strottman). 9. Some problems in relativistic hydrodynamics (C. G. van Weert).

  1. Continuous coherent Lyman- alpha excitation of atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Eikema, K S; Walz, J; Hänsch, T W

    2001-06-18

    The 1S-2P transition in atomic hydrogen has been observed for the first time with almost natural linewidth. We employ a unique source of continuous coherent Lyman- alpha radiation based on four-wave mixing in mercury. The output of the source has been improved 40-fold to yield 20 nW. This demonstration shows that laser cooling and detection with continuous Lyman- alpha radiation has excellent prospects for future experiments with antihydrogen.

  2. Continuous Coherent Lyman-{alpha} Excitation of Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Eikema, K. S. E.; Walz, J.; Hansch, T. W.

    2001-06-18

    The 1S{minus}2P transition in atomic hydrogen has been observed for the first time with almost natural linewidth. We employ a unique source of continuous coherent Lyman-{alpha} radiation based on four-wave mixing in mercury. The output of the source has been improved 40-fold to yield 20nW. This demonstration shows that laser cooling and detection with continuous Lyman-{alpha} radiation has excellent prospects for future experiments with antihydrogen.

  3. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmogorov, A. Stupishin, N.; Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup −} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce “geometrical” beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  4. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kolmogorov, A; Atoian, G; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Ritter, J; Stupishin, N; Zelenski, A

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H(-) ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  5. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, A.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ritter, J.; Stupishin, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H- ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ˜0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  6. Cold antihydrogen production in the ATRAP2 apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrubel, Jonathan; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Le Sage, D.; Levitt, B.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Speck, A.; George, M. C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Carew, A.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Walz, J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new ATRAP2 experimental platform, which has succeeded in producing thousands of anthydrogen (=H) atoms in a combined Penning-Ioffe trap. The Penning trap provides confinement for charged particles and the quadrupole Ioffe trap provides a neutral atom trap for =H atoms. Up to 78,000 antiprotons (=p) are trapped and cooled to 7K in a 1T bias field with every ejection from CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator. At the same time 5x10^6 positrons (e^+) are loaded. Several shots are stacked and adiabatically transferred into neighboring electrodes in the center of the quadrupole Ioffe trap. Fine control in the Penning trap is provided by 37 individually rf and dc biased gold-plated copper cylinders. The Ioffe trap is ramped to full field and the =p are coaxed to interact with the e^+. As the =p are cooled by the e^+, =H atoms are formed that may be trapped by the Ioffe trap. The apparatus includes MnF2 windows in the Ioffe trap to transmit Lyman-α radiation into the production space, which is needed for future laser cooling and precision spectroscopy of =H.

  7. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  8. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Hakel, Peter; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Sherrill, Manalo Edgar

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generatedmore » with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.« less

  9. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  10. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    PubMed

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  11. Low-energy scattering of antihydrogen by helium and molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, E. A. G.; Todd, A. C.; Liu, Y.; Gregory, M. R.; Jonsell, S.; Plummer, M.

    2008-08-08

    In this paper, we describe in detail calculations that we have carried out of cross sections for rearrangement processes in very low-energy helium+antihydrogen (H-bar) scattering that result in He{sup +}p-bar+Ps or Hep-bar+e{sup +} or {alpha}p-bar+Ps{sup -}. The interaction between the leptons is taken into account very accurately. Results are presented for all three processes. A description is also given of a preliminary calculation of elastic and antiproton annihilation cross sections for very low-energy H{sub 2}+H-bar scattering.

  12. Self-consistent static analysis of using nested-well plasma traps for achieving antihydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Dolliver, D. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    1999-12-10

    The use of a Malmberg-Penning type trap with nested electric potential wells to confine overlapping antiproton and positron plasmas for the purpose of producing low temperature antihydrogen is studied. Two approaches for confining antiproton and positron plasmas with a region of overlap are considered. In one approach the two components have a large temperature difference. In the other, one of the components is in a nonequilibrium 'antishielding' plasma state. A finite differences algorithm is used to solve Poisson's equation based on a simultaneous overrelaxation numerical approach. Self-consistent numerical results for required trap potentials and possible particle density profiles are presented.

  13. Redistributing populations of Rydberg atoms with half-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.X.; Collins, L.A.

    2004-04-01

    Expanding the wave function in terms of eigenstates, we calculated the population redistribution of high-Rydberg hydrogen atoms under the interactions of external time-dependent electromagnetic fields. Our numerical results show that populations of Rydberg atoms can be driven down to lower n levels with a train of half-cycle pulses. Oscillations of the Rydberg population through both n levels and l levels are observed during these interactions. The approach may have applications in providing an effective mechanism for producing near ground-state atoms from the initially high-Rydberg distributions found in recombining ultracold plasmas such as encountered in the antihydrogen trapping experiments at CERN.

  14. Comparative analysis of theories of relativistic photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Bahman; Gordon, Daniel; Palastro, John

    2015-11-01

    Laser-plasma experiments routinely rely on photoionization for plasma formation. For large laser intensities or for high-Z atoms relativistic effects become important. We investigate a unique regime of relativistic photoionization from high-Z atoms where relativistic effects modify both the bound and continuum electronic states. Theories of photoionization are based on the imaginary time method and the S-matrix method, amongst others. We compare the results of these approaches for both the Dirac and the Klein-Gordon equations. Analytical results for the momentum distribution of ejected electrons and ionization rate are presented and compared with those from numerical solutions. Work supported by the Department of Energy and the NRL Base Program.

  15. Static electric multipole susceptibilities of the relativistic hydrogenlike atom in the ground state: Application of the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmytkowski, Radosław; Łukasik, Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    The ground state of the Dirac one-electron atom, placed in a weak, static electric field of definite 2L polarity, is studied within the framework of the first-order perturbation theory. The Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function [R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30, 825 (1997), 10.1088/0953-4075/30/4/007; erratum R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30, 2747 (1997), 10.1088/0953-4075/30/11/023] is used to derive closed-form analytical expressions for various far-field and near-nucleus static electric multipole susceptibilities of the atom. The far-field multipole susceptibilities—the polarizabilities αL, the electric-to-magnetic cross susceptibilities αE L →M (L ∓1 ), and the electric-to-toroidal-magnetic cross susceptibilities αE L →T L —are found to be expressible in terms of one or two nonterminating generalized hypergeometric functions F2 with the unit argument. Counterpart formulas for the near-nucleus multipole susceptibilities—the electric nuclear shielding constants σEL→E L, the near-nucleus electric-to-magnetic cross susceptibilities σE L →M (L ∓1 ), and the near-nucleus electric-to-toroidal-magnetic cross susceptibilities σE L →T L —involve one or two terminating F2(1 ) series and for each L may be rewritten in terms of elementary functions. Numerical values of the far-field dipole, quadrupole, octupole, and hexadecapole susceptibilities are provided for selected hydrogenic ions. The effect of a declared uncertainty in the CODATA 2014 recommended value of the fine-structure constant α on the accuracy of numerical results is investigated. Analytical quasirelativistic approximations, valid to the second order in α Z , where Z is the nuclear charge number, are also derived for all types of the far-field and near-nucleus susceptibilities considered in the paper.

  16. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aucar, I. Agustín Gomez, Sergio S.; Giribet, Claudia G.; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C.

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH{sup +} (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH{sup +} systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  17. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S; Giribet, Claudia G; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH(+) (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH(+) systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  18. Magnetic trapping of long-lived cold Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-H; Guest, J R; Povilus, A P; Hansis, E; Raithel, G

    2005-12-01

    We report on the trapping of long-lived strongly magnetized Rydberg atoms. 85Rb atoms are laser cooled and collected in a superconducting magnetic trap with a strong bias field (2.9 T) and laser excited to Rydberg states. Collisions scatter a small fraction of the Rydberg atoms into long-lived high-angular momentum "guiding-center" Rydberg states, which are magnetically trapped. The Rydberg atomic cloud is examined using a time-delayed, position-sensitive probe. We observe magnetic trapping of these Rydberg atoms for times up to 200 ms. Oscillations of the Rydberg-atom cloud in the trap reveal an average magnetic moment of the trapped Rydberg atoms of approximately -8microB. These results provide guidance for other Rydberg-atom trapping schemes and illuminate a possible route for trapping antihydrogen.

  19. Magnetic Trapping of Long-Lived Cold Rydberg Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-H.; Guest, J.R.; Povilus, A.P.; Hansis, E.; Raithel, G.

    2005-12-09

    We report on the trapping of long-lived strongly magnetized Rydberg atoms. {sup 85}Rb atoms are laser cooled and collected in a superconducting magnetic trap with a strong bias field (2.9 T) and laser excited to Rydberg states. Collisions scatter a small fraction of the Rydberg atoms into long-lived high-angular momentum 'guiding-center' Rydberg states, which are magnetically trapped. The Rydberg atomic cloud is examined using a time-delayed, position-sensitive probe. We observe magnetic trapping of these Rydberg atoms for times up to 200 ms. Oscillations of the Rydberg-atom cloud in the trap reveal an average magnetic moment of the trapped Rydberg atoms of {approx_equal}-8{mu}{sub B}. These results provide guidance for other Rydberg-atom trapping schemes and illuminate a possible route for trapping antihydrogen.

  20. Formation of positron-atom bound states in collisions between Rydberg Ps and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, A. R.; Cassidy, D. B.; Deller, A.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2016-05-01

    Predicted 20 years ago, positron binding to neutral atoms has not yet been observed experimentally. A scheme is proposed to detect positron-atom bound states by colliding Rydberg positronium (Ps) with neutral atoms. Estimates of the charge-transfer reaction cross section are obtained using the first Born approximation for a selection of neutral atom targets and a wide range of incident Ps energies and principal quantum numbers. We also estimate the corresponding Ps ionization cross section. The accuracy of the calculations is tested by comparison with earlier predictions for charge transfer in Ps collisions with hydrogen and antihydrogen. We describe an existing Rydberg Ps beam suitable for producing positron-atom bound states and estimate signal rates based on the calculated cross sections and realistic experimental parameters. We conclude that the proposed methodology is capable of producing such states and of testing theoretical predictions of their binding energies.

  1. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  2. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  3. Formation of antihydrogen in the ground state and {ital n}=2 level

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S.; Biswas, R.; Sinha, C.

    1995-05-01

    The cross sections of antihydrogen formation in the ground state and {ital n}=2 level by the impact of antiprotons on the ground state of positronium have been calculated under the framework of the eikonal approximation for incident energy of 30--1000 keV. The excited-state capture cross sections are quite appreciable and are even larger than the ground-state cross sections for impact energies {le}75 keV. The total eikonal cross sections ({sigma}={sigma}{sub 1{ital s}}+{sigma}{sub 2{ital s}}+{sigma}{sub 2{ital p}}) are always higher than the corresponding first-order Born approximation cross section throughout the present energy span.

  4. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  5. Relativistic corrections to the nuclear Schiff moment

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, V.F.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2005-06-01

    Parity- and time-invariance-violating (P,T-odd) atomic electric dipole moments (EDM) are induced by the interaction between atomic electrons and nuclear P,T-odd moments, which are themselves produced by P,T-odd nuclear forces. The nuclear EDM is screened by atomic electrons. The EDM of a nonrelativistic atom with closed electron subshells is induced by the nuclear Schiff moment. For heavy relativistic atoms EDM is induced by the nuclear local dipole moments, which differ by 10-50% from the Schiff moments calculated previously. We calculate the local dipole moments for {sup 199}Hg and {sup 205}Tl where the most accurate atomic [Romalis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2505 (2001)] and molecular [Cho et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 2559 (1989); Phys. Rev. A 44, 2783 (1991)] EDM measurements have been performed.

  6. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  7. The effect of an anti-hydrogen bond on Fermi resonance: A Raman spectroscopic study of the Fermi doublet ν1-ν12 of liquid pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-Fei; Gao, Shu-Qin; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Li, Zuo-Wei

    2012-08-01

    The effects of an anti-hydrogen bond on the ν1-ν12 Fermi resonance (FR) of pyridine are experimentally investigated by using Raman scattering spectroscopy. Three systems, pyridine/water, pyridine/formamide, and pyridine/carbon tetrachloride, provide varying degrees of strength for the diluent-pyridine anti-hydrogen bond complex. Water forms a stronger anti-hydrogen bond with pyridine than with formamide, and in the case of adding non-polar solvent carbon tetrachloride, which is neither a hydrogen bond donor nor an acceptor and incapable of forming a hydrogen bond with pyridine, the intermolecular distance of pyridine will increase and the interaction of pyridine molecules will reduce. The dilution studies are performed on the three systems. Comparing with the values of the Fermi coupling coefficient W of the ring breathing mode ν1 and triangle mode ν12 of pyridine at different volume concentrations, which are calculated according to the Bertran equations, in three systems, we find that the solution with the strongest anti-hydrogen bond, water, shows the fastest change in the ν1-ν12 Fermi coupling coefficient W with the volume concentration varying, followed by the formamide and carbon tetrachloride solutions. These results suggest that the stronger anti-hydrogen bond-forming effect will cause a greater reduction in the strength of the ν1-ν12 FR of pyridine. According to the mechanism of the formation of an anti-hydrogen bond in the complexes and the FR theory, a qualitative explanation for the anti-hydrogen bond effect in reducing the strength of the ν1-ν12 FR of pyridine is given.

  8. K-shell Ionization of Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaz Uddin, M.; Basak, A. K.

    The total cross-sections of electron impact single K-shell ionization of C, N, O, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ga, Ge and Zr atoms are computed using the previously propounded relativistic and non-relativistic BED, relativistic DM and Gryzinski models. We also propose a hybrid RDM model combining the relativistic component of the Gryzinski model with the non-relativistic DM model. The calculated cross-sections are compared to the available experimental data as well as some predictions, made by Khare et al., from the plane wave Born approximation theory.

  9. Relativistic decay widths of autoionization processes: The relativistic FanoADC-Stieltjes method

    SciTech Connect

    Fasshauer, Elke; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Pernpointner, Markus

    2015-04-14

    Electronic decay processes of ionized systems are, for example, the Auger decay or the Interatomic/ Intermolecular Coulombic Decay. In both processes, an energetically low lying vacancy is filled by an electron of an energetically higher lying orbital and a secondary electron is instantaneously emitted to the continuum. Whether or not such a process occurs depends both on the energetic accessibility and the corresponding lifetime compared to the lifetime of competing decay mechanisms. We present a realization of the non-relativistically established FanoADC-Stieltjes method for the description of autoionization decay widths including relativistic effects. This procedure, being based on the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction (ADC), was adapted to the relativistic framework and implemented into the relativistic quantum chemistry program package Dirac. It is, in contrast to other existing relativistic atomic codes, not limited to the description of autoionization lifetimes in spherically symmetric systems, but is instead also applicable to molecules and clusters. We employ this method to the Auger processes following the Kr3d{sup −1}, Xe4d{sup −1}, and Rn5d{sup −1} ionization. Based on the results, we show a pronounced influence of mainly scalar-relativistic effects on the decay widths of autoionization processes.

  10. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  11. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  12. Relativistic Quantum Scars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Akis, Richard

    2009-07-31

    The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

  13. Exact Relativistic `Antigravity' Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin S.

    2006-01-01

    The Schwarzschild solution is used to find the exact relativistic motion of a payload in the gravitational field of a mass moving with constant velocity. At radial approach or recession speeds faster than 3-1/2 times the speed of light, even a small mass gravitationally repels a payload. At relativistic speeds, a suitable mass can quickly propel a heavy payload from rest nearly to the speed of light with negligible stresses on the payload.

  14. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-15

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  15. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  16. Atomic Physics with Ultra-Slow/Trapped Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2005-03-17

    Recently, slow and ultra-slow antiprotons are now available, which will open a new field of research in atomic physics as well as in related fields. In realizing this, the combination of an RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) and a large multi-ring trap (MRT) installed in a super-conducting solenoid has been employed. Several million antiprotons have already been accumulated, and a mono-energetic antiproton beam of 10 eV has been extracted and transported through a specially designed beam line. A couple of basic experiments which get feasible by the developments of ultra slow antiproton beam are discussed, which include ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes and also to study spectroscopic nature of various meta-stable antiprotonic atoms under single collision conditions. A so-called cusp trap configuration is also discussed, which could for the first time synthesize intense spin-polarized antihydrogen beams. At the same time, it could trap antihydrogen atoms for a macroscopic time.

  17. A relativistic analysis of clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The relativistic conversion between coordinate time and atomic time is reformulated to allow simpler time calculations relating analysis in solar-system barycentric coordinates (using coordinate time) with earth-fixed observations (measuring earth-bound proper time or atomic time.) After an interpretation of terms, this simplified formulation, which has a rate accuracy of about 10 to the minus 15th power, is used to explain the conventions required in the synchronization of a world wide clock network and to analyze two synchronization techniques-portable clocks and radio interferometry. Finally, pertinent experiment tests of relativity are briefly discussed in terms of the reformulated time conversion.

  18. SAMPEX Relativistic Microbursts Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Comess, M.; Smith, D. M.; Selesnick, R. S.; Sample, J. G.; Millan, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Relativistic (>1 MeV) electron microburst precipitation is thought to account for significant relativistic electron loss. We present the statistical and spectral analysis of relativistic microbursts observed by the Proton/Electron Telescope (PET) on board the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer(SAMPEX) satellite from 1992 to 2004. Spectrally we find that microbursts are well fit by an exponential energy distribution in the 0.5-4 MeV range with a spectral e-folding energy of E0 < 375 keV. We also discuss the comparison of morning microbursts with events at midnight, which were first identified as microbursts by O'Brien et al. (2004). Finally, we compare the loss-rates due to microbursts and non-microburst precipitation during storm times and averaged over all times.

  19. Relativistic Weierstrass random walks.

    PubMed

    Saa, Alberto; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    The Weierstrass random walk is a paradigmatic Markov chain giving rise to a Lévy-type superdiffusive behavior. It is well known that special relativity prevents the arbitrarily high velocities necessary to establish a superdiffusive behavior in any process occurring in Minkowski spacetime, implying, in particular, that any relativistic Markov chain describing spacetime phenomena must be essentially Gaussian. Here, we introduce a simple relativistic extension of the Weierstrass random walk and show that there must exist a transition time t{c} delimiting two qualitative distinct dynamical regimes: the (nonrelativistic) superdiffusive Lévy flights, for trelativistic) Gaussian diffusion, for t>t{c} . Implications of this crossover between different diffusion regimes are discussed for some explicit examples. The study of such an explicit and simple Markov chain can shed some light on several results obtained in much more involved contexts. PMID:20866862

  20. Relativistic Bursian diode equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ender, A. Y.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Schamel, H.

    2011-03-15

    A comprehensive study of steady-states of a planar vacuum diode driven by a cold relativistic electron beam is presented. The emitter electric field as a characteristic function for their existence is evaluated in dependence of the diode length, the applied potential V, and the relativistic beam factor at injection {gamma}{sub 0}. It is used to classify the different branches of possible solutions, which encompass electron flows that are (i) transmitted through the diode completely, (ii) partially reflected from a virtual cathode (VC) either within the diode region or at the collector side, and (iii) reflected totally. As a byproduct, the V and {gamma}{sub 0} dependences of both bifurcation points of the minimum potential and of the transmitted current are obtained and the ultrarelativistic limit, {gamma}{sub 0}>>1, is performed. In this highly relativistic regime, the density of electrons appears to be constant across the diode region except for a small area around the VC.

  1. Relativistic Weierstrass random walks.

    PubMed

    Saa, Alberto; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    The Weierstrass random walk is a paradigmatic Markov chain giving rise to a Lévy-type superdiffusive behavior. It is well known that special relativity prevents the arbitrarily high velocities necessary to establish a superdiffusive behavior in any process occurring in Minkowski spacetime, implying, in particular, that any relativistic Markov chain describing spacetime phenomena must be essentially Gaussian. Here, we introduce a simple relativistic extension of the Weierstrass random walk and show that there must exist a transition time t{c} delimiting two qualitative distinct dynamical regimes: the (nonrelativistic) superdiffusive Lévy flights, for trelativistic) Gaussian diffusion, for t>t{c} . Implications of this crossover between different diffusion regimes are discussed for some explicit examples. The study of such an explicit and simple Markov chain can shed some light on several results obtained in much more involved contexts.

  2. Cross section for Rydberg antihydrogen production via charge exchange between Rydberg positroniums and antiprotons in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnický, D.; Caravita, R.; Canali, C.; Testera, G.

    2016-08-01

    The antihydrogen formation by charge exchange between cold antiprotons and Rydberg positronium Ps* is studied by using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. In the absence of external magnetic field the cross section scaled by the fourth power of the Ps* principal quantum number nPs shows a universal behavior as a function of the ratio kv between the velocity of the Ps center of mass and that of the positron in the classical circular orbit. At low velocity, below about kv≃0.2 -0.3 , we show for Rydberg positronium that the cross section increases as 1 /kv2 or, in an equivalent way, as 1 /EPs cm with EPs cm being the Ps* center-of-mass energy. In this regime the distribution of the principal quantum number of the antihydrogen state is narrow and it shows a peak at about √{2}nPs while at higher kv values a broad distribution of antihydrogen states is produced. The study of the collision process in the presence of moderate magnetic field (0.5-2 T) shows that there is an experimentally interesting region of kv with the cross section slightly higher than that in the absence of field. However the presence of a magnetic field changes significantly the cross section behavior as a function of kv, especially at low velocities, where reductions of the cross sections and deviations from the 1 /kv2 (1 /EPs cm) are observed. Our calculations show a dependance of the cross section upon the angle between the magnetic field and the flight direction of the incoming Ps*.

  3. Cross section for Rydberg antihydrogen production via charge exchange between Rydberg positroniums and antiprotons in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnický, D.; Caravita, R.; Canali, C.; Testera, G.

    2016-08-01

    The antihydrogen formation by charge exchange between cold antiprotons and Rydberg positronium Ps* is studied by using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. In the absence of external magnetic field the cross section scaled by the fourth power of the Ps* principal quantum number nPs shows a universal behavior as a function of the ratio kv between the velocity of the Ps center of mass and that of the positron in the classical circular orbit. At low velocity, below about kv≃0.2 -0.3 , we show for Rydberg positronium that the cross section increases as 1 /kv2 or, in an equivalent way, as 1 /EPs cm with EPs cm being the Ps* center-of-mass energy. In this regime the distribution of the principal quantum number of the antihydrogen state is narrow and it shows a peak at about √{2}nPs while at higher kv values a broad distribution of antihydrogen states is produced. The study of the collision process in the presence of moderate magnetic field (0.5-2 T) shows that there is an experimentally interesting region of kv with the cross section slightly higher than that in the absence of field. However the presence of a magnetic field changes significantly the cross section behavior as a function of kv, especially at low velocities, where reductions of the cross sections and deviations from the 1 /kv2 (1 /EPs cm) are observed. Our calculations show a dependance of the cross section upon the angle between the magnetic field and the flight direction of the incoming Ps*.

  4. Perspective: relativistic effects.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-04-21

    This perspective article discusses some broadly-known and some less broadly-known consequences of Einstein's special relativity in quantum chemistry, and provides a brief outline of the theoretical methods currently in use, along with a discussion of recent developments and selected applications. The treatment of the electron correlation problem in relativistic quantum chemistry methods, and expanding the reach of the available relativistic methods to calculate all kinds of energy derivative properties, in particular spectroscopic and magnetic properties, requires on-going efforts. PMID:22519307

  5. Relativistic nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of three distinct approaches to the construction of relativistic dynamical models: (1) Relativistic canonical quantum mechanics. (The Hilbert space of states is independent of the interactions, which are introduced by modifying the energy operator.) (2) Hilbert spaces of manifestly covariant wave functions. (The interactions modify the metric of the Hilbert space.) (3) Covariant Green functions. In each of the three approaches the focus is on the formulation of the two-body dynamics, and problems in the construction of the corresponding many-body dynamics are discussed briefly. 21 refs.

  6. Perspective: relativistic effects.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-04-21

    This perspective article discusses some broadly-known and some less broadly-known consequences of Einstein's special relativity in quantum chemistry, and provides a brief outline of the theoretical methods currently in use, along with a discussion of recent developments and selected applications. The treatment of the electron correlation problem in relativistic quantum chemistry methods, and expanding the reach of the available relativistic methods to calculate all kinds of energy derivative properties, in particular spectroscopic and magnetic properties, requires on-going efforts.

  7. Extension of the binary-encounter-dipole model to relativistic incident electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Ki; Santos, José Paulo; Parente, Fernando

    2000-11-01

    Formulas for the total ionization cross section by electron impact based on the binary-encounter-dipole (BED) model and its simpler version, the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) model are extended to relativistic incident electron energies. Total ionization cross sections for the hydrogen and helium atoms from the new relativistic formulas are compared to experimental data. Relativistic effects double the total ionization cross section of H and He at incident electron energy ~300 keV and dominate the cross section thereafter. A simple modification of the original BED-BEB formulas is proposed for applications to ion targets and inner-shell electrons of neutral atoms and molecules. The relativistic and nonrelativistic BEB cross sections are compared to the K-shell ionization cross sections by electron impact for the carbon, argon, nickel, niobium, and silver atoms. For carbon and argon, the relativistic effects are small, and both forms of the BEB cross sections agree well with available experimental data. For the nickel and heavier atoms, the relativistic increase of cross sections becomes noticeable from about 100 keV and higher in the incident electron energy. The empirical formula by Casnati et al. [J. Phys. B 15, 155 (1982)] after correcting for relativistic effects as shown by Quarles [Phys. Rev. A 13, 1278 (1976)] agrees well with the BEB cross sections for light atoms. However, the peak values of the Casnati cross sections become higher than the relativistic BEB peak cross sections as the atomic number increases. The BEB model is also applied to the total ionization cross section of the xenon atom, and the theory agrees well with experiments at low incident electron energies, but disagrees with experiment at relativistic incident energies.

  8. Crystallization and collapse in relativistically degenerate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, it is shown that a mass density limit exists beyond which the relativistically degenerate matter would crystallize. The mass density limit, found here, is quite analogous to the mass limit predicted by Chandrasekhar for a type of compact stars called white dwarfs (M{sub Ch} Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.43 Solar Mass). In this study, the old problem of white dwarf core collapse, which has been previously investigated by Chandrasekhar using hydrostatic stability criteria, is revisited in the framework of the quantum hydrodynamics model by inspection of the charge screening at atomic scales in the relativistic degeneracy plasma regime taking into account the relativistic Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron interaction features such as the quantum statistical pressure, Coulomb attraction, electron exchange-correlation, and quantum recoil effects. It is revealed that the existence of ion correlation and crystallization of matter in the relativistically degenerate plasma puts a critical mass density limit on white dwarf core region. It is shown that a white dwarf star with a core mass density beyond this critical limit can undergo the spontaneous core collapse (SCC). The SCC phenomenon, which is dominantly caused by the electron quantum recoil effect (interference and localization of the electron wave function), leads to a new exotic state of matter. In such exotic state, the relativistic electron degeneracy can lead the white dwarf crystallized core to undergo the nuclear fusion and an ultimate supernova by means of the volume reduction (due to the enhanced compressibility) and huge energy release (due to the increase in cohesive energy), under the stars huge inward gravitational pressure. Moreover, it is found that the SCC phenomenon is significantly affected by the core composition (it is more probable for heavier plasmas). The critical mass density found here is consistent with the values calculated for core density of typical white dwarf stars.

  9. Scattering of H(1s) off metastable helium atom at thermal energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-06-15

    Quantal calculations for scattering of ground-state antihydrogen by metastable (n=2S) helium atoms have been performed using the nonadiabatic, atomic orbital expansion technique at thermal energies. The zero-energy elastic cross sections of the present systems are much greater than the corresponding value for the ground-state helium target. The low-energy elastic cross section for the singlet metastable helium [He(2 {sup 1}S)] target is higher than the corresponding value when the target is in the metastable triplet state [He(2 {sup 3}S)].

  10. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  11. The Relativistic Rocket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  12. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  13. Relativistic timescale analysis suggests lunar theory revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.

    1995-01-01

    The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by observing the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.

  14. Relativistic effects on x-ray structure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batke, Kilian; Eickerling, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Today, combined experimental and theoretical charge density studies based on quantum chemical calculations and x-ray diffraction experiments allow for the investigation of the topology of the electron density at subatomic resolution. When studying compounds containing transition metal elements, relativistic effects need to be adequately taken into account not only in quantum chemical calculations of the total electron density ρ ({r}), but also for the atomic scattering factors employed to extract ρ ({r}) from experimental x-ray diffraction data. In the present study, we investigate the magnitude of relativistic effects on x-ray structure factors and for this purpose {F}({{r}}*) have been calculated for the model systems M(C2H2) (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) from four-component molecular wave functions. Relativistic effects are then discussed by a comparison to structure factors obtained from a non-relativistic reference and different quasi-relativistic approximations. We show, that the overall effects of relativity on the structure factors on average amount to 0.81%, 1.51% and 2.78% for the three model systems under investigation, but that for individual reflections or reflection series the effects can be orders of magnitude larger. Employing the quasi-relativistic Douglas-Kroll-Hess second order or the zeroth order regular approximation Hamiltonian takes these effects into account to a large extend, reducing the differences between the (quasi-)relativistic and the non-relativistic result by one order of magnitude. In order to further determine the experimental significance of the results, the magnitude of the relativistic effects is compared to the changes of the model structure factor data when charge transfer and chemical bonding is taken into account by a multipolar expansion of {F}({{r}}*).

  15. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2014-07-15

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  16. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Heavy Elements: Interatomic potentials and Lines Shift for Systems 'Alkali Elements-Inert Gases'

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O.; Gurnitskaya, E.; Loboda, A.; Mischenko, E.

    2009-03-09

    New relativistic approach, based on the gauge-invariant perturbation theory (PT) with using the optimized wave functions basis's, is applied to calculating the inter atomic potentials, hyper fine structure (hfs) collision shift for alkali atoms in atmosphere of inert gases. Data for inter atomic potentials, collision shifts of the Rb and Cs atoms in atmosphere of the inert gas He are presented.

  17. Relativistic Pseudospin Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N.

    2011-05-06

    We show that the pseudospin symmetry that Akito Arima discovered many years ago (with collaborators) is a symmetry of the the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of the scalar and vector potentials are a constant. In this paper we discuss some of the implications of this relativistic symmetry and the experimental data that support these predictions. In his original paper Akito also discussed pseudo-U(3) symmetry. We show that pseudo-U(3) symmetry is a symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of harmonic oscillator vector and scalar potentials are equal to a constant, and we give the generators of pseudo-U(3) symmetry. Going beyond the mean field we summarize new results on non relativistic shell model Hamiltonians that have pseudospin symmetry and pseudo-orbital angular momentum symmetry as a dynamical symmetries.

  18. Relativistic multiwave Cerenkov generators

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, S.P.; Cherepenin, V.A.; Kanavets, V.I.; Klimov, A.I.; Kopenkin, A.D.; Koshelev, V.I.; Popov, V.A.; Slepkov, A.I. )

    1990-06-01

    A review of research on relativistic multiwave Cherenkov generators (MWCG) is provided. Presented is the linear theory of these devices, allowing a detailed description of multiwave interaction of a relativistic electron beam with an electromagnetic field in an electro-dynamic superdimensional MWCG system. The results of theoretical research on the starting parameters of generation, power flows, and the structure of the radiated field in a MWCG of a 3-cm-wave band are reported. The experiments on obtaining and investigating high-power pulses of microwave radiation in a MWCG of 3-cm- and 8-mm-wavelength bands are described. In particular, the results of research on a MWCG with the power of 15 GW in a 3-cm-wavelength band and the power of 3 GW in a 8-mm-wavelength band are presented. The results of research of spatial and temporal coherence of such generator radiation are reported.

  19. Relativistic shell model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnstahl, R. J.

    1986-06-01

    Shell model calculations are discussed in the context of a relativistic model of nuclear structure based on renormalizable quantum field theories of mesons and baryons (quantum hadrodynamics). The relativistic Hartree approximation to the full field theory, with parameters determined from bulk properties of nuclear matter, predicts a shell structure in finite nuclei. Particle-hole excitations in finite nuclei are described in an RPA calculation based on this QHD ground state. The particle-hole interaction is prescribed by the Hartree ground state, with no additional parameters. Meson retardation is neglected in deriving the RPA equations, but it is found to have negligible effects on low-lying states. The full Dirac matrix structure is maintained throughout the calculation; no nonrelativistic reductions are made. Despite sensitive cancellations in the ground state calculation, reasonable excitation spectra are obtained for light nuclei. The effects of including charged mesons, problems with heavy nuclei, and prospects for improved and extended calculations are discussed.

  20. Relativistic electrons in space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simnett, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning relativistic electrons, above 0.3 MeV, in interplanetary space, as measured by detectors on board satellites operating beyond the influence of the magnetosphere. The electrons have a galactic component, which at the lower energies is subject both to solar modulation and to spasmodic 'quiet time' increases and a direct solar component correlated with flare activity. The recent measurements have established the form of the differential energy spectrum of solar flare electrons. Electrons have been detected from flares behind the visible solar disk. Relativistic electrons do not appear to leave the sun at the time of the flash phase of the flare, although there are several signatures of electron acceleration at this time. The delay is interpreted as taking place during the transport of the electrons through the lower corona.

  1. Dielectric cavity relativistic magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    An alteration in the structure of the A6 relativistic magnetron is proposed, which introduces an extra degree of freedom to its design and enhances many of its quality factors. This modification involves the partial filling of the cavities of the device with a low-loss dielectric material. The operation of a dielectric-filled A6 is simulated; the results indicate single-mode operation at the desired π mode and a substantially cleaner rf spectrum.

  2. Closed-form expression for the magnetic shielding constant of the relativistic hydrogenlike atom in an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate: Application of the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefańska, Patrycja

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical derivation of the closed-form expression for the dipole magnetic shielding constant of a Dirac one-electron atom being in an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate. The external magnetic field, by which the atomic state is perturbed, is assumed to be weak, uniform, and time independent. With respect to the atomic nucleus we assume that it is pointlike, spinless, motionless, and of charge Z e . Calculations are based on the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function [R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B 30, 825 (1997), 10.1088/0953-4075/30/4/007; erratum R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B 30, 2747(E) (1997), 10.1088/0953-4075/30/11/023], combined with the theory of hypergeometric functions. The final result is of an elementary form and agrees with corresponding formulas obtained earlier by other authors for some particular states of the atom.

  3. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  4. Point form relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic SU(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klink, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The point form is used as a framework for formulating a relativistic quantum mechanics, with the mass operator carrying the interactions of underlying constituents. A symplectic Lie algebra of mass operators is introduced from which a relativistic harmonic oscillator mass operator is formed. Mass splittings within the degenerate harmonic oscillator levels arise from relativistically invariant spin-spin, spin-orbit, and tensor mass operators. Internal flavor (and color) symmetries are introduced which make it possible to formulate a relativistic SU(6) model of baryons (and mesons). Careful attention is paid to the permutation symmetry properties of the hadronic wave functions, which are written as polynomials in Bargmann spaces.

  5. Duskside relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentzen, Kirsten Ruth

    1999-10-01

    On August 20, 1996, a balloon-borne X-ray pinhole camera and a high resolution germanium X-ray spectrometer observed an intense X-ray event near Kiruna, Sweden, at 1835 MLT, on an L-shell of 5.8. This X-ray event consisted of seven bursts spaced 100-200 seconds apart, with smaller 10-20 second variations observed within individual bursts. The energy spectra of these bursts show the presence of X-rays with energies greater than 1 MeV, which are best accounted for by atmospheric bremsstrahlung from mono-energetic 1.7 MeV precipitating electrons. The X-ray imager observed no significant motion or small-scale spatial structure in the event, implying that the bursts were temporal in nature. Ultra- violet images from the Polar satellite and energetic particle data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites show a small magnetospheric substorm onset about 24 minutes before the start of the relativistic precipitation event. Since the balloon was south of the auroral oval and there was no associated increase in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous altitude, the event must be the result of some mechanism selectively precipitating ambient relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. The balloon X-ray observations are analyzed in a magnetospheric context, in order to determine which of several mechanisms for selective precipitation of relativistic electrons can account for the event. Resonance with electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode waves on the equator is the most likely candidate. The drift of substorm-injected warm protons is calculated using input from the geosynchronous satellites. Wave growth in the model is driven by temperature anisotropies in the warm proton population. A numerical solution of the wave dispersion relation shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can be excited in high-density duskside regions such as the plasmasphere or detached plasma regions. These waves can selectively precipitate relativistic electrons of energy 1.7 MeV in

  6. Electron correlation energies in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Shane Patrick

    This dissertation is a study of electron correlation energies Ec in atoms. (1) Accurate values of E c are computed for isoelectronic sequences of "Coulomb-Hooke" atoms with varying mixtures of Coulombic and Hooke character. (2) Coupled-cluster calculations in carefully designed basis sets are combined with fully converged second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) computations to obtain fairly accurate, non-relativistic Ec values for the 12 closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn. The complete basis-set (CBS) limits of MP2 energies are obtained for open-shell atoms by computations in very large basis sets combined with a knowledge of the MP2/CBS limit for the next larger closed-shell atom with the same valence shell structure. Then higher-order correlation corrections are found by coupled-cluster calculations using basis sets that are not quite as large. The method is validated for the open-shell atoms from Al to Cl and then applied to get E c values, probably accurate to 3%, for the 4th-period open-shell atoms: K, Sc-Cu, and Ga-Br. (3) The results show that, contrary to quantum chemical folklore, MP2 overestimates |Ec| for atoms beyond Fe. Spin-component scaling arguments are used to provide a simple explanation for this overestimation. (4) Eleven non-relativistic density functionals, including some of the most widely-used ones, are tested on their ability to predict non-relativistic, electron correlation energies for atoms and their cations. They all lead to relatively poor predictions for the heavier atoms. Several novel, few-parameter, density functionals for the correlation energy are developed heuristically. Four new functionals lead to improved predictions for the 4th-period atoms without unreasonably compromising accuracy for the lighter atoms. (5) Simple models describing the variation of E c with atomic number are developed.

  7. Distinct optical properties of relativistically degenerate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, we use the collisional quantum magnetohydrodynamic (CQMHD) model to derive the transverse dielectric function of a relativistically degenerate electron fluid and investigate various optical parameters, such as the complex refractive index, the reflection and absorption coefficients, the skin-depth and optical conductivity. In this model we take into accounts effects of many parameters such as the atomic-number of the constituent ions, the electron exchange, electron diffraction effect and the electron-ion collisions. Study of the optical parameters in the solid-density, the warm-dense-matter, the big-planetary core, and the compact star number-density regimes reveals that there are distinct differences between optical characteristics of the latter and the former cases due to the fundamental effects of the relativistic degeneracy and other quantum mechanisms. It is found that in the relativistic degeneracy plasma regime, such as found in white-dwarfs and neutron star crusts, matter possess a much sharper and well-defined step-like reflection edge beyond the x-ray electromagnetic spectrum, including some part of gamma-ray frequencies. It is also remarked that the magnetic field intensity only significantly affects the plasma reflectivity in the lower number-density regime, rather than the high density limit. Current investigation confirms the profound effect of relativistic degeneracy on optical characteristics of matter and can provide an important plasma diagnostic tool for studying the physical processes within the wide scope of quantum plasma regimes be it the solid-density, inertial-confined, or astrophysical compact stars.

  8. Relativistic interactions and realistic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, T.; Madland, D.; Manakos, P.; Mannel, T.; Nikolaus, B.A.; Strottman, D. |

    1992-12-31

    A four-fermion-coupling Lagrangian (relativistic Skyrme-type) interaction has been proposed for relativistic nuclear structure calculations. This interaction, which has the merit of simplicity, is from the outset tailored as an effective interaction for relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. Various extensions of such a model are discussed and compared with Walecka`s meson-nucleon mean field approach. We also present results of the calculation of nuclear ground state properties with an extended (density dependent) version of the four fermion interaction in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation.

  9. The relativist stance.

    PubMed

    Rössler, O E; Matsuno, K

    1998-04-01

    The two mindsets of absolutism and relativism are juxtaposed, and the relational or relativist stance is vindicated. The only 'absolute' entity which undeniably exists, consciousness has the reality of a dream. The escape hatch from this prison is relational, as Descartes and Levinas found out: Unfalsified relational consistency implies exteriority. Exteriority implies infinite power which in turn makes compassion inevitable. Aside from ethics as a royal way to enlightenment, a new technology called 'deep technology' may be accessible. It changes the whole world in a demonstrable fashion by manipulation of the micro frame--that is, the observer-world interface.

  10. Relativistic quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. B.; Ralph, T. C.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past few years, a new field of high research intensity has emerged that blends together concepts from gravitational physics and quantum computing. Known as relativistic quantum information, or RQI, the field aims to understand the relationship between special and general relativity and quantum information. Since the original discoveries of Hawking radiation and the Unruh effect, it has been known that incorporating the concepts of quantum theory into relativistic settings can produce new and surprising effects. However it is only in recent years that it has become appreciated that the basic concepts involved in quantum information science undergo significant revision in relativistic settings, and that new phenomena arise when quantum entanglement is combined with relativity. A number of examples illustrate that point. Quantum teleportation fidelity is affected between observers in uniform relative acceleration. Entanglement is an observer-dependent property that is degraded from the perspective of accelerated observers moving in flat spacetime. Entanglement can also be extracted from the vacuum of relativistic quantum field theories, and used to distinguish peculiar motion from cosmological expansion. The new quantum information-theoretic framework of quantum channels in terms of completely positive maps and operator algebras now provides powerful tools for studying matters of causality and information flow in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. This focus issue provides a sample of the state of the art in research in RQI. Some of the articles in this issue review the subject while others provide interesting new results that will stimulate further research. What makes the subject all the more exciting is that it is beginning to enter the stage at which actual experiments can be contemplated, and some of the articles appearing in this issue discuss some of these exciting new developments. The subject of RQI pulls together concepts and ideas from

  11. The relativist stance.

    PubMed

    Rössler, O E; Matsuno, K

    1998-04-01

    The two mindsets of absolutism and relativism are juxtaposed, and the relational or relativist stance is vindicated. The only 'absolute' entity which undeniably exists, consciousness has the reality of a dream. The escape hatch from this prison is relational, as Descartes and Levinas found out: Unfalsified relational consistency implies exteriority. Exteriority implies infinite power which in turn makes compassion inevitable. Aside from ethics as a royal way to enlightenment, a new technology called 'deep technology' may be accessible. It changes the whole world in a demonstrable fashion by manipulation of the micro frame--that is, the observer-world interface. PMID:9648695

  12. Modeling relativistic nuclear collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderlik, C.; Magas, V.; Strottman, D.; Csernai, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Modeling Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisioiis at RHIC and LHC energies using a Multi Module Model is presented. The first Module is the Effective String Rope Model for the calculation of the initial stages of the reaction; the output of this module is used as the initial state for the subsequent one-fluid hydrodynainical calculation module. It is shown that such an initial state leads to the creation of the third flow component. The hydrodynamical evolution of the energy density distribution is presented for RHIC energies. The final module describing the Freeze Out; and Hadronization is also discussed.

  13. relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).

  14. Relativistic and nonrelativistic quarkonium models

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, S.

    1982-11-01

    We propose a quarkonium potential for the Klein-Gordon equation. The relativistic effects are small even for uu-bar and dd-bar systems because the introduction of a scalar constant potential in a Klein-Gordon equation allows a minimization of relativistic effects via cancellations in our model.

  15. Relativistic particle acceleration in plerions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, Jonathan; Tavani, Marco

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent research on the structure and particle acceleration properties of relativistic shock waves in which the magnetic field is transverse to the flow direction in the upstream medium, and whose composition is either pure electrons and positrons or primarily electrons and positrons with an admixture of heavy ions. Particle-in-cell simulation techniques as well as analytic theory have been used to show that such shocks in pure pair plasmas are fully thermalized -- the downstream particle spectra are relativistic Maxwellians at the temperature expected from the jump conditions. On the other hand, shocks containing heavy ions which are a minority constituent by number but which carry most of the energy density in the upstream medium do put approximately 20% of the flow energy into a nonthermal population of pairs downstream, whose distribution in energy space is N(E) varies as E(exp -2), where N(E)dE is the number of particles with energy between E and E+dE. The mechanism of thermalization and particle acceleration is found to be synchrotron maser activity in the shock front, stimulated by the quasi-coherent gyration of the whole particle population as the plasma flowing into the shock reflects from the magnetic field in the shock front. The synchrotron maser modes radiated by the heavy ions are absorbed by the pairs at their (relativistic) cyclotron frequencies, allowing the maximum energy achievable by the pairs to be gamma(sub +/-)m(sub +/-)c squared = m(sub i)c squared gamma(sub 1)/Z(sub i), where gamma(sub 1) is the Lorentz factor of the upstream flow and Z(sub i) is the atomic number of the ions. The shock's spatial structure is shown to contain a series of 'overshoots' in the magnetic field, regions where the gyrating heavy ions compress the magnetic field to levels in excess of the eventual downstream value. This shock model is applied to an interpretation of the structure of the inner regions of the Crab Nebula, in particular to the 'wisps

  16. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  17. Stationary relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with vz≈ c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialised code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres and elucidated the nature of radial oscillations of steady-state jets.

  18. A relativistic trolley paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvejev, Vadim N.; Matvejev, Oleg V.; Grøn, Ø.

    2016-06-01

    We present an apparent paradox within the special theory of relativity, involving a trolley with relativistic velocity and its rolling wheels. Two solutions are given, both making clear the physical reality of the Lorentz contraction, and that the distance on the rails between each time a specific point on the rim touches the rail is not equal to 2 π R , where R is the radius of the wheel, but 2 π R / √{ 1 - R 2 Ω 2 / c 2 } , where Ω is the angular velocity of the wheels. In one solution, the wheel radius is constant as the velocity of the trolley increases, and in the other the wheels contract in the radial direction. We also explain two surprising facts. First that the shape of a rolling wheel is elliptical in spite of the fact that the upper part of the wheel moves faster than the lower part, and thus is more Lorentz contracted, and second that a Lorentz contracted wheel with relativistic velocity rolls out a larger distance between two successive touches of a point of the wheel on the rails than the length of a circle with the same radius as the wheels.

  19. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  20. Relativistic Iron Line Fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, M.; Dauser, T.; Beuchert, T.; Jeffreson, S.; Tawabutr, J.; Wilms, J.; García, J.; Walton, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    The 6.4 keV Iron reflection line possesses strong diagnostic potential for AGN-systems. In the rare case of unobscured AGN, this line receives a contribution from the very center of the accretion flow close to the event horizon that is subject to strong relativistic effects. The shape of this line distortion can be used infer important parameters of the central accretion region, especially the black hole spin parameter a* and the accretion disk inclination i. We analyze several (nine?) bare AGN spectra from the sample of Walton et al. 2012 using high resolution spectra from the XMM and NuStar archives. The relativistic reflection is modeled using the RELXILL code (Dauser 20XX). The newest iteration of the RELXILL model also supports a lamp post geometry for the irradiation of the accretion disk. By combining these detailed models with the wide spectral range of NuStar and XMM/NuStar joint observations we can put tight constraints on the aforementioned parameters and we can constrain the height of the source h in a possible lamp post geometry.

  1. Half-cycle-pulse-train induced state redistribution of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, P. K.; Speck, A.

    2010-01-15

    Population transfer between low-lying Rydberg states independent of the initial state is realized using a train of half-cycle pulses with pulse durations much shorter than the classical orbital period. We demonstrate experimentally the population transfer from initial states around n=50 with 10% of the population de-excited down to n<40 as well as up to the continuum. This is a demonstration of a state-independent de-excitation technique applicable to the currently produced state distribution of antihydrogen. The measured population transfer matches well to a model of the process for one-dimensional atoms.

  2. Relativistic fluid formulation and theory of intense relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siambis, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A new general relativistic fluid formulation has been obtained for intense relativistic electron beams (IREB) with arbitrarily high relativistic mass factor ..gamma... This theory is valid for confined IREB equilibria such as those found inside high energy accelerators as well as in the pinched and ion-focused regimes of beam propagation in plasma channels. The new relativistic fluid formulation is based on the covariant relativistic fluid formulation of Newcomb with the parameter lambda identical to 1, in order to allow for realistic confined equilibria. The resulting equilibrium constraints require that the beam has a slow rotational velocity around its direction of propagation and that the off-diagonal thermal stress element, associated with these two directions of motion, be nonzero. The effective betatron oscillation frequency of the fluid elements of the beam is modified by the radial gradient and anisotropies in the thermal stress elements of the beam fluid. The wave equation, for sausage, hose and filamentation excitations on the relativistic fluid beam, is found to be formally identical to that obtained from the Vlasov equation approach, hence phase-mixing damping is a generic and self-consistent correlate of the new relativistic fluid formulation.

  3. Use of Relativistic Effective Core Potentials in the Calculation of Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, the advantage of using relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) in the calculation of total ionization cross sections of heavy atoms or molecules containing heavy atoms is discussed. Numerical examples for Ar, Kr, Xe, and WF6 are presented.

  4. Relativistic Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Evan; Kwiat, Paul

    2006-03-01

    We present results from a relativistic quantum cryptography system which uses photon storage to avoid bit sifting, in principle doubling the useful key rate. Bob stores the photon he receives from Alice in an optical delay line until she sends him the classical basis information, allowing him to measure every photon in the correct basis. Accounting for loss in our 489-ns storage cavity, we achieve a 66% increase in the BB84 key rate. The same system could be used for even greater gains in either the six-state protocol or cryptography using a larger Hilbert space. We show that the security of this protocol is equivalent to standard BB84: assuming the quantum and classical signals are space-like separated, no eavesdropper bound by special relativity can access both simultaneously.

  5. Relativistic Runaway Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breizman, Boris

    2014-10-01

    This talk covers recent developments in the theory of runaway electrons in a tokamak with an emphasis on highly relativistic electrons produced via the avalanche mechanism. The rapidly growing population of runaway electrons can quickly replace a large part of the initial current carried by the bulk plasma electrons. The magnetic energy associated with this current is typically much greater than the particle kinetic energy. The current of a highly relativistic runaway beam is insensitive to the particle energy, which separates the description of the runaway current evolution from the description of the runaway energy spectrum. A strongly anisotropic distribution of fast electrons is generally prone to high-frequency kinetic instabilities that may cause beneficial enhancement of runaway energy losses. The relevant instabilities are in the frequency range of whistler waves and electron plasma waves. The instability thresholds reported in earlier work have been revised considerably to reflect strong dependence of collisional damping on the wave frequency and the role of plasma non-uniformity, including radial trapping of the excited waves in the plasma. The talk also includes a discussion of enhanced scattering of the runaways as well as the combined effect of enhanced scattering and synchrotron radiation. A noteworthy feature of the avalanche-produced runaway current is a self-sustained regime of marginal criticality: the inductive electric field has to be close to its critical value (representing avalanche threshold) at every location where the runaway current density is finite, and the current density should vanish at any point where the electric field drops below its critical value. This nonlinear Ohm's law enables complete description of the evolving current profile. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DEFG02-04ER54742 and by ITER contract ITER-CT-12-4300000273. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of

  6. Radiative cascade of highly excited hydrogen atoms in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Topcu, Tuerker; Robicheaux, Francis

    2006-04-15

    We have studied the radiative decay of atomic hydrogen in strong magnetic fields of up to 4 T. We have followed the radiative cascade from completely l,m mixed distributions of highly excited states as well as from distributions that involve highly excited states with |m|{approx}n. We have found that the time it takes to populate the ground state is not affected by the magnetic field for the initial states with n < or approx. 20. For higher n manifolds, the electrons in the most negative m states are substantially slowed down by the magnetic field resulting in a much longer lifetime. We show that less than 10% of the antihydrogen atoms with n{approx}35 generated in antihydrogen experiments at 4 K will decay to their ground states before they hit the wall of the vacuum container unless they are trapped. We have also found that the decay time is mainly determined by the fraction of atoms that were initially in highest negative m states due to the fact that only {delta}m+{delta}{pi}=1 transitions are allowed in the magnetic field. We give a semiclassical method for calculating the decay rates for circular states and show that when the initial states have high-m, semiclassical rates agree with the full quantum mechanical rates within a couple of percent for states with effective n > or approx. 20.

  7. Gauge origin independent calculations of molecular magnetisabilities in relativistic four-component theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliaš, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond

    2013-07-01

    The use of magnetic-field dependent London atomic orbitals, also called gauge including atomic orbitals, is known to be an efficient choice for accurate non-relativistic calculations of magnetisabilities. In this work, the appropriate formulas were extended and implemented in the framework of the four-component relativistic linear response method at the self-consistent field single reference level. Benefits of employing the London atomic orbitals in relativistic calculations are illustrated with Hartree-Fock wave functions on the XF3 (X = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) series of molecules. Significantly better convergence of magnetisabilities with respect to the basis set size is observed compared to calculations employing a common gauge origin. In fact, it is mandatory to use London atomic orbitals unless you want to use ridiculously large basis sets. Relativistic effects on magnetisabilities are found to be quite small (<5%) for this particular set of molecules, but should be investigated on a larger set of molecules. We emphasise the breakdown of the connection between the paramagnetic contribution to magnetisabilities and rotational g tensors in the relativistic domain and discuss its origin. Finally, we visualise the magnetisability density which shows markedly atomic features evocative of Pascal's rules.

  8. Some problems in relativistic thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Veitsman, E. V.

    2007-11-15

    The relativistic equations of state for ideal and real gases, as well as for various interface regions, have been derived. These dependences help to eliminate some controversies in the relativistic thermodynamics based on the special theory of relativity. It is shown, in particular, that the temperature of system whose velocity tends to the velocity of light in vacuum varies in accordance with the Ott law T = T{sub 0}/{radical}1 - v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Relativistic dependences for heat and mass transfer, for Ohm's law, and for a viscous flow of a liquid have also been derived.

  9. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  10. Theoretical Studies of Atomic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Charlotte Froese Fischer

    2005-07-08

    Atomic structure calculations were performed for properties such as energy levels, binding energies, transition probabilities, lifetimes, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts. Accurate computational procedures were devised so that properties could be predicted even when they could not be obtained from experiment, and to assist in the identification of observed data. The method used was the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, optionally corrected for relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Fully relativistic Dirac-Fock calculations also were performed using the GRASP code A database of energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities was designed and implemented and, at present, includes many results for Be-like to Ar-like.

  11. Relativistic spectra of bound fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Giachetti, Riccardo; Sorace, Emanuele

    2007-02-27

    A two fermion relativistic invariant wave equation is used for numerical calculations of the hyperfine shifts of the Positronium levels in a Breit interaction scheme. The results agree with known data up to the order {alpha}4.

  12. Simulating relativistic binaries with Whisky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, L.

    We report about our first tests and results in simulating the last phase of the coalescence and the merger of binary relativistic stars. The simulations were performed using our code Whisky and mesh refinement through the Carpet driver.

  13. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  14. Conductivity of a relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Braams, B.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1989-03-01

    The collision operator for a relativistic plasma is reformulated in terms of an expansion in spherical harmonics. This formulation is used to calculate the electrical conductivity. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Scattering in Relativistic Particle Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bievre, Stephan

    The problem of direct interaction in relativistic particle mechanics has been extensively studied and a variety of models has been proposed avoiding the conclusions of the so-called no-interaction theorems. In this thesis we study scattering in the relativistic two-body problem. We use our results to analyse gauge invariance in Hamiltonian constraint models and the uniqueness of the symplectic structure in manifestly covariant relativistic particle mechanics. We first present a general geometric framework that underlies approaches to relativistic particle mechanics. This permits a model-independent and geometric definition of the notions of asymptotic completeness and of Moller and scattering operators. Subsequent analysis of these concepts divides into two parts. First, we study the kinematic properties of the scattering transformation, i.e. those properties that arise solely from the invariance of the theory under the Poincare group. We classify all canonical (symplectic) scattering transformations on the relativistic phase space for two free particles in terms of a single function of the two invariants of the theory. We show how this function is determined by the center of mass time delay and scattering angle and vice versa. The second part of our analysis of the relativistic two-body scattering problem is devoted to the dynamical properties of the scattering process. Hence, we turn to two approaches to relativistic particle mechanics: the Hamiltonian constraint models and the manifestly covariant formalism. Using general geometric arguments, we prove "gauge invariance" of the scattering transformation in the Todorov -Komar Hamiltonian constraint model. We conclude that the scattering cross sections of the Todorov-Komar models have the same angular dependence as their non-relativistic counterpart, irrespective of a choice of gauge. This limits the physical relevance of those models. We present a physically non -trivial Hamiltonian constraint model, starting from

  16. Transport coefficients of a relativistic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, O. J.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a self-consistent transport theory for a relativistic plasma is developed. Using the notation of Braginskii [S. I. Braginskii, in Reviews of Plasma Physics, edited by M. A. Leontovich (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1, p. 174], we provide semianalytical forms of the electrical resistivity, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivity tensors for a Lorentzian plasma in a magnetic field. This treatment is then generalized to plasmas with arbitrary atomic number by numerically solving the linearized Boltzmann equation. The corresponding transport coefficients are fitted by rational functions in order to make them suitable for use in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations and transport calculations. Within the confines of linear transport theory and on the assumption that the plasma is optically thin, our results are valid for temperatures up to a few MeV. By contrast, classical transport theory begins to incur significant errors above kBT ˜10 keV, e.g., the parallel thermal conductivity is suppressed by 15% at kBT =20 keV due to relativistic effects.

  17. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Dyall, Kenneth G; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-21

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  18. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Dyall, Kenneth G.; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  19. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  20. Practical Relativistic Bit Commitment.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, T; Kaniewski, J; Bussières, F; Houlmann, R; Tomamichel, M; Wehner, S; Zbinden, H

    2015-07-17

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which Alice wishes to commit a secret bit to Bob. Perfectly secure bit commitment between two mistrustful parties is impossible through an asynchronous exchange of quantum information. Perfect security is, however, possible when Alice and Bob each split into several agents exchanging classical information at times and locations suitably chosen to satisfy specific relativistic constraints. In this Letter we first revisit a previously proposed scheme [C. Crépeau et al., Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. 7073, 407 (2011)] that realizes bit commitment using only classical communication. We prove that the protocol is secure against quantum adversaries for a duration limited by the light-speed communication time between the locations of the agents. We then propose a novel multiround scheme based on finite-field arithmetic that extends the commitment time beyond this limit, and we prove its security against classical attacks. Finally, we present an implementation of these protocols using dedicated hardware and we demonstrate a 2 ms-long bit commitment over a distance of 131 km. By positioning the agents on antipodal points on the surface of Earth, the commitment time could possibly be extended to 212 ms.

  1. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. P.; Hughes, P. A.

    2009-09-01

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 102-106. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 102 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter’s capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  2. Magnetic Cusp and Electric Nested- or Single-Well Configurations for High Density Antihydrogen and Fusion Nonneutral Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Ordonez

    1999-12-31

    Malmberg-Penning traps have had limited uses for applications that require high density nonneutral plasma confinement. For such traps, the density is severely limited because a magnetic field is used to provide a radially inward force to balance both self-electric and centrifugal radially outward forces. A possible way to confine higher density nonneutral plasmas is to use a magnetic cusp configuration. An annular nonneutral plasma would be confined in the radial magnetic field of a magnetic cusp such that radial confinement is provided by an externally produced electric potential well while axial confinement is provided by the magnetic field. In addition, a radial electric potential profile having a nested-well configuration can be used to simultaneously confine two oppositely signed plasma species (e.g., positrons and antiprotons) that overlap. In the work reported, various aspects of using magnetic cusp configurations and electric nested-well configurations are considered. Plasma confinement with these configurations may be useful for obtaining fast antihydrogen recombination and trapping rates and for achieving practical fusion power production.

  3. Magnetic cusp and electric nested- or single-well configurations for high density antihydrogen and fusion nonneutral plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C. A.

    1999-12-10

    Malmberg-Penning traps have had limited uses for applications that require high density nonneutral plasma confinement. For such traps, the density is severely limited because a magnetic field is used to provide a radially inward force to balance both self-electric and centrifugal radially outward forces. A possible way to confine higher density nonneutral plasmas is to use a magnetic cusp configuration. An annular nonneutral plasma would be confined in the radial magnetic field of a magnetic cusp such that radial confinement is provided by an externally produced electric potential well while axial confinement is provided by the magnetic field. In addition, a radial electric potential profile having a nested-well configuration can be used to simultaneously confine two oppositely signed plasma species (e.g., positrons and antiprotons) that overlap. In the work reported, various aspects of using magnetic cusp configurations and electric nested-well configurations are considered. Plasma confinement with these configurations may be useful for obtaining fast antihydrogen recombination and trapping rates and for achieving practical fusion power production.

  4. Shielding of relativistic protons.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, A; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Mancusi, D; Sihver, L; Rusek, A

    2007-06-01

    Protons are the most abundant element in the galactic cosmic radiation, and the energy spectrum peaks around 1 GeV. Shielding of relativistic protons is therefore a key problem in the radiation protection strategy of crewmembers involved in long-term missions in deep space. Hydrogen ions were accelerated up to 1 GeV at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York. The proton beam was also shielded with thick (about 20 g/cm2) blocks of lucite (PMMA) or aluminium (Al). We found that the dose rate was increased 40-60% by the shielding and decreased as a function of the distance along the axis. Simulations using the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) show that the dose increase is mostly caused by secondary protons emitted by the target. The modified radiation field after the shield has been characterized for its biological effectiveness by measuring chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed just behind the shield block, or to the direct beam, in the dose range 0.5-3 Gy. Notwithstanding the increased dose per incident proton, the fraction of aberrant cells at the same dose in the sample position was not significantly modified by the shield. The PHITS code simulations show that, albeit secondary protons are slower than incident nuclei, the LET spectrum is still contained in the low-LET range (<10 keV/microm), which explains the approximately unitary value measured for the relative biological effectiveness. PMID:17256178

  5. L-shell Auger and Coster-Kronig spectra from relativistic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Aoyagi, M.; Mark, H.

    1979-01-01

    The intensities of L-shell Auger and Coster-Kronig transitions in heavy atoms have been calculated relativistically. A detailed comparison is made with measured Auger spectra of Pt and U. The pertinent transition energies were computed from relativistic wave functions with inclusion of the Breit interaction, self-energy, a vacuum-polarization correction, and complete atomic relaxation. Multiplet splitting is found to distribute Auger electrons from certain transitions among several lines. The analysis leads to reassignment of a number of lines in the measured spectra. Lines originally identified as L2-L3Ni in the U spectrum are shown to arise from M4,5 Auger transitions instead.

  6. OPE convergence in non-relativistic conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Khandker, Zuhair U.; Prabhu, Siddharth

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by applications to the study of ultracold atomic gases near the unitarity limit, we investigate the structure of the operator product expansion (OPE) in non-relativistic conformal field theories (NRCFTs). The main tool used in our analysis is the representation theory of charged (i.e. non-zero particle number) operators in the NR-CFT, in particular the mapping between operators and states in a non-relativistic "radial quantization" Hilbert space. Our results include: a determination of the OPE coefficients of descendant operators in terms of those of the underlying primary state, a demonstration of convergence of the (imaginary time) OPE in certain kinematic limits, and an estimate of the decay rate of the OPE tail inside matrix elements which, as in relativistic CFTs, depends exponentially on operator dimensions. To illustrate our results we consider several examples, including a strongly interacting field theory of bosons tuned to the unitarity limit, as well as a class of holographic models. Given the similarity with known statements about the OPE in SO(2, d) invariant field theories, our results suggest the existence of a bootstrap approach to constraining NRCFTs, with applications to bound state spectra and interactions. We briefly comment on a possible implementation of this non-relativistic conformal bootstrap program.

  7. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  8. Modeling terrestrial gamma ray flashes produced by relativistic feedback discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ningyu; Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports a modeling study of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) produced by relativistic feedback discharges. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes are intense energetic radiation originating from the Earth's atmosphere that has been observed by spacecraft. They are produced by bremsstrahlung interactions of energetic electrons, known as runaway electrons, with air atoms. An efficient physical mechanism for producing large fluxes of the runaway electrons to make the TGFs is the relativistic feedback discharge, where seed runaway electrons are generated by positrons and X-rays, products of the discharge itself. Once the relativistic feedback discharge becomes self-sustaining, an exponentially increasing number of relativistic electron avalanches propagate through the same high-field region inside the thundercloud until the electric field is partially discharged by the ionization created by the discharge. The modeling results indicate that the durations of the TGF pulses produced by the relativistic feedback discharge vary from tens of microseconds to several milliseconds, encompassing all durations of the TGFs observed so far. In addition, when a sufficiently large potential difference is available in thunderclouds, a self-propagating discharge known as the relativistic feedback streamer can be formed, which propagates like a conventional positive streamer. For the relativistic feedback streamer, the positive feedback mechanism of runaway electron production by the positrons and X-rays plays a similar role as the photoionization for the conventional positive streamer. The simulation results of the relativistic feedback streamer show that a sequence of TGF pulses with varying durations can be produced by the streamer. The relativistic streamer may initially propagate with a pulsed manner and turn into a continuous propagation mode at a later stage. Milliseconds long TGF pulses can be produced by the feedback streamer during its continuous propagation. However

  9. Generations of non-relativistic and relativistic average M shell fluorescence yield (ϖM) (computer code AMSFYLD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Mittal, Raj

    2014-11-01

    Average M shell fluorescence yield (ϖM) have been calculated from non-relativistic data of McGuire (Phys Rev A 1972;5:1043-47) in the region Z=60-90 and relativistic data of Chen, Crasemann and Mark (Phys Rev A 1980;21:449-53) and (Phys Rev A 1983;27:2989-94) in the region Z=70-90 on M sub-shell fluorescence yield (ωMi, i=1-5) and Coster-Kronig yield (fMij, i=1-4, j=2-5) procured from our earlier work (a computer software code MFCKYLD) using Scofield's data (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Report UCRL 51326; 1973) on M sub-shell photo-ionization cross-sections. Subsequently, a computer software code AMSFYLD was developed to generate the yield values on computer terminal or in file for both non-relativistic and relativistic data just by entering the atomic number Z of the element through keyboard or file. The values were compared with available theoretical and experimental values in the literature. The agreement between the present data and the other supports the present values.

  10. Polyanalytic relativistic second Bargmann transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Mouayn, Zouhaïr

    2015-05-15

    We construct coherent states through special superpositions of eigenstates of the relativistic isotonic oscillator. In each superposition, the coefficients are chosen to be L{sup 2}-eigenfunctions of a σ-weight Maass Laplacian on the Poincaré disk, which are associated with the eigenvalue 4m(σ−1−m), m∈Z{sub +}∩[0,(σ−1)/2]. For each nonzero m, the associated coherent states transform constitutes the m-true-polyanalytic extension of a relativistic version of the second Bargmann transform, whose integral kernel is expressed in terms of a special Appel-Kampé de Fériet’s hypergeometric function. The obtained results could be used to extend the known semi-classical analysis of quantum dynamics of the relativistic isotonic oscillator.

  11. Fluctuations in relativistic causal hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Mishra, Ananta P.

    2014-05-01

    Formalism to calculate the hydrodynamic fluctuations by applying the Onsager theory to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation is already known. In this work, we calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations within the framework of the second order hydrodynamics of Müller, Israel and Stewart and its generalization to the third order. We have also calculated the fluctuations for several other causal hydrodynamical equations. We show that the form for the Onsager-coefficients and form of the correlation functions remain the same as those obtained by the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation and do not depend on any specific model of hydrodynamics. Further we numerically investigate evolution of the correlation function using the one dimensional boost-invariant (Bjorken) flow. We compare the correlation functions obtained using the causal hydrodynamics with the correlation function for the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation. We find that the qualitative behavior of the correlation functions remains the same for all the models of the causal hydrodynamics.

  12. Toward a relativistic gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Solovev, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    Macroscopic gas dynamics on the basis of general-relativity equations is examined. An additional equation is derived which provides for completeness of the system of relativistic gasdynamic equations. Relativistic equations of two-fluid electromagnetic gas dynamics are obtained. The introduction of appropriate energy-momentum tensors makes it possible to allow for dissipative processes conditioned by viscosity, thermal conductivity, radiative thermal conductivity, ohmic resistance, and ion-electron temperature difference. The problem of generalizing the Friedmann cosmological model in the case of particle production and annihilation is considered. Also, considered are gas equilibrium in a spherically symmetric gravitational field and a two-fluid relativistic stream in an intrinsic electromagnetic field. 16 references.

  13. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning-Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Keller, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Kurchaninov, L.

    2009-10-15

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning-Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency {omega}{sub r} of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when {omega}{sub r} is close to zero.

  14. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  15. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  16. Relativistic treatment of inertial spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Lewis

    1998-03-01

    A relativistic spin operator for Dirac particles is identified and it is shown that a coupling of spin to angular velocity arises in the relativistic case, just as Mashhoon had speculated, and Hehl and Ni had demonstrated, in the non-relativistic case.

  17. Irreversible degradation of quantum coherence under relativistic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieci; Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2016-06-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum coherence under Unruh thermal noise and seek under which condition the coherence can be frozen in a relativistic setting. We find that the frozen condition is either (i) the initial state is prepared as an incoherence state or (ii) the detectors have no interaction with the external field. That is to say, the decoherence of the detectors' quantum state is irreversible under the influence of thermal noise induced by Unruh radiation. It is shown that quantum coherence approaches zero only in the limit of an infinite acceleration, while quantum entanglement could reduce to zero for a finite acceleration. It is also demonstrated that the robustness of quantum coherence is better than entanglement under the influence of the atom-field interaction for an extremely large acceleration. Therefore, quantum coherence is more robust than entanglement in an accelerating system and the coherence-type quantum resources are more accessible for relativistic quantum information processing tasks.

  18. Frontiers in Relativistic Celestial Mechanics, Vol. 2, Applications and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-08-01

    Relativistic celestial mechanics - investigating the motion celestial bodies under the influence of general relativity - is a major tool of modern experimental gravitational physics. With a wide range of prominent authors from the field, this two-volume series consists of reviews on a multitude of advanced topics in the area of relativistic celestial mechanics - starting from more classical topics such as the regime of asymptotically-flat spacetime, light propagation and celestial ephemerides, but also including its role in cosmology and alternative theories of gravity as well as modern experiments in this area. This second volume of a two-volume series covers applications of the theory as well as experimental verifications. From tools to determine light travel times in curved space-time to laser ranging between earth and moon and between satellites, and impacts on the definition of time scales and clock comparison techniques, a variety of effects is discussed. On the occasion of his 80-th birthday, these two volumes honor V. A. Brumberg - one of the pioneers in modern relativistic celestial mechanics. Contributions include: J. Simon, A. Fienga: Victor Brumberg and the French school of analytical celestial mechanics T. Fukushima: Elliptic functions and elliptic integrals for celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy P. Teyssandier: New tools for determining the light travel time in static, spherically symmetric spacetimes beyond the order G2 J. Müller, L. Biskupek, F. Hofmann and E. Mai: Lunar laser ranging and relativity N. Wex: Testing relativistic celestial mechanics with radio pulsars I. Ciufolini et al.: Dragging of inertial frames, fundamental physics, and satellite laser ranging G. Petit, P. Wolf, P. Delva: Atomic time, clocks, and clock comparisons in relativistic spacetime: a review

  19. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  20. Simplified Relativistic Force Transformation Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Benjamin U.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified relativistic force transformation equation is derived and then used to obtain the equation for the electromagnetic forces on a charged particle, calculate the electromagnetic fields due to a point charge with constant velocity, transform electromagnetic fields in general, derive the Biot-Savart law, and relate it to Coulomb's law.…

  1. Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

    2010-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

  2. Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

    2010-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows. PMID:20867451

  3. Simulations of Relativistic Extragalactic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. A.; Duncan, G. C.

    1994-05-01

    We present results for 2-D, axisymmetric simulations of flows with Lorentz factors ~ 5 -- 10, typical of values inferred for superluminal BL Lacs and QSOs. The simulations were performed with a numerical hydrodynamic code that admits relativistic flow speed. We exploit the property that the relativistic Euler equations for mass, momentum and total energy densities in the laboratory frame have the same form as the nonrelativistic equations, to solve for laboratory frame variables using a conventional Godunov-type scheme with approximate Riemann solver: the HLLE method. The relativistic nature of the flow is incorporated by performing a Lorentz transformation at every step, at each cell center or cell boundary where pressure, sound speed or velocity are required. Determination of the velocity in this manner is a robust algebraic procedure within which we can ensure that vrelativistic flows exhibit a less pronounced pattern of incident and reflection shocks on axis. For flows which have propagated to a fixed number of jet radii, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the contact surface is much less evident in the high Lorentz factor cases, supporting the contention that relativistic flows are less prone to such instability. We describe how the morphology of the cocoon and shocked ambient gas change with increasing Lorentz factor. This work was supported by NSF grant AST 9120224 and by the Ohio Supercomputer Center from a Cray Research Software Development Grant.

  4. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  5. Spin-Interactions and the Non-relativistic Limit of Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saue, Trond

    This chapter discusses how to extinguish spin-orbit interactions and/or scalar relativistic effects from four-component relativistic molecular calculations in order to assess their importance on molecular properties. It is pointed out that standard non-relativistic calculations use the non-relativistic free-particle Hamiltonian , but the relativistic Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between particles and fields. In the strict non-relativistic limit, electrodynamics reduce to electrostatics, that is there are no effects of retardation and no magnetic interactions. It is, however, perfectly reasonable from a pragmatic point of view to introduce both scalar and vector potentials in a non-relativistic framework. Non-relativistic theory can perfectly well accommodate magnetic sources, including spin, but does not provide a mechanism for generating them. We demonstrate that the pragmatic approach leads to some inconsistencies in that non-relativistic theory cannot describe spin-same orbit interactions, but spin-other orbit interactions. We also emphasize that the distinction between spin-orbit interactions and other spin interactions is somewhat artificial and highly dependent on the chosen reference frame. In a previous paper [L. Visscher and T. Saue, J. Chem. Phys., 2000, 113, 3996] we demonstrated how to eliminate spin-orbit interaction from four-component relativistic calculations of spectroscopic constants by deleting the quaternion imaginary parts of matrix representations of the modified Dirac equation. In this chapter, we discuss the extension of this approach to second-order electric and magnetic properties. We will demonstrate the elimination of poles corresponding to spin-forbidden transitions from the dispersion of the dipole polarizability of the mercury atom. More care is needed when considering second-order magnetic properties in that the elimination of quaternion imaginary parts will extinguish all spin interactions. A procedure is developed

  6. Visual phenomena induced by relativistic carbon ions with and without Cerenkov radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1978-01-01

    Exposing the human eye to individual carbon ions moving at relativistic speeds results in visual phenomena that include point flashes, streaks, and larger diffuse flashes. The diffuse flashes have previously been observed by astronauts in space but not in laboratory experiments with particles of high atomic number and energy. They are observed only when the nucleus moves fast enough to generate Cerenkov radiation.

  7. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    1998-09-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  8. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  9. Project Physics Tests 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 5 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 23 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of atomic model are examined on aspects of relativistic corrections, electron emission, photoelectric effects, Compton effect, quantum theories, electrolysis experiments, atomic number and mass,…

  10. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, ( N s ∝ r T F 3 / r d 3 where rTF and rd are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar objects.

  11. Relativistic rocket: Dream and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, Oleg G.

    2014-06-01

    The dream of interstellar flights persists since the first pioneers in astronautics and has never died. Many concepts of thruster capable to propel a rocket to the stars have been proposed and the most suitable among them are thought to be photon propulsion and propulsion by the products of proton-antiproton annihilation in magnetic nozzle. This article addresses both concepts allowing for cross-section of annihilation among other issues in order to show their vulnerability and to indicate the problems. The concept of relativistic matter propulsion is substantiated and discussed. The latter is argued to be the most straightforward way to build-up a relativistic rocket firstly because it is based on the existing technology of ion generators and accelerators and secondly because it can be stepped up in efflux power starting from interplanetary spacecrafts powered by nuclear reactors to interstellar starships powered by annihilation reactors. The problems imposed by thermodynamics and heat disposal are accentuated.

  12. Relativistic hydrodynamics on graphic cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Jochen; Lindenstruth, Volker; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-02-01

    We show how to accelerate relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using graphic cards (graphic processing units, GPUs). These improvements are of highest relevance e.g. to the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC where (ideal and dissipative) relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm (SHASTA), which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  13. Relativistic symmetries in nuclear single-particle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-You; Liang, Hao Zhao; Meng, Jie; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    Symmetry is a fundamental concept in quantum physics. The quasi-degeneracy between single-particle orbitals (n, l, j = l + 1/2) and (n -1, l + 2, j = l + 3/2) indicates a hidden symmetry in atomic nuclei, the so-called pseudospin symmetry. Since the pseudospin symmetry was recognized as a relativistic symmetry in 1990s, many special features, including the spin symmetry for anti-nucleons, and many new concepts have been introduced. In this Chapter, we will illustrate the schematic picture of spin and pseudospin symmetries, derive the basic formalism, highlight the recent progress from several different aspects, and discuss selected open issues in this topic.

  14. Pythagoras Theorem and Relativistic Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulaj, Zenun; Dhoqina, Polikron

    2010-01-01

    In two inertial frames that move in a particular direction, may be registered a light signal that propagates in an angle with this direction. Applying Pythagoras theorem and principles of STR in both systems, we can derive all relativistic kinematics relations like the relativity of simultaneity of events, of the time interval, of the length of objects, of the velocity of the material point, Lorentz transformations, Doppler effect and stellar aberration.

  15. Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-06-24

    Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic 'flying mirror', which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of {approx_equal}4-6x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are {approx}55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3x10{sup 7} photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

  16. Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T.

    2008-06-01

    Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic "flying mirror", which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of ≈4-6×1019 cm-3. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are ˜55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3×107 photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

  17. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Efroimsky, Michael; Kaplan, George

    2011-09-01

    The general theory of relativity was developed by Einstein a century ago. Since then, it has become the standard theory of gravity, especially important to the fields of fundamental astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and experimental gravitational physics. Today, the application of general relativity is also essential for many practical purposes involving astrometry, navigation, geodesy, and time synchronization. Numerous experiments have successfully tested general relativity to a remarkable level of precision. Exploring relativistic gravity in the solar system now involves a variety of high-accuracy techniques, for example, very long baseline radio interferometry, pulsar timing, spacecraft Doppler tracking, planetary radio ranging, lunar laser ranging, the global positioning system (GPS), torsion balances and atomic clocks. Over the last few decades, various groups within the International Astronomical Union have been active in exploring the application of the general theory of relativity to the modeling and interpretation of high-accuracy astronomical observations in the solar system and beyond. A Working Group on Relativity in Celestial Mechanics and Astrometry was formed in 1994 to define and implement a relativistic theory of reference frames and time scales. This task was successfully completed with the adoption of a series of resolutions on astronomical reference systems, time scales, and Earth rotation models by the 24th General Assembly of the IAU, held in Manchester, UK, in 2000. However, these resolutions only form a framework for the practical application of relativity theory, and there have been continuing questions on the details of the proper application of relativity theory to many common astronomical problems. To ensure that these questions are properly addressed, the 26th General Assembly of the IAU, held in Prague in August 2006, established the IAU Commission 52, "Relativity in Fundamental Astronomy". The general scientific goals of the new

  18. Relativistic high harmonics and (sub-)attosecond pulses: relativistic spikes and relativistic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, A.; Baeva, T.; An der Brügge, D.; Münster, S.

    2009-11-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study high harmonic generation from overdense plasmas in the relativistic regime. Different incidence angles as well as different laser polarizations are considered and scalings are recovered. It is shown that the theory of relativistic spikes and the BGP power-law spectra [Phys. Rev. E 74, 046404 (2006)] describes well the normal incidence and s-polarized obliquely incident laser pulses. In the case of p-polarized laser pulses, exceptions from the BGP theory can appear when the quasi-static vector potential build-up at the plasma boundary becomes equal to that of the laser. In this case, the spectrum flattens significantly and has a lower cutoff.

  19. Relativistic Navigation: A Theoretical Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    1996-01-01

    We present a theoretical foundation for relativistic astronomical measurements in curved space-time. In particular, we discuss a new iterative approach for describing the dynamics of an isolated astronomical N-body system in metric theories of gravity. To do this, we generalize the Fock-Chandrasekhar method of the weak-field and slow-motion approximation (WFSMA) and develop a theory of relativistic reference frames (RF's) for a gravitationally bounded many-extended-body problem. In any proper RF constructed in the immediate vicinity of an arbitrary body, the N-body solutions of the gravitational field equations are formally presented as a sum of the Riemann-flat inertial space-time, the gravitational field generated by the body itself, the unperturbed solutions for each body in the system transformed to the coordinates of this proper RF, and the gravitational interaction term. We develop the basic concept of a general WFSMA theory of the celestial RF's applicable to a wide class of metric theories of gravity and an arbitrary model of matter distribution. We apply the proposed method to general relativity. Celestial bodies are described using a perfect fluid model; as such, they possess any number of internal mass and current multipole moments that explicitly characterize their internal structures. The obtained relativistic corrections to the geodetic equations of motion arise because of a coupling of the bodies' multiple moments to the surrounding gravitational field. The resulting relativistic transformations between the different RF's extend the Poincare group to the motion of deformable self-gravitating bodies. Within the present accuracy of astronomical measurements we discuss the properties of the Fermi-normal-like proper RF that is defined in the immediate vicinity of the extended compact bodies. We further generalize the proposed approximation method and include two Eddington parameters (gamma, Beta). This generalized approach was used to derive the

  20. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  1. Relativistic radiation transport in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Kichenassamy, S.; Krikorian, R.A.

    1985-10-15

    A general-relativistic radiative transfer equation in an isotropic, weakly absorbing, nonmagnetized dispersive medium is derived using the kinetic-theoretical approach and the relativistic Hamiltonian theory of geometrical optics in those media. It yields the generally accepted classical equation in the special-relativistic approximation and in stationary conditions. The influence of the gravitational field and of space-time variations of the refractive index n on the radiation distribution is made explicit in the case of spherical symmetry.

  2. Mesoscopic Superposition States in Relativistic Landau Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-21

    We show that a linear superposition of mesoscopic states in relativistic Landau levels can be built when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily superpositions of coherent states involving the particle orbital quanta in a well-defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that these mesoscopic superpositions have a purely relativistic origin and disappear in the nonrelativistic limit.

  3. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-12-07

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li{sub 3} molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  4. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Frisch, Michael J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li3 molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  5. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen elastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Makhoute, A.

    2004-06-01

    We study the effects of the relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions. We begin by considering the case when no radiation is present. This is necessary in order to check the consistency of our calculations and we then carry out the calculations using the relativistic Dirac-Volkov states. It turns out that a simple formal analogy links the analytical expressions of the unpolarized differential cross section without laser and the unpolarized differential cross section in the presence of a laser field.

  6. Relativistic effects of the rotation of the earth on remote clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1974-01-01

    A treatment is given of relativistic clock synchronization effects due to the rotation of the earth. Unlike other approaches, the point of view of an earth fixed coordinate system is used which offers insight to many problems. An attempt is made to give the reader an intuitive grasp of the subject as well as to provide formulae for his use. Specific applications to global timekeeping, navigation, VLBI, relativistic clock experiments, and satellite clock synchronization are discussed. The question of whether atomic clocks are ideal clocks is also treated.

  7. Dissipation in relativistic pair-plasma reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-11-15

    An investigation into the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection is presented. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. A set of numerical simulations is analyzed, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For antiparallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  8. Relativistic Bernstein waves in a degenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Muddasir; Hussain, Azhar; Murtaza, G.

    2011-09-15

    Bernstein mode for a relativistic degenerate electron plasma is investigated. Using relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations, a general expression for the conductivity tensor is derived and then employing Fermi-Dirac distribution function a generalized dispersion relation for the Bernstein mode is obtained. Two limiting cases, i.e., non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic are discussed. The dispersion relations obtained are also graphically presented for some specific values of the parameters depicting how the propagation characteristics of Bernstein waves as well as the Upper Hybrid oscillations are modified with the increase in plasma number density.

  9. Dissipation in Relativistic Pair-Plasma Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. We analyze a set of numerical simulations, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For anti-parallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  10. Relativistic and non-relativistic solitons in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Satyendra Nath

    This thesis entitled as "Relativistic and Non-relativistic Solitons in Plasmas" is the embodiment of a number of investigations related to the formation of ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas under various physical situations. The whole work of the thesis is devoted to the studies of solitary waves in cold and warm collisionless magnetized or unmagnetized plasmas with or without relativistic effect. To analyze the formation of solitary waves in all our models of plasmas, we have employed two established methods namely - reductive perturbation method to deduce the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, the solutions of which represent the important but near exact characteristic concepts of soliton-physics. Next, the pseudopotential method to deduce the energy integral with total nonlinearity in the coupling process for exact characteristic results of solitons has been incorporated. In Chapter 1, a brief description of plasma in nature and laboratory and its generation are outlined elegantly. The nonlinear differential equations to characterize solitary waves and the relevant but important methods of solutions have been mentioned in this chapter. The formation of solitary waves in unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas, and in relativistic plasmas has been described through mathematical entity. Applications of plasmas in different fields are also put forwarded briefly showing its importance. The study of plasmas as they naturally occur in the universe encompasses number of topics including sun's corona, solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, ionospheres, auroras, cosmic rays and radiation. The study of space weather to understand the universe, communications and the activities of weather satellites are some useful areas of space plasma physics. The surface cleaning, sterilization of food and medical appliances, killing of bacteria on various surfaces, destroying of viruses, fungi, spores and plasma coating in industrial instruments ( like computers) are some of the fields

  11. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Dyall, Kenneth G; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-21

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  12. Induced long-range dipole-field-enhanced antihydrogen formation in the p + Ps(n = 2) --> e(-) + H(n < or = 2) reaction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chi Yu; Caballero, David; Papp, Zoltán

    2002-02-11

    We report high-precision calculations that correctly include the rearrangement channels by solving the modified Faddeev equations for energies between the Ps(n = 2) and H(n = 3) thresholds, which involve six and eight open channels. We find that 99% of the antihydrogen is formed in H(n = 2). Just above the Ps(n = 2) threshold the S, P, and D partial waves contribute nearly 1400pi(a(2)0) near the maximum. We find evidence that the induced long-range dipole potential is responsible for such a large H formation cross section. The possibility of utilizing this resonance to synthesize low-energy H is discussed.

  13. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  14. Relativistic electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities.

    PubMed

    Chen, K R; Huang, R D; Wang, J C; Chen, Y Y

    2005-03-01

    The relativistic instabilities of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves driven by MeV ions are analytically and numerically studied. As caused by wave magnetic field and in sharp contrast to the electrostatic case, interesting characteristics such as Alfve nic behavior and instability transition are discovered and illuminated in detail. The instabilities are reactive and are raised from the coupling of slow ions' first-order resonance and fast ions' second-order resonance, that is an essential extra mechanism due to relativistic effect. Because of the wave magnetic field, the nonresonant plasma dielectric is usually negative and large, that affects the instability conditions and scaling laws. A negative harmonic cyclotron frequency mismatch between the fast and slow ions is required for driving a cubic (and a coupled quadratic) instability; the cubic (square) root scaling of the peak growth rate makes the relativistic effect more important than classical mechanism, especially for low fast ion density and Lorentz factor being close to unity. For the cubic instability, there is a threshold (ceiling) on the slow ion temperature and density (the external magnetic field and the fast ion energy); the Alfve n velocity is required to be low. This Alfve nic behavior is interesting in physics and important for its applications. The case of fast protons in thermal deuterons is numerically studied and compared with the analytical results. When the slow ion temperature or density (the external magnetic field or the fast ion energy) is increased (reduced) to about twice (half) the threshold (ceiling), the same growth rate peak transits from the cubic instability to the coupled quadratic instability and a different cubic instability branch appears. The instability transition is an interesting new phenomenon for instability. PMID:15903591

  15. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic spherical shell flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We examine a radiatively driven spherical flow from a central object, whose thickness is smaller than the radius of the central object, and a plane-parallel approximation can be used-a spherical shell flow. We first solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained comoving flux, we then solve the relativistic hydrodynamical equation, and obtain a new velocity field. We repeat these double iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. We found that the flow speed v(τ) is roughly approximated as β ≡ v/c = βs(1 - τ/τb), where τ is the optical depth, τb the flow total optical depth, and c the speed of light. We further found that the flow terminal speed vs is roughly expressed as β _s ≡ v_s/c = (Γ hat{F}_0-1)τ_b/dot{m} , where Γ is the central luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity, hat{F}_0 the comoving flux normalized by the incident flux, and of the order of unity, and dot{m} the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical mass loss.

  16. Strong Interactions in Strange Exotic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.

    2003-08-01

    Strong interaction level shifts and widths in - and K- atoms have been analyzed. The phenomenological density dependent approach as well as the relativistic mean field (RMF) model yield nucleus optical potentials with a repulsive real part in the nuclear interior. This has important consequences for the spectroscopy of hypernuclei. The study of K- atoms cannot resolve the depth of the K- nucleus potential. The fits to the kaonic atom data are satisfactory for both the relatively shallow potentials derived from chiral models and for the deep potentials based on the phenomenological and RMF analyses.

  17. Thermodynamics of polarized relativistic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtun, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    We give the free energy of equilibrium relativistic matter subject to external gravitational and electromagnetic fields, to one-derivative order in the gradients of the external fields. The free energy allows for a straightforward derivation of bound currents and bound momenta in equilibrium. At leading order, the energy-momentum tensor admits a simple expression in terms of the polarization tensor. Beyond the leading order, electric and magnetic polarization vectors are intrinsically ambiguous. The physical effects of polarization, such as the correlation between the magneto-vortically induced surface charge and the electro-vortically induced surface current, are not ambiguous.

  18. Relativistic mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Ring, Peter; Zhao, Pengwei

    In this chapter, the covariant energy density functional is constructed with both the meson-exchange and the point-coupling pictures. Several widely used functionals with either nonlinear or density-dependent effective interactions are introduced. The applications of covariant density functional theory are demonstrated for infinite nuclear matter and finite nuclei with spherical symmetry, axially symmetric quadrupole deformation, and triaxial quadrupole shapes. Finally, a relativistic description of the nuclear landscape has been discussed, which is not only important for nuclear structure, but also important for nuclear astrophysics, where we are facing the problem of a reliable extrapolation to the very neutron-rich nuclei.

  19. Adaptive wavelets and relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Eric; Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthe; Debuhr, Jackson; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for integrating the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics equations using iterated interpolating wavelets. Such provide an adaptive implementation for simulations in multidimensions. A measure of the local approximation error for the solution is provided by the wavelet coefficients. They place collocation points in locations naturally adapted to the flow while providing expected conservation. We present demanding 1D and 2D tests includingthe Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, we consider an outgoing blast wave that models a GRB outflow.

  20. Relativistic quantum private database queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Si-Jia; Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Ming-Ou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Jakobi et al. (Phys Rev A 83, 022301, 2011) suggested the first practical private database query protocol (J-protocol) based on the Scarani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 92, 057901, 2004) quantum key distribution protocol. Unfortunately, the J-protocol is just a cheat-sensitive private database query protocol. In this paper, we present an idealized relativistic quantum private database query protocol based on Minkowski causality and the properties of quantum information. Also, we prove that the protocol is secure in terms of the user security and the database security.

  1. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  2. Relativistic kinematics and stationary motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Jorge G.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-11-01

    The relativistic jerk, snap and all higher-order kinematical D-vectors are defined for the motion of a massive particle in a D-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. We illustrate the formalism with stationary motions, for which we provide a new, Lorentz covariant, classification. We generalize some cases to branes, explaining the relevance to uniform motion in a heat bath. We also consider some non-stationary motions, including motion with constant proper jerk, and free fall into a black hole as viewed from a GEMS perspective.

  3. Importance of Relativistic Effects and Electron Correlation in Structure Factors and Electron Density of Diphenyl Mercury and Triphenyl Bismuth.

    PubMed

    Bučinský, Lukáš; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Grabowsky, Simon

    2016-08-25

    This study investigates the possibility of detecting relativistic effects and electron correlation in single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments using the examples of diphenyl mercury (HgPh2) and triphenyl bismuth (BiPh3). In detail, the importance of electron correlation (ECORR), relativistic effects (REL) [distinguishing between total, scalar and spin-orbit (SO) coupling relativistic effects] and picture change error (PCE) on the theoretical electron density, its topology and its Laplacian using infinite order two component (IOTC) wave functions is discussed. This is to develop an understanding of the order of magnitude and shape of these different effects as they manifest in the electron density. Subsequently, the same effects are considered for the theoretical structure factors. It becomes clear that SO and PCE are negligible, but ECORR and scalar REL are important in low- and medium-order reflections on absolute and relative scales-not in the high-order region. As a further step, Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) and subsequent X-ray constrained wavefunction (XCW) fitting have been performed for the compound HgPh2 with various relativistic and nonrelativistic wave functions against the experimental structure factors. IOTC calculations of theoretical structure factors and relativistic HAR as well as relativistic XCW fitting are presented for the first time, accounting for both scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects. PMID:27434184

  4. Importance of Relativistic Effects and Electron Correlation in Structure Factors and Electron Density of Diphenyl Mercury and Triphenyl Bismuth.

    PubMed

    Bučinský, Lukáš; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Grabowsky, Simon

    2016-08-25

    This study investigates the possibility of detecting relativistic effects and electron correlation in single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments using the examples of diphenyl mercury (HgPh2) and triphenyl bismuth (BiPh3). In detail, the importance of electron correlation (ECORR), relativistic effects (REL) [distinguishing between total, scalar and spin-orbit (SO) coupling relativistic effects] and picture change error (PCE) on the theoretical electron density, its topology and its Laplacian using infinite order two component (IOTC) wave functions is discussed. This is to develop an understanding of the order of magnitude and shape of these different effects as they manifest in the electron density. Subsequently, the same effects are considered for the theoretical structure factors. It becomes clear that SO and PCE are negligible, but ECORR and scalar REL are important in low- and medium-order reflections on absolute and relative scales-not in the high-order region. As a further step, Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) and subsequent X-ray constrained wavefunction (XCW) fitting have been performed for the compound HgPh2 with various relativistic and nonrelativistic wave functions against the experimental structure factors. IOTC calculations of theoretical structure factors and relativistic HAR as well as relativistic XCW fitting are presented for the first time, accounting for both scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects.

  5. Magnetism and rotation in relativistic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mameda, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the analogy between magnetism and rotation in relativistic theory. In nonrelativistic theory, the exact correspondence between magnetism and rotation is established in the presence of an external trapping potential. Based on this, we analyze relativistic rotation under external trapping potentials. A Landau-like quantization is obtained by considering an energy-dependent potential.

  6. Einstein Never Approved of Relativistic Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    During much of the 20th century it was widely believed that one of the significant insights of special relativity was "relativistic mass." Today there are two schools on that issue: the traditional view that embraces speed-dependent "relativistic mass," and the more modern position that rejects it, maintaining that there is only one mass and it's…

  7. Nonlinear, relativistic Langmuir waves in astrophysical magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.

    1987-01-01

    Large amplitude, electrostatic plasma waves are relevant to physical processes occurring in the astrophysical magnetospheres wherein charged particles are accelerated to relativistic energies by strong waves emitted by pulsars, quasars, or radio galaxies. The nonlinear, relativistic theory of traveling Langmuir waves in a cold plasma is reviewed. The cases of streaming electron plasma, electronic plasma, and two-streams are discussed.

  8. Relativistic Definition of Spin Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Lewis H.

    2002-12-01

    Some years ago Mashhoon [1] made the highly interesting suggestion that there existed a coupling of spin with rotations, just as there exists such a coupling with orbital angular momentum, as seen in the Sagnac effect, for example. Spin being essentially a quantum phenomenon, the obvious place to look for this was by studying the Dirac equation, and Hehl and Ni, in such an investigation [2], indeed found a coupling term of just the type Mashhoon had envisaged. Part of their procedure, however, was to take the nonrelativistic limit, and this was done by performing appropriate Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) transformations. In the nonrelativistic limit, it is well-known that the spin operators for Dirac particles are in essence the Pauli matrices; but it is also well-known, and indeed was part of the motivation for Foldy and Wouthuysen's paper, that for fully-fledged Dirac particles the (4×4 generalisation of the) Pauli matrices do not yield satisfactory spin operators, since spin defined in this way would not be conserved. The question therefore presented itself: is there a relativistic spin operator for Dirac particles, such that in the relativistic, as well as the nonrelativistic, régime a Mashhoon spin-rotation coupling exists?...

  9. Single electron relativistic clock interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushev, P. A.; Cole, J. H.; Sholokhov, D.; Kukharchyk, N.; Zych, M.

    2016-09-01

    Although time is one of the fundamental notions in physics, it does not have a unique description. In quantum theory time is a parameter ordering the succession of the probability amplitudes of a quantum system, while according to relativity theory each system experiences in general a different proper time, depending on the system's world line, due to time dilation. It is therefore of fundamental interest to test the notion of time in the regime where both quantum and relativistic effects play a role, for example, when different amplitudes of a single quantum clock experience different magnitudes of time dilation. Here we propose a realization of such an experiment with a single electron in a Penning trap. The clock can be implemented in the electronic spin precession and its time dilation then depends on the radial (cyclotron) state of the electron. We show that coherent manipulation and detection of the electron can be achieved already with present day technology. A single electron in a Penning trap is a technologically ready platform where the notion of time can be probed in a hitherto untested regime, where it requires a relativistic as well as quantum description.

  10. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  11. Non-relativistic scale anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2016-06-01

    We extend the cohomological analysis in arXiv:1410.5831 of anisotropic Lifshitz scale anomalies. We consider non-relativistic theories with a dynamical critical exponent z = 2 with or without non-relativistic boosts and a particle number symmetry. We distinguish between cases depending on whether the time direction does or does not induce a foliation structure. We analyse both 1 + 1 and 2 + 1 spacetime dimensions. In 1 + 1 dimensions we find no scale anomalies with Galilean boost symmetries. The anomalies in 2 + 1 dimensions with Galilean boosts and a foliation structure are all B-type and are identical to the Lifshitz case in the purely spatial sector. With Galilean boosts and without a foliation structure we find also an A-type scale anomaly. There is an infinite ladder of B-type anomalies in the absence of a foliation structure with or without Galilean boosts. We discuss the relation between the existence of a foliation structure and the causality of the field theory.

  12. Relativistic Non-Thermal Bremsstrahlung Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, Vladimir; Arbutina, Bojan; Dobardžić, Aleksandra; Pavlović, Marko Z.

    2013-11-01

    By applying a method of virtual quanta we derive formulae for relativistic non-thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from relativistic electrons as well as from protons and heavier particles with power-law momentum distribution N(p)dp = k p-qdp. We show that emission which originates from an electron scattering on an ion, represents the most significant component of relativistic non-thermal bremsstrahlung. Radiation from an ion scattering on electron, known as inverse bremsstrahlung, is shown to be negligible in overall non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission. These results arise from theory refinement, where we introduce the dependence of relativistic kinetic energy of an incident particle, upon the energy of scattered photon. In part, it is also a consequence of a different mass of particles and relativistic effects.

  13. Relativistic electron and ion dust charging currents

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Boukhalfa, Soufiane

    2009-09-15

    A first theoretical attempt is made to present a relativistic generalization of the well-known orbit-limited motion theory. The appropriate relativistic (electron and ion) dust charging currents are derived. The nonlinear electrostatic potential is then expressed in terms of the variable dust charge and we take advantage of this new transcendental relation to investigate briefly the effects of relativistic charge carriers. As the relativistic character of the plasma increases, it becomes evident that certain negative values of the dust charge can never be achieved as increasingly larger values of the nonlinear potential are involved. The obtained formulas bring a possibility to build theories of nonlinear collective process in relativistic dusty plasmas.

  14. Toward an absolute NMR shielding scale using the spin-rotation tensor within a relativistic framework.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S; Giribet, Claudia G; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2016-08-24

    One of the most influential articles showing the best way to get the absolute values of NMR magnetic shieldings, σ (non-measurables) from both accurate measurements and theoretical calculations, was published a long time ago by Flygare. His model was shown to break down when heavy atoms are involved. This fact motivated the development of new theories of nuclear spin-rotation (SR) tensors, which consider electronic relativistic effects. One was published recently by some of us. In this article we take another step further and propose three different models that generalize Flygare's model. All of them are written using four-component relativistic expressions, though the two-component relativistic SO-S term also appears in one. The first clues for these developments were built from the relationship among σ and the SR tensors within the two-component relativistic LRESC model. Besides, we had to introduce a few other well defined assumptions: (i) relativistic corrections must be included in a way to best reproduce the relationship among the (e-e) term (called "paramagnetic" within the non-relativistic domain) of σ and its equivalent part of the SR tensor, (ii) as happens in Flygare's rule, the shielding of free atoms shall be included to improve accuracy. In the highest accurate model, a new term known as Spin-orbit due to spin, SO-S (in this mechanism the spin-Zeeman Hamiltonian replaces the orbital-Zeeman Hamiltonian), is included. We show the results of the application of those models to halogen containing linear molecules. PMID:27506822

  15. Toward an absolute NMR shielding scale using the spin-rotation tensor within a relativistic framework.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S; Giribet, Claudia G; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2016-08-24

    One of the most influential articles showing the best way to get the absolute values of NMR magnetic shieldings, σ (non-measurables) from both accurate measurements and theoretical calculations, was published a long time ago by Flygare. His model was shown to break down when heavy atoms are involved. This fact motivated the development of new theories of nuclear spin-rotation (SR) tensors, which consider electronic relativistic effects. One was published recently by some of us. In this article we take another step further and propose three different models that generalize Flygare's model. All of them are written using four-component relativistic expressions, though the two-component relativistic SO-S term also appears in one. The first clues for these developments were built from the relationship among σ and the SR tensors within the two-component relativistic LRESC model. Besides, we had to introduce a few other well defined assumptions: (i) relativistic corrections must be included in a way to best reproduce the relationship among the (e-e) term (called "paramagnetic" within the non-relativistic domain) of σ and its equivalent part of the SR tensor, (ii) as happens in Flygare's rule, the shielding of free atoms shall be included to improve accuracy. In the highest accurate model, a new term known as Spin-orbit due to spin, SO-S (in this mechanism the spin-Zeeman Hamiltonian replaces the orbital-Zeeman Hamiltonian), is included. We show the results of the application of those models to halogen containing linear molecules.

  16. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-01

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  17. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Niskanen, J.; Norman, P.; Aksela, H.; Aagren, H.

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of {approx}4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  18. Transition properties of low-lying states in atomic indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2011-07-15

    We present here the results of our relativistic many-body calculations of various properties of the first six low-lying excited states of indium. The calculations were performed using the relativistic coupled-cluster method in the framework of the singles, doubles, and partial triples approximation. The lifetime of the [4p{sup 6}]5s{sup 2}5p{sub 3/2} state in this atom is determined. Our results could be used to shed light on the reliability of the lifetime measurements of the excited states of atomic indium that we have considered in the present work.

  19. Theoretical atomic physics code development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.E.H.; Abdallah, J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a set of computer codes for atomic physics calculations at Los Alamos. These codes can calculate a large variety of data with a minimum of effort on the part of the user. In particular, differential cross sections and electron impact coherence parameters can be readily obtained for arbitrary ions or atoms. Currently, the theory consists of non-relativistic Hartree-Fock structure calculations and non relativistic distorted wave approximation or first order many body theory collisional calculations. 12 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Deexcitation of high-Rydberg-state atoms with a chirped train of half-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kopyciuk, T.; Parzynski, R.

    2007-05-15

    Encouraged by the experiments on production of antihydrogen atoms in high Rydberg states we have calculated the effect of deexcitation towards lower states by a chirped train of identical unidirectional half-cycle pulses. The calculations exploit both the one-dimensional and impulse approximations providing convenient analytical formulas for the Rydberg-to-Rydberg transition amplitudes. The calculated deexcitation is shown in terms of the mean value of localization of the Rydberg wave packet in the coordinate space, the Rydberg-state population distribution, the Husimi phase-space distribution function, and the probability density distribution, each of these measures vs the length of the applied train of half-cycle pulses. The results for chirped trains are compared with those for periodic trains and examples of higher deexcitation efficiency of the chirped trains are given.

  1. Simulations of Dynamic Relativistic Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle Patrick

    Neutron stars and black holes are generally surrounded by magnetospheres of highly conducting plasma in which the magnetic flux density is so high that hydrodynamic forces are irrelevant. In this vanishing-inertia—or ultra-relativistic—limit, magnetohydrodynamics becomes force-free electrodynamics, a system of equations comprising only the magnetic and electric fields, and in which the plasma response is effected by a nonlinear current density term. In this dissertation I describe a new pseudospectral simulation code, designed for studying the dynamic magnetospheres of compact objects. A detailed description of the code and several numerical test problems are given. I first apply the code to the aligned rotator problem, in which a star with a dipole magnetic field is set rotating about its magnetic axis. The solution evolves to a steady state, which is nearly ideal and dissipationless everywhere except in a current sheet, or magnetic field discontinuity, at the equator, into which electromagnetic energy flows and is dissipated. Magnetars are believed to have twisted magnetospheres, due to internal magnetic evolution which deforms the crust, dragging the footpoints of external magnetic field lines. This twisting may be able to explain both magnetars' persistent hard X-ray emission and their energetic bursts and flares. Using the new code, I simulate the evolution of relativistic magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. The field lines expand outward, forming a strong current layer; eventually the configuration loses equilibrium and a dynamic rearrangement occurs, involving large-scale rapid magnetic reconnection and dissipation of the free energy of the twisted magnetic field. When the star is rotating, the magnetospheric twisting leads to a large increase in the stellar spin-down rate, which may take place on the long twisting timescale or in brief explosive events, depending on where the twisting is applied and the history of the system

  2. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  3. Diagnosing particle acceleration in relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.; Liang, Edison P.; Summerlin, Errol J.; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian A.; Roustazadeh, Parisa

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy emission from blazars and other relativistic jet sources indicates that electrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic (GeV - TeV) energies in these systems. This paper summarizes recent results from numerical studies of two fundamentally different particle acceleration mechanisms potentially at work in relativistic jets: Magnetic-field generation and relativistic particle acceleration in relativistic shear layers, which are likely to be present in relativistic jets, is studied via Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic shocks is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting magnetic-field configurations and thermal + non-thermal particle distributions are then used to predict multi-wavelength radiative (synchrotron + Compton) signatures of both acceleration scenarios. In particular, we address how anisotropic shear-layer acceleration may be able to circumvent the well-known Lorentz-factor crisis, and how the self-consistent evaluation of thermal + non-thermal particle populations in diffusive shock acceleration simulations provides tests of the bulk Comptonization model for the Big Blue Bump observed in the SEDs of several blazars.

  4. Generalized Ohm's law for relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandus, A.; Tsagas, C. G.

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the relativistic expression of Ohm's law by studying a multifluid system of charged species using the 1 + 3 covariant formulation of general relativistic electrodynamics. This is done by providing a fully relativistic, fully non-linear propagation equation for the spatial component of the electric 4-current. Our analysis proceeds along the lines of the non-relativistic studies and extends previous relativistic work on cold plasmas. Exploiting the compactness and transparency of the covariant formalism, we provide a direct comparison with the standard Newtonian versions of Ohm's law and identify the relativistic corrections in an unambiguous way. The generalized expression of Ohm's law is initially given relative to an arbitrary observer and for a multicomponent relativistic charged medium. Then, the law is written with respect to the Eckart frame and for a hot two-fluid plasma with zero total charge. Finally, we apply our analysis to a cold proton-electron plasma and recover the well-known magnetohydrodynamic expressions. In every step, we discuss the approximations made and identify familiar effects, like the Biermann battery and the Hall effect.

  5. Relativistic effects in Lyman-α forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iršič, Vid; Di Dio, Enea; Viel, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-α) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range (z=2-5). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar-Lyman-α cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects are sizeable at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross-correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considering cross-correlations between tracers with very different biases, and should be included in the data analysis of the current and future surveys. Moreover, the idea presented in this paper is highly complementary to other techniques and observables trying to isolate the effect of the relativistic corrections and thus test the validity of the theory of gravity beyond the Newtonian regime.

  6. Playing relativistic billiards beyond graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadurní, E.; Seligman, T. H.; Mortessagne, F.

    2010-05-01

    The possibility of using hexagonal structures in general, and graphene in particular, to emulate the Dirac equation is the topic under consideration here. We show that Dirac oscillators with or without rest mass can be emulated by distorting a tight-binding model on a hexagonal structure. In the quest to make a toy model for such relativistic equations, we first show that a hexagonal lattice of attractive potential wells would be a good candidate. Firstly, we consider the corresponding one-dimensional (1D) model giving rise to a 1D Dirac oscillator and then construct explicitly the deformations needed in the 2D case. Finally, we discuss how such a model can be implemented as an electromagnetic billiard using arrays of dielectric resonators between two conducting plates that ensure evanescent modes outside the resonators for transversal electric modes, and we describe a feasible experimental setup.

  7. Invisibility cloaks in relativistic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimeh, Jad C.; Thompson, Robert T.; Wegener, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We consider an ideal invisibility cloak which is illuminated by monochromatic light and which moves in vacuum at constant relativistic velocity with respect to the common inertial frame of light source and observer. We show that, in general, the moving cloak becomes detectable by image distortions and by generating a broad frequency spectrum of the scattered light. However, for many special combinations of incident light frequency, wave vector of light, and cloak velocity, ideal cloaking remains possible. It becomes nonreciprocal though. This means that light rays emitted by the light source arrive at the observer as though they have traveled through vacuum, but they take completely different paths after being retroreflected at the observer position.

  8. Landau damping in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Brent

    2016-02-01

    We examine the phenomenon of Landau damping in relativistic plasmas via a study of the relativistic Vlasov-Poisson (rVP) system on the torus for initial data sufficiently close to a spatially uniform steady state. We find that if the steady state is regular enough (essentially in a Gevrey class of degree in a specified range) and if the deviation of the initial data from this steady state is small enough in a certain norm, the evolution of the system is such that its spatial density approaches a uniform constant value quasi-exponentially fast (i.e., like exp ( - C |" separators=" t | ν ¯ ) for ν ¯ ∈ ( 0 , 1 ) ). We take as a priori assumptions that solutions launched by such initial data exist for all times (by no means guaranteed with rVP, but a reasonable assumption since we are close to a spatially uniform state) and that the various norms in question are continuous in time (which should be a consequence of an abstract version of the Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem). In addition, we must assume a kind of "reverse Poincaré inequality" on the Fourier transform of the solution. In spirit, this assumption amounts to the requirement that there exists 0 < ϰ < 1 so that the mass in the annulus ϰ ≤ |" separators=" v | < 1 for the solution launched by the initial data is uniformly small for all t. Typical velocity bounds for solutions to rVP launched by small initial data (at least on ℝ6) imply this bound. We note that none of our results require spherical symmetry (a crucial assumption for many current results on rVP).

  9. Relativistic Theory of Few Body Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Franz Gross

    2002-11-01

    Very significant advances have been made in the relativistic theory of few body systems since I visited Peter Sauer and his group in Hannover in 1983. This talk provides an opportunity to review the progress in this field since then. Different methods for the relativistic calculation of few nucleon systems are briefly described. As an example, seven relativistic calculations of the deuteron elastic structure functions, A, B, and T{sub 20}, are compared. The covariant SPECTATOR {copyright} theory, among the more successful and complete of these methods, is described in more detail.

  10. STREAM INSTABILITIES IN RELATIVISTICALLY HOT PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Shaisultanov, Rashid; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Eichler, David

    2012-01-10

    The growth rates for Weibel and Buneman instabilities of relativistic ion beams in a relativistically hot electron background are derived analytically for general propagation angles. The Weibel instability perpendicular to the streaming direction is found to be the fastest growing mode and probably the first to appear. Oblique, quasiperpendicular modes grow almost as fast as the growth rate varies only moderately with angle, and they may distort or corrugate the filaments after the perpendicular mode saturates. The growth rate of the purely longitudinal (Buneman) mode is significantly smaller, contrary to the non-relativistic case. The results are consistent with simulations, which display aligned magnetic filaments and their subsequent disruption.

  11. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic entanglement in the rest-frame instant form of dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alba, David; Crater, Horace W.; Lusanna, Luca

    2011-06-15

    A new formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics is proposed in the framework of the rest-frame instant form of dynamics, where the world-lines of the particles are parametrized in terms of the Fokker-Pryce center of inertia and of Wigner-covariant relative 3-coordinates inside the instantaneous Wigner 3-spaces, and where there is a decoupled (non-covariant and non-local) canonical relativistic center of mass. This approach: (a) allows us to make a consistent quantization in every inertial frame; (b) leads to a description of both bound and scattering states; (c) offers new insights on the relativistic localization problem; (d) leads to a non-relativistic limit with a Hamilton-Jacobi treatment of the Newton center of mass; (e) clarifies non-local aspects (spatial non-separability) of relativistic entanglement connected with Lorentz signature and not present in its non-relativistic treatment.

  13. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas–Fermi model

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, (N{sub s}∝r{sub TF}{sup 3}/r{sub d}{sup 3} where r{sub TF} and r{sub d} are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar

  14. Theory of symmetry for a rotational relativistic Birkhoff system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shao-Kai; Chen, Xiang-Wei; Guo, Yong-Xin

    2002-05-01

    The theory of symmetry for a rotational relativistic Birkhoff system is studied. In terms of the invariance of the rotational relativistic Pfaff-Birkhoff-D'Alembert principle under infinitesimal transformations, the Noether symmetries and conserved quantities of a rotational relativistic Birkhoff system are given. In terms of the invariance of rotational relativistic Birkhoff equations under infinitesimal transformations, the Lie symmetries and conserved quantities of the rotational relativistic Birkhoff system are given.

  15. Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic plane-parallel flows: Behavior of the Eddington factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer in a relativistic plane-parallel flow which is accelerated from its base, like an accretion disk wind, is numerically examined under a fully special-relativistic treatment. We first derive relativistic formal solutions. We then iteratively solve the relativistic transfer equation for several cases such as radiative equilibrium or local thermodynamic equilibrium, and obtain specific intensities in the inertial and comoving frames, as well as moment quantities and the Eddington factor. Moment quantities are rather different in each case, but the behavior of the Eddington factor for the plane-parallel case is quite similar in all cases. The Eddington factor generally depends on the flow velocity v as well as the optical depth τ. In the case of relativistic plane-parallel flows, in an optically thin regime of τ ≲ 1, it is slightly larger than 1/3 at very slow speed, it becomes smaller than 1/3 at mildly relativistic speed, and it again increases up to unity in the highly relativistic case. At highly relativistic speed, on the other hand, it becomes larger than 1/3 even in an optically thick regime. We find the Eddington approximation is fairly good, except for τ ≲ 1 or v/c ≳ 0.9, although the moment formalism under the Eddington approximation has some defects at v/c=1/√{3}.

  16. Atomic electron binding energies in fermium

    SciTech Connect

    Das, M.P.

    1981-02-01

    Calculations of the binding energies of electrons in fermium by using a relativistic local-density functional theory are reported. It is found that relaxation effects are nonnegligible for inner core orbitals. Calculated orbital binding energies are compared with those due to nonlocal Dirac-Fock calculations and also with those determined experimentally from conversion electron spectroscopy. Finally the usefulness of the local-density approximation for the study of heavy atomic and condensed systems is discussed.

  17. Speculations on a relativistic strong focusing self-collider with very high luminosity (≥10 40 cm -2s -1): Macroproduction of antinuclei and other micro cross section events and formation of ambiplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    1988-08-01

    unity; equilibrium will be achieved at Ti/ Te ˜ 10 5. Antihydrogen atoms and molecules. overlineH0 and overlineH2-, will be produced at 10 -3 -10 -2 antiproton production rates, but will probably be ionized at comparable rates. Antideuterons, antihelium, antilithium will be produced at conservatively estimated rates of ˜10 14 s -1, 10 10 s -1, and ˜10 6 -10 4 s -1, respectively.

  18. ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEI: A NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    1999-10-29

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic nuclei provide a window on the behavior of strong interactions at asymptotically high energies. They also will allow the authors to study the bulk properties of hadronic matter at very high densities.

  19. Relativistic perturbations for all the planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestrade, J.-F.; Bretagnon, P.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic perturbations in the osculating elements of all the planets, due to the theory of General Relativity, are presented where only the gravitational field of the sun is taken into account and the effects are calculated in the post-Newtonian approximation. The relativistic effects are calculated with the requirement that an accuracy of 5 x 10 to the -12th UA be kept over an interval of 1000 years, and are expressed in series form depending on the dynamical time in the isotropic coordinate and standard coordinate systems. The method uses equations derived from the equations of Gauss for the relativistic acceleration. A theory of the motion of Mercury is derived through the addition of the relativistic perturbations to the third-order Newtonian theory of Bretagnon (1981). It is noted that the computer programs used allow any values for the physical parameters Gamma and Beta of the Eddigton-Robertson metric.

  20. Relativistic Thomson Scatter from Factor Calculation

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this program is calculate the fully relativistic Thomson scatter from factor in unmagnetized plasmas. Such calculations are compared to experimental diagnoses of plasmas at such facilities as the Jupiter laser facility here a LLNL.

  1. Pseudospectral approach to relativistic molecular theory.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2004-08-22

    The efficient relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) and Dirac-Kohn-Sham (DKS) methods are proposed by an application of the pseudospectral (PS) approach. The present PS-DHF/DKS method is a relativistic extension of the PS-HF/KS method of Friesner, though we aim at higher numerical accuracy by elimination of superfluous arbitrariness. The relativistic PS-DHF/DKS method is implemented into our REL4D programs. Several PS applications to molecular systems show that the relativistic PS-DHF/DKS approach is more efficient than the traditional approach without a loss of accuracy. The present PS-DKS method successfully assigns and predicts the photoelectron spectra of hexacarbonyl complexes of tungsten and seaborgium theoretically.

  2. Classical dynamics of the relativistic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims at a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of the classical relativistic oscillator. Numerical integration of its dynamical equations permits a thorough treatment of its motion. Both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are considered.

  3. Relativistic quark-diquark model of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, J.; Vassallo, A.; Santopinto, E.

    2011-06-15

    A relativistic quark-diquark mass operator with direct and exchange interaction has been constructed in the framework of point form dynamics. The nonstrange baryon spectrum has been calculated and compared with experimental data.

  4. Quantum probability assignment limited by relativistic causality

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yeong Deok; Choi, Taeseung

    2016-01-01

    Quantum theory has nonlocal correlations, which bothered Einstein, but found to satisfy relativistic causality. Correlation for a shared quantum state manifests itself, in the standard quantum framework, by joint probability distributions that can be obtained by applying state reduction and probability assignment that is called Born rule. Quantum correlations, which show nonlocality when the shared state has an entanglement, can be changed if we apply different probability assignment rule. As a result, the amount of nonlocality in quantum correlation will be changed. The issue is whether the change of the rule of quantum probability assignment breaks relativistic causality. We have shown that Born rule on quantum measurement is derived by requiring relativistic causality condition. This shows how the relativistic causality limits the upper bound of quantum nonlocality through quantum probability assignment. PMID:26971717

  5. Quantum Deformations of Einstein's Relativistic Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lukierski, Jerzy

    2006-11-03

    We shall outline two ways of introducing the modification of Einstein's relativistic symmetries of special relativity theory -- the Poincare symmetries. The most complete way of introducing the modifications is via the noncocommutative Hopf-algebraic structure describing quantum symmetries. Two types of quantum relativistic symmetries are described, one with constant commutator of quantum Minkowski space coordinates ({theta}{mu}{nu}-deformation) and second with Lie-algebraic structure of quantum space-time, introducing so-called {kappa}-deformation. The third fundamental constant of Nature - fundamental mass {kappa} or length {lambda} - appears naturally in proposed quantum relativistic symmetry scheme. The deformed Minkowski space is described as the representation space (Hopf-module) of deformed Poincare algebra. Some possible perspectives of quantum-deformed relativistic symmetries will be outlined.

  6. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  7. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  8. Coherent states for the relativistic harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldaya, Victor; Guerrero, J.

    1995-01-01

    Recently we have obtained, on the basis of a group approach to quantization, a Bargmann-Fock-like realization of the Relativistic Harmonic Oscillator as well as a generalized Bargmann transform relating fock wave functions and a set of relativistic Hermite polynomials. Nevertheless, the relativistic creation and annihilation operators satisfy typical relativistic commutation relations of the Lie product (vector-z, vector-z(sup dagger)) approximately equals Energy (an SL(2,R) algebra). Here we find higher-order polarization operators on the SL(2,R) group, providing canonical creation and annihilation operators satisfying the Lie product (vector-a, vector-a(sup dagger)) = identity vector 1, the eigenstates of which are 'true' coherent states.

  9. Relativistic diffusive motion in random electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2011-08-01

    We show that the relativistic dynamics in a Gaussian random electromagnetic field can be approximated by the relativistic diffusion of Schay and Dudley. Lorentz invariant dynamics in the proper time leads to the diffusion in the proper time. The dynamics in the laboratory time gives the diffusive transport equation corresponding to the Jüttner equilibrium at the inverse temperature β-1 = mc2. The diffusion constant is expressed by the field strength correlation function (Kubo's formula).

  10. Relativistic particle beams for interstellar propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordley, Gerald D.

    1993-04-01

    The concept of pellet-stream propulsion proposed by Singer (1980) is extended to particle beams and relativistic velocities. A simple relativistic mission study is presented, and it is shown how certain technological developments might enhance the concept. In particular, considerations discussed include beam drivers; beam cooling, steering, and focusing; beam driven mission mechanics; and the radiation problem. The energy issues are also briefly considered.

  11. Mass versus relativistic and rest masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of relativistic mass, which increases with velocity, is not compatible with the standard language of relativity theory and impedes the understanding and learning of the theory by beginners. The same difficulty occurs with the term rest mass. To get rid of relativistic mass and rest mass it is appropriate to replace the equation E =mc2 by the true Einstein's equation E0=mc2, where E0 is the rest energy and m is the mass.

  12. On Lorentz invariants in relativistic magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-Di; Wang, Xiao-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Lorentz invariants whose nonrelativistic correspondences play important roles in magnetic reconnection are discussed in this paper. Particularly, the relativistic invariant of the magnetic reconnection rate is defined and investigated in a covariant two-fluid model. Certain Lorentz covariant representations for energy conversion and magnetic structures in reconnection processes are also investigated. Furthermore, relativistic measures for topological features of reconnection sites, particularly magnetic nulls and separatrices, are analyzed.

  13. Relativistic mean field description of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Ring, Peter; Zhao, Pengwei; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) models with pairing treated by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) approaches and applications for exotic nuclear phenomena including nuclear halos, the position of the proton drip line and proton radioactivity, the surface diffuseness and its relation to nuclear exotic phenomena, and the effects of pairing correlations on the nuclear size.

  14. Relativistic uranium beams - the Bevalac experience

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1983-03-01

    This paper will address areas where relativistic heavy ion accelerators differ from proton facilities. Salient areas are: (1) the specialized injectors for heavy ions; ion sources, structures for very low charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) ions, and stripper optimization; (2) special requirements for the synchrotron ring; ultrahigh vacuum, flexible controls and instrumentation. These areas are discussed in the context of the Bevalac, as well as our idea for a next-generation relativistic heavy ion accelerator.

  15. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Relativistically modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Li, X. Q.

    2012-09-15

    Based on the set of nonlinear coupling equations, which has considered the relativistic effects of electrons, modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves has been investigated in this paper. Both the characteristic scale and maximum growth rate of the Langmuir field will enhance with the increase in the electron relativistic effect. The numerical results indicate that longitudinal perturbations induce greater instability than transverse perturbations do, which will lead to collapse and formation of the pancake-like structure.

  17. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    The position of users located on the Earth's surface or near it may be found with the classic positioning systems (CPS). Certain information broadcast by satellites of global navigation systems, as GPS and GALILEO, may be used for positioning. The CPS are based on the Newtonian formalism, although relativistic post-Newtonian corrections are done when they are necessary. This thesis contributes to the development of a different positioning approach, which is fully relativistic from the beginning. In the relativistic positioning systems (RPS), the space-time position of any user (ship, spacecraft, and so on) can be calculated with the help of four satellites, which broadcast their proper times by means of codified electromagnetic signals. In this thesis, we have simulated satellite 4-tuples of the GPS and GALILEO constellations. If a user receives the signals from four satellites simultaneously, the emission proper times read -after decoding- are the user "emission coordinates". In order to find the user "positioning coordinates", in an appropriate almost inertial reference system, there are two possibilities: (a) the explicit relation between positioning and emission coordinates (broadcast by the satellites) is analytically found or (b) numerical codes are designed to calculate the positioning coordinates from the emission ones. Method (a) is only viable in simple ideal cases, whereas (b) allows us to consider realistic situations. In this thesis, we have designed numerical codes with the essential aim of studying two appropriate RPS, which may be generalized. Sometimes, there are two real users placed in different positions, which receive the same proper times from the same satellites; then, we say that there is bifurcation, and additional data are needed to choose the real user position. In this thesis, bifurcation is studied in detail. We have analyzed in depth two RPS models; in both, it is considered that the satellites move in the Schwarzschild's space

  18. Analytic Solution of a Two-Dimensional Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Li.

    1990-03-01

    The two dimensional hydrogen atom problem is solved analytically in both the relativistic and non-relativistic cases. In the nonrelativistic case, exact formulae for energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for both the discrete and continuous parts of the spectrum, dipole matrix elements, DC Stark effect, single- and two-photon transition rate, fine and hyperfine structures are obtained. The binding energy of the ground state is found to be reduced by a factor of four from that of a three dimensional hydrogen atom. In the relativistic case, exact analytic expressions for discrete eigen energy and normalized eigen wave function are derived. It is shown that the solution to the Dirac equation is disjoint in the spin-coordinate space (four -component spinor) in contrast to the three dimensional counterpart. This surprising result is a consequence of the planar motion of the electron.

  19. Atomic inner-shell transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Mark, H.

    1984-01-01

    Atomic inner-shell processes have quite different characteristics, in several important aspects, from processes in the optical regime. Energies are large, e.g., the 1s binding energy reaches 100 keV at Z = 87; relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic effects therefore are strong. Radiationless transitions vastly dominate over photon emission in most cases. Isolated inner-shell vacancies have pronounced single-particle character, with correlations generally contributing only approximately 1 eV to the 1s and 2p binding energies; the structure of such systems is thus well tractable by independent-particle self-consistent-field atomic models. For systems containing multiple deep inner-shell vacancies, or for highly stripped ions, the importance of relativistic intermediate coupling and configuration interaction becomes pronounced. Cancellation of the Coulomb interaction can lead to strong manifestations of the Breit interaction in such phenomena as multiplet splitting and hypersatellite X-ray shifts. Unique opportunities arise for the test of theory.

  20. Electromagnetic interactions and the relativistic infinite-component wave equation for hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, C.C.; Inomata, A.

    1981-01-15

    We examine the problem of incorporating external electromagnetic interactions into the theory of the relativistic infinite-component SO(4,2) wave equation for the hydrogen atom proposed by Barut. We introduce the simplest set of covariant interaction terms modeled after the nonrelativistic SO(4,2) theory as an alternative to the complicated array of terms obtained from the formal replacement P/sub ..mu../..-->..P/sub ..mu../-eA/sub ..mu../. Using a covariant perturbation theory, we calculate the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the ground state of the hydrogen atom in uniform fields and show that they have the correct nonrelativistic reductions.