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Sample records for relativistic hadron gas

  1. Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvan, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy G. The thermodynamical potential G is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

  2. Sudden Hadronization in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, Johann; Letessier, Jean

    2000-11-27

    We formulate and study a mechanical instability criterion for sudden hadronization of dense matter fireballs formed in 158A GeV Pb-Pb collisions. Considering properties of quark-gluon matter and hadron gas we obtain the phase boundary between these two phases and demonstrate that the required deep quark-gluon-plasma supercooling prior to sudden hadronization has occurred.

  3. Relativistic Few-Body Hadronic Physics Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzou, Wayne

    2016-06-20

    The goal of this research proposal was to use ``few-body'' methods to understand the structure and reactions of systems of interacting hadrons (neutrons, protons, mesons, quarks) over a broad range of energy scales. Realistic mathematical models of few-hadron systems have the advantage that they are sufficiently simple that they can be solved with mathematically controlled errors. These systems are also simple enough that it is possible to perform complete accurate experimental measurements on these systems. Comparison between theory and experiment puts strong constraints on the structure of the models. Even though these systems are ``simple'', both the experiments and computations push the limits of technology. The important property of ``few-body'' systems is that the ``cluster property'' implies that the interactions that appear in few-body systems are identical to the interactions that appear in complicated many-body systems. Of particular interest are models that correctly describe physics at distance scales that are sensitive to the internal structure of the individual nucleons. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle implies that in order to be sensitive to physics on distance scales that are a fraction of the proton or neutron radius, a relativistic treatment of quantum mechanics is necessary. The research supported by this grant involved 30 years of effort devoted to studying all aspects of interacting two and three-body systems. Realistic interactions were used to compute bound states of two- and three-nucleon, and two- and three-quark systems. Scattering observables for these systems were computed for a broad range of energies - from zero energy scattering to few GeV scattering, where experimental evidence of sub-nucleon degrees of freedom is beginning to appear. Benchmark calculations were produced, which when compared with calculations of other groups provided an essential check on these complicated calculations. In addition to computing bound state

  4. Relativistic hadrons and the origin of relativistic outflows in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, John; Kazanas, D.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the hydrodynamic origin of relativistic outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Specifically, we propose that the presence of a population of relativistic hadrons in the AGN 'central engine' and the associated neutron production suffices to produce outflows which under rather general conditions could be relativistic. The main such condition is that the size of the neutron production region be larger than the neutron flight path tau(sub n) approximately 3 x 10(exp 13) cm. This condition guarantees that the mean energy per particle in the proton fluid, resulting from the decay of the neutrons outside their production region, be greater than the proton rest mass. The expansion of this fluid can then lead naturally to a relativistic outflow by conversion of its internal energy to directed motion. We follow the development of such flows by solving the mass, energy as well as the kinetic equation for the proton gas in steady state, taking into account the source terms due to compute accurately the adiabatic index of the expanding gas, and in conjunction with Bernoulli's equation the detailed evolution of the bulk Lorentz factor. We further examine the role of large-scale magnetic fields in confining these outflows to produce the jets observed at larger scales.

  5. Hadron thermodynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammiraju, P.

    1985-01-01

    Various phenomenological models based on statistical thermodynamical considerations were used to fit the experimental data at high P sub T to a two temperature distribution. Whether this implies that the two temperatures belong to two different reaction mechanisms, or consequences of Lorentz-contraction factor, or related in a fundamental way to the intrinsic thermodynamics of Space-Time can only be revealed by further theoretical and experimental investigations of high P sub T phenomena in extremely energetic hadron-hadron collisions.

  6. Fast Dynamical Evolution of Hadron Resonance Gas via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc . A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles as the Ξ0- and the Ω‑-baryon. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH . Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2. . . 5 fm/c.

  7. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  8. Relativistic mean-field hadronic models under nuclear matter constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, M.; Lourenço, O.; Avancini, S. S.; Carlson, B. V.; Delfino, A.; Menezes, D. P.; Providência, C.; Typel, S.; Stone, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The microscopic composition and properties of infinite hadronic matter at a wide range of densities and temperatures have been subjects of intense investigation for decades. The equation of state (EoS) relating pressure, energy density, and temperature at a given particle number density is essential for modeling compact astrophysical objects such as neutron stars, core-collapse supernovae, and related phenomena, including the creation of chemical elements in the universe. The EoS depends not only on the particles present in the matter, but, more importantly, also on the forces acting among them. Because a realistic and quantitative description of infinite hadronic matter and nuclei from first principles in not available at present, a large variety of phenomenological models has been developed in the past several decades, but the scarcity of experimental and observational data does not allow a unique determination of the adjustable parameters. Purpose: It is essential for further development of the field to determine the most realistic parameter sets and to use them consistently. Recently, a set of constraints on properties of nuclear matter was formed and the performance of 240 nonrelativistic Skyrme parametrizations was assessed [M. Dutra et al., Phys. Rev. C 85, 035201 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.035201] in describing nuclear matter up to about three times nuclear saturation density. In the present work we examine 263 relativistic-mean-field (RMF) models in a comparable approach. These models have been widely used because of several important aspects not always present in nonrelativistic models, such as intrinsic Lorentz covariance, automatic inclusion of spin, appropriate saturation mechanism for nuclear matter, causality, and, therefore, no problems related to superluminal speed of sound in medium. Method: Three different sets of constraints related to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter, symmetry energy, and its derivatives were used. The

  9. Longitudinal and Transverse Parton Momentum Distributions for Hadrons within Relativistic Constituent Quark Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, T.; Pace, E.; Pasquini, B.; Salme, G.

    2010-08-05

    Longitudinal and transverse parton distributions for pion and nucleon are calculated from hadron vertexes obtained by a study of form factors within relativistic quark models. The relevance of the one-gluon-exchange dominance at short range for the behavior of the form factors at large momentum transfer and of the parton distributions at the end points is stressed.

  10. Electron-deuteron scattering in a relativistic theory of hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.

    1998-11-01

    The author reviews a three-dimensional formalism that provides a systematic way to include relativistic effects including relativistic kinematics, the effects of negative-energy states, and the boosts of the two-body system in calculations of two-body bound-states. He then explains how to construct a conserved current within this relativistic three-dimensional approach. This general theoretical framework is specifically applied to electron-deuteron scattering both in impulse approximation and when the {rho}{pi}{gamma} meson-exchange current is included. The experimentally-measured quantities A, B, and T{sub 20} are calculated over the kinematic range that is probed in Jefferson Lab experiments. The role of both negative-energy states and meson retardation appears to be small in the region of interest.

  11. Hadronization conditions in relativistic nuclear collisions and the QCD pseudo-critical line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, Francesco; Steinheimer, Jan; Stock, Reinhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    We compare the reconstructed hadronization conditions in relativistic nuclear collisions in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy range 4.7-2760 GeV in terms of temperature and baryon-chemical potential with lattice QCD calculations, by using hadronic multiplicities. We obtain hadronization temperatures and baryon chemical potentials with a fit to measured multiplicities by correcting for the effect of post-hadronization rescattering. The post-hadronization modification factors are calculated by means of a coupled hydrodynamical-transport model simulation under the same conditions of approximate isothermal and isochemical decoupling as assumed in the statistical hadronization model fits to the data. The fit quality is considerably better than without rescattering corrections, as already found in previous work. The curvature of the obtained "true" hadronization pseudo-critical line κ is found to be 0.0048 ± 0.0026, in agreement with lattice QCD estimates; the pseudo-critical temperature at vanishing μB is found to be 164.3 ± 1.8 MeV.

  12. Dynamics of strange, charm and high momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Greiner, C.; Stöcker, H.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate hadron production and attenuation of hadrons with strange and charm quarks (or antiquarks) as well as high transverse momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions from 2 A GeV to 21.3 A TeV within two independent transport approaches (UrQMD and HSD). Both transport models are based on quark, diquark, string and hadronic degrees of freedom, but do not include any explicit phase transition to a quark-gluon plasma. From our dynamical calculations we find that both models do not describe the maximum in the K+/ π+ ratio at 20-30 A GeV in central Au+Au collisions found experimentally, though the excitation functions of strange mesons are reproduced well in HSD and UrQMD. Furthermore, the transport calculations show that the charmonium recreation by D+ D¯→J/Ψ+ meson reactions is comparable to the dissociation by ‘comoving’ mesons at RHIC energies contrary to SPS energies. This leads to the final result that the total J/ Ψ suppression as a function of centrality at RHIC should be less than the suppression seen at SPS energies where the ‘comover’ dissociation is substantial and the backward channels play no role. Furthermore, our transport calculations-in comparison to experimental data on transverse momentum spectra from pp, d+Au and Au+Au reactions-show that pre-hadronic effects are responsible for both the hardening of the hadron spectra for low transverse momenta (Cronin effect) as well as the suppression of high pT hadrons. The mutual interactions of formed hadrons are found to be negligible in central Au+Au collisions at s=200 GeV for p T≥6 GeV/c and the sizeable suppression seen experimentally is attributed to a large extent to the interactions of ‘leading’ pre-hadrons with the dense environment.

  13. Test of Relativistic Gravity for Propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated `antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  14. Hadronic matter at finite temperature and density within an effective relativistic mean-field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.

    2012-10-01

    We study hot and dense hadronic matter by means of an effective relativistic mean-field model with the inclusion of the full octet of baryons, the Δ-isobar degrees of freedom and the lightest pseudoscalar and vector mesons. These last particles are considered by taking into account an effective chemical potential and an effective mass depending on the self-consistent interaction between baryons. The analysis is performed by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge fraction and zero net strangeness.

  15. Relativistic extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennisi, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the present paper is to construct a relativistic extended thermodynamics (ET) theory of rarefied polyatomic gases. This is achieved by adopting the closure procedure for the 14 generalized moments of a distribution function that, as in the classical case, depends on an additional continuous variable representing the energy of the internal modes of a molecule. This permits the theory to take into account the energy exchange between translational modes and internal modes of a molecule in binary collisions. The theory includes the ET theory of monatomic gases as a singular limit and converges to the corresponding ET theory of polyatomic gases in the classical limit. In contrast to a monatomic gas in which the order of magnitude of the dynamical pressure is O(1 /c2) , the dynamical pressure in a polyatomic gas is not small due to the internal motion of molecules as is the case in the classical limit. Therefore the present theory might result particularly useful in cosmology to describe some aspects of the post-recombination era.

  16. Analysis of hadron yield data within hadron resonance gas model with multi-component eigenvolume corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr; Stoecker, Horst

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of thermal fits to heavy-ion hadron yield data of ALICE and NA49 collaborations to the systematic uncertainties in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model related to the modeling of the eigenvolume interactions. We find a surprisingly large sensitivity in extraction of chemical freeze-out parameters to the assumptions regarding eigenvolumes of different hadrons. We additionally study the effect of including yields of light nuclei into the thermal fits to LHC data and find even larger sensitivity to the modeling of their eigenvolumes. The inclusion of light nuclei yields, thus, may lead to further destabilization of thermal fits. Our results show that modeling of eigenvolume interactions plays a crucial role in thermodynamics of HRG and that conclusions based on a non-interacting HRG are inconclusive.

  17. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  18. Strange quark suppression and strange hadron production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Long Haiyan; Feng Shengqin; Zhou Daimei; Yan Yuliang; Ma Hailiang; Sa Benhao

    2011-09-15

    The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE based on PYTHIA is utilized to systematically investigate strange particle production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Globally speaking, the PACIAE results of the strange particle rapidity density at midrapidity and the transverse momentum distribution are better than those of PYTHIA (default) in comparison with STAR and ALICE experimental data. This may represent the importance of the parton and hadron rescatterings, as well as the reduction mechanism of strange quark suppression, added in the PACIAE model. The K/{pi} ratios as a function of reaction energy in pp collisions from CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) to LHC energies are also analyzed in this paper.

  19. Light-front Holography - A New Approach to Relativistic Hadron Dynamics and Nonperturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2012-06-20

    The holographic mapping of gravity in AdS space to QCD, quantized at fixed light-front time, provides a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. In particular, the elastic and transition form factors of the pion and the nucleons are well described in this framework. The light-front AdS/QCD holographic approach thus gives a frame-independent first approximation of the color-confining dynamics, spectroscopy, and excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark bound states in QCD. More generally, we show that the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the eigensolutions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schroedinger equation, with an effective confining potential which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. The proposed method to compute the effective interaction thus resembles the two-particle-irreducible functional techniques used in quantum field theory.

  20. Heat Flux for a Relativistic Dilute Bidimensional Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Perciante, A. L.; Méndez, A. R.; Escobar-Aguilar, E.

    2017-04-01

    Relativistic kinetic theory predicts substantial modifications to the dissipation mechanisms of a dilute gas. For the heat flux, these include (in the absence of external forces) a correction to the thermal conductivity and the appearance of a new, purely relativistic, term proportional to the density gradient. In this work we obtain such constitutive equation for the particular case of a bidimensional gas. The calculation is based on the Chapman-Enskog solution to the relativistic Boltzmann equation and yields analytical expressions for the corresponding transport coefficients, which are evaluated for the particular case of hard disks. These results will be useful for numerical simulations and may be applied to bidimensional non-dense materials.

  1. Heat Flux for a Relativistic Dilute Bidimensional Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Perciante, A. L.; Méndez, A. R.; Escobar-Aguilar, E.

    2017-02-01

    Relativistic kinetic theory predicts substantial modifications to the dissipation mechanisms of a dilute gas. For the heat flux, these include (in the absence of external forces) a correction to the thermal conductivity and the appearance of a new, purely relativistic, term proportional to the density gradient. In this work we obtain such constitutive equation for the particular case of a bidimensional gas. The calculation is based on the Chapman-Enskog solution to the relativistic Boltzmann equation and yields analytical expressions for the corresponding transport coefficients, which are evaluated for the particular case of hard disks. These results will be useful for numerical simulations and may be applied to bidimensional non-dense materials.

  2. In-medium viscous coefficients of a hot hadronic gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyaya, Utsab; Ghosh, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sourav; Mitra, Sukanya

    2016-10-01

    We estimate the shear and the bulk viscous coefficients for a hot hadronic gas mixture made of pions and nucleons. The viscosities are evaluated in the relativistic kinetic theory approach by solving the transport equation in the relaxation time approximation for binary collisions (π π ,π N , and N N ). Instead of the vacuum cross sections usually used in the literature we employ in-medium scattering amplitudes in the estimation of the relaxation times. The modified cross sections for π π and π N scattering are obtained using one-loop modified thermal propagators for ρ ,σ , and Δ in the scattering amplitudes which are calculated using effective interactions. The resulting suppression of the cross sections at finite temperature and baryon density is observed to significantly affect the T and μN dependence of the viscosities of the system.

  3. Chemical Relaxation Times in a Hadron Gas at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose

    1993-07-01

    The relaxation time of particle numbers in hot hadronic matter with vanishing baryon number are estimated using the ideal gas approximation and taking into account resonance decays and annihilation processes as the only sources of particle number fluctuations.Near the QCD critical temperature the longest relaxation times turn out to be of the order of 10 fm and grow roughly exponentially to become of the order of 10^3 fm at temperatures around 100 MeV.As a consequence of such long relaxation times, a clear departure from chemical equilibrium must be observed in the momentum distribution of secondary particles produced in high energy nuclear collisions.

  4. The effect of inclusion of Δ resonances in relativistic mean-field model with scaled hadron masses and coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, K. A.; Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the equation of state of the baryon matter plays a decisive role in the description of neutron stars. With an increase of the baryon density the filling of Fermi seas of hyperons and Δ isobars becomes possible. Their inclusion into standard relativistic mean-field models results in a strong softening of the equation of state and a lowering of the maximum neutron star mass below the measured values. We extend a relativistic mean-field model with scaled hadron masses and coupling constants developed in our previous works and take into account now not only hyperons but also the Δ isobars. We analyze available empirical information to put constraints on coupling constants of Δs to mesonic mean fields. We show that the resulting equation of state satisfies majority of presently known experimental constraints.

  5. Dissipation process of binary gas mixtures in thermally relativistic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, dissipation process of binary gas mixtures in thermally relativistic flows is discussed with focus on characteristics of diffusion flux. As an analytical object, we consider the relativistic rarefied-shock layer around a triangular prism. Numerical results for the diffusion flux are compared with the Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) order approximation of the diffusion flux, which is calculated using the diffusion and thermal-diffusion coefficients by Kox et al (1976 Physica A 84 165-74). In the case of uniform flow with small Lorentz contraction, the diffusion flux, which is obtained by calculating the relativistic Boltzmann equation, is roughly approximated by the NSF order approximation inside the shock wave, whereas the diffusion flux in the vicinity of a wall is markedly different from the NSF order approximation. The magnitude of the diffusion flux, which is obtained by calculating the relativistic Boltzmann equation, is similar to that of the NSF order approximation inside the shock wave, unlike the pressure deviator, dynamic pressure and heat flux, even when the Lorentz contraction in the uniform flow becomes large, because the diffusion flux does not depend on the generic Knudsen number from its definition in Eckart’s frame. Finally, the author concludes that for accuracy diffusion flux must be calculated using the particle four-flow and averaged four velocity, which are formulated using the four velocity defined by each species of hard spherical particles.

  6. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that electric fields may lead to chiral separation in quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both be completely produced in off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We use the Woods-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of off-central collisions. The chiral electric field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy regions are studied in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory Foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  7. Acceleration in Perpendicular Relativistic Shocks for Plasmas Consisting of Leptons and Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem, A.; Fiúza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the acceleration of light particles in perpendicular shocks for plasmas consisting of a mixture of leptonic and hadronic particles. Starting from the full set of conservation equations for the mixed plasma constituents, we generalize the magnetohydrodynamical jump conditions for a multi-component plasma, including information about the specific adiabatic constants for the different species. The impact of deviations from the standard model of an ideal gas is compared in theory and particle-in-cell simulations, showing that the standard MHD model is a good approximation. The simulations of shocks in electron-positron-ion plasmas are for the first time multi-dimensional, transverse effects are small in this configuration, and one-dimensional (1D) simulations are a good representation if the initial magnetization is chosen high. 1D runs with a mass ratio of 1836 are performed, which identify the Larmor frequency ω ci as the dominant frequency that determines the shock physics in mixed component plasmas. The maximum energy in the non-thermal tail of the particle spectra evolves in time according to a power law vpropt α with α in the range 1/3 < α < 1, depending on the initial parameters. A connection is made with transport theoretical models by Drury and Gargaté & Spitkovsky, which predict an acceleration time vpropγ and the theory for small wavelength scattering by Kirk & Reville, which predicts a behavior rather as vpropγ2. Furthermore, we compare different magnetic field orientations with B 0 inside and out of the plane, observing qualitatively different particle spectra than in pure electron-ion shocks.

  8. Hadrons from coalescence plus fragmentation in A A collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, Vincenzo; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    In a coalescence plus independent fragmentation approach we calculate the pT spectra of the main hadrons: π ,K ,p ,p ¯,Λ ,ϕ in a wide range of transverse momentum from low pT up to about 10 GeV. The approach in its main features was developed several years ago at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy. Augmenting the model with the inclusion of some more main resonance decays, we show that the approach correctly predicts the evolution of the pT spectra from RHIC to LHC (Large Hadron Collider) energy and in particular the baryon-to-meson ratios p /π ,p ¯/π ,Λ /K that reach a value of the order of unit at pT˜3 GeV . This is achieved without any change of the coalescence parameters. The more recent availability of experimental data up to pT˜10 GeV for Λ spectrum as well as for p /π and Λ /K shows some lack of yield in a limited pT range around 6 GeV. This indicates that the baryons pT spectra from Albino-Kniehl-Kramer fragmentation functions are too flat at pT≲8 GeV . We also show that in a coalescence plus fragmentation approach one predicts a nearly pT independent p /ϕ ratio up to pT˜4 GeV followed by a significant decrease at higher pT. Such a behavior is driven by a similar radial flow effect at pT<2 GeV and the dominance of fragmentation for ϕ at larger pT.

  9. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  10. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, C; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kuhn, C; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lapointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-02-06

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be theta=1.37+/-0.02(stat)-0.07+0.06(syst), independent of p_{ perpendicular}.

  11. A covariant Fokker-Planck equation for a simple gas from relativistic kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.

    2010-12-14

    A manifestly covariant Fokker-Planck differential equation is derived for the case of a relativistic simple gas by taking a small momentum transfer approximation within the collision integral of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. We follow closely previous work, with the main difference that we keep manifest covariance at every stage of the analysis. In addition, we use the covariant Juettner distribution function to find a relativistic generalization of the Einstein's fluctuation-dissipation relation.

  12. Equation of state of the relativistic free electron gas at arbitrary degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2016-12-01

    We study the problem of the relativistic free electron gas at arbitrary degeneracy. The specific heat at constant volume and particle number CV and the specific heat at constant pressure and particle number CP are calculated. The question of equation of state is also studied. Non degenerate and degenerate limits are considered. We generalize the formulas obtained in the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic regimes.

  13. Color-singlet relativistic correction to inclusive J/ψ production associated with light hadrons at B factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu

    2010-08-01

    We study the first-order relativistic correction to the associated production of J/ψ with light hadrons at B factory experiments at s=10.58GeV, in the context of nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization. We employ a strategy for NRQCD expansion that slightly deviates from the orthodox doctrine, in that the matching coefficients are not truly of a “short-distance” nature, but explicitly depend upon physical kinematic variables rather than partonic ones. Our matching method, with validity guaranteed by the Gremm-Kapustin relation, is particularly suited for the inclusive quarkonium production and decay processes with involved kinematics, exemplified by the process e+e-→J/ψ+gg considered in this work. Despite some intrinsic ambiguity affiliated with the order-v2 NRQCD matrix element, if we choose its value as what has been extracted from a recent Cornell-potential-model-based analysis, including the relative order-v2 effect is found to increase the lowest-order prediction for the integrated J/ψ cross section by about 30%, and exert a modest impact on J/ψ energy, angular and polarization distributions except near the very upper end of the J/ψ energy. The order-v2 contribution to the energy spectrum becomes logarithmically divergent at the maximum of J/ψ energy. A consistent analysis may require that these large end-point logarithms be resummed to all orders in αs.

  14. Fluctuation theorem for entropy production during effusion of a relativistic ideal gas.

    PubMed

    Cleuren, B; Willaert, K; Engel, A; Van den Broeck, C

    2008-02-01

    The probability distribution of the entropy production for the effusion of a relativistic ideal gas is calculated explicitly. This result is then extended to include particle and antiparticle pair production and annihilation. In both cases, the fluctuation theorem is verified.

  15. Determining transport coefficients for a microscopic simulation of a hadron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Scott; Baez, Alexander; Kim, Jane

    2017-02-01

    Quark-gluon plasmas produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions quickly expand and cool, entering a phase consisting of multiple interacting hadronic resonances just below the QCD deconfinement temperature, T ˜155 MeV. Numerical microscopic simulations have emerged as the principal method for modeling the behavior of the hadronic stage of heavy-ion collisions, but the transport properties that characterize these simulations are not well understood. Methods are presented here for extracting the shear viscosity and two transport parameters that emerge in Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics. The analysis is based on studying how the stress-energy tensor responds to velocity gradients. Results are consistent with Kubo relations if viscous relaxation times are twice the collision time.

  16. New Hadron Monitor By Using A Gas-Filled RF Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Fasce, Giorgio; Flanagan, Gene; Johnson, Rolland; Tollestrup, Alvin; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-05-01

    It is trend to build an intense neutrino beam facility for the fundamental physics research, e.g. LBNF at Fermilab, T2K at KEK, and CNGS at CERN. They have investigated a hadron monitor to diagnose the primary/secondary beam quality. The existing hadron monitor based on an ionization chamber is not robust in the high-radiation environment vicinity of MW-class secondary particle production targets. We propose a gas-filled RF resonator to use as the hadron monitor since it is simple and hence radiation robust in this environment. When charged particles pass through the resonator they produce ionized plasma via the Coulomb interaction with the inert gas. The beam-induced plasma changes the permittivity of inert gas. As a result, a resonant frequency in the resonator shifts with the amount of ionized electrons. The radiation sensitivity is adjustable by the inert gas pressure and the RF amplitude. The hadron profile will be reconstructed with a tomography technique in the hodoscope which consists of X, Y, and theta layers by using a strip-shaped gas resonator. The sensitivity and possible system design will be shown in this presentation.

  17. From chiral quark dynamics with Polyakov loop to the hadron resonance gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Arriola, E. R.; Salcedo, L. L.; Megias, E.

    2013-03-25

    Chiral quark models with Polyakov loop at finite temperature have been often used to describe the phase transition. We show how the transition to a hadron resonance gas is realized based on the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop.

  18. (Pion interferometry search for a phase change in hadronic matter in relativistic heavy ion collisions and its application to RHIC: Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to assist in the investigation of the behavior of hadronic matter under extreme conditions. Specifically, this project intends to actively involve Creighton students and faculty in the search for indications of a phase transition from hadronic to quark matter. It is believed that the conditions necessary for the formation of this quark-gluon plasma include large energy densities over extended volumes. The technique of boson interferometry may prove to be the effective tool in verifying the existence of a quark-gluon plasma. This project continues active collaboration with Department of Energy research centers working on the NA36, NA44, and STAR experiments. It involves the effective development of the hardware, software and analytical skills required for a large relativistic heavy ion facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (RHIC). Integral to this endeavor are educational opportunities for students at Creighton University.

  19. [Pion interferometry search for a phase change in hadronic matter in relativistic heavy ion collisions and its application to RHIC: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, M.

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to assist in the investigation of the behavior of hadronic matter under extreme conditions. Specifically, this project intends to actively involve Creighton students and faculty in the search for indications of a phase transition from hadronic to quark matter. It is believed that the conditions necessary for the formation of this quark-gluon plasma include large energy densities over extended volumes. The technique of boson interferometry may prove to be the effective tool in verifying the existence of a quark-gluon plasma. This project continues active collaboration with Department of Energy research centers working on the NA36, NA44, and STAR experiments. It involves the effective development of the hardware, software and analytical skills required for a large relativistic heavy ion facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (RHIC). Integral to this endeavor are educational opportunities for students at Creighton University.

  20. New scenarios for hard-core interactions in a hadron resonance gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satarov, L. M.; Vovchenko, V.; Alba, P.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Stoecker, H.

    2017-02-01

    The equation of state of baryon-symmetric hadronic matter with hard-sphere interactions is studied. It is assumed that mesons M are pointlike, but baryons B and antibaryons B ¯ have the same hard-core radius rB. Three possibilities are considered: (1) the B B and B B ¯ interactions are the same; (2) baryons do not interact with antibaryons; (3) the B B ¯ , M B , and M B ¯ interactions are negligible. By choosing the parameter rB=0.3 -0.6 fm, we calculate the nucleon to pion ratio as a function of temperature and perform the fit of hadron yields measured in central Pb+Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV . New nontrivial effects in the interacting hadron resonance gas at temperatures 150 -200 MeV are found.

  1. Transport coefficients for relativistic gas mixtures of hard-sphere particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Moratto, Valdemar

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we calculate the transport coefficients for a relativistic binary mixture of diluted gases of hard-sphere particles. The gas mixture under consideration is studied within the relativistic Boltzmann equation in the presence of a gravitational field described by the isotropic Schwarzschild metric. We obtain the linear constitutive equations for the thermodynamic fluxes. The driving forces for the fluxes of particles and heat will appear with terms proportional to the gradient of gravitational potential. We discuss the consequences of the gravitational dependence on the driving forces. We obtain general integral expressions for the transport coefficients and evaluate them by assuming a hard-sphere interaction amongst the particles when they collide and not very disparate masses and diameters of the particles of each species. The obtained results are expressed in terms of their temperature dependence through the relativistic parameter which gives the ratio of the rest energy of the particles and the thermal energy of the gas mixture. Plots are given to analyze the behavior of the transport coefficients with respect to the temperature when small variations in masses and diameters of the particles of the species are present. We also analyze for each coefficient the corresponding limits to a single gas so the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limiting cases are recovered as well. Furthermore, we show that the transport coefficients have a dependence on the gravitational field.

  2. Bulk viscosity for pion and nucleon thermal fluctuation in the hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-10-01

    We have calculated microscopically bulk viscosity of hadronic matter, where equilibrium thermodynamics for all hadrons in medium are described by the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Considering pions and nucleons as abundant medium constituents, we have calculated their thermal widths, which inversely control the strength of bulk viscosities for respective components and represent their in-medium scattering probabilities with other mesonic and baryonic resonances, present in the medium. Our calculations show that bulk viscosity increases with both temperature and baryon chemical potential, whereas viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases with temperature and with baryon chemical potential, the ratio increases first and then decreases. The decreasing nature of the ratio with temperature has been observed in most of the earlier investigations with few exceptions. We find that the temperature dependence of bulk viscosity crucially depends on the structure of the relaxation time. Along the chemical freeze-out line in nucleus-nucleus collisions with increasing collision energy, bulk viscosity as well as the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases, which also agrees with earlier references. Our results indicate the picture of a strongly coupled hadronic medium.

  3. Freeze-out conditions in proton-proton collisions at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sabita; Mishra, Debadeepti; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2017-01-01

    The freeze-out conditions in proton-proton collisions at √{sNN}=200 , 900, and 7000 GeV have been extracted by fits to the mean hadron yields at midrapidity within the framework of the statistical model of an ideal gas of hadrons and resonances in the grand canonical ensemble. The variation of the extracted freeze-out thermal parameters and the goodness of the fits with √{sN N} are discussed. We find the extracted temperature and baryon chemical potential of the freeze-out surface to be similar in p +p and heavy-ion collisions. On the other hand, the thermal behavior of the strange hadrons is qualitatively different in p +p as compared to A +A collisions. We find an additional parameter accounting for nonequilibrium strangeness production is essential for describing the p +p data. This is in contrast to A +A where the nonequilibrium framework could be successfully replaced by a sequential and complete equilibrium model with an early freeze-out of the strange hadrons.

  4. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Abrams, Robert; Dinkel, Holly; Freemire, Ben; Johnson, Rolland; Kazakevich, Grigory; Tollestrup, Alvin; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  5. Correlations of conserved-number mixed susceptibilities in a hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-11-01

    The ratios of off-diagonal and diagonal susceptibilities of conserved charges are studied using a hadron resonance gas (HRG) model with an emphasis towards providing a proper baseline for comparison to the corresponding future experimental measurements. We have studied the effect of kinematic acceptances, transverse momentum (pT), and pseudorapidity (η ), and different charged states on the ratios of the calculated susceptibilities. We find that the effect of pT and η acceptance on the ratio of the susceptibilities is small relative to their dependence on the beam energy or the charged states of the used particles. We also present a HRG based calculation for various combinations of cumulant ratios of protons and pions, recently proposed as robust observables (with no theoretical uncertainties) for critical point search in the experiments. These results which increase as a function of collision energy will provide a better baseline for noncritical point physics compared to Poisson expectation.

  6. dynamical evolution of an ultra-relativistic fireball colliding with a freely expanding gas

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the hydrodynamical evolution of an ultra-relativistic fireball colliding with a freely expanding gas. The hydrodynamical interaction of the fireball and the gas results in the formation of a geometrically thin shell. We study the dynamical evolution of the shell analytically and perform a numerical simulation equipped with adaptive mesh refinement to investigate the internal structure of the shell. The shocked gas can give rise to bright emission in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy range. We propose that the breakout emission from the forward shock and the photospheric emission from the reverse-shocked fireball contribute to early gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of transition properties in highly charged inert-gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out an extensive investigation of various spectroscopic properties of highly charged inert-gas ions using a relativistic coupled-cluster method through a one-electron detachment procedure. In particular, we have calculated the atomic states 2 s22 p53/2 2P, 2 s22 p51/2 2P, and 2 s 2 p61/2 2S in F-like inert-gas ions; 3 s23 p53/2 2P, 3 s23 p51/2 2P, and 3 s 3 p61/2 2S states in Cl-like Kr, Xe, and Rn; and 4 s24 p53/2 2P, 4 s24 p51/2 2P, and 4 s 4 p61/2 2S states in Br-like Xe and Rn. Starting from a single-reference Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function, we construct our exact atomic states by including the dynamic correlation effects in an all-order perturbative fashion. Employing this method, we estimate the ionization potential energies of three low-lying orbitals present in their respective closed-shell configurations. Since the considered highly charged inert-gas ions exhibit huge relativistic effects, we have taken into account the corrections due to Breit interaction as well as from the dominant quantum electrodynamic correction such as vacuum polarization and self-energy effects in these systems. Using our calculated relativistic atomic wave functions and energies, we accurately determine various transition properties such as wavelengths, line strengths, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and lifetimes of the excited states.

  8. X-ray diagnostic for current density profiling relativistic electron beams in vacuum and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; Koppel, L.; Smith, J.

    1986-02-15

    An x-ray imaging technique has been studied for the purpose of observing the current density profile in a high-current relativistic electron beam (50 MeV, 10 kA). Calculations and measurements of energy spectra and intensities are in good agreement. Results indicate sufficient photon yield for pinhole imaging when the beam deposits a small part of its energy in high-Z gas or a thin high-Z foil. Characteristic L and K x-ray emission is not found not be a reliable technique due to strong L and K shell fluorescence in the presence of intense bremsstrahlung radiation. It is also found that at pressures on the order of one atmosphere, the density of energy deposition in a gas cell is too small to generate sufficient photon yield for time-resolved measurements.

  9. Description of hot and dense hadron-gas properties in a new excluded-volume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    A new equation of state for a hot and dense hadron gas (HG) is obtained where the finite hard-core size of baryons has been incorporated into a thermodynamically consistent formulation of excluded volume correction. Our model differs from other existing approaches on the following points. We assign a hard-core volume only to each baryon and mesons, which, although they possess a small volume, can fuse and interpenetrate into one another. Use of the full quantum statistics is made to obtain the grand canonical partition function, where excluded-volume correction has been incorporated by explicitly integrating over volume. We thus find that the new model works even for cases of extreme temperatures and/or densities where most other approaches fail. The numerical calculation indicates that the causality is respected by our prescription even at extreme densities. The temperature and density dependences of various thermodynamical quantities, e.g., pressure, baryon density, entropy and energy density, compare well with the results of other microscopic HG models. After suitable parametrization of the center-of-mass energy in terms of temperature and baryon chemical potential, we explore some new freeze-out criteria which exhibit full independence of the collision energy and of the structures of the colliding nuclei. We further demonstrate the suitability of our model for explaining the various experimental results of the multiplicity ratios of various particles and their antiparticles. Finally, we use our excluded-volume model to obtain the transport behavior of a hot and/or dense HG, such as shear viscosity- to-entropy ratio and speed of sound, and compare the results with earlier calculations.

  10. Relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction from molecules in the gas phase (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S.; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Centurion, Martin; Wang, Xijie

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a powerful technique that can be used to resolve structural changes of gas molecules during a photochemical reaction. However, the temporal resolution in pump-probe experiments has been limited to the few-ps level by the space-charge effect that broadens the electron pulse duration and by velocity mismatch between the pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, making only long-lived intermediate states accessible. Taking advantage of relativistic effects, Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electrons can be used to suppress both the space-charge effect and the velocity mismatch, and hence to achieve a temporal resolution that is fast enough to follow coherent nuclear motion in the target molecules. In this presentation, we show the first MeV UED experiments on gas phase targets. These experiments not only demonstrate that femtosecond temporal resolution is achieved, but also show that the spatial resolution is not compromised. This unprecedented combination of spatiotemporal resolution is sufficient to image coherent nuclear motions, and opens the door to a new class of experiments where the structural changes can be followed simultaneously in both space and time.

  11. Black hole thermodynamics as seen through a microscopic model of a relativistic Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákala, Jozef; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-02-01

    Equations of gravity when projected on spacetime horizons resemble Navier-Stokes equation of a fluid with a specific equation of state [T. Damour, Surface effects of black hole physics, in Proc. M. Grossman Meeting (North Holland, 1982), p. 587, T. Padmanabhan, Phys. Rev. D 83 (2011) 044048, arXiv:gr-qc/1012.0119, S. Kolekar and T. Padmanabhan, Phys. Rev. D 85 (2011) 024004, arXiv:gr-qc/1012.5421]. We show that this equation of state describes massless ideal relativistic gas. We use these results, and build an explicit and simple molecular model of the fluid living on the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black hole horizons. For the spin zero Bose gas, our model makes two predictions: (i) The horizon area/entropy is quantized as given by Bekenstein’s quantization rule, (ii) The model explains the correct type of proportionality between horizon area and entropy. However, for the physically relevant range of parameters, the proportionality constant is never equal to 1/4.

  12. Computation of masses and binding energies of some hadrons and bosons according to the rotating lepton model and the relativistic Newton equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayenas, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Grigoriou, D.

    2016-08-01

    We compute analytically the masses, binding energies and hamiltonians of gravitationally bound Bohr-type states via the rotating relativistic lepton model which utilizes the de Broglie wavelength equation in conjunction with special relativity and Newton's relativistic gravitational law. The latter uses the inertial-gravitational masses, rather than the rest masses, of the rotating particles. The model also accounts for the electrostatic charge- induced dipole interactions between a central charged lepton, which is usually a positron, with the rotating relativistic lepton ring. We use three rotating relativistic neutrinos to model baryons, two rotating relativistic neutrinos to model mesons, and a rotating relativistic electron neutrino - positron (or electron) pair to model the W± bosons. It is found that gravitationally bound ground states comprising three relativistic neutrinos have masses in the baryon mass range (∼⃒ 0.9 to 1 GeV/c2), while ground states comprising two neutrinos have masses in the meson mass range (∼⃒ 0.4 to 0.8 GeV/c2). It is also found that the rest mass values of quarks are in good agreement with the heaviest neutrino mass value of 0.05 eV/c2 and that the mass of W± bosons (∼⃒ 81 GeV/c2) corresponds to the mass of a rotating gravitationally confined e± — ve pair. A generalized expression is also derived for the gravitational potential energy of such relativistic Bohr-type structures.

  13. The response of relativistic outflowing gas to the inner accretion disk of a black hole.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael L; Pinto, Ciro; Fabian, Andrew C; Lohfink, Anne; Buisson, Douglas J K; Alston, William N; Kara, Erin; Cackett, Edward M; Chiang, Chia-Ying; Dauser, Thomas; De Marco, Barbara; Gallo, Luigi C; Garcia, Javier; Harrison, Fiona A; King, Ashley L; Middleton, Matthew J; Miller, Jon M; Miniutti, Giovanni; Reynolds, Christopher S; Uttley, Phil; Vasudevan, Ranjan; Walton, Dominic J; Wilkins, Daniel R; Zoghbi, Abderahmen

    2017-03-01

    The brightness of an active galactic nucleus is set by the gas falling onto it from the galaxy, and the gas infall rate is regulated by the brightness of the active galactic nucleus; this feedback loop is the process by which supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxies may moderate the growth of their hosts. Gas outflows (in the form of disk winds) release huge quantities of energy into the interstellar medium, potentially clearing the surrounding gas. The most extreme (in terms of speed and energy) of these-the ultrafast outflows-are the subset of X-ray-detected outflows with velocities higher than 10,000 kilometres per second, believed to originate in relativistic (that is, near the speed of light) disk winds a few hundred gravitational radii from the black hole. The absorption features produced by these outflows are variable, but no clear link has been found between the behaviour of the X-ray continuum and the velocity or optical depth of the outflows, owing to the long timescales of quasar variability. Here we report the observation of multiple absorption lines from an extreme ultrafast gas flow in the X-ray spectrum of the active galactic nucleus IRAS 13224-3809, at 0.236 ± 0.006 times the speed of light (71,000 kilometres per second), where the absorption is strongly anti-correlated with the emission of X-rays from the inner regions of the accretion disk. If the gas flow is identified as a genuine outflow then it is in the fastest five per cent of such winds, and its variability is hundreds of times faster than in other variable winds, allowing us to observe in hours what would take months in a quasar. We find X-ray spectral signatures of the wind simultaneously in both low- and high-energy detectors, suggesting a single ionized outflow, linking the low- and high-energy absorption lines. That this disk wind is responding to the emission from the inner accretion disk demonstrates a connection between accretion processes occurring on very different

  14. The response of relativistic outflowing gas to the inner accretion disk of a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Michael L.; Pinto, Ciro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lohfink, Anne; Buisson, Douglas J. K.; Alston, William N.; Kara, Erin; Cackett, Edward M.; Chiang, Chia-Ying; Dauser, Thomas; De Marco, Barbara; Gallo, Luigi C.; Garcia, Javier; Harrison, Fiona A.; King, Ashley L.; Middleton, Matthew J.; Miller, Jon M.; Miniutti, Giovanni; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Uttley, Phil; Vasudevan, Ranjan; Walton, Dominic J.; Wilkins, Daniel R.; Zoghbi, Abderahmen

    2017-03-01

    The brightness of an active galactic nucleus is set by the gas falling onto it from the galaxy, and the gas infall rate is regulated by the brightness of the active galactic nucleus; this feedback loop is the process by which supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxies may moderate the growth of their hosts. Gas outflows (in the form of disk winds) release huge quantities of energy into the interstellar medium, potentially clearing the surrounding gas. The most extreme (in terms of speed and energy) of these—the ultrafast outflows—are the subset of X-ray-detected outflows with velocities higher than 10,000 kilometres per second, believed to originate in relativistic (that is, near the speed of light) disk winds a few hundred gravitational radii from the black hole. The absorption features produced by these outflows are variable, but no clear link has been found between the behaviour of the X-ray continuum and the velocity or optical depth of the outflows, owing to the long timescales of quasar variability. Here we report the observation of multiple absorption lines from an extreme ultrafast gas flow in the X-ray spectrum of the active galactic nucleus IRAS 13224‑3809, at 0.236 ± 0.006 times the speed of light (71,000 kilometres per second), where the absorption is strongly anti-correlated with the emission of X-rays from the inner regions of the accretion disk. If the gas flow is identified as a genuine outflow then it is in the fastest five per cent of such winds, and its variability is hundreds of times faster than in other variable winds, allowing us to observe in hours what would take months in a quasar. We find X-ray spectral signatures of the wind simultaneously in both low- and high-energy detectors, suggesting a single ionized outflow, linking the low- and high-energy absorption lines. That this disk wind is responding to the emission from the inner accretion disk demonstrates a connection between accretion processes occurring on very

  15. Equilibration of hadrons in HICs via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2016-08-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc. A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH. Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2... 5fm/c.

  16. Equilibration of hadrons in HICs via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc. A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH. Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2…5fm/c.

  17. Quark-hadron phase transition and strangeness conservation constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed-Uddin

    1999-01-01

    The implications of the strangeness conservation in a hadronic resonance gas (HRG) on the expected phase transition to the quark gluon plasma (QGP) are investigated. It is assumed that under favourable conditions a first order hadron-quark matter phase transition may occur in the hot hadronic matter such as those produced in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at CERN and BNL. It is however shown that the criteria of strict strangeness conservation in the HRG may not permit the occurrence of a strict first order equilibrium quark-hadron phase transition unlike a previous study. This emerges as a consequence of the application of a realistic equation of state (EOS) for the HRG and QGP phases, which account for the finite-size effect arising from the short range hard-core hadronic repulsion in the HRG phase and the perturbative QCD interactions in the QGP phase. For a first order hadron-quark matter phase transition to occur one will therefore require large fluctuations in the critical thermal parameters, which might arise due to superheating, supercooling or other nonequlibrium effects. We also discuss a scenario proposed earlier, leading to a possible strangeness separation process during hadronization.

  18. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a relativistic gas at the transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo

    2016-11-01

    The Jüttner distribution function for equilibrium relativistic fluids has two well-known limits, the non-relativistic limit at low temperatures and ultra-relativistic limit for high temperatures. Recently, the description of this transition in velocity space in the system, from a gaussian to a bimodal distribution was made by Mendoza et al. Physically, it is a transition between a regime where the relativistic energy is dominated by kinetic to another where the rest energy dominates. It has been found that the critical temperature at which the relativistic corrections becomes relevant, depends just on the dimension of the system, this allowed a description in terms of the theory of critical points (Montakhab et al.). In this contribution a review of the thermodynamic quantities that are only dependent on the ratio between temperature and critical temperature, and the dimension is made. We will also analyze the effects of critical temperature on dissipative processes in simple special relativistic fluids. Particularly, purely relativistic terms that are usually proportional to the number density gradient are studied. The transport coefficients can be written in terms of the transition temperature, this will allow us to identify the lower order relativistic effects just in terms of the dimension of the system.

  19. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  20. Preliminary results of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as real-time beam monitor in hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aza, E.; Ciocca, M.; Murtas, F.; Puddu, S.; Pullia, M.; Silari, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of proton and carbon ion beams in cancer therapy (also known as hadron therapy) is progressively growing worldwide due to their improved dose distributions, sparing of healthy tissues and (for carbon ions) increased radiobiological effectiveness especially for radio-resistant tumours. Strict Quality Assurance (QA) protocols need to be followed for guaranteeing the clinical beam specifications. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a gaseous detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology for measuring the beam spot dimensions and the homogeneity of the scanned irradiation field, which are daily QA tasks commonly performed using radiochromic films. Measurements performed at the National Centre for Oncological Hadron Therapy (CNAO) in Pavia (Italy) showed that the detector is able to monitor the 2D beam image on-line with a pad granularity of 2 mm and a response proportional to the number of delivered particles. The dose homogeneity was measured with low deviation from the results obtained with radiochromic films.

  1. Point form relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic SU(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klink, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The point form is used as a framework for formulating a relativistic quantum mechanics, with the mass operator carrying the interactions of underlying constituents. A symplectic Lie algebra of mass operators is introduced from which a relativistic harmonic oscillator mass operator is formed. Mass splittings within the degenerate harmonic oscillator levels arise from relativistically invariant spin-spin, spin-orbit, and tensor mass operators. Internal flavor (and color) symmetries are introduced which make it possible to formulate a relativistic SU(6) model of baryons (and mesons). Careful attention is paid to the permutation symmetry properties of the hadronic wave functions, which are written as polynomials in Bargmann spaces.

  2. Validation of Hadronic Models in GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Koi, Tatsumi; Wright, Dennis H.; Folger, Gunter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; Heikkinen, Aatos; Truscott, Peter; Lei, Fan; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

    2007-09-26

    Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

  3. High baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at energies attainable at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2017-01-01

    In very high-energy collisions nuclei are practically transparent to each other but produce very hot nearly baryon-free matter in the so-called central rapidity region. The energy in the central rapidity region comes from the kinetic energy of the colliding nuclei. We calculate the energy and rapidity loss of the nuclei using the color glass condensate model. This model also predicts the excitation energy of the nuclear fragments. Using a space-time picture of the collision we calculate the baryon and energy densities of the receding baryonic fireballs. For central collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energy attainable at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for example, we find baryon densities more than ten times that of atomic nuclei over a large volume.

  4. Hadronization of partons

    SciTech Connect

    Albino, S.

    2010-07-15

    The description of inclusive production of single unpolarized light hadrons using fragmentation functions in the framework of the factorization theorem is reviewed. The factorization of observables into perturbatively calculable quantities and these universal fragmentation functions are summarized and some improvements beyond the standard fixed order approach are discussed. The extraction of fragmentation functions for light charged ({pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p/p) and neutral (K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda}/{Lambda}) hadrons using these theoretical tools is discussed through global fits to experimental data from reactions at various colliders, in particular from accurate e{sup +}e{sup -} reactions at the Large Electron-Position Collider (LEP), and the subsequent successful predictions of other experimental data, such as data gathered at Hadron Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA), the Tevatron, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), from these fitted fragmentation functions as allowed by factorization universality. These global fits also impose competitive constraints on {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}). Emphasis is placed on the need for accurate data from pp(p) and ep reactions in which the hadron species is identified in order to constrain the separate fragmentation functions of the gluon and each quark flavor for each hadron species.

  5. ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEI: A NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    1999-10-29

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic nuclei provide a window on the behavior of strong interactions at asymptotically high energies. They also will allow the authors to study the bulk properties of hadronic matter at very high densities.

  6. Heavy Flavor Dynamics in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan

    Heavy flavor hadrons serve as valuable probes of the transport properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this dissertation, we introduce a comprehensive framework that describes the full-time evolution of heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions, including its initial production, in-medium evolution inside the QGP matter, hadronization process from heavy quarks to their respective mesonic bound states and the subsequent interactions between heavy mesons and the hadron gas. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is studied within the framework of a Langevin equation coupled to hydrodynamic models that simulate the space-time evolution of the hot and dense QGP matter. We improve the classical Langevin approach such that, apart from quasi-elastic scatterings between heavy quarks and the medium background, radiative energy loss is incorporated as well by treating gluon radiation as a recoil force term. The subsequent hadronization of emitted heavy quarks is simulated via a hybrid fragmentation plus recombination model. The propagation of produced heavy mesons in the hadronic phase is described using the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. Our calculation shows that while collisional energy loss dominates the heavy quark motion inside the QGP in the low transverse momentum (p T) regime, contributions from gluon radiation are found to be significant at high pT. The recombination mechanism is important for the heavy flavor meson production at intermediate energies. The hadronic final state interactions further enhance the suppression and the collective flow of heavy mesons we observe. Within our newly developed framework, we present numerical results for the nuclear modification and the elliptic flow of D mesons, which are consistent with measurements at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC); predictions for B mesons are also provided. In

  7. QCD thermodynamics and missing hadron states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreczky, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Equation of State and fluctuations of conserved charges in hot strongly interacting matter are being calculated with increasing accuracy in lattice QCD, and continuum results at physical quark masses become available. At sufficiently low temperature the thermodynamic quantities can be understood in terms of hadron resonance gas model that includes known hadrons and hadronic resonances from Particle Data Book. However, for some quantities it is necessary to include undiscovered hadronic resonances (missing states) that are, however, predicted by quark model and lattice QCD study of hadron spectrum. Thus, QCD thermodynamics can provide indications for the existence of yet undiscovered hadron states.

  8. Hard thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, F. D.; Thoma, M. H.

    2001-06-01

    The recent status of hard thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is reviewed and the current rates are presented with emphasis on corrected bremsstrahlung processes in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and quark-hadron duality. Employing Bjorken hydrodynamics with an EOS supporting the phase transition from QGP to hot hadron gas (HHG), thermal photon spectra are computed. For SPS 158 GeV Pb+Pb collisions, comparison with other theoretical results and the WA98 direct photon data indicates significant contributions due to prompt photons. Extrapolating the presented approach to RHIC and LHC experiments, predictions of the thermal photon spectrum show a QGP outshining the HHG in the high-pT-region.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy of heteronuclear dimers in the gas phase and supported on graphene: relativistic density-functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2014-04-09

    The structural and magnetic properties of mixed PtCo, PtFe, and IrCo dimers in the gas phase and supported on a free-standing graphene layer have been calculated using density-functional theory, both in the scalar-relativistic limit and self-consistently including spin-orbit coupling. The influence of the strong magnetic moments of the 3d atoms on the spin and orbital moments of the 5d atoms, and the influence of the strong spin-orbit coupling contributed by the 5d atom on the orbital moments of the 3d atoms have been studied in detail. The magnetic anisotropy energy is found to depend very sensitively on the nature of the eigenstates in the vicinity of the Fermi level, as determined by band filling, exchange splitting and spin-orbit coupling. The large magnetic anisotropy energy of free PtCo and IrCo dimers relative to the easy direction parallel to the dimer axis is coupled to a strong anisotropy of the orbital magnetic moments of the Co atom for both dimers, and also on the Ir atom in IrCo. In contrast the PtFe dimer shows a weak perpendicular anisotropy and only small spin and orbital anisotropies of opposite sign on the two atoms. For dimers supported on graphene, the strong binding within the dimer and the stronger interaction of the 3d atom with the substrate stabilizes an upright geometry. Spin and orbital moments on the 3d atom are strongly quenched, but due to the weaker binding within the dimer the properties of the 5d atom are more free-atom-like with increased spin and orbital moments. The changes in the magnetic moment are reflected in the structure of the electronic eigenstates near the Fermi level, for all three dimers the easy magnetic direction is now parallel to the dimer axis and perpendicular to the graphene layer. The already very large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of IrCo is further enhanced by the interaction with the support, the MAE of PtFe changes sign, and that of the PtCo dimer is reduced. These changes are discussed in relation to

  10. Theory of hadronic nonperturbative models

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.; Polyzou, W.N.

    1995-08-01

    As more data probing hadron structure become available hadron models based on nonperturbative relativistic dynamics will be increasingly important for their interpretation. Relativistic Hamiltonian dynamics of few-body systems (constituent-quark models) and many-body systems (parton models) provides a precisely defined approach and a useful phenomenology. However such models lack a quantitative foundation in quantum field theory. The specification of a quantum field theory by a Euclidean action provides a basis for the construction of nonperturbative models designed to maintain essential features of the field theory. For finite systems it is possible to satisfy axioms which guarantee the existence of a Hilbert space with a unitary representation of the Poincare group and the spectral condition which ensures that the spectrum of the four-momentum operator is in the forward light cone. The separate axiom which guarantees locality of the field operators can be weakened for the construction for few-body models. In this context we are investigating algebraic and analytic properties of model Schwinger functions. This approach promises insight into the relations between hadronic models based on relativistic Hamiltonian dynamics on one hand and Bethe-Salpeter Green`s-function equations on the other.

  11. Hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  12. Effects of quark-gluon plasma and hadron gas on charmonium production at energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baoyi

    2016-04-01

    The production of charmonium in heavy ion collisions is investigated based on the Boltzmann-type transport model for charmonium evolution and the Langevin equation for charm quark evolution. Charmonium suppression and regeneration in both quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and hadron phase are considered. Charm quarks are far from thermalization, and regeneration of charmonium in QGP and hadron gas is negligible at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). At peripheral collisions, charmonium suppression with hadron gas explains the experimental data well. But at central collisions, additional suppression from deconfined matter (QGP) is necessary for the data. This means there should be QGP produced at central collisions, and no QGP produced at peripheral collisions at SPS energy. Predictions are also made at FAIR √{sN N}=7.7 GeV Au+Au collisions.

  13. Effects of volume corrections and resonance decays on cumulants of net-charge distributions in a Monte Carlo hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao-jie

    2017-02-01

    The effects of volume corrections and resonance decays (the resulting correlations between positive charges and negative charges) on cumulants of net-proton distributions and net-charge distributions are investigated by using a Monte Carlo hadron resonance gas (MCHRG) model. The required volume distributions are generated by a Monte Carlo Glauber (MC-Glb) model. Except the variances of net-charge distributions, the MCHRG model with more realistic simulations of volume corrections, resonance decays and acceptance cuts can reasonably explain the data of cumulants of net-proton distributions and net-charge distributions reported by the STAR collaboration. The MCHRG calculations indicate that both the volume corrections and resonance decays make the cumulant products of net-charge distributions deviate from the Skellam expectations: the deviations of Sσ and κσ2 are dominated by the former effect while the deviations of ω are dominated by the latter one.

  14. Light-cone quantization and hadron structure

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Quantum chromodynamics provides a fundamental description of hadronic and nuclear structure and dynamics in terms of elementary quark and gluon degrees of freedom. In practice, the direct application of QCD to reactions involving the structure of hadrons is extremely complex because of the interplay of nonperturbative effects such as color confinement and multi-quark coherence. In this talk, the author will discuss light-cone quantization and the light-cone Fock expansion as a tractable and consistent representation of relativistic many-body systems and bound states in quantum field theory. The Fock state representation in QCD includes all quantum fluctuations of the hadron wavefunction, including fax off-shell configurations such as intrinsic strangeness and charm and, in the case of nuclei, hidden color. The Fock state components of the hadron with small transverse size, which dominate hard exclusive reactions, have small color dipole moments and thus diminished hadronic interactions. Thus QCD predicts minimal absorptive corrections, i.e., color transparency for quasi-elastic exclusive reactions in nuclear targets at large momentum transfer. In other applications, such as the calculation of the axial, magnetic, and quadrupole moments of light nuclei, the QCD relativistic Fock state description provides new insights which go well beyond the usual assumptions of traditional hadronic and nuclear physics.

  15. Forced canonical thermalization in a hadronic transport approach at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliinychenko, Dmytro; Petersen, Hannah

    2017-03-01

    Hadronic transport approaches based on an effective solution of the relativistic Boltzmann equation are widely applied for the dynamical description of heavy ion reactions at low beam energies. At high densities, the assumption of binary interactions often used in hadronic transport approaches may not be applicable anymore. Therefore, we effectively simulate the high-density regime using the local forced canonical thermalization. This framework provides the opportunity to interpolate in a dynamical way between two different limits of kinetic theory: the dilute gas approximation and the ideal fluid case. This approach will be important for studies of the dynamical evolution of heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies as experimentally investigated at the beam energy scan program at RHIC, and in the future at FAIR and NICA. On the other hand, this new way of modeling hot and dense strongly interacting matter might be relevant for small systems at high energies (LHC and RHIC) as well.

  16. Specific heat of matter formed in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sumit; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rupa; Nayak, Tapan K.; Nandi, Basanta K.

    2016-10-01

    We report the excitation energy dependence of specific heat (cv) of hadronic matter at freeze-out in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies by analyzing the published data on event-by-event mean transverse momentum ( ) distributions. The distributions in finite pT ranges are converted to distributions of effective temperatures, and dynamical fluctuations in temperature are extracted by subtracting widths of the corresponding mixed event distributions. The heat capacity per particle at the kinetic freeze-out surface is presented as a function of collision energy, which shows a sharp rise in cv below √{sN N}=62.4 GeV. We employ the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model to estimate cv at the chemical and kinetic freeze-out surfaces. The experimental results are compared to the HRG and other theoretical model calculations. HRG results show good agreement with data. Model predictions for cv at the CERN Large Hadron Collider energy are presented.

  17. Hadron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.

    1984-05-30

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain.

  18. Bubble dynamics and the quark-hadron phase transition in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogaça, D. A.; Sanches, S. M.; Fariello, R.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-05-01

    We study the nucleation of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in a hadron gas at low temperatures and high baryon densities. This kind of process will presumably happen very often in nuclear collisions at the GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) and the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (NICA). When the appropriate energy densities (or baryon densities) and temperatures are reached the conversion of one phase into another is not instantaneous. It is a complex process, which involves the nucleation of bubbles of the new phase. One important element of this transition process is the rate of growth of a QGP bubble. In order to estimate it we solve the Relativistic Rayleigh-Plesset equation which governs the dynamics of a relativistic spherical bubble in a strongly interacting medium. The baryon rich hadron gas is represented by the nonlinear Walecka model and the QGP is described by the MIT bag model and also by a mean field model of QCD.

  19. The Hadron Blind Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; Zajac, Stephanie; Hemmick, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab have hinted at the existence of a new form of matter at high gluon density, the Color Glass Condensate. High energy electron scattering off of nuclei, focusing on the low-x components of the nuclear wave function, will definitively measure this state of matter. However, when a nucleus contributes a low x parton, the reaction products are highly focused in the electron-going direction and have large momentum in the lab system. High-momentum particle identification is particularly challenging. A particle is identifiable by its mass, but tracking algorithms only yield a particle's momentum based on its track's curvature. The particle's velocity is needed to identify the particle. A ring-imaging Cerenkov detector is being developed for the forward angle particle identification from the technological advancements of PHENIX's Hadron-Blind Detector (HBD), which uses Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and pixelated pad planes to detect Cerenkov photons. The new HBD will focus the Cerenkov photons into a ring to determine the parent particle's velocity. Results from the pad plane simulations, construction tests, and test beam run will be presented.

  20. Antiparticle to particle production ratios in hadron-hadron and d-Au collisions in the DPMJET-III Monte Carlo model

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, F. W.; Ranft, J.; Engel, R.; Roesler, S.

    2008-01-15

    To understand baryon stopping we analyze new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Fermilab data within the framework of the multichain Monte Carlo DPMJET-III. The present consideration is restricted to hadron-hadron and d-Au collisions, where the present version of the model can be trusted.

  1. Electromagnetic recombination spectra at the quark-hadron phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Clint; Pratt, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Because quarks carry electric charge, they can radiate light when they change energy levels, which is exactly what happens when they hadronize. This is true not only in jets but also in heavy-ion collisions, where a thermalized plasma of quarks and gluons cools into a gas of hadrons. First, direct emission of photons from two quarks coalescing from the continuum into pions is calculated using the quark-meson model. The yield of final-state photons to pions is found to be about e2/gπq q 2 , which is on the order of a percent. Second, the yield of photons from the decay of highly excited color singlets, which may exist ephemerally during hadronizaton, is estimated. Because these contributions occur late in the reaction, they should carry significant elliptic flow, which may help explain the large observed flow of direct photons by the PHENIX Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The enhanced emission also helps explain the PHENIX Collaboration's surprisingly large observed γ /π ratio.

  2. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and

  3. Investigation of the non-relativistic fermi-gas model by considering the position-dependent mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, S.; de Montigny, M.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the Schrödinger equation in the position-dependent mass framework with an infinite square well potential. We apply this approach to a Fermi gas, calculate the density of states of the gas, examine the information entropy, some expectation values and the uncertainty principle.

  4. Thermodynamics of Hot Hadronic Gases at Finite Baryon Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Michael Glenn

    In this thesis we investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) matter at finite baryon densities. We begin by constructing crossover models for the thermodynamic equation of state. These use switching functions to smoothly interpolate between a hadronic gas model at low energy densities to a perturbative QCD equation of state at high energy densities. We carefully design the switching function to avoid introducing first-, second-, or higher-order phase transitions which lattice QCD indicates are not present at small baryon chemical potentials. We employ three kinds of hadronic models in the crossover constructions, two of which include repulsive interactions via an excluded volume approximation while one model does not. We find that the three crossover models are in excellent agreement with accurate lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state over a wide range of temperatures and baryon chemical potentials. Hence, the crossover models should be very useful for parameterizing the equation of state at finite baryon densities, which is needed to build next-generation hydrodynamic simulations of heavy-ion collisions. We next calculate the speed of sound and baryon number fluctuations predicted by the crossover models. We find that crossover models with hadronic repulsion are most successful at reproducing the lattice results, while the model without repulsion is less successful, and hadron (only) models show poor agreement. We then compare the crossover models to net-proton fluctuation measurements from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comparisons suggest baryon number fluctuations freeze-out well below the chemical freeze-out temperature. We also search for signs of critical fluctuations in the STAR data, but we find no evidence for them at this time. Finally, we derive kinetic theory formulas for the shear and bulk viscosity and thermal conductivity of hot hadronic

  5. FUTURE SCIENCE AT THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    LUDLAM, T.

    2006-12-21

    QCD was developed in the 1970's as a theory of the strong interaction describing the confinement of quarks in hadrons. An early consequence of this picture was the realization that at sufficiently high temperature, or energy density, the confining forces are overcome by color screening effects, resulting in a transition from hadronic matter to a new state--later named the Quark Gluon Plasma--whose bulk dynamical properties are determined by the quark and gluon degrees of freedom, rather than those of confined hadrons. The suggestion that this phase transition in a fundamental theory of nature might occur in the hot, dense nuclear matter created in heavy ion collisions triggered a series of experimental searches during the past two decades at CERN and at BNL, with successively higher-energy nuclear collisions. This has culminated in the present RHIC program. In their first five years of operation, the RHIC experiments have identified a new form of thermalized matter formed in Au+Au collisions at energy densities more than 100 times that of a cold atomic nucleus. Measurements and comparison with relativistic hydrodynamic models indicate that the matter thermalizes in an unexpectedly short time ( < 1 fm/c) , has an energy density at least 15 times larger than needed for color deconfinement, has a temperature about 2 times the critical temperature of {approx}170 MeV predicted by lattice QCD, and appears to exhibit collective motion with ideal hydrodynamic properties--a ''perfect liquid'' that appears to flow with a near-zero viscosity to entropy ratio - lower than any previously observed fluid and perhaps close to a universal lower bound. There are also indications that the new form of matter directly involves quarks. Comparison of measured relative hadron abundances with very successful statistical models indicates that hadrons chemically decouple at a temperature of 160-170 MeV. There is evidence suggesting that this happens very close to the quark-hadron phase

  6. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, July 1, 1994--June 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    This progress report contains 36 items of research work done by ten members of the University of Maryland Nuclear Theory Group with 21 outside collaborators from various institutions in the US, Canada, Korea and Europe. The report is in four sections, each representing major and basic areas of interest in nuclear theory. The sections are as follows: (1) hadrons in nuclei and nuclear matter; (2) hadron physics; (3) relativistic dynamics in quark, hadron and nuclear physics; (4) heavy ion dynamics and related processes.

  7. Relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Relativistic geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum metrology enables new applications in geodesy, including relativistic geodesy. The recent progress in optical atomic clocks and in long-distance frequency transfer by optical fiber together pave the way for using measurements of the gravitational frequency redshift for geodesy. The remote comparison of frequencies generated by calibrated clocks will allow for a purely relativistic determination of differences in gravitational potential and height between stations on Earth surface (chronometric leveling). The long-term perspective is to tie potential and height differences to atomic standards in order to overcome the weaknesses and inhomogeneity of height systems determined by classical spirit leveling. Complementarily, gravity measurements with atom interferometric setups, and satellite gravimetry with space borne laser interferometers allow for new sensitivities in the measurement of the Earth's gravity field.

  9. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  10. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  11. Hadron-Hadron Interactions in the Constituent Quark Model: Results and Extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Swanson

    2001-01-01

    Hadronic interactions are discussed within the context of the constituent quark model. The ''Quark Born Diagram'' methodology is outlined, extensive applications to meson-meson and meson-baryon interactions are discussed, and general features of these interactions are highlighted. The second half of this document deals with shortcomings of the quark model approach and methods to overcome them. These include relativistic kinematics, unitarity, nonlocal potentials, coupled channel effects, and the chiral nature of the pion.

  12. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  13. Novel Perspectives for Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-03-09

    I discuss several novel and unexpected aspects of quantum chromodynamics. These include: (a) the nonperturbative origin of intrinsic strange, charm and bottom quarks in the nucleon at large x; the breakdown of pQCD factorization theorems due to the lensing effects of initial- and final-state interactions; (b) important corrections to pQCD scaling for inclusive reactions due to processes in which hadrons are created at high transverse momentum directly in the hard processes and their relation to the baryon anomaly in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions; and (c) the nonuniversality of quark distributions in nuclei. I also discuss some novel theoretical perspectives in QCD: (a) light-front holography - a relativistic color-confining first approximation to QCD based on the AdS/CFT correspondence principle; (b) the principle of maximum conformality - a method which determines the renormalization scale at finite order in perturbation theory yielding scheme independent results; (c) the replacement of quark and gluon vacuum condensates by 'in-hadron condensates' and how this helps to resolve the conflict between QCD vacuum and the cosmological constant.

  14. Relativistic causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Giovanni; Owen Weatherall, James

    2014-11-01

    Relativity theory is often taken to include, or to imply, a prohibition on superluminal propagation of causal processes. Yet, what exactly the prohibition on superluminal propagation amounts to and how one should deal with its possible violation have remained open philosophical problems, both in the context of the metaphysics of causation and the foundations of physics. In particular, recent work in philosophy of physics has focused on the causal structure of spacetime in relativity theory and on how this causal structure manifests itself in our most fundamental theories of matter. These topics were the subject of a workshop on "Relativistic Causality in Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity" that we organized (along with John Earman) at the Center for Philosophy of Science in Pittsburgh on April 5-7, 2013. The present Special Issue comprises contributions by speakers in that workshop as well as several other experts exploring different aspects of relativistic causality. We are grateful to the journal for hosting this Special Issue, to the journal's managing editor, Femke Kuiling, for her help and support in putting the issue together, and to the authors and the referees for their excellent work.

  15. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  16. Computational Gas-Phase Formation Enthalpy and Electron Affinity for Platinum Hexafluoride: Is Gaseous PtF6 Diamagnetic because of a Relativistic Effect?

    PubMed

    Fernandes De Farias, Robson

    2016-12-05

    In the present work, a computational thermochemistry study (semiempirical, PM6 method) for platinum hexafluoride (PtF6) is performed. The gas-phase formation enthalpy (ΔfH°) and electron affinity are calculated and the results compared with the experimental data. A calculated ΔfH°(g) value of -669.47 kJ mol(-1), in very good agreement with the experimental data from the literature, was obtained by Knudsen cell mass spectrometry. However, such a value was obtained when a PtF6 molecule with no unpaired electrons (diamagnetic) was modeled. Such a fact is in contrast with the four-unpaired-electron configuration (t2g(3)eg(1)) generally accepted for gaseous (and solid) PtF6 but is in agreement with the fact (based on quantum relativistic calculations) that the triplet state t2g is split in the tetragonal field into a singlet and a lower-lying doublet, with four 5d(4) electrons occupying the 5dxz and 5dyz atomic orbitals in the spin paired state. The modeled compound exhibits a distorted structure and a dipole moment of 0.30 D. The calculated electron affinity is 7.6 eV, in very good agreement with the experimental and calculated data. The computed zero-point energy, G°, H°, and S° values for such a structure are 34.71 kJ mol(-1), -725.59 kJ mol(-1), -612.11 kJ mol(-1), and 380.31 J K(-1) mol(-1). The positive S° and negative G° and H° values show that, from a thermodynamic point of view, the structure it stable. A working hypothesis is proposed in which the coordination number in PtF6 is 8 and the fluoride has a polymeric nature.

  17. The PHENIX Hadron Blind Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J. M.

    2009-03-10

    Dielectron measurements by the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC are limited by the combinatorial background from electrons and positrons which are not produced in the same pair. The Hadron Blind Detector will allow a substantial reduction of this background by correctly identifying dielectrons from photon conversions and pion Dalitz decays which dominate the signal in the low mass region of the spectrum. Triple GEM stacks, with a CsI photocathode deposited on the uppermost GEM, detect Cherenkov light produced by electrons in a CF{sub 4} radiator. The transparency of CF{sub 4}, high quantum efficiency of CsI in the UV, and absence of a window between the gas radiator and the GEMs allow a large photoelectron yield, while minimizing the hadron signal. Results from the HBD in RHIC's Run-7 and preparations for upcoming runs are discussed.

  18. Unraveling hadron structure with generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Belitsky; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2004-10-01

    The recently introduced generalized parton distributions have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. They combine the features of form factors, parton densities and distribution amplitudes - the functions used for a long time in studies of hadronic structure. Generalized parton distributions are analogous to the phase-space Wigner quasi-probability function of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which encodes full information on a quantum-mechanical system. We give an extensive review of main achievements in the development of this formalism. We discuss physical interpretation and basic properties of generalized parton distributions, their modeling and QCD evolution in the leading and next-to-leading orders. We describe how these functions enter a wide class of exclusive reactions, such as electro- and photo-production of photons, lepton pairs, or mesons.

  19. Many body theory in hadronic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe Jose

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation presents the development of several many body techniques of widespread use in Atomic, Nuclear and Solid State to Hadronic, the low energy Particle Physics that studies strong interactions. For the high energy, asymptotically free, quarks and gluons described by Quantum Chromodynamics, a canonical (BCS) transformation is performed to generate effective low energy degrees of freedom. Then a model Hamiltonian is approximately diagonalized in Fock space using the TDA and RPA formulations. The relativistic wave equations resulting in each sector are numerically solved, yielding mass eigenvalues for the hadronic spectrum. The TDA provides a reasonable approximation for the glueball and meson spectra, with the exception of the light pseudoscalar mesons, where only the RPA correctly incorporates chiral symmetry and the Goldstone boson nature of the pion. Particular attention is devoted to charmed and hybrid mesons, especially exotic states, given the existing data from BNL and prospects of detection at both TJNAF (Hall D) and CERN (Compass).

  20. Hadron Physics at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-10-24

    The new FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The hadron physics program centers around the the high-energy storage ring HESR for antiprotons and the PANDA experiment that is integrated in it. The physics program includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics, electromagnetic processes and charm in nuclei.

  1. Holographic Model of Hadronization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nick; Tedder, Andrew

    2008-04-25

    We study hadronization of the final state in a particle-antiparticle annihilation using a holographic gravity dual description of QCD. At the point of hadronization we match the events to a simple (Gaussian) energy distribution in the five dimensional theory. The final state multiplicities are then modeled by calculating the overlap between the Gaussian and a set of functions in the fifth dimension which represent each hadron. We compare our results to those measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. Hadron production numbers over a range of 4 orders of magnitude are reproduced well.

  2. Holographic model of hadronization.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick; Tedder, Andrew

    2008-04-25

    We study hadronization of the final state in a particle-antiparticle annihilation using a holographic gravity dual description of QCD. At the point of hadronization we match the events to a simple (Gaussian) energy distribution in the five dimensional theory. The final state multiplicities are then modeled by calculating the overlap between the Gaussian and a set of functions in the fifth dimension which represent each hadron. We compare our results to those measured in e(+)e(-) collisions. Hadron production numbers over a range of 4 orders of magnitude are reproduced well.

  3. QCD, hadrons and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardulli, G.

    2005-04-01

    I give a summary of Section E of the sixth edition of the Conference Quark confinement and the hadron spectrum. Papers were presented on different subjects, from spectroscopy, including pentaquarks and hadron structure, to new physics effects (non commutative field theories, supersymmetry and extra dimensions) and the problem of color confinement, both in ordinary Yang-Mills models and in supersymmetric Yang-Mills.

  4. Spectral functions and in-medium properties of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripolt, R.-A.; von Smekal, L.; Wambach, J.

    The in-medium modifications of hadron properties such as masses and decay widths have been a major focus of the scientific work of Gerry Brown and the insights gained by him and his collaborators made them major drivers of this field for several decades. Their prediction of experimental signals in di-lepton pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions was instrumental in initiating large experimental campaigns which continue till today. In this chapter, we review recent results which elucidate the relation of hadronic spectral properties at finite temperature and density to the restoration of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry.

  5. Processes in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of a Boltzmann distribution in particle kinetic energies is investigated for a plasma with theta = KTe/mc-squared much greater than unity, where m is the electron mass. It is shown that thermalization of the electron gas by binary collisions is not sufficiently effective to maintain the equilibrium distribution when other processes that perturb the equilibrium are taken into account. Electron-positron pair production in electron-electron and electron-ion collisions, and perturbations of a Boltzmann distribution by nonthermal processes are evaluated. Thermalization by means of other mechanisms, such as interaction with plasma waves is discussed, and the opacity of a relativistic plasma is computed for Compton scattering, pair production in the fields of electrons and ions, inverse bremsstrahlung, and synchrotron self-absorption.

  6. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  7. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  8. DETAILED COMPARISON BETWEEN PARTON CASCADE AND HADRONIC CASCADE AT SPS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NARA,Y.

    1998-10-23

    The authors study the importance of the partonic phase produced in relativistic heavy ion collision by comparing the parton cascade model and the hadronic cascade model. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated with JAM and discussions are given comparing with VNI. Both of these models give good description of experimental data. They also discuss the strangeness production mechanism and the directed transverse flow.

  9. Renormdynamics and Hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhaldiani, Nugzar

    2016-01-01

    Independently radiating valence quarks and corresponding negative binomial distribution presents phenomenologically preferable mechanism of hadronization in multiparticle production processes. Main properties of the renormdynamics, corresponding motion equations and their solutions are considered.

  10. The Mesozoic Era of relativistic heavy ion physics and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.

    1994-03-01

    In order to understand how matter 15 billion years ago in the form of quarks, gluons and leptons at a temperature of 2 {times} 10{sup 12} {degrees}K evolved to become today`s Universe, the goal of relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics is to understand the equation of state of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. This quest is of cross-disciplinary interest. The phase transition from partonic matter to hadronic matter tens of micro-seconds after the beginning of the universe is of interest to cosmology. Fluctuations during this phase transition would influence nucleosynthesis and the understanding of baryonic inhomogeneities in the universe. The nuclear matter equation of state, which describes the incompressibility of nuclear matter, governs neutron star stability. It determines the possible existence of strange quark matter stars and the dynamics of supernova expansion in astrophysics. The existence of collective nuclear phenomena in nuclear physics is also determined by the nuclear equation of state. In relativistic heavy ion collisions collective nuclear flow has been observed and is being studied extensively to obtain a better understanding of the incompressibility of nuclear matter. In high energy nuclear and particle physics, production and excitations of hadronic final states have been studied in detail and are important to an overall understanding of the equation of state of nuclear matter at finite temperature. The possibility in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions to create and study highly excited hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom provides a unique opportunity for understanding the behavior of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. Study of the QCD vacuum, of particular interest in particle physics, would provide a better understanding of symmetry-breaking mechanisms and the origins of the masses of the various quarks and particles.

  11. Radiobiology of Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Streit-Bianchi, Marilena

    2008-08-11

    Radiobiological studies of hadrons beams are essential for optimizing tumour treatments. Whit hadrons when clinical facilities are running radiobiological studies are also done to ensure beam optimization and quality control as well as for the understanding of tumour and normal tissue reactions and late effects. Beam characteristic determinations nowadays are carried out according to well established radiobiological standard parameters and using well established biological reference systems. Some of the most recent studies on the topic are reported here.

  12. Radiobiology of Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit-Bianchi, Marilena

    2008-08-01

    Radiobiological studies of hadrons beams are essential for optimizing tumour treatments. Whit hadrons when clinical facilities are running radiobiological studies are also done to ensure beam optimization and quality control as well as for the understanding of tumour and normal tissue reactions and late effects. Beam characteristic determinations nowadays are carried out according to well established radiobiological standard parameters and using well established biological reference systems. Some of the most recent studies on the topic are reported here.

  13. Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic spherical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic spherical flows is numerically examined under the fully special relativistic treatment. We first derive relativistic formal solutions for the relativistic radiative transfer equation in relativistic spherical flows. We then iteratively solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation, using an impact parameter method/tangent ray method, and obtain specific intensities in the inertial and comoving frames, as well as moment quantities, and the Eddington factor. We consider several cases; a scattering wind with a luminous central core, an isothermal wind without a core, a scattering accretion on to a luminous core, and an adiabatic accretion on to a dark core. In the typical wind case with a luminous core, the emergent intensity is enhanced at the center due to the Doppler boost, while it reduces at the outskirts due to the transverse Doppler effect. In contrast to the plane-parallel case, the behavior of the Eddington factor is rather complicated in each case, since the Eddington factor depends on the optical depth, the flow velocity, and other parameters.

  14. Holography inspired stringy hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in flat four dimensional space-time. The models are based on a "map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5 ×S5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line, a meson, a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the "string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best fits, write down certain predictions for higher excited hadrons and present attempts to identify glueballs.

  15. Dynamical phase trajectories for relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arsene, I. C.; Bravina, L. V.; Cassing, W.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Russkikh, V. N.; Larionov, A.; Randrup, J.; Toneev, V. D.; Zeeb, G.; Zschiesche, D.

    2007-03-15

    Central collisions of gold nuclei are simulated by several existing models and the central net baryon density {rho} and the energy density {epsilon} are extracted at successive times for beam kinetic energies of 5-40 GeV/nucleon. The resulting trajectories in the ({rho},{epsilon}) phase plane are discussed from the perspective of experimentally exploring the expected first-order hadronization phase transition with the planned FAIR at GSI or in a low-energy campaign at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  16. Hadronic wavefunctions in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, T.

    1994-05-01

    The analysis of light-cone wavefunctions seems the most promising theoretical approach to a detailed understanding of the structure of relativistic bound states, particularly hadrons. However, there are numerous complications in this approach. Most importantly, the light-cone approach sacrifices manifest rotational invariance in exchange for the elimination of negative-energy states. The requirement of rotational invariance of the full theory places important constraints on proposed light-cone wavefunctions, whether they are modelled or extracted from some numerical procedure. A formulation of the consequences of the hidden rotational symmetry has been sought for some time; it is presented in Chapter 2. In lattice gauge theory or heavy-quark effective theory, much of the focus is on the extraction of numerical values of operators which are related to the hadronic wavefunction. These operators are to some extent interdependent, with relations induced by fundamental constraints on the underlying wavefunction. The consequences of the requirement of unitarity are explored in Chapter 3, and are found to have startling phenomenological relevance. To test model light-cone wavefunctions, experimental predictions must be made. The reliability of perturbative QCD as a tool for making such predictions has been questioned. In Chapter 4, the author presents a computation of the rates for nucleon-antinucleon annihilation, improving the reliability of the perturbative computation by taking into account the Sudakov suppression of exclusive processes at large transverse impact parameter. In Chapter 5, he develops the analysis of semiexclusive production. This work focuses on processes in which a single isolated meson is produced perturbatively and recoils against a wide hadronizing system. At energies above about 10 GeV, semiexclusive processes are shown to be the most sensitive experimental probes of hadronic structure.

  17. Nonrelativistic approaches derived from point-coupling relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.; Sa Martins, J. S.

    2010-03-15

    We construct nonrelativistic versions of relativistic nonlinear hadronic point-coupling models, based on new normalized spinor wave functions after small component reduction. These expansions give us energy density functionals that can be compared to their relativistic counterparts. We show that the agreement between the nonrelativistic limit approach and the Skyrme parametrizations becomes strongly dependent on the incompressibility of each model. We also show that the particular case A=B=0 (Walecka model) leads to the same energy density functional of the Skyrme parametrizations SV and ZR2, while the truncation scheme, up to order {rho}{sup 3}, leads to parametrizations for which {sigma}=1.

  18. Relativistic blast waves in two dimensions. I - The adiabatic case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate solutions are presented for the dynamical evolution of strong adiabatic relativistic blast waves which result from a point explosion in an ambient gas in which the density varies both with distance from the explosion center and with polar angle in axisymmetry. Solutions are analytical or quasi-analytical for the extreme relativistic case and numerical for the arbitrarily relativistic case. Some general properties of nonplanar relativistic shocks are also discussed, including the incoherence of spherical ultrarelativistic blast-wave fronts on angular scales greater than the reciprocal of the shock Lorentz factor, as well as the conditions for producing blast-wave acceleration.

  19. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  20. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  1. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  2. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  3. Hadron Physics with Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2005-10-26

    The new FAIR facility which comes into operation at GSI in the upcoming years has a dedicated program of utilizing antiprotons for hadron physics. In particular, the planned PANDA experiment belongs to the group of core experiments at the new FAIR facility in Darmstadt/Germany. PANDA will be a universal detector to study the strong interaction by utilizing the annihilation process of antiprotons with protons and nuclear matter. The current paper gives an introduction into the hadron physics with antiprotons and part of the planned physics program with PANDA.

  4. Convexity and symmetrization in relativistic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, T.

    1990-09-01

    There is a strong motivation for the desire to have symmetric hyperbolic field equations in thermodynamics, because they guarantee well-posedness of Cauchy problems. A generic quasi-linear first order system of balance laws — in the non-relativistic case — can be shown to be symmetric hyperbolic, if the entropy density is concave with respect to the variables. In relativistic thermodynamics this is not so. This paper shows that there exists a scalar quantity in relativistic thermodynamics whose concavity guarantees a symmetric hyperbolic system. But that quantity — we call it —bar h — is not the entropy, although it is closely related to it. It is formed by contracting the entropy flux vector — ha with a privileged time-like congruencebar ξ _α . It is also shown that the convexity of h plus the requirement that all speeds be smaller than the speed of light c provide symmetric hyperbolic field equations for all choices of the direction of time. At this level of generality the physical meaning of —h is unknown. However, in many circumstances it is equal to the entropy. This is so, of course, in the non-relativistic limit but also in the non-dissipative relativistic fluid and even in relativistic extended thermodynamics for a non-degenerate gas.

  5. Light-Front Holography and Hadronization at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy; Shrock, Robert

    2008-07-25

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Light-front holography is a remarkable feature of AdS/CFT: it allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. We suggest that the spatial support of QCD condensates is restricted to the interior of hadrons, since they arise due to the interactions of confined quarks and gluons. Chiral symmetry is thus broken in a limited domain of size 1=m{sub {pi}} in analogy to the limited physical extent of superconductor phases. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  6. Light-Front Holography and Hadronization at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de; Shrock, Robert

    2008-10-13

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Light-front holography is a remarkable feature of AdS/CFT: it allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. We suggest that the spatial support of QCD condensates is restricted to the interior of hadrons, since they arise due to the interactions of confined quarks and gluons. Chiral symmetry is thus broken in a limited domain of size 1/m{sub {pi}}, in analogy to the limited physical extent of superconductor phases. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  7. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-09-10

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  8. Relativistic Sommerfeld Low Temperature Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, O.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    We derive a relativistic Sommerfeld expansion for thermodynamic quantities in many-body fermionic systems. The expansion is used to generate the equation of state of the Walecka model and its isotherms. We find that these results are in good agreement with numerical calculations, even when the expansion is truncated at its lowest order, in the low temperature regime, defined by T/xf ≪ 1. Although the interesting region near the liquid-gas phase transition is excluded by this criterion, the expansion may still find usefulness in the study of very cold nuclear matter systems, such as neutron stars.

  9. Weibull model of multiplicity distribution in hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Sadhana; Nandi, Basanta K.; Sett, Priyanka

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the use of the Weibull distribution as a simple parametrization of charged particle multiplicities in hadron-hadron collisions at all available energies, ranging from ISR energies to the most recent LHC energies. In statistics, the Weibull distribution has wide applicability in natural processes that involve fragmentation processes. This provides a natural connection to the available state-of-the-art models for multiparticle production in hadron-hadron collisions, which involve QCD parton fragmentation and hadronization. The Weibull distribution describes the multiplicity data at the most recent LHC energies better than the single negative binomial distribution.

  10. Hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  11. Non-relativistic leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Wörmann, Mirco E-mail: mwoermann@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2014-02-01

    In many phenomenologically interesting models of thermal leptogenesis the heavy neutrinos are non-relativistic when they decay and produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. We propose a non-relativistic approximation for the corresponding rate equations in the non-resonant case, and a systematic way for computing relativistic corrections. We determine the leading order coefficients in these equations, and the first relativistic corrections. The non-relativistic approximation works remarkably well. It appears to be consistent with results obtained using a Boltzmann equation taking into account the momentum distribution of the heavy neutrinos, while being much simpler. We also compute radiative corrections to some of the coefficients in the rate equations. Their effect is of order 1% in the regime favored by neutrino oscillation data. We obtain the correct leading order lepton number washout rate in this regime, which leads to large ( ∼ 20%) effects compared to previous computations.

  12. The physics and experimental program of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    The primary motivation for studying nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic and ultrarelativistic energies is to investigate matter at high energy densities ({var_epsilon} {much_gt} 1 GeV/fm{sup 3}). Early speculations of possible exotic states of matter focused on the astrophysical implications of abnormal states of dense nuclear matter. Field theoretical calculations predicted abnormal nuclear states and excitation of the vacuum. This generated an initial interest among particle and nuclear physicists to transform the state of the vacuum by using relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Extremely high temperatures, above the Hagedorn limiting temperature, were expected and a phase transition to a system of deconfined quarks and gluons, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), was predicted. Such a phase of matter would have implications for both early cosmology and stellar evolution. The understanding of the behavior of high temperature nuclear matter is still in its early stages. However, the dynamics of the initial stages of these collisions, which involve hard parton-parton interactions, can be calculated using perturbative QCD. Various theoretical approaches have resulted in predictions that a high temperature (T {approximately} 500 MeV) gluon gas will be formed in the first instants (within 0.3 fm/c) of the collision. Furthermore, QCD lattice calculations exhibit a phase transition between a QGP and hadronic matter at a temperature near 250 MeV. Such phases of matter may have existed shortly after the Big Bang and may exist in the cores of dense stars. An important question is whether such states of matter can be created and studied in the laboratory. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and a full complement of detector systems are being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate these new and fundamental properties of matter.

  13. Relativistic Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Over the past one hundred years, Brownian motion theory has contributed substantially to our understanding of various microscopic phenomena. Originally proposed as a phenomenological paradigm for atomistic matter interactions, the theory has since evolved into a broad and vivid research area, with an ever increasing number of applications in biology, chemistry, finance, and physics. The mathematical description of stochastic processes has led to new approaches in other fields, culminating in the path integral formulation of modern quantum theory. Stimulated by experimental progress in high energy physics and astrophysics, the unification of relativistic and stochastic concepts has re-attracted considerable interest during the past decade. Focusing on the framework of special relativity, we review, here, recent progress in the phenomenological description of relativistic diffusion processes. After a brief historical overview, we will summarize basic concepts from the Langevin theory of nonrelativistic Brownian motions and discuss relevant aspects of relativistic equilibrium thermostatistics. The introductory parts are followed by a detailed discussion of relativistic Langevin equations in phase space. We address the choice of time parameters, discretization rules, relativistic fluctuation-dissipation theorems, and Lorentz transformations of stochastic differential equations. The general theory is illustrated through analytical and numerical results for the diffusion of free relativistic Brownian particles. Subsequently, we discuss how Langevin-type equations can be obtained as approximations to microscopic models. The final part of the article is dedicated to relativistic diffusion processes in Minkowski spacetime. Since the velocities of relativistic particles are bounded by the speed of light, nontrivial relativistic Markov processes in spacetime do not exist; i.e., relativistic generalizations of the nonrelativistic diffusion equation and its Gaussian solutions

  14. SHARE: Statistical hadronization with resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrieri, G.; Steinke, S.; Broniowski, W.; Florkowski, W.; Letessier, J.; Rafelski, J.

    2005-05-01

    SHARE is a collection of programs designed for the statistical analysis of particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. With the physical input of intensive statistical parameters, it generates the ratios of particle abundances. The program includes cascade decays of all confirmed resonances from the Particle Data Tables. The complete treatment of these resonances has been known to be a crucial factor behind the success of the statistical approach. An optional feature implemented is the Breit-Wigner distribution for strong resonances. An interface for fitting the parameters of the model to the experimental data is provided. Program summaryTitle of the program:SHARE, October 2004, version 1.2 Catalogue identifier: ADVD Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVD Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: PC, Pentium III, 512 MB RAM (not hardware dependent) Operating system: Linux: RedHat 6.1, 7.2, FEDORA, etc. (not system dependent) Programming language:FORTRAN77: g77, f77 as well as Mathematica, ver. 4 or 5, for the case of full chemical equilibrium and particle widths set to zero Size of the package: 645 KB directory including example programs (87 KB compressed distribution archive) External routines: KERNLIB, MATHLIB and PACKLIB from the CERN Program Library (see http://cernlib.web.cern.ch for download and installation instructions) Distribution format: tar.gz Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15 277 Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 522 Computer: Any computer with an f77 compiler Nature of the physical problem: Statistical analysis of particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions involves the formation and the subsequent decays of a large number of resonances. With the physical input of thermal parameters, such as the temperature and fugacities, and considering cascading decays, along with weak

  15. Hadronic Lorentz violation in chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamand, Rasha; Altschul, Brett; Schindler, Matthias R.

    2017-03-01

    Any possible Lorentz violation in the hadron sector must be tied to Lorentz violation at the underlying quark level. The relationships between the theories at these two levels are studied using chiral perturbation theory. Starting from a two-flavor quark theory that includes dimension-4 Lorentz-violation operators, the effective Lagrangians are derived for both pions and nucleons, with novel terms appearing in both sectors. Since the Lorentz-violation coefficients for nucleons and pions are all related to a single set of underlying quark coefficients, one can compare the sensitivity of different types of experiments. Our analysis shows that atomic physics experiments currently provide constraints on the quark parameters that are stronger by about 10 orders of magnitude than astrophysical experiments with relativistic pions. Alternatively, it is possible to place approximate bounds on pion Lorentz violation using only proton and neutron observations. Under the assumption that the Lorentz-violating operators considered here are the only ones contributing to the relevant observables and taking the currently unknown hadronic low-energy constants to be of natural size, the resulting estimated bounds on four pion parameters are at the 10-23 level, representing improvements of 10 orders of magnitude.

  16. Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

  17. Additional strange hadrons from QCD thermodynamics and strangeness freezeout in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Ding, H-T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Maezawa, Y; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Wagner, M

    2014-08-15

    We compare lattice QCD results for appropriate combinations of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number fluctuations with predictions from two hadron resonance gas (HRG) models having different strange hadron content. The conventionally used HRG model based on experimentally established strange hadrons fails to describe the lattice QCD results in the hadronic phase close to the QCD crossover. Supplementing the conventional HRG with additional, experimentally uncharted strange hadrons predicted by quark model calculations and observed in lattice QCD spectrum calculations leads to good descriptions of strange hadron thermodynamics below the QCD crossover. We show that the thermodynamic presence of these additional states gets imprinted in the yields of the ground-state strange hadrons leading to a systematic 5-8 MeV decrease of the chemical freeze-out temperatures of ground-state strange baryons.

  18. Hadronic and nuclear interactions in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Despite the evidence that QCD - or something close to it - gives a correct description of the structure of hadrons and their interactions, it seems paradoxical that the theory has thus far had very little impact in nuclear physics. One reason for this is that the application of QCD to distances larger than 1 fm involves coherent, non-perturbative dynamics which is beyond present calculational techniques. For example, in QCD the nuclear force can evidently be ascribed to quark interchange and gluon exchange processes. These, however, are as complicated to analyze from a fundamental point of view as is the analogous covalent bond in molecular physics. Since a detailed description of quark-quark interactions and the structure of hadronic wavefunctions is not yet well-understood in QCD, it is evident that a quantitative first-principle description of the nuclear force will require a great deal of theoretical effort. Another reason for the limited impact of QCD in nuclear physics has been the conventional assumption that nuclear interactions can for the most part be analyzed in terms of an effective meson-nucleon field theory or potential model in isolation from the details of short distance quark and gluon structure of hadrons. These lectures, argue that this view is untenable: in fact, there is no correspondence principle which yields traditional nuclear physics as a rigorous large-distance or non-relativistic limit of QCD dynamics. On the other hand, the distinctions between standard nuclear physics dynamics and QCD at nuclear dimensions are extremely interesting and illuminating for both particle and nuclear physics.

  19. QCD and Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  20. Relativistic Jets and Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    In order to study the relativistic jets from collapsars, we have developed a special relativistic multiple-dimensional hydrodynamics code similar to the GENESIS code (Aloy et al., ApJS, 122, 151). The code is based on the PPM interpolation algorithm and Marquina's Riemann solver. Using this code, we have simulated the propagation of axisymmetric jets along the rotational axis of collapsed rotating stars (collapsars). Using the progenitors of MacFadyen, Woosley, and Heger, a relativistic jet is injected at a given inner boundary radius. This radius, the opening angle of the jet, its Lorentz factor, and its total energy are parameters of the problem. A highly collimated, relativistic outflow is observed at the surface of the star several seconds later. We will discuss the hydrodynamical focusing of the jet, it's break out properties, time evolution, and sensitivity to the adopted parameters.

  1. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  2. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  3. Exact Relativistic `Antigravity' Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin S.

    2006-01-01

    The Schwarzschild solution is used to find the exact relativistic motion of a payload in the gravitational field of a mass moving with constant velocity. At radial approach or recession speeds faster than 3-1/2 times the speed of light, even a small mass gravitationally repels a payload. At relativistic speeds, a suitable mass can quickly propel a heavy payload from rest nearly to the speed of light with negligible stresses on the payload.

  4. Numerical Relativistic Quantum Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-08

    Introduction 1 II. Relativistic Wave Equations 2 III. Stationary States 4 A. Analytical Solutions for Coulomb Potentials 4 B. Numerical Solutions...C. Relativistic Ionization Example 15 V. Computational Performance 18 VI. Conclusions 21 VII. Acknowledgements 22 References 23 1 I. INTRODUCTION ...peculiar result that B0 = 1 TG is a weak field. At present, such fields are observed only in connection with astrophysical phenomena [14]. The highest

  5. Electromagnetic wave equations for relativistically degenerate quantum magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, Waqas; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K.

    2010-06-15

    A generalized set of nonlinear electromagnetic quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations is derived for a magnetized quantum plasma, including collisional, electron spin-(1/2), and relativistically degenerate electron pressure effects that are relevant for dense astrophysical systems, such as white dwarfs. For illustrative purposes, linear dispersion relations are derived for one-dimensional magnetoacoustic waves for a collisionless nonrelativistic degenerate gas in the presence of the electron spin-(1/2) contribution and for magnetoacoustic waves in a plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons. It is found that both the spin and relativistic degeneracy at high densities tend to slow down the magnetoacoustic wave due to the Pauli paramagnetic effect and relativistic electron mass increase. The present study outlines the theoretical framework for the investigation of linear and nonlinear behaviors of electromagnetic waves in dense astrophysical systems. The results are applied to calculate the magnetoacoustic speeds for both the nonrelativistic and relativistic electron degeneracy cases typical for white dwarf stars.

  6. Electromagnetic wave equations for relativistically degenerate quantum magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Masood, Waqas; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K

    2010-06-01

    A generalized set of nonlinear electromagnetic quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations is derived for a magnetized quantum plasma, including collisional, electron spin- 1/2, and relativistically degenerate electron pressure effects that are relevant for dense astrophysical systems, such as white dwarfs. For illustrative purposes, linear dispersion relations are derived for one-dimensional magnetoacoustic waves for a collisionless nonrelativistic degenerate gas in the presence of the electron spin- 1/2 contribution and for magnetoacoustic waves in a plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons. It is found that both the spin and relativistic degeneracy at high densities tend to slow down the magnetoacoustic wave due to the Pauli paramagnetic effect and relativistic electron mass increase. The present study outlines the theoretical framework for the investigation of linear and nonlinear behaviors of electromagnetic waves in dense astrophysical systems. The results are applied to calculate the magnetoacoustic speeds for both the nonrelativistic and relativistic electron degeneracy cases typical for white dwarf stars.

  7. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards

  8. PSEUDOSPIN SYMMETRY IN NUCLEI, SPIN SYMMETRY IN HADRONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE; T. GOLDMAN; J. GINOCCHIO

    2000-08-01

    Ginocchio argued that chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is responsible for the relativistic pseudospin symmetry in the Dirac equation, explaining the observed approximate pseudospin symmetry in sizable nuclei. On a much smaller scale, it is known that spin-orbit splittings in hadrons are small. Specifically, new experimental data from CLEO indicate small splittings in D-mesons. For heavy-light mesons we identify a cousin of pseudospin symmetry that suppresses these splittings in the Dirac equation, known as spin symmetry. We suggest an experimental test of the implications of spin symmetry for wave functions in electron-positron annihilation. We investigate how QCD can give rise to two different dynamical symmetries on nuclear and hadronic scales.

  9. Relativistic effects in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsimirskii, K.B.

    1995-11-01

    Relativistic effects become apparent when the velocity of the electron is arbitrarily close to the speed of light (137 au) without actually attaining it (in heavy atoms of elements at the end of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table). At the orbital level, the relativistic effect is apparent in the radial contraction of penetrating s and p shells, expansion of nonpenetrating d and f shells, and the spin-orbit splitting of p-,d-, and f-shells. The appearance of a relativistic effect is indicated in the variation in the electronic configurations of the atoms in the Periodic Table, the appearance of new types of closed electron shells (6s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 6p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 7s{sub 1/2}{sup 2}, 5d{sub 3/2}{sup 4}), the stabilization of unstable oxidation states of heavy elements, the characteristic variation in the ionization enthalpies of heavy atoms, their electron affinity, hydration energies, redox potentials, and optical electronegativities. In the spectra of coordination compounds, a relativistic effect is observed when comparing the position of the charge transfer bands in analogous compounds, the parameters characterizing the ligand field strength (10Dq), the interatomic distances and angles in compounds of heavy elements. A relativistic effect is also apparent in the ability of heavy metals to form clusters and superclusters. Relativistic corrections also affect other properties of heavy metal compounds (force constants, dipole moments, biological activity, etc.).

  10. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  11. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  12. Influence of pions on the hadron-quark phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Dutra, M.; Frederico, T.; Malheiro, M.; Delfino, A.

    2013-05-06

    In this work we present the features of the hadron-quark phase transition diagrams in which the pions are included in the system. To construct such diagrams we use two different models in the description of the hadronic and quark sectors. At the quark level, we consider two distinct parametrizations of the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) models. In the hadronic side, we use a well known relativistic mean-field (RMF) nonlinear Walecka model. We show that the effect of the pions on the hadron-quark phase diagrams is to move the critical end point (CEP) of the transitions lines. Such an effect also depends on the value of the critical temperature (T{sub 0}) in the pure gauge sector used to parametrize the PNJL models. Here we treat the phase transitions using two values for T{sub 0}, namely, T{sub 0}= 270 MeV and T{sub 0}= 190 MeV. The last value is used to reproduce lattice QCD data for the transition temperature at zero chemical potential.

  13. BRAHMS (Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometer) Figures and Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    The BRAHMS experiment was designed to measure charged hadrons over a wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum to study the reaction mechanisms of the relativistic heavy ion reactions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the properties of the highly excited nuclear matter formed in these reactions. The experiment took its first data during the RHIC 2000 year run and completed data taking in June 2006. The BRAHMS archive makes publications available and also makes data and figures from those publications available as separate items. See also the complete list of publications, multimedia presentations, and related papers at http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/brahms/WWW/publications.html

  14. Correlations of heavy quarks produced at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Mohammed; Jamil, Umme; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2012-02-01

    We study the correlations of heavy quarks produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions and find them to be quite sensitive to the effects of the medium and the production mechanisms. In order to put this on a quantitative footing, as a first step, we analyze the azimuthal, transverse momentum, and rapidity correlations of heavy quark-antiquark (Q\\overline{Q}) pairs in pp collisions at {O}(α3s). This sets the stage for the identification and study of medium modification of similar correlations in the relativistic collision of heavy nuclei at the Large Hadron Collider. Next we study the additional production of charm quarks in heavy ion collisions due to multiple scatterings, namely jet-jet collisions, jet-thermal collisions, and thermal interactions. We find that these give rise to azimuthal correlations which are quite different from those arising from the prompt initial production at leading order and at next to leading order. Communicated by Professor Steffen Bass.

  15. Particles with variable spin and a composite hadron model

    SciTech Connect

    Pletyukov, V.A.; Strazhev, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of relativistic wave equations (RWE) is examined as a possibility for construction of a gauge model without use of external coordinates, based on localization of nongeometric symmetry. The described approach ascribes to the quark a wave function the component of which obey RWE. It considers the quark as a particle with a variable spin of 1/2, 3/2. Without introducing the concept of color it is possible to solve the problem of the relationship between spin and statistics in the composite hadron model.

  16. Hadronic absorption cross sections of B{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Lodhi, M. A. K.; Akram, Faisal; Irfan, Shaheen

    2011-09-15

    The cross sections of B{sub c} absorption by {pi} mesons are calculated using a hadronic Lagrangian based on the SU(5) flavor symmetry. Calculated cross sections are found to be in the ranges 2-7 mb and 0.2-2 mb for the processes B{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{yields}DB and B{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{yields}D*B*, respectively, when the monopole form factor is included. These results could be useful in calculating the production rate of B{sub c} mesons in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  17. Supersymmetry across the light and heavy-light hadronic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, Hans Gunter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-10-07

    Relativistic light-front bound-state equations for mesons and baryons can be constructed in the chiral limit from the supercharges of a superconformal algebra which connect baryon and meson spectra. Quark masses break the conformal invariance, but the basic underlying supersymmetric mechanism, which transforms meson and baryon wave functions into each other, still holds and gives remarkable connections across the entire spectrum of light and heavy-light hadrons. As a result, we also briefly examine the consequences of extending the supersymmetric relations to double-heavy mesons and baryons.

  18. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1994-07-01

    Under Hadrons in Nuclei and Nuclear Matter the authors research the ways in which the properties of nucleons and mesons are modified in the nuclear medium. Research progress is reported on a number of topics in this general area, including studies of the role of chiral symmetry for finite density or temperature nuclear matter, the use of QCD sum rules to describe baryons in nuclear matter, and color transparency. In the general field of Hadron Physics broad progress included studies of perturbative QCD, heavy quark physics, QCD sum rules, and QCD-based models. Notable progress was also achieved in Relativistic Dynamics in Quark, Hadron, and Nuclear Physics, where an explicit model of composite particles shows how the z-graph physics (which is an essential part of Dirac phenomenology) comes about. In addition, calculations of elastic electron-deuteron scattering based on two-body relativistic dynamics and meson exchange currents were completed, as were studies of quark-anti-quark bound states based on a relativistic quark model. Progress is also reported on the relativistic few-body problem. In the area of Heavy Ion Dynamics and Sharp Lepton Pairs, work continues on the Composite Particle Scenario for the `Sharp Lepton Problem`. In particular, the scenario can now encompass the anomalous sharp leptons reported from positron irradiation of heavy neutral atoms, establishing such irradiations as an alternative experimental window to the heavy ion experiments.

  19. Nonextensive statistical effects in the quark-gluon plasma formation at relativistic heavy-ion collisions energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, Gianpiero; Lavagno, Andrea; Pigato, Daniele

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the relativistic equation of state of hadronic matter and quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon density in the framework of the non-extensive statistical mechanics, characterized by power-law quantum distributions. We impose the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge and strangeness number. For the hadronic phase, we study an extended relativistic mean-field theoretical model with the inclusion of strange particles (hyperons and mesons). For the quark sector, we employ an extended MIT-Bag model. In this context we focus on the relevance of non-extensive effects in the presence of strange matter.

  20. Physics of very high energy hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1986-09-01

    A review is given of the physics accessible at a very high energy hadron-hadron collider. Emphasis is placed on the reliability of the predicted rates, and upon the energy and luminosity required to explore new physics options. 38 refs., 19 figs.

  1. Monte Carlo approach for hadron azimuthal correlations in high energy proton and nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, Isabel; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2012-09-01

    We use a Monte Carlo approach to study hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies at midrapidity. We build a hadron event generator that incorporates the production of 2→2 and 2→3 parton processes and their evolution into hadron states. For nucleus-nucleus collisions we include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using a modified fragmentation function approach. In the presence of the medium, for the case when three partons are produced in the hard scattering, we analyze the Monte Carlo sample in parton and hadron momentum bins to reconstruct the angular correlations. We characterize this sample by the number of partons that are able to hadronize by fragmentation within the selected bins. In the nuclear environment the model allows hadronization by fragmentation only for partons with momentum above a threshold pTthresh=2.4 GeV. We argue that one should treat properly the effect of those partons with momentum below the threshold, because their interaction with the medium may lead to showers of low-momentum hadrons along the direction of motion of the original partons as the medium becomes diluted.

  2. Gamma-hadron families and scaling violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.; Wrotniak, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    For three different interaction models we have simulated gamma-hadron families, including the detector (Pamir emulsion chamber) response. Rates of gamma families, hadrons, and hadron-gamma ratios were compared with experiments.

  3. Quarkonia production with leptons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    V. Papadimitriou

    2004-06-09

    We discuss current issues and present the latest measurements on quarkonia production from experiments monitoring hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. These measurements include cross section and polarization results for charmonium and bottomonium states.

  4. Hadronic laws from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, R. T.

    1992-06-01

    A review is given of progress in deriving the effective action for hadronic physics, S[π, ϱ, ω,.., overlineN, N,..] , from the fundamental defining action of QCD, S[ overlineq, q, A μa] . This is a problem in quantum field theory and the most success so far has been achieved using functional integral calculus (FIC) techniques. This formulates the problem as an exercise in changing the variables of integration in the functional integrals, from those of the quark and gluon fields to those of the (bare) meson and baryon fields. The appropriate variables are determined by the dynamics of QCD, and the final hadronic variables (essentially the 'normal modes' of QCD) are local fields describing the 'centre-of-mass' motion of extended bound states of quarks. The quarks are extensively dressed by the gluons, and the detailed aspects of the hidden chiral symmetry emerge naturally from the formalism. Particular attention is given to covariant integral equations which determine bare nucleon structure (i.e. in the quenched approximation). These equations, which arise from the closed double-helix diagrams of the FIC analysis, describe the baryons in terms of quark-diquark structure, in the form of Faddeev equations. This hadronisation of QCD also generates the dressing of these baryons by the pions, and the non-local πNN coupling.

  5. Energy dependence of hadronic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, T. A.; Groom, D. E.; Job, P. K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Stevenson, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    Two features of high-energy hadronic cascades have long been known to shielding specialists: a) in a high-energy hadronic cascade in a given material (incident E ≳ 10 GeV), the relative abundance and spectrum of each hadronic species responsible for most of the energy deposition is independent of the energy or species of the incident hadron, and b) because π0 production bleeds off more and more energy into the electromagnetic sector as the energy of the incident hadron increases, the absolute level of this low-energy hadronic activity ( E ≲ 1 GeV) rises less rapidly than the incident energy, and in fact rises very nearly as a power of the incident energy. Both features are of great importance in hadron calorimetry, where it is the "universal spectrum" which makes possible the definition of an intrinsic {e}/{h}, and the increasing fraction of the energy going into π0's which leads to the energy dependence of {e}/{π}. We present evidence for the "universal spectrum," and use an induction argument and simulation results to demonstrate that the low-energy activity ss Em, with 0.80 ≲ m ≲ 0.85. The hadronic activity produced by incident pions is 15-20% less than that initiated by protons.

  6. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.; Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  7. Review of hadrons in medium

    SciTech Connect

    Krein, Gastão

    2016-01-22

    I review the present status in the theoretical and phenomenological understanding of hadron properties in strongly interacting matter. The topics covered are the EMC effect, nucleon structure functions in cold nuclear matter, spectral properties of light vector mesons in hot and cold nuclear matter, and in-medium properties of heavy flavored hadrons.

  8. Theoretical summary of the 8th International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.

    1999-11-15

    The Constituent Quark Model has provided a remarkable description of the experimentally observed hadron spectrum but still has no firm theoretical basis. Attempts to provide a QCD justification discussed at Hadron99 include QCD Sum Rules, instantons, relativistic potential models and the lattice. Phenomenological analyses to clarify outstanding problems like the nature of the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons and the low branching ratio for {psi} {prime} {r_arrow} {rho} {r_arrow} {pi} were presented. New experimental puzzles include the observation of {anti p}p {r_arrow} {phi}{pi}.

  9. Hot and dense hadronic matter in an effective mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lavagno, A.

    2010-04-15

    We investigate the equation of state of hadronic matter at finite values of baryon density and temperature reachable in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The analysis is performed by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge fraction, and zero net strangeness. We consider an effective relativistic mean-field model with the inclusion of DELTA isobars, hyperons, and the lightest pseudoscalar and vector meson degrees of freedom. In this context, we study the influence of the DELTA-isobar degrees of freedom in the hadronic equation of state and, in connection, the behavior of different particle-antiparticle ratios and strangeness production.

  10. Relativistic heavy ions physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.

    1989-01-01

    Central nuclear collisions at energies far above 1 GeV/nucleon may provide for conditions, where the transition from highly excited hadronic matter into quark matter or quark-gluon plasma can be probed. We review current ideas about the nature of, and signals for, this transition, and we discuss the (hadronic) string model approach to the nuclear collisions dynamics. At even higher energies in the TeV/nucleon range peripheral nuclear collisions may become a laboratory for electroweak physics at the unification scale allowing, e.g., for Higgs boson production. 42 refs., 29 figs.,

  11. Hadronic Scenarios for Gamma-Ray Emission from Three Supernova Remnants Interacting with Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huan; Fang, Jun; Zhang, Li

    2014-04-01

    GeV γ-rays detected with the large area telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray space telescope in the direction of HB21, MSH 17-39 and G337.0-0.1 have been recently reported. The three supernova remnants (SNRs) show interactions with molecular clouds, and they are effective gamma-ray emitters as the relativistic protons accelerated by the SNR shocks inelastically colliding with the dense gas in the clouds. The origin of the observed γ-rays for the three remnants is investigated in the scenario of the diffusive shock acceleration. In the model, a part of the SNR shock transmits into the nearby molecular clouds, and the shock velocity is greatly reduced. As a result, a shock with a relatively low Alfvén Mach number is generated, and the spectra of the accelerated protons and the γ-ray photons produced via proton-proton interaction can be obtained. The results show that the observed γ-ray spectra for the three SNRs interacting with the molecular clouds can be reproduced. It can be concluded that the hadronic origin of the γ-rays for the three SNRs is approved, and the ability of SNR shocks to accelerate protons is also supported.

  12. Hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2013-02-01

    The HARP and NA61/SHINE hadroproduction experiments as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. HARP measurements have already been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First measurements released recently by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61/SHINE experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  13. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  14. The Relativistic Rocket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  15. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  17. Physics at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  18. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2014-07-15

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  19. Causality constraints on hadron production in high energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2014-04-01

    For hadron production in high energy collisions, causality requirements lead to the counterpart of the cosmological horizon problem: the production occurs in a number of causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) must be conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. This provides a theoretical basis for the observed suppression of strangeness production in elementary interactions (pp, e+e-). In contrast, the space-time superposition of many collisions in heavy ion interactions largely removes these causality constraints, resulting in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full equilibrium.

  20. Phenomenology of photon and dilepton production in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the latest theoretical results on direct photon and dilepton production from relativistic heavy-ion collisions. While the dilepton spectra at low invariant mass show in-medium effects like collisional broadening of the vector meson spectral functions, the dilepton yield at high invariant masses (above 1.1 GeV) is dominated by QGP contributions for central heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. The present status of the photon v2 "puzzle" - a large elliptic flow v2 of the direct photons experimentally observed at RHIC and LHC energies - is also addressed. The role of hadronic and partonic sources for the photon spectra and v2 is considered as well as the possibility to subtract the QGP signal from the experimental observables.

  1. Bottom hadrons from lattice QCD with domain wall and NRQCD fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Meinel, William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Matthew Wingate

    2009-07-01

    Dynamical 2+1 flavor lattice QCD is used to calculate the masses of bottom hadrons, including B mesons, singly and doubly bottom baryons, and for the first time also the triply-bottom baryon Omega{sub bbb}. The domain wall action is used for the up-, down-, and strange quarks (both valence and sea), while the bottom quark is implemented with non-relativistic QCD. A calculation of the bottomonium spectrum is also presented.

  2. Physics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-08-01

    This introductory talk contains a brief discussion of future experiments at RHIC related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we consider the relation between space-time picture of the collision and spectra of the observed secondaries. We discuss where one should look for QGP signals and for possible manifestation of the phase transition. We pay more attention to a rather new topic: hadron modification in the gas phase, which is interesting by itself as a collective phenomenon, and also as a precursor indicating what happens with hadrons near the phase transition. We briefly review current understanding of the photon physics, dilepton production, charm and strangeness and J/{psi} suppression. At the end we try to classify all possible experiments. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Current operators in relativistic few-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.; Klink, W.H.; Polyzou, W.N.

    1995-08-01

    The interpretation of experiments that explore hadron structure with electromagnetic probes requires both a nonperturbative representation of the hadron states and a compatible representation of the current-density operator. Intuitive interpretations depend strongly on the {open_quotes}impulse approximation{close_quotes}, that is, the use of one-body currents. One-body currents, however, cannot satisfy essentially the constraints imposed by the dynamics. In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics the problem of constructing dynamically required interaction currents is well understood and has been solved. Since Galilei transformations are kinematic, only time-translation covariance and current conservation impose dynamical constraints on current operators. These constraints can be satisfied by the well-known construction of so-called {open_quotes}minimal{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}model-independent{close_quotes} currents. Descriptions of hadron structure and of nuclear effects probed at high energies require a relativistic description. In relativistic few-body dynamics, one-body currents are covariant only under the kinematic subgroup of the Poincare group. Full Poincare covariance and current conservation implies dynamically determined interaction currents. The separation of the current operator into impulse current and interaction current depends on the {open_quotes}form of dynamics{close_quotes}, that is on the choice of the kinematic subgroup. The choice of the light-front kinematics has unique advantages not available with other forms of dynamics: (1) a relevant subgroup of the translations is kinematic, (2) initial and final states are related by kinematic Lorentz transformations, (3) the contributions of the individual constituents are related kinematically to the total current. These features were exploited successfully in calculations of deuteron form factors and quark-model form factors of hadrons.

  4. Hadronic γ-ray images of Sedov supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshley, V.; Petruk, O.

    2012-01-01

    A number of modern experiments in high-energy astrophysics produce images of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the TeV and GeV γ-rays. Either relativistic electrons (due to the inverse-Compton scattering) or protons (due to the pion decays) may be responsible for this emission. In particular, the broad-band spectra of SNRs may be explained in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios. Another kind of observational data, namely, images of SNRs, is an important part of experimental information. We present a method to model γ-ray images of Sedov SNRs in uniform media and magnetic field due to hadronic emission. These γ-rays are assumed to appear as a consequence of meson decays produced in inelastic collisions of accelerated protons with thermal protons downstream of the shock - a model would be relevant for SNRs without firm confirmations of the shock-cloud interaction, as e.g. SN 1006. Distribution of surface brightness of the shell-like SNR is synthesized numerically for a number of configurations. An approximate analytical formula for azimuthal and radial variation of hadronic γ-ray brightness close to the shock is derived. The properties of images as well as the main factors determining the surface brightness distribution are determined. Some conclusions that would be relevant to SN 1006 are discussed.

  5. Hadronic and electromagnetic fragmentation of ultrarelativistic heavy ions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, H. H.; Fassò, A.; Ferrari, A.; Jowett, J. M.; Sala, P. R.; Smirnov, G. I.

    2014-02-01

    Reliable predictions of yields of nuclear fragments produced in electromagnetic dissociation and hadronic fragmentation of ion beams are of great practical importance in analyzing beam losses and interactions with the beam environment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN as well as for estimating radiation effects of galactic cosmic rays on the spacecraft crew and electronic equipment. The model for predicting the fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions is briefly described, and then applied to problems of relevance for LHC. The results are based on the fluka code, which includes electromagnetic dissociation physics and dpmjet-iii as hadronic event generator. We consider the interaction of fully stripped lead ions with nuclei in the energy range from about one hundred MeV to ultrarelativistic energies. The yields of fragments close in the mass and charge to initial ions are calculated. The approach under discussion provides a good overall description of Pb fragmentation data at 30 and 158A GeV as well as recent LHC data for √sNN =2.76 TeV Pb-Pb interactions. Good agreement with the calculations in the framework of different models is found. This justifies application of the developed simulation technique both at the LHC injection energy of 177A GeV and at its collision energies of 1.38, 1.58, and 2.75A TeV, and gives confidence in the results obtained.

  6. Exploring Jet-Hadron correlations at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Joel

    2016-08-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the conditions are met to produce the hot and dense, strongly interacting medium known as the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP, a state of matter created shortly after the Big Bang, is a phase where the deconfinement of quarks and gluons is hypothesized. Jets, the collimated sprays of hadrons from fragmenting partons, are a key probe of the medium. The experimental methods used for jet measurements at ALICE to remove, reduce, and correct for the underlying background event will be presented. In pp collisions, jet production is well understood within the framework of perturbative QCD and acts as a rigorous baseline measurement for jet quenching measurements. By comparing to heavy ion collision systems, we can study the suppression of the number of jets seen and study the modification of the pT or angular distributions of jet fragments. Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a full (charged + neutral) reconstructed (trigger) jet in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in ALICE will be presented here. Newly developed combinatoric background subtraction methods and their improvement compared to prior techniques will be discussed.

  7. Forward physics of hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    These lectures were given at the Baikal Summer School on Physics of Elementary Particles and Astrophysics in July 2012. They can be viewed as a concise introduction to hadronic diffraction, to the physics of the Pomeron and related topics.

  8. Light-Front Holography, AdS/QCD, and Hadronic Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-12-09

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation with a confining potential which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. The distinction between static structure functions, such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions, versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering, is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  9. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  10. Bose-Einstein correlation within the framework of hadronic mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Burande, Chandrakant S.

    2015-03-10

    The Bose-Einstein correlation is the phenomenon in which protons and antiprotons collide at extremely high energies; coalesce one into the other resulting into the fireball of finite dimension. They annihilate each other and produces large number of mesons that remain correlated at distances very large compared to the size of the fireball. It was believed that Einstein’s special relativity and relativistic quantum mechanics are the valid frameworks to represent this phenomenon. Although, these frameworks are incomplete and require arbitrary parameters (chaoticity) to fit the experimental data which are prohibited by the basic axioms of relativistic quantum mechanics, such as that for the vacuum expectation values. Moreover, correlated mesons can not be treated as a finite set of isolated point-like particles because it is non-local event due to overlapping of wavepackets. Therefore, the Bose-Einstein correlation is incompatible with the axiom of expectation values of quantum mechanics. In contrary, relativistic hadronic mechanics constructed by Santilli allows an exact representation of the experimental data of the Bose-Einstein correlation and restore the validity of the Lorentz and Poincare symmetries under nonlocal and non-Hamiltonian internal effects. Further, F. Cardone and R. Mignani observed that the Bose-Einstein two-point correlation function derived by Santilli is perfectly matched with experimental data at high energy.

  11. Two types of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    Resonances and enhancements in meson-meson scattering can be divided into two classes distinguished by their behavior as the number of colors (Nc) in QCD becomes large: The first are ordinary mesons that become stable as Nc → ∞. This class includes textbook qbar q mesons as well as glueballs and hybrids. The second class, extraordinary mesons, are enhancements that disappear as Nc → ∞; they subside into the hadronic continuum. This class includes indistinct and controversial objects that have been classified as qbarqbar qq mesons or meson-meson molecules. Peláez's study of the Nc dependence of unitarized chiral dynamics illustrates both classes: the p-wave ππ and Kπ resonances, the ρ (770) and K∗ (892), behave as ordinary mesons; the s-wave ππ and Kπ enhancements, the σ (600) and κ (800), behave like extraordinary mesons. Ordinary mesons resemble Feshbach resonances while extraordinary mesons look more like effects due to potentials in meson-meson scattering channels. I build and explore toy models along these lines. Finally I discuss some related dynamical issues affecting the interpretation of extraordinary mesons.

  12. Late effects from hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  13. Heavy Quarkonium Dissociation Cross Sections in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    C.-Y. Wong; Eric Swanson; Ted Barnes

    2001-12-01

    Many of the hadron-hadron cross sections required for the study of the dynamics of matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions can be calculated using the quark-interchange model. Here we evaluate the low-energy dissociation cross sections of J/{psi}, {psi}', {chi}, {Upsilon}, and {Upsilon}' in collision with {pi}, {rho}, and K, which are important for the interpretation of heavy-quarkonium suppression as a signature for the quark gluon plasma. These comover dissociation processes also contribute to heavy-quarkonium suppression, and must be understood and incorporated in simulations of heavy-ion collisions before QGP formation can be established through this signature.

  14. Evidence for creation of strong electromagnetic fields in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toneev, V.; Rogachevsky, O.; Voronyuk, V.

    2016-08-01

    It is proposed to identify the strong electric field created during relativistic collisions of asymmetric nuclei via observation of pseudorapidity and transverse-momentum distributions of hadrons with the same mass but opposite charges. The detailed calculation results for the directed flow within the Parton-Hadron String Dynamics model are given for Cu-Au interactions at the NICA collision energies of √{s_{NN}} = 9 and 5 GeV. The separation effect is observable at 9GeV as clearly as at 200 GeV.

  15. Relativistic Pseudospin Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N.

    2011-05-06

    We show that the pseudospin symmetry that Akito Arima discovered many years ago (with collaborators) is a symmetry of the the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of the scalar and vector potentials are a constant. In this paper we discuss some of the implications of this relativistic symmetry and the experimental data that support these predictions. In his original paper Akito also discussed pseudo-U(3) symmetry. We show that pseudo-U(3) symmetry is a symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of harmonic oscillator vector and scalar potentials are equal to a constant, and we give the generators of pseudo-U(3) symmetry. Going beyond the mean field we summarize new results on non relativistic shell model Hamiltonians that have pseudospin symmetry and pseudo-orbital angular momentum symmetry as a dynamical symmetries.

  16. Relativistic electrons in space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simnett, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning relativistic electrons, above 0.3 MeV, in interplanetary space, as measured by detectors on board satellites operating beyond the influence of the magnetosphere. The electrons have a galactic component, which at the lower energies is subject both to solar modulation and to spasmodic 'quiet time' increases and a direct solar component correlated with flare activity. The recent measurements have established the form of the differential energy spectrum of solar flare electrons. Electrons have been detected from flares behind the visible solar disk. Relativistic electrons do not appear to leave the sun at the time of the flash phase of the flare, although there are several signatures of electron acceleration at this time. The delay is interpreted as taking place during the transport of the electrons through the lower corona.

  17. Effect of an equilibrium phase transition on multiphase transport in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Meiling; Du Jiaxin; Liu Lianshou

    2006-10-15

    The hadronization scheme for parton transport in relativistic heavy ion collisions is considered in detail. It is pointed out that the traditional scheme for particles being freezed out one by one leads to serious problem on unreasonable long lifetime of partons. A collective phase transition following a supercooling is implemented in a simple way. It turns out that the modified model with a sudden phase transition is able to reproduce the experimental longitudinal distributions of final state particles better than the original one does. The encouraging results indicate that equilibrium phase transition should be taken into proper account in parton transport models for relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  18. Relativistic Quantum Information Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-20

    In S. Kalara and D.V. Nanopou- los, editors, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Black Holes , Membranes, Wormholes and Superstrings, pages...within the gravitational field of a black hole . We outline the general theory of how the entanglement of polarized photons changes under...relativistic Lorentz transformations, and have studied quantum information transmission in the presence of a black hole . A description of the accretion of

  19. Relativistic statistical arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in high-frequency financial trading have made light propagation delays between geographically separated exchanges relevant. Here we show that there exist optimal locations from which to coordinate the statistical arbitrage of pairs of spacelike separated securities, and calculate a representative map of such locations on Earth. Furthermore, trading local securities along chains of such intermediate locations results in a novel econophysical effect, in which the relativistic propagation of tradable information is effectively slowed or stopped by arbitrage.

  20. Relativistic gravity gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2016-12-01

    In general relativity, relativistic gravity gradiometry involves the measurement of the relativistic tidal matrix, which is theoretically obtained from the projection of the Riemann curvature tensor onto the orthonormal tetrad frame of an observer. The observer's 4-velocity vector defines its local temporal axis and its local spatial frame is defined by a set of three orthonormal nonrotating gyro directions. The general tidal matrix for the timelike geodesics of Kerr spacetime has been calculated by Marck [Proc. R. Soc. A 385, 431 (1983)]. We are interested in the measured components of the curvature tensor along the inclined "circular" geodesic orbit of a test mass about a slowly rotating astronomical object of mass M and angular momentum J . Therefore, we specialize Marck's results to such a "circular" orbit that is tilted with respect to the equatorial plane of the Kerr source. To linear order in J , we recover the gravitomagnetic beating phenomenon [B. Mashhoon and D. S. Theiss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1542 (1982)], where the beat frequency is the frequency of geodetic precession. The beat effect shows up as a special long-period gravitomagnetic part of the relativistic tidal matrix; moreover, the effect's short-term manifestations are contained in certain post-Newtonian secular terms. The physical interpretation of this effect is briefly discussed.

  1. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  2. Hadron particle theory

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Radiation therapy with ``hadrons`` (protons, neutrons, pions, ions) has accrued a 55-year track record, with by now over 30,000 patients having received treatments with one of these particles. Very good, and in some cases spectacular results are leading to growth in the field in specific well-defined directions. The most noted contributor to success has been the ability to better define and control the radiation field produced with these particles, to increase the dose delivered to the treatment volume while achieving a high degree of sparing of normal tissue. An additional benefit is the highly-ionizing, character of certain beams, leading to creater cell-killing potential for tumor lines that have historically been very resistant to radiation treatments. Until recently these treatments have been delivered in laboratories and research centers whose primary, or original mission was physics research. With maturity in the field has come both the desire to provide beam facilities more accessible to the clinical setting, of a hospital, as well as achieving, highly-efficient, reliable and economical accelerator and beam-delivery systems that can make maximum advantage of the physical characteristics of these particle beams. Considerable work in technology development is now leading, to the implementation of many of these ideas, and a new generation of clinically-oriented facilities is beginning to appear. We will discuss both the physical, clinical and technological considerations that are driving these designs, as well as highlighting, specific examples of new facilities that are either now treating, patients or that will be doing so in the near future.

  3. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation.

  4. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation.

  5. Chaoticity parameter λ in two-pion interferometry in an expanding boson gas model

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jie; Ru, Peng; Zhang, Wei-Ning; ...

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the chaoticity parameter λ in two-pion interferometry in an expanding boson gas model. The degree of Bose-Einstein condensation of identical pions, density distributions, and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) correlation functions are calculated for the expanding gas within the mean-field description with a harmonic oscillator potential. The results indicate that a sources with thousands of identical pions may exhibit a degree of Bose-Einstein condensation at the temperatures during the hadronic phase in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. This finite condensation may decrease the chaoticity parameter λ in the two-pion interferometry measurements at low pion pair momenta, but influence only slightly the λ valuemore » at high pion pair momentum.« less

  6. Density-Dependent Properties of Hadronic Matter in the self-consistent Chiral ({sigma},{pi},{omega}) Mean-Field Model

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Schun T.; Uechi, Hiroshi

    2011-05-06

    Density-dependent relations among saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter and properties of hadronic stars are discussed by applying the conserving chiral nonlinear ({sigma},{pi},{omega}) hadronic mean-field theory. The chiral nonlinear ({sigma},{pi},{omega}) mean-field theory is an extension of the conserving nonlinear (nonchiral) {sigma}-{omega} hadronic mean-field theory which is thermodynamically consistent, relativistic and is a Lorentz-covariant mean-field theory of hadrons. In the extended chiral ({sigma},{pi},{omega}) mean-field model, all the masses of hadrons are produced by the breaking of chiral symmetry, which is different from other conventional chiral partner models. By comparing both nonchiral and chiral mean-field approximations, the effects of the chiral symmetry breaking mechanism on the mass of {sigma}-meson, coefficients of nonlinear interactions and Fermi-liquid properties are investigated in nuclear matter and neutron stars.

  7. The segmentation of hadron calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He Sheng

    1987-05-01

    Optimization of the segmentation of large hadron calorimeters is important in order to obtain good resolution for jet physics at minimum construction cost for the next generation of high energy experiments. The principles of the segmentation of hadron calorimeters are discussed. As an example, the Monte Carlo optimization of the segmentation of the L3 hadron calorimeter barrel at CERN is described. Comparisons of results for the reconstructed jet shapes show that the optimum number ADC channels is about 20K for the readout of 450K wires of the proportional chambers. The matching between the sandwiched φ towers and Z towers is the dominant factor for angular resolution. Based on these Monte Carlo simulations, an optimized tower structure is obtained.

  8. History of hadron therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Amaldi, Ugo

    2015-06-01

    In the last 60 years, hadron therapy has made great advances passing from a stage of pure research to a well-established treatment modality for solid tumours. In this paper the history of hadron therapy accelerators is reviewed, starting from the first cyclotrons used in the thirties for neutron therapy and passing to more modern and flexible machines used nowadays. The technical developments have been accompanied by clinical studies that allowed the selection of the tumours which are more sensitive to this type of radiotherapy. This paper aims at giving a review of the origin and the present status of hadron therapy accelerators, describing the technological basis and the continuous development of this application to medicine of instruments developed for fundamental science. At the end the present challenges are reviewed.

  9. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong.

    1992-12-01

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 32[sup 3] [times] 64 lattice volume at [beta] = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the [triangle] masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion.

  10. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong

    1992-12-01

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 32{sup 3} {times} 64 lattice volume at {beta} = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the {triangle} masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion.

  11. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  12. An Undergraduate Exercise in the First Law of Relativistic Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guemez, J.

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal compression of an ideal gas is analysed using a relativistic thermodynamics formalism based on the principle of inertia of energy (Einstein's equation) and the asynchronous formulation (Cavalleri and Salgarelli 1969 "Nuovo Cimento" 42 722-54), which is similar to the formalism developed by van Kampen (1968 "Phys. Rev." 173 295-301)…

  13. Relativistic quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. B.; Ralph, T. C.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past few years, a new field of high research intensity has emerged that blends together concepts from gravitational physics and quantum computing. Known as relativistic quantum information, or RQI, the field aims to understand the relationship between special and general relativity and quantum information. Since the original discoveries of Hawking radiation and the Unruh effect, it has been known that incorporating the concepts of quantum theory into relativistic settings can produce new and surprising effects. However it is only in recent years that it has become appreciated that the basic concepts involved in quantum information science undergo significant revision in relativistic settings, and that new phenomena arise when quantum entanglement is combined with relativity. A number of examples illustrate that point. Quantum teleportation fidelity is affected between observers in uniform relative acceleration. Entanglement is an observer-dependent property that is degraded from the perspective of accelerated observers moving in flat spacetime. Entanglement can also be extracted from the vacuum of relativistic quantum field theories, and used to distinguish peculiar motion from cosmological expansion. The new quantum information-theoretic framework of quantum channels in terms of completely positive maps and operator algebras now provides powerful tools for studying matters of causality and information flow in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. This focus issue provides a sample of the state of the art in research in RQI. Some of the articles in this issue review the subject while others provide interesting new results that will stimulate further research. What makes the subject all the more exciting is that it is beginning to enter the stage at which actual experiments can be contemplated, and some of the articles appearing in this issue discuss some of these exciting new developments. The subject of RQI pulls together concepts and ideas from

  14. Newtonian and relativistic cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Wald, Robert M.

    2012-03-01

    Cosmological N-body simulations are now being performed using Newtonian gravity on scales larger than the Hubble radius. It is well known that a uniformly expanding, homogeneous ball of dust in Newtonian gravity satisfies the same equations as arise in relativistic Friedmann-Lemaître-Robinson-Walker cosmology, and it also is known that a correspondence between Newtonian and relativistic dust cosmologies continues to hold in linearized perturbation theory in the marginally bound/spatially flat case. Nevertheless, it is far from obvious that Newtonian gravity can provide a good global description of an inhomogeneous cosmology when there is significant nonlinear dynamical behavior at small scales. We investigate this issue in the light of a perturbative framework that we have recently developed [S. R. Green and R. M. Wald, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 83, 084020 (2011).10.1103/PhysRevD.83.084020], which allows for such nonlinearity at small scales. We propose a relatively straightforward dictionary—which is exact at the linearized level—that maps Newtonian dust cosmologies into general relativistic dust cosmologies, and we use our “ordering scheme” to determine the degree to which the resulting metric and matter distribution solve Einstein’s equation. We find that, within our ordering scheme, Einstein’s equation fails to hold at “order 1” at small scales and at “order ɛ” at large scales. We then find the additional corrections to the metric and matter distribution needed to satisfy Einstein’s equation to these orders. While these corrections are of some interest in their own right, our main purpose in calculating them is that their smallness should provide a criterion for the validity of the original dictionary (as well as simplified versions of this dictionary). We expect that, in realistic Newtonian cosmologies, these additional corrections will be very small; if so, this should provide strong justification for the use of Newtonian simulations

  15. Ultrabaric relativistic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, G.; Weiss, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ultrabaric superfluid solutions are obtained for Einstein's equations to examine the possibility of the existence of superluminal sound speeds. The discussion is restricted only by requiring the energy-momentum tensor and the equation of state of matter to be represented by full relativistic equations. Only a few universes are known to satisfy the conditions, and those exhibit tension and are inflationary. Superluminal sound velocities are shown, therefore, to be possible for the interior Schwarzchild metric, which has been used to explain the red shift of quasars, and the Stephiani solution (1967). The latter indicates repeated transitions between superluminal and subliminal sound velocities in the hyperbaric superfluid of the early universe.

  16. Hadron scattering, resonances, and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul

    2016-12-01

    The non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has historically left a gap in our understanding of the connection between the fundamental theory of the strong interactions and the rich structure of experimentally observed phenomena. For the simplest properties of stable hadrons, this is now circumvented with the use of lattice QCD (LQCD). In this talk I discuss a path towards a rigorous determination of few-hadron observables from LQCD. I illustrate the power of the methodology by presenting recently determined scattering amplitudes in the light-meson sector and their resonance content.

  17. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  18. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  19. Properties of b-flavored hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    Experimental progress in the study of b-flavored hadrons is reviewed. The observation of the B meson, properties of hadronic B decays, semi-leptonic B decays, and the B lifetime are discussed. 30 references.

  20. Relativistic Effects on Chemical Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how anomalous chemical properties may be explained by considering relativistic effects. Traces development of the relativistic wave equation (Dirac equation) starting with the Borh treatment of the hydrogen atom and discusses major consequences of the Dirac equation. Suggests that these topics receive greater attention in the…

  1. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  2. relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauser, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).

  3. Strange and heavy mesons in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Daniel; Abreu, Luciano M.; Bratkovskaya, Elena; Ilner, Andrej; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Ramos, Angels; Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.

    2014-04-01

    We present selected results on the properties of strange and heavy-flavoured mesons in a hot and dense nuclear medium, with emphasis in selfconsistent coupled-channel approaches based on the chiral Lagrangian. In the strangeness sector, we discuss how the enhanced reactivity of light strange vectors at FAIR conditions can be tied to in-medium effects on their predominant decay modes (e.g. bar K* → bar Kπ) and to the excitation of strange baryons in vector-meson nucleon interactions. In the heavy-flavour sector, we focus on recent determinations of the transport coefficients of charmed and bottomed mesons in a hadron gas at vanishing baryonic chemical potential. We comment on the role of microscopic transport simulations to establish a connection between theoretical models and experimental observables from heavy-ion collisions (HICs).

  4. Probing the hadron-quark mixed phase at high isospin and baryon density. Sensitive observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Greco, Vincenzo; Shao, Guo-Yun

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the isospin effect on the possible phase transition from hadronic to quark matter at high baryon density and finite temperatures. The two-Equation of State (Two-EoS) model is adopted to describe the hadron-quark phase transition in dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions. For the hadron sector we use Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) effective models, already tested on heavy-ion collision (HIC). For the quark phase we consider various effective models, the MIT-Bag static picture, the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) approach with chiral dynamics and finally the NJL coupled to the Polyakov-loop field (PNJL), which includes both chiral and (de)confinement dynamics. The idea is to extract mixed phase properties which appear robust with respect to the model differences. In particular we focus on the phase transitions of isospin asymmetric matter, with two main results: i) an earlier transition to a mixed hadron-quark phase, at lower baryon density/chemical potential with respect to symmetric matter; ii) an "Isospin Distillation" to the quark component of the mixed phase, with predicted effects on the final hadron production. Possible observation signals are suggested to probe in heavy-ion collision experiments at intermediate energies, in the range of the NICA program.

  5. Robust relativistic bit commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Chailloux, André; Leverrier, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic cryptography exploits the fact that no information can travel faster than the speed of light in order to obtain security guarantees that cannot be achieved from the laws of quantum mechanics alone. Recently, Lunghi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.030502] presented a bit-commitment scheme where each party uses two agents that exchange classical information in a synchronized fashion, and that is both hiding and binding. A caveat is that the commitment time is intrinsically limited by the spatial configuration of the players, and increasing this time requires the agents to exchange messages during the whole duration of the protocol. While such a solution remains computationally attractive, its practicality is severely limited in realistic settings since all communication must remain perfectly synchronized at all times. In this work, we introduce a robust protocol for relativistic bit commitment that tolerates failures of the classical communication network. This is done by adding a third agent to both parties. Our scheme provides a quadratic improvement in terms of expected sustain time compared with the original protocol, while retaining the same level of security.

  6. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  7. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  8. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk

    2000-09-01

    Quark-hadron duality addresses some of the most fundamental issues in strong interaction physics, in particular the nature of the transition from the perturbative to non-perturbative regions of QCD. I summarize recent developments in quark-hadron duality in lepton-hadron scattering, and outline how duality can be studied at future high-luminosity facilities such as Jefferson Lab at 12 GeV, or an electron-hadron collider such as EPIC.

  9. Jets propagation through a hadron-string medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konchakovski, V. P.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2010-09-15

    Di-jet correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach taking into account the reaction of the medium on the jet energy loss nonperturbatively. A comparison with the STAR and PHENIX data in central Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy {radical}(s)=200 GeV is performed differentially (i.e., with respect to correlations in azimuthal angle {Delta}{phi} and pseudorapidity {Delta}{eta}). The HSD results do not show enough suppression for the 'away-side' jets in accordance with earlier perturbative studies. Furthermore, the 'Mach-cone' structure for the angle distribution in the away-side jet as well as 'ridge' long-range rapidity correlations in the 'near-side' jet - observed by the STAR, PHENIX, and PHOBOS Collaborations - are not seen in the HSD results, thus suggesting a partonic origin.

  10. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-Qin; Zhang, Mao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The production of the hadronic resonances K*0(892), ϕ(1020), Σ*(1385), and Ξ*(1530) in central AA collisions at , 200, and 2760 GeV is systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization is described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The p T spectra of K*0(892) calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low p T ≲ 1.5 GeV, and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects, the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on ϕ(1020) production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low p T on the basis of overall agreement with the data. We also predict the p T spectra of Σ*(1385) and Ξ*(1530), to be tested by the future experimental data. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575100, 11305076, 11505104)

  11. Future hadron physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  12. The very large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  13. Key Issues in Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Capstick; et. Al.

    2000-12-01

    A group of fifty physicists met in Duck, NC, Nov. 6-9 to discuss the current status and future goals of hadronic physics. The main purpose of the meeting was to define the field by identifying its key issues, challenges, and opportunities. The conclusions, incorporating considerable input from the community at large, are presented in this white paper.

  14. Hadronic Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-03-19

    In this talk I discuss a few recent results on lattice calculations of scattering lengths in hadronic processes. In particular, I present the scattering length of the pion-pion scattering in the I=2 channel and the nucleon-nucleon {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} coupled channels.

  15. Exciting Developments in Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Kamal K.

    2006-02-11

    There has been a renaissance in hadron spectroscopy during the last couple of years. Long lost states have been tracked down. Unexpected states are showing up all over, and numerous measurements with unprecedented precision are being reported. A review is presented.

  16. B physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  17. The relation between relativistic and non-relativistic continuum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellstede, G. O.; von Borzeszkowski, H.-H.; Chrobok, T.; Muschik, W.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the relativistic theory of irreversible processes with the aim to answer the following questions: (1) Under which conditions is this theory a relativistic generalization of the non-relativistic theory of irreversible processes (in particular, this implies to ask for the conditions under which the first law of thermodynamics can be recovered from the relativistic conservation law of total energy), and (2) how do the relativistic corrections look like? To this end, we perform a low-energy approximation for the balance equations underlying the theory, i.e., for the balances of the particle number, the energy-momentum and the entropy. It is shown that, going up to the 3rd order in the expansion series of the balances, the non-relativistic theory can be derived when one assumes that the 4-current of the particle flow is purely convective and the product of the 3-dimensional acceleration and velocity is equal to zero. Afterwards, the higher-order terms are discussed. Since our discussion mainly makes use of those balance equations that lie on the basis of most versions of continuum thermodynamics, the results do not only refer to early TIP presented by Eckart (Phys Rev 58:919, 1940) and Landau and Lifshitz (Fluid mechanics. Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1940), but also to its extended and/or general-relativistic versions.

  18. A relativistic toy model for Unruh black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonaro, P.

    2014-08-01

    We consider the wave propagation in terms of acoustic geometry in a quantum relativistic system. This reduces, in the hydrodynamic limit, to the equations which govern the motion of a relativistic Fermi-degenerate gas in one space dimension. The derivation of an acoustic metric for one-dimensional (1D) systems is in general plagued with the impossibility of defining a conformal factor. Here we show that, although the system is intrinsically one-dimensional, the Unruh procedure continues to work because of the particular structure symmetry of the model. By analyzing the dispersion relation, attention is also paid to the quantum effects on the wave propagation.

  19. Relativistic rise measurement for heavy cosmic rays in xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Potential advantages of the use of the relativistic rise of energy loss in gas-filled counters for cosmic ray energy measurement have been noted by Tueller et al. (1979) and Gregory and Parnell (1979). Gregory and Parnell have reported measurements on the relativistic rise for cosmic ray iron nuclei in parallel plate ionization chambers 8.4 cm thick filled with a xenon and methane mixture. The present investigation is concerned with the observed rise and ionization signal fluctuations for a sample of elements from carbon through iron in the cosmic rays. The results are compared with a calculation of the energy deposit within the ion chamber.

  20. Lorentz invariant relative velocity and relativistic binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannoni, Mirco

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of Lorentz invariant relative velocity that is often misunderstood or unknown in high energy physics literature. The properties of the relative velocity allow to formulate the invariant flux and cross-section without recurring to nonphysical velocities or any assumption about the reference frame. Applications such as the luminosity of a collider, the use as kinematic variable, and the statistical theory of collisions in a relativistic classical gas are reviewed. It is emphasized how the hyperbolic properties of the velocity space explain the peculiarities of relativistic scattering.

  1. Anomalous correlation between hadron and electromagnetic particles in hadron and gamma-ray families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between hadrons and electromagnetic particles were studied in the hadron-gamma families observed in the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. It is found that there exist a number of hadrons which associate electromagnetic showers in extraordinarily close vicinity. The probability to have such a large number of hadrons associating electromagnetic showers, expected from background calculation, is found to be negligibly small and it means there exists anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in the characteristic spread of atmospheric electromagnetic cascade.

  2. Inverse Compton Scattering in Mildly Relativistic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inverse Compton scattering in mildly relativistic static and moving plasmas with low optical depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculated the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cosmic background radiation. Our semi-analytic method is based on a separation of photon diffusion in frequency and real space. We use Monte Carlo simulation to derive the intensity and frequency of the scattered photons for a monochromatic incoming radiation. The outgoing spectrum is determined by integrating over the spectrum of the incoming radiation using the intensity to determine the correct weight. This method makes it possible to study the emerging radiation as a function of frequency and direction. As a first application we have studied the effects of finite optical depth and gas infall on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (not possible with the extended Kompaneets equation) and discuss the parameter range in which the Boltzmann equation and its expansions can be used. For high temperature clusters (k(sub B)T(sub e) greater than or approximately equal to 15 keV) relativistic corrections based on a fifth order expansion of the extended Kompaneets equation seriously underestimate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at high frequencies. The contribution from plasma infall is less important for reasonable velocities. We give a convenient analytical expression for the dependence of the cross-over frequency on temperature, optical depth, and gas infall speed. Optical depth effects are often more important than relativistic corrections, and should be taken into account for high-precision work, but are smaller than the typical kinematic effect from cluster radial velocities.

  3. Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Fireballs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piran, Tsvi; Shemi, Amotz; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Many models of gamma-ray bursts involve a fireball, which is an optically thick concentration of radiation energy with a high ratio of energy density to rest mass. We examine analytically and numerically the evolution of a relativistic fireball. We show that, after an early rearrangement phase, most of the matter and energy in the fireball is concentrated within a narrow shell. The shell propagates at nearly the speed of light, with a frozen radial profile, and according to a simple set of scaling laws. The spectrum of the escaping radiation is harder at early times and softer later on. Depending on the initial energy-to-mass ratio, the final outcome of a fireball is either photons with roughly the initial temperature or ultrarelativistic baryons. In the latter case, the energy could be converted back to gamma-rays via interaction with surrounding material.

  4. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumberg, Victor A.

    2010-08-01

    Relativistic celestial mechanics (RCM) refers to a science to study the motion of celestial bodies within the framework of general relativity theory (GRT) by Einstein. Being a straightforward successor of Newtonian celestial mechanics RCM embraces all aspects of motion of celestial bodies including (1) physics of motion, i.e. investigation of the physical nature of all effects influencing the motion of celestial bodies and formulation of a physical model for a specific problem; (2) mathematics of motion, i.e. investigation of the mathematical characteristics of the solutions of the differential equations of motion of celestial bodies; (3) computation of motion, i.e. the actual determination of the quantitative characteristics of motion; (4) astronomy of motion, i.e. application of mathematical solution of a problem to a specific celestial body, comparison with the results of observations, determination of initial values and parameters of motion, and checking the physical and mathematical models employed for a given problem.

  5. Photodetachment of relativistic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, J.B.; Gram, P.A.M.; Hamm, M.E.; Hamm, R.W.; Bryant, H.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Clark, D.A.; Frost, C.A.; Smith, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    A series of fundamental laser ion beam experiments has been made feasible by the high-quality, relativistic (..beta.. = 0.842) H/sup -/ ion beam available at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The relatavistic Doppler shift of the light from an ordinary ultraviolet laser provides what is, in effect, a continuously tunable vacuum-ultraviolet laser in the rest frame of the moving ions. The Lorentz transformation of a modest laboratory magnetic field provides an electric field of several megavolts/centimeter. The latest results of photo-detachment work with H/sup -/ beams and our spectroscopic work with H/sup 0/ beams are presented. Plans for future work are discussed.

  6. Chaoticity parameter λ in two-pion interferometry in an expanding boson gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Ru, Peng; Zhang, Wei-Ning; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the chaoticity parameter λ in two-pion interferometry in an expanding boson gas model. The degree of Bose-Einstein condensation of identical pions, density distributions, and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) correlation functions are calculated for the expanding gas within the mean-field description with a harmonic oscillator potential. The results indicate that a sources with thousands of identical pions may exhibit a degree of Bose-Einstein condensation at the temperatures during the hadronic phase in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. This finite condensation may decrease the chaoticity parameter λ in the two-pion interferometry measurements at low pion pair momenta, but influence only slightly the λ value at high pion pair momentum.

  7. Thermalization of hadrons via Hagedorn states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2014-10-01

    Hagedorn states are characterized by being very massive hadron-like resonances and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. To generate such a zoo of different Hagedorn states, a covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved by ensuring energy conservation and conservation of baryon number B, strangeness S, and electric charge Q. The numerical solution of this equation provides Hagedorn spectra, which also enable us to obtain the decay width for Hagedorn states needed in cascading decay simulations. A single Hagedorn state cascades by various two-body decay channels subsequently into final stable hadrons. All final hadronic observables such as masses, spectral functions, and decay branching ratios for hadronic feed-down are taken from a hadronic transport model. Strikingly, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons are exponential, showing a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature.

  8. Some problems in relativistic thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Veitsman, E. V.

    2007-11-15

    The relativistic equations of state for ideal and real gases, as well as for various interface regions, have been derived. These dependences help to eliminate some controversies in the relativistic thermodynamics based on the special theory of relativity. It is shown, in particular, that the temperature of system whose velocity tends to the velocity of light in vacuum varies in accordance with the Ott law T = T{sub 0}/{radical}1 - v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Relativistic dependences for heat and mass transfer, for Ohm's law, and for a viscous flow of a liquid have also been derived.

  9. Observation of relativistic effects in collective Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Price, D; Divol, L; Tynan, G R; Froula, D H

    2009-10-08

    We observe relativistic modifications to the Thomson scattering spectrum in a traditionally classical regime: v{sub osc}/c = eE{sub 0}/cm{omega}{sub 0} << 1 and T{sub e} < 1 keV. The modifications result from scattering off electron-plasma fluctuations with relativistic phase velocities. Normalized phase velocities v/c between 0.03 and 0.12 have been achieved in a N{sub 2} gas-jet plasma by varying the plasma density from 3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} to 7 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and electron temperature between 85 eV and 700 eV. For these conditions, the complete temporally resolved Thomson scattering spectrum including the electron and ion features has been measured. A fully relativistic treatment of the Thomson scattering form factor has been developed and shows excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the

  11. Mixing of relativistic ideal gases with relative relativistic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Narvaez, R. E.; Ares de Parga, A. M.; Ares de Parga, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Redefined Relativistic Thermodynamics is tested by means of mixing two ideal gases at different temperatures and distinct velocities. The conservation of the 4-vector energy-momentum leads to a tremendous increment of the temperature. This phenomenon can be used in order to describe the heating of a cold clump with shocked jets material. A prediction for improving the ignition of a Tokamak is proposed. The compatibility of the Redefined Relativistic Thermodynamics with the Thermodynamical Field Theory is analyzed.

  12. The mechanics of relativistic space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirov, U. N.

    The relativistic mechanics of an artificial space body with a variable rest mass is presented in a systematic manner. In particular, attention is given to the principles of Lobachevskii geometry, Riemann geometry, and relativity; general Lorentz transformations and relativistic kinematics; the principal theorems of the relativistic mechanics of a space vehicle in spherically symmetric gravitational fields; and the relativistic motion of a space vehicle with jet propulsion. Possible applications of relativistic mechanics are examined.

  13. Modeling QCD for Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tandy, P. C.

    2011-10-24

    We review the approach to modeling soft hadron physics observables based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations of QCD. The focus is on light quark mesons and in particular the pseudoscalar and vector ground states, their decays and electromagnetic couplings. We detail the wide variety of observables that can be correlated by a ladder-rainbow kernel with one infrared parameter fixed to the chiral quark condensate. A recently proposed novel perspective in which the quark condensate is contained within hadrons and not the vacuum is mentioned. The valence quark parton distributions, in the pion and kaon, as measured in the Drell Yan process, are investigated with the same ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations.

  14. Exotic Hadrons from B Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulsom, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. One of the most important discoveries was that of an apparent four-quark particle, named X(3872). It was the first of a growing X, Y, Z alphabet of exotic hadrons, now numbering more than a dozen, found by the e + e - collider experiments. These multi-quark states represent an unusual departure from the standard description that hadronic matter consists of only two or three quarks. These discoveries have led to the emergence of a new category of physics within heavy meson spectroscopy. This talk will review some of these key experimental results, and highlight the potential of the next generation B-Factory, Belle II, as it begins operation in the coming year.

  15. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  16. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Abler, Daniel; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components. PMID:23824127

  17. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  18. Relativistic Electron Beams Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene; Chanrion, Olivier; van der Velde, Oscar; Soula, Serge; Odzimek, Anna; Bennett, Alec; Whitley, Toby; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    It has recently been discovered that lightning discharges generate upward-directed relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds. This extends the phenomenon of relativistic runaway breakdown believed to occur inside thunderclouds to the atmosphere above thunderclouds. This marks a profound advance in our understanding of the atmosphere because we now know it acts as a giant, natural, particle accelerator. The accelerated electrons can reach significant relativistic energies of some MeV during their passage from the troposphere, through the middle atmosphere, into near-Earth space. These relativistic electron beams constitute a current above thunderclouds and effectively transfer energy from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere. This coupling process thereby forms a novel element of the global atmospheric electric circuit which links tropospheric thunderclouds to the atmosphere above. This contribution describes the radio remote sensing of upward electron beams to determine their occurrence frequency and to characterise their physical properites.

  19. Relativistic effects in atom gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Atom interferometry is currently developing rapidly, which is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. Thus, it is extremely significant to develop a general relativistic model for atom interferometers. In this paper, we mainly present an analytical derivation process and first give a complete vectorial expression for the relativistic interferometric phase shift in an atom interferometer. The dynamics of the interferometer are studied, where both the atoms and the light are treated relativistically. Then, an appropriate coordinate transformation for the light is performed crucially to simplify the calculation. In addition, the Bordé A B C D matrix combined with quantum mechanics and the "perturbation" approach are applied to make a methodical calculation for the total phase shift. Finally, we derive the relativistic phase shift kept up to a sensitivity of the acceleration ˜1 0-14 m/s 2 for a 10 -m -long atom interferometer.

  20. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  1. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  2. Hadron physics from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We sketch the basic ideas of the lattice regularization in Quantum Field Theory, the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations, and applications to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This approach enables the numerical measurement of observables at the non-perturbative level. We comment on selected results, with a focus on hadron masses and the link to Chiral Perturbation Theory. At last, we address two outstanding issues: topological freezing and the sign problem.

  3. Compensation effects in hadron calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.; Brau, J.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Goodman, M.; Wilson, R.

    1984-01-01

    The pros and cons of utilizing a fissionable material such as /sup 238/U to compensate for the nuclear binding energy losses in a hadron calorimeter are discussed. Fissionable material can return some lost energy to the particle cascade in terms of low-energy neutrons and gamma rays, but electromagnetic sampling inefficiencies (often called transition effects) and the detection medium which tries to convert this energy to a useable signal are just as important. 12 references.

  4. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  5. Hadron Properties with FLIC Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    James Zanotti; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Williams; J Zhang

    2003-07-01

    The Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action provides a new form of nonperturbative O(a)-improvement in lattice fermion actions offering near continuum results at finite lattice spacing. It provides computationally inexpensive access to the light quark mass regime of QCD where chiral nonanalytic behavior associated with Goldstone bosons is revealed. The motivation and formulation of FLIC fermions, its excellent scaling properties and its low-lying hadron mass phenomenology are presented.

  6. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  7. Relativistic Jets from Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; MacFadyen, A.

    2000-03-01

    Using a collapsar progenitor model of MacFadyen & Woosley, we have simulated the propagation of an axisymmetric jet through a collapsing rotating massive star with the GENESIS multidimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code. The jet forms as a consequence of an assumed (constant or variable) energy deposition in the range of 1050-1051 ergs s-1 within a 30 deg cone around the rotation axis. The jet flow is strongly beamed (approximately less than a few degrees), spatially inhomogeneous, and time dependent. The jet reaches the surface of the stellar progenitor (R*=2.98x1010 cm) intact. At breakout, the maximum Lorentz factor of the jet flow is 33. After breakout, the jet accelerates into the circumstellar medium, whose density is assumed to decrease exponentially and then become constant, ρext=10-5 g cm-3. Outside the star, the flow begins to expand laterally also (v~c), but the beam remains very well collimated. At a distance of 2.54 R*, where the simulation ends, the Lorentz factor has increased to 44.

  8. Relativistic Electron Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.

    2017-03-01

    The desire to push recent experiments on electron vortices to higher energies leads to some theoretical difficulties. In particular the simple and very successful picture of phase vortices of vortex charge ℓ associated with ℓℏ units of orbital angular momentum per electron is challenged by the facts that (i) the spin and orbital angular momentum are not separately conserved for a Dirac electron, which suggests that the existence of a spin-orbit coupling will complicate matters, and (ii) that the velocity of a Dirac electron is not simply the gradient of a phase as it is in the Schrödinger theory suggesting that, perhaps, electron vortices might not exist at a fundamental level. We resolve these difficulties by showing that electron vortices do indeed exist in the relativistic theory and show that the charge of such a vortex is simply related to a conserved orbital part of the total angular momentum, closely related to the familiar situation for the orbital angular momentum of a photon.

  9. Newtonian and Relativistic Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen; Wald, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Cosmological N-body simulations are now being performed using Newtonian gravity on scales larger than the Hubble radius. It is known that a uniformly expanding, homogeneous ball of dust in Newtonian gravity satisfies the Friedmann equations, and also that a correspondence between Newtonian and relativistic dust cosmologies holds in linearized perturbation theory. Nevertheless, it is not obvious that Newtonian gravity can provide a good global description of an inhomogeneous cosmology with significant nonlinear dynamical behavior at small scales. We investigate this issue in light of a perturbative framework that we have recently developed. We propose a straightforward dictionary---exact at the linearized level---that maps Newtonian dust cosmologies into GR dust cosmologies, and we use our ordering scheme to determine the degree to which the resulting metric and matter distribution solve Einstein's equation. We then find additional corrections needed to satisfy Einstein's equation to ``order 1'' at small scales and to ``order ɛ'' at large scales. We expect that, in realistic Newtonian cosmologies, these additional corrections will be very small; if so, this should provide strong justification for the use of Newtonian simulations to describe GR cosmologies.

  10. Small pad RPCs as detector for high granularity digital hadron calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammosov, V.; Gapienko, V.; Ivanilov, A.; Sefkow, F.; Semak, A.; Sviridov, Yu.; Usenko, E.; Zaets, V.

    2004-11-01

    Requirements for sampling hadron calorimetry with gaseous active medium and digital read-out for a future linear e+e--collider (FLC) are formulated. Monogap glass Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) prototypes equipped with 1cm2 read-out pads and operated in saturated avalanche and streamer modes are studied as a possible detector for digital hadron calorimetry. Operating characteristics of the prototypes such as induced charges, efficiencies and fired pad multiplicities are measured for different gas mixtures, gas gap widths and anode thicknesses, electronics thresholds, beam incident angle and intensity. Choice of RPC working performance is outlined.

  11. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; ...

    2016-02-18

    We observed the collective behavior of hadronic particles in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In our work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, the thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2–3 in 0%–1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermalmore » photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.« less

  12. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. P.; Hughes, P. A.

    2009-09-01

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 102-106. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 102 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter’s capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  13. Shock wave produced by hadron-quark phase transition in neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo de Almeida, Luis; Duarte, Sérgio José Barbosa; Rodrigues, Hilário

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present a schematic description of the detonation wave in hadronic matter inside a neutron star core. We have used a simplified two shells model where the inner shell medium is initially composed of a small lump of strange quark matter surrounded by a large outer shell composed of hadronic matter. We have utilized an equation of state (EOS) based on Relativistic Mean Field Theory with the parameter set NL3 to describe the nuclear and subnuclear phases. We use the MIT bag model to describe the strange quark matter. The hadron-quark phase transition actually induces highly non equilibrium modes, which may become a detonation process (faster) or a burning process (slower). The main purpose of the work is to study the formation of a remnant quark star and the possibility of mass ejection caused by the hadron-quark phase transition. We have found that the total amount of ejected mass is dependant of the bag constant utilized in the strange matter description.

  14. D(s) meson as a quantitative probe of diffusion and hadronization in nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Fries, Rainer J; Rapp, Ralf

    2013-03-15

    The modifications of D(s)-meson spectra in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are identified as a quantitative probe of key properties of the hot nuclear medium. The unique valence-quark content of the D(s)=cs̄ couples the well-known strangeness enhancement with the collective-flow pattern of primordially produced charm quarks. This idea is illustrated utilizing a consistent strong-coupling treatment with hydrodynamic bulk evolution and nonperturbative T-matrix interactions for both heavy-quark diffusion and hadronization in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). A large enhancement of the D(s) nuclear modification factor at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is predicted, with a maximum of ∼1.5-1.8 at transverse momenta around 2  GeV/c. This is a direct consequence of the strong coupling of the heavy quarks to the QGP and their hadronization via coalescence with strange quarks. We furthermore introduce the effects of diffusion in the hadronic phase and suggest that an increase of the D-meson elliptic flow compared to the D(s) can disentangle the transport properties of hadronic and QGP liquids.

  15. Hadronic form factor models and spectroscopy within the gauge/gravity correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-03-20

    We show that the nonperturbative light-front dynamics of relativistic hadronic bound states has a dual semiclassical gravity description on a higher dimensional warped AdS space in the limit of zero quark masses. This mapping of AdS gravity theory to the boundary quantum field theory, quantized at fixed light-front time, allows one to establish a precise relation between holographic wave functions in AdS space and the light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons. The resulting AdS/QCD model gives a remarkably good accounting of the spectrum, elastic and transition form factors of the light-quark hadrons in terms of one parameter, the QCD gap scale. The light-front holographic approach described here thus provides a frame-independent first approximation to the light-front Hamiltonian problem for QCD. This article is based on lectures at the Niccolo Cabeo International School of Hadronic Physics, Ferrara, Italy, May 2011.

  16. Hadron Physics with PANDA at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-10-21

    The recently established FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The PANDA experiment, which is integrated in the HESR storage ring for antiprotons is at the center of the hadron physics program. It includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics and electromagnetic processes.

  17. Hadronic weak charges and parity-violating forward Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    Background: Parity-violating elastic electron-nucleon scattering at low momentum transfer allows one to access the nucleon's weak charge, the vector coupling of the Z -boson to the nucleon. In the Standard Model and at tree level, the weak charge of the proton is related to the weak mixing angle and accidentally suppressed, QWp ,tree=1 -4 sin2θW≈0.07 . Modern experiments aim at extracting QWp at ˜1 % accuracy. Similarly, parity nonconservation in atoms allows to access the weak charge of atomic nuclei. Purpose: We consider a novel class of radiative corrections due to the exchange of two photons, with parity violation in the hadronic/nuclear system. These corrections are prone to long-range interactions and may affect the extraction of sin2θW from the experimental data at the relevant level of precision. Methods: The two-photon exchange contribution to the parity-violating electron-proton scattering amplitude is studied in the framework of forward dispersion relations. We address the general properties of the parity-violating forward Compton scattering amplitude and use relativistic chiral perturbation theory to provide the first field-theoretical proof that it obeys a superconvergence relation. Results: We show that the significance of this new correction increases with the beam energy in parity-violating electron scattering, but the superconvergence relation protects the formal definition of the weak charge as a limit at zero-momentum transfer and zero energy. We evaluate the new correction in a hadronic model with pion loops and the Δ (1232 ) resonance, supplemented with a high-energy contribution. For the kinematic conditions of existing and upcoming experiments we show that two-photon exchange corrections with hadronic or nuclear parity violation do not pose a problem for the interpretation of the data in terms of the weak mixing angle at the present level of accuracy. Conclusions: Two-photon exchange in presence of hadronic or nuclear parity violation

  18. Ultra-relativistic heavy ions and the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    The study of ultra-relativistic heavy ions at an accelerator such as the CBA provides a unique glimpse of matter as it may have appeared in the early universe. This hot dense matter very probably appears as a quark-gluon plasma which expands and cools into hadronic matter. The CBA would provide data at the very highest energies, and produce matter at the highest energy densities. The possibility of using a cyclotron to inject very heavy ions into the AGS and then into the CBA would also allow the production of quark-gluon matter at higher energy densities than would light ions, and would make the matter in a larger volume where surface effects are minimized. At the highest energies with very heavy ions, there is great flexibility in the experimental signals which might be studied, as well as the nature of the matter which is produced. Some of the possibilities are discussed. (WHK)

  19. The Emergence of Hadrons from QCD Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, William; Color Dynamics in Cold Matter (CDCM) Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The formation of hadrons from energetic quarks, the dynamical enforcement of QCD confinement, is not well understood at a fundamental level. In Deep Inelastic Scattering, modifications of the distributions of identified hadrons emerging from nuclei of different sizes reveal a rich variety of spatial and temporal characteristics of the hadronization process, including its dependence on spin, flavor, energy, and hadron mass and structure. The EIC will feature a wide range of kinematics, allowing a complete investigation of medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung by the propagating quarks, leading to partonic energy loss. This fundamental process, which is also at the heart of jet quenching in heavy ion collisions, can be studied for light and heavy quarks at the EIC through observables quantifying hadron ``attenuation'' for a variety of hadron species. Transverse momentum broadening of hadrons, which is sensitive to the nuclear gluonic field, will also be accessible, and can be used to test our understanding from pQCD of how this quantity evolves with pathlength, as well as its connection to partonic energy loss. The evolution of the forming hadrons in the medium will shed new light on the dynamical origins of the forces between hadrons, and thus ultimately on the nuclear force. Supported by the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT) of Chile.

  20. Hadronization measurements in cold nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, Raphael

    2015-05-01

    Hadronization is the non-perturbative process of QCD by which partons become hadrons. It has been studied at high energies through various processes, we focus here on the experiments of lepto-production of hadrons in cold nuclear matter. By studying the dependence of observables to the atomic number of the target, these experimentscan give information on the dynamic of the hadronization at the femtometer scale. In particular, we will present preliminary results from JLab Hall B (CLAS collaboration), which give unprecedented statistical precision. Then, we will present results of a phenomenological study showing how HERMES data can be described with pure energyloss models.

  1. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  2. Prognosis of Gles of Relativistic Solar Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge; Juárez-Zuñiga, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Ground level enhancements (GLEs) are relativistic solar particles measured at ground level by the worldwide network of cosmic ray detectors. These sporadic events are associated with solar flares and are assumed to be of a quasi-random nature. Studying them gives information about their source and propagation processes, the maximum capacity of the Sun as a particle accelerator engine, the magnetic structure of the medium traversed, etc. Space vehicles, as well as electric transformers and gas pipes at high latitudes may be damaged by this kind of radiation. As a result, their prediction has turned out to be very important, but because of their random occurrence, up to now few efforts toward this goal have been made. The results of these efforts have been limited to possible warnings in real time, just before a GLE occurrence, but no specific dates have been predicted well enough in advance to prevent possible hazards. In this study we show that, in spite of the quasi-stochastic nature of GLEs, it is possible to predict them with relative precision, even for future solar cycles. Additionally, a previous study establishing synchronization among some periodicities of several layers of solar atmosphere argues against the full randomness of the phenomenon of relativistic particle production. Therefore, by means of wavelet spectral analysis combined with fuzzy logic tools, we reproduce previous known GLE events and present results for future events. The next GLE is expected to occur in the first semester of 2016.

  3. PROGNOSIS OF GLEs OF RELATIVISTIC SOLAR PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge; Juárez-Zuñiga, Alan E-mail: z.alan.z@hotmail.com

    2015-04-10

    Ground level enhancements (GLEs) are relativistic solar particles measured at ground level by the worldwide network of cosmic ray detectors. These sporadic events are associated with solar flares and are assumed to be of a quasi-random nature. Studying them gives information about their source and propagation processes, the maximum capacity of the Sun as a particle accelerator engine, the magnetic structure of the medium traversed, etc. Space vehicles, as well as electric transformers and gas pipes at high latitudes may be damaged by this kind of radiation. As a result, their prediction has turned out to be very important, but because of their random occurrence, up to now few efforts toward this goal have been made. The results of these efforts have been limited to possible warnings in real time, just before a GLE occurrence, but no specific dates have been predicted well enough in advance to prevent possible hazards. In this study we show that, in spite of the quasi-stochastic nature of GLEs, it is possible to predict them with relative precision, even for future solar cycles. Additionally, a previous study establishing synchronization among some periodicities of several layers of solar atmosphere argues against the full randomness of the phenomenon of relativistic particle production. Therefore, by means of wavelet spectral analysis combined with fuzzy logic tools, we reproduce previous known GLE events and present results for future events. The next GLE is expected to occur in the first semester of 2016.

  4. RECOLLIMATION SHOCKS IN MAGNETIZED RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Gómez, Jose L.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Meli, Athina; Hardee, Philip E.

    2015-08-10

    We have performed two-dimensional special-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-equilibrium over-pressured relativistic jets in cylindrical geometry. Multiple stationary recollimation shock and rarefaction structures are produced along the jet by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves excited at the interface between the jet and the surrounding ambient medium. Although initially the jet is kinematically dominated, we have considered axial, toroidal, and helical magnetic fields to investigate the effects of different magnetic-field topologies and strengths on the recollimation structures. We find that an axial field introduces a larger effective gas pressure and leads to stronger recollimation shocks and rarefactions, resulting in larger flow variations. The jet boost grows quadratically with the initial magnetic field. On the other hand, a toroidal field leads to weaker recollimation shocks and rarefactions, significantly modifying the jet structure after the first recollimation rarefaction and shock. The jet boost decreases systematically. For a helical field, instead, the behavior depends on the magnetic pitch, with a phenomenology that ranges between the one seen for axial and toroidal magnetic fields, respectively. In general, however, a helical magnetic field yields a more complex shock and rarefaction substructure close to the inlet that significantly modifies the jet structure. The differences in shock structure resulting from different field configurations and strengths may have observable consequences for disturbances propagating through a stationary recollimation shock.

  5. Recollimation Shocks in Magnetized Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Gómez, Jose L.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Meli, Athina; Hardee, Philip E.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2015-08-01

    We have performed two-dimensional special-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-equilibrium over-pressured relativistic jets in cylindrical geometry. Multiple stationary recollimation shock and rarefaction structures are produced along the jet by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves excited at the interface between the jet and the surrounding ambient medium. Although initially the jet is kinematically dominated, we have considered axial, toroidal, and helical magnetic fields to investigate the effects of different magnetic-field topologies and strengths on the recollimation structures. We find that an axial field introduces a larger effective gas pressure and leads to stronger recollimation shocks and rarefactions, resulting in larger flow variations. The jet boost grows quadratically with the initial magnetic field. On the other hand, a toroidal field leads to weaker recollimation shocks and rarefactions, significantly modifying the jet structure after the first recollimation rarefaction and shock. The jet boost decreases systematically. For a helical field, instead, the behavior depends on the magnetic pitch, with a phenomenology that ranges between the one seen for axial and toroidal magnetic fields, respectively. In general, however, a helical magnetic field yields a more complex shock and rarefaction substructure close to the inlet that significantly modifies the jet structure. The differences in shock structure resulting from different field configurations and strengths may have observable consequences for disturbances propagating through a stationary recollimation shock.

  6. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Quark forces from hadronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2009-04-17

    We consider the implications of the most general two-body quark-quark interaction Hamiltonian for the spin-flavor structure of the negative parity L = 1 excited baryons. Assuming the most general two-body quark interaction Hamiltonian, we derive two correlations among the masses and mixing angles of these states, which constrain the mixing angles, and can be used to test for the presence of three-body quark interactions. We find that the pure gluon-exchange model is disfavored by data, independently of any assumptions about hadronic wave functions.

  8. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jicai; Hwa, Rudolph C.

    1992-12-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ecco is extended to three-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in lnpT, and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle φ. The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent ν=1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined.

  9. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Hwa, R. C.

    1992-06-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ECCO is extended to 3-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in 1np(sub T), and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle (phi). The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent nu = 1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined.

  10. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  11. The theory of hadronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1995-03-16

    This report briefly discusses progress on the following topics: isospin breaking in the pion-nucleon system; subthreshold amplitudes in the {pi}N system; neutron-proton charge-exchange; transparency in pion production; energy dependence of pion DCX; direct capture of pions into deeply bound atomic states; knock out of secondary components in the nucleus; radii of neutron distributions in nuclei; the hadronic double scattering operator; pion scattering and charge exchange from polarized nuclei; pion absorption in nuclei; modification of nucleon structure in nuclei; and antiproton annihilation in nuclei.

  12. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  14. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic and Ultra-Relativistic Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic and ultra-relativistic shock waves. High upstream flow gamma factors are used, Γ=(1-uup2/c2)-0.5, which are relevant to models of ultra-relativistic particle shock acceleration in the central engines and relativistic jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) fireballs. Numerical investigations are carried out on acceleration properties in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic flow regime (Γ ˜ 10-1000) concerning angular distributions, acceleration time scales, particle energy gain versus number of crossings and spectral shapes. We perform calculations for both parallel and oblique sub-luminal and super-luminal shocks. For parallel and oblique sub-luminal shocks, the spectra depend on whether or not the scattering is represented by pitch angle diffusion or by large angle scattering. The large angle case exhibits a distinctive structure in the basic power-law spectrum not nearly so obvious for small angle scattering. However, both cases yield a significant 'speed-up' of acceleration rate when compared with the conventional, non-relativistic expression, tacc=[c/(uup-udown)] (λup/uup+λdown/udown). An energization by a factor Γ2 for the first crossing cycle and a large energy gains for subsequent crossings as well as the high 'speed-up' factors found, are important in supporting past works, especially the models developed by Vietri and Waxman on ultra-high energy cosmic ray, neutrino and gamma-ray production in GRB. For oblique super-luminal shocks, we calculate the energy gain and spectral shape for a number of different inclinations. For this case the acceleration of particles is 'pictured' by a shock drift mechanism. We use high gamma flows with Lorentz factors in the range 10-40 which are relevant to ultra-relativistic shocks in AGN accretion disks and jets. In all investigations we closely follow the particle's trajectory along the magnetic field

  15. Large amplitude relativistic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Timothy

    2010-05-15

    Relativistic, longitudinal plasma oscillations are studied for the case of a simple water bag distribution of electrons having cylindrical symmetry in momentum space with the axis of the cylinder parallel to the velocity of wave propagation. The plasma is required to obey the relativistic Vlasov-Poisson equations, and solutions are sought in the wave frame. An exact solution for the plasma density as a function of the electrostatic field is derived. The maximum electric field is presented in terms of an integral over the known density. It is shown that when the perpendicular momentum is neglected, the maximum electric field approaches infinity as the wave phase velocity approaches the speed of light. It is also shown that for any nonzero perpendicular momentum, the maximum electric field will remain finite as the wave phase velocity approaches the speed of light. The relationship to previously published solutions is discussed as is some recent controversy regarding the proper modeling of large amplitude relativistic plasma waves.

  16. Non-Relativistic Superstring Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2007-12-14

    We construct a supersymmetric version of the 'critical' non-relativistic bosonic string theory [1] with its manifest global symmetry. We introduce the anticommuting bc CFT which is the super partner of the {beta}{gamma} CFT. The conformal weights of the b and c fields are both 1/2. The action of the fermionic sector can be transformed into that of the relativistic superstring theory. We explicitly quantize the theory with manifest SO(8) symmetry and find that the spectrum is similar to that of Type IIB superstring theory. There is one notable difference: the fermions are non-chiral. We further consider 'noncritical' generalizations of the supersymmetric theory using the superspace formulation. There is an infinite range of possible string theories similar to the supercritical string theories. We comment on the connection between the critical non-relativistic string theory and the lightlike Linear Dilaton theory.

  17. Polyanalytic relativistic second Bargmann transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Mouayn, Zouhaïr

    2015-05-15

    We construct coherent states through special superpositions of eigenstates of the relativistic isotonic oscillator. In each superposition, the coefficients are chosen to be L{sup 2}-eigenfunctions of a σ-weight Maass Laplacian on the Poincaré disk, which are associated with the eigenvalue 4m(σ−1−m), m∈Z{sub +}∩[0,(σ−1)/2]. For each nonzero m, the associated coherent states transform constitutes the m-true-polyanalytic extension of a relativistic version of the second Bargmann transform, whose integral kernel is expressed in terms of a special Appel-Kampé de Fériet’s hypergeometric function. The obtained results could be used to extend the known semi-classical analysis of quantum dynamics of the relativistic isotonic oscillator.

  18. Relativistic like structure of classical thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, Hernando; Sánchez, Alberto; Vázquez, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze in the context of geometrothermodynamics a Legendre invariant metric structure in the equilibrium space of an ideal gas. We introduce the concept of thermodynamic geodesic as a succession of points, each corresponding to a state of equilibrium, so that the resulting curve represents a quasi-static process. A rigorous geometric structure is derived in which the thermodynamic geodesics at a given point split the equilibrium space into two disconnected regions separated by adiabatic geodesics. This resembles the causal structure of special relativity, which we use to introduce the concept of adiabatic cone for thermodynamic systems. This result might be interpreted as an alternative indication of the inter-relationship between relativistic physics and classical thermodynamics.

  19. State of hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grannis, P.D. |

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  20. Special Relativistic Hydrodynamics with Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2016-12-01

    Special relativistic hydrodynamics with weak gravity has hitherto been unknown in the literature. Whether such an asymmetric combination is possible has been unclear. Here, the hydrodynamic equations with Poisson-type gravity, considering fully relativistic velocity and pressure under the weak gravity and the action-at-a-distance limit, are consistently derived from Einstein’s theory of general relativity. An analysis is made in the maximal slicing, where the Poisson’s equation becomes much simpler than our previous study in the zero-shear gauge. Also presented is the hydrodynamic equations in the first post-Newtonian approximation, now under the general hypersurface condition. Our formulation includes the anisotropic stress.

  1. Relativistic solutions to directed energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Neeraj; Lubin, Philip M.; Zhang, Qicheng

    2016-09-01

    This paper analyses the nature and feasibility of using directed energy to propel probes through space at relativistic speeds. Possible mission scenarios are considered by varying the spacecraft mass, thickness of the sail and power of the directed energy array. We calculate that gram-scaled probes are capable of achieving relativistic speeds and reaching Alpha Centauri well within a human lifetime. A major drawback is the diffraction of the beam which reduces the incident power on the sail resulting in a terminal velocity for the probes. Various notions of efficiency are discussed and we conclude that directed energy propulsion provides a viable direction for future space exploration.

  2. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  3. Quantum Tunneling Time: Relativistic Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dai-Yu; Wang, Towe; Xue, Xun

    2013-11-01

    Several years ago, in quantum mechanics, Davies proposed a method to calculate particle's traveling time with the phase difference of wave function. The method is convenient for calculating the sojourn time inside a potential step and the tunneling time through a potential hill. We extend Davies' non-relativistic calculation to relativistic quantum mechanics, with and without particle-antiparticle creation, using Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac Equation, for different forms of energy-momentum relation. The extension is successful only when the particle and antiparticle creation/annihilation effect is negligible.

  4. Status and Prospects for Hadron Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, Raphaeel

    2010-03-30

    The latest results from the HARP, MIPP and NA61 Hadron Production Experiments are reviewed and their implications for neutrinos physics experiments are discussed. We emphasize three neutrino sources: accelerator-based neutrino beams, advanced neutrino sources and atmospheric neutrinos. Finally, prospects from additional forthcoming hadron production measurements are presented.

  5. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  6. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  7. TOPOLOGICAL THEORY OF HADRONS II: BARYONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P.

    1981-10-01

    The first paper of this series described a method for incorporating spin into the meson sector of the topological theory of hadrons. This second paper extends the theory to all hadrons. It also incorporates into the covariant S-matrix topological framework the group-theoretic properties of the constituent quark model.

  8. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  9. Numerical magneto-hydrodynamics for relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inghirami, Gabriele; Del Zanna, Luca; Beraudo, Andrea; Moghaddam, Mohsen Haddadi; Becattini, Francesco; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    We present an improved version of the ECHO-QGP numerical code, which self-consistently includes for the first time the effects of electromagnetic fields within the framework of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD). We discuss results of its application in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity of the plasma. After reviewing the relevant covariant 3+1 formalisms, we illustrate the implementation of the evolution equations in the code and show the results of several tests aimed at assessing the accuracy and robustness of the implementation. After providing some estimates of the magnetic fields arising in non-central high-energy nuclear collisions, we perform full RMHD simulations of the evolution of the quark-gluon plasma in the presence of electromagnetic fields and discuss the results. In our ideal RMHD setup we find that the magnetic field developing in non-central collisions does not significantly modify the elliptic flow of the final hadrons. However, since there are uncertainties in the description of the pre-equilibrium phase and also in the properties of the medium, a more extensive survey of the possible initial conditions as well as the inclusion of dissipative effects are indeed necessary to validate this preliminary result.

  10. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  11. Relativistic Optimized Link by KLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    The KLT is a way of optimizing the signal processing of a given noisy signal by projecting the noisy signal itself onto the set of orthonormal basis functions spanned by the eigenfunctions of the autocorrelation of the noisy signal. Thus, the key problem in computing the KLT of a noisy signal is the computation of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the autocorrelation of the noisy signal. For the special case of the Brownian motion (i.e. the basic Gaussian noisy signal) it can be proved that the KLT eigenfunctions are just sines, i.e. the KLT is the same as the FT. Let us now bring relativity into the KLT picture (this paper is confined to special relativity; general relativity can be KLT-studied also, but the calculations are, of course, even more difficult). Also, only rectilinear motions will be considered here. So, if one considers a source in relativistic motion, then the noisy signal undergoes a time-rescaling that depends on the type of relativistic motion. In past work this author has demostrated that the eigenfunctions of the time-rescaled, relativistic Brownian motion are Bessel functions of the first kind, and their eigenvalues are the zeros of such Bessel functions. In addition, it is stated (without proofs) that explicit formulae for the KLT signal processing can be found for the particularly important cases of the noisy signals received on Earth from a relativistic spacecraft whose motion is either: 1) uniform; or 2) uniformly accelerated.

  12. Proper-time relativistic dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tepper L.; Zachary, W. W.; Lindesay, James

    1993-01-01

    Proper-time relativistic single-particle classical Hamiltonian mechanics is formulated using a transformation from observer time to system proper time which is a canonical contact transformation on extended phase space. It is shown that interaction induces a change in the symmetry structure of the system which can be analyzed in terms of a Lie-isotopic deformation of the algebra of observables.

  13. Relativistic resonance and decay phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Hai V.

    2015-04-01

    The exact relation τ = ℏ/Γ between the width Γ of a resonance and the lifetime τ for the decay of this resonance could not be obtained in standard quantum theory based on the Hilbert space or Schwartz space axiom in non-relativistic physics as well as in the relativistic regime. In order to obtain the exact relation, one has to modify the Hilbert space axiom or the Schwartz space axiom and choose new boundary conditions based on the Hardy space axioms in which the space of the states and the space of the observables are described by two different Hardy spaces. As consequences of the new Hardy space axioms, one obtains, instead of the symmetric time evolution for the states and the observables, asymmetrical time evolutions for the states and observables which are described by two semi-groups. A relativistic resonance obeying the exponential time evolution can be described by a relativistic Gamow vector, which is defined as superposition of the exact out-plane wave states with a Breit-Wigner energy distribution of the width Γ.

  14. Manipulating relativistic electrons with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    2016-09-01

    The motion control of relativistic electrons with lasers allows for an efficient and elegant way to map the space with ultra-intense electric-field components, which, in turn, permits a unique improvement of the electron beam parameters. This perspective addresses the recent laser plasma accelerator experiments related to the phase space engineering of electron beams in a plasma medium performed at LOA.

  15. Action Principle for Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al., which uses a noncanonical bracket to implement constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed.

  16. Microscopic Processes in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Fredricksen, J.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. Sum rules and photon emission in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Nathan Prescott Montgomery

    In this work, we examine properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) at moderate temperatures and density. These conditions are reached in the later stages of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions after the matter has cooled sufficiently to re-hadronize from a quark-gluon plasma. The properties of matter in this stage are expected to change smoothly with temperature. We explore this behavior in two ways. First, we use finite-temperature sum rules to analyze the properties of vector and axial-vector spectral functions at low temperatures. Previous models used in sum rule analyses frequently led to ambiguous applications. Here we avoid such ambiguities by using an improved vacuum spectral function model together with a strict leading-order-in-temperature expansion. This results in well-defined finite temperature spectral functions. Additionally, we incorporate a finite pion mass, which we show induces an analytical violation of the sum rules. We then proceed to numerically measure that violation. Second, we calculate thermal photon emissivities of QCD matter from interactions involving both mesons and baryons. We identify a novel source of thermal photons from a system composed of pi, rho, and o mesons, then calculate photon emission rates from this system using both relativistic kinetic theory and thermal field theory. These rates are compared to existing calculations and found to be significant. We then calculate thermal photon emission rates from baryon interactions, using an exhaustive set of both strange and non-strange particles. We again find novel sources of photons from this system, compare the total rates to calculations of current state-of-the-art photon emission rates, and find them to be comparable.

  18. Nuclear Physics and Hadron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Braunn, B.

    2011-12-13

    Hadron therapy uses light charged particles beams (mainly proton and {sup 12}C ions) to irradiate tumors. These beams present a ballistic advantage with a maximum energy deposition at the end of the path. A large dose can be delivered inside a deep tumor while the surrounding healthy tissues are preserved. There is an obvious advantage in using these beams but the beam control has to be achieved and all the physical processes leading to the energy deposition have to be fully under control. This treatment protocol requires accurate control devices and a good knowledge of the physical processes occurring all along the path of the projectile in human tissues. In this report, we will present one example of a beam monitor for the proton therapy. We will also present the experimental program which has been initiated to obtain fundamental data on the nuclear fragmentation process.

  19. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  20. Hadron therapy: history, status, prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenov, G. I.; Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2016-08-01

    A brief historical review is given of external radiation therapy (RT), one of the main cancer treatment methods along with surgery and chemotherapy. Cellular mechanisms of radiation damage are described. Special attention is paid to hadron (proton and ion) therapy, its history, results, problems, challenges, current trends, and prospects. Undeniably great contributions to proton therapy have been made by Russian researchers, notably at the experimental centers that have operated since the mid-20th century at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, the A I Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), and the B P Konstantinov Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics. A quarter of the global clinical experience was accumulated by 1990 at the world's largest ITEP-hosted multicabin proton therapy center.

  1. A 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Huovinen, P.; Bleicher, M.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the details of 3+1 dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code for the simulations of quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The code solves the equations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics in the Israel-Stewart framework. With the help of ideal-viscous splitting, we keep the ability to solve the equations of ideal hydrodynamics in the limit of zero viscosities using a Godunov-type algorithm. Milne coordinates are used to treat the predominant expansion in longitudinal (beam) direction effectively. The results are successfully tested against known analytical relativistic inviscid and viscous solutions, as well as against existing 2+1D relativistic viscous code. Catalogue identifier: AETZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 92 750 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: any with a C++ compiler and the CERN ROOT libraries. Operating system: tested on GNU/Linux Ubuntu 12.04 x64 (gcc 4.6.3), GNU/Linux Ubuntu 13.10 (gcc 4.8.2), Red Hat Linux 6 (gcc 4.4.7). RAM: scales with the number of cells in hydrodynamic grid; 1900 Mbytes for 3D 160×160×100 grid. Classification: 1.5, 4.3, 12. External routines: CERN ROOT (http://root.cern.ch), Gnuplot (http://www.gnuplot.info/) for plotting the results. Nature of problem: relativistic hydrodynamical description of the 3-dimensional quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Solution method: finite volume Godunov-type method. Running time: scales with the number of hydrodynamic cells; typical running times on Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz, single thread mode, 160

  2. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of {sup 20}Ne, {sup 40}Ar, {sup 84}Kr, and {sup 129}Xe: Correlation energies and dipole polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, B. K.; Angom, D.; Latha, K. V. P.

    2009-12-15

    We have carried out a detailed and systematic study of the correlation energies of inert gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and relativistic coupled-cluster theory. In the relativistic coupled-cluster calculations, we implement perturbative triples and include these in the correlation energy calculations. We then calculate the dipole polarizability of the ground states using perturbed coupled-cluster theory.

  3. Fast Lattice Boltzmann Solver for Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Boghosian, B. M.; Succi, S.

    2010-07-02

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

  4. Self-Consistent Synchrotron Spectra from Trans-Relativistic Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing analytical models describing the second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic electrons due to collisions with MHD waves assume that the injected seed particles are already highly relativistic, despite the fact that the most prevalent source of particles is usually the non-relativistic thermal background gas. This presents a problem because the momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient describing the interaction between the electrons and the MHD waves is qualitatively different in the non-relativistic and highly relativistic limits. The lack of an analytical model has forced workers to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work, we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem of electron acceleration, obtained by using a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. We refer to this process as "quasi hard-sphere scattering." The model also incorporates the appropriate momentum dependence for the particle escape timescale, and the effect of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses, which are critical for establishing the location of the high-energy cutoff in the particle spectrum. Since synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses are included in the transport equation, the resulting radiation spectra are computed self-consistently. The results can be used to model the acceleration of radiating electrons in AGN and solar environments, applications of both types are discussed.

  5. Suppression of the high-p(T) charged-hadron R(AA) at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Shen, C

    2012-11-16

    We present a parameter-free postdiction of the high-p(T) charged-hadron nuclear modification factor (R(AA)) in two centralities, measured by the CMS Collaboration in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. The evolution of the bulk medium is modeled using viscous fluid dynamics, with parameters adjusted to describe the soft hadron yields and elliptic flow. Assuming the dominance of radiative energy loss, we compute the medium modification of the R(AA) using a perturbative QCD-based formalism, the higher twist scheme. The transverse momentum diffusion coefficient q[over ^] is assumed to scale with the entropy density and is normalized by fitting the R(AA) in the most central Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. This setup is validated in noncentral Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider and then extrapolated to Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, keeping the relation between q[over ^] and entropy density unchanged. We obtain a satisfactory description of the CMS R(AA) over the p(T) range from 10 to 100 GeV.

  6. Trends and Progress in Nuclear and Hadron Physics: A Straight or Winding Road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vary, James P.; Adhikari, Lekha; Chen, Guangyao; Li, Meijian; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Qian, Wenyang; Spence, John R.; Tang, Shuo; Tuchin, Kirill; Zhao, Xingbo

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative calculations of the properties of hadrons and nuclei, with assessed uncertainties, have emerged as competitive with experimental measurements in a number of major cases. We may well be entering an era where theoretical predictions are critical for experimental progress. Cross-fertilization between the fields of relativistic hadronic structure and non-relativistic nuclear structure is readily apparent. Non-perturbative renormalization methods such as similarity renormalization group and Okubo-Lee-Suzuki schemes as well as many-body methods such as coupled cluster, configuration interaction and lattice simulation methods are now employed and advancing in both major areas of physics. New algorithms to apply these approaches on supercomputers are shared among these areas of physics. The roads to success have intertwined with each community taking the lead at various times in the recent past. We briefly sketch these fascinating paths and comment on some symbiotic relationships. We also overview some recent results from the Hamiltonian basis light-front quantization approach.

  7. Strangeness in hadronic stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorren, R.; Prakash, M.; Ellis, P. J.

    1995-12-01

    We examine the presence of strangeness-bearing components, hyperons and kaons, in dense neutron star matter. Calculations are performed using relativistic mean field models, in which both the baryon-baryon and kaon-baryon interactions are mediated by meson exchange. Results of kaon condensation are found to be qualitatively similar to previous work with chiral models, if compatibility of the kaon optical potentials is required. The presence of strangeness, be it in the form of hyperons or kaons, implies a reduction in the maximum mass and a relatively large number of protons, sufficient to allow rapid cooling to take place. The need to improve upon the poorly known couplings of the strange particles, which determine the composition and structure of neutron stars, is stressed. We also discuss generic problems with effective masses in mean field theories.

  8. Finite nuclei in relativistic models with a light chiral scalar meson

    SciTech Connect

    Serot, B.D.; Furnstahl, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Relativistic chiral models with a light scalar, meson appear to provide an economical marriage of successful relativistic mean-field theories and chiral symmetry. In these models, the scalar meson serves as both the chiral partner of the pion and the mediator of the intermediate-range nucleon-nucleon (NN) attraction. However, while some of these models can reproduce the empirical nuclear matter saturation point, they fail to reproduce observed properties of finite nuclei, such as spin-orbit splittings, shell structure, charge densities, and surface energetics. There deficiencies imply that this realization of chiral symmetry is incorrect. An alternative scenario for chiral hadronic models, which features a heavy chiral scalar and dynamical generation of the NN attraction, is discussed.

  9. Bound-free electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengül, M. Y.; Güçlü, M. C.; Fritzsche, S.

    2009-10-01

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collider and the large hadron colliders. In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the electrons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au+Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb+Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  10. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Pair of hadrons (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complements single-hadron SIDIS. The study of di-hadrons allow us to study higher twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs (f 1, g 1, h 1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations which provide direct and unique insights into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  11. Hadron cascades produced by electromagnetic cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, T.M.; Ranft, J.

    1986-12-01

    A method for calculating high energy hadron cascades induced by multi-GeV electron and photon beams is described. Using the EGS4 computer program, high energy photons in the EM shower are allowed to interact hadronically according to the vector meson dominance (VMD) model, facilitated by a Monte Carlo version of the dual multistring fragmentation model which is used in the hadron cascade code FLUKA. The results of this calculation compare very favorably with experimental data on hadron production in photon-proton collisions and on the hadron production by electron beams on targets (i.e., yields in secondary particle beam lines). Electron beam induced hadron star density contours are also presented and are compared with those produced by proton beams. This FLUKA-EGS4 coupling technique could find use in the design of secondary beams, in the determination high energy hadron source terms for shielding purposes, and in the estimation of induced radioactivity in targets, collimators and beam dumps.

  12. Identity method to study chemical fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Grebieszkow, Katarzyna; Mackowiak, Maja; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2011-05-15

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the chemical composition of the hadronic final state of relativistic heavy-ion collisions carry valuable information on the properties of strongly interacting matter produced in the collisions. However, in experiments incomplete particle identification distorts the observed fluctuation signals. The effect is quantitatively studied and a new technique for measuring chemical fluctuations, the identity method, is proposed. The method fully eliminates the effect of incomplete particle identification. The application of the identity method to experimental data is explained.

  13. QCD on the Light-Front. A Systematic Approach to Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter

    2014-06-01

    Light-front Hamiltonian theory, derived from the quantization of the QCD Lagrangian at fixed light-front time x + = x 0 + x 3, provides a rigorous frame-independent framework for solving nonperturbative QCD. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian H LF predict the hadronic mass spectrum, and the corresponding eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure, providing a direct connection to the QCD Lagrangian. In the semiclassical approximation the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrödinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. Remarkably, the potential U has a unique form of a harmonic oscillator potential if one requires that the chiral QCD action remains conformally invariant. A mass gap and the color confinement scale also arises when one extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light-front Hamiltonian theory. In the case of mesons, the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of H LF for zero quark mass satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion in the invariant variable , which is conjugate to the invariant mass squared . The result is a nonperturbative relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. Only one mass parameter appears. The corresponding light-front Dirac equation provides a dynamical and spectroscopic model of nucleons. The same light-front equations arise from the holographic mapping of the soft-wall model modification of AdS5 space with a unique dilaton profile to QCD

  14. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  15. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2012-08-01

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons. We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  16. Non-perturbative QCD and hadron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos-Martínez, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    A brief exposition of contemporary non-perturbative methods based on the Schwinger-Dyson (SDE) and Bethe-Salpeter equations (BSE) of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and their application to hadron physics is given. These equations provide a non-perturbative continuum formulation of QCD and are a powerful and promising tool for the study of hadron physics. Results on some properties of hadrons based on this approach, with particular attention to the pion distribution amplitude, elastic, and transition electromagnetic form factors, and their comparison to experimental data are presented.

  17. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study pi pi elastic scattering, including the rho resonance, as well as coupled-channel pi K, eta K scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  18. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel π >K, ηK scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  19. Relativistic jet feedback in high-redshift galaxies - I. Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph; Wagner, Alex

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of 3D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of interaction of active galactic nucleus jets with a dense turbulent two-phase interstellar medium, which would be typical of high-redshift galaxies. We describe the effect of the jet on the evolution of the density of the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). The jet-driven energy bubble affects the gas to distances up to several kiloparsecs from the injection region. The shocks resulting from such interactions create a multiphase ISM and radial outflows. One of the striking result of this work is that low-power jets (Pjet ≲ 1043 ergs-1), although less efficient in accelerating clouds, are trapped in the ISM for a longer time and hence affect the ISM over a larger volume. Jets of higher power drill through with relative ease. Although the relativistic jets launch strong outflows, there is little net mass ejection to very large distances, supporting a galactic fountain scenario for local feedback.

  20. Transition in the Equilibrium Distribution Function of Relativistic Particles

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a transition from single peaked to bimodal velocity distribution in a relativistic fluid under increasing temperature, in contrast with a non-relativistic gas, where only a monotonic broadening of the bell-shaped distribution is observed. Such transition results from the interplay between the raise in thermal energy and the constraint of maximum velocity imposed by the speed of light. We study the Bose-Einstein, the Fermi-Dirac, and the Maxwell-Jüttner distributions, and show that they all exhibit the same qualitative behavior. We characterize the nature of the transition in the framework of critical phenomena and show that it is either continuous or discontinuous, depending on the group velocity. We analyze the transition in one, two, and three dimensions, with special emphasis on twodimensions, for which a possible experiment in graphene, based on the measurement of the Johnson-Nyquist noise, is proposed. PMID:22937220

  1. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  2. On wave stability in relativistic cosmic-ray hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Wave stability of a two-fluid hydrodynamical model describing the acceleration of cosmic rays by the first-order Fermi mechanism in relativistic, cosmic-ray-modified shocks is investigated. For a uniform background state, the short- and long-wavelength wave speeds are shown to interlace, thus assuring wave stability in this case. A JWKB analysis is performed to investigate the stability of short-wavelength thermal gas sound waves in the smooth, decelerating supersonic flow upstream of a relativistic, cosmic-ray-modified shock. The stability of the waves is assessed both in terms of the fluid velocity and density perturbations, as well as in terms of the wave action. The stability and interaction of the short-wavelength cosmic-ray coherent mode with the background flow is also studied.

  3. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1992--June 30 , 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.J.; Cohen, T.D.

    1993-07-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. The section on Hadrons in Nuclei reports research into the ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate decreases in nuclear matter, and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the Structure of Hadrons reports progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon. These results cover widely different approaches -- lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. Progress in Relativistic Nuclear Physics is reported on electromagnetic interactions in a relativistic bound state formalism, with applications to elastic electron scattering by deuterium, and on application of a two-body quasipotential equation to calculate the spectrum of mesons formed as bound states of a quark and antiquark. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium similar to that found from QCD sum rules. Calculations of three-body bound states with simple forms of relativistic dynamics are also discussed. The section on Heavy Ion Dynamics and Related Processes describes progress on the (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) problem and heavy-on dynamics. In particular, the sharp electrons observed in {beta}{sup +} irradiation of heavy atoms have recently been subsumed into the ``Composite Particle Scenario,`` generalizing the ``(e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}-Puzzle`` of the pairs from heavy ion collisions to the ``Sharp Lepton Problem.``

  4. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS TRIGGERED BY A QUARK-HADRON PHASE TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Hempel, Matthias; Kaeppeli, Roger; Rauscher, Thomas; Winteler, Christian; Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Froehlich, Carla; Sagert, Irina

    2012-10-10

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis in the explosion of massive stars that are triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition during the early post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. The present study is based on general-relativistic radiation hydrodynamics simulations with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry, which utilize a quark-hadron hybrid equation of state based on the MIT bag model for strange quark matter. The quark-hadron phase transition inside the stellar core forms a shock wave propagating toward the surface of the proto-neutron star. This shock wave results in an explosion and ejects neutron-rich matter from the outer accreted layers of the proto-neutron star. Later, during the cooling phase, the proto-neutron star develops a proton-rich neutrino-driven wind. We present a detailed analysis of the nucleosynthesis outcome in both neutron-rich and proton-rich ejecta and compare our integrated nucleosynthesis with observations of the solar system and metal-poor stars. For our standard scenario, we find that a 'weak' r-process occurs and elements up to the second peak (A {approx} 130) are successfully synthesized. Furthermore, uncertainties in the explosion dynamics could barely allow us to obtain the strong r-process which produces heavier isotopes, including the third peak (A {approx} 195) and actinide elements.

  5. Latest results of charged hadron flow measurements in CuAu collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of azimuthal anisotropic flow vn for inclusive charged hadrons and identified particles at mid rapidity in Cu+Au collisions at √sNN = 200GeV are presented. The data were recorded by the PHENIX experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider(RHIC). Directed, elliptic and triangular flow as a function of transverse momentum pT are measured with respect to event planes. The inclusive charged hadron vi shows the negative value at high pT. The v2 and v3 are compared to those in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. We find the v 2 and v3 follow an empirical scaling with 1/(ɛnN1/3 part). We also compare the v2 and v3 to hydrodynamical predictions. The identified particles v2 and v3 show a mass ordering in low pT region and baryon and meson splitting in high pT region. However the identified hadron v1 only shows mass ordering in mid pT region.

  6. Symmetry energy effects on the mixed hadron-quark phase at high baryon density

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, M.; Greco, V.; Plumari, S.; Liu, B.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.

    2011-01-15

    The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Relativistic mean-field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Due to the different symmetry term in the two phases, isospin effects appear to be rather significant. With increasing isospin asymmetry the binodal transition line of the (T,{rho}{sub B}) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities (e.g., the FAIR/NICA projects). Some observable effects are suggested, in particular an isospin distillation mechanism with a more isospin asymmetric quark phase, to be seen in charged meson yield ratios, and an onset of quark number scaling of the meson-baryon elliptic flows. The presented isospin effects on the mixed phase appear to be robust with respect to even large variations of the poorly known symmetry term at high baryon density in the hadron phase. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of isospin contributions in effective QCD Lagrangian approaches, at the level of explicit isovector parts and/or quark condensates, is discussed.

  7. Chandra Discovers Relativistic Pinball Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    across the shock front, like they're in a relativistic pinball machine," said team member Glenn Allen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge. "The magnetic fields are like the bumpers, and the shock is like a flipper." In their analysis of the huge data set, the team was able to separate the X-rays coming from the accelerating electrons from those coming from the heated stellar debris. The data imply that some of these electrons are accelerated at a rate close to the maximum predicted by theory. Cosmic rays are composed of electrons, protons, and ions, of which only glow from electrons is detectable in X-rays. Protons and ions, which constitute the bulk of cosmic rays, are expected to behave similarly to the electrons. "It's exciting to see regions where the glow produced by cosmic rays actually outshines the 10-million-degree gas heated by the supernova's shock waves," said John Houck, also of MIT. "This helps us understand not only how cosmic rays are accelerated, but also how supernova remnants evolve." As the total energy of the cosmic rays behind the shock wave increases, the magnetic field behind the shock is modified, along with the character of the shock wave itself. Researching the conditions in the shocks helps astronomers trace the changes of the supernova remnant with time, and ultimately better understand the original supernova explosion. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  8. Hadron spectroscopy and B physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.

    1991-11-01

    A description is given of the physics opportunities at RHIC regarding quark-gluon spectroscopy. The basic idea is to isolate with appropriate triggers the sub-processes pomeron + pomeron {yields} hadrons and {gamma}{sup *} + {gamma}{sup *} {yields} hadrons with the net effective mass of hadrons in the range of 1.0 to 10.0 GeV, in order to study the hadronic states composed of quarks and gluons. The double-pomeron interactions are expected to produce glueballs and hybrids preferentially, while the two-offshell-photon initial states should couple predominantly to quarkonia and multiquark states. Of particular interest is the possibility of carrying out a CP-violation study in the self-tagging B decays, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Relativistic rocket: Dream and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, Oleg G.

    2014-06-01

    The dream of interstellar flights persists since the first pioneers in astronautics and has never died. Many concepts of thruster capable to propel a rocket to the stars have been proposed and the most suitable among them are thought to be photon propulsion and propulsion by the products of proton-antiproton annihilation in magnetic nozzle. This article addresses both concepts allowing for cross-section of annihilation among other issues in order to show their vulnerability and to indicate the problems. The concept of relativistic matter propulsion is substantiated and discussed. The latter is argued to be the most straightforward way to build-up a relativistic rocket firstly because it is based on the existing technology of ion generators and accelerators and secondly because it can be stepped up in efflux power starting from interplanetary spacecrafts powered by nuclear reactors to interstellar starships powered by annihilation reactors. The problems imposed by thermodynamics and heat disposal are accentuated.

  10. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2016-03-07

    We measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons, using the PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In the past, heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transversemore » momentum are measured in Au + Au collisions. Here, we compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p + p collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for p(T) > 4 GeV/c. We use the bottom electron fractions in Au + Au and p + p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron R(AA) to calculate the R(AA) for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. Finally, we find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3 < p(T) < 4 GeV/c.« less

  11. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  12. Relativistic optics of nondispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Miron, R.; Zet, G.

    1995-09-01

    The relativistic optics of the nondispersive media endowed with the metric g{sub ij}(x) and with a nonlinear connection is studied. The d-connection relates the conformal and projective properties of the space-time. A post-Newtonian estimation for the metric g{sub ij} is also given. It is shown that the solar system tests impose a constraint on a combination of the post-Newtonian parameters describing the model.

  13. Thermodynamic and relativistic uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Plotnikov, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Thermodynamic uncertainty relation (UR) was verified experimentally. The experiments have shown the validity of the quantum analogue of the zeroth law of stochastic thermodynamics in the form of the saturated Schrödinger UR. We have also proposed a new type of UR for the relativistic mechanics. These relations allow us to consider macroscopic phenomena within the limits of the ratio of the uncertainty relations for different physical quantities.

  14. Hadrons and Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2002-06-01

    Before matter as we know it emerged, the universe was filled with the primordial state of hadronic matter called quark gluon plasma. This hot soup of quarks and gluon is effectively an inescapable consequence of our current knowledge about the fundamental hadronic interactions, quantum chromodynamics. This book covers the ongoing search to verify this prediction experimentally and discusses the physical properties of this novel form of matter.

  15. Hadron formation from interaction among quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z. G.; Yang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the hadronization process of quark system. A phenomenological potential is introduced to describe the interaction between a quark pair. The potential depends on the color charge of those quarks and their relative distances. Those quarks move according to classical equations of motion. Due to the color interaction, coloring quarks are separated to form color neutral clusters which are supposed to be the hadrons.

  16. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; ...

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generatedmore » with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.« less

  17. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, C. J.; Fryer, C. L.; Hungerford, A. L.; Hakel, P.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generated with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.

  18. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Benacquista, Matthew J; Downing, Jonathan M B

    2013-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10(4)-10(6) stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  19. Relativistic covariance of Ohm's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, R.; Schober, G. A. H.

    2016-04-01

    The derivation of Lorentz-covariant generalizations of Ohm's law has been a long-term issue in theoretical physics with deep implications for the study of relativistic effects in optical and atomic physics. In this article, we propose an alternative route to this problem, which is motivated by the tremendous progress in first-principles materials physics in general and ab initio electronic structure theory in particular. We start from the most general, Lorentz-covariant first-order response law, which is written in terms of the fundamental response tensor χμ ν relating induced four-currents to external four-potentials. By showing the equivalence of this description to Ohm's law, we prove the validity of Ohm's law in every inertial frame. We further use the universal relation between χμ ν and the microscopic conductivity tensor σkℓ to derive a fully relativistic transformation law for the latter, which includes all effects of anisotropy and relativistic retardation. In the special case of a constant, scalar conductivity, this transformation law can be used to rederive a standard textbook generalization of Ohm's law.

  20. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Hakel, Peter; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Sherrill, Manalo Edgar

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generated with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.

  1. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  2. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  3. MHD Equation of State with Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhigang; Däppen, Werner; Zejda, Ladislav

    2001-01-01

    The Mihalas-Däppen-Hummer (MHD) equation of state does not include the effect of relativistic partially degenerate electrons, although nonrelativistic partial degeneracy is taken into account. The discovery of a relativistic correction in helioseismology forces us to perform an appropriate upgrade of the MHD equation of state. We have adopted the method of J. M. Aparicio to evaluate the relativistic Fermi-Dirac functions. Our calculations confirm the validity of the approximation used, which works well for the weakly relativistic electrons under solar-center conditions. However, our results will also provide reliable thermodynamic quantities in the stronger relativistic regime as found in more massive stars. Since a particular feature of the original MHD papers was an explicit list of the adopted free energy and its first- and second-order analytical derivatives, we give the corresponding relativistic quantities in the Appendix.

  4. Relativistic Navigation: A Theoretical Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    1996-01-01

    We present a theoretical foundation for relativistic astronomical measurements in curved space-time. In particular, we discuss a new iterative approach for describing the dynamics of an isolated astronomical N-body system in metric theories of gravity. To do this, we generalize the Fock-Chandrasekhar method of the weak-field and slow-motion approximation (WFSMA) and develop a theory of relativistic reference frames (RF's) for a gravitationally bounded many-extended-body problem. In any proper RF constructed in the immediate vicinity of an arbitrary body, the N-body solutions of the gravitational field equations are formally presented as a sum of the Riemann-flat inertial space-time, the gravitational field generated by the body itself, the unperturbed solutions for each body in the system transformed to the coordinates of this proper RF, and the gravitational interaction term. We develop the basic concept of a general WFSMA theory of the celestial RF's applicable to a wide class of metric theories of gravity and an arbitrary model of matter distribution. We apply the proposed method to general relativity. Celestial bodies are described using a perfect fluid model; as such, they possess any number of internal mass and current multipole moments that explicitly characterize their internal structures. The obtained relativistic corrections to the geodetic equations of motion arise because of a coupling of the bodies' multiple moments to the surrounding gravitational field. The resulting relativistic transformations between the different RF's extend the Poincare group to the motion of deformable self-gravitating bodies. Within the present accuracy of astronomical measurements we discuss the properties of the Fermi-normal-like proper RF that is defined in the immediate vicinity of the extended compact bodies. We further generalize the proposed approximation method and include two Eddington parameters (gamma, Beta). This generalized approach was used to derive the

  5. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  6. Relativistic radiation transport in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Kichenassamy, S.; Krikorian, R.A.

    1985-10-15

    A general-relativistic radiative transfer equation in an isotropic, weakly absorbing, nonmagnetized dispersive medium is derived using the kinetic-theoretical approach and the relativistic Hamiltonian theory of geometrical optics in those media. It yields the generally accepted classical equation in the special-relativistic approximation and in stationary conditions. The influence of the gravitational field and of space-time variations of the refractive index n on the radiation distribution is made explicit in the case of spherical symmetry.

  7. Mesoscopic Superposition States in Relativistic Landau Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-21

    We show that a linear superposition of mesoscopic states in relativistic Landau levels can be built when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily superpositions of coherent states involving the particle orbital quanta in a well-defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that these mesoscopic superpositions have a purely relativistic origin and disappear in the nonrelativistic limit.

  8. A relativistic correction to semiclassical charmonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J.

    1995-09-01

    It is shown that the relativistic linear potentials, introduced by the author within the particle à la Wheeler-Feynman direct-interaction (AAD) theory, applied to the semiclassically quantized charmonium, yield energy spectrum comparable to that of some known models. Using the expansion of the relativistic linear AAD potentials in powers ofc -1, the charmonium spectrum, given as a rule by Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization of circular orbits, is extended up to the second order of relativistic corrections.

  9. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  10. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  11. Effect of Chaos on Relativistic Quantum Tunneling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Effect of chaos on relativistic quantum tunneling This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article...of chaos on relativistic quantum tunneling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...tunneling dynamics even in the relativistic quantum regime. Similar phenomena have been observed in graphene. A physical theory is developed to

  12. Relabeling symmetry in relativistic fluids and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazura, Yohei; Yoshida, Zensho; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-10-01

    The conservation of the recently formulated relativistic canonical helicity is derived from Noether's theorem with the fluid elements' relabeling symmetry. Upon Eulerianizing the Noether current, the purely spatial volume integral on the Lagrangian coordinates is mapped to a space-time mixed three-dimensional integral on the four-dimensional Eulerian coordinates. The relativistic conservation law in the Eulerian coordinates is no longer represented by any divergence-free current. We have also formulated a relativistic action principle of MHD on the Lagrangian coordinates, and have derived the relativistic MHD cross helicity. Work supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows 241010.

  13. Dissipation in Relativistic Pair-Plasma Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. We analyze a set of numerical simulations, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For anti-parallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  14. Dissipation in relativistic pair-plasma reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-11-15

    An investigation into the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection is presented. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. A set of numerical simulations is analyzed, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For antiparallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  15. Relativistic and non-relativistic solitons in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Satyendra Nath

    This thesis entitled as "Relativistic and Non-relativistic Solitons in Plasmas" is the embodiment of a number of investigations related to the formation of ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas under various physical situations. The whole work of the thesis is devoted to the studies of solitary waves in cold and warm collisionless magnetized or unmagnetized plasmas with or without relativistic effect. To analyze the formation of solitary waves in all our models of plasmas, we have employed two established methods namely - reductive perturbation method to deduce the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, the solutions of which represent the important but near exact characteristic concepts of soliton-physics. Next, the pseudopotential method to deduce the energy integral with total nonlinearity in the coupling process for exact characteristic results of solitons has been incorporated. In Chapter 1, a brief description of plasma in nature and laboratory and its generation are outlined elegantly. The nonlinear differential equations to characterize solitary waves and the relevant but important methods of solutions have been mentioned in this chapter. The formation of solitary waves in unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas, and in relativistic plasmas has been described through mathematical entity. Applications of plasmas in different fields are also put forwarded briefly showing its importance. The study of plasmas as they naturally occur in the universe encompasses number of topics including sun's corona, solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, ionospheres, auroras, cosmic rays and radiation. The study of space weather to understand the universe, communications and the activities of weather satellites are some useful areas of space plasma physics. The surface cleaning, sterilization of food and medical appliances, killing of bacteria on various surfaces, destroying of viruses, fungi, spores and plasma coating in industrial instruments ( like computers) are some of the fields

  16. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency.

    PubMed

    Stark, David J; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V; Toncian, Toma; Hazeltine, R D; Mahajan, S M

    2015-07-10

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. For an anisotropic electron distribution, propagation characteristics, like the critical density, will depend on the polarization of the electromagnetic wave. Despite the onset of the Weibel instability in such plasmas, the anisotropy can persist long enough to affect laser propagation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization.

  17. A correlated-cluster model and the ridge phenomenon in hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward

    2017-03-01

    A study of the near-side ridge phenomenon in hadron-hadron collisions based on a cluster picture of multiparticle production is presented. The near-side ridge effect is shown to have a natural explanation in this context provided that clusters are produced in a correlated manner in the collision transverse plane.

  18. Hadronic interactions in the MINOS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordosky, Michael Alan

    2004-08-01

    MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, will study neutrino flavor transformations using a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and a Far detector located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The MINOS collaboration also constructed the CalDet (calibration detector), a smaller version of the Near and Far detectors, to determine the topological and signal response to hadrons, electrons and muons. The detector was exposed to test-beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron East Hall during 2001-2003, where it collected events at momentum settings between 200 MeV/c and 10 GeV/c. In this dissertation we present results of the CalDet experiment, focusing on the topological and signal response to hadrons. We briefly describe the MINOS experiment and its iron-scintillator tracking-sampling calorimters as a motivation for the CalDet experiment. We discuss the operation of the CalDet in the beamlines as well as the trigger and particle identification systems used to isolate the hadron sample. The method used to calibrate the MINOS detector is described and validated with test-beam data. The test-beams were simulated to model the muon flux, energy loss upstream of the detector and the kaon background. We describe the procedure used to discriminate between pions and muons on the basis of the event topology. The hadron samples were used to benchmark the existing GEANT3 based hadronic shower codes and determine the detector response and resolution for pions and protons. We conclude with comments on the response to single hadrons and to neutrino induced hadronic showers.

  19. Time Dependent Leptonic and Lepto-Hadronic Modeling of Blazar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DIltz, Christopher S.

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are known to exhibit multi-wavelength variability across the whole electromagnetic spectrum. In the context of blazars, the variability timescale can be as short as a few minutes. Correlated variability has been seen in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum: from radio wavelengths to high energy gamma-rays. This correlated variability in different wavelength bands can put constraints on the particle content, acceleration mechanisms and radiative properties of the relativistic jets that produce blazar emission. Two models are typically invoked to explain the origin of the broadband emission across the electromagnetic spectrum: Leptonic and Hadronic Modeling. Both models have had success in reproducing the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazar emission with different input parameters, making the origin of the emission difficult to determine. However, flaring events cause the spectral components that produce the SED to evolve on different timescales, producing different light curve behavior for both models. My Ph.D. research involves developing one-zone time dependent leptonic and lepto-hadronic codes to reproduce the broadband SEDs of blazars and then model flaring scenarios in order to find distinct differences between the two models. My lepto-hadronic code also considers the time dependent evolution of the radiation emitted by secondary particles (pions and muons) generated from photo-hadronic interactions between the photons and protons in the emission region. I present fits to the broadband SEDs of the flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) 3C 273 and 3C 279 using my one-zone leptonic and lepto-hadronic model, respectively. I showed that by considering perturbations of any one of the selected input parameters for both models: magnetic field, particle injection luminosity, particle spectral index, and stochastic acceleration time scale, distinct differences arise in the light curves for the optical, X-ray and

  20. Theoretical studies in medium-energy nuclear and hadronic physics. [Indiana Univ. Nuclear Theory Center and Department of Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C J; Macfarlane, M H; Matsui, T; Serot, B D

    1993-01-01

    A proposal for theoretical nuclear physics research is made for the period April 1, 1993 through March 31, 1996. Research is proposed in the following areas: relativistic many-body theory of nuclei and nuclear matter, quasifree electroweak scattering and strange quarks in nuclei, dynamical effects in (e,e[prime]p) scattering at large momentum transfer, investigating the nucleon's parton sea with polarized leptoproduction, physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus[endash]nucleus collisions, QCD sum rules and hadronic properties, non-relativistic models of nuclear reactions, and spin and color correlations in a quark-exchange model of nuclear matter. Highlights of recent research, vitae of principal investigators, and lists of publications and invited talks are also given. Recent research dealt primarily with medium-energy nuclear physics, relativistic theories of nuclei and the nuclear response, the nuclear equation of state under extreme conditions, the dynamics of the quark[endash]gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and theories of the nucleon[endash]nucleon force.

  1. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Dyall, Kenneth G.; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  2. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Dyall, Kenneth G; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-21

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  3. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Stark, David J.; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Mahajan, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. We consider here the simplest problem: the propagation of a low amplitude pulse through a preformed relativistically hot anisotropic electron plasma to explore its intrinsic dielectric properties. We find that: 1) the critical density for propagation depends strongly on the pulse polarization, 2) two plasmas with the same density and average energy per electron can exhibit profoundly different responses to electromagnetic pulses, 3) the anisotropy-driven Weibel instability develops as expected; the timescales of the growth and back reaction (on anisotropy), however, are long enough that sufficient anisotropy persists for the entire duration of the simulation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract Nos. DE-FG02-04ER54742 and DE-AC05-06OR23100 (D. J. S.) and NNSA Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512.

  4. Relativistic quantum private database queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Si-Jia; Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Ming-Ou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Jakobi et al. (Phys Rev A 83, 022301, 2011) suggested the first practical private database query protocol (J-protocol) based on the Scarani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 92, 057901, 2004) quantum key distribution protocol. Unfortunately, the J-protocol is just a cheat-sensitive private database query protocol. In this paper, we present an idealized relativistic quantum private database query protocol based on Minkowski causality and the properties of quantum information. Also, we prove that the protocol is secure in terms of the user security and the database security.

  5. On the relativistic anisotropic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojai, F.; Kohandel, M.; Stepanian, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behavior of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed.

  6. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  7. Relativistic shock spectra: A prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    I argue that particles heated by relativistic shocks should assume an equilibrium energy distribution. This leads to a synchrotron spectrum F(sub nu) varies as nu(sup 1/3) up to approximately the critical frequency nu(sub 0) of an electron with the mean electron energy. Application to gamma ray bursts (GRB's) implies that a burst with 10(exp -5) erg/(sq cm s) of soft gamma-rays and h(nu(sub 0)) = 300 KeV should be about 18th magnitude in visible light and a few micro-Jy at 1 GHz (less if self-absorbed).

  8. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  9. Arbitrarily Long Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Chailloux, André; Leverrier, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    We consider the recent relativistic bit commitment protocol introduced by Lunghi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030502 (2015)] and present a new security analysis against classical attacks. In particular, while the initial complexity of the protocol scales double exponentially with the commitment time, our analysis shows that the correct dependence is only linear. This has dramatic implications in terms of implementation: in particular, the commitment time can easily be made arbitrarily long, by only requiring both parties to communicate classically and perform efficient classical computation.

  10. Action principle for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-04-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al. [Ann. Phys. 169, 29 (1986)], which uses a noncanonical bracket to effect constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed. Two significant byproducts of this formalism are the introduction of a new divergence-free 4-vector variable for the magnetic field, and a new Lie-dragged form for the theory.

  11. Thermodynamics of polarized relativistic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtun, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    We give the free energy of equilibrium relativistic matter subject to external gravitational and electromagnetic fields, to one-derivative order in the gradients of the external fields. The free energy allows for a straightforward derivation of bound currents and bound momenta in equilibrium. At leading order, the energy-momentum tensor admits a simple expression in terms of the polarization tensor. Beyond the leading order, electric and magnetic polarization vectors are intrinsically ambiguous. The physical effects of polarization, such as the correlation between the magneto-vortically induced surface charge and the electro-vortically induced surface current, are not ambiguous.

  12. Theoretical studies of hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    COTANCH, STEPHEN R

    2007-03-20

    This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei , was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

  13. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    DOE PAGES

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; ...

    2016-05-25

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin–spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Ourmore » analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π , ρ , K , K* and Φ meson families as well as to the N , Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ* , Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. Here, we also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.« less

  14. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Lorce, Cedric

    2016-05-25

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin–spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Our analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π , ρ , K , K* and Φ meson families as well as to the N , Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ* , Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. Here, we also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.

  15. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-08-01

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Our analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π, ρ, K, K* and ϕ meson families as well as to the N, Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ*, Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.

  16. New signals of quark-gluon-hadron mixed phase formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, K. A.; Sagun, V. V.; Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Oliinychenko, D. R.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Nikonov, E. G.; Taranenko, A. V.; Zinovjev, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    Here we present several remarkable irregularities at chemical freeze-out which are found using an advanced version of the hadron resonance gas model. The most prominent of them are the sharp peak of the trace anomaly existing at chemical freeze-out at the center-of-mass energy 4.9 GeV and two sets of highly correlated quasi-plateaus in the collision energy dependence of the entropy per baryon, total pion number per baryon, and thermal pion number per baryon which we found at the center-of-mass energies 3.8-4.9 GeV and 7.6-10 GeV. The low-energy set of quasi-plateaus was predicted a long time ago. On the basis of the generalized shock-adiabat model we demonstrate that the low-energy correlated quasi-plateaus give evidence for the anomalous thermodynamic properties inside the quark-gluon-hadron mixed phase. It is also shown that the trace anomaly sharp peak at chemical freeze-out corresponds to the trace anomaly peak at the boundary between the mixed phase and quark gluon plasma. We argue that the high-energy correlated quasi-plateaus may correspond to a second phase transition and discuss its possible origin and location. Besides we suggest two new observables which may serve as clear signals of these phase transformations.

  17. Sub-photospheric Shocks in Relativistic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of internal shocks in opaque relativistic outflows, in particular in cosmological gamma-ray bursts. The shocks produce neutrino emission and affect the observed photospheric radiation from the explosion. They develop from internal compressive waves and can be of different types depending on the composition of the outflow. (1) Shocks in “photon gas,” with negligible plasma inertia, have a unique structure determined by the force-free condition—zero radiation flux in the plasma rest frame. Radiation dominance over plasma inertia suppresses the formation of collisionless shocks mediated by collective electromagnetic fields. (2) If the outflow is sufficiently magnetized, a strong collisionless subshock develops, which is embedded in a thicker radiation-mediated structure. (3) Waves in outflows with a free neutron component lead to dissipation through nuclear collisions. At large optical depths, shocks have a thickness comparable to the neutron free path, with embedded radiation-mediated and collisionless subshocks. The paper also presents first-principles simulations of magnetized flows filled with photons, demonstrating the formation of shocks and their structure. Simple estimates show that magnetized sub-photospheric shocks are efficient producers of photons and have a great impact on the observed photospheric radiation. The shock structure changes as the outflow expands toward its photosphere. The dissipation is accompanied by strong {e}+/- pair creation, and the {e}+/- -dressed shock carries the photosphere with it up to two decades in radius, emitting a strong pulse of nonthermal radiation.

  18. Apparatus to measure relativistic mass increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetzelschwab, John W.

    2003-09-01

    An apparatus that uses readily available material to measure the relativistic mass increase of beta particles from a radioactive 204Tl source is described. Although the most accurate analysis uses curve fitting or a Kurie plot, students may just use the raw data and a simple calculation to verify the relativistic mass increase.

  19. Compton Effect with Non-Relativistic Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    In deducing the change of wavelength of x-rays scattered by atomic electrons, one normally makes use of relativistic kinematics for electrons. However, recoiling energies of the electrons are of the order of a few keV which is less than 0.2% of their rest energies. Hence the authors may ask whether relativistic formulae are really necessary. In…

  20. Einstein Never Approved of Relativistic Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    During much of the 20th century it was widely believed that one of the significant insights of special relativity was "relativistic mass." Today there are two schools on that issue: the traditional view that embraces speed-dependent "relativistic mass," and the more modern position that rejects it, maintaining that there is only one mass and it's…

  1. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  2. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  3. A New Slant on Hadron Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Thomas; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Will Detmold; Stewart Wright; Derek Leinweber

    2001-09-01

    Rather than regarding the restriction of current lattice QCD simulations to quark masses that are 5--10 times larger than those observed, we note that this presents a wonderful opportunity to deepen our understanding of QCD. Just as it has been possible to learn a great deal about QCD by treating N{sub c} as a variable, so the study of hadron properties as a function of quark mass is leading us to a much deeper appreciation of hadron structure. As examples we cite recent progress in using the chiral properties of QCD to connect hadron masses, magnetic moments, charge radii and structure functions calculated at large quark masses within lattice QCD with the values observed physically.

  4. Hadronization of QCD and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    An introductory treatment of hadronization through functional integral calculus and bifocal Bose fields is given. Emphasis is placed on the utility of this approach for providing a connection between QCD and effective hadronic field theories. The hadronic interactions obtained by this method are nonlocal due to the QCD substructure, yet, in the presence of an electromagnetic field, maintain the electromagnetic gauge invariance manifest at the quark level. A local chiral model which is structurally consistent with chiral perturbation theory is obtained through a derivative expansion of the nonlocalities with determined, finite coefficients. Tree-level calculations of the pion form factor and {pi} {minus} {pi} scattering, which illustrate the dual constituent-quark-chiral-model nature of this approach, are presented.

  5. Dynamic versus Static Hadronic Structure Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2009-01-09

    'Static' structure functions are the probabilistic distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron. In contrast, the 'dynamic' structure functions measured in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering include the effects of rescattering associated with the Wilson line. Initial- and final-state rescattering, neglected in the parton model, can have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, producing single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, nuclear shadowing, and non-universal nuclear antishadowing|novel leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also review how 'direct' higher-twist processes--where a proton is produced in the hard subprocess itself--can explain the anomalous proton-to-pion ratio seen in high centrality heavy ion collisions.

  6. Freeze-out, Hadronization and Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The comparison of the statistical hadronization model with experimental data and lattice QCD results is not always straightforward. Indeed, the interpretation of the ϕ meson production, of the proton to pion multiplicity ratio at LHC and the agreement of the freeze-out curve with the lattice critical line in the T — µB plane, require further analyses. Moreover the dynamics of the hadronization has to be compatible with: 1) the statitical behavior also observed in elementary high energy collisions; 2) a universal hadronization temperature for all high energy collisions; 3) the freeze-out criteria. In these lecture notes the SHM is recalled and some explanations of the puzzling aspects of its comparison with data are discussed.

  7. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the KΛN vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  8. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  9. Are relativistic jets monoparametric engines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georganopoulos, M.; Meyer, E. T.; Fossati, G.; Lister, M. L.

    We adopt as a working hypothesis that relativistic jets are essentially mono-parametric entities, and that their physical properties are a function of a single physical parameter, the same way the physical properties of main sequence stars are mainly a function of the star mass. We propose that the physical parameter is the jet kinetic power, and we use as a proxy for this quantity the low frequency extended radio luminosity (LFERL), an orientation insensitive quantity. We discuss the consequences of this hypothesis for the collective properties of relativistic jets and we show that a blazar sequence should spontaneously emerge on the peak frequency vs luminosity plot as the locus of those sources that are well aligned to the observer's line of sight. We also show that the sources of the same LFERL should form tracks that start from a location on the blazar sequence and move to lower luminosities and peak frequencies in a way that encodes information about the emitting plasma energetics and kinematics and velocity gradients, as well as about the inverse Compton (IC) emission seed photons. We are currently working on collecting the observations that will allow us to put this idea to the test.

  10. Single electron relativistic clock interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushev, P. A.; Cole, J. H.; Sholokhov, D.; Kukharchyk, N.; Zych, M.

    2016-09-01

    Although time is one of the fundamental notions in physics, it does not have a unique description. In quantum theory time is a parameter ordering the succession of the probability amplitudes of a quantum system, while according to relativity theory each system experiences in general a different proper time, depending on the system's world line, due to time dilation. It is therefore of fundamental interest to test the notion of time in the regime where both quantum and relativistic effects play a role, for example, when different amplitudes of a single quantum clock experience different magnitudes of time dilation. Here we propose a realization of such an experiment with a single electron in a Penning trap. The clock can be implemented in the electronic spin precession and its time dilation then depends on the radial (cyclotron) state of the electron. We show that coherent manipulation and detection of the electron can be achieved already with present day technology. A single electron in a Penning trap is a technologically ready platform where the notion of time can be probed in a hitherto untested regime, where it requires a relativistic as well as quantum description.

  11. Density-Dependent Relations among Properties of Hadronic Matter and Applications to Hadron-Quark Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Hiroshi; Uechi, Schun T.

    2011-05-06

    Density-dependent relations among the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter and hyperonic matter, and properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars are shown by applying the conserving nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} hadronic mean-field theory. Nonlinear interactions are renormalized self-consistently as effective coupling constants, effective masses, and sources of equations of motion by maintaining thermodynamic consistency to the mean-field approximation. Effective masses and coupling constants at the saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter simultaneously determine the binding energy and saturation properties of hyperonic matter. The coupling constants expected from the hadronic mean-field model and SU(6) quark model for the vector coupling constants are compared by calculating masses of hadron-quark neutron stars. The nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} mean-field approximation with vacuum fluctuation corrections and strange quark matter defined by the MIT-bag model were employed to examine properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars. We found that hadron-(strange) quark stars become more stable at high densities compared to pure hadronic and strange quark stars.

  12. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to study energetic plasma phenomena by using particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations, we need to deal with relativistic velocity distributions in these simulations. However, numerical algorithms to deal with relativistic distributions are not well known. In this contribution, we overview basic algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in PIC and Monte-Carlo simulations. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are newly proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are 􏰅50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  13. Electron Correlation in 4-Component Relativistic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, Luuk; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The full 4-component Dirac-Coulomb equation can nowadays be used in molecular calculations, The first step in solving this relativistic many-electron equation usually consists of solving the closed or open-shell Diarc-Fock equations. Like in non-relativistic calculations the outcome does not account for the effects of electron correlation. This can in principle be remedied by developing relativistic variants of electron correlation methods like Configuration Interaction or Coupled Cluster. In this talk the differences and similarities of such relativistic approaches as compared to non-relativistic methods will be reviewed. Results of Configuration Interaction calculations on the PtH molecule and on the MeF(sub 6, sup 2-) (Me= Co, Rh, Ir) complexes will be presented to give an impression of the kind of results that currently can be obtained.

  14. Monte Carlo implementation of polarized hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Kotzinian, Aram; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2017-01-01

    We study the polarized quark hadronization in a Monte Carlo (MC) framework based on the recent extension of the quark-jet framework, where a self-consistent treatment of the quark polarization transfer in a sequential hadronization picture has been presented. Here, we first adopt this approach for MC simulations of the hadronization process with a finite number of produced hadrons, expressing the relevant probabilities in terms of the eight leading twist quark-to-quark transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) splitting functions (SFs) for elementary q →q'+h transition. We present explicit expressions for the unpolarized and Collins fragmentation functions (FFs) of unpolarized hadrons emitted at rank 2. Further, we demonstrate that all the current spectator-type model calculations of the leading twist quark-to-quark TMD SFs violate the positivity constraints, and we propose a quark model based ansatz for these input functions that circumvents the problem. We validate our MC framework by explicitly proving the absence of unphysical azimuthal modulations of the computed polarized FFs, and by precisely reproducing the earlier derived explicit results for rank-2 pions. Finally, we present the full results for pion unpolarized and Collins FFs, as well as the corresponding analyzing powers from high statistics MC simulations with a large number of produced hadrons for two different model input elementary SFs. The results for both sets of input functions exhibit the same general features of an opposite signed Collins function for favored and unfavored channels at large z and, at the same time, demonstrate the flexibility of the quark-jet framework by producing significantly different dependences of the results at mid to low z for the two model inputs.

  15. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  16. Hadron Spectroscopy in Double Pomeron Exchange Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Central exclusive production in hadron-hadron collisions at high energies, for example p + p -> p + X + p, where the "+" represents a large rapidity gap, is a valuable process for spectroscopy of mesonic states X. At collider energies the gaps can be large enough to be dominated by pomeron exchange, and then the quantum numbers of the state X are restricted. Isoscalar JPC = 0++ and 2++ mesons are selected, and our understanding of these spectra is incomplete. In particular, soft pomeron exchanges favor gluon-dominated states such as glueballs, which are expected in QCD but not yet well established. I will review some published data.

  17. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  18. The QCD vacuum, hadrons and superdense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.

    1986-01-01

    This is probably the only textbook available that gathers QCD, many-body theory and phase transitions in one volume. The presentation is pedagogical and readable. Contents: The QCD Vacuum: Introduction; QCD on the Lattice Topological Effects in Gauges Theories. Correlation Functions and Microscopic Excitations: Introduction; Operator Product Expansion; The Sum Rules beyond OPE; Nonpower Contributions to Correlators and Instantons; Hadronic Spectroscopy on the Lattice. Dense Matter: Hadronic Matter; Asymptotically Dense Quark-Gluon Plasma; Instantons in Matter; Lattice Calculations at Finite Temperature; Phase Transitions; Macroscopic Excitations and Experiments: General Properties of High Energy Collisions; ''Barometers'', ''Thermometers'', Interferometric ''Microscope''; Experimental Perspectives.

  19. Hadron polarizability data analysis: GoAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegen, H.; Collicott, C.; Hornidge, D.; Martel, P.; Ott, P.

    2015-12-01

    The A2 Collaboration at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, Germany, is working towards determining the polarizabilities of hadrons from nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics through Compton scattering experiments at low energies. The asymmetry observables are directly related to the scalar and spin polarizabilities of the hadrons. Online analysis software, which will give real-time feedback on asymmetries, efficiencies, energies, and angle distributions, has been developed. The new software is a big improvement over the existing online code and will greatly develop the quality of the acquired data.

  20. Hadron polarizability data analysis: GoAT

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, H. Hornidge, D.; Collicott, C.; Martel, P.; Ott, P.

    2015-12-31

    The A2 Collaboration at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, Germany, is working towards determining the polarizabilities of hadrons from nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics through Compton scattering experiments at low energies. The asymmetry observables are directly related to the scalar and spin polarizabilities of the hadrons. Online analysis software, which will give real-time feedback on asymmetries, efficiencies, energies, and angle distributions, has been developed. The new software is a big improvement over the existing online code and will greatly develop the quality of the acquired data.

  1. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, Richard F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; R. Pennington, M.; Peters, K.; M. Richard, J.; P. Shen, C.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; S. Swanson, E.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.

  2. Medium Modification of Hadronic Interactions from Low Energy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    Medium-modification of hadronic interactions is defined as the differences between hadron-hadron interaction in the nuclear medium and the corresponding interaction in free space. Deeply penetrating hadrons provide such information and we discuss here pionic atoms and scattering by nuclei of 21.5 MeV pions. Brief mention is made also of the interaction of 500-700 MeV/c K+ with nuclei.

  3. Simulations of Dynamic Relativistic Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle Patrick

    Neutron stars and black holes are generally surrounded by magnetospheres of highly conducting plasma in which the magnetic flux density is so high that hydrodynamic forces are irrelevant. In this vanishing-inertia—or ultra-relativistic—limit, magnetohydrodynamics becomes force-free electrodynamics, a system of equations comprising only the magnetic and electric fields, and in which the plasma response is effected by a nonlinear current density term. In this dissertation I describe a new pseudospectral simulation code, designed for studying the dynamic magnetospheres of compact objects. A detailed description of the code and several numerical test problems are given. I first apply the code to the aligned rotator problem, in which a star with a dipole magnetic field is set rotating about its magnetic axis. The solution evolves to a steady state, which is nearly ideal and dissipationless everywhere except in a current sheet, or magnetic field discontinuity, at the equator, into which electromagnetic energy flows and is dissipated. Magnetars are believed to have twisted magnetospheres, due to internal magnetic evolution which deforms the crust, dragging the footpoints of external magnetic field lines. This twisting may be able to explain both magnetars' persistent hard X-ray emission and their energetic bursts and flares. Using the new code, I simulate the evolution of relativistic magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. The field lines expand outward, forming a strong current layer; eventually the configuration loses equilibrium and a dynamic rearrangement occurs, involving large-scale rapid magnetic reconnection and dissipation of the free energy of the twisted magnetic field. When the star is rotating, the magnetospheric twisting leads to a large increase in the stellar spin-down rate, which may take place on the long twisting timescale or in brief explosive events, depending on where the twisting is applied and the history of the system

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Jump Conditions for Oblique Relativistic Shocks with Gyrotropic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Double, Glen P.; Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2003-01-01

    Shock jump conditions, i.e., the specification of the downstream parameters of the gas in terms of the upstream parameters, are obtained for steady-state, plane shocks with oblique magnetic fields and arbitrary flow speeds. This is done by combining the continuity of particle number flux and the electromagnetic boundary conditions at the shock with the magnetohydrodynamic conservation laws derived from the stress-energy tensor. For ultrarelativistic and nonrelativistic shocks, the jump conditions may be solved analytically. For mildly relativistic shocks, analytic solutions are obtained for isotropic pressure using an approximation for the adiabatic index that is valid in high sonic Mach number cases. Examples assuming isotropic pressure illustrate how the shock compression ratio depends on the shock speed and obliquity. In the more general case of gyrotropic pressure, the jump conditions cannot be solved analytically with- out additional assumptions, and the effects of gyrotropic pressure are investigated by parameterizing the distribution of pressure parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. Our numerical solutions reveal that relatively small departures from isotropy (e.g., approximately 20%) produce significant changes in the shock compression ratio, r , at all shock Lorentz factors, including ultrarelativistic ones, where an analytic solution with gyrotropic pressure is obtained. In particular, either dynamically important fields or significant pressure anisotropies can incur marked departures from the canonical gas dynamic value of r = 3 for a shocked ultrarelativistic flow and this may impact models of particle acceleration in gamma-ray bursts and other environments where relativistic shocks are inferred. The jump conditions presented apply directly to test-particle acceleration, and will facilitate future self-consistent numerical modeling of particle acceleration at oblique, relativistic shocks; such models include the modification of the fluid

  5. Exclusive production of double J/ψ mesons in hadronic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Khoze, V. A.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    We present the first calculation of exclusive double J/\\psi production in hadronic collisions. We analyse in detail the form of the Born-level gg\\to J/\\psi J/\\psi amplitudes within the non-relativistic quarkonium approximation and discuss the implications of this for the central exclusive production channel, within the ‘Durham’ perturbative model. In addition we show that this direct single parton scattering contribution is expected to be strongly dominant in the exclusive case. We present predictions for the LHC and show that the expected cross sections are in fair agreement with the LHCb Run-I measurement of exclusive double J/\\psi production, with the measured invariant mass distribution described well by the theory. Motivated by this encouraging result we present predictions for observables that may be measured in LHC Run-II, and estimate the size of the expected cross sections in the \\psi (2S) and {{χ }c} cases.

  6. Optimization of dynamic aperture for hadron lattices in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Yichao; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2015-05-03

    The potential upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to an electron ion collider (eRHIC) involves numerous extensive changes to the existing collider complex. The expected very high luminosity is planned to be achieved at eRHIC with the help of squeezing the beta function of the hadron ring at the IP to a few cm, causing a large rise of the natural chromaticities and thus bringing with it challenges for the beam long term stability (Dynamic aperture). We present our effort to expand the DA by carefully tuning the nonlinear magnets thus controlling the size of the footprints in tune space and all lower order resonance driving terms. We show a reasonably large DA through particle tracking over millions of turns of beam revolution.

  7. Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  8. Relativistic Dynamics and Mass Exchange in Binary Black Hole Mini-disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Dennis B.; Campanelli, Manuela; Krolik, Julian H.; Mewes, Vassilios; Noble, Scott C.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first exploration of gas dynamics in a relativistic binary black hole (BH) system in which an accretion disk (a “mini-disk”) orbits each BH. We focus on 2D hydrodynamical studies of comparable-mass, non-spinning systems. Relativistic effects alter the dynamics of gas in this environment in several ways. Because the gravitational potential between the two BHs becomes shallower than in the Newtonian regime, the mini-disks stretch toward the L1 point and the amount of gas passing back and forth between the mini disks increases sharply with decreasing binary separation. This “sloshing” is quasi-periodically modulated at 2 and 2.75 times the binary orbital frequency, corresponding to timescales of hours to days for supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs). In addition, relativistic effects add an m = 1 component to the tidally driven spiral waves in the disks that are purely m = 2 in Newtonian gravity; this component becomes dominant when the separation is ≲100 gravitational radii. Both the sloshing and the spiral waves have the potential to create distinctive radiation features that may uniquely mark SMBBHs in the relativistic regime.

  9. Relativistic mean-field models and nuclear matter constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra, M.; Lourenco, O.; Carlson, B. V.; Delfino, A.; Menezes, D. P.; Avancini, S. S.; Stone, J. R.; Providencia, C.; Typel, S.

    2013-05-06

    This work presents a preliminary study of 147 relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic models used in the literature, regarding their behavior in the nuclear matter regime. We analyze here different kinds of such models, namely: (i) linear models, (ii) nonlinear {sigma}{sup 3}+{sigma}{sup 4} models, (iii) {sigma}{sup 3}+{sigma}{sup 4}+{omega}{sup 4} models, (iv) models containing mixing terms in the fields {sigma} and {omega}, (v) density dependent models, and (vi) point-coupling ones. In the finite range models, the attractive (repulsive) interaction is described in the Lagrangian density by the {sigma} ({omega}) field. The isospin dependence of the interaction is modeled by the {rho} meson field. We submit these sets of RMF models to eleven macroscopic (experimental and empirical) constraints, used in a recent study in which 240 Skyrme parametrizations were analyzed. Such constraints cover a wide range of properties related to symmetric nuclear matter (SNM), pure neutron matter (PNM), and both SNM and PNM.

  10. Clustering of Hadronic Showers with a Structural Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-13

    The internal structure of hadronic showers can be resolved in a high-granularity calorimeter. This structure is described in terms of simple components and an algorithm for reconstruction of hadronic clusters using these components is presented. Results from applying this algorithm to simulated hadronic Z-pole events in the SiD concept are discussed.

  11. Longitudinally-invariant k⊥-clustering algorithms for hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, S.; Dokshitzer, Yu. L.; Seymour, M. H.; Webber, B. R.

    1993-09-01

    We propose a version of the QCD-motivated " k⊥" jet-clustering algorithm for hadron-hadron collisions which is invariant under boosts along the beam directions. This leads to improved factorization properties and closer correspondence to experimental practice at hadron colliders. We examine alternative definitions of the resolution variables and cluster recombination scheme, and show that the algorithm can be implemented efficiently on a computer to provide a full clustering history of each event. Using simulated data at √ S = 1.8 TeV, we study the effects of calorimeter segmentation, hadronization and the soft underlying event, and compare the results with those obtained using a conventional cone-type algorithm.

  12. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, G.; Price, T.; Watson, N. K.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; de la Taille, Ch.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range of 10-80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from GEANT4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  13. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  14. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  15. Hard hadronic collisions: extrapolation of standard effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Berger, E.; Douiri, A.; Fontannaz, M.; Humpert, B.; Ingelman, G.; Kinnunen, R.; Pietarinen, E.

    1984-01-01

    We study hard hadronic collisions for the proton-proton (pp) and the proton-antiproton (p anti p) option in the CERN LEP tunnel. Based on our current knowledge of hard collisions at the present CERN p anti p Collider, and with the help of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), we extrapolate to the next generation of hadron colliders with a centre-of-mass energy E/sub cm/ = 10 to 20 TeV. We estimate various signatures, trigger rates, event topologies, and associated distributions for a variety of old and new physical processes, involving prompt photons, leptons, jets, W/sup + -/ and Z bosons in the final state. We also calculate the maximum fermion and boson masses accessible at the LEP Hadron Collider. The standard QCD and electroweak processes studied here, being the main body of standard hard collisions, quantify the challenge of extracting new physics with hadron colliders. We hope that our estimates will provide a useful profile of the final states, and that our experimental physics colleagues will find this of use in the design of their detectors. 84 references.

  16. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  17. Scaling violation in hadron-nucleus interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbetski, Y. G.; Garsevanishvili, L. P.; Kotlyarevski, D. M.; Ladaria, N. K.; Tatalashvili, N. G.; Tsomaya, P. V.; Sherer, N. I.; Shabelski, Y. M.; Stemanetyan, G. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The scaling violation within the pionization region in the energy range of 0.2 to 2.0 TeV is shown on the basis of the analysis of angular characteristics in the interactions of the cosmic radiation hadrons with the nuclei of various substances (CH2, Al, Cu, Pb).

  18. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  19. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  20. Hadron physics at the COMPASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-05-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interactions, in principle describes the interaction of quark and gluon fields. However, due to the self-coupling of the gluons, quarks and gluons are confined into hadrons and cannot exist as free particles. The quantitative understanding of this confinement phenomenon, which is responsible for about 98% of the mass of the visible universe, is one of the major open questions in particle physics. The measurement of the excitation spectrum of hadrons and of their properties gives valuable input to theory and phenomenology. In the Constituent Quark Model (CQM) two types of hadrons exist: mesons, made out of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which consist of three quarks. But more advanced QCD-inspired models and Lattice QCD calculations predict the existence of hadrons with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). The Compass experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large data sets, which allow to study light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unprecedented detail. The presented overview of the first results from this data set focuses in particular on the light meson sector and presents a detailed analysis of three-pion final states. A new JPC = 1++ state, the a1(1420), is observed with a mass and width in the ranges m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2.

  1. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Generalized Ohm's law for relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandus, A.; Tsagas, C. G.

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the relativistic expression of Ohm's law by studying a multifluid system of charged species using the 1 + 3 covariant formulation of general relativistic electrodynamics. This is done by providing a fully relativistic, fully non-linear propagation equation for the spatial component of the electric 4-current. Our analysis proceeds along the lines of the non-relativistic studies and extends previous relativistic work on cold plasmas. Exploiting the compactness and transparency of the covariant formalism, we provide a direct comparison with the standard Newtonian versions of Ohm's law and identify the relativistic corrections in an unambiguous way. The generalized expression of Ohm's law is initially given relative to an arbitrary observer and for a multicomponent relativistic charged medium. Then, the law is written with respect to the Eckart frame and for a hot two-fluid plasma with zero total charge. Finally, we apply our analysis to a cold proton-electron plasma and recover the well-known magnetohydrodynamic expressions. In every step, we discuss the approximations made and identify familiar effects, like the Biermann battery and the Hall effect.

  3. Relativistic effects in Lyman-α forest

    SciTech Connect

    Iršič, Vid; Dio, Enea Di; Viel, Matteo E-mail: enea.didio@oats.inaf.it

    2016-02-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-α) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range (z=2−5). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar-Lyman-α cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects are sizeable at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross-correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considering cross-correlations between tracers with very different biases, and should be included in the data analysis of the current and future surveys. Moreover, the idea presented in this paper is highly complementary to other techniques and observables trying to isolate the effect of the relativistic corrections and thus test the validity of the theory of gravity beyond the Newtonian regime.

  4. Diagnosing particle acceleration in relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.; Liang, Edison P.; Summerlin, Errol J.; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian A.; Roustazadeh, Parisa

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy emission from blazars and other relativistic jet sources indicates that electrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic (GeV - TeV) energies in these systems. This paper summarizes recent results from numerical studies of two fundamentally different particle acceleration mechanisms potentially at work in relativistic jets: Magnetic-field generation and relativistic particle acceleration in relativistic shear layers, which are likely to be present in relativistic jets, is studied via Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic shocks is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting magnetic-field configurations and thermal + non-thermal particle distributions are then used to predict multi-wavelength radiative (synchrotron + Compton) signatures of both acceleration scenarios. In particular, we address how anisotropic shear-layer acceleration may be able to circumvent the well-known Lorentz-factor crisis, and how the self-consistent evaluation of thermal + non-thermal particle populations in diffusive shock acceleration simulations provides tests of the bulk Comptonization model for the Big Blue Bump observed in the SEDs of several blazars.

  5. GRIM: General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Foucart, Francois; Gammie, Charles F.

    2017-02-01

    GRIM (General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics) evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Non-ideal effects are modeled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. GRIM, which runs on CPUs as well as on GPUs, combines time evolution and primitive variable inversion needed for conservative schemes into a single step using only the residuals of the governing equations as inputs. This enables the code to be physics agnostic as well as flexible regarding time-stepping schemes.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic production of relativistic jets.

    PubMed

    Meier, D L; Koide, S; Uchida, Y

    2001-01-05

    A number of astronomical systems have been discovered that generate collimated flows of plasma with velocities close to the speed of light. In all cases, the central object is probably a neutron star or black hole and is either accreting material from other stars or is in the initial violent stages of formation. Supercomputer simulations of the production of relativistic jets have been based on a magnetohydrodynamic model, in which differential rotation in the system creates a magnetic coil that simultaneously expels and pinches some of the infalling material. The model may explain the basic features of observed jets, including their speed and amount of collimation, and some of the details in the behavior and statistics of different jet-producing sources.

  7. Relativistic entanglement and Bell's inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Doyeol; Moon, Young Hoon; Lee, Hyuk-jae; Hwang, Sung Woo

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the Lorentz transformation of entangled Bell states seen by a moving observer is studied. The calculated Bell observable for four joint measurements turns out to give a universal value, ++-=(2/{radical}(2-{beta}{sup 2}))(1+{radical}(1-{beta}{sup 2})), where a,b are the relativistic spin observables derived from the Pauli-Lubanski pseudovector and {beta}=(v/c). We found that the degree of violation of the Bell's inequality is decreasing with increasing velocity of the observer and Bell's inequality is satisfied in the ultrarelativistic limit where the boost speed reaches the speed of light.

  8. Localization scheme for relativistic spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupka, J.; Hanrath, M.; Dolg, M.

    2011-12-01

    A new method to determine localized complex-valued one-electron functions in the occupied space is presented. The approach allows the calculation of localized orbitals regardless of their structure and of the entries in the spinor coefficient matrix, i.e., one-, two-, and four-component Kramers-restricted or unrestricted one-electron functions with real or complex expansion coefficients. The method is applicable to localization schemes that maximize (or minimize) a functional of the occupied spinors and that use a localization operator for which a matrix representation is available. The approach relies on the approximate joint diagonalization (AJD) of several Hermitian (symmetric) matrices which is utilized in electronic signal processing. The use of AJD in this approach has the advantage that it allows a reformulation of the localization criterion on an iterative 2 × 2 pair rotating basis in an analytical closed form which has not yet been described in the literature for multi-component (complex-valued) spinors. For the one-component case, the approach delivers the same Foster-Boys or Pipek-Mezey localized orbitals that one obtains from standard quantum chemical software, whereas in the multi-component case complex-valued spinors satisfying the selected localization criterion are obtained. These localized spinors allow the formulation of local correlation methods in a multi-component relativistic framework, which was not yet available. As an example, several heavy and super-heavy element systems are calculated using a Kramers-restricted self-consistent field and relativistic two-component pseudopotentials in order to investigate the effect of spin-orbit coupling on localization.

  9. Baryon Loaded Relativistic Blast Waves in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Ray, Alak

    2011-03-01

    We provide a new analytic blast wave solution which generalizes the Blandford-McKee solution to arbitrary ejecta masses and Lorentz factors. Until recently relativistic supernovae have been discovered only through their association with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The blast waves of such explosions are well described by the Blandford-McKee (in the ultra-relativistic regime) and Sedov-Taylor (in the non-relativistic regime) solutions during their afterglows, as the ejecta mass is negligible in comparison to the swept-up mass. The recent discovery of the relativistic supernova SN 2009bb, without a detected GRB, opens up the possibility of highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflows which remains in nearly free-expansion phase during the radio afterglow. In this work, we consider a massive, relativistic shell, launched by a Central Engine Driven EXplosion (CEDEX), decelerating adiabatically due to its collision with the pre-explosion circumstellar wind profile of the progenitor. We compute the synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons in the shock amplified magnetic field. This models the radio emission from the circumstellar interaction of a CEDEX. We show that this model explains the observed radio evolution of the prototypical SN 2009bb and demonstrate that SN 2009bb had a highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflow. We discuss the effect of baryon loading on the dynamics and observational manifestations of a CEDEX. In particular, our predicted angular size of SN 2009bb is consistent with very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) upper limits on day 85, but is presently resolvable on VLBI angular scales, since the relativistic ejecta is still in the nearly free-expansion phase.

  10. Mean transverse momenta correlations in hadron-hadron collisions in MC toy model with repulsing strings

    SciTech Connect

    Altsybeev, Igor

    2016-01-22

    In the present work, Monte-Carlo toy model with repulsing quark-gluon strings in hadron-hadron collisions is described. String repulsion creates transverse boosts for the string decay products, giving modifications of observables. As an example, long-range correlations between mean transverse momenta of particles in two observation windows are studied in MC toy simulation of the heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Thermodynamic laws and equipartition theorem in relativistic Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Koide, T; Kodama, T

    2011-06-01

    We extend the stochastic energetics to a relativistic system. The thermodynamic laws and equipartition theorem are discussed for a relativistic Brownian particle and the first and the second law of thermodynamics in this formalism are derived. The relation between the relativistic equipartition relation and the rate of heat transfer is discussed in the relativistic case together with the nature of the noise term.

  12. Highlights from Compass in hadron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-06-01

    Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for 98% of the mass in the visible universe. Measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons consisting of a quark and an antiquark and baryons, which are made of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD, predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be, e.g., described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the Compass experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to study the light-quark meson and baryon spectra with unmatched precision. The overview shown here focuses on the light meson sector, presenting a detailed Partial-Wave Analysis of the processes: π- p → π-π+π- p and π- p → π-π0π0 p. A new state, the a1(1420) with JPC = 1++, is observed. Its Breit-Wigner parameters are found to be in the ranges: m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2. In the same analysis, a signal in a wave with JPC = 1- + is observed. A resonant origin of this signal would not be explicable within the CQM. In addition to this possibility of an exotic state, possible non-resonant origin of this signal is discussed.

  13. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Analytic models of relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    We present not a literature review but a description, as detailed and consistent as possible, of two analytic models of disk accretion onto a rotating black hole: a standard relativistic disk and a twisted relativistic disk. Although one of these models is older than the other, both are of topical interest for black hole studies. The treatment is such that the reader with only a limited knowledge of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics, with little or no use of additional sources, can gain insight into many technical details lacking in the original papers.

  15. Relativistic corrections to a generalized sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinky, H.; Leung, P. T.

    2006-09-01

    Relativistic corrections to a previously established generalized sum rule are obtained using the Foldy-Wouthysen transformation. This sum rule derived previously by Wang [Phys. Rev. A 60, 262 (1999)] for a nonrelativistic system contains both the well-known Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn and Bethe sum rules, for which relativistic corrections have been obtained in the literature. Our results for the generalized formula will be applied to recover several results obtained previously in the literature, as well as to another sum rule whose relativistic corrections will be obtained.

  16. Relativistic rotation curve for cosmological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Mansouri, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Using a general relativistic exact model for spherical structures in a cosmological background, we have put forward an algorithm to calculate the test particle geodesics within such cosmological structures in order to obtain the velocity profile of stars or galaxies. The rotation curve thus obtained is based on a density profile and is independent of any mass definition which is not unique in general relativity. It is then shown that this general relativistic rotation curves for a toy model and a NFW density profile are almost identical to the corresponding Newtonian one, although the general relativistic masses may be quite different.

  17. The relativistic Black-Scholes model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzetrzelewski, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    The Black-Scholes equation, after a certain coordinate transformation, is equivalent to the heat equation. On the other hand the relativistic extension of the latter, the telegraphers equation, can be derived from the Euclidean version of the Dirac equation. Therefore, the relativistic extension of the Black-Scholes model follows from relativistic quantum mechanics quite naturally. We investigate this particular model for the case of European vanilla options. Due to the notion of locality incorporated in this way, one finds that the volatility frown-like effect appears when comparing to the original Black-Scholes model.

  18. Relativistic effects on acidities and basicities of Brønsted acids and bases containing gold.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ilmar A; Burk, Peeter; Kasemets, Kalev; Koppel, Ivar

    2013-11-07

    It is usually believed that relativistic effects as described by the Dirac-Schrödinger equation (relative to the classical or time-independent Schrödinger equation) are of little importance in chemistry. A closer look, however, reveals that some important and widely known properties (e.g., gold is yellow, mercury is liquid at room temperature) stem from relativistic effects. So far the influence of relativistic effects on the acid-base properties has been mostly ignored. Here we show that at least for compounds of gold such omission is completely erroneous and would lead to too high basicity and too low acidity values with errors in the range of 25-55 kcal mol(-1) (or 20 to 44 powers of ten in pK(a) units) in the gas-phase. These findings have important implications for the design of new superstrong acids and bases, and for the understanding of gold-catalysed reactions.

  19. Relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic entanglement in the rest-frame instant form of dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alba, David; Crater, Horace W.; Lusanna, Luca

    2011-06-15

    A new formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics is proposed in the framework of the rest-frame instant form of dynamics, where the world-lines of the particles are parametrized in terms of the Fokker-Pryce center of inertia and of Wigner-covariant relative 3-coordinates inside the instantaneous Wigner 3-spaces, and where there is a decoupled (non-covariant and non-local) canonical relativistic center of mass. This approach: (a) allows us to make a consistent quantization in every inertial frame; (b) leads to a description of both bound and scattering states; (c) offers new insights on the relativistic localization problem; (d) leads to a non-relativistic limit with a Hamilton-Jacobi treatment of the Newton center of mass; (e) clarifies non-local aspects (spatial non-separability) of relativistic entanglement connected with Lorentz signature and not present in its non-relativistic treatment.

  20. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  1. Prospects of medium tomography using back-to-back hadron correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-05-15

    We discuss the prospects of extracting information on bulk QCD matter distribution and evolution on the basis of hard hadronic back-to-back correlations in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. Using both hydrodynamic and parametrized evolution models for the space-time evolution of produced matter, which have been tested against data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, we study six different setups for the space-time dependence of hard-parton energy losses. Assuming that the energy loss of hard partons traversing the medium is radiative and calculable in the Baier-Dokshitzer-Mueller-Peigne-Schiff formalism, we adjust one parameter, the quenching power scale, to the measured nuclear suppression factor R{sub AA} in each of the setups and study the systematic variations of the back-to-back yield as a function of transverse momentum p{sub T}. We show which space-time regions are probed by one- and two-particle observables and study in some detail the role of longitudinal and transverse expansion. We also comment on the importance of considering fluctuations around the average energy loss. We conclude that while current data are too limited in momentum coverage, future data for higher trigger energy might provide the lever arm in away-side hadron momentum necessary to perform medium tomography, provided that sufficient precision can be achieved.

  2. Light-Front Quantization Approach to the Gauge Gravity Correspondence and Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2010-05-26

    We find a correspondence between semiclassical QCD quantized on the light-front and a dual gravity model in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, thus providing an initial approximation to QCD in its strongly coupled regime. This correspondence - light-front holography - leads to a light-front Hamiltonian and relativistic bound-state wave equations that are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within hadrons at equal lightfront time. The eigenvalues of the resulting light-front Schrodinger and Dirac equations are consistent with the observed light meson and baryon spectrum, and the eigenmodes provide the light-front wavefunctions, the probability amplitudes describing the dynamics of the hadronic constituents. The light-front equations of motion, which are dual to an effective classical gravity theory, possess remarkable algebraic and integrability properties which are dictated by the underlying conformal properties of the theory. We extend the algebraic construction to include a confining potential while preserving the integrability of the mesonic and baryonic bound-state equations.

  3. Static and dynamic properties of hadronic systems with heavy quarks b and c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde-Velasco, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis has been devoted to the study of different properties of hadrons with one and two heavy quarks c and/or b. All calculations have been done in the framework of a nonrelativistic constituent quark model. In order to check the sensitivity of our results to the inter--quark interaction we have used five different quark--quark potentials. The spread in results gives an estimation of theoretical uncertainties and so has been quoted. Most observables studied change only at the level of a few per cent when changing the interaction potential. Another source of theoretical uncertainty is the use of nonrelativistic kinematics in the evaluation of the orbital wave functions and the construction of our nonrelativistic states, although we think that a good part of these relativistic effects are contained in an effective way in the parameters of the quark-quark potentials, which were adjusted in the original works to reproduce the experimental spectra of mesons. Mesons wave functions have been evaluated using a Numerov algorithm, while for baryons the three body problem has been solved using a variational approach with ansatz wave functions that include simplifications that arise from HQS and HQSS. To compute hadron decays we have relied on the impulse approximation, which induces small axial and vector current conservation violations due to binding effects. These binding effects, though they affect some of the weak form factors analyzed, have little influence on the decay widths.

  4. Measurements of di-hadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropies in the BES at RHIC by STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liao; STAR Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) aims to vary the temperature and baryon-chemical potential of the medium formed from heavy-ion collisions, by colliding Au nuclei at energies from 7.7 GeV to 200 GeV (center of mass energy per nucleon). In doing so, it hopes to create a map of the Quantum ChromoDynamical (QCD) phase diagram of nuclear matter, and determine at which temperature Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) formation occurs. Spatial inhomogeneities in the initial state of the collision can create pressure gradients in the QGP, which induce anisotropies among produced particles, known as azimuthal anisotropy. These anisotropies manifest themselves as the ridge in di-hadron correlations, which has been extensively studied at the top the RHIC energies and the LHC. We will present some preliminary measurements of di-hadron correlations from√{sNN} = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27 and 39 GeV BES data, and the azimuthal anisotropy parameters v2 { 2 } and v3 { 2 } obtained from the ΔηΔϕ correlation function, and compare with previous STAR results at top (or higher) RHIC energies. We will also look at the Δη gap dependence and the energy dependence of these anisotropy parameters.

  5. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  6. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  7. Pseudospectral approach to relativistic molecular theory.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2004-08-22

    The efficient relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) and Dirac-Kohn-Sham (DKS) methods are proposed by an application of the pseudospectral (PS) approach. The present PS-DHF/DKS method is a relativistic extension of the PS-HF/KS method of Friesner, though we aim at higher numerical accuracy by elimination of superfluous arbitrariness. The relativistic PS-DHF/DKS method is implemented into our REL4D programs. Several PS applications to molecular systems show that the relativistic PS-DHF/DKS approach is more efficient than the traditional approach without a loss of accuracy. The present PS-DKS method successfully assigns and predicts the photoelectron spectra of hexacarbonyl complexes of tungsten and seaborgium theoretically.

  8. Coherent states for the relativistic harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldaya, Victor; Guerrero, J.

    1995-01-01

    Recently we have obtained, on the basis of a group approach to quantization, a Bargmann-Fock-like realization of the Relativistic Harmonic Oscillator as well as a generalized Bargmann transform relating fock wave functions and a set of relativistic Hermite polynomials. Nevertheless, the relativistic creation and annihilation operators satisfy typical relativistic commutation relations of the Lie product (vector-z, vector-z(sup dagger)) approximately equals Energy (an SL(2,R) algebra). Here we find higher-order polarization operators on the SL(2,R) group, providing canonical creation and annihilation operators satisfying the Lie product (vector-a, vector-a(sup dagger)) = identity vector 1, the eigenstates of which are 'true' coherent states.

  9. Thermal Properties of Degenerate Relativistic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homorodean, Laurean

    We present the concentration-temperature phase diagram, characteristic functions, thermal equation of state and heat capacity at constant volume for degenerate ideal gases of relativistic fermions and bosons. The nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic limits of these laws are also discussed.

  10. Entropic formulation of relativistic continuum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    An entropic formulation of relativistic continuum mechanics is developed in the Landau-Lifshitz frame. We introduce two spatial scales, one being the small scale representing the linear size of each material particle and the other the large scale representing the linear size of a large system which consists of material particles and is to linearly regress to the equilibrium. We propose a local functional which is expected to represent the total entropy of the larger system and require the entropy functional to be maximized in the process of linear regression. We show that Onsager's original idea on linear regression can then be realized explicitly as current conservations with dissipative currents in the desired form. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this formulation by showing that one can treat a wide class of relativistic continuum materials, including standard relativistic viscous fluids and relativistic viscoelastic materials.

  11. Relativistic Langevin equation for runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, J. A.; Martin-Solis, J. R.; Sanchez, R.

    2016-10-01

    The Langevin approach to the kinetics of a collisional plasma is developed for relativistic electrons such as runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas. In this work, we consider Coulomb collisions between very fast, relativistic electrons and a relatively cool, thermal background plasma. The model is developed using the stochastic equivalence of the Fokker-Planck and Langevin equations. The resulting Langevin model equation for relativistic electrons is an stochastic differential equation, amenable to numerical simulations by means of Monte-Carlo type codes. Results of the simulations will be presented and compared with the non-relativistic Langevin equation for RE electrons used in the past. Supported by MINECO (Spain), Projects ENE2012-31753, ENE2015-66444-R.

  12. Einstein Never Approved of Relativistic Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2009-09-01

    During much of the 20th century it was widely believed that one of the significant insights of special relativity was "relativistic mass." Today there are two schools on that issue: the traditional view that embraces speed-dependent "relativistic mass," and the more modern position that rejects it, maintaining that there is only one mass and it's speed-independent. This paper explores the history of "relativistic mass," emphasizing Einstein's public role and private thoughts. We show how the concept of speed-dependent mass mistakenly evolved out of a tangle of ideas despite Einstein's prescient reluctance. Along the way there will be previously unrevealed surprises (e.g., Einstein never derived the expression for "relativistic mass," and privately disapproved of it).

  13. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering γ quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  15. Mass versus relativistic and rest masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of relativistic mass, which increases with velocity, is not compatible with the standard language of relativity theory and impedes the understanding and learning of the theory by beginners. The same difficulty occurs with the term rest mass. To get rid of relativistic mass and rest mass it is appropriate to replace the equation E =mc2 by the true Einstein's equation E0=mc2, where E0 is the rest energy and m is the mass.

  16. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin; Chen, Zhong-Ping; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2017-03-01

    Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The "relativistic" filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  17. BL Lac objects and relativistic beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1986-01-01

    General arguments for relativistic beaming in BL Lac objects are reviewed. These include overproduction of X-rays and fast time variability. Comments are made about the relationship of the X-ray continuum to that at lower frequencies, and observational evidence for and against continuum radiation being relativistically beamed is discussed. Finally, there is discussion of the influence of geometrical effects on predictions for time variability as a function of frequency in the context of inhomogeneous synchrotron self-Compton jet models.

  18. Relativistic uranium beams - the Bevalac experience

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1983-03-01

    This paper will address areas where relativistic heavy ion accelerators differ from proton facilities. Salient areas are: (1) the specialized injectors for heavy ions; ion sources, structures for very low charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) ions, and stripper optimization; (2) special requirements for the synchrotron ring; ultrahigh vacuum, flexible controls and instrumentation. These areas are discussed in the context of the Bevalac, as well as our idea for a next-generation relativistic heavy ion accelerator.

  19. Relativistically modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Li, X. Q.

    2012-09-15

    Based on the set of nonlinear coupling equations, which has considered the relativistic effects of electrons, modulational instability by strong Langmuir waves has been investigated in this paper. Both the characteristic scale and maximum growth rate of the Langmuir field will enhance with the increase in the electron relativistic effect. The numerical results indicate that longitudinal perturbations induce greater instability than transverse perturbations do, which will lead to collapse and formation of the pancake-like structure.

  20. Relabeling symmetry in relativistic fluids and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazura, Yohei; Yoshida, Zensho; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-11-01

    The conservation of the recently formulated relativistic canonical helicity (Yoshida et al 2014 J. Math. Phys. 55 043101) is derived from Noether's theorem by constructing an action principle on the relativistic Lagrangian coordinates (we obtain general cross helicities that include the helicity of the canonical vorticity). The conservation law is, then, explained by the relabeling symmetry pertinent to the Lagrangian label of fluid elements. Upon Eulerianizing the Noether current, the purely spatial volume integral on the Lagrangian coordinates is mapped to a space-time mixed three-dimensional integral on the four-dimensional Eulerian coordinates. The relativistic conservation law in the Eulerian coordinates is no longer represented by any divergence-free current; hence, it is not adequate to regard the relativistic helicity (represented by the Eulerian variables) as a Noether charge, and this stands the reason why the ‘conventional helicity’ is no longer a constant of motion. We have also formulated a relativistic action principle of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on the Lagrangian coordinates, and have derived the relativistic MHD cross helicity.

  1. Hadronic matter at the edge: A survey of some theoretical approaches to the physics of the QCD phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    In the past few years a wealth of high quality data has made possible to test current theoretical ideas about the properties of hadrons subject to extreme conditions of density and temperature. The relativistic heavy-ion program carried out at the CERN-SPS and under development at the BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC has provided results that probe the evolution of collisions of hadronic matter at high energies from the initially large density to the late dilute stages. In addition, QCD on the lattice has produced results complementing these findings with first principles calculations for observables in a regime where perturbative techniques cannot describe the nature of strongly coupled systems. This work aims to review some recent developments that make use of field theoretical methods to describe the physics of hadrons at finite temperature and density. I concentrate on two of the main topics that have been explored in the last few years: (1) The search for the structure of the phase diagram and (2) analytical signals linked to the chiral symmetry restoration/deconfinement.

  2. Theory of hadronic production of heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.

    1981-07-01

    Conventional theoretical predictions for hadronic production of heavy quarks (Q anti Q) are reviewed and confronted with data. Perturbative hard scattering predictions agree qualitatively well with hidden Q anti Q production (e.g., psi, chi, T) whereas for open Q anti Q-production (e.g., pp ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c//sup +/X) additional mechanisms or inputs are needed to explain the forwardly produced ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ at ISR. It is suggested that the presence of c anti c-pairs on the 1 to 2% level in the hadron Fock state decomposition (intrinsic charm) gives a natural description of the ISR data. The theoretical foundations of the intrinsic charm hypotheses together with its consequences for lepton-induced reactions is discussed in some detail.

  3. Trends in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Syresin, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hadron therapy with protons and carbon ions is one of the most effective branches in radiation oncology. It has advantages over therapy using gamma radiation and electron beams. Fifty thousand patients a year need such treatment in Russia. A review of the main modern trends in the development of accelerators for therapy and treatment techniques concerned with respiratory gated irradiation and scanning with the intensity modulated pencil beams is given. The main stages of formation, time structure, and the main parameters of the beams used in proton therapy, as well as the requirements for medicine accelerators, are considered. The main results of testing with the beam of the C235-V3 cyclotron for the first Russian specialized hospital proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad are presented. The use of superconducting accelerators and gantry systems for hadron therapy is considered.

  4. Exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Andreas

    1991-06-01

    The recent experimental results on exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons obtained by the ARGUS collaboration are presented in the talk. The results include exclusive hadronic decays involving a b → c transition, namely B decays with a D, D ∗ plus several pions and B decays to J/ψ or ψ' mesons plus Kaons have been studied. The measurements of branching ratios for two-body B decays involving a J/ψ or ψ' meson are of wide interest in the light of proposals for the study of CP violation in future experiments. The branching ratios are compared with the predictions of the model of Bauer, Stech and Wirbel and with a model of A.V. Dobrovolskaya. Using the cleanest decay channels, the masses and mass difference of the charged and neutral B meson are obtained. This mass difference is then compared with the mass splitting in other isospinmultipletts and with theoretical models.

  5. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk; Rolf Ent; Cynthia Keppel

    2004-08-01

    The duality between partonic and hadronic descriptions of physical phenomena is one of the most remarkable features of strong interaction physics. A classic example of this is in electron-nucleon scattering, in which low-energy cross sections, when averaged over appropriate energy intervals, are found to exhibit the scaling behavior expected from perturbative QCD. We present a comprehensive review of data on structure functions in the resonance region, from which the global and local aspects of duality are quantified, including its flavor, spin and nuclear medium dependence. To interpret the experimental findings, we discuss various theoretical approaches which have been developed to understand the microscopic origins of quark-hadron duality in QCD. Examples from other reactions are used to place duality in a broader context, and future experimental and theoretical challenges are identified.

  6. Sources of compensation in hadronic calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.S.; Gabriel, T.A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Wilson, R.

    1988-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are presented using the CALOR code system to study the design of a large hybrid hadron calorimeter system employing a warm liquid active medium (tetramethylsilane, Si(CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/) and uranium plates in addition to a conventional Fe/plastic system. In the system described here, the uranium provides partial compensation by suppressing the electromagnetic cascade produced by incident electrons due to sampling inefficiencies. The results of the simulations also indicate that significant compensation is achieved (given small enough saturation) due to low energy recoil protons produced in collisions with low energy (1--20 MeV) cascade and fission neutrons in the active medium. Both compensation mechanisms are important to help balance the response of a calorimeter to incident electrons and hadrons, that is, to achieve a ratio of pulse heights (e/h approx. 1) which will lead to the best energy resolution. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ c,b mesons and S-wave η c,b mesons in highenergy hadron-hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ c -meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum ( pT) spectrum of χ c mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ( χ c2)/ σ( χ c1) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ b -meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η c -meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  8. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Téramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deur, Alexandre; Dosch, Hans Günter; Sufian, Raza Sabbir

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron sector.

  9. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    DOE PAGES

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimentalmore » and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.« less

  10. Hadron Production in Quark and Antiquark Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, David

    1999-09-27

    We present a number of jet fragmentation measurements e{sup +}e{sup -} --> hadrons. The ALEPH collaboration measures inclusive rho{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) production rates, improving the world averages. The SLD collaboration measures pi{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} and p/anti-p production in light-, c- and b-flavor Z{sup 0} decays, as well as leading hadrons in light-quark jets, precisely. The DELPHI collaboration measures the average charged multiplicity in light- and b-flavor events at 183 and 189 GeV, verifying a precise prediction of QCD and excluding flavor-independent fragmentation.

  11. Hadronic density of states from string theory.

    PubMed

    Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A; Vaman, Diana

    2003-09-12

    We present an exact calculation of the finite temperature partition function for the hadronic states corresponding to a Penrose-Güven limit of the Maldacena-Nùñez embedding of the N=1 super Yang-Mills (SYM) into string theory. It is established that the theory exhibits a Hagedorn density of states. We propose a semiclassical string approximation to the finite temperature partition function for confining gauge theories admitting a supergravity dual, by performing an expansion around classical solutions characterized by temporal windings. This semiclassical approximation reveals a hadronic energy density of states of a Hagedorn type, with the coefficient determined by the gauge theory string tension as expected for confining theories. We argue that our proposal captures primarily information about states of pure N=1 SYM theory, given that this semiclassical approximation does not entail a projection onto states of large U(1) charge.

  12. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  13. Detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cissoko, M. )

    1992-02-15

    This paper is concerned with an algebraic study of the equations of detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account the pressure and the energy of thermal radiation. A new approach to shock and detonation wavefronts is outlined. The fluid under consideration is assumed to be perfect (nonviscous and nonconducting) and to obey the following equation of state: {ital p}=({gamma}{minus}1){rho} where {ital p}, {rho}, and {gamma} are the pressure, the total energy density, and the adiabatic index, respectively. The solutions of the equations of detonation waves are reduced to the problem of finding physically acceptable roots of a quadratic polynomial {Pi}({ital X}) where {ital X} is the ratio {tau}/{tau}{sub 0} of dynamical volumes behind and ahead of the detonation wave. The existence and the locations of zeros of this polynomial allow it to be shown that if the equation of state of the burnt fluid is known then the variables characterizing the unburnt fluid obey well-defined physical relations.

  14. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  15. Causal Categories: Relativistically Interacting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob; Lal, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    A symmetric monoidal category naturally arises as the mathematical structure that organizes physical systems, processes, and composition thereof, both sequentially and in parallel. This structure admits a purely graphical calculus. This paper is concerned with the encoding of a fixed causal structure within a symmetric monoidal category: causal dependencies will correspond to topological connectedness in the graphical language. We show that correlations, either classical or quantum, force terminality of the tensor unit. We also show that well-definedness of the concept of a global state forces the monoidal product to be only partially defined, which in turn results in a relativistic covariance theorem. Except for these assumptions, at no stage do we assume anything more than purely compositional symmetric-monoidal categorical structure. We cast these two structural results in terms of a mathematical entity, which we call a causal category. We provide methods of constructing causal categories, and we study the consequences of these methods for the general framework of categorical quantum mechanics.

  16. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.; Limon, P.; Syphers, M.

    1996-12-01

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

  17. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  18. High energy hadron collisions in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Ryskin, M. G.

    1990-05-01

    In this review we present the microscopic approach to large cross section physics at high energy, based on the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD and the reggeon diagram technique. We insist that at high energy the main source of secondary hadrons is the production and fragmentation of the gluon minijets with transverse momentum qt ≈ q0, which rapidly growswith energy, namely q2t≈ q20≈Λ 2 exp(2.5√ln s). Such a large value of the transverse momentum allows us to adopt perturbative QCD for high hadron collisions. The completely avoid the unknown confinement problem, a new scale overlineQ0 ( overlineQ0≈1 GeV, α s( overlineQ20)<1) is introduced in our calculations and only momenta qt> overlineQ0 for gluons are taken into account in any integration. All our results only slightly depend on the value of overlineQ0. It is shown that perturbative QCD is able to describe the main properties of the hedron interactions at high energy, namely, the inclusive spectra of secondary hadrons as functions of y and qt, including small qt⪅300MeV, in a wide energy range √ s=50-900 GeV, the multiplicity distribution, the mean transverse momentum versus multiplicity and so on. We use only three phenomenological parameters in such a description of the experimental data; these values are in agreement with theoretical estimates. Our approach predicts a rapid increase of the mean transverse momentum for secondary hadrons, qt≈ q0, where q0=2.5 GeV at √ S=0.5 TeV, and q0⋍7 GeV at √ S=40 TeV, the total multiplicity N≈ q20, the total cross section σ t≈ln 2s and a comparatively slow increase of the diffraction dissociation cross section σ D≈ln s.

  19. Search for hadronic b-->u decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Gläser, R.; Harder, G.; Krüger, A.; Nilsson, A. W.; Nippe, A.; Oest, T.; Reidenbach, M.; Schäfer, M.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Sefkow, F.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Drescher, A.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Scheck, H.; Schweda, G.; Spaan, B.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Volland, U.; Wegener, H.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ball, S.; Gabriel, J. C.; Geyer, C.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Khan, S.; Spengler, J.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Frisken, W. R.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Kutschke, R.; Macfarlene, D. B.; McLean, K. W.; Orr, R. S.; Parsons, J. A.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Swain, J. D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Yoon, T.-S.; Ruf, T.; Schael, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Boštjančič, B.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Babaev, A.; Danilo, M.; Fominykh, B.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Semenov, A.; Semenov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tchistilin, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Childers, R.; Darden, C. W.; Argus Collaboration

    1990-05-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we searched for b→u transitions in exclusive hadronic B meson decays. A systematic analysis of B decays into pions has been performed for decay modes with 2-7 pions in the final state. In none of the decays a positive signal was observed. The upper limits obtained on various branching ratios are consistent with the current model predictions.

  20. Perspectives of hadron therapy in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, J. G.

    2008-08-11

    The need for a hadron therapy center in Mexico is presented. The question if such a facility is affordable in Mexico is discussed, addressing the economical factor as well as the expertise and know how available in both the private and the public sector. To conclude, a possible path, and the first steps on it, to move forward towards a medical facility in Mexico devoted to proton therapy are sketched.