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Sample records for relativistic particle-in-cell simulation

  1. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Particle Accleration in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Highly accelerated particles are observed in astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), microquasars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic electron-ion and electron-positron jets injected into a stationary medium show that efficient acceleration occurs downstream in the jet. In collisionless relativistic shocks particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities, e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-stream instabilities, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly non-uniform, small-scale magnetic fields. The instability depends on strength and direction of the magnetic field. Particles in relativistic jets may be accelerated in a complicated dynamics of relativistic jets with magnetic field. We present results of our recent PIC simulations.

  2. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Particle Accleration in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Highly accelerated particles are observed in astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), microquasars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic electron-ion and electron-positron jets injected into a stationary medium show that efficient acceleration occurs downstream in the jet. In collisionless relativistic shocks particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities, e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-stream instabilities, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly non-uniform, small-scale magnetic fields. The instability depends on strength and direction of the magnetic field. Particles in relativistic jets may be accelerated in a complicated dynamics of relativistic jets with magnetic field. We present results of our recent PIC simulations.

  3. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Global Relativistic Jets with Helical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duţan, Ioana; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Niemiec, Jacek; Kobzar, Oleh; Pohl, Martin; Gómez, Jose L.; Pe'er, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob T.; Nordlund, Åke; Meli, Athina; Sol, Helene; Hardee, Philip E.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    We study the interaction of relativistic jets with their environment, using 3-dimen- sional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations for two cases of jet composition: (i) electron-proton (e - - p +) and (ii) electron-positron (e +/-) plasmas containing helical magnetic fields. We have performed simulations of ``global'' jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Mushroom instability. We have found that these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. For the e - - p + jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed, whereas for the e +/- jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without a helical magnetic field. We plan to perform further simulations using much larger systems to confirm these new findings.

  4. The scaling of relativistic double-year widths - Poisson-Vlasov solutions and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulkanen, Martin E.; Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    The study of relativistic plasma double layers is described through the solution of the one-dimensional, unmagnetized, steady-state Poisson-Vlasov equations and by means of one-dimensional, unmagnetized, particle-in-cell simulations. The thickness vs potential-drop scaling law is extended to relativistic potential drops and relativistic plasma temperatures. The transition in the scaling law for 'strong' double layers suggested by analytical two-beam models by Carlqvist (1982) is confirmed, and causality problems of standard double-layer simulation techniques applied to relativistic plasma systems are discussed.

  5. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-15

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  7. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  8. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows from GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities {e.g., the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.-/

  9. New Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows from GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Zhang, B.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D.; Fishman, J. F.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  10. Relativistic Particle-in-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows Observed by GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "'jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  11. Minimization of the numerical phase velocity error in Particle-In-Cell simulations for relativistic charged particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Michael; Huang, Chengkun; Albright, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    The microbunching instability arises when GeV electrons interact with their coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Accurate particle-in-cell (PIC) modeling of this instability requires a method where the numerical phase velocity of light is very close to its physical value. This is also advantageous for mitigating the effects of Numerical Cherenkov Radiation (NCR), arising when simulating highly relativistic particles in astrophysical and high energy density laboratory settings. It has been shown that the use of a weighted stencil when calculating fields from the Ampere and Faraday laws affords a solver with a tunable phase velocity. A numerical dispersion relation appropriate to the PIC algorithm with the 3D FV24 scheme has been derived. Stencil weights that minimize the phase velocity error for the CSR and NCR problems will be presented along with simulations demonstrating the comparative advantages of this approach. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL and supported by LDRD.

  12. Investigation of Rising-Sun Magnetrons Operated at Relativistic Voltages Using Three Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, R.W.; Genoni, T.C.; Spencer, T.A.

    1999-08-02

    This work is an attempt to elucidate effects that may limit efficiency in magnetrons operated at relativistic voltages (V {approximately} 500 kV). Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate the behavior of 14 and 22 cavity, cylindrical, rising-sun magnetrons. Power is extracted radially through a single iris located at the end of every other cavity. Numerical results show that in general output power and efficiency increase approximately linearly with increasing iris width (decreasing vacuum Q) until the total Q becomes too low for stable oscillation in the n-mode to be maintained. Beyond this point mode competition and/or switching occur and efficiency decreases. Results reveal that the minimum value of Q (maximum efficiency) that can be achieved prior to the onset of mode competition is significantly affected by the magnitude of the 0-space-harmonic of the {pi}-mode, a unique characteristic of rising-suns, and by the magnitude of the electron current density (space-charge effects). By minimizing these effects, up to 3.7 GW output power has been produced at an efficiency of 40%.

  13. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the interaction between a relativistically moving leptonic micro-cloud and ambient electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Markoff, S.; Borghesi, M.; Zepf, M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The jets of compact accreting objects are composed of electrons and a mixture of positrons and ions. These outflows impinge on the interstellar or intergalactic medium and both plasmas interact via collisionless processes. Filamentation (beam-Weibel) instabilities give rise to the growth of strong electromagnetic fields. These fields thermalize the interpenetrating plasmas. Aims: Hitherto, the effects imposed by a spatial non-uniformity on filamentation instabilities have remained unexplored. We examine the interaction between spatially uniform background electrons and a minuscule cloud of electrons and positrons. The cloud size is comparable to that created in recent laboratory experiments and such clouds may exist close to internal and external shocks of leptonic jets. The purpose of our study is to determine the prevalent instabilities, their ability to generate electromagnetic fields and the mechanism, by which the lepton micro-cloud transfers energy to the background plasma. Methods: A square micro-cloud of equally dense electrons and positrons impinges in our particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation on a spatially uniform plasma at rest. The latter consists of electrons with a temperature of 1 keV and immobile ions. The initially charge- and current neutral micro-cloud has a temperature of 100 keV and a side length of 2.5 plasma skin depths of the micro-cloud. The side length is given in the reference frame of the background plasma. The mean speed of the micro-cloud corresponds to a relativistic factor of 15, which is relevant for laboratory experiments and for relativistic astrophysical outflows. The spatial distributions of the leptons and of the electromagnetic fields are examined at several times. Results: A filamentation instability develops between the magnetic field carried by the micro-cloud and the background electrons. The electromagnetic fields, which grow from noise levels, redistribute the electrons and positrons within the cloud, which boosts

  14. Particle-in-cell simulation for parametric decays of a circularly polarized Alfvén wave in relativistic thermal electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A. Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Alejandro Valdivia, J.

    2014-03-15

    Parametric decays of a left-handed circularly polarized Alfvén wave propagating along a constant background magnetic field in a relativistic thermal electron-positron plasma are studied by means of a one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation. Relativistic effects are included in the Lorentz equation for the momentum of the particles and in their thermal motion, by considering a Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution function for the initial condition. In the linear stage of the simulation, we find many instabilities that match the predictions of relativistic fluid theory. In general, the growth rates of the instabilities increase as the pump wave amplitude is increased, and decrease with a raise in the plasma temperatures. We have confirmed that for very high temperatures the Alfvén branch is suppressed, consistent with analytical calculations.

  15. Investigation of the operating characteristics of a 12 stepped-cavity relativistic magnetron with axial extraction driven by an "F" transparent cathode using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Schamiloglu, E.; Jiang, W.; Fuks, M.; Liu, C.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the performance of a 12 stepped-cavity relativistic magnetron with axial extraction (12 stepped-cavity RMDO) driven by an "F" transparent cathode (the "F" transparent cathode is a coaxial transparent cathode with two azimuthal periods of increased thickness and which looks like the letter "F," so we call it "F" transparent cathode) through particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is shown that using the "F" transparent cathode, an electronic efficiency of 70% with gigawatt output power is obtained while reducing the axial leakage current by about 50% compared to using the usual transparent cathode. Further PIC simulations demonstrate that frequency bifurcation occurs and mode switching can be achieved using several hundred kilowatts input RF power in the 12 stepped-cavity RMDO driven by an "F" transparent cathode. For example, it was found that using an applied driver power of 180 kW for 10 ns, the operating TE31 mode can be switched to the TE41 mode. It is also found that the secondary electron and backscattered electron emission and axial leakage current were two disturbing factors for the 12 stepped-cavity RMDO when it works at a stable operation mode but when the 12 stepped-cavity RMDO works near the critical magnetic field at the boundary between two modes, these two factors would lead to the operation modes changing.

  16. A study of the early-stage evolution of relativistic electron-ion shock using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, E. J.; Min, K.; Choi, C. R.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2014-07-15

    We report the results of a 3D particle-in-cell simulation carried out to study the early-stage evolution of the shock formed when an unmagnetized relativistic jet interacts with an ambient electron-ion plasma. Full-shock structures associated with the interaction are observed in the ambient frame. When open boundaries are employed in the direction of the jet, the forward shock is seen as a hybrid structure consisting of an electrostatic shock combined with a double layer, while the reverse shock is seen as a double layer. The ambient ions show two distinct features across the forward shock: a population penetrating into the shocked region from the precursor region and an accelerated population escaping from the shocked region into the precursor region. This behavior is a signature of a combination of an electrostatic shock and a double layer. Jet electrons are seen to be electrostatically trapped between the forward and reverse shock structures showing a ring-like distribution in a phase-space plot, while ambient electrons are thermalized and become essentially isotropic in the shocked region. The magnetic energy density grows to a few percent of the jet kinetic energy density at both the forward and the reverse shock transition layers in a rather short time scale. We see little disturbance of the jet ions over this time scale.

  17. OBJECTIVE:Object-Oriented Formulations of Particle-in-Cell (PIC) Plasma Simulations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-11-30

    OOPIC (Object-Oriented Particle - in - Cell ). is a two - dimensional (x-y, r-z) relativistic electromagnetic/electrostatic PIC-MCC ( particle - in - cell ...The object-oriented paradigm provides an opportunity for advanced PI C modeling, increased flexibility, and extensibility. Particle - in - cell codes for... simulating plasmas are traditionally written in structured FORTRAN or C. This has resulted in large legacy codes

  18. Development of a relativistic Particle In Cell code PARTDYN for linear accelerator beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadte, D.; Patidar, C. B.; Pal, M. K.

    2017-04-01

    A relativistic Particle In Cell (PIC) code PARTDYN is developed for the beam dynamics simulation of z-continuous and bunched beams. The code is implemented in MATLAB using its MEX functionality which allows both ease of development as well higher performance similar to a compiled language like C. The beam dynamics calculations carried out by the code are compared with analytical results and with other well developed codes like PARMELA and BEAMPATH. The effect of finite number of simulation particles on the emittance growth of intense beams has been studied. Corrections to the RF cavity field expressions were incorporated in the code so that the fields could be calculated correctly. The deviations of the beam dynamics results between PARTDYN and BEAMPATH for a cavity driven in zero-mode have been discussed. The beam dynamics studies of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) using PARTDYN have been presented.

  19. SHARP: A Spatially Higher-order, Relativistic Particle-in-cell Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mohamad; Broderick, Avery E.; Chang, Philip; Pfrommer, Christoph; Lamberts, Astrid; Puchwein, Ewald

    2017-05-01

    Numerical heating in particle-in-cell (PIC) codes currently precludes the accurate simulation of cold, relativistic plasma over long periods, severely limiting their applications in astrophysical environments. We present a spatially higher-order accurate relativistic PIC algorithm in one spatial dimension, which conserves charge and momentum exactly. We utilize the smoothness implied by the usage of higher-order interpolation functions to achieve a spatially higher-order accurate algorithm (up to the fifth order). We validate our algorithm against several test problems—thermal stability of stationary plasma, stability of linear plasma waves, and two-stream instability in the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes. Comparing our simulations to exact solutions of the dispersion relations, we demonstrate that SHARP can quantitatively reproduce important kinetic features of the linear regime. Our simulations have a superior ability to control energy non-conservation and avoid numerical heating in comparison to common second-order schemes. We provide a natural definition for convergence of a general PIC algorithm: the complement of physical modes captured by the simulation, i.e., those that lie above the Poisson noise, must grow commensurately with the resolution. This implies that it is necessary to simultaneously increase the number of particles per cell and decrease the cell size. We demonstrate that traditional ways for testing for convergence fail, leading to plateauing of the energy error. This new PIC code enables us to faithfully study the long-term evolution of plasma problems that require absolute control of the energy and momentum conservation.

  20. Multigrid Particle-in-cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-17

    A new scheme to accurately retain kinetic electron effects in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the case of electrostatic drift waves is presented. The splitting scheme, which is based on exact separation between adiabatic and on adiabatic electron responses, is shown to yield more accurate linear growth rates than the standard df scheme. The linear and nonlinear elliptic problems that arise in the splitting scheme are solved using a multi-grid solver. The multi-grid particle-in-cell approach offers an attractive path, both from the physics and numerical points of view, to simulate kinetic electron dynamics in global toroidal plasmas.

  1. Concurrent Algorithm For Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, Paulett C.; Decyk, Viktor K.

    1990-01-01

    Separate decompositions used for particle-motion and field calculations. General Concurrent Particle-in-Cell (GCPIC) algorithm used to implement motions of individual plasma particles (ions and electrons) under influence of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer codes on concurrent processors. Simulates motions of individual plasma particles under influence of electromagnetic fields generated by particles themselves. Performed to study variety of nonlinear problems in plasma physics, including magnetic and inertial fusion, plasmas in outer space, propagation of electron and ion beams, free-electron lasers, and particle accelerators.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  3. Enhanced stopping of macro-particles in particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Ellis, I.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-15

    We derive an equation for energy transfer from relativistic charged particles to a cold background plasma appropriate for finite-size particles that are used in particle-in-cell simulation codes. Expressions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional particles are presented, with special attention given to the two-dimensional case. This energy transfer is due to the electric field of the wake set up in the background plasma by the relativistic particle. The enhanced stopping is dependent on the q{sup 2}/m, where q is the charge and m is the mass of the relativistic particle, and therefore simulation macro-particles with large charge but identical q/m will stop more rapidly. The stopping power also depends on the effective particle shape of the macro-particle. These conclusions are verified in particle-in-cell simulations. We present 2D simulations of test particles, relaxation of high-energy tails, and integrated fast ignition simulations showing that the enhanced drag on macro-particles may adversely affect the results of these simulations in a wide range of high-energy density plasma scenarios. We also describe a particle splitting algorithm which can potentially overcome this problem and show its effect in controlling the stopping of macro-particles.

  4. Particle-in-cell Simulations with Kinetic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-02-12

    A new scheme, based on an exact separation between adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of drift-type modes is presented. The (linear and nonlinear) elliptic equations for the scalar fields are solved using a multi-grid solver. The new scheme yields linear growth rates in excellent agreement with theory and it is shown to conserve energy well into the nonlinear regime. It is also demonstrated that simulations with few electrons are reliable and accurate, suggesting that large-scale, PIC simulations with electron dynamics in toroidal geometry (e.g., tokamaks and stellarators plasmas) are within reach of present-day massively parallel supercomputers.

  5. Optimized Loading for Particle-in-cell Gyrokinetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-05-13

    The problem of particle loading in particle-in-cell gyrokinetic simulations is addressed using a quadratic optimization algorithm. Optimized loading in configuration space dramatically reduces the short wavelength modes in the electrostatic potential that are partly responsible for the non-conservation of total energy; further, the long wavelength modes are resolved with good accuracy. As a result, the conservation of energy for the optimized loading is much better that the conservation of energy for the random loading. The method is valid for any geometry and can be coupled to optimization algorithms in velocity space.

  6. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  7. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF AXISYMMETRIC PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-04-20

    We perform ''first-principles'' relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of aligned pulsar magnetosphere. We allow free escape of particles from the surface of a neutron star and continuously populate the magnetosphere with neutral pair plasma to imitate pair production. As pair plasma supply increases, we observe the transition from a charge-separated ''electrosphere'' solution with trapped plasma and no spin-down to a solution close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with electromagnetically dominated pulsar wind. We calculate the magnetospheric structure, current distribution, and spin-down power of the neutron star. We also discuss particle acceleration in the equatorial current sheet.

  8. On the effect of baryon loading in magnetized counterstreaming plasmas. II. Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.; Sakai, J.-I.

    2008-12-01

    Assuming a non-relativistic three species electron-positron-ion plasma, the counterstreaming instability is investigated for waves propagating parallel and perpendicular to a homogeneous background magnetic field. To support previous analytical investigations (Tautz and Sakai 2007), the instability is investigated by means of self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the presence of a third particle species is responsible for a variety of new features that cannot be seen either from an electron-ion plasma or for an electron-positron plasma.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations on spontaneous thermal magnetic field fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, F. J. R. Jr.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper an electromagnetic particle code is used to investigate the spontaneous thermal emission. Specifically we perform particle-in-cell simulations employing a non-relativistic isotropic Maxwellian particle distribution to show that thermal fluctuations are related to the origin of spontaneous magnetic field fluctuation. These thermal fluctuations can become seed for further amplification mechanisms and thus be considered at the origin of the cosmological magnetic field, at microgauss levels. Our numerical results are in accordance with theoretical results presented in the literature.

  10. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  12. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  13. Turbulence dissipation challenge: particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss application of three particle in cell (PIC) codes to the problems relevant to turbulence dissipation challenge. VPIC is a fully kinetic code extensively used to study a variety of diverse problems ranging from laboratory plasmas to astrophysics. PSC is a flexible fully kinetic code offering a variety of algorithms that can be advantageous to turbulence simulations, including high order particle shapes, dynamic load balancing, and ability to efficiently run on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Finally, HYPERS is a novel hybrid (kinetic ions+fluid electrons) code, which utilizes asynchronous time advance and a number of other advanced algorithms. We present examples drawn both from large-scale turbulence simulations and from the test problems outlined by the turbulence dissipation challenge. Special attention is paid to such issues as the small-scale intermittency of inertial range turbulence, mode content of the sub-proton range of scales, the formation of electron-scale current sheets and the role of magnetic reconnection, as well as numerical challenges of applying PIC codes to simulations of astrophysical turbulence.

  14. Speed-limited particle-in-cell (SLPIC) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory; Cary, John; Jenkins, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Speed-limited particle-in-cell (SLPIC) simulation is a new method for particle-based plasma simulation that allows increased timesteps in cases where the timestep is determined (e.g., in standard PIC) not by the smallest timescale of interest, but rather by an even smaller physical timescale that affects numerical stability. For example, SLPIC need not resolve the plasma frequency if plasma oscillations do not play a significant role in the simulation; in contrast, standard PIC must usually resolve the plasma frequency to avoid instability. Unlike fluid approaches, SLPIC retains a fully-kinetic description of plasma particles and includes all the same physical phenomena as PIC; in fact, if SLPIC is run with a PIC-compatible timestep, it is identical to PIC. However, unlike PIC, SLPIC can run stably with larger timesteps. SLPIC has been shown to be effective for finding steady-state solutions for 1D collisionless sheath problems, greatly speeding up computation despite a large ion/electron mass ratio. SLPIC is a relatively small modification of standard PIC, with no complexities that might degrade parallel efficiency (compared to PIC), and is similarly compatible with PIC field solvers and boundary conditions.

  15. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy.

  16. Low-noise collision operators for particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2005-05-15

    A new method to implement low-noise collision operators in particle-in-cell simulations is presented. The method is based on the fact that relevant collision operators can be included naturally in the Lagrangian formulation that exemplifies the particle-in-cell simulation method. Numerical simulations show that the momentum and energy conservation properties of the simulated plasma associated with the low-noise collision operator are improved as compared with standard collision algorithms based on random numbers.

  17. Low-noise Collision Operators for Particle-in-cell Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2005-03-08

    A new method to implement low-noise collision operators in particle-in-cell simulations is presented. The method is based on the fact that relevant collision operators can be included naturally in the Lagrangian formulation that exemplifies the particle-in-cell simulation method. Numerical simulations show that the momentum and energy conservation properties of the simulated plasma associated with the low-noise collision operator are improved as compared with standard collision algorithms based on random numbers.

  18. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to study energetic plasma phenomena by using particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations, we need to deal with relativistic velocity distributions in these simulations. However, numerical algorithms to deal with relativistic distributions are not well known. In this contribution, we overview basic algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in PIC and Monte-Carlo simulations. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are newly proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are 􏰅50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  19. Novel Simulation Methods in the Particle-In-Cell Framework Warp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Dave, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Furman, M. A.; Secondo, R.; Venturini, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2011-10-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Framework Warp is being developed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFSVNL) to guide the development of accelerators that can deliver beams suitable for high energy density experiments and implosion of inertial fusion capsules. It is also applied to the study and design of existing and next generation high-energy accelerators including the study of electron cloud effects, laser wakefield acceleration, coherent synchrotron radiation, etc. We will present a selection of original numerical methods that were developed by the HIFSVNL, including: PIC with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), a large-timestep mover for particles of arbitrary magnetized species, a new relativistic leapfrog particle pusher, simulations in Lorentz boosted frames, an electromagnetic solver with tunable numerical dispersion and efficient stride-based digital filtering. Examples of applications of the methods to the abovementioned fields will also be given. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and DE-AC52-07NA27344, US-LHC program LARP, and US-DOE SciDAC program ComPASS. Used resources of NERSC, supported by US-DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  20. Elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability in flowing-plasma particle-in-cell simulations by using Galilean coordinates.

    PubMed

    Lehe, Remi; Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B; Maier, Andreas R; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic flowing plasmas are of key interest to several fields of physics (including, e.g., laser-wakefield acceleration, when viewed in a Lorentz-boosted frame) but remain sometimes infeasible due to the well-known numerical Cherenkov instability (NCI). In this article, we show that, for a plasma drifting at a uniform relativistic velocity, the NCI can be eliminated by simply integrating the PIC equations in Galilean coordinates that follow the plasma (also sometimes known as comoving coordinates) within a spectral analytical framework. The elimination of the NCI is verified empirically and confirmed by a theoretical analysis of the instability. Moreover, it is shown that this method is applicable both to Cartesian geometry and to cylindrical geometry with azimuthal Fourier decomposition.

  1. Elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability in flowing-plasma particle-in-cell simulations by using Galilean coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Lehe, Remi; Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B.; Maier, Andreas R.; Vay, Jean -Luc

    2016-11-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic flowing plasmas are of key interest to several fields of physics (including, e.g., laser-wakefield acceleration, when viewed in a Lorentz-boosted frame) but remain sometimes infeasible due to the well-known numerical Cherenkov instability (NCI). In this article, we show that, for a plasma drifting at a uniform relativistic velocity, the NCI can be eliminated by simply integrating the PIC equations in Galilean coordinates that follow the plasma (also sometimes known as comoving coordinates) within a spectral analytical framework. The elimination of the NCI is verified empirically and confirmed by a theoretical analysis of the instability. Moreover, it is shown that this method is applicable both to Cartesian geometry and to cylindrical geometry with azimuthal Fourier decomposition.

  2. Elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability in flowing-plasma particle-in-cell simulations by using Galilean coordinates

    DOE PAGES

    Lehe, Remi; Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B.; ...

    2016-11-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic flowing plasmas are of key interest to several fields of physics (including, e.g., laser-wakefield acceleration, when viewed in a Lorentz-boosted frame) but remain sometimes infeasible due to the well-known numerical Cherenkov instability (NCI). In this article, we show that, for a plasma drifting at a uniform relativistic velocity, the NCI can be eliminated by simply integrating the PIC equations in Galilean coordinates that follow the plasma (also sometimes known as comoving coordinates) within a spectral analytical framework. The elimination of the NCI is verified empirically and confirmed by a theoretical analysis of the instability. Moreover,more » it is shown that this method is applicable both to Cartesian geometry and to cylindrical geometry with azimuthal Fourier decomposition.« less

  3. Elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability in flowing-plasma particle-in-cell simulations by using Galilean coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehe, Remi; Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B.; Maier, Andreas R.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic flowing plasmas are of key interest to several fields of physics (including, e.g., laser-wakefield acceleration, when viewed in a Lorentz-boosted frame) but remain sometimes infeasible due to the well-known numerical Cherenkov instability (NCI). In this article, we show that, for a plasma drifting at a uniform relativistic velocity, the NCI can be eliminated by simply integrating the PIC equations in Galilean coordinates that follow the plasma (also sometimes known as comoving coordinates) within a spectral analytical framework. The elimination of the NCI is verified empirically and confirmed by a theoretical analysis of the instability. Moreover, it is shown that this method is applicable both to Cartesian geometry and to cylindrical geometry with azimuthal Fourier decomposition.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulations of the relaxation of electron beams in inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; Tsiklauri, David

    2016-12-01

    Previous theoretical considerations of electron beam relaxation in inhomogeneous plasmas have indicated that the effects of the irregular solar wind may account for the poor agreement of homogeneous modelling with the observations. Quasi-linear theory and Hamiltonian models based on Zakharov's equations have indicated that when the level of density fluctuations is above a given threshold, density irregularities act to de-resonate the beam-plasma interaction, restricting Langmuir wave growth on the expense of beam energy. This work presents the first fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of beam relaxation under the influence of density irregularities. We aim to independently determine the influence of background inhomogeneity on the beam-plasma system, and to test theoretical predictions and alternative models using a fully kinetic treatment. We carry out one-dimensional (1-D) PIC simulations of a bump-on-tail unstable electron beam in the presence of increasing levels of background inhomogeneity using the fully electromagnetic, relativistic EPOCH PIC code. We find that in the case of homogeneous background plasma density, Langmuir wave packets are generated at the resonant condition and then quasi-linear relaxation leads to a dynamic increase of wavenumbers generated. No electron acceleration is seen - unlike in the inhomogeneous experiments, all of which produce high-energy electrons. For the inhomogeneous experiments we also observe the generation of backwards-propagating Langmuir waves, which is shown directly to be due to the refraction of the packets off the density gradients. In the case of higher-amplitude density fluctuations, similar features to the weaker cases are found, but also packets can also deviate from the expected dispersion curve in -space due to nonlinearity. Our fully kinetic PIC simulations broadly confirm the findings of quasi-linear theory and the Hamiltonian model based on Zakharov's equations. Strong density fluctuations

  5. Particle-in-cell simulation of a Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Boying; Yu, Daren; Cao, Yong; Duan, Ping

    2010-04-01

    Hall thrusters are widely used as space electric propulsion devices. Due to the complex plasma phenomenon and high computation cost, currently it is difficult to fully simulate the real physical process in Hall thrusters. Recently, Szabo and Taccogna have proposed two different methods to simplify and accelerate the simulation, respectively. In this paper, both these methods of acceleration are analysed and compared, and then a modified method of acceleration is proposed. In order to verify the modified method of acceleration, the influence of magnetic field gradient on plasma parameter distribution in the channel is simulated. The numerical results show that the magnetic field gradient can significantly alter the position of the ionization region and thruster performance.

  6. Particle-in-Cell simulation of energetic particles driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.; Lang, Jianying; Fu, Guoyong

    2009-11-01

    We present simulations of the evolution of energetic particles driven modes with the gyrokinetic turbulence code GEMfootnotetextY. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comp. Phys. 220, 839 (2007), except that kinetic electrons are replaced by a mass-less fluid model. PIC simulations of energetic particles use either the conventional full-f method or the δ method. The latter is adequate for low-amplitude fluctuation amplitudes. The collisional δ -methodfootnotetextY. Chen and R. White, Phys. Plasmas 4, 3591 (1997) is used to systematically account for collisions and particle source and sink. Steady state saturation amplitudes are benchmarked with predictions of analytic theory. We also employ full-f simulationsfootnotetextY. Todo et. al, Phys. Plasmas 10, 2888 (2003) to study bursty events in which the instabilities reach large amplitudes and cause macroscopic redistribution or loss of the particles. With full-f it is easy to retain all the nonlinear effects and treat accurately discontinuities in the distribution function at phase-space boundaries. Whereas the energetic particle current is neglegible in the Ampere's law in δ simulations, it is important in full-f simulations. Thermal ion kinetic effects are observed to be important.

  7. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Fahlen, J.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Langdon, A. B.

    2006-10-01

    Using the full-PIC code OSIRIS, we have studied stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) over a wide range of parameters relevant to NIF. The role of beat-wave damping as a saturation mechanism is explored, as well as its relationship to other nonlinear effects which have previously been used to explain SRS behavior in NIF-relevant plasmas. Vu et al., have proposed that a nonlinear frequency shift due to the trapped particles detunes the instability, Brunner and Valeo argue that the trapped-particle instability is one of the dominant saturation mechanisms, while L. Yin et al., claim that electron beam acoustic modes are important. We will discuss the role played by each of these effects in OSIRIS simulations, as well as the importance of plasma wave convection on the recurrence of SRS reflectivity. We will also discuss how SRS behavior changes as the electron density and temperature are varied.

  8. Implementations of mesh refinement schemes for particle-in-cell plasma simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.

    2003-10-20

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations and present two implementations in more detail, with examples.

  9. Global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of internal kink instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Zocco, Alessandro

    2012-12-15

    Internal kink instabilities have been studied in straight tokamak geometry employing an electromagnetic gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The ideal-MHD internal kink mode and the collisionless m=1 tearing mode have been successfully simulated with the PIC code. Diamagnetic effects on the internal kink modes have also been investigated.

  10. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF OBLIQUE PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Cerutti, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    We present “first-principles” relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the oblique pulsar magnetosphere with pair formation. The magnetosphere starts to form with particles extracted from the surface of the neutron star. These particles are accelerated by surface electric fields and emit photons capable of producing electron–positron pairs. We inject secondary pairs at the locations of primary energetic particles whose energy exceeds the threshold for pair formation. We find solutions that are close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with the Y-point and current sheet. Solutions with obliquities ≤40° do not show pair production in the open field line region because the local current density along the magnetic field is below the Goldreich–Julian value. The bulk outflow in these solutions is charge-separated, and pair formation happens in the current sheet and return current layer only. Solutions with higher inclinations show pair production in the open field line region, with high multiplicity of the bulk flow and the size of the pair-producing region increasing with inclination. We observe the spin-down of the star to be comparable to MHD model predictions. The magnetic dissipation in the current sheet ranges between 20% for the aligned rotator and 3% for the orthogonal rotator. Our results suggest that for low obliquity neutron stars with suppressed pair formation at the light cylinder, the presence of phenomena related to pair activity in the bulk of the polar region, e.g., radio emission, may crucially depend on the physics beyond our simplified model, such as the effects of curved spacetime or multipolar surface fields.

  11. Lorentz boosted frame simulation technique in Particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng

    In this dissertation, we systematically explore the use of a simulation method for modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, called the Lorentz boosted frame technique. In the lab frame the plasma length is typically four orders of magnitude larger than the laser pulse length. Using this technique, simulations are performed in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma length, which is Lorentz contracted, and the laser length, which is Lorentz expanded, are now comparable. This technique has the potential to reduce the computational needs of a LWFA simulation by more than four orders of magnitude, and is useful if there is no or negligible reflection of the laser in the lab frame. To realize the potential of Lorentz boosted frame simulations for LWFA, the first obstacle to overcome is a robust and violent numerical instability, called the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI), that leads to unphysical energy exchange between relativistically drifting particles and their radiation. This leads to unphysical noise that dwarfs the real physical processes. In this dissertation, we first present a theoretical analysis of this instability, and show that the NCI comes from the unphysical coupling of the electromagnetic (EM) modes and Langmuir modes (both main and aliasing) of the relativistically drifting plasma. We then discuss the methods to eliminate them. However, the use of FFTs can lead to parallel scalability issues when there are many more cells along the drifting direction than in the transverse direction(s). We then describe an algorithm that has the potential to address this issue by using a higher order finite difference operator for the derivative in the plasma drifting direction, while using the standard second order operators in the transverse direction(s). The NCI for this algorithm is analyzed, and it is shown that the NCI can be eliminated using the same strategies that were used for the hybrid FFT

  12. Improved Conservation Properties for Particle-in-cell Simulations with Kinetic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-19

    It is shown that a simple algorithm which exactly segregates between adiabatic and non-adiabatic electrons in particle-in-cell simulations of drift modes yields excellent conservation properties (e.g. particle number, energy) compared to the conventional df scheme. The removal of the free streaming term in the evolution of the marker weight is shown to be responsible for the improved linear and nonlinear properties of the simulated plasma.

  13. Verification of particle-in-cell simulations against exact solutions of kinetic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Miles

    2015-09-01

    Demonstrating correctness of computer simulations (or verification) has become a matter of increasing concern in recent years. The strongest type of verification is a demonstration that the simulation converges to an exact solution of the mathematical model that is supposed to be solved. Of course, this is possible only if such an exact solution is available. In this paper, we are interested in kinetic simulation using the particle-in-cell method, and consequently a relevant exact solution must be a solution of a kinetic equation. While we know of no such solutions that exercise all the features of a typical particle-in-cell simulation, in this paper we show that the mathematical literature contains several such solutions that involve a large fraction of the functionality of such a code, and which collectively exercise essentially all of the code functionality. These solutions include the plane diode, the neutron criticality problem, and the calculation of ion energy distribution functions in oscillating fields. In each of theses cases, we can show the the particle-in-cell simulation converges to the exact solution in the expected way. These demonstrations are strong evidence of correct implementation. Work supported by Science Foundation Ireland under grant 08/SRC/I1411.

  14. Thrust calculation of electric solar wind sail by particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Kento; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Muranaka, Takanobu; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, thrust characteristics of an electric solar wind sail were numerically evaluated using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The thrust obtained from the PIC simulation was lower than the thrust estimations obtained in previous studies. The PIC simulation indicated that ambient electrons strongly shield the electrostatic potential of the tether of the sail, and the strong shield effect causes a greater thrust reduction than has been obtained in previous studies. Additionally, previous expressions of the thrust estimation were modified by using the shielded potential structure derived from the present simulation results. The modified thrust estimation agreed very well with the thrust obtained from the PIC simulation.

  15. Energy loss in intergalactic pair beams: Particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, A.; Kilian, P.; Spanier, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The change in the distribution function of electron-positron pair beams determines whether GeV photons can be produced as secondary radiation from TeV photons. We will discuss the instabilities driven by pair beams. Methods: The system of a thermal proton-electron plasma and the electron-positron beam is collision free. We have, therefore, used the particle-in-cell simulation approach. It was necessary to alter the physical parameters, but the ordering of growth rates has been retained. Results: We were able to show that plasma instabilities can be recovered in particle-in-cell simulations, but their effect on the pair distribution function is negligible for the beam-background energy density ratios typically found in blazars.

  16. Ultra High Resolution Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Transition to Turbulence using GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Fox, William; Karimabadi, Homa; Roytershteyn, Vadim; Daughton, William

    2012-10-01

    Advances in computing power have enabled kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of plasma transition to turbulence at unprecedent resolutions. Nonlinear Kelvin-Helmholtz and tearing instabilities, driven by an initial shear flow, lead to fully developed turbulence, spanning scales from MHD down to electron kinetic scales. Currently, advances in computational capabilities for some of the largest computers in the world, like DOE's upcoming Titan machine, are driven by the use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate computationally intensive tasks. We present new modules in the electromagnetic particle-in-cell code PSC that enable effective use of the computational capabilities of massively parallel GPU based computers for kinetic plasma simulations. In particular, we will address (1) efficient algorithms for implementing particle advance, current deposition and sorting, (2) a load balancing scheme based on decomposition into small patches and space-filling curves, and (3) challenges of using both CPU and GPUs simultaneously in order to exploit all available computational resources optimally.

  17. Rescaling of microwave breakdown theory for monatomic gases by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huihui; Meng, Lin; Liu, Dagang; Liu, Laqun

    2013-12-15

    A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code is developed to rescale the microwave breakdown theory which is put forward by Vyskrebentsev and Raizer. The results of simulations show that there is a distinct error in this theory when the high energy tail of electron energy distribution function increases. A rescaling factor is proposed to modify this theory, and the change rule of the rescaling factor is presented.

  18. Wavelet-based Poisson solver for use in particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Balsa; Pogorelov, Ilya V

    2005-06-01

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet-based Poisson solver for use in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Our method harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and additional compression of relevant data sets. We present and discuss preliminary results relating to the application of the new solver to test problems in accelerator physics and astrophysics.

  19. Magnetic Reconnection during Collisionless, Stressed, X-point Collapse using Particle-in-cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-09-01

    Dungey's (1953) work on X-point collapse is the earliest analysis done on magnetic reconnection and predates the tearing mode, Sweet-Parker and Petcheck reconnection models. X-point collapse soon fell out of favour because in the collisional (MHD) regime, for the plausible space plasma parameters, it was found to be inefficient. We however show [Tsiklauri D. and T. Haruki, Phys. of Plasmas, 14, 112905, (2007)] that in the collisionless regime, which is indeed more applicable to space plasmas, the reconnection is efficient. We study magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed, X-point collapse using kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic Particle-in-Cell numerical code. Two cases of weakly and strongly stressed X-point collapse were considered. Here descriptors weakly and strongly refer to 20% and 124% unidirectional spatial compression of the X-point, respectively. We found that within about one Alfven time, 2% and 20% of the initial magnetic energy is converted into heat and accelerated particle energy in the case of weak and strong stress, respectively. In the both cases, during the peak of the reconnection, the quadruple out-of-plane magnetic field is generated. These results strongly suggest the importance of the collisionless, stressed X-point collapse as an efficient mechanism of converting magnetic energy into heat and super-thermal particle energy. In the weakly stressed case, the reconnection rate, defined as the out-of-plane electric field in the X-point normalized by the product of external magnetic field and Alfven speeds, peaks at 0.11, with its average over 1.25 Alfven times being 0.04. Electron energy distribution in the current sheet, at the high-energy end of the spectrum, shows a power-law distribution with the index varying in time, attaining a maximal value of -4.1 at the final simulation time step (1.25 Alfven times). In the strongly stressed case, magnetic reconnection peak occurs 3.4 times faster and is more efficient

  20. ELECTRON ACCELERATIONS AT HIGH MACH NUMBER SHOCKS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS IN VARIOUS PARAMETER REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2012-08-20

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collisionless shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various Alfven Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron {beta}{sub e} (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We find electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (M{sub A} {approx} 30) with a mass ratio of M/m = 100 and {beta}{sub e} = 0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with a large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low.

  1. Electron Accelerations at High Mach Number Shocks: Two-dimensional Particle-in-cell Simulations in Various Parameter Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collisionless shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various Alfvén Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron β e (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We find electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (MA ~ 30) with a mass ratio of M/m = 100 and β e = 0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with a large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low.

  2. Electron Accelerations at High Mach Number Shocks: Two-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulations in Various Parameter Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.

    2012-12-01

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collision-less shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations with various Alfven Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron βe (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We found electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (MA ~ 30) with a mass ratio of M/m=100 and βe=0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with the large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely-high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low. Matsumoto et al., Astrophys. J., 755, 109, 2012.

  3. Simulation of Smith-Purcell terahertz radiation using a particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, J. T.; Gardelle, J.

    2006-06-01

    A simulation of the generation of Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at terahertz frequencies has been performed using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The simulation supposes that a thin (but infinitely wide) monoenergetic electron beam passes over a diffraction grating. We simulate two configurations, one similar to the Dartmouth SP free-electron laser, with a low-energy continuous beam (we use an axial magnetic field to constrain the electrons to essentially one-dimensional motion). The other is similar to the recent MIT experiment that uses a prebunched 15 MeV beam.

  4. Particle-in-cell based parameter study of 12-cavity, 12-cathode rising-sun relativistic magnetrons for improved performance

    SciTech Connect

    Majzoobi, A.; Joshi, R. P. Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.

    2015-10-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to analyze the efficiency, output power and leakage currents in a 12-Cavity, 12-Cathode rising-sun magnetron with diffraction output (MDO). The central goal is to conduct a parameter study of a rising-sun magnetron that comprehensively incorporates performance enhancing features such as transparent cathodes, axial extraction, the use of endcaps, and cathode extensions. Our optimum results demonstrate peak output power of about 2.1 GW, with efficiencies of ∼70% and low leakage currents at a magnetic field of 0.45 Tesla, a 400 kV bias with a single endcap, for a range of cathode extensions between 3 and 6 centimeters.

  5. Nonequilibrium Gyrokinetic Fluctuation Theory and Sampling Noise in Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2007-10-09

    The present state of the theory of fluctuations in gyrokinetic GK plasmas and especially its application to sampling noise in GK particle-in-cell PIC simulations is reviewed. Topics addressed include the Δf method, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for both classical and GK many-body plasmas, the Klimontovich formalism, sampling noise in PIC simulations, statistical closure for partial differential equations, the theoretical foundations of spectral balance in the presence of arbitrary noise sources, and the derivation of Kadomtsev-type equations from the general formalism.

  6. Particle-in-Cell Code BEAMPATH for Beam Dynamics Simulations in Linear Accelerators and Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Y.

    2004-10-28

    A code library BEAMPATH for 2 - dimensional and 3 - dimensional space charge dominated beam dynamics study in linear particle accelerators and beam transport lines is developed. The program is used for particle-in-cell simulation of axial-symmetric, quadrupole-symmetric and z-uniform beams in a channel containing RF gaps, radio-frequency quadrupoles, multipole lenses, solenoids and bending magnets. The programming method includes hierarchical program design using program-independent modules and a flexible combination of modules to provide the most effective version of the structure for every specific case of simulation. Numerical techniques as well as the results of beam dynamics studies are presented.

  7. ASPEN: A Fully Kinetic, Reduced-Description Particle-in-Cell Model for Simulating Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; DuBois, D. F.

    1999-11-01

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal envelopes in order to model parametric instabilities with low-frequency and high-frequency daughter waves. Because temporal envelope approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. The RPIC model is fully three dimensional and has been implemented in two dimensions on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. We believe this code is the first particle-in-cell code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilites in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and Langmuir decay instability are presented.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of the runaway breakdown of nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-12-01

    The runaway breakdown initiated by a mono-energetic beam of runaway electrons propagating through a cathode-anode gap filled with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is studied using the one-dimensional particle-in-cell numerical model. It is shown that the breakdown is strongly influenced by the amplitude of the beam, its duration, and the electric field in the vicinity of the cathode. In addition, the simulation results showed that, in spite of the formation of rather dense plasma inside the cathode-anode gap by runaway electrons, the electric field is not screened because of frequent electron-neutral collisions.

  9. Acceleration of a Particle-in-Cell Code for Space Plasma Simulations with OpenACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Vaivads, Andris; Vencels, Juris; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Hart, Alistair; Laure, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    We simulate space plasmas with the Particle-in-cell (PIC) method that uses computational particles to mimic electrons and protons in solar wind and in Earth magnetosphere. The magnetic and electric fields are computed by solving the Maxwell's equations on a computational grid. In each PIC simulation step, there are four major phases: interpolation of fields to particles, updating the location and velocity of each particle, interpolation of particles to grids and solving the Maxwell's equations on the grid. We use the iPIC3D code, which was implemented in C++, using both MPI and OpenMP, for our case study. By November 2014, heterogeneous systems using hardware accelerators such as Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) and the Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors for high performance computing continue growth in the top 500 most powerful supercomputers world wide. Scientific applications for numerical simulations need to adapt to using accelerators to achieve portability and scalability in the coming exascale systems. In our work, we conduct a case study of using OpenACC to offload the computation intensive parts: particle mover and interpolation of particles to grids, in a massively parallel Particle-in-Cell simulation code, iPIC3D, to multi-GPU systems. We use MPI for inter-node communication for halo exchange and communicating particles. We identify the most promising parts suitable for GPUs accelerator by profiling using CrayPAT. We implemented manual deep copy to address the challenges of porting C++ classes to GPU. We document the necessary changes in the exiting algorithms to adapt for GPU computation. We present the challenges and findings as well as our methodology for porting a Particle-in-Cell code to multi-GPU systems using OpenACC. In this work, we will present the challenges, findings and our methodology of porting a Particle-in-Cell code for space applications as follows: We profile the iPIC3D code by Cray Performance Analysis Tool (CrayPAT) and identify

  10. Global particle-in-cell simulations of plasma pressure effects on Alfvenic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Koenies, Axel; Hatzky, Roman

    2011-01-15

    Global linear gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of electromagnetic modes in realistic tokamak geometry are reported. The effect of plasma pressure on Alfvenic modes is studied. It is shown that the fast-particle pressure can considerably affect the shear Alfven wave continuum structure and hence the toroidicity-induced gap in the continuum. It is also found that the energetic ions can substantially reduce the growth rate of the ballooning modes (and perhaps completely stabilize them in a certain parameter range). Ballooning modes are found to be the dominant instabilities if the bulk-plasma pressure gradient is large enough.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of ambipolar and nonambipolar diffusion in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Boswell, R. W.

    2012-05-15

    Using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we investigate cross-field diffusion in low-pressure magnetized plasmas both in the presence and absence of conducting axial boundaries. With no axial boundary, the cross-field diffusion is observed to be ambipolar, as expected. However, when axial boundaries are added, the diffusion becomes distinctly nonambipolar. Electrons are prevented from escaping to the transverse walls and are preferentially removed from the discharge along the magnetic field lines, thus allowing quasi-neutrality to be maintained via a short-circuit effect at the axial boundaries.

  12. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  13. Sheath and presheath in ion-ion plasmas via particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meige, A.; Leray, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Chabert, P.

    2008-02-11

    A full particle-in-cell simulation is developed to investigate electron-free plasmas constituted of positive and negative ions under the influence of a dc bias voltage. It is shown that high-voltage sheaths following the classical Child-law sheaths form within a few microseconds (which corresponds to the ion transit time) after the dc voltage is applied. It is also shown that there exists the equivalent of a Bohm criterion where a presheath accelerates the ions collected at one of the electrodes up to the sound speed before they enter the sheath. From an applied perspective, this leads to smaller sheaths than one would expect.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of hot electron generation using defocused laser light in cone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Pasley, John

    2016-08-15

    The effects of defocusing a high intensity pulse of laser light on the generation of hot electrons in a cone are investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The results indicate that defocused laser light can soften the electron energy spectrum and increase the coupling efficiency compared to the use of a laser in tight focus. It is shown that this is a consequence of the density profile of plasma produced by the laser prepulse, which is less dense in the case of the defocused laser. The relevance of this result to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is discussed.

  15. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  16. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-15

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  17. Particle-In-Cell simulations of high pressure plasmas using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Markus; Atteln, Frank; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Mertmann, Philipp; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are widely used to understand the fundamental phenomena in low-temperature plasmas. Particularly plasmas at very low gas pressures are studied using PIC methods. The inherent drawback of these methods is that they are very time consuming -- certain stability conditions has to be satisfied. This holds even more for the PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas due to the very high collision rates. The simulations take up to very much time to run on standard computers and require the help of computer clusters or super computers. Recent advances in the field of graphics processing units (GPUs) provides every personal computer with a highly parallel multi processor architecture for very little money. This architecture is freely programmable and can be used to implement a wide class of problems. In this paper we present the concepts of a fully parallel PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas using the benefits of GPU programming.

  18. Particle-in-Cell and molecular dynamics simulation of plasma-surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehlert, Hanno; Filinov, Alexei; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Depending on their energy, particles from a plasma can initiate various processes on the surface of a solid. This includes, i.a., sputtering, adsorption of the particle on the surface, or the emission of secondary electrons back into the plasma. Particle-in-Cell simulations with Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) have been used to investigate the influence of surface processes on the physical conditions in an rf discharge. Here, we perform PIC-MCC simulations and focus on the physical parameters in the sheath region as the plasma-surface boundary layer from which energetic plasma particles reach the surface and into which particles from the solid are emitted. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain a better understanding of the microscopic processes on the surface. Supported by Kiel University via KiNSIS and by the ITAP-INP junior research group.

  19. Effect of a damping force on dust acoustic waves simulated by particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Zhong-Zheng; Duan, Wen-shan

    2017-04-01

    Damping dust acoustic waves described by the Korteweg-de Vries-type (KdV-type) equation and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation-type (quasi-NLSE) have been studied by the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. The KdV-type equation and the quasi-NLSE with dust-neutral collision are analytically obtained by the reductive perturbation method. The PIC simulation methods for dust acoustic waves with damping force are shown. The PIC simulation results are compared with the analytical one. The relationship of the damping coefficient with the collision frequency is obtained. It is found that amplitudes of KdV-type solitary waves and quasienvelope solitary waves with damping force decrease exponentially.

  20. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Two and Three Spatial Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacone, R. E.; Vu, H. X.

    1996-11-01

    The results arising from numerical simulations of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in two and three spatial dimensions using HERCULES, a particle ion/adiabatic fluid-electron particle-in cell code(H. X. Vu, J. Comput. Phys.) 124, 417 (1996)., are presented. We compare the results of these simulations against the solutions of a linearized fluid model of SBS in homogeneous plasmas(C. J. McKinstrie, R. Betti, R. E. Giacone, T. Kolber and J. S. Li, Phys. Rev. E) 50, 2182 (1994).. Multidimensional effects on the angular dependance of SBS are studied. The results obtained from numerical simulations are in good agreement with the linear model. Comparisons of beam bending (H. A. Rose, Phys. Plasmas) 3, 1709 (1996). and cross laser beams effects in two and three dimensions will be also presented. Work performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy.

  1. Particle-In-Cell simulation of laser photodetachment in capacitively coupled radio frequency oxygen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Teichmann, T.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.; Küllig, C.; Dittmann, K.; Meichsner, J.

    2013-11-15

    Particle-In-Cell simulations with Monte Carlo collision of capacitively coupled radio frequency oxygen discharges are used to study the appearance and characteristics of two experimentally observed electronegative modes, the high electronegative mode for low peak-to-peak voltage, and the low electronegative mode for high peak-to-peak voltage. For the high electronegative mode, the simulated laser photodetachment signal agrees very well with the experiment. The simulation identifies the dominant transport processes for high electronegativities: electrons flow fast out of the perturbed region, where the laser pulse generates laser detachment of negative ions. Negative ions are not streaming inward, but are produced within this region by dissociative attachment after the laser pulse.

  2. Solution of Poisson's equation in electrostatic Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnfeld, Daniel; Schneider, Ralf; Matyash, Konstantin; Lüskow, Karl; Bandelow, Gunnar; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Duras, Julia; Kemnitz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    For spacecrafts the concept of ion thrusters presents a very efficient method of propulsion. Optimization of thrusters is imperative, but experimental access is difficult. Plasma simulations offer means to understand the plasma physics within an ion thruster and can aid the design of new thruster concepts. In order to achieve best simulation performances, code optimizations and parallelization strategies need to be investigated. In this work the role of different solution strategies for Poisson's equation in electrostatic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the HEMP-DM3a ion thruster was studied. The direct solution method of LU decomposition is compared to a stationary iterative method, the successive over-relaxation solver. Results and runtime of solvers were compared, and an outlook on further improvements and developments is presented. This work was supported by the German Space Agency DLR through Project 50RS1510..

  3. Particle-in-Cell simulations of filamentary structures formation in DBD-tissue interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre; Messmer, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrated high potential of the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas for medical applications, such as sterilization or tissue regeneration. Despite intensive experimental studies have been conducted, the mechanism of plasma-tissue interaction still remains unclear. One of the open questions for the plasma-medical applications is the mechanism of filamentary structures formation in plasma and their interaction with tissues. Since formation of filaments is a purely kinetic effect, this issue needs to be addressed using kinetic, Particle-In-Cell simulation approach. We will present results of such numerical study. We performed 2D simulations of multiple streamers generation in atmospheric air using Tech-X's 2D/3D hybrid simulation tool VORPAL. We will demonstrate the resolution of the filamentary structure and will report the plasma properties. We will also address the plasma-induced effects on the tissue.

  4. Model and particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distribution in collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhuwen; Kong, Bo; Luo, Yuee; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Yuansheng

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a self-consistent theoretical model, which is described by the ion energy distributions (IEDs) in collisionless sheaths, and the analytical results for different combined dc/radio frequency (rf) capacitive coupled plasma discharge cases, including sheath voltage errors analysis, are compared with the results of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional plane-parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The IEDs in collisionless sheaths are performed on combination of dc/rf voltage sources electrodes discharge using argon as the process gas. The incident ions on the grounded electrode are separated, according to their different radio frequencies, and dc voltages on a separated electrode, the IEDs, and widths of energy in sheath and the plasma sheath thickness are discussed. The IEDs, the IED widths, and sheath voltages by the theoretical model are investigated and show good agreement with PIC simulations.

  5. Small-angle Coulomb collision model for particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S. Winske, Dan; Daughton, William; Albright, Brian

    2009-03-20

    We construct and investigate a set of stochastic differential equations that incorporate the physics of velocity-dependent small-angle Coulomb collisions among the plasma particles in a particle-in-cell simulation. Each particle is scattered stochastically from all the other particles in a simulation cell modeled as one or more Maxwellians. Total energy and momentum are conserved by linear transformation of the velocity increments. In two test simulations the proposed 'particle-moment' collision algorithm performs well with time steps as large as 10% of the relaxation time - far larger than a particle-pairing collision algorithm, in which pairs of particles are scattered from one another, requires to achieve the same accuracy.

  6. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  7. How large can the electron to proton mass ratio be in particle-in-cell simulations of unstable systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Dieckmann, M. E.

    2010-03-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are widely used as a tool to investigate instabilities that develop between a collisionless plasma and beams of charged particles. However, even on contemporary supercomputers, it is not always possible to resolve the ion dynamics in more than one spatial dimension with such simulations. The ion mass is thus reduced below 1836 electron masses, which can affect the plasma dynamics during the initial exponential growth phase of the instability and during the subsequent nonlinear saturation. The goal of this article is to assess how far the electron to ion mass ratio can be increased, without changing qualitatively the physics. It is first demonstrated that there can be no exact similarity law, which balances a change in the mass ratio with that of another plasma parameter, leaving the physics unchanged. Restricting then the analysis to the linear phase, a criterion allowing to define a maximum ratio is explicated in terms of the hierarchy of the linear unstable modes. The criterion is applied to the case of a relativistic electron beam crossing an unmagnetized electron-ion plasma.

  8. Particle-in-Cell laser-plasma simulation on Xeon Phi coprocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmin, I. A.; Bastrakov, S. I.; Efimenko, E. S.; Gonoskov, A. A.; Korzhimanov, A. V.; Meyerov, I. B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the development of a high-performance implementation of the Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulation on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. We discuss the suitability of the method for Xeon Phi architecture and present our experience in the porting and optimization of the existing parallel Particle-in-Cell code PICADOR. Direct porting without code modification gives performance on Xeon Phi close to that of an 8-core CPU on a benchmark problem with 50 particles per cell. We demonstrate step-by-step optimization techniques, such as improving data locality, enhancing parallelization efficiency and vectorization leading to an overall 4.2 × speedup on CPU and 7.5 × on Xeon Phi compared to the baseline version. The optimized version achieves 16.9 ns per particle update on an Intel Xeon E5-2660 CPU and 9.3 ns per particle update on an Intel Xeon Phi 5110P. For a real problem of laser ion acceleration in targets with surface grating, where a large number of macroparticles per cell is required, the speedup of Xeon Phi compared to CPU is 1.6 ×.

  9. Verification of particle-in-cell simulations with Monte Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Widespread recent interest in techniques for demonstrating that computer simulation programs are correct (‘verification’) has been motivated by evidence that traditional development and testing procedures are disturbingly ineffective. Reproducing an exact solution of the relevant model equations is generally accepted as the strongest available verification procedure, but this technique depends on the availability of suitable exact solutions. In this paper we consider verification of a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions. We know of no exact solutions that simultaneously exercise all of the functions of this code. However, we show here that there can be found in the literature a number of non-trivial exact solutions, each of which exercises a substantial subset of these functions, and which in combination exercise all of the functions of the code. That the code is able to reproduce these solutions is correctness evidence of a stronger kind than has hitherto been elucidated.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of an RF emission mechanism associated with hypervelocity impact plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Alex C.; Close, Sigrid

    2017-05-01

    Radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts has been detected in multiple experiments, but the physical mechanism responsible is not well understood. Plasma is created by these impacts and rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum; it's been argued that the observed RF emission is associated with a process in the plasma. A recent model proposes that coherent oscillations from a large scale charge separation due to the expansion of the plasma can produce RF. In this paper, we use a discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell technique to simulate this process. Initial conditions are drawn from hydrocode impact simulations, and the results are compared to experimental measurements. Under the assumption that there exists a difference in bulk speed of electrons and ions at a certain point in the expansion, we do find that radiation is produced by the plasma.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of ion-acoustic waves with application to Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, Etienne J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Maharaj, Shimul K.

    2014-07-15

    Using a particle-in-cell simulation, the dispersion and growth rate of the ion-acoustic mode are investigated for a plasma containing two ion and two electron components. The electron velocities are modelled by a combination of two kappa distributions, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. The ion components consist of adiabatic ions and an ultra-low density ion beam to drive a very weak instability, thereby ensuring observable waves. The ion-acoustic mode is explored for a range of parameter values such as κ, temperature ratio, and density ratio of the two electron components. The phase speed, frequency range, and growth rate of the mode are investigated. Simulations of double-kappa two-temperature plasmas typical of the three regions of Saturn's magnetosphere are also presented and analysed.

  12. Electrostatic plasma simulation by Particle-In-Cell method using ANACONDA package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandón, J. S.; Grisales, J. P.; Riascos, H.

    2017-06-01

    Electrostatic plasma is the most representative and basic case in plasma physics field. One of its main characteristics is its ideal behavior, since it is assumed be in thermal equilibrium state. Through this assumption, it is possible to study various complex phenomena such as plasma oscillations, waves, instabilities or damping. Likewise, computational simulation of this specific plasma is the first step to analyze physics mechanisms on plasmas, which are not at equilibrium state, and hence plasma is not ideal. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used because of its precision for this kind of cases. This work, presents PIC method implementation to simulate electrostatic plasma by Python, using ANACONDA packages. The code has been corroborated comparing previous theoretical results for three specific phenomena in cold plasmas: oscillations, Two-Stream instability (TSI) and Landau Damping(LD). Finally, parameters and results are discussed.

  13. Plasma electron hole kinematics. II. Hole tracking Particle-In-Cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2016-08-01

    The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and the effects of "jetting."

  14. A kinetic electron-neutral collision model for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointon, Timothy; Cartwright, Keith

    2014-10-01

    Details of a kinetic electron-neutral collision model for particle-in-cell plasma simulation codes are presented. The model uses an efficient scheme to randomly select collision events - elastic, excitation and ionization - with the appropriate probability Ionization events create electron-ion pairs, and the secondary electrons can themselves ionize the gas. To maintain a manageable particle count, a particle merger algorithm can be used to periodically replace all particles of a given species in a cell with a new, smaller set that conserves charge, momentum, and energy Small-scale tests show that results with the merger are in good agreement with non-merged runs. Large simulations can only be done with the merger on, and typically show excellent merger efficiency (>90%). Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. DOE's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000.

  15. Object-Oriented Parallel Particle-in-Cell Code for Beam Dynamics Simulation in Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Decky, V.

    1999-11-13

    In this paper, we present an object-oriented three-dimensional parallel particle-in-cell code for beam dynamics simulation in linear accelerators. A two-dimensional parallel domain decomposition approach is employed within a message passing programming paradigm along with a dynamic load balancing. Implementing object-oriented software design provides the code with better maintainability, reusability, and extensibility compared with conventional structure based code. This also helps to encapsulate the details of communications syntax. Performance tests on SGI/Cray T3E-900 and SGI Origin 2000 machines show good scalability of the object-oriented code. Some important features of this code also include employing symplectic integration with linear maps of external focusing elements and using z as the independent variable, typical in accelerators. A successful application was done to simulate beam transport through three superconducting sections in the APT linac design.

  16. Plasma electron hole kinematics. II. Hole tracking Particle-In-Cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2016-08-15

    The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and the effects of “jetting.”.

  17. Particle in cell simulation of a radiofrequency plasma jet expanding in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, C. Hawkins, R.; Boswell, R. W.

    2015-03-02

    The effect of a pressure gradient (∼133 Pa–0.133 Pa) on electron and ion energy distributions in a radiofrequency (rf at 13.56 MHz) argon plasma jet is studied using a 1D-3v Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC domain is three times that of the 0.018 m long plasma cavity and the total simulation time is 1 ms. Ion heating and acceleration up to a drift velocity about 2000 m s{sup −1} are measured along the jet's main expansion axis. Elastic and charge exchange ion-neutral collisions histograms computed at equilibrium during 0.74 ms show that charge exchange collisions act as the main neutral heating mechanism.

  18. Observation of transient electric fields in particle-in-cell simulation of capacitively coupled discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, Predhiman K.

    2014-07-15

    The analytical prediction of the presence of transient electric field regions between the bulk plasma and sheath edge in radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (RF-CCP) discharges has been reported by Kaganovich [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 265006 (2002)]. In this paper, we have used the semi-infinite particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation technique to verify the theoretical prediction for the existence of transient electric field in the linear regime; it is shown that the PIC simulation results are in good agreement with the results predicted by analytical model in this regime. It is also demonstrated that the linear theory overestimates the transient electric field as one moves from linear to weakly nonlinear regime. The effect of applied RF current density and electron temperature on evolution of transition field and phase mixing regime has been explored.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Yukawa Systems by Particle-in-cell Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Zeiler, Andreas; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2002-12-01

    Aiming at a fully self-consistent numerical model for the simulation of complex plasmas in rf-driven discharges, a highly efficient parallel particle-in-cell code has been developed, allowing for realizations of up to one billion interacting particles. As a first test case, we consider a Yukawa system which represents the simplest approximation of a complex plasma. The Yukawa approach where the dust particles are dressed with an isotropic Debye potential can be regarded as a low-order description of the dust-plasma interaction in the bulk a rf-driven complex plasma, away from the electrode sheaths. The simulation code is tested by examining a liquid-solid phase transition, i.e., the formation of a face-centered-cubic Yukawa crystal. This is done in a periodic-cube sub-volume, containing 13,824 dust particles, which corresponds to a total system size of ≈ 884,000 particles.

  20. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Gas Ionization by Short Intense Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre; Bruhwiler, David; Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Catravas, Palma; Toth, Csaba; Shadwick, Brad; Cary, John; Giacone, Rodolfo; Verboncoeur, John; Mardahl, Peter

    2001-10-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can generate accelerating gradients orders of magnitude larger than those obtained in conventional metal structures. In many LWFA experiments, the leading edge of the short, intense laser pulse completely ionizes a background neutral gas. An important question is the effect of laser ionization on the evolution of the laser pulse. Dispersive effects can modify the length and shape of the pulse as it propagates through the gas/plasma. Pulse steepening or break-up can affect the growth of the plasma wake. We will present particle-in-cell simulations using the ADK [M.V. Ammosov et al., Sov. Phys. JETP 64, p. 1191 (1986)] tunneling ionization model in the XOOPIC [J.P. Verboncoeur et al., J. Comp. Phys. 104, p. 321 (1993)] code. These simulations will be compared with experimental LWFA results from the l'OASIS laboratory of LBNL [W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, p. 2510 (2001)].

  1. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  2. Improved understanding of the ball-pen probe through particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy-Sugrue, S.; Harrison, J.; Walkden, N. R.; Bryant, P.; Bradley, J. W.

    2017-05-01

    Ball-pen probes (BPP) have been deployed in the SOL of numerous tokamak experiments and low-temperature magnetised plasmas to make direct measurements of the plasma potential and electron temperature. Despite strong empirical evidence for the success of the BPP it lacks a theoretical underpinning of its collection mechanism. In this paper we investigate the capability of the probe to measure the plasma potential by means of particle-in-cell simulations. The BPP is found to float at a potential offset from the plasma potential by a factor {T}{{e}}{α }{{BPP}}. By simulating BPPs and Langmuir probes, excellent agreement has been found between the measured electron temperature and the specified source temperature. The transport mechanism for both ions and electrons has been determined. E × B drifts are observed to drive electrons and ions down the tunnel. This mechanism is sensitive to the diameter of the probe.

  3. Particle in cell simulation of a radiofrequency plasma jet expanding in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Hawkins, R.; Boswell, R. W.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient (˜133 Pa-0.133 Pa) on electron and ion energy distributions in a radiofrequency (rf at 13.56 MHz) argon plasma jet is studied using a 1D-3v Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC domain is three times that of the 0.018 m long plasma cavity and the total simulation time is 1 ms. Ion heating and acceleration up to a drift velocity about 2000 m s-1 are measured along the jet's main expansion axis. Elastic and charge exchange ion-neutral collisions histograms computed at equilibrium during 0.74 ms show that charge exchange collisions act as the main neutral heating mechanism.

  4. Measuring Landau damping in Particle-in-Cell simulations using particles of different charge-weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Sarkar, A.; Cao, Y.-X.; Huang, M. C.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    We study whether putting more particles in ``region of interest (ROI)'' in phase space can efficiently increase Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation accuracy. We use Landau damping of a plasma wave as a figure of merit and set the ROI near the phase velocity of the wave. Improvement in Landau damping rate measurement is observed in 1D PIC simulations when employing more particles in the ROI but the effect is not monotonic. This is partly due to energy transfer from particles of large charge weights to those of smaller weights through the electric fields. Possible strategies to mitigate the energy transfer will also be discussed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1314734 and by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0012316.

  5. Optimizing physical parameters in 1-D particle-in-cell simulations with Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John P.; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation tool, OOPD1, is wrapped in the Python programming language, enabling automated algorithmic optimization of physical and numerical parameters. The Python-based environment exposes internal variables, enabling modification of simulation parameters, as well as run-time generation of new diagnostics based on calculations with internal data. For problems requiring an iterative optimization approach, this enables a programmable interactive feedback loop style simulation model, where the input to one simulation is a programmable function of the output of the previous one. This approach is applied to field-emission of electrons in a diode, in order to explore space charge effects in bipolar flow. We find an analytical solution for maximizing the space-charge limited current through a diode with an upstream ion current, and confirm the result with simulations, demonstrating the efficacy of the feedback scheme. We also demonstrate and analyze a modeling approach for scaling the ion mass, which can shorten simulation time without changing the ultimate result. The methods presented can be generalized to handle other applications where it is desirable to evolve simulation parameters based on algorithmic results from the simulation, including models in which physical or numerical parameter tuning is used to converge or optimize a system in one or more variables.

  6. Three-dimensional simple conformal symplectic particle-in-cell methods for simulations of high power microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Zaigao; Cheng, Guoxin; Wang, Pan

    2016-08-01

    To overcome the staircase error in the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, a three dimensional (3D) simple conformal (SC) symplectic PIC method is presented in this paper. The SC symplectic finite integration technique (FIT) scheme is used to advance the electromagnetic fields without reduction of the time step. Particles are emitted from conformal boundaries with the charge conserving emission scheme and moved by using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The symplectic formulas of auxiliary-differential equation, complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (ADE-CFS-PML) are given for truncating the open boundaries, numerical results show that the maximum relative error of truncation is less than 90 dB. Based on the surface equivalence theorem, the computing algorithms of conformal signals' injection are given, numerical results show that the algorithms can give the right mode patterns and the errors of cutoff frequencies could be as low as 0.1%. To verify the conformal algorithms, a magnetically insulated line oscillator is simulated, and the results are compared to those provided by using the 2.5D UNIPIC code, which show that they agree well. The results also show that the high order symplectic integration method can suppress the numerical Cherenkov radiation.

  7. Suprathermal particle energization in dipolarization fronts: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, San; Angelopoulos, V.; Fu, Huishan

    2016-10-01

    Within dipolarization fronts (DFs) in the Earth's magnetotail, significant magnetic energy is converted to plasma energy, and a significant portion of the electrons and ions therein are accelerated to suprathermal energies. The mechanism that produces these suprathermal particles while simultaneously reducing magnetic field energy is poorly understood, however. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to explore this process in conventional flux bundle-type DFs, which are formed by single X line reconnection and connected to the Earth, and in newly proposed flux rope-type DFs, which are formed and bracketed by two X lines. In flux bundle-type DFs, electrons are betatron accelerated near the Bz peak, and ions are energized through reflection at the front. In flux rope-type DFs, most suprathermal electrons and ions are confined to the flux rope's magnetic structure and are accelerated through repeated reflections at the structure's two ends.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation of a double stage Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daren; Song, Maojiang; Liu, H.; Ding, Y. J.; Li, Hong

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of inventing a double stage Hall thruster is to control the propellant ionization and ion acceleration independently. In order to better understand the physics involved in such a thruster, an improved particle-in-cell method is used in this paper to simulate the discharge process. It is shown that the numerical features in the ionization stage accord well with the experimental results. It is also indicated that the ionization process and the acceleration process cannot be separated completely, as a relatively important ionization still occurs in the acceleration stage. Furthermore, an optimal threshold of ionization voltage in the ionization stage is existed to obtain the most favorable distributions of plasma parameters in the whole discharge channel.

  9. Whistler turbulence forward vs. inverse cascade. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta βe = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in themore » inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.« less

  10. WHISTLER TURBULENCE FORWARD CASCADE VERSUS INVERSE CASCADE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta β {sub e} = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  11. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  12. Combining electromagnetic gyro-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations with collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Christoph; Kleiber, Ralf; Könies, Axel

    2017-09-01

    It has been an open question whether for electromagnetic gyro-kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations pitch-angle collisions and the recently introduced pullback transformation scheme (Mishchenko et al., 2014; Kleiber et al., 2016) are consistent. This question is positively answered by comparing the PIC code EUTERPE with an approach based on an expansion of the perturbed distribution function in eigenfunctions of the pitch-angle collision operator (Legendre polynomials) to solve the electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with collisions in slab geometry. It is shown how both approaches yield the same results for the frequency and damping rate of a kinetic Alfvén wave and how the perturbed distribution function is substantially changed by the presence of pitch-angle collisions.

  13. Half-Cell RF Gun Simulations with the Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Busby, R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Kewisch, J.; Kayran, D.; Calaga, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-22

    We have simulated Brookhaven National Laboratory's half-cell superconducting RF gun design for a proposed high-current ERL using the three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code VORPAL. VORPAL computes the fully self-consistent electromagnetic fields produced by the electron bunches, meaning that it accurately models space-charge effects as well as bunch-to-bunch beam loading effects and the effects of higher-order cavity modes, though these are beyond the scope of this paper. We compare results from VORPAL to the well-established space-charge code PARMELA, using RF fields produced by SUPERFISH, as a benchmarking exercise in which the two codes should agree well.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropy ${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; ...

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropymore » $${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.« less

  16. Fully implicit, energy-conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations in multiple dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Chen, Guangye

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a new, implicit 2D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations, based on the Vlasov-Darwin model. The Vlasov-Darwin model avoids radiative noise issues, but is elliptic and renders explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Absolutely stable, fully implicit, charge and energy conserving PIC algorithms for both electrostatic and electromagnetic regimes have been recently developed in 1D. In this study, we build on these recent successes to develop a multi-D, fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model. The algorithm conserves global energy, local charge, and particle canonical-momentum exactly. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner, allowing the efficient use of large timesteps compared to the explicit CFL. We demonstrate the potential of the approach with various numerical examples in 2D-3V.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulations of electromagnetic turbulence with kinetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Jerome

    2006-04-01

    The accurate treatment of electron dynamics in global (toroidal) particle-in-cell simulations is a considerable challenge from the numerical standpoint. The large thermal velocity of the (transit) electrons imposes a stringent condition on the time step for a brute force method. In the electrostatic case, it has been shown that the splitting scheme [1] for the electron dynamics is more accurate, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes, that the conventional perturbative delta f scheme. We present the electromagnetic version of the splitting scheme and specifically discuss the issues of energy and momentum conservation properties, the importance of the initial loading in phase space [2], and the spatial and time resolution requirements.[1] J.L.V. Lewandowski, Physics of Plasmas, 8, 3204 (2003).[2] J.L.V. Lewandowski, Physics Letters A, 313, 291 (2003).

  18. Parametric decay of a parallel propagating monochromatic whistler wave: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yangguang; Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Wang, Shui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, by using one-dimensional (1-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the parametric decay of a parallel propagating monochromatic whistler wave with various wave frequencies and amplitudes. The pump whistler wave can decay into a backscattered daughter whistler wave and an ion acoustic wave, and the decay instability grows more rapidly with the increase of the frequency or amplitude. When the frequency or amplitude is sufficiently large, a multiple decay process may occur, where the daughter whistler wave undergoes a secondary decay into an ion acoustic wave and a forward propagating whistler wave. We also find that during the parametric decay a considerable part of protons can be accelerated along the background magnetic field by the enhanced ion acoustic wave through the Landau resonance. The implication of the parametric decay to the evolution of whistler waves in Earth's magnetosphere is also discussed in the paper.

  19. New Particle-in-Cell Code for Numerical Simulation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Rui Li

    2010-05-01

    We present a first look at the new code for self-consistent, 2D simulations of beam dynamics affected by the coherent synchrotron radiation. The code is of the particle-in-cell variety: the beam bunch is sampled by point-charge particles, which are deposited on the grid; the corresponding forces on the grid are then computed using retarded potentials according to causality, and interpolated so as to advance the particles in time. The retarded potentials are evaluated by integrating over the 2D path history of the bunch, with the charge and current density at the retarded time obtained from interpolation of the particle distributions recorded at discrete timesteps. The code is benchmarked against analytical results obtained for a rigid-line bunch. We also outline the features and applications which are currently being developed.

  20. Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L.; Pogorelov, I.V.

    2005-05-13

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.

  1. Multi-dimensional, fully implicit, exactly conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations in curvilinear geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a new, conservative, fully implicit 2D3V Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm in curvilinear geometry for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations. Unlike standard explicit PIC schemes, fully implicit PIC algorithms are unconditionally stable and allow exact discrete energy and charge conservation. Here, we extend these algorithms to curvilinear geometry. The algorithm retains its exact conservation properties in curvilinear grids. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner for weakly to modestly magnetized plasmas, which allows efficient use of large timesteps, O (√{mi/me}c/veT) larger than the explicit CFL. In this presentation, we will introduce the main algorithmic components of the approach, and demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 1D (slow shock) and 2D (island coalescense).

  2. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of THz Coherent Transition Radiation from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, D.; Messmer, P.; Cary, J. R.; Leemans, W. P.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.; Geddes, C.; van Tilborg, J.; Shadwick, B.

    2004-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) concepts are characterized by ultra-high gradients and ultra-short (tens of fs) bunch lengths. Non-invasive bunch-length diagnostics, at or very near the plasma exit, are key to continuing the rapid advances in LWFA technology. These short bunches can radiate strongly at THz frequencies via coherent transition radiation (CTR) as they exit the plasma [1]. Careful measurements of the THz spectrum will provide the necessary bunch-length diagnostic [2], once the effects of various secondary complications have been quantified. Particle-in-cell simulations, using the VORPAL code [3] are being used to characterize CTR emitted from a self-modulated LWFA. The status of this on-going work will be presented. [1] Wim Leemans et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 074802-1 (2003). [2] C. Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E 69, 016501 (2004). [3] C. Nieter and J. Cary, J. Comp. Phys. 196, 488 (2004).

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of laser beat-wave magnetization of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Genoni, T. C.; Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-03-15

    The interaction of two lasers with a difference frequency near that of the ambient plasma frequency produces beat waves that can resonantly accelerate thermal electrons. These beat waves can be used to drive electron current and thereby embed magnetic fields into the plasma [Welch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 225002 (2012)]. In this paper, we present two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the beat-wave current-drive process over a wide range of angles between the injected lasers, laser intensities, and plasma densities. We discuss the application of this technique to the magnetization of dense plasmas, motivated in particular by the problem of forming high-β plasma targets in a standoff manner for magneto-inertial fusion. The feasibility of a near-term experiment embedding magnetic fields using lasers with micron-scale wavelengths into a ∼10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}-density plasma is assessed.

  4. Whistler turbulence forward vs. inverse cascade. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta βe = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  5. Taking larger timesteps with speed-limited particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory; Cary, John

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is often impractical because it includes too much unnecessary physics. For example, to avoid instability in many simulations the timestep must be small enough to resolve the plasma frequency, even if plasma oscillations do not play a significant role. Other methods (e.g., MHD/fluid and hybrid approaches) allow faster simulation, but often don't include enough physics. A new method, speed-limited PIC (SLPIC) simulation, offers kinetic simulation with an arbitrary-strength approximation tied to the timestep. With a small (standard PIC) timestep, SLPIC is identical to PIC, while a larger timestep (e.g., large compared to the inverse plasma frequency) results in the relaxation of fast particles over slower timescales. SLPIC is therefore useful in situations where the particle distribution functions change slowly compared to the timestep required by PIC. For example, SLPIC can simulate collisionless sheaths with a timestep hundreds of times larger than the inverse plasma frequency. SLPIC involves relatively isolated changes of a standard PIC code and poses no extra difficulties for parallelism; complexities of PIC, such as field solvers, collisions, and boundary conditions, carry over naturally to SLPIC with little change. This work is supported by NASA.

  6. A methodology for the rigorous verification of Particle-in-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Fabio; Beadle, Carrie F.; Ricci, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    A methodology to perform a rigorous verification of Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations is presented, both for assessing the correct implementation of the model equations (code verification) and for evaluating the numerical uncertainty affecting the simulation results (solution verification). The proposed code verification methodology is a generalization of the procedure developed for plasma simulation codes based on finite difference schemes that was described by Riva et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 062301 (2014)] and consists of an order-of-accuracy test using the method of manufactured solutions. The generalization of the methodology for PIC codes consists of accounting for numerical schemes intrinsically affected by statistical noise and providing a suitable measure of the distance between continuous, analytical distribution functions and finite samples of computational particles. The solution verification consists of quantifying both the statistical and discretization uncertainties. The statistical uncertainty is estimated by repeating the simulation with different pseudorandom number generator seeds. For the discretization uncertainty, the Richardson extrapolation is used to provide an approximation of the analytical solution and the grid convergence index is used as an estimate of the relative discretization uncertainty. The code verification methodology is successfully applied to a PIC code that numerically solves the one-dimensional, electrostatic, collisionless Vlasov-Poisson system. The solution verification methodology is applied to quantify the numerical uncertainty affecting the two-stream instability growth rate, which is numerically evaluated thanks to a PIC simulation.

  7. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-12-17

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta βe = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field Bo, and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to Bo. The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating.

  8. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-12-17

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta βe = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field Bo,more » and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to Bo. The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating.« less

  9. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Atmospheric Pressure He/2%H2O Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Graves, D. B.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure micro-discharges in contact with liquid surfaces are of increasing interest, especially in the bio-medical field. We conduct 1D3v particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a voltage-driven 1 mm width atmospheric pressure He/2% H2O plasma discharge in series with an 0.5 mm width liquid H2O layer and a 1mm width quartz dielectric layer. A previously developed two-temperature hybrid global model of atmospheric pressure He/H2O discharges was used to determine the most important species and collisional reactions to use in the PIC simulations. We found that H13O6+, H5O3-, and electrons were the most prominent charged species, while most of the metastable helium He* was quenched via Penning ionization. The ion-induced secondary emission coefficient γi was assumed to be 0.15 at all surfaces. A series of simulations were conducted at 27.12 MHz with Jrf ~ 800-2200 A/m2. The H2O rotational and vibrational excitation losses were so high that electrons reached the walls at thermal temperatures. We also simulated a much lower frequency case of 50 kHz with Vrf = 10 kV. In this case, the discharge ran in a pure time-varying γ-mode. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Science Contract DE-SC0001939.

  10. Accuracy of momentum and gyrodensity transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, B. F.; Villard, L.

    2014-05-15

    Gyrokinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations based on conservative Lagrangian formalisms admit transport equations for conserved quantities such as gyrodensity and toroidal momentum, and these can be derived for arbitrary wavelength, even though previous applications have used the long-wavelength approximation. In control-variate PIC simulations, a consequence of the different treatment of the background (f{sub 0}) and perturbed parts (δf), when a splitting f = f{sub 0} + δf is performed, is that analytical transport relations for the relevant fluxes and moments are only reproduced in the large marker number limit. The transport equations for f can be used to write the inconsistency in the perturbed quantities explicitly in terms of the sampling of the background distribution f{sub 0}. This immediately allows estimates of the error in consistency of momentum transport in control-variate PIC simulations. This inconsistency tends to accumulate secularly and is not directly affected by the sources and noise control in the system. Although physical tokamaks often rotate quite strongly, the standard gyrokinetic formalism assumes weak perpendicular flows, comparable to the drift speed. For systems with such weak flows, maintaining acceptably small relative errors requires that a number of markers scale with the fourth power of the linear system size to consistently resolve long-wavelength evolution. To avoid this unfavourable scaling, an algorithm for exact gyrodensity transport has been developed, and this is shown to allow accurate simulations with an order of magnitude fewer markers.

  11. Electron and Ion Heating By Whistler Turbulence: Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. S.; Gary, S. P.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma have been carried out to study the consequent heating of both electrons and ions. An initial relatively isotropic spectrum of long-wavelength whistler mode fluctuations is imposed upon the system. The simulations follow the temporal evolution of the field fluctuations as they decay via a forward cascade into a broadband, turbulent spectrum at shorter wavelengths with an anisotropy in the sense of stronger fluctuation energy at k||, where the subscripts denote directions relative to the background magnetic field. As in previous whistler turbulence PIC simulations, electrons are heated with T||e >> Tperp,e. Consistent with the results of Saito and Nariyuki (2014) the ions are also heated, although more weakly than the electrons and with Tperp,i >> T||i. Larger simulation box sizes enable longer wavelength turbulence and lead to comparatively greater ion heating. Ion heating as a function of βe and initial fluctuation amplitudes is also studied. Saito, S., and Y. Nariyuki (2014), Perpendicular Ion Acceleration in Whistler Turbulence, Phys. Plasmas, 21, 042303.

  12. Energy dissipation by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Peter Gary, S.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-05-15

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma model. The simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes and follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into a broadband, anisotropic, turbulent spectrum at shorter wavelengths. For relatively small levels of the initial fluctuation energy ϵ{sub e}, linear collisionless damping provides most of the dissipation of the turbulence. But as ϵ{sub e} and the total dissipation increase, linear damping becomes less important and, especially at β{sub e} ≪ 1, nonlinear processes become stronger. The PDFs and kurtoses of the magnetic field increments in the simulations suggest that intermittency in whistler turbulence generally increases with increasing ϵ{sub e} and β{sub e}. Correlation coefficient calculations imply that the current structure dissipation also increases with increasing ϵ{sub e} and β{sub e}, and that the nonlinear dissipation processes in these simulations are primarily associated with regions of localized current structures.

  13. Particle-in-cell simulations of particle energization from low Mach number fast mode shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Workman, Jared C.; Blackman, Eric G.; Ren, Chuang; Siller, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often studied in the high Mach number limit but weakly compressive fast shocks can occur in magnetic reconnection outflows and are considered to be a site of particle energization in solar flares. Here we study the microphysics of such perpendicular, low Mach number collisionless shocks using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with a reduced ion/electron mass ratio and employ a moving wall boundary method for initial generation of the shock. This moving wall method allows for more control of the shock speed, smaller simulation box sizes, and longer simulation times than the commonly used fixed wall, reflection method of shock formation. Our results, which are independent of the shock formation method, reveal the prevalence shock drift acceleration (SDA) of both electron and ions in a purely perpendicular shock with Alfvén Mach number MA=6.8 and ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure β=8. We determine the respective minimum energies required for electrons and ions to incur SDA. We derive a theoretical electron distribution via SDA that compares to the simulation results. We also show that a modified two-stream instability due to the incoming and reflecting ions in the shock transition region acts as the mechanism to generate collisionless plasma turbulence that sustains the shock.

  14. Extended Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Ganymede's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; Jia, Xianzhe; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Chen, Yuxi; Daldorff, Lars K. S.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Borovikov, Dmitry; Haiducek, John D.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed the implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solarwind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The MHD with embedded PIC domains (MHO-EPIC) algorithm Is a two-way coupled kinetic-fluid model. As one of the very first applications of the MHD-EPIC algorithm, we simulate the Interaction between Jupiter's magnetospherlc plasma and Ganymede's magnetosphere. We compare the MHO-EPIC simulations with pure Hall MHD simulations and compare both model results with Galileo observations to assess the Importance of kinetic effects In controlling the configuration and dynamics of Ganymede's magnetosphere. We find that the Hall MHD and MHO-EPIC solutions are qualitatively similar, but there are significant quantitative differences. In particular. the density and pressure inside the magnetosphere show different distributions. For our baseline grid resolution the PIC solution is more dynamic than the Hall MHD simulation and it compares significantly better with the Galileo magnetic measurements than the Hall MHD solution. The power spectra of the observed and simulated magnetic field fluctuations agree extremely well for the MHD-EPIC model. The MHO-EPIC simulation also produced a few flux transfer events (FTEs) that have magnetic signatures very similar to an observed event. The simulation shows that the FTEs often exhibit complex 3-0 structures with their orientations changing substantially between the equatorial plane and the Galileo trajectory, which explains the magnetic signatures observed during the magnetopause crossings. The computational cost of the MHO-EPIC simulation was only about 4 times more than that of the Hall MHD simulation.

  15. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, S. G.; Jin, Y. S.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, G. J.; Shon, C. H.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons are presented. 300 GHz electromagnetic wave generation in a resonant cavity is analyzed by using a 3D simulation model in which all the geometric parameters (such as the grid thickness, repeller shape, beam radius, etc.) are described. When an electron beam of an energy of 1.0 keV and a net current of 8.9 mA is used, the maximum electronic efficiency of energy transfer is observed when the gap transit angle is 0.7{pi} rad, and the efficiency saturates when the beam current is over 10 mA. Space charge forces produce a shift in the optimum repeller voltage. It is also shown that the effect of the beam temperature is not critical, even though the bunching wavelength of the electron beam is several times smaller than that in conventional vacuum electron devices. Our simulation results show that a microfabricated 300 GHz reflex klystron can directly generate electromagnetic waves with output power levels of several tens of milliwatts.

  16. Particle-In-Cell Simulation on the Characteristics of a Receiving Antenna in Space Plasma Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2008-12-31

    We applied the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulation to the analysis of receiving antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. In the analysis, we set up external waves in a simulation region and receive them with a numerical antenna model placed in the simulation region. Using this method, we evaluated the effective length of electric field antennas used for plasma wave investigations conducted by scientific spacecraft. We particularly focused on the effective length of an electric field instrument called MEFISTO for a future mission to Mercury: BepiColombo. We first confirmed that the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is basically longer than that of a simple dipole antenna for both electrostatic and electromagnetic plasma waves. By applying the principle of a voltmeter, the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is predicted to become identical to the separation between two sensor-conductor's midpoints. However, the numerical result revealed that the actual effective length becomes shorter than the prediction, which is caused by the shorting-out effect due to the presence of a center boom conductor between the two sensor conductors. Since the above effect is difficult to treat theoretically, the present numerical method is a powerful tool for further quantitative evaluation of the antenna characteristics.

  17. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-01

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  18. Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation of heat flux mitigation using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüskow, Karl Felix; Kemnitz, S.; Bandelow, G.; Duras, J.; Kahnfeld, D.; Matthias, P.; Schneider, R.; Konigorski, D.

    2016-10-01

    The particle-in-cell (PIC) method was used to simulate heat flux mitigation experiments with partially ionised argon. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of reducing heat flux towards a target using magnetic fields. Modelling using the PIC method is able to reproduce the heat flux mitigation qualitatively. This is driven by modified electron transport. Electrons are magnetised and react directly to the external magnetic field. In addition, an increase of radial turbulent transport is also needed to explain the experimental observations in the model. Close to the target an increase of electron density is created. Due to quasi-neutrality, ions follow the electrons. Charge exchange collisions couple the dynamics of the neutrals to the ions and reduce the flow velocity of neutrals by radial momentum transport and subsequent losses. By this, the dominant heat-transport channel by neutrals gets reduced and a reduction of the heat deposition, similar to the experiment, is observed. Using the simulation a diagnostic module for optical emission is developed and its results are compared with spectroscopic measurements and photos from the experiment. The results of this study are in good agreement with the experiment. Experimental observations such as a shrank bright emission region close to the nozzle exit, an additional emission in front of the target and an overall change in colour to red are reproduced by the simulation.

  19. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-15

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  20. Rescaling of equilibrium magnetically insulated flow theory based on results from particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P.F.; Schumer, J.W.

    2006-06-15

    By relaxing an assumption on the electron density in the flow layer used in magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) theory, the theory is rescaled to match particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results, providing a more accurate determination of the line voltage from the measurement of anode and cathode currents over a broad range of parameters. Results from the PIC simulations also show that self-limited flow is not determined by either a minimum-current or a minimum-energy condition, but rather is closer to saturated flow. In addition, analytic expressions are obtained for the first time for the self-limited flow impedance Z{sub f}{sup SL}(V)/Z{sub 0} and the self-limited anode and cathode currents Z{sub 0}I{sub a}{sup SL}(V) and Z{sub 0}I{sub c}{sup SL}(V), where Z{sub 0} is the vacuum impedance of the line and V is the voltage. Similar expressions for both minimum-current flow and minimum-energy flow are also obtained. Results are compared with other models for MITL flow and show that this rescaled MITL flow model is most consistent with the PIC simulation results. Finally, it is shown that a matched load condition can never be satisfied for self-limited (or line-limited) flow.

  1. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Asymmetric Dual Frequency Capacitive Discharge Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Alan; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2003-10-01

    Dual frequency capacitive discharges are finding increasing use for etching in the microelectronics industry. In the ideal case, the high frequency power (typically 27.1-160 MHz) controls the plasma density and the low frequency power (typically 2-13.56 MHz) controls the ion energy. The electron power deposition and the dynamics of dual frequency rf sheaths are not well understood. We report on particle-in-cell computer simulations of an asymmetric dual frequency argon discharge. The simulations are performed in 1D (radial) geometry using the bounded electrostatic code XPDP1. Operating parameters are 27.1/2 MHz high/low frequencies, 10/13 cm inner/outer radii, 3-200 mTorr pressures, and 10^9-10^11 cm-3 densities. We determine the power deposition and sheath dynamics for the high frequency power alone, and with various added low frequency powers. We compare the simulation results to simple global models of dual frequency discharges. Support provided by Lam Research, NSF Grant ECS-0139956, California industries, and UC-SMART Contract SM99-10051.

  2. Particle-in-cell Simulations Of Particle Energization From Low Mach Number Fast Mode Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chuang; Blackman, E.; Park, J.; Siller, R.; Workman, J.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless perpendicular mangetosonic shocks relevant for termination shocks during solar flares are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with a reduced ion/electron mass ratio and a moving wall boundary condition. Compared to the reflection boundary condition, the moving wall method can control the shock speed and allows for smaller box sizes and longer simulation times in the study of shocks. In a purely perpendicular shock with the Alfven Mach number of 6.8 and plasma beta of 8. Electron and ion acceleration via shock drift acceleration (SDA) is observed. The modified two-stream instability due to the incoming and reflecting ions in the shock transition region is identified to be a possible turbulent dissipation mechanism. We determine the respective minimum energies required for electrons and ions to incur SDA. We derive a theoretical electron distribution via SDA that compares favorably to the simulation results. This work was supported by DOE under Grant DE-FG02-06ER54879 and Cooperate Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302, by NSF under Grant PHY-0903797, and by NSFC under Grant No. 11129503. The research used resources of NERSC. We also thank the OSIRIS consortium for the use of OSIRIS.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGES

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; ...

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total forcemore » on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.« less

  5. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-01

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Toth, G.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.; Markidis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is much more dynamic than other planetary magnetospheres because of Mercury's weak intrinsic magnetic field and its proximity to the Sun. Magnetic reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz phenomena occur in Mercury's magnetopause and magnetotail at higher frequencies than in other planetary magnetosphere. For instance, chains of flux transfer events (FTEs) on the magnetopause, have been frequentlyobserved by the the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft (Slavin et al., 2012). Because ion Larmor radius is comparable to typical spatial scales in Mercury's magnetosphere, finite Larmor radius effects need to be accounted for. In addition, it is important to take in account non-ideal dissipation mechanisms to accurately describe magnetic reconnection. A kinetic approach allows us to model these phenomena accurately. However, kinetic global simulations, even for small-size magnetospheres like Mercury's, are currently unfeasible because of the high computational cost. In this work, we carry out global simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere with the recently developed MHD-EPIC model, which is a two-way coupling of the extended magnetohydrodynamic (XMHD) code BATS-R-US with the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D. The PIC model can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient. We will present our preliminary results and comparison with MESSENGER observations.

  7. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.

  8. Kinetic structures of quasi-perpendicular shocks in global particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ivy Bo Markidis, Stefano; Laure, Erwin; Johlander, Andreas; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Henri, Pierre; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-09-15

    We carried out global Particle-in-Cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a magnetosphere to study the kinetic collisionless physics in super-critical quasi-perpendicular shocks. After an initial simulation transient, a collisionless bow shock forms as a result of the interaction of the solar wind and a planet magnetic dipole. The shock ramp has a thickness of approximately one ion skin depth and is followed by a trailing wave train in the shock downstream. At the downstream edge of the bow shock, whistler waves propagate along the magnetic field lines and the presence of electron cyclotron waves has been identified. A small part of the solar wind ion population is specularly reflected by the shock while a larger part is deflected and heated by the shock. Solar wind ions and electrons are heated in the perpendicular directions. Ions are accelerated in the perpendicular direction in the trailing wave train region. This work is an initial effort to study the electron and ion kinetic effects developed near the bow shock in a realistic magnetic field configuration.

  9. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Preformed Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-06-27

    Two critical issues in the amplification of laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma slabs are the saturation mechanism of the amplification effect (which determines the maximum attainable output intensity of a Raman amplifier) and the optimal plasma density for amplification. Previous investigations [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 82 (22):4448-4451, 1999] identified forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities of the amplifying seed as the likely saturation mechanisms and lead to an estimated unfocused output intensities of 10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2}. The optimal density for amplification is determined by the competing constraints of minimizing the plasma density so as to minimize the growth rate of the instabilities leading to saturation but also maintaining the plasma sufficiently dense that the driven Langmuir wave responsible for backscattering does not break prematurely. Here, particle-in-cell code are simulations presented which verify that saturation of backward Raman amplification does occur at intensities of {approx}10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2} by forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities. The optimal density for amplification in a plasma with the representative temperature of T(sub)e = 200 eV is also shown in these simulations to be intermediate between the cold plasma wave-breaking density and the density limit found by assuming a water bag electron distribution function.

  10. Particle-in-cell Simulation of Electron Acceleration in Solar Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, G.; Nordlund, Å.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate electron acceleration resulting from three-dimensional magnetic reconnection between an emerging, twisted magnetic flux rope and a pre-existing weak, open magnetic field. We first follow the rise of an unstable, twisted flux tube with a resistive MHD simulation where the numerical resolution is enhanced by using fixed mesh refinement. As in previous MHD investigations of similar situations, the rise of the flux tube into the pre-existing inclined coronal magnetic field results in the formation of a solar coronal jet. A snapshot of the MHD model is then used as an initial and boundary condition for a particle-in-cell simulation, using up to half a billion cells and over 20 billion charged particles. Particle acceleration occurs mainly in the reconnection current sheet, with accelerated electrons displaying a power law in the energy probability distribution with an index of around -1.5. The main acceleration mechanism is a systematic electric field, striving to maintaining the electric current in the current sheet against losses caused by electrons not being able to stay in the current sheet for more than a few seconds at a time.

  11. 2D Kinetic Particle in Cell Simulations of a Shear-Flow Stabilized Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummel, Kurt; Higginson, Drew; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; McLean, Harry; Shumlak, Uri; Nelson, Brian; Golingo, Raymond; Claveau, Elliot; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Team; University of Washington Team

    2016-10-01

    The Z-pinch is a relatively simple and attractive potential fusion reactor design, but attempts to develop such a reactor have consistently struggled to overcome Z-pinch instabilities. The ``sausage'' and ``kink'' modes are among the most robust and prevalent Z-pinch instabilities, but theory and simulations suggest that axial flow-shear, dvz / dr ≠ 0 , can suppress these modes. Experiments have confirmed that Z-pinch plasmas with embedded axial flow-shear display a significantly enhanced resilience to the sausage and kink modes at a demonstration current of 50kAmps. A new experiment is under way to test the concept at higher current, and efforts to model these plasmas are being expanded. The performance and stability of these devices will depend on features like the plasma viscosity, anomalous resistivity, and finite Larmor radius effects, which are most accurately characterized in kinetic models. To predict these features, kinetic simulations using the particle in cell code LSP are now in development, and initial benchmarking and 2D stability analyses of the sausage mode are presented here. These results represent the first kinetic modeling of the flow-shear stabilized Z-pinch. This work is funded by the USDOE/ARPAe Alpha Program. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Kinetic Structures of Quasi-Perpendicular Shocks in Global Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, I. B.; Markidis, S.; Laure, E.; Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Pierre, H.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out global Particle-in-Cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a magnetosphere to study the kinetic collisionless physics in super-critical quasi-perpendicular shocks. After an initial simulation transient, a collisionless bow shock forms as a result of the interaction of the solar wind and a planet magnetic dipole. The shock ramp has a thickness of approximately one ion skin depth and is followed by a trailing wave train in the shock downstream. At the downstream edge of the bow shock, whistler waves propagate along the magnetic field lines and the presence of electron cyclotron waves has been identified. A small part of the solar wind ion population is specularly reflected by the shock while a larger part is deflected and heated by the shock. Solar wind ions and electrons are heated in the perpendicular directions. Ions are accelerated in the perpendicular direction in the trailing wave train region. This work is an initial effort to study the electron and ion kinetic effects developed near the bow shock in a realistic magnetic field configuration.

  13. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Ionizing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-06-27

    By using the amplifying laser pulse in a plasma-based backward Raman laser amplifier to generate the plasma by photo-ionization of a gas simultaneous with the amplification process, possible instabilities of the pumping laser pulse can be avoided. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to study this amplification mechanism, and earlier results using more elementary models of the Raman interaction are verified [D.S. Clark and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas, 9 (6): 2772-2780, 2002]. The effects (unique to amplification in ionizing plasmas and not included in previous simulations) of blue-shifting of the pump and seed laser pulses and the generation of a wake are observed not significantly to impact the amplification process. As expected theoretically, the peak output intensity is found to be limited to I {approx} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} by forward Raman scattering of the amplifying seed. The integrity of the ionization front of the seed pulse against the development of a possible transverse modulation instability is also demonstrated.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Tajima, Toshiki; Farinella, Deano; Shin, Youngmin; Mourou, Gerard; Wheeler, Jonathan; Taborek, Peter; Chen, Pisin; Dollar, Franklin; Shen, Baifei

    2016-10-18

    Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ~O(10–100) MeV. Here, our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Tajima, Toshiki; Farinella, Deano; ...

    2016-10-18

    Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In additionmore » to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ~O(10–100) MeV. Here, our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.« less

  16. MHD-EPIC: Extended Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Ganymede's Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed theimplicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-USmagnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions wherekinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. TheBATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest ofthe computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description issufficient. As one of the very first applications of the MHD-EPICalgorithm (Daldorff et al. 2014, JCP, 268, 236) we simulate theinteraction between Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma with Ganymede'smagnetosphere, where the separation of kinetic and global scalesappears less severe than for the Earth's magnetosphere. Because theexternal Jovian magnetic field remains in an anti-parallel orientationwith respect to Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field, magneticreconnection is believed to be the major process that couples the twomagnetospheres. As the PIC model is able to describe self-consistentlythe electron behavior, our coupled MHD-EPIC model is well suited forinvestigating the nature of magnetic reconnection in thisreconnection-driven mini-magnetosphere. We will compare the MHD-EPICsimulations with pure Hall MHD simulations and compare both modelresults with Galileo plasma and magnetic field measurements to assess therelative importance of ion and electron kinetics in controlling theconfiguration and dynamics of Ganymede's magnetosphere.

  17. The Lacuna Open Boundary Condition For Electromagnetics and Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Eric; Greenwood, Andrew; Christlieb, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    In many typical situations in computational electromagnetics (CEM), a finite computational domain must be truncated with a boundary condition (called an absorbing boundary condition or open boundary condition, among other names) that allows outgoing waves to exit with minimal spurious reflection. One highly successful such boundary condition is the perfectly matched layer (PML), introduced by Berenger in 1994 and refined by others in subsequent years, which provides for minimal reflection at an acceptable computational cost. One difficulty in the use of PML is the need to tune several parameters to suit any given problem. Another open boundary condition is the lacuna open boundary condition (LOBC), pioneered by Ryaben'kii, Tsynkov and others, which makes use of the presence of lacunae, still regions where all waves have left and will no longer return, in solutions to wave equations in odd dimensions with compactly supported sources. We examine the use of the LOBC as a means of truncating Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) meshes in electromagnetic simulations and particle-in-cell simulations of plasmas, and compare to PML in terms of spurious reflections, computational cost and ease of use.

  18. Hybrid particle-in-cell simulations of weakly collisional shock formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spisak, Jacob; Valenzuela, Julio; Kim, Joohwan; Beg, Farhat

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we studied shock formation by the head on collision of supersonic plasma jets using a wire configuration on the compact current driver GenASIS (200 kA in 150 ns). We used two wire materials: aluminum, where radiative cooling is not significant, and copper, where radiation is important to shock dynamics. In both cases, when the jets collide a conical structure develops in time and moves towards the cathode at a speed of 20km/s. Radiation effects are apparent in the copper case, as the shock is thinner than in the Aluminum case and when it starts moving a prominent bow shock develops. Furthermore, the estimated inter jet ion mean free path is larger than the shock width, indicating a magnetic field may help mediate the shock. To investigate the physics of weakly collisional shock formation, we perform two dimensional simulations of two merging, counter-propagating jets using the initial conditions from the experiment. Electrons are treated as a fluid and ions are treated as kinetic particles using the hybrid particle in cell code LSP. We explore how shock formation is affected by radiative cooling and the presence of an external magnetic field. We also carried out simulations where both ions and electrons were treated as fluids. This work was partially financed by Department of Energy Grant Number DE-SC0014493.

  19. Multidimensional, fully implicit, exactly conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We discuss a new, conservative, fully implicit 2D-3V particle-in-cell algorithm for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations, based on the Vlasov-Darwin model. Unlike earlier linearly implicit PIC schemes and standard explicit PIC schemes, fully implicit PIC algorithms are unconditionally stable and allow exact discrete energy and charge conservation. This has been demonstrated in 1D electrostatic and electromagnetic contexts. In this study, we build on these recent algorithms to develop an implicit, orbit-averaged, time-space-centered finite difference scheme for the Darwin field and particle orbit equations for multiple species in multiple dimensions. The Vlasov-Darwin model is very attractive for PIC simulations because it avoids radiative noise issues in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes. The algorithm conserves global energy, local charge, and particle canonical-momentum exactly, even with grid packing. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner, which allows efficient use of large timesteps, O(√{mi/me}c/veT) larger than the explicit CFL. In this presentation, we will introduce the main algorithmic components of the approach, and demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 1D and 2D. Support from the LANL LDRD program and the DOE-SC ASCR office.

  20. Particle-in-cell simulations of tunneling ionization effects in plasma-based accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Giacone, Rodolfo E.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can sustain accelerating gradients on the order of 100 GV/m. If the plasma is not fully ionized, fields of this magnitude will ionize neutral atoms via electron tunneling, which can completely change the dynamics of the plasma wake. Particle-in-cell simulations of a high-field plasma wakefield accelerator, using the OOPIC code [D. L. Bruhwiler et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 101302 (2001)], which includes field-induced tunneling ionization of neutral Li gas, show that the presence of even moderate neutral gas density significantly degrades the quality of the wakefield. The tunneling ionization model in OOPIC has been validated via a detailed comparison with experimental data from the l'OASIS laboratory [W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 174802 (2002)]. The properties of a wake generated directly from a neutral gas are studied, showing that one can recover the peak fields of the fully ionized plasma simulations, if the density of the electron drive bunch is increased such that the bunch rapidly ionizes the gas.

  1. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Tajima, Toshiki; Farinella, Deano; Shin, Youngmin; Mourou, Gerard; Wheeler, Jonathan; Taborek, Peter; Chen, Pisin; Dollar, Franklin; Shen, Baifei

    2016-10-01

    Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV /cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ˜O (10 - 100 ) MeV . Our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  2. The Plasma Simulation Code: A modern particle-in-cell code with patch-based load-balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Fox, William; Abbott, Stephen; Ahmadi, Narges; Maynard, Kristofor; Wang, Liang; Ruhl, Hartmut; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the Plasma Simulation Code (PSC), an explicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with support for different order particle shape functions. We review the basic components of the particle-in-cell method as well as the computational architecture of the PSC code that allows support for modular algorithms and data structure in the code. We then describe and analyze in detail a distinguishing feature of PSC: patch-based load balancing using space-filling curves which is shown to lead to major efficiency gains over unbalanced methods and a previously used simpler balancing method.

  3. Non-linear evolution of the diocotron instability in a pulsar electrosphere: two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2009-08-01

    Context: The physics of the pulsar magnetosphere near the neutron star surface remains poorly constrained by observations. Indeed, little is known about its emission mechanism, from radio to high-energy X-ray and gamma-rays. Nevertheless, it is believed that large vacuum gaps exist in this magnetosphere, and a non-neutral plasma partially fills the neutron star surroundings to form an electrosphere in differential rotation. Aims: According to several of our previous works, the equatorial disk in this electrosphere is diocotron and magnetron unstable, at least in the linear regime. To better assess the long term evolution of these instabilities, we study the behavior of the non-neutral plasma using particle simulations. Methods: We designed a two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code in cylindrical coordinates, solving Poisson equation for the electric potential. In the diocotron regime, the equation of motion for particles obeys the electric drift approximation. As in the linear study, the plasma is confined between two conducting walls. Moreover, in order to simulate a pair cascade in the gaps, we add a source term feeding the plasma with charged particles having the same sign as those already present in the electrosphere. Results: First we checked our code by looking for the linear development of the diocotron instability in the same regime as the one used in our previous work, for a plasma annulus and for a typical electrosphere with differential rotation. To very good accuracy, we retrieve the same growth rates, supporting the correctness of our PIC code. Next, we consider the long term non-linear evolution of the diocotron instability. We found that particles tend to cluster together to form a small vortex of high charge density rotating around the axis of the cylinder with only little radial excursion of the particles. This grouping of particles generates new low density or even vacuum gaps in the plasma column. Finally, in more general

  4. Particle-in-cell simulation of coherent and superradiant Smith-Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Yang, Z.; Imasaki, K.; Park, Gun-Sik

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a study of coherent and superradiant Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation with the help of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation model supposes a rectangular grating with period length of 173μm to be driven by a single electron bunch, a train of periodic bunches and a continuous beam, respectively. We chose 40 keV as the initial energy of electrons and therefore the SP radiation frequency falls in the THz regime. From our single bunch simulation we distinguish the true SP radiation separated in time from the emission of the evanescent wave. The evanescent wave radiates from both ends of the grating and is characterized by an angle independent frequency lower than the minimum allowed SP frequency. In order to avoid the buildup of beam bunching from an initially continuous beam, we use a train of periodic bunches to excite the grating and observe the superradiant phenomenon. The repetition frequency of the spatially periodic bunches is assumed to be 300 GHz. We find that the superradiant radiation is only emitted at higher harmonics of this frequency and at the corresponding SP angles. This result conforms to the viewpoint of Andrews and co-workers. The simulation with a continuous beam shows the dependence of the output power on the beam current. The power curve shows two regimes, one for the incoherent SP radiation and the other for the superradiance, which resembles the Dartmouth experimental result. And furthermore, the frequency spectrum shows an apparent difference for the two regimes, which is in contrast to the observations of Urata and co-workers.

  5. Interplay between protons and electrons in a firehose-unstable plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Maneva, Yana

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic plasma instabilities originating from unstable, non-Maxwellian shapes of the velocity distribution functions serve as internal degrees of freedom in plasma dynamics, and play an important role near solar current sheets and in solar wind plasmas. In the presence of strong temperature anisotropy (different thermal spreads in the velocity space with respect to the mean magnetic field), plasmas are unstable either to the firehose mode or to the mirror mode in the case of predominant parallel and perpendicular temperatures, respectively. The growth rates of these instabilities and their thresholds depend on plasma properties, such as the temperature anisotropy and the plasma beta. The physics of the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities becomes even more diverse for various shapes of velocity distribution functions and the particle species of interest. Recent studies based on a linear instability analysis show an interplay in the firehose instability between protons and electrons when the both types of particle species are prone to unstable velocity distribution functions and their instability thresholds. In this work we perform for the first time 3D nonlinear PIC (particle-in-cell) numerical simulations to test for the linear-theory prediction of the simultaneous proton-electron firehose instability. The simulation setup allows us not only to evaluate the growth rate of each firehose instability, but also to track its nonlinear evolution and the related wave-particle interactions such as the pitch-angle scattering or saturation effects. The specialty of our simulation is that the magnetic and electric fields have a low numerical noise level by setting a sufficiently large number of super-particles into the simulation box and enhancing the statistical significance of the velocity distribution functions. We use the iPIC3D code with fully periodic boundaries under various conditions of the electron-to-proton mass ratio, which gives insight into the

  6. Particle-in-cell simulation of collisionless reconnection with open outflow boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, Alex; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2008-08-15

    A new method for applying open boundary conditions in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations is utilized to study magnetic reconnection. Particle distributions are assumed to have zero normal derivatives at the boundaries. Advantages and possible limitations of this method for PIC simulations are discussed. Results from a reconnection simulation study are presented. For the purpose of this investigation, a 2 (1/2)-dimensional electromagnetic PIC simulation using open conditions at the outflow boundaries and simple reflecting boundaries to the inflow regions is discussed. The electron diffusion region is defined as that region where the out-of-plane electron inertial electric field is positive indicating acceleration and flux transfer; the evolution of this region is analyzed. It is found that this region varies in the range 2.5-4 local electron inertial lengths in total width and in the range 10-15 local electron inertial lengths in total length for the mass ratio 25. The reconnection rate is investigated in terms of the aspect ratio of the electron diffusion region plus inflow and outflow measures at its boundaries. It is shown that a properly measured aspect ratio predicts the flux transfer rate, scaled to account for the decline in field strength and electron density at the inflow boundary to the electron diffusion region. It is concluded that this electron diffusion region either adjusts its aspect ratio for compatibility with the flux transfer rate that is set elsewhere, as in the Hall reconnection model, or that it is this region that controls the reconnection flux transfer rate.

  7. Open Boundary Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Dipolarization Front Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, Alex; Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2014-01-01

    First results are presented from an ongoing open boundary 2-1/2D particle-in-cell simulation study of dipolarization front (DF) propagation in Earth's magnetotail. At this stage, this study is focused on the compression, or pileup, region preceding the DF current sheet. We find that the earthward acceleration of the plasma in this region is in general agreement with a recent DF force balance model. A gyrophase bunched reflected ion population at the leading edge of the pileup region is reflected by a normal electric field in the pileup region itself, rather than through an interaction with the current sheet. We discuss plasma wave activity at the leading edge of the pileup region that may be driven by gradients, or by reflected ions, or both; the mode has not been identified. The waves oscillate near but above the ion cyclotron frequency with wavelength several ion inertial lengths. We show that the waves oscillate primarily in the perpendicular magnetic field components, do not propagate along the background magnetic field, are right handed elliptically (close to circularly) polarized, exist in a region of high electron and ion beta, and are stationary in the plasma frame moving earthward. We discuss the possibility that the waves are present in plasma sheet data, but have not, thus far, been discovered.

  8. Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Collisionless Driven Reconnection with Open Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimas, Alex; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    First results are discussed from an ongoing study of driven collisionless reconnection using a 2 1/2-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation model with open inflow and outflow boundaries. An extended electron diffusion region (EEDR) is defined as that region surrounding a reconnecting neutral line in which the out-of-plane nonideal electric field is positive. It is shown that the boundaries of this region in the directions of the outflow jets are at the positions where the electrons make the transition from unfrozen meandering motion in the current sheet to outward drifting with the magnetic field in the outflow jets; a turning length scale is defined to mark these positions, The initial width of the EEDR in the inflow directions is comparable to the electron bounce width. Later. as shoulders develop to form a two-scale structure. thc EEDR width expands to the ion bounce width scale. The inner portion of the EEDR or the electron diffusion region proper remains at the electron bounce width. Two methods are introduced for predicting the reconnection electric field using the dimensions of the EEDR. These results are interpreted as further evidence that the EEDR is the region that is relevant to understanding the electron role in the neutral line vicinity.

  9. Particle-In-Cell simulation concerning heat-flux mitigation using electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüskow, Karl Felix; Duras, Julia; Kemnitz, Stefan; Kahnfeld, Daniel; Matthias, Paul; Bandelow, Gunnas; Schneider, Ralf; Konigorski, Detlev

    2016-10-01

    In space missions enormous amount of money is spent for the thermal protection system for re-entry. To avoid complex materials and save money one idea is to reduce the heat-flux towards the spacecraft. The partially-ionized gas can be controlled by electromagnetic fields. For first-principle tests partially ionized argon flow from an arc-jet was used to measure the heat-flux mitigation created by an external magnetic field. In the successful experiment a reduction of 85% was measured. In this work the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method was used to simulate this experiment. PIC is able to reproduce the heat flux mitigation qualitatively. The main mechanism is identified as a changed electron transport and by this, modified electron density due to the reaction to the applied magnetic field. Ions follow due to quasi-neutrality and influence then strongly by charge exchange collisions the neutrals dynamics and heat deposition. This work was supported by the German Space Agency DLR through Project 50RS1508.

  10. Investigation of Parametric Excitation of Whistler Waves Using 3D Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Rose, David; Paraschiv, Ioana

    2016-10-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a parametric interaction between quasi-electrostatic lower oblique resonance (LOR) and lower frequency (ω < ωLH) ion acoustic or extremely low frequency (ELF) waves can produce electromagnetic whistler waves in a cold magnetized plasma. It was also demonstrated theoretically that this interaction can more efficiently generate electromagnetic whistler waves than by direct excitation by a conventional loop antenna, operating at a single frequency. For the purpose of numerically validating the above result, a series of particle-in-cell simulations were carried out. We first demonstrate the ability to accurately model whistler wave excitation producing the familiar resonant surfaces which comprise the LOR using a modeled loop antenna. Next we demonstrate the ability to generate ion acoustic waves as well as ELF waves, both of which are shown to agree with the expected linear dispersion relations. Finally, we investigate the existence of any nonlinear interaction which indicates the desired parametric excitation and attempt to analyze the efficiency of this method of excitation and radiated power going into the whistler part of the VLF wave spectrum.

  11. Numerical Uncertainty Estimation for Stochastic Particle-in-Cell Simulations Applied to Verification and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Numerical error estimation is a key component in verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification. For ParticleIn-Cell (PIC) plasma simulations, error estimation is complicated due to the presence of stochastic noise and multiple convergence parameters (grid size, time step, macro particle weight). In this talk, we will discuss recent developments for the Stochastic Richardson Extrapolation Based Error Quantification method (StREEQ). This method at its core is a multi-regression technique, where nine regression models and multiple bootstrap samples propagate uncertainties due to the fit and the stochasticity of the underlying data for an appropriate error model with unknown convergence rates. Recently, automation of the convergence parameter domain selection has been implemented; this enables efficient error estimation for large data sets, including analysis of multiple quantities of interest and time dependent data. This method is demonstrated for verification of both steady and time-periodic electron diodes, as well as validation of radiation generated plasma in an end-radiated cylinder. In collaboration with Gregg Radtke, Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Physics based optimization of Particle-in-Cell simulations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Stephen; D'Azevedo, Ed

    2016-10-01

    We present progress in improving the performance of the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code XGC-1 on NVIDIA GPUs, as well as enhancements made to portability and developer productivity using OpenACC directives. Increasingly simulation codes are required to use heterogeneous accelerator resources on the most powerful supercomputing systems. PIC methods are well suited to these massively parallel accelerator architectures, as particles can largely be advanced independently within a time-step. Their advance must still, however, reference field data on underlying grid structures, which presents a significant performance bottleneck. Even ported to GPUs using CUDA Fortran, the XGC-1 electron push routine accounts for a significant portion of the code execution time. By applying physical insight to the motion of electrons across the device (and therefore field grids) we have developed techniques that increase performance of this kernel by up to 5X, compared to the original CUDA Fortran implementation. Architecture specific optimizations can be isolated in small `leaf' routines, which allows for a portable OpenACC implementation that performs nearly as well as the optimized CUDA.

  13. Kinetic Alfvén Turbulence: Electron and Ion Heating by Particle-in-cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph; Parashar, Tulasi N.

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the forward cascade of decaying kinetic Alfvén turbulence have been carried out as an initial-value problem on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron–ion plasma model with {β }{{e}}={β }{{i}}=0.50 and m i/m e = 100, where subscripts e and i represent electrons and ions, respectively. Initial anisotropic narrowband spectra of relatively long-wavelength modes with approximately gyrotropic distributions in {k}\\perp undergo a forward cascade to broadband spectra of magnetic fluctuations at shorter wavelengths. Maximum electron and ion heating rates are computed as functions of the initial fluctuating magnetic field energy density {\\varepsilon }o on the range 0.05< {\\varepsilon }{{o}}< 0.50. In contrast to dissipation by whistler turbulence, the maximum ion heating rate due to kinetic Alfvén turbulence is substantially greater than the maximum electron heating rate. Furthermore, ion heating as well as electron heating due to kinetic Alfvén turbulence scale approximately with ε o. Finally, electron heating leads to anisotropies of the type {T}\\parallel {{e}}> {T}\\perp {{e}}, where the parallel and perpendicular symbols refer to directions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the background magnetic field, whereas the heated ions remain relatively isotropic. This implies that, for the range of ε o values considered, the Landau wave–particle resonance is a likely heating mechanism for the electrons and may also contribute to ion heating.

  14. Electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigated the electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability using two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. We introduced a velocity shear layer with a thickness comparable to the electron Debye length and examined the generation of the KH instability. The KH instability occurs in a similar manner as observed in the KH instabilities in fluid or ion scales producing surface waves and rolled-up vortices. The strength and growth rate of the electron Debye scale KH instability is affected by the structure of the velocity shear layer. The strength depends on the magnitude of the velocity and the growth rate on the velocity gradient of the shear layer. However, the development of the electron Debye scale KH instability is mainly determined by the electric field generated by charge separation. Significant mixing of electrons occurs across the shear layer, and a fraction of electrons can penetrate deeply into the opposite side fairly far from the vortices across the shear layer.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulation study of a lower-hybrid shock

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Ynnerman, A.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-06-15

    The expansion of a magnetized high-pressure plasma into a low-pressure ambient medium is examined with particle-in-cell simulations. The magnetic field points perpendicular to the plasma's expansion direction and binary collisions between particles are absent. The expanding plasma steepens into a quasi-electrostatic shock that is sustained by the lower-hybrid (LH) wave. The ambipolar electric field points in the expansion direction and it induces together with the background magnetic field a fast E cross B drift of electrons. The drifting electrons modify the background magnetic field, resulting in its pile-up by the LH shock. The magnetic pressure gradient force accelerates the ambient ions ahead of the LH shock, reducing the relative velocity between the ambient plasma and the LH shock to about the phase speed of the shocked LH wave, transforming the LH shock into a nonlinear LH wave. The oscillations of the electrostatic potential have a larger amplitude and wavelength in the magnetized plasma than in an unmagnetized one with otherwise identical conditions. The energy loss to the drifting electrons leads to a noticeable slowdown of the LH shock compared to that in an unmagnetized plasma.

  16. Particle in cell simulations of tearing modes in reversed-field-pinch-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Svidzinski, Vladmir; Li, Hui; Albright, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations of tearing modes in two-dimensional plane geometry in a force free reversed field pinch (RFP) like plasma equilibrium are performed to study possible kinetic effects on these modes in RFPs. Linear tearing modes are compared in the PIC and two fluid models. The results showed that the growth rates and the profiles of magnetic field components in the two models are very similar, indicating that the kinetic effects on the tearing modes are weak such that the two fluid approximation is rather accurate for modeling these instabilities in RFPs. During the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode in this geometry small scale secondary instabilities located near the internal layer of the primary tearing instability are excited. These secondary instabilities appear to be driven by the nonlinearly induced local pressure gradient in the regions of unfavorable curvature of the nonlinearly evolved magnetic field. They could also appear in a realistic RFP geometry and play a role during sawtooth crashes in these machines.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sarveshwar Sengupta, Sudip; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-02-15

    The propagation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is studied in the laboratory frame (x, t) using a 1-D particle-in-cell code that evolves the ion dynamics by treating them as particles but assumes the electrons to follow the usual Boltzmann distribution. It is observed that for very low Mach numbers the simulation results closely match the Korteweg-de Vries soliton solutions, obtained in the wave frame, and which propagate without distortion. The collision of two such profiles is observed to exhibit the usual solitonic behaviour. As the Mach number is increased, the given profile initially evolves and then settles down to the exact solution of the full non-linear Poisson equation, which then subsequently propagates without distortion. The fractional change in amplitude is found to increase linearly with Mach number. It is further observed that initial profiles satisfying k{sup 2}λ{sub de}{sup 2}<1 break up into a series of solitons.

  18. Parallel mesh support for particle-in-cell methods in magnetic fusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Eisung; Shephard, Mark S.; Seol, E. Seegyoung; Kalyanaraman, Kaushik; Ibanez, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    As supercomputing power continues to increase Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are being widely adopted for transport simulations of magnetic fusion devices. Current implementations place a copy of the entire continuum mesh and its fields used in the PIC calculations on every node. This is in general not a scalable solution as computational power continues to grow faster than node level memory. To address this scalability issue, while still maintaining sufficient mesh per node to control costly inter-node communication, a new unstructured mesh distribution methods and associated mesh based PIC calculation procedure is being developed building on the parallel unstructured mesh infrastructure (PUMI). Key components to be outlined in the presentation include (i) the mesh distribution strategy, (ii) how the particles are tracked during a push cycle taking advantage of the unstructured mesh adjacency structures and searches based on that structure, and (iii) how the field solve steps and particle migration are controlled. Performance comparisons to the current approach will also be presented.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulation of astrophysical plasmas: Probing the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, Thomas Alan

    Cosmic rays, the product of natural extraterrestrial particle accelerators far more powerful than the LHC, were first detected a century ago. A "standard model" of cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants has begun to emerge, but a number of questions still require satisfactory answers. The maximum particle energy attainable via the most favored mechanism, diffusive shock acceleration, is limited by the amplitude of magnetic-field turbulence in the unshocked interstellar or circumstellar medium, but cosmic rays are observed at high enough energies that some magnetic-field amplification is required. By what mechanisms might this amplification occur, and can it operate to a great enough extent to account for those cosmic rays thought to be of Galactic origin? A number of proposed solutions involve instabilities arising from interactions between cosmic rays and the upstream plasma, whose evolution becomes highly nonlinear. A related question explored is whether the presence of accelerated particles in the shock vicinity has any microscopic effect on the instabilities governing the shock itself. Particle-in-cell kinetic simulations allow us to investigate the growth and saturation of these instabilities at the (astrophysically) microscopic scale, providing valuable insights and important considerations for self-consistent macroscopic models of particle acceleration.

  20. Particle-in-cell simulation of collisionless driven reconnection with open boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, Alex; Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2010-11-15

    First results are discussed from an ongoing study of driven collisionless reconnection using a 2(1/2)-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation model with open inflow and outflow boundaries. An extended electron diffusion region (EEDR) is defined as that region surrounding a reconnecting neutral line in which the out-of-plane nonideal electric field is positive. It is shown that the boundaries of this region in the directions of the outflow jets are at the positions where the electrons make the transition from unfrozen meandering motion in the current sheet to outward drifting with the magnetic field in the outflow jets; a turning length scale is defined to mark these positions. The initial width of the EEDR in the inflow directions is comparable to the electron bounce width. Later, as shoulders develop to form a two-scale structure, the EEDR width expands to the ion bounce width scale. The inner portion of the EEDR or the electron diffusion region proper remains at the electron bounce width. Two methods are introduced for predicting the reconnection electric field using the dimensions of the EEDR. These results are interpreted as further evidence that the EEDR is the region that is relevant to understanding the electron role in the neutral line vicinity.

  1. Comparison of dust charging between orbital-motion-limited theory and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-11-15

    The Orbital-Motion-Limited (OML) theory has been modified to predict the dust charge and the results were contrasted with the Whipple approximation [X. Z. Tang and G. L. Delzanno, Phys. Plasmas 21, 123708 (2014)]. To further establish its regime of applicability, in this paper, the OML predictions (for a non-electron-emitting, spherical dust grain at rest in a collisionless, unmagnetized plasma) are compared with particle-in-cell simulations that retain the absorption radius effect. It is found that for large dust grain radius r{sub d} relative to the plasma Debye length λ{sub D}, the revised OML theory remains a very good approximation as, for the parameters considered (r{sub d}/λ{sub D} ≤ 10, equal electron and ion temperatures), it yields the dust charge to within 20% accuracy. This is a substantial improvement over the Whipple approximation. The dust collected currents and energy fluxes, which remain the same in the revised and standard OML theories, are accurate to within 15%–30%.

  2. Electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability using two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. We introduced a velocity shear layer with a thickness comparable to the electron Debye length and examined the generation of the KH instability. The KH instability occurs in a similar manner as observed in the KH instabilities in fluid or ion scales producing surface waves and rolled-up vortices. The strength and growth rate of the electron Debye scale KH instability is affected by the structure of the velocity shear layer. The strength depends on the magnitude of the velocity and the growth rate on the velocity gradient of the shear layer. However, the development of the electron Debye scale KH instability is mainly determined by the electric field generated by charge separation. Significant mixing of electrons occurs across the shear layer, and a fraction of electrons can penetrate deeply into the opposite side fairly far from the vortices across the shear layer.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam propagation in the magnetospheric plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powis, A. T.; Kaganovich, I.; Johnson, J.; Sanchez, E. R.

    2016-12-01

    New accelerator technologies have made it possible to produce a light-weight compact electron beam accelerator able to be installed on a small to medium sized satellite for applications of mapping the magnetisphere. We present a particle-in-cell (PIC) study of electron beam propagation in the magnetospheric environment. Two-stream and fillamentation instabilities, as well as generation of whistler waves can potentially disrupt beam propagation in the plasma environment [1,2]. We compare results of the PIC simulations with previous analytical estimates for the threshold of instabilities. [1] "Whistler Wave Excitation and Effects of Self-Focusing on Ion Beam Propagation through a Background Plasma along a Solenoidal Magnetic Field", M. Dorf, I. Kaganovich, E. Startsev, and R. C. Davidson, Physics of Plasmas 17, 023103 (2010). [2] "Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams", R. C. Davidson, M. A. Dorf, I. D. Kaganovich, H. Qin, A. B. Sefkow, E. A. Startsev, D. R. Welch, D. V. Rose, and S. M. Lund, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 606, 11 (2009).

  4. Nonlinear kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas via particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese, Aaron; Smolyakov, Andrei; Sydorenko, Dmytro

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas due to thermal motion of particles modified by self-consistent magnetic fields are studied using a particle-in-cell code. In the low pressure, low frequency regime, electron mean free paths are large relative to device size and the trajectories are strongly curved by the induced rf magnetic field. Analytic linear theories are unable to recover effects accumulated along each nonlinear path. Therefore, the simulated ICP is made progressively more complex to find the source of observed plasma behaviours. With only thermal motion modifying the wave-particle interaction, nonlocal behaviour becomes dominant at low frequencies, causing an anomalous skin effect with increased skin depth and power absorption and decreased ponderomotive force. However, when influenced by magnetic fields, the nonlocal effects are suppressed at large wave amplitudes due to nonlinear trapping. A mechanism is proposed for this low frequency restoration of local behaviour. Finally, a low rate of electron-neutral collisions is found to counteract the nonlinear behaviour, and hence reinforces nonlocal behaviour.

  5. Three dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of the 67P environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divin, Andrey; Deca, Jan; Henri, Pierre; Horanyi, Mihaly; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Eriksson, Anders

    2017-04-01

    ESA's Rosetta orbiter spacecraft escorted comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for two years, carrying 21 scientific instruments. Five of those were dedicated to plasma measurements. The mission revealed for the first time, and in unprecedented detail, the fascinating evolution of a comet and its interaction with our Sun as it races along its 6.45yr elliptical orbit around the Sun. Using a self-consistent 3-D fully kinetic electromagnetic particle-in-cell approach, we focus on the global cometary environment and, in particular, on the collisionless electron-kinetic interaction. We include cometary ions and electrons produced by the ionization of the outgassing cometary atmosphere in addition to the solar wind ion and electron plasma flow. We approximate mass-loading of the cold cometary ion and electron populations using a 1/r relation with distance to the comet with a total neutral production rate of Q = 1026 s-1. Our simulation results disentangle for the first time the kinetic ion and electron dynamics of the solar wind interaction with a weakly outgassing comet. The simulated global structure of the solar wind-comet interaction confirms the results reported in hybrid simulations of the induced cometary magnetosphere. Moreover, we show that cometary and solar wind electrons neutralize the solar wind protons and cometary ions, respectively, in the region of influence around the comet, representing to first order a four-fluid behavior. The electron energy distribution close to the comet is shown to be a mix of cometary and solar wind electrons that appear as, respectively, a thermal and a suprathermal components. Analyzing ion and electron energy distribution functions, and comparing with plasma measurements from ESA's Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we conclude that a detailed kinetic treatment of the electron dynamics is critical to fully capture the complex physics of mass-loading plasmas.

  6. Lagrangian MHD Particle-in-Cell simulations of coronal interplanetary shocks driven by observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bacchini, Fabio; Bemporad, Alessandro; Susino, Roberto; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the June 11, 1999 CME-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light (WL) coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d towards the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new 1D Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-gamma model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.). Work supported by the European Commission under the SWIFF project (swiff.eu)

  7. Colliding Two Shocks: 1-D full Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Hada, T.; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Mazelle, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Shock-shock interactions occur on various places in space and the interaction can produce high energy particles. A coronal mass ejection driven shock can collide with the Earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011]. This study reported that ions are accelerated by the first Fermi acceleration between the two shocks before the collision. An electron acceleration through an interplanetary shock-Earth's bow shock interaction was also reported [Terasawa et al., 1997]. Shock-shock interactions can occur in astrophysical phenomena as well as in the heliosphere. For example, a young supernova shock can collide with the wind termination shock of a massive star if they are close to each other [Bykov et al., 2013]. Although hybrid simulations (ions and electrons treated as super-particles and mass-less fluid, respectively) were carried out to understand the kinetic nature of a shock-shock interaction [Cargill et al., 1986], hybrid simulations cannot resolve electron dynamics and non-thermal electrons. We, therefore, use one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate a shock-shock interaction in which two shocks collide head-on. In a case of quasi-perpendicular shocks, electrons are accelerated by the mirror reflection between the two shocks before the collision (Fermi acceleration). On the other hand, because ions cannot go back upstream, the electron acceleration mechanism does not occur for ions. In a case of quasi-parallel shocks, ions can go back upstream and are accelerated at the shocks. The accelerated ions have great effect on the shock structure.

  8. Particle-In-Cell Simulations on Electric Field Antenna Characteristics in the Spacecraft Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Usui, H.; Kojima, H.; Omura, Y.; Matsumoto, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Physics (STP) group in Japan has organized a new magnetospheric mission named SCOPE whose objective is to investigate the scale-coupling process of plasma dynamics in the Terrestrial magnetosphere. For the sophisticated electric field measurements planned in the SCOPE mission, we have to investigate the antenna characteristics which are essential for the precise calibration of observed data. Particularly, (1) realistic antenna geometries including spacecraft body and (2) inhomogeneous plasma environment created by plasma-spacecraft interactions should be taken into consideration in the antenna analysis for application to the scientific mission. However, the analysis of the antenna impedance is very complex because the plasma is a dispersive and anisotropic medium, and thus it is too difficult to consider the realistic plasma environment near the spacecraft by the theoretical approaches. In the present study, we apply the Particle-In-Cell simulations to the antenna analysis, which enables us to treat the antenna model including a spacecraft body and analyze the effects of photoelectron emission on antenna characteristics. The present antenna model consists of perfect conducting antennas and spacecraft body, and the photoelectron emission from the sunlit surfaces is also modeled. Using these models, we first performed the electrostatic simulations and examined the photoelectron environment around the spacecraft. Next, the antenna impedance under the obtained photoelectron environment was examined by the electromagnetic simulations. Impedance values obtained in photoelectron environment were much different from those in free space, and they were analogous to the impedance characteristics of an equivalent electric circuit consisting of a resistance and capacitance connected in parallel. The validity of the obtained values has been examined by the comparison with the measurements by the scientific spacecraft.

  9. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic plasma radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, thought to be the underlying mechanism for Type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some studies indicate that no such processes occur. Methods: We self-consistently simulate three-wave based plasma emission through all stages by using 2D, fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams using the EPOCH2D code. Results: Here we present the results of two simulations; Run 1 (nb/n0 = 0.0057, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 16) and Run 2 (nb/n0 = 0.05, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 8), which we find to permit and prohibit plasma emission respectively. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to frequency conservation requirements. In resolving this apparent contradiction through a comprehensive analysis, in this paper we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses emission. Comparison of our results also indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, an alternative plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in an astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  11. Revealing the sub-structures of the magnetic reconnection separatrix via particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.; Deng, X. H.; Pang, Y.; Xu, X. J.; Yao, M.; Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G.; Li, H. M.; Wang, D. D.; Wang, Y. H.

    2012-07-15

    Magnetic separatrix is an important boundary layer separating the inflow and outflow regions in magnetic reconnection. In this article, we investigate the sub-structures of the separatrix region by using two-and-half dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The separatrix region can be divided into two sub-regions in terms of the ion and electron frozen-in conditions. Far from the neutral sheet, ions and electrons are magnetized in magnetic fields. Approaching the neutral sheet, ion frozen-in condition is broken in a narrow region ({approx}c/{omega}{sub pi}) at the edge of a density cavity, while electrons are frozen-in to magnetic fields. In this region, electric field E{sub z} is around zero, and the convective term -(v{sub i} Multiplication-Sign B) is balanced by the Hall term in the generalized Ohm's law because ions carry the perpendicular current. Inside the density cavity, both ion and electron frozen-in conditions are broken. The region consists of two sub-ion or electron-scale layers, which contain intense electric fields. Formation of the two sub-layers is due to the complex electron flow pattern around the separatrix region. In the layer, E{sub z} is balanced by a combination of Hall term and the divergence of electron pressure tensor, with the Hall term being dominant. Our preliminary simulation result shows that the separatrix region in guide field reconnection also contains two sub-regions: the inner region and the outer region. However, the inner region contains only one current layer in contrast with the case without guide field.

  12. Delta-f particle-in-cell simulation of X-B mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N.; Cary, J. R.; Barnes, D. C.; Carlsson, J.

    2006-04-01

    Low-noise, delta-f particle-in-cell algorithm has been implemented in VORPAL, a massive parallel, hybrid plasma modeling code (Chet Nieter and John. R. Cary, J. Comp. Physics 196, 448 (2004)). This computation method allows us to simulate the mode conversion between the extraordinary wave (X) and electron Bernstein wave (EBW) in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the linear regime, it is found that a full X-B mode conversion can be obtained for optimized parameters as φ/φce<2 (φ is the driving frequency and φce is the electron cyclotron frequency). No 100% conversion is found for φ/φce moderately larger than 2. The simulation results agree with the predictions of Ram's theory (Ram & Schultz, Phys. Plasma 4084 (2000)). The agreement indicates that X-B mode conversion can be well described by the quadratic wave equation based on cold plasma approximation, and this is consistent with the phase-space picture of mode conversion. It is also shown that the conversion efficiency is significantly affected by the gradient of magnetic fields. When the amplitude of the incident X wave increases, it is shown that the nonlinear self-interaction of the electron converted EBW gives rise to the second harmonic generation at a pump power as low as three orders smaller than the electron thermal energy. If the fundamental EBW is sufficiently large, the non-propagating third and fourth harmonic modes are also generated. *The work was supported by DOE Contract No.DE-FG02-04ER54735.

  13. Revealing the sub-structures of the magnetic reconnection separatrix via particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Deng, X. H.; Pang, Y.; Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G.; Li, H. M.; Xu, X. J.; Wang, Y. H.; Yao, M.; Wang, D. D.

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic separatrix is an important boundary layer separating the inflow and outflow regions in magnetic reconnection. In this article, we investigate the sub-structures of the separatrix region by using two-and-half dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The separatrix region can be divided into two sub-regions in terms of the ion and electron frozen-in conditions. Far from the neutral sheet, ions and electrons are magnetized in magnetic fields. Approaching the neutral sheet, ion frozen-in condition is broken in a narrow region (˜c/ωpi) at the edge of a density cavity, while electrons are frozen-in to magnetic fields. In this region, electric field Ez is around zero, and the convective term -(vi × B) is balanced by the Hall term in the generalized Ohm's law because ions carry the perpendicular current. Inside the density cavity, both ion and electron frozen-in conditions are broken. The region consists of two sub-ion or electron-scale layers, which contain intense electric fields. Formation of the two sub-layers is due to the complex electron flow pattern around the separatrix region. In the layer, Ez is balanced by a combination of Hall term and the divergence of electron pressure tensor, with the Hall term being dominant. Our preliminary simulation result shows that the separatrix region in guide field reconnection also contains two sub-regions: the inner region and the outer region. However, the inner region contains only one current layer in contrast with the case without guide field.

  14. Magnetospheric Simulations With the Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics With Embedded Particle-in-Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Jia, X.; Chen, Y.; Markidis, S.; Peng, B.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Tenishev, V.; Borovikov, D.; Haiducek, J. D.; Gombosi, T. I.; Glocer, A.; Dorelli, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient with its block-adaptive grid. The current implementation of the MHD-EPIC model allows two-way coupled simulations in two and three dimensions with multiple embedded PIC regions. The MHD and PIC grids can have different grid resolutions. The MHD variables and the moments of the PIC distribution functions are interpolated and message passed in an efficient manner through the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Both BATS-R-US and iPIC3D are massively parallel codes fully integrated into, run by and coupled through the SWMF. We have successfully applied the MHD-EPIC code to model Ganymede's magnetosphere. Using four PIC regions we have in effect performed a fully kinetic simulation of the moon's mini-magnetosphere with a grid resolution that is about 5 times finer than the ion inertial length. The Hall MHD model provides proper boundary conditions for the four PIC regions and connects them with each other and with the inner and outer outer boundary conditions of the much larger MHD domain. We compare our results with Galileo magnetic observations and find good overall agreement with both Hall MHD and MHD-EPIC simulations. The power spectrum for the small scale fluctuations, however, agrees with the data much better for the MHD-EPIC simulation than for Hall MHD. In the MHD-EPIC simulation, unlike in the pure Hall MHD results, we also find signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs) that agree very well with the observed FTE signatures both in terms of shape and amplitudes. We will also highlight our ongoing efforts to model the magnetospheres of Mercury and

  15. Particle in Cell Simulations of the Pulsar Y-Point -- Nature of the Accelerating Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, satellite observations have yielded a wealth of data on pulsed high-energy emission from pulsars. Several different models have been advanced to fit this data, all of which “paint” the emitting region onto a different portion of the magnetosphere.In the last few years, particle in cell simulations of pulsar magnetospheres have reached the point where they are able to self-consistently model particle acceleration and dissipation. One of the key findings of these simulations is that the region of the current sheet in and around the Y-point provides the highest rate of dissipation of Poynting flux (Belyaev 2015a). On the basis of this physical evidence, it is quite plausible that this region should be associated with the pulsed high energy emission from pulsars. We present high resolution PIC simulations of an axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere, which are run using PICsar (Belyaev 2015b). These simulations focus on the particle dynamics and electric fields in and around the Y-point region. We run two types of simulations -- first, a force-free magnetosphere and second, a magnetosphere with a gap between the return current layer and the outflowing plasma in the polar wind zone. The latter setup is motivated by studies of pair production with general relativity (Philippov et al. 2015, Belyaev & Parfrey (in preparation)). In both cases, we find that the Y-point and the current sheet in its direct vicinity act like an “electric particle filter” outwardly accelerating particles of one sign of charge while returning the other sign of charge back to the pulsar. We argue that this is a natural behavior of the plasma as it tries to adjust to a solution that is as close to force-free as possible. As a consequence, a large E dot J develops in the vicinity of the Y-point leading to dissipation of Poynting flux. Our work is relevant for explaining the plasma physical mechanisms underlying pulsed high energy emission from pulsars.

  16. Modern gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of fusion plasmas on top supercomputers

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Bei; Ethier, Stephane; Tang, William; ...

    2017-06-29

    The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code at Princeton (GTC-P) is a highly scalable and portable particle-in-cell (PIC) code. It solves the 5D Vlasov-Poisson equation featuring efficient utilization of modern parallel computer architectures at the petascale and beyond. Motivated by the goal of developing a modern code capable of dealing with the physics challenge of increasing problem size with sufficient resolution, new thread-level optimizations have been introduced as well as a key additional domain decomposition. GTC-P's multiple levels of parallelism, including inter-node 2D domain decomposition and particle decomposition, as well as intra-node shared memory partition and vectorization have enabled pushing the scalability ofmore » the PIC method to extreme computational scales. In this paper, we describe the methods developed to build a highly parallelized PIC code across a broad range of supercomputer designs. This particularly includes implementations on heterogeneous systems using NVIDIA GPU accelerators and Intel Xeon Phi (MIC) co-processors and performance comparisons with state-of-the-art homogeneous HPC systems such as Blue Gene/Q. New discovery science capabilities in the magnetic fusion energy application domain are enabled, including investigations of Ion-Temperature-Gradient (ITG) driven turbulence simulations with unprecedented spatial resolution and long temporal duration. Performance studies with realistic fusion experimental parameters are carried out on multiple supercomputing systems spanning a wide range of cache capacities, cache-sharing configurations, memory bandwidth, interconnects and network topologies. These performance comparisons using a realistic discovery-science-capable domain application code provide valuable insights on optimization techniques across one of the broadest sets of current high-end computing platforms worldwide.« less

  17. Transverse instability and the structure of two-dimensional electron holes: particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.; Wu, M.; Huang, C.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    A multi-dimensional electron phase-space hole (electron hole) is considered to be unstable to the transverse instability. We perform two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the evolution of electron holes at different plasma conditions; we find that the evolution is determined by combined actions between the transverse instability and the stabilization by the ackground magnetic field. In very weakly magnetized plasma, the transverse instability dominates the evolution of the electron holes. The parallel cut of the perpendicular electric field has bipolar structures, accompanied by the kinking of the electron holes. Such structures last for only tens of electron plasma periods. With the increase of the background magnetic field, the evolution of the electron holes becomes slower. The bipolar structures of the parallel cut of the perpendicular electric field in the electron holes can evolve into unipolar structures. In very strongly magnetized plasma, the unipolar structures of the parallel cut of the perpendicular electric field can last for thousands of electron plasma periods. At the same time, the perpendicular electric field in the electron holes can also influence electron trajectories passing through the electron holes, which results in variations of charge density along the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field outside of the electron holes. When the amplitude of the electron hole is sufficiently strong, streaked structures of the perpendicular electric field can be formed outside of the electron holes, which then emit electrostatic whistler waves because of the interactions between the streaked structures of the perpendicular electric field and vibrations of the kinked electron holes.

  18. Development of 1D Particle-in-Cell Code and Simulation of Plasma-Wall Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Laura P.

    This thesis discusses the development of a 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) code and the analysis of plasma-wall interactions. The 1D code (Plasma and Wall Simulation -- PAWS) is a kinetic simulation of plasma done by treating both electrons and ions as particles. The goal of this thesis is to study near wall plasma interaction to better understand the mechanism that occurs in this region. The main focus of this investigation is the effects that secondary electrons have on the sheath profile. The 1D code is modeled using the PIC method. Treating both the electrons and ions as macroparticles the field is solved on each node and weighted to each macro particle. A pre-ionized plasma was loaded into the domain and the velocities of particles were sampled from the Maxwellian distribution. An important part of this code is the boundary conditions at the wall. If a particle hits the wall a secondary electron may be produced based on the incident energy. To study the sheath profile the simulations were run for various cases. Varying background neutral gas densities were run with the 2D code and compared to experimental values. Different wall materials were simulated to show their effects of SEE. In addition different SEE yields were run, including one study with very high SEE yields to show the presence of a space charge limited sheath. Wall roughness was also studied with the 1D code using random angles of incidence. In addition to the 1D code, an external 2D code was also used to investigate wall roughness without secondary electrons. The roughness profiles where created upon investigation of wall roughness inside Hall Thrusters based off of studies done on lifetime erosion of the inner and outer walls of these devices. The 2D code, Starfish[33], is a general 2D axisymmetric/Cartesian code for modeling a wide a range of plasma and rarefied gas problems. These results show that higher SEE yield produces a smaller sheath profile and that wall roughness produces a lower SEE yield

  19. Gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of Alfvén eigenmodes in presence of continuum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey Könies, Axel; Hatzky, Roman

    2014-05-15

    First-principle gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of a global Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmode (TAE) are undertaken in the presence of a strong coupling with the continuum. Effects of the bulk plasma temperature on the interplay between the TAE and Kinetic Alfvén Waves (KAWs) are investigated. A global TAE-KAW structure is identified which appears to be more unstable with respect to the fast ions than a simple (fluid-like) TAE mode.

  20. Simulations of Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, Lj.; Skoric, M.M.; Ishiguro, S.

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the growth of instabilities in an underdense plasma, a number of simulations was carried out using the one-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) relativistic particle-in-cell code. A new type of Raman-like scattering was identified in a subcritical regime, which is overdense for standard SRS. This novel instability is a parametric decay of the relativistic EM wave into a scattered light and an electron-acoustic ({omega} < {omega}p) electrostatic wave. In the linear stage, resonant matchings are well satisfied, while the scattered Stokes wave is always driven near critical. During nonlinear saturation, due to rapid growth and strong localization of the Stokes wave, narrow intense EM soliton-like structures with down-shifted laser light trapped inside are formed; eventually, to be irradiated through the plasma-vacuum interface in the form of intense low-frequency EM bursts. This behavior alters the distribution of laser energy between transmission, scattering losses and generation of energetic electrons.

  1. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-03-02

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H{sub 2} ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns.

  2. Computer simulation of phase locking multi-cavity relativistic gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A. T.; Yang, Z. H.; Lin, Chih-Chien

    1989-07-01

    A particle-in-cell model has been employed to investigate the phase-locking phenomenon of multi-cavity relativistic gyrotron oscillators. Simulation results show that a prebunched beam causes the output wave to overshoot, which in turn prolongs the time for establishing phase locking. The beam axial velocity spread is observed to reduce the locking bandwidth. The phenomenon of priming or injection seeding is simulated. The phase locked time depends on the growth rate of the oscillator and the amount of inject frequency deviation from the locking boundary.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of the critical ionization velocity effect in finite size clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Lu, G.; Goertz, C. K.; Nishikawa, K. - I.

    1994-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism in a finite size cloud is studied with a series of electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. It is observed that an initial seed ionization, produced by non-CIV mechanisms, generates a cross-field ion beam which excites a modified beam-plasma instability (MBPI) with frequency in the range of the lower hybrid frequency. The excited waves accelerate electrons along the magnetic field up to the ion drift energy that exceeds the ionization energy of the neutral atoms. The heated electrons in turn enhance the ion beam by electron-neutral impact ionization, which establishes a positive feedback loop in maintaining the CIV process. It is also found that the efficiency of the CIV mechanism depends on the finite size of the gas cloud in the following ways: (1) Along the ambient magnetic field the finite size of the cloud, L (sub parallel), restricts the growth of the fastest growing mode, with a wavelength lambda (sub m parallel), of the MBPI. The parallel electron heating at wave saturation scales approximately as (L (sub parallel)/lambda (sub m parallel)) (exp 1/2); (2) Momentum coupling between the cloud and the ambient plasma via the Alfven waves occurs as a result of the finite size of the cloud in the direction perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the neutral drift. This reduces exponentially with time the relative drift between the ambient plasma and the neutrals. The timescale is inversely proportional to the Alfven velocity. (3) The transvers e charge separation field across the cloud was found to result in the modulation of the beam velocity which reduces the parallel heating of electrons and increases the transverse acceleration of electrons. (4) Some energetic electrons are lost from the cloud along the magnetic field at a rate characterized by the acoustic velocity, instead of the electron thermal velocity. The loss of energetic electrons from the cloud seems to be larger in the direction of

  4. Benchmarking Particle-in-Cell drift wave simulations with Eulerian simulations in a flux-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott; Wan, Weigang; Bravenec, Ronald; Wang, Eric; Candy, Jeff

    2012-10-01

    We present the implementation of a flux-tube option in the global turbulence code GEM.footnotetextY. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comp. Phys. 220, 839 (2007) This is necessary for benchmarking purposes because of the immense complexity involved in comparing global simulations. The global GEM assumes the magnetic equilibrium to be completely given. Our initial flux-tube implementation simply selects a radial location as the center of the flux-tube and a radial size of the flux-tube, sets all equilibrium quantities (B, ∇B, T, ∇T, the Jacobian etc.) to be equal to their values at the center of the flux-tube, and retains only a linear radial profile of the safety factor needed for boundary conditions. We found good agreement between GEM and GYRO/GS2 for the mode frequency/growth rate in the case of adiabatic electrons, but a difference of ˜15% in the growth rates when kinetic electrons are included. Our goal is to understand the origin of this moderate disagreement. An alternative local geometry model based on a local solution of the Grad-Shafranov equationfootnotetextJ. Candy, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51, 105009 (2009) has been implemented and new benchmarking results from this model will be presented.

  5. Fluid preconditioning for Newton–Krylov-based, fully implicit, electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.; Leibs, C.A.; Knoll, D.A.; Taitano, W.

    2014-02-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes an energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension [9]. The algorithm in the reference employs an unpreconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method, which ensures nonlinear convergence at every timestep (resolving the dynamical timescale of interest). Kinetic enslavement, which is one key component of the algorithm, not only enables fully implicit PIC as a practical approach, but also allows preconditioning the kinetic solver with a fluid approximation. This study proposes such a preconditioner, in which the linearized moment equations are closed with moments computed from particles. Effective acceleration of the linear GMRES solve is demonstrated, on both uniform and non-uniform meshes. The algorithm performance is largely insensitive to the electron–ion mass ratio. Numerical experiments are performed on a 1D multi-scale ion acoustic wave test problem.

  6. A particle-in-cell method for the simulation of plasmas based on an unconditionally stable field solver

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Eric M.; Causley, Matthew; Christlieb, Andrew; Bettencourt, Matthew

    2016-08-09

    Here, we propose a new particle-in-cell (PIC) method for the simulation of plasmas based on a recently developed, unconditionally stable solver for the wave equation. This method is not subject to a CFL restriction, limiting the ratio of the time step size to the spatial step size, typical of explicit methods, while maintaining computational cost and code complexity comparable to such explicit schemes. We describe the implementation in one and two dimensions for both electrostatic and electromagnetic cases, and present the results of several standard test problems, showing good agreement with theory with time step sizes much larger than allowed by typical CFL restrictions.

  7. A particle-in-cell method for the simulation of plasmas based on an unconditionally stable field solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Eric M.; Causley, Matthew; Christlieb, Andrew; Bettencourt, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new particle-in-cell (PIC) method for the simulation of plasmas based on a recently developed, unconditionally stable solver for the wave equation. This method is not subject to a CFL restriction, limiting the ratio of the time step size to the spatial step size, typical of explicit methods, while maintaining computational cost and code complexity comparable to such explicit schemes. We describe the implementation in one and two dimensions for both electrostatic and electromagnetic cases, and present the results of several standard test problems, showing good agreement with theory with time step sizes much larger than allowed by typical CFL restrictions.

  8. A particle-in-cell method for the simulation of plasmas based on an unconditionally stable field solver

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Eric M.; Causley, Matthew; Christlieb, Andrew; Bettencourt, Matthew

    2016-08-09

    Here, we propose a new particle-in-cell (PIC) method for the simulation of plasmas based on a recently developed, unconditionally stable solver for the wave equation. This method is not subject to a CFL restriction, limiting the ratio of the time step size to the spatial step size, typical of explicit methods, while maintaining computational cost and code complexity comparable to such explicit schemes. We describe the implementation in one and two dimensions for both electrostatic and electromagnetic cases, and present the results of several standard test problems, showing good agreement with theory with time step sizes much larger than allowed by typical CFL restrictions.

  9. Study of strong enhancement of synchrotron radiation via surface plasma waves excitation by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. Cao, L. H.; He, X. T.; Wu, Dong; Liu, Z. J.

    2015-11-02

    Synchrotron radiation is strongly enhanced by the resonant excitation of surface plasma waves (SPWs). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that energy conversion efficiency from laser to radiation in the case of SPWs excitation is about 18.7%, which is improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with that of no SPWs excitation. Besides the high energy conversion efficiency, the frequency spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation are also improved in the case of SPWs excitation because of the quasi-static magnet field induced by surface plasma waves excitation.

  10. A study of V-shaped potential formation using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almomany, Abedalmuhdi; Sewell, Stephen; Earl Wells, B.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    In this research, two-dimensional electrostatic Particle-In-Cell simulation techniques were used to study the dynamic formation of V-shaped potential structures in the upward current regions of auroral plasmas. These simulations imposed a non-constant but more realistic spatially varying external magnetic field that increases in magnitude as it nears the ionospheric regions. A characteristic of these simulations was that V-shaped potential structures became clearly visible within the expanding plasma as they evolved, with a transversely non-uniform converging perpendicular electric field being evident. These observations were consistent across a wide range of simulation sizes. The inclusion of dipole-like magnetic fields in the auroral region leads to more visible V-shaped potential structure than that in the simulations with a constant magnetic field.

  11. Particle-in-cell Monte Carlo and fluid simulations of argon-oxygen plasma: Comparisons with experiments and validations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Iza, F.; Lee, J.K.

    2006-05-15

    Particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) and fluid simulations of argon-oxygen plasmas in capacitively and inductively coupled plasma reactors are presented. Potential profiles and electron/ion kinetic information such as electron/ion energy distributions and temperatures are compared with experimental data as well as with other analytical and numerical results. One-dimensional PIC-MCC simulations compare favorably with experimental data obtained in capacitively coupled reactors over a wide range of pressure and power. Two-dimensional fluid simulations of capacitive discharges differs from the results of PIC-MCC simulations as nonlocal effects play an important role in these discharges. Fluid simulations as nonlocal inductively coupled plasmas, however, agree favorably with experimental observations.

  12. Output power fluctuations due to different weights of macro particles used in particle-in-cell simulations of Cerenkov devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Rong; Wang, Hongguang; Li, Yongdong; Liu, Chunliang

    2016-07-01

    The output power fluctuations caused by weights of macro particles used in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a backward wave oscillator and a travelling wave tube are statistically analyzed. It is found that the velocities of electrons passed a specific slow-wave structure form a specific electron velocity distribution. The electron velocity distribution obtained in PIC simulation with a relative small weight of macro particles is considered as an initial distribution. By analyzing this initial distribution with a statistical method, the estimations of the output power fluctuations caused by different weights of macro particles are obtained. The statistical method is verified by comparing the estimations with the simulation results. The fluctuations become stronger with increasing weight of macro particles, which can also be determined reversely from estimations of the output power fluctuations. With the weights of macro particles optimized by the statistical method, the output power fluctuations in PIC simulations are relatively small and acceptable.

  13. Output power fluctuations due to different weights of macro particles used in particle-in-cell simulations of Cerenkov devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Rong; Li, Yongdong; Liu, Chunliang; Wang, Hongguang

    2016-07-15

    The output power fluctuations caused by weights of macro particles used in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a backward wave oscillator and a travelling wave tube are statistically analyzed. It is found that the velocities of electrons passed a specific slow-wave structure form a specific electron velocity distribution. The electron velocity distribution obtained in PIC simulation with a relative small weight of macro particles is considered as an initial distribution. By analyzing this initial distribution with a statistical method, the estimations of the output power fluctuations caused by different weights of macro particles are obtained. The statistical method is verified by comparing the estimations with the simulation results. The fluctuations become stronger with increasing weight of macro particles, which can also be determined reversely from estimations of the output power fluctuations. With the weights of macro particles optimized by the statistical method, the output power fluctuations in PIC simulations are relatively small and acceptable.

  14. Influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Vernay, T.; Villard, L.; Hatzky, R.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global particle-in-cell ion-temperature-gradient simulations is studied. Although this term is in theory orders of magnitude smaller than the others, several authors [L. Villard, P. Angelino, A. Bottino et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46, B51 (2004); L. Villard, S. J. Allfrey, A. Bottino et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 172 (2004); J. C. Kniep, J. N. G. Leboeuf, and V. C. Decyck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 98 (2004); J. Candy, R. E. Waltz, S. E. Parker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 074501 (2006)] found different results on its role. The study is performed using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes TORB (theta-pinch) [R. Hatzky, T. M. Tran, A. Koenies et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 898 (2002)] and ORB5 (tokamak geometry) [S. Jolliet, A. Bottino, P. Angelino et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 177, 409 (2007)]. In particular, it is demonstrated that the parallel nonlinearity, while important for energy conservation, affects the zonal electric field only if the simulation is noise dominated. When a proper convergence is reached, the influence of parallel nonlinearity on the zonal electric field, if any, is shown to be small for both the cases of decaying and driven turbulence.

  15. Influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Vernay, T.; Villard, L.; Hatzky, R.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global particle-in-cell ion-temperature-gradient simulations is studied. Although this term is in theory orders of magnitude smaller than the others, several authors [L. Villard, P. Angelino, A. Bottino et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46, B51 (2004); L. Villard, S. J. Allfrey, A. Bottino et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 172 (2004); J. C. Kniep, J. N. G. Leboeuf, and V. C. Decyck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 98 (2004); J. Candy, R. E. Waltz, S. E. Parker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 074501 (2006)] found different results on its role. The study is performed using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes TORB (theta-pinch) [R. Hatzky, T. M. Tran, A. Könies et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 898 (2002)] and ORB5 (tokamak geometry) [S. Jolliet, A. Bottino, P. Angelino et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 177, 409 (2007)]. In particular, it is demonstrated that the parallel nonlinearity, while important for energy conservation, affects the zonal electric field only if the simulation is noise dominated. When a proper convergence is reached, the influence of parallel nonlinearity on the zonal electric field, if any, is shown to be small for both the cases of decaying and driven turbulence.

  16. Fully implicit Particle-in-cell algorithms for multiscale plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis

    2015-07-16

    The outline of the paper is as follows: Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for fully ionized collisionless plasmas, explicit vs. implicit PIC, 1D ES implicit PIC (charge and energy conservation, moment-based acceleration), and generalization to Multi-D EM PIC: Vlasov-Darwin model (review and motivation for Darwin model, conservation properties (energy, charge, and canonical momenta), and numerical benchmarks). The author demonstrates a fully implicit, fully nonlinear, multidimensional PIC formulation that features exact local charge conservation (via a novel particle mover strategy), exact global energy conservation (no particle self-heating or self-cooling), adaptive particle orbit integrator to control errors in momentum conservation, and canonical momenta (EM-PIC only, reduced dimensionality). The approach is free of numerical instabilities: ωpeΔt >> 1, and Δx >> λD. It requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant CPU gains (vs explicit PIC) have been demonstrated. The method has much potential for efficiency gains vs. explicit in long-time-scale applications. Moment-based acceleration is effective in minimizing NFE, leading to an optimal algorithm.

  17. Particle-in-cell δf gyrokinetic simulations of the microtearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, J.; Chen, Yang; Wan, Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Guttenfelder, W.; Canik, J. M.

    2016-01-15

    The linear stability properties of the microtearing mode are investigated in the edge and core regimes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) using the particle-in-cell method based gyrokinetic code GEM. The dependence of the mode on various equilibrium quantities in both regions is compared. While the microtearing mode in the core depends upon the electron-ion collisions, in the edge region, it is found to be weakly dependent on the collisions and exists even when the collision frequency is zero. The electrostatic potential is non-negligible in each of the cases. It plays opposite roles in the core and edge of NSTX. While the microtearing mode is partially stabilized by the electrostatic potential in the core, it has substantial destabilizing effect in the edge. In addition to the spherical tokamak, we also study the microtearing mode for parameters relevant to the core of a standard tokamak. The fundamental characteristics of the mode remain the same; however, the electrostatic potential in this case is destabilizing as opposed to the core of NSTX. The velocity dependence of the collision frequency, which is crucial for the mode to grow in slab calculations, is not required to destabilize the mode in toroidal devices.

  18. Numerical simulation of quantum systems using the Particle-In-Cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Youssef, Ziad; Hemke, Torben; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is a very powerful method for studying the dynamics of plasmas. It has been primarily developed for tracking the charged particle trajectories subject to selfconsistent and external electromagnetic fields. Exploiting the power of modern computers, one is able to track the classical paths of tens of millions of particles at the same time. In the late 1980th, it was Dawson (and later Dauger) who had the idea to apply the PIC method to the classical part in the semiclassical approach to quantum systems via path integral methods. One could estimate that if a thousands of classical paths are sufficient to describe the dynamics of one quantum particle, then millions classical paths could describe the dynamics of a quantum particle system. A PIC code in the frame of a semiclassical approach would therefore enable the investigation of a number of quantum phenomena, e.g., optical properties, electrical properties, and, ultimately, chemical reactions. In this contribution we explain the use of the PIC code yapic (developed by the authors) in the frame of the path integral method and discuss the numerical results for simple quantum phenomena, i.e., the quantum harmonic oscillator and quantum tunneling. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of FOR 2093.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of discharges with intense electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Dmytro

    2013-09-01

    In many plasma devices, the plasma is bounded by walls which emit electrons due to secondary electron emission or thermionic emission. At low pressures, the electron mean free path exceeds the plasma dimensions, and the emitted electrons accelerated by the intense electric field of the near-wall sheath propagate through the plasma as an electron beam. The beam dynamics in a finite length system is different from theoretical predictions for infinite or periodic plasmas. This presentation gives a summary of numerical studies of beam-plasma interaction in Hall thrusters and dc discharges carried out with a particle-in-cell code. The code resolves one spatial coordinate and three velocity components, it is based on the direct implicit algorithm, the electron-to-ion mass ratio is realistic, numerous collisions between electrons and neutrals and the Coulomb collisions are included, code performance is enhanced with the help of MPI parallelization. The following effects are discussed: vanishing of the two-stream instability due to modification of the bulk electron velocity distribution, sheath instability in Hall thrusters, intermittency and multiple regimes of the two-stream instability in dc discharges. In collaboration with I. D. Kaganovich, Y. Raitses, A. V. Khrabrov (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ), P. L. G. Ventzek, L. Chen (Tokyo Electron America, Austin, TX), A. Smolyakov (University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada).

  20. The Convergence of Particle-in-Cell Schemes for Cosmological Dark Matter Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Andrew; Colella, Phillip; Van Straalen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Particle methods are a ubiquitous tool for solving the Vlasov-Poisson equation in comoving coordinates, which is used to model the gravitational evolution of dark matter (DM) in an expanding universe. However, these methods are known to produce poor results on idealized test problems, particularly at late times, after the particle trajectories have crossed. To investigate this, we have performed a series of one- and two-dimensional “Zel’dovich pancake” calculations using the popular particle-in-cell (PIC) method. We find that PIC can indeed converge on these problems provided that the following modifications are made. The first modification is to regularize the singular initial distribution function by introducing a small but finite artificial velocity dispersion. This process is analogous to artificial viscosity in compressible gas dynamics, and, as with artificial viscosity, the amount of regularization can be tailored so that its effect outside of a well-defined region—in this case, the high-density caustics—is small. The second modification is the introduction of a particle remapping procedure that periodically reexpresses the DM distribution function using a new set of particles. We describe a remapping algorithm that is third-order accurate and adaptive in phase space. This procedure prevents the accumulation of numerical errors in integrating the particle trajectories from growing large enough to significantly degrade the solution. Once both of these changes are made, PIC converges at second order on the Zel’dovich pancake problem, even at late times, after many caustics have formed. Furthermore, the resulting scheme does not suffer from the unphysical, small-scale “clumping” phenomenon known to occur on the pancake problem when the perturbation wavevector is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinate axes.

  1. THE CONVERGENCE OF PARTICLE-IN-CELL SCHEMES FOR COSMOLOGICAL DARK MATTER SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Andrew; Colella, Phillip; Van Straalen, Brian

    2016-01-10

    Particle methods are a ubiquitous tool for solving the Vlasov–Poisson equation in comoving coordinates, which is used to model the gravitational evolution of dark matter (DM) in an expanding universe. However, these methods are known to produce poor results on idealized test problems, particularly at late times, after the particle trajectories have crossed. To investigate this, we have performed a series of one- and two-dimensional “Zel’dovich pancake” calculations using the popular particle-in-cell (PIC) method. We find that PIC can indeed converge on these problems provided that the following modifications are made. The first modification is to regularize the singular initial distribution function by introducing a small but finite artificial velocity dispersion. This process is analogous to artificial viscosity in compressible gas dynamics, and, as with artificial viscosity, the amount of regularization can be tailored so that its effect outside of a well-defined region—in this case, the high-density caustics—is small. The second modification is the introduction of a particle remapping procedure that periodically reexpresses the DM distribution function using a new set of particles. We describe a remapping algorithm that is third-order accurate and adaptive in phase space. This procedure prevents the accumulation of numerical errors in integrating the particle trajectories from growing large enough to significantly degrade the solution. Once both of these changes are made, PIC converges at second order on the Zel’dovich pancake problem, even at late times, after many caustics have formed. Furthermore, the resulting scheme does not suffer from the unphysical, small-scale “clumping” phenomenon known to occur on the pancake problem when the perturbation wavevector is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinate axes.

  2. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of a Nonlinear Transverse Electromagnetic Wave in a Pulsar Wind Termination Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Skjaeraasen, Olaf; Melatos, A.; Spitkovsky, A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-15

    A 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to investigate the propagation of a large-amplitude, superluminal, nearly transverse electromagnetic (TEM) wave in a relativistically streaming electron-positron plasma with and without a shock. In the freestreaming, unshocked case, the analytic TEM dispersion relation is verified, and the streaming is shown to stabilize the wave against parametric instabilities. In the confined, shocked case, the wave induces strong, coherent particle oscillations, heats the plasma, and modifies the shock density profile via ponderomotive effects. The wave decays over {approx}> 10{sup 2} skin depths; the decay length scale depends primarily on the ratio between the wave frequency and the effective plasma frequency, and on the wave amplitude. The results are applied to the termination shock of the Crab pulsar wind, where the decay length-scale ({approx}> 0.05''?) might be comparable to the thickness of filamentary, variable substructure observed in the optical and X-ray wisps and knots.

  3. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF THE NONRESONANT, COSMIC-RAY-DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio; Reville, Brian; Kirk, John G.

    2009-06-10

    In supernova remnants, the nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields upstream of collisionless shocks is essential for the acceleration of cosmic rays to the energy of the 'knee' at 10{sup 15.5} eV. A nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current is thought to be responsible for this effect. We perform two-dimensional, particle-in-cell simulations of this instability. We observe an initial growth of circularly polarized nonpropagating magnetic waves as predicted in linear theory. It is demonstrated that in some cases the magnetic energy density in the growing waves can grow to at least 10 times its initial value. We find no evidence of competing modes, nor of significant modification by thermal effects. At late times, we observe saturation of the instability in the simulation, but the mechanism responsible is an artifact of the periodic boundary conditions and has no counterpart in the supernova-shock scenario.

  4. Dynamics of positive probes in underdense, strongly magnetized, E×B drifting plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Cooke, David L.

    2013-09-15

    Electron trapping, electron heating, space-charge wings, wake eddies, and current collection by a positive probe in E×B drifting plasma were studied in three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. In these simulations, electrons and ions were magnetized with respect to the probe and the plasma was underdense (ω{sub pe}<ω{sub ce}). A large drift velocity (Mach 4.5 with respect to the ion acoustic speed) between the plasma and probe was created with background electric and magnetic fields. Four distinct regions developed in the presences of the positive probe: a quasi-trapped electron region, an electron-depletion wing, an ion-rich wing, and a wake region. We report on the observations of strong electron heating mechanisms, space-charge wings, ion cyclotron charge-density eddies in the wake, electron acceleration due to a magnetic presheath, and the current-voltage relationship.

  5. Variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation of nonlinear mode conversion from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Xiang, Nong

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the nonlinear mode conversion of extraordinary waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied using the variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation. The accuracy of the nonlinear simulation is guaranteed by the long-term accuracy and conservativeness of the symplectic algorithm. The spectra of the electromagnetic wave, the evolution of the wave reflectivity, the energy deposition profile, and the parameter-dependent properties of radio-frequency waves during the nonlinear mode conversion are investigated. It is illustrated that nonlinear effects significantly modify the physics of the radio-frequency injection in magnetized plasmas. The evolutions of the radio-frequency wave reflectivity and the energy deposition are observed, as well as the self-interaction of the Bernstein waves and mode excitations. Even for waves with small magnitude, nonlinear effects can also become important after continuous wave injections, which are common in the realistic radio-frequency wave heating and current drive experiments.

  6. Electromagnetic 2D/3D Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal anomalies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Divin, Andrey; Markidis, Stefano; Amaya, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    We present the first 2D/3D fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies. The simulations are performed using the implicit electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code iPIC3D [Markidis, Lapenta & Rizwan-uddin, 2010]. Multiscale physics is resolved for all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) in the code, recently updated with a set of open boundary conditions designed for solar wind-body interactions. We use a dipole to model the crustal anomaly. The dipole center is located outside the computational domain and the boundary representing the lunar surface is modeled as a particle-absorbing plane. Photo-emission from the lunar surface is at this point not included, but will be in future work. We study the behaviour of the dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD simulations [Harnett & Winglee, 2000, 2002, 2003] and spacecraft observations [Kurata et al., 2005; Halekas et al., 2008; Wieser et al., 2010]. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Finally we will present preliminary results on the interaction of the solar wind with weaker magnetic anomalies in which highly non-adiabatic interactions are expected.

  7. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results and comparison with theory scaling laws for photoelectron-generated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M. |

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code computer simulations. Using the MAGIC PIC code, the simulations were performed in one dimension to handle the diverse scale lengths of the particles and fields in the problem. The simulations involved monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. A sinusoidal, 100% modulated, 6.3263 ns pulse train, as well as unmodulated emission, were used to explore the behavior of the particles, fields, and generated radiation. A special postprocessor was written to convert the PIC code simulated electron sheath into far-field radiation parameters by means of rigorous retarded time calculations. The results of the small-spot PIC simulations were used to generate various graphs showing resonance and nonresonance radiation quantities such as radiated lobe patterns, frequency, and power. A database of PIC simulation results was created and, using a nonlinear curve-fitting program, compared with theoretical scaling laws. Overall, the small-spot behavior predicted by the theoretical scaling laws was generally observed in the PIC simulation data, providing confidence in both the theoretical scaling laws and the PIC simulations.

  8. Mesh refinement for particle-in-cell plasma simulations: Applications to - and benefits for - heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.L.; Colella, P.; McCorquodale, P.; Van Straalen, B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    2002-05-24

    The numerical simulation of the driving beams in a heavy ion fusion power plant is a challenging task, and simulation of the power plant as a whole, or even of the driver, is not yet possible. Despite the rapid progress in computer power, past and anticipated, one must consider the use of the most advanced numerical techniques, if they are to reach the goal expeditiously. One of the difficulties of these simulations resides in the disparity of scales, in time and in space, which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g., fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. They discuss the challenges posed by the implementation of this technique into plasma simulations (due to the presence of particles and electromagnetic waves). They present the prospects for and projected benefits of its application to heavy ion fusion, in particular to the simulation of the ion source and the final beam propagation in the chamber. A Collaboration project is under way at LBNL between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the HIF group to couple the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) library CHOMBO developed by the ANAG group to the Particle-In-Cell accelerator code (WARP) developed by the HIF-VNL. They describe their progress and present their initial findings.

  9. A particle-in-cell method for the simulation of plasmas based on an unconditionally stable field solver

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, Eric M.; Causley, Matthew; Christlieb, Andrew; ...

    2016-08-09

    Here, we propose a new particle-in-cell (PIC) method for the simulation of plasmas based on a recently developed, unconditionally stable solver for the wave equation. This method is not subject to a CFL restriction, limiting the ratio of the time step size to the spatial step size, typical of explicit methods, while maintaining computational cost and code complexity comparable to such explicit schemes. We describe the implementation in one and two dimensions for both electrostatic and electromagnetic cases, and present the results of several standard test problems, showing good agreement with theory with time step sizes much larger than allowedmore » by typical CFL restrictions.« less

  10. Multirate Particle-in-Cell Time Integration Techniques of Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Collisionless Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Knoll, Dana Alan; Barnes, Daniel C

    2015-07-31

    A multi-rate PIC formulation was developed that employs large timesteps for slow field evolution, and small (adaptive) timesteps for particle orbit integrations. Implementation is based on a JFNK solver with nonlinear elimination and moment preconditioning. The approach is free of numerical instabilities (ωpeΔt >>1, and Δx >> λD), and requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant gains (vs. conventional explicit PIC) may be possible for large scale simulations. The paper is organized as follows: Vlasov-Maxwell Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for plasmas; Explicit, semi-implicit, and implicit time integrations; Implicit PIC formulation (Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) with nonlinear elimination allows different treatments of disparate scales, discrete conservation properties (energy, charge, canonical momentum, etc.)); Some numerical examples; and Summary.

  11. Parallel Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulations of Space-charge Dominated Beam-Cavity Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Ng, C.K.; Prudencio, E.E.; Schussman, G.L.; Uplenchwar, R.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel finite element (FE) particle-in-cell code Pic3P (Pic2P) for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space-charge effects. As opposed to standard space-charge dominated beam transport codes, which are based on the electrostatic approximation, Pic3P (Pic2P) includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects as it self-consistently solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations using higher-order FE methods on conformal meshes. Use of efficient, large-scale parallel processing allows for the modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next-generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun are presented.

  12. Particle-in-cell simulations of multi-MeV pulsed X-ray induced air plasmas at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ribière, M. D'Almeida, T.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de; Maulois, M.; Delbos, C.; Garrigues, A.; Cessenat, O.; Azaïs, B.

    2016-03-15

    A full kinetic modelling of the charge particles dynamics generated upon the irradiation of an air-filled cavity by a multi-MeV pulsed x-ray is performed. From the calculated radiative source generated by the ASTERIX generator, we calculated the electromagnetic fields generated by x-ray induced air plasmas in a metallic cavity at different pressures. Simulations are carried out based on a Particle-In-Cell interpolation method which uses 3D Maxwell-Vlasov calculations of the constitutive charged species densities of air plasmas at different pressures at equilibrium. The resulting electromagnetic fields within the cavity are calculated for different electron densities up to 4 × 10{sup 10 }cm{sup −3}. For each air pressure, we show electronic plasma waves formation followed by Landau damping. As electron density increases, the calculations exhibit space-charged neutralization and return current formation.

  13. First principles simulation of laser-induced periodic surface structure using the particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2015-11-01

    We present our results of a fundamental simulation of a periodic grating structure formation on a copper target during the femtosecond-pulse laser damage process, and compare our results to recent experiment. The particle-in-cell (PIC) method is used to model the initial laser heating of the electrons, a two-temperature model (TTM) is used to model the thermalization of the material, and a modified PIC method is employed to model the atomic transport leading to a damage crater morphology consistent with experimental grating structure formation. This laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is shown to be directly related to the formation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and their interference with the incident laser pulse.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of sheath formation around biased interconnectors in a low-earth-orbit plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between satellite solar arrays and the LEO plasma is presently studied with particle-in-cell simulations in which an electrical potential was suddenly applied to the solar cell interconnector. The consequent temporal response was followed for the real O(+)-electron mass ratio in the cases of 100- and 250-V solar cells, various solar cell thicknesses, and solar cells with secondary electron emission. Larger applied potentials and thinner solar cells lead to greater initial polarization surface charges, and therefore longer discharging and shielding times. When secondary electron emission from the cover glass is brought to bear, however, the potential structure is nearly planar, allowing constant interaction between plasma electrons and cover glass; a large fraction of the resulting secondary electrons is collected by the interconnector, constituting an order-of-magnitude increase in collected current.

  15. Comparison of an ARTEMIS lunar wake fly-by with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Farrell, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    On February 13, 2010, the ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft flew through the lunar wake at approximately 3.5 lunar radii downstream from the Moon. Detailed measurements were made of the plasma and electromagnetic field environment, including a density depletion in the wake, counter-streaming ion beams, and electrostatic wave activity. Additionally, the combination of a tilted interplanetary magnetic field orientation and an asymmetric solar wind electron distribution caused a resulting spatial asymmetry in the generation of electron beams and electrostatic waves [Halekas et al, SSR, 2011]. Here, we simulate the ARTEMIS P1 wake crossing with a one-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code in order to (1) reproduce the general characteristics of the lunar wake fly-by, (2) include the effect of the asymmetric nature of the interplanetary magnetic field and electron distribution, and (3) study the effect of these asymmetries on the generation of electron beams and electrostatic waves.

  16. Kinetic modeling of x-ray laser-driven solid Al plasmas via particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royle, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Mancini, R. C.; Paraschiv, I.; Johzaki, T.

    2017-06-01

    Solid-density plasmas driven by intense x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation are seeded by sources of nonthermal photoelectrons and Auger electrons that ionize and heat the target via collisions. Simulation codes that are commonly used to model such plasmas, such as collisional-radiative (CR) codes, typically assume a Maxwellian distribution and thus instantaneous thermalization of the source electrons. In this study, we present a detailed description and initial applications of a collisional particle-in-cell code, picls, that has been extended with a self-consistent radiation transport model and Monte Carlo models for photoionization and K L L Auger ionization, enabling the fully kinetic simulation of XFEL-driven plasmas. The code is used to simulate two experiments previously performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source investigating XFEL-driven solid-density Al plasmas. It is shown that picls-simulated pulse transmissions using the Ecker-Kröll continuum-lowering model agree much better with measurements than do simulations using the Stewart-Pyatt model. Good quantitative agreement is also found between the time-dependent picls results and those of analogous simulations by the CR code scfly, which was used in the analysis of the experiments to accurately reproduce the observed K α emissions and pulse transmissions. Finally, it is shown that the effects of the nonthermal electrons are negligible for the conditions of the particular experiments under investigation.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shock formation via head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Hsu, S. C.

    2013-08-15

    We describe numerical simulations, using the particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid-PIC code lsp[T. P. Hughes et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 110401 (1999)], of the head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets. The goals of these experiments are to form and study astrophysically relevant collisionless shocks in the laboratory. Using the plasma jet initial conditions (density ∼10{sup 14}–10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}, temperature ∼ few eV, and propagation speed ∼20–150 km/s), large-scale simulations of jet propagation demonstrate that interactions between the two jets are essentially collisionless at the merge region. In highly resolved one- and two-dimensional simulations, we show that collisionless shocks are generated by the merging jets when immersed in applied magnetic fields (B∼0.1–1 T). At expected plasma jet speeds of up to 150 km/s, our simulations do not give rise to unmagnetized collisionless shocks, which require much higher velocities. The orientation of the magnetic field and the axial and transverse density gradients of the jets have a strong effect on the nature of the interaction. We compare some of our simulation results with those of previously published PIC simulation studies of collisionless shock formation.

  18. Fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of a deuterium gas puff z pinch.

    PubMed

    Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Clark, R E; Mostrom, C B; Stygar, W A; Leeper, R J

    2009-12-18

    We present the first fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium gas puff z pinch. Recent experiments with 15-MA current pinches have suggested that the dominant neutron-production mechanism is thermonuclear. We observe distinct differences between the kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations in the pinch evolution with the kinetic simulations producing both thermonuclear and beam-target neutrons. The kinetic approach demonstrated in this Letter represents a viable alternative for performing future plasma physics calculations.

  19. Fully Kinetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of a Deuterium Gas Puff z Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Clark, R. E.; Mostrom, C. B.; Stygar, W. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2009-12-18

    We present the first fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium gas puff z pinch. Recent experiments with 15-MA current pinches have suggested that the dominant neutron-production mechanism is thermonuclear. We observe distinct differences between the kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations in the pinch evolution with the kinetic simulations producing both thermonuclear and beam-target neutrons. The kinetic approach demonstrated in this Letter represents a viable alternative for performing future plasma physics calculations.

  20. The Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) method: a semi-implicit adaptive algorithm for Particle In Cell plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Maria Elena; Beck, Arnaud; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations of plasmas are not bound anymore by the stability constraints of explicit algorithms. Semi implicit and fully implicit methods allow to use larger grid spacings and time steps. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques permit to locally change the simulation resolution. The code proposed in Innocenti et al., 2013 and Beck et al., 2013 is however the first to combine the advantages of both. The use of the Implicit Moment Method allows to taylor the resolution used in each level to the physical scales of interest and to use high Refinement Factors (RF) between the levels. The Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) structure, where all levels are simulated as complete domains, conjugates algorithmic and practical advantages. The different levels evolve according to the local dynamics and achieve optimal level interlocking. Also, the capabilities of the Object Oriented programming model are fully exploited. The MLMD algorithm is demonstrated with magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks simulations with very high RFs between the levels. Notable computational gains are achieved with respect to simulations performed on the entire domain with the higher resolution. Beck A. et al. (2013). submitted. Innocenti M. E. et al. (2013). JCP, 238(0):115-140.

  1. Nonlinear evolution of ion acoustic solitary waves in space plasmas: Fluid and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Bharati; Kakad, Amar; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-01

    Spacecraft observations revealed the presence of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) in various regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. Over the years, many researchers have attempted to model these observations in terms of electron/ion acoustic solitary waves by using nonlinear fluid theory/simulations. The ESW structures predicted by fluid models can be inadequate due to its inability in handling kinetic effects. To provide clear view on the application of the fluid and kinetic treatments in modeling the ESWs, we perform both fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) and estimate the quantitative differences in their characteristics like speed, amplitude, and width. We find that the number of trapped electrons in the wave potential is higher for the IASW, which are generated by large-amplitude initial density perturbation (IDP). The present fluid and PIC simulation results are in close agreement for small amplitude IDPs, whereas for large IDPs they show discrepancy in the amplitude, width, and speed of the IASW, which is attributed to negligence of kinetic effects in the former approach. The speed of IASW in the fluid simulations increases with the increase of IASW amplitude, while the reverse tendency is seen in the PIC simulation. The present study suggests that the fluid treatment is appropriate when the magnitude of phase velocity of IASW is less than the ion acoustic (IA) speed obtained from their linear dispersion relation, whereas when it exceeds IA speed, it is necessary to include the kinetic effects in the model.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of Magnetic Field Generation, Evolution, and Reconnection in Laser-driven Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Jack; Moissard, Clément; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    The advent of high-energy-density physics facilities has introduced the opportunity to experimentally investigate magnetic field dynamics relevant to both ICF and astrophysical plasmas. Recent experiments have demonstrated magnetic reconnection between colliding plasma plumes, where the reconnecting magnetic fields were self-generated in the plasma by the Biermann battery effect. In this study, we simulate these experiments from first principles using 2-D and 3-D particle-in-cell simulations. Simulations self-consistently demonstrate magnetic field generation by the Biermann battery effect, followed by advection by the Hall effect and ion flow. In 2-D simulations, we find in both the collisionless case and the semi-collisional case, defined by eVi × B >> Rei /ne (where Rei is the electron ion momentum transfer) that quantitative agreement with the generalized Ohm's law is only obtained with the inclusion of the pressure tensor. Finally, we document that significant field is destroyed at the reconnection site by the Biermann term, an inverse, `anti-Biermann' effect, which has not been considered previously in analysis of the experiment. The role of the anti-Biermann effect will be compared to standard reconnection mechanisms in 3-D reconnection simulations. This research used resources of the ORLC Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. DoE under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  3. Delta-f to Full-F Particle-In-Cell Simulation of Microturbulence in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.; Ethier, S.; Ganesh, J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of a generalized weight-based particle simulation scheme suitable for simulating tokamak turbulence is reported. The scheme, which is a generalization of the perturbed distribution schemes developed earlier for PIC simulations, is now capable of handling the full distribution of the particles in the simulation. Specifically, we can simulate both the delta-f and the full-F particles within the same code. Its development [1] is based on the concept of multiscale expansion, which separates the scale lengths of the background inhomogeneity from those associated with the perturbed distributions, and on the fact that the intrinsic particle noise level is troublesome only in the beginning of the simulation, where the signal to noise ratio is low. But, when the signal to noise ratio becomes higher afterwards, we can gradually turn on the the full-F particles without interfering with the ensuing fluctuations. We will report on the simulation studies using GTC [2] for the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven instabilities in the presence of zonal flows. The physics of steady state transport in tokamaks will be discussed.[4pt] [1] W. W. Lee, T. G. Jenkins and S. Ethier, Comp. Phys. Comm. 182, 564 (2011).[0pt] [2] Z. Lin, T. S. Hahm, W. W. Lee, W. M. Tang, R. White Science 281, 1835 (1998).

  4. Simulations of the effects of mobile ions on the relativistic beam-plasma instability for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Lee, H.

    1983-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the beam-plasma instability for intense relativistic electron beams in dense plasmas show rapid heating of the electrons to multi-kilovolt temperatures. The resulting hydrodynamic motion of the plasma results in density gradients that degrade the interaction. Heat flow out of the plasma is found in some instances to limit the gradient formation process.

  5. Effects of variations in electron thermal velocity on the whistler anisotropy instability: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Wang, Joseph; Decyk, Viktor K.; Gary, S. Peter

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates how the physics of the whistler anisotropy instability (WAI) is affected by variations in the electron thermal velocity vte, referred to here in terms of the ratio v̂ t e=vt e/c , where c is the speed of light. The WAI is driven by the electron condition RT>1 , where RT=Te ⊥/Te ∥ is the temperature anisotropy ratio and ⊥/∥ signify directions perpendicular/parallel to the background magnetic field B0 . While a typical value of v̂ t e in the solar wind is ˜0.005 , electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations often use a value near 0.1 in order to maximize the computational time step. In this study, a two-dimensional (2D) Darwin particle-in-cell (DPIC) code, MDPIC2, is used. The time step in the DPIC model is not affected by the choice of v̂ t e , making DPIC suited for this study. A series of simulations are carried out under the condition that the electron βe is held fixed, while v̂ t e is varied over the range 0.1 ≥v̂ t e≥0.025 . The results show that, with βe held fixed, the linear dispersion properties and the nonlinear saturation amplitude and pitch angle scattering rates associated with the WAI are insensitive to the value of v̂ t e . A supplementary investigation is conducted which characterizes how the WAI model is affected at various values of v̂ t e by noise associated with the limited number of particles in a typical PIC simulation. It is found that the evolution of the WAI is more strongly influenced by electrostatic noise as v̂ t e is decreased. The electrostatic noise level is inversely proportional to the number of particles per computational cell ( Nc ); this implies that the number of particles required to remove nonphysical effects from the PIC simulation increases as v̂ t e decreases. It is concluded that PIC simulations of this instability which use an artificially large value of v̂ t e accurately reproduce the response of a cooler plasma as long as a realistic value of βe is used

  6. Investigation of plasma immersion ion implantation of nickel-titanium rod by multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2008-03-01

    A multiple-grid-particle-in-cell numerical method has been developed. This method uses grids of different cell sizes and details are needed in only one part of the simulation region and not others. Hence, there are fewer nodes in the simulation thereby reduced computational time without sacrificing details. In the multiple-grid system, a phenomenon is identified to arise at the interface between two grids and a half-cell weighting method is utilized to solve the weighting issue at the boundary. It is shown that the expression of the change of momentum has no weighting function. This method is employed to numerically simulate the plasma immersion ion implantation process into a nickel titanium rod measuring 50 mm long and 4.8 mm in diameter used in orthopaedic surgery. To conduct more uniform implantation, the NiTi rod is elevated on the sample stage by a metal rod. The nitrogen implantation fluences and depth profiles are simulated and compared to experimental values determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  7. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  8. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for thetransport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ionsource VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, DamonS.; Leitner, Daniela; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lyneis,Claude M.; Qiang, Ji; Grote, Dave P.

    2005-09-19

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This paper presents first results of comparisons between simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He+, He2+) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase space current density measurements. Further, measurements of phase space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-15

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, Ling-yu; Yang, Lei E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn

    2014-08-15

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

  11. Discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell simulation of longitudinal plasma wave damping and comparison to the Landau approximation and the exact solution of the dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, F. R.; Bell, T. F.; Spasojevic, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2011-06-15

    We present results showing the measured Landau damping rate using a high-order discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell (DG-PIC) [G. B. Jacobs and J. S. Hesthaven, J. Comput. Phys. 214, 96 (2006)] method. We show that typical damping rates measured in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations can differ significantly from the linearized Landau damping coefficient and propose a simple numerical method to solve the plasma dispersion function exactly for moderate to high damping rates. Simulation results show a high degree of agreement between the high-order PIC results and this calculated theoretical damping rate.

  12. Nonlinear electromagnetic formulation for particle-in-cell simulation of lower hybrid waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z. Kuley, A.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-06-15

    An electromagnetic particle simulation model has been formulated and verified for nonlinear processes of lower hybrid (LH) waves in fusion plasmas. Electron dynamics are described by the drift kinetic equation using either kinetic momentum or canonical momentum. Ion dynamics are treated as the fluid system or by the Vlasov equation. Compressible magnetic perturbation is retained to simulate both the fast and slow LH waves. Numerical properties are greatly improved by using the electron continuity equation to enforce the consistency between electrostatic potential and vector potential, and by using the importance sampling scheme. The simulation model has been implemented in the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC), and verified for the dispersion relation and nonlinear particle trapping of the electromagnetic LH waves.

  13. Quasi-One-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, Frans H.; Sheehan, J. P.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Shebalin, John V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the quasi-one-dimensional simulation of magnetic nozzles is presented and simulations of a magnetic nozzle are performed. The effects of the density variation due to plasma expansion and the magnetic field forces on ion acceleration are investigated. Magnetic field forces acting on the electrons are found to be responsible for the formation of potential structures which accelerate ions. The effects of the plasma density variation alone are found to only weakly affect ion acceleration. Strongly diverging magnetic fields drive more rapid potential drops.

  14. Global particle-in-cell simulations of microturbulence with kinetic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, J. L. V.; Rewoldt, G.; Ethier, S.; Lee, W. W.; Lin, Z.

    2006-07-15

    The effects of nonadiabatic electrons on ion temperature gradient drift instabilities have been studied in global toroidal geometry using the gyrokinetic particle simulation approach. Compared to the nonlinear global simulations based on only the adiabatic response of the electrons, we have found that the cross-field ion heat transport is two to three times larger in the presence of trapped electrons as compared to the purely adiabatic electron case, and that the zonal component of the electrostatic potential has a shorter wavelength. The numerical methods for calculating both the adiabatic and the nonadiabatic responses for the electrons are presented.

  15. Global particle in cell simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak ∖fs20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Lau, C.; Sun, G. Y.

    2016-10-01

    We are looking into a new nonlinear kinetic simulation model to study the radio frequency heating and current drive of fusion plasmas using toroidal code GTC. In this model ions are considered as fully kinetic (FK) particles using Vlasov equation and the electrons are treated as drift kinetic (DK) particles using drift kinetic equation. We have benchmarked this numerical model to verify the linear physics of normal modes, conversion of slow and fast waves and its propagation in the core region of the tokamak using the Boozer coordinates. In the nonlinear simulation of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) in a tokamak, parametric decay instability (PDI) is observed where a large amplitude pump wave decays into an IBW sideband and an ion cyclotron quasi-mode (ICQM). The ICQM induces an ion perpendicular heating, with a heating rate proportional to the pump wave intensity. Finally, in the electromagnetic LH simulation, nonlinear wave trapping of electrons is verified and plasma current is nonlinearly driven. Presently we are working on the development of new PIC simulation model using cylindrical coordinates to address the RF wave propagation from the edge of the tokamak to the core region and the parametric instabilities associated with this RF waves. We have verified the cyclotron integrator using Boris push method.

  16. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of electrostatic Bernstein waves in plasmas with kappa velocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul, R. F. Mace, R. L.

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic Bernstein waves that propagate exactly perpendicularly to a static magnetic field in an electron-ion plasma are investigated using one-and-two-halves dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An ion-to-electron mass ratio of m{sub i}/m{sub e} = 100 is used, allowing sufficient separation of the electron and ion time scales while still accounting for the ion dynamics without resorting to exceptionally long simulation run times. As a consequence of the mass ratio used, both the high frequency electron Bernstein wave and the lower frequency ion Bernstein wave are resolved within a single simulation run. The simulations presented here use isotropic three-dimensional kappa velocity distributions as well as the widely used Maxwellian velocity distribution, and the results from using each of these velocity distributions are analysed and compared. The behaviour of the Bernstein waves is found to be significantly dependent on the spectral index, κ, of the kappa distribution in all frequency domains of the Bernstein waves. In both the Maxwellian and kappa cases, spectral analysis of the electric field (wave) intensities, as a function of ω and k, show very good agreement between the simulation results and the linear dispersion relation for Bernstein waves. This agreement serves to validate the simulation techniques used, as well as the theory of Bernstein waves in plasmas with a kappa velocity distribution. The intensity of the field fluctuations in the simulations containing an abundance of superthermal particles, i.e., where the plasma has a kappa velocity distribution with a low kappa index, is slightly higher compared to the simulations of plasmas with higher kappa values. The plasmas with low kappa values also exhibit a broader region in frequency space of high intensity field fluctuations.

  17. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of plasma cavitation and bursty Brillouin backscattering for nonrelativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Riconda, C.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.

    2006-08-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of laser-plasma interaction using a plane-wave geometry show strong bursty stimulated Brillouin backscattering, rapid filamentation, and subsequent plasma cavitation. It is shown that the cavitation is not induced by self-focusing. The electromagnetic fields below the plasma frequency that are excited are related to transient soliton-like structures. At the origin of these solitons is a three-wave decay process exciting new modes in the plasma. The cavitation is responsible for a strong local reduction of the reflectivity and goes along with an efficient but transient heating of the electrons. Once heating ceases, transmission starts to increase. Local as well as global average reflectivities attain a very low value due to strong plasma density variations brought about by the cavitation process. On the one hand, the simulations confirm the existence of a new mechanism of cavity and soliton formation in nonrelativistic laser-plasma interaction in two dimensions, which was shown to exist in one-dimensional simulations [S. Weber, C. Riconda, and V. T. Tikhonchuk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 055005 (2005)]. On the other hand, new aspects are introduced inherently related to the additional degree of freedom.

  18. Efficient particle-in-cell simulation of auroral plasma phenomena using a CUDA enabled graphics processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Stephen

    This thesis introduces a software framework that effectively utilizes low-cost commercially available Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) to simulate complex scientific plasma phenomena that are modeled using the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) paradigm. The software framework that was developed conforms to the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a standard for general purpose graphic processing that was introduced by NVIDIA Corporation. This framework has been verified for correctness and applied to advance the state of understanding of the electromagnetic aspects of the development of the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis. For each phase of the PIC methodology, this research has identified one or more methods to exploit the problem's natural parallelism and effectively map it for execution on the graphic processing unit and its host processor. The sources of overhead that can reduce the effectiveness of parallelization for each of these methods have also been identified. One of the novel aspects of this research was the utilization of particle sorting during the grid interpolation phase. The final representation resulted in simulations that executed about 38 times faster than simulations that were run on a single-core general-purpose processing system. The scalability of this framework to larger problem sizes and future generation systems has also been investigated.

  19. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M; Friedel, Reinhard H; Funsten, Herbert O; Gary, S Peter; Hospodarsky, George B; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Skoug, Ruth M; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr <Ω e , where Ω e is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃Ω e /2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ∼Ω e /2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  20. A Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chap, Andrew; Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Scott, John H.

    2013-01-01

    A Particle-in-cell simulation model has been developed to study the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) applied to the conversion of charged fusion products into electricity. In this model the availability of a beam of collimated fusion products is assumed; the simulation is focused on the conversion of the beam kinetic energy into alternating current (AC) electric power. The model is electrostatic, as the electro-dynamics of the relatively slow ions can be treated in the quasistatic approximation. A two-dimensional, axisymmetric (radial-axial coordinates) geometry is considered. Ion beam particles are injected on one end and travel along the axis through ring-shaped electrodes with externally applied time-varying voltages, thus modulating the beam by forming a sinusoidal pattern in the beam density. Further downstream, the modulated beam passes through another set of ring electrodes, now electrically oating. The modulated beam induces a time alternating potential di erence between adjacent electrodes. Power can be drawn from the electrodes by connecting a resistive load. As energy is dissipated in the load, a corresponding drop in beam energy is measured. The simulation encapsulates the TWDEC process by reproducing the time-dependent transfer of energy and the particle deceleration due to the electric eld phase time variations.

  1. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Hiroki Ishiguro, Seiji

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  2. Scaled-down particle-in-cell simulation of cathode plasma expansion in magnetically insulated coaxial diode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Cai, Dan

    2016-03-15

    The expansion of cathode plasma in magnetically insulated coaxial diode (MICD) is investigated in theory and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The temperature and density of the cathode plasma are about several eV and 10{sup 13}–10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}, respectively, and its expansion velocity is of the level of few cm/μs. Through hydrodynamic theory analysis, expressions of expansion velocities in axial and radial directions are obtained. The characteristics of cathode plasma expansion have been simulated through scaled-down PIC models. Simulation results indicate that the expansion velocity is dominated by the ratio of plasma density other than the static electric field. The electric field counteracts the plasma expansion reverse of it. The axial guiding magnetic field only reduces the radial transport coefficients by a correction factor, but not the axial ones. Both the outward and inward radial expansions of a MICD are suppressed by the much stronger guiding magnetic field and even cease.

  3. Hybrid (particle in cell-fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic soliton generation including super-thermal and trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Nopoush, M.; Abbasi, H.

    2011-08-15

    The present paper is devoted to the simulation of the nonlinear disintegration of a localized perturbation into an ion-acoustic soliton in a plasma. Recently, this problem was studied by a simple model [H. Abbasi et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095007 (2008)]. The main assumptions were (i) in the electron velocity distribution function (DF), the ion-acoustic soliton velocity was neglected in comparison to the electron thermal velocity, (ii) on the ion-acoustic evolution time-scale, the electron velocity DF was assumed to be stationary, and (iii) the calculation was restricted to the small amplitude case. In order to generalize the model, one has to consider the evolution of the electron velocity DF for finite amplitudes. For this purpose, a one dimensional electrostatic hybrid code, particle in cell (PIC)-fluid, was designed. It simulates the electrons dynamics by the PIC method and the cold ions dynamics by the fluid equations. The plasma contains a population of super-thermal electrons and, therefore, a Lorentzian (kappa) velocity DF is used to model the high energy tail in the electron velocity DF. Electron trapping is included in the simulation in view of their nonlinear resonant interaction with the localized perturbation. A Gaussian initial perturbation is used to model the localized perturbation. The influence of both the trapped and the super-thermal electrons on this process is studied and compared with the previous model.

  4. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr<Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr≃Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ˜Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  5. Cosmological particle-in-cell simulations with ultralight axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltmaat, Jan; Niemeyer, Jens C.

    2016-12-01

    We study cosmological structure formation with ultralight axion dark matter, or "fuzzy dark matter" (FDM), using a particle-mesh scheme to account for the quantum pressure arising in the Madelung formulation of the Schrödinger-Poisson equations. Subpercent-level energy conservation and correct linear behavior are demonstrated. Whereas the code gives rise to the same core-halo profiles as direct simulations of the Schrödinger equation, it does not reproduce the detailed interference patterns. In cosmological simulations with FDM initial conditions, we find a maximum relative difference of O(10%) in the power spectrum near the quantum Jeans length compared to using a standard N -body code with identical initial conditions. This shows that the effect of quantum pressure during nonlinear structure formation cannot be neglected for precision constraints on a dark matter component consisting of ultralight axions.

  6. Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Laser WakefieldExperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, F.S.; Antonsen, T.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cary, J.R.; Decyk,V.K.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Huang, C.; Hakim, A.; Katsouleas, T.; Lu, W.; Messmer, P.; Mori, W.B.; Tzoufras, M.; Vieira, J.

    2007-06-01

    Plasma accelerator methods offer the potential to reduce thesize of moderate and high energy accelerators by factors of 1000. In thepast few years great advances have been made in the production of lowemittance, high quality (i.e., monoenergetic) electron beams withenergies between .1 and 1 GeV using ultra-fast (<50 femtoseconds),high power (>10TW) lasers. The most noticeable of these advances werethe experimental results presented in the "Dream Beam" issue of Natureand in a recent issues of Physical Review Letters, Nature, and NaturePhysics. The experimental progress have been made due to advances inlasers, diagnostics, plasma sources, and the knowledge of how to controlof this highly nonlinear acceleration process. And this experimentalprogress has occurred simultaneously with and been in part due toadvances in modeling capabilities. Using a hierarchy of particlein-cell(PIC) codes OSIRIS, VORPAL, and QuickPIC, we have performed numerous fullscale 3D simulations using parameters quoted from the Nature and NaturePhysics articles. Our simulations have predicted results, providedagreement between simulations and experiments (within the shot-to-shotvariations of the experiments), and provided insight into the complicatedphysics of the experiments. Most importantly, as our confidence in thefidelity of our methods increases we can now guide the planning of newexperiments, and probe parameters that are not yet available. Therebyproviding a "road map" for generating high quality, high-charge 10 to 100GeV electron beams for use in high-energy physics and lightsources.

  7. Global particle-in-cell simulations of microturbulence with kinetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Jerome

    2005-10-01

    A systematic approach (called the splitting scheme [1]) to accurately model electron kinetic effects in gyrokinetic PIC simulation is presented. The 1D application of the scheme shows that the linear properties of the simulated plasma are more accurate [1]than the conventional perturbative delta-f scheme and that the nonlinear properties are considerably improved [2] It will be shown that an accurate loading of the initial distribution function based on a neural network algorithm [3] and a noise-free collisional operator [4]for PIC codes allow for even longer simulations with good momentum and energy conservation properties. The toroidal version of the scheme, which relies on a global finite-element elliptic solver [5] is used in the GTC code [6]; preliminary results on trapped- electron mode modified ITG turbulence will be reported.[1]J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3204 (2003)[2]J.L.V. Lewandowski, PPCF, 45, L49 (2003)[3]J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Lett. A, 291 (2003)[4] J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas 12, 2322 (2005)[5] Y. Nishimura et al, submitted to JCP (2004) [6] Z. Lin et al, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1857 (2000) [supported by Scidac Center for GPS project

  8. Nonlinear Evolution of Ion Acoustic Solitary Waves in Earth's Magnetosphere: Fluid and Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, A.; Kakad, B. A.; Omura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent spacecraft observations, coherent electrostatic solitary wave (ESWs) structures are observed in various regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. Over the years, many researchers have attempted to model these observations in terms of electron/ion acoustic solitary waves by using nonlinear fluid theory/simulations. The ESW structures predicted by fluid models can be inadequate due to its inability in handling kinetic effects. To provide clear view on the application of the fluid and kinetic treatments in modeling the ESWs, we perform both fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) and estimate the quantitative differences in their characteristics like speed, amplitude, and width. It is noted that a long time evolution of Gaussian type perturbations in the equilibrium electron and ion densities generated the nonlinear IASW structures in both fluid and PIC simulations. The IASW structures represent vortices of trapped electrons in PIC simulations. We find that the number of trapped electrons in the wave potential is higher for the large amplitude IASW, which are generated by large-amplitude initial density perturbation (IDP). The present fluid and PIC simulation results are in close agreement for small amplitude IDPs, whereas for large IDPs they show discrepancy in the amplitude, width, and speed of the IASW, which is attributed to negligence of kinetic effects in the former approach. The speed of IASW in the fluid simulations increases with the increase of IASW amplitude, while the reverse tendency is seen in the PIC simulation. The present study suggests that the fluid treatment is appropriate to model the IASW observations when the magnitude of phase velocity of IASW is less than the ion acoustic (IA) speed obtained from their linear dispersion relation, whereas when it exceeds IA speed, it is necessary to include the kinetic effects in the model.

  9. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Twisted Magnetospheres of Magnetars. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-08-01

    The magnetospheres of magnetars are believed to be filled with electron-positron plasma generated by electric discharge. We present a first numerical experiment demonstrating this process in an axisymmetric magnetosphere with a simple threshold prescription for pair creation, which is applicable to the inner magnetosphere with an ultrastrong field. The {e}+/- discharge occurs in response to the twisting of the closed magnetic field lines by a shear deformation of the magnetar surface, which launches electric currents into the magnetosphere. The simulation shows the formation of an electric “gap” with an unscreened electric field ({\\boldsymbol{E}}\\cdot {\\boldsymbol{B}}\

  10. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of whistler wave generated by strong velocity shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D.; Scales, W.

    2016-12-01

    Inhomogeneous transverse flows are generated in plasma that contains a static electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field, which is a configuration that may naturally arise in the boundary layer between plasmas of different characteristics. The magnetized plasma layer with a velocity gradient is shown to be unstable to waves in the Very Low Frequency band that spans the ion and electron gyrofrequencies. With a three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC model, we are going to numerically reproduce the generation of whistler waves by strong velocity gradient. The simulation results will be compared with phenomena found in laboratory experiments. Velocity distribution function of will be investigated for possible acceleration of electrons by whistlers. Implications are for the dynamics in the radiation belt.

  11. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  12. Final Report for "Simulation Tools for Parallel Microwave Particle in Cell Modeling"

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H Stoltz

    2008-09-25

    Transport of high-power rf fields and the subsequent deposition of rf power into plasma is an important component of developing tokamak fusion energy. Two limitations on rf heating are: (i) breakdown of the metallic structures used to deliver rf power to the plasma, and (ii) a detailed understanding of how rf power couples into a plasma. Computer simulation is a main tool for helping solve both of these problems, but one of the premier tools, VORPAL, is traditionally too difficult to use for non-experts. During this Phase II project, we developed the VorpalView user interface tool. This tool allows Department of Energy researchers a fully graphical interface for analyzing VORPAL output to more easily model rf power delivery and deposition in plasmas.

  13. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection with a Non-Uniform Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Fiona; Neukirch, Thomas; Hesse, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Results are presented of a first study of collisionless magnetic reconnection starting from a recently found exact nonlinear force-free Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium. The initial state has a Harris sheet magnetic field profile in one direction and a non-uniform guide field in a second direction, resulting in a spatially constant magnetic field strength as well as a constant initial plasma density and plasma pressure. It is found that the reconnection process initially resembles guide field reconnection, but that a gradual transition to anti-parallel reconnection happens as the system evolves. The time evolution of a number of plasma parameters is investigated, and the results are compared with simulations starting from a Harris sheet equilibrium and a Harris sheet plus constant guide field equilibrium.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with a non-uniform guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Hesse, M.; Harrison, M. G.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-03-01

    Results are presented of a first study of collisionless magnetic reconnection starting from a recently found exact nonlinear force-free Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium. The initial state has a Harris sheet magnetic field profile in one direction and a non-uniform guide field in a second direction, resulting in a spatially constant magnetic field strength as well as a constant initial plasma density and plasma pressure. It is found that the reconnection process initially resembles guide field reconnection, but that a gradual transition to anti-parallel reconnection happens as the system evolves. The time evolution of a number of plasma parameters is investigated, and the results are compared with simulations starting from a Harris sheet equilibrium and a Harris sheet plus constant guide field equilibrium.

  15. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of long-anode magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rajendra Kumar; Maurya, Shivendra; Singh, Vindhyavasini Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Long Anode Magnetron (LAM) is a design scheme adopted to attain greater thermal stability and higher power levels for the conventional magnetrons. So a LAM for 5MW Power level at 2.858 GHz was `Virtual Prototyped' using Admittance Matching field theory (AMT) andthen a PIC Study (Beam-wave interaction) was conducted using CST Particle Studio (CST-PS) which is explained in this paper. The convincing results thus obtained were - hot resonant frequency of 2.834 GHz. Output power of 5 MW at beam voltage of 58kV and applied magnetic field of 2200 Gauss with an overall efficiency of 45%. The simulated parameters values on comparison with the E2V LAM tube (M5028) were in good agreement which validates the feasibility of the design approach.

  16. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with a non-uniform guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, F. Neukirch, T. Harrison, M. G.; Hesse, M.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-03-15

    Results are presented of a first study of collisionless magnetic reconnection starting from a recently found exact nonlinear force-free Vlasov–Maxwell equilibrium. The initial state has a Harris sheet magnetic field profile in one direction and a non-uniform guide field in a second direction, resulting in a spatially constant magnetic field strength as well as a constant initial plasma density and plasma pressure. It is found that the reconnection process initially resembles guide field reconnection, but that a gradual transition to anti-parallel reconnection happens as the system evolves. The time evolution of a number of plasma parameters is investigated, and the results are compared with simulations starting from a Harris sheet equilibrium and a Harris sheet plus constant guide field equilibrium.

  17. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of long-anode magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Rajendra Kumar Maurya, Shivendra; Singh, Vindhyavasini Prasad

    2016-03-09

    Long Anode Magnetron (LAM) is a design scheme adopted to attain greater thermal stability and higher power levels for the conventional magnetrons. So a LAM for 5MW Power level at 2.858 GHz was ‘Virtual Prototyped’ using Admittance Matching field theory (AMT) andthen a PIC Study (Beam-wave interaction) was conducted using CST Particle Studio (CST-PS) which is explained in this paper. The convincing results thus obtained were – hot resonant frequency of 2.834 GHz. Output power of 5 MW at beam voltage of 58kV and applied magnetic field of 2200 Gauss with an overall efficiency of 45%. The simulated parameters values on comparison with the E2V LAM tube (M5028) were in good agreement which validates the feasibility of the design approach.

  18. One dimensional PIC simulation of relativistic Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajawat, Roopendra Singh; Sengupta, Sudip

    2016-10-01

    Spatio-temporal evolution of the relativistic Buneman instability has been investigated in one dimension using an in-house developed particle-in-cell simulation code. Starting from the excitation of the instability, its evolution has been followed numerically till its quenching and beyond. The simulation results have been quantitatively compared with the fluid theory and are found to be in conformity with the well known fact that the maximum growth rate (γmax) reduces due to relativistic effects and varies with γ e 0 and m/M as γ m a x ˜ /√{ 3 } 2 √{ γ e 0 } ( /m 2 M ) 1 / 3 , where γ e 0 is the Lorentz factor associated with the initial electron drift velocity (v0) and (m/M) is the electron to ion mass ratio. Further it is observed that in contrast to the non-relativistic results [A. Hirose, Plasma Phys. 20, 481 (1978)] at the saturation point, the ratio of electrostatic field energy density ( ∑ k | E k | 2 / 8 π ) to initial drift kinetic energy density (W0) scales with γ e 0 as ˜ 1 / γe 0 2 . This novel result on the scaling of energy densities has been found to be in quantitative agreement with the scalings derived using fluid theory.

  19. A comparison of weak-turbulence and particle-in-cell simulations of weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, H. Brady, C. S.; Che Rozenan, M. B.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-15

    Quasilinear theory has long been used to treat the problem of a weak electron beam interacting with plasma and generating Langmuir waves. Its extension to weak-turbulence theory treats resonant interactions of these Langmuir waves with other plasma wave modes, in particular, ion-sound waves. These are strongly damped in plasma of equal ion and electron temperatures, as sometimes seen in, for example, the solar corona and wind. Weak turbulence theory is derived in the weak damping limit, with a term describing ion-sound wave damping then added. In this paper, we use the EPOCH particle-in-cell code to numerically test weak turbulence theory for a range of electron-ion temperature ratios. We find that in the cold ion limit, the results agree well, but for increasing ion temperature the three-wave resonance becomes broadened in proportion to the ion-sound wave damping rate. Additionally, we establish lower limits on the number of simulation particles needed to accurately reproduce the electron and wave distributions in their saturated states and to reproduce their intermediate states and time evolution. These results should be taken into consideration in, for example, simulations of plasma wave generation in the solar corona of Type III solar radio bursts from the corona to the solar wind and in weak turbulence investigations of ion-acoustic lines in the ionosphere.

  20. Modeling a thermionic energy converter using finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, F. S.; Lu, P. S.; Ragan-Kelley, B.; Minnich, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Lin, M. C.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic energy converter (TEC) is a static device that converts heat directly into electricity by boiling electrons off a hot emitter surface across a small inter-electrode gap to a cooler collector surface. The main challenge in TECs is overcoming the space charge limit, which limits the current transmitted across a gap of a given voltage and width. We have verified the feasibility of studying and developing a TEC using a bounded finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell plasma simulation code, OOPD1, developed by Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, formerly at UC Berkeley and now at Michigan State University. In this preliminary work, a TEC has been modeled kinetically using OOPD1, and the accuracy has been verified by comparing with an analytically solvable case, giving good agreement. With further improvement of the code, one will be able to quickly and cheaply analyze space charge effects, and seek designs that mitigate the space charge effect, allowing TECs to become more efficient and cost-effective.

  1. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang Germaschewski, K.; Hakim, Ammar H.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-01-15

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed.

  2. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUSLY DRIVEN MIRROR AND ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITIES IN HIGH BETA ASTROPHYSICAL AND HELIOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-10

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ∼ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p {sub ∥} and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ∼ 0.3 (B) in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ∼ 0.1 (B), the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  3. Cross-Platform Graphical User Interface with fast 3-D Rendering for Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David; Luetkemeyer, Kelly; Cary, John

    1999-11-01

    The Graphical User Interface (GUI) for XOOPIC (X11-based Object-Oriented Particle-in-Cell) is being ported to Qt, a cross-platform C++ windowing toolkit, thus permitting the code to run on PC's running both Windows 95/98/NT and Linux, as well as all commercial Unix platforms. All 3-D graphics will be handled through OpenGL, the cross-platform standard for fast 3-D rendering. The use of object-oriented design (OOD) techniques keeps the GUI/physics interface clean, and minimizes the impact of GUI development on the physics code. OOD also improves the maintainability and extensibility of large scientific simulation codes, while allowing for cross-platform portability and ready interchange of individual algorithms or entire physics kernels. Planned new GUI features include interactive modifications of the simulation parameters, including generation of a slowly-varying mesh and automatic updating of a corresponding input file. Improved modeling of high-power microwave tubes is one of the primary applications being targeted by this project.

  4. Modeling a thermionic energy converter using finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, F. S.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, P. S.; Ragan-Kelley, B.; Minnich, A.; Lin, M. C.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-02-15

    A thermionic energy converter (TEC) is a static device that converts heat directly into electricity by boiling electrons off a hot emitter surface across a small inter-electrode gap to a cooler collector surface. The main challenge in TECs is overcoming the space charge limit, which limits the current transmitted across a gap of a given voltage and width. We have verified the feasibility of studying and developing a TEC using a bounded finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell plasma simulation code, OOPD1, developed by Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, formerly at UC Berkeley and now at Michigan State University. In this preliminary work, a TEC has been modeled kinetically using OOPD1, and the accuracy has been verified by comparing with an analytically solvable case, giving good agreement. With further improvement of the code, one will be able to quickly and cheaply analyze space charge effects, and seek designs that mitigate the space charge effect, allowing TECs to become more efficient and cost-effective.

  5. Monte Carlo approach to calculate ionization dynamics of hot solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; He, X T; Yu, W; Fritzsche, S

    2017-02-01

    A physical model based on a Monte Carlo approach is proposed to calculate the ionization dynamics of hot-solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and where the impact (collision) ionization (CI), electron-ion recombination (RE), and ionization potential depression (IPD) by surrounding plasmas are taken into consideration self-consistently. When compared with other models, which are applied in the literature for plasmas near thermal equilibrium, the temporal relaxation of ionization dynamics can also be simulated by the proposed model. Besides, this model is general and can be applied for both single elements and alloys with quite different compositions. The proposed model is implemented into a PIC code, with (final) ionization equilibriums sustained by competitions between CI and its inverse process (i.e., RE). Comparisons between the full model and model without IPD or RE are performed. Our results indicate that for bulk aluminium at temperature of 1 to 1000 eV, (i) the averaged ionization degree increases by including IPD; while (ii) the averaged ionization degree is significantly over estimated when the RE is neglected. A direct comparison from the PIC code is made with the existing models for the dependence of averaged ionization degree on thermal equilibrium temperatures and shows good agreements with that generated from Saha-Boltzmann model and/or FLYCHK code.

  6. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Continuously Driven Mirror and Ion Cyclotron Instabilities in High Beta Astrophysical and Heliospheric Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ~ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p ∥ and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ~ 0.3 langBrang in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ~ 0.1 langBrang, the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  7. Features of electron current layers: Comparison between three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Yeladandi, Manish; Somarothu, Trinath; Wells, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Wygant et al. (2005) and more recently Chen et al. (2008) reported Cluster observations on some basic features of electron current layers (ECL) in the magnetotail. These features include (1) a bifurcated ECL consisting of two layers with relatively large currents separated by a region of small current, (2) peaked density at the ECL center bordered by extended low-density regions, (3) bipolar Hall electric fields (EHall), (4) fine-scale, large-amplitude spiky turbulence in the electric fields normal to the plane of the ECL (En), (5) energized electrons that become increasingly isotropized toward the ECL central region, (6) cold electrons bordering the ECL, (7) ions accelerated by the Hall electric field, and (8) ions counterstreaming against the ions accelerated by EHall on both the north and south sides of the neutral sheet at the ECL midplane. We compare all these features with results from fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of an ECL. Simulations reveal that the fine structures in the electric fields inside the ECL are created by the ECL-driven electrostatic instabilities, which are instrumental in rapid heating and isotropization of the electrons with power law energy distribution, Fe(E) ≈ E-0.7. The heated electrons set up ambipolar electric fields (Ea) in the central part of the ECL, reflecting ions accelerated by EHall. The overall structures in the normal electric fields result from the superposition of EHall, Ea, and the instability-generated electric fields.

  8. Monte Carlo particle-in-cell methods for the simulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell gyrokinetic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, A.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2015-10-01

    > The particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is the most popular method for the discretisation of the general 6D Vlasov-Maxwell problem and it is widely used also for the simulation of the 5D gyrokinetic equations. The method consists of coupling a particle-based algorithm for the Vlasov equation with a grid-based method for the computation of the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. In this review we derive a Monte Carlo PIC finite-element model starting from a gyrokinetic discrete Lagrangian. The variations of the Lagrangian are used to obtain the time-continuous equations of motion for the particles and the finite-element approximation of the field equations. The Noether theorem for the semi-discretised system implies a certain number of conservation properties for the final set of equations. Moreover, the PIC method can be interpreted as a probabilistic Monte Carlo like method, consisting of calculating integrals of the continuous distribution function using a finite set of discrete markers. The nonlinear interactions along with numerical errors introduce random effects after some time. Therefore, the same tools for error analysis and error reduction used in Monte Carlo numerical methods can be applied to PIC simulations.

  9. Monte Carlo approach to calculate ionization dynamics of hot solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; He, X. T.; Yu, W.; Fritzsche, S.

    2017-02-01

    A physical model based on a Monte Carlo approach is proposed to calculate the ionization dynamics of hot-solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and where the impact (collision) ionization (CI), electron-ion recombination (RE), and ionization potential depression (IPD) by surrounding plasmas are taken into consideration self-consistently. When compared with other models, which are applied in the literature for plasmas near thermal equilibrium, the temporal relaxation of ionization dynamics can also be simulated by the proposed model. Besides, this model is general and can be applied for both single elements and alloys with quite different compositions. The proposed model is implemented into a PIC code, with (final) ionization equilibriums sustained by competitions between CI and its inverse process (i.e., RE). Comparisons between the full model and model without IPD or RE are performed. Our results indicate that for bulk aluminium at temperature of 1 to 1000 eV, (i) the averaged ionization degree increases by including IPD; while (ii) the averaged ionization degree is significantly over estimated when the RE is neglected. A direct comparison from the PIC code is made with the existing models for the dependence of averaged ionization degree on thermal equilibrium temperatures and shows good agreements with that generated from Saha-Boltzmann model and/or FLYCHK code.

  10. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Hakim, Ammar H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed.

  11. Whistler Anisotropy Instabilities as the Source of Banded Chorus: Van Allen Probes Observations and Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, S. Peter; Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus events are enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr <Ωe where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ~=Ωe / 2 . Here two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from HOPE instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. Observations show a three-component electron model consisting of a dense, cold (a few tens of eV) population, a less dense, warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a still less dense, hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. Simulations show that the warm component drives quasi-electrostatic upper-band chorus, and the hot component drives electromagnetic lower-band chorus; the gap near Ωe / 2 follows from growth of the two distinct instabilities.

  12. Verification of high voltage rf capacitive sheath models with particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2009-10-01

    Collisionless and collisional high voltage rf capacitive sheath models were developed in the late 1980's [1]. Given the external parameters of a single-frequency capacitively coupled discharge, plasma parameters including sheath width, electron and ion temperature, plasma density, power, and ion bombarding energy can be estimated. One-dimensional electrostatic PIC codes XPDP1 [2] and OOPD1 [3] are used to investigate plasma behaviors within rf sheaths and bulk plasma. Electron-neutral collisions only are considered for collisionless sheaths, while ion-neutral collisions are taken into account for collisional sheaths. The collisionless sheath model is verified very well by PIC simulations for the rf current-driven and voltage-driven cases. Results will be reported for collisional sheaths also. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16 (1988) 638; 17 (1989) 338 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Phys. 104 (1993) 321 [3] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199

  13. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma jet/cloud streaming across a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasma jets/clouds in magnetic field configurations typical for the terrestrial magnetotail and frontside magnetosheath is a topic of interest for understanding the physics of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. The presence of high-speed jets in the frontside magnetosheath has been recently proved experimentally by Cluster and THEMIS spacecrafts. There is increasing evidence that the bursty bulk flows in the magnetotail have jet-like features. In the present paper we use fully electromagnetic 3D explicit particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the interaction of a localized three-dimensional plasma element/jet/cloud with a transverse magnetic field. We consider a plasma jet/cloud that moves in vacuum and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field. Ampère and Faraday's laws are used to compute the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields on a three-dimensional spatial grid having a step-size of the order of the Debye length and using a time-step that resolves the plasma frequency. The initial magnetic field inside the simulation domain is uniform and the plasma bulk velocity at the beginning of the simulation is normal to the magnetic field direction. The total time scale of the simulation is of the order of few ion Larmor periods. Space and time variations of the plasma parameters and of the electromagnetic field are analyzed and discussed. We emphasize non-MHD effects like the energy-dispersion signatures at the edges of the plasma element, similar to results previously reported by Voitcu and Echim (2012) using test-kinetic simulations. Acknowledgments: Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  14. On particle movers in cylindrical geometry for Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Camporeale, E.

    2013-11-01

    Three movers for the orbit integration of charged particles in a given electromagnetic field are analyzed and compared in cylindrical geometry. The classic Boris mover, which is of leap-frog type with position and velocities staggered by half time step, is connected to a second order Strang operator splitting integrator. In general the Boris mover is about 20% faster than the Strang splitting mover without sacrificing much in terms of accuracy. Furthermore, the Boris mover is second order accurate only for a very specific choice of the initial half step needed by the algorithm to get started. Unlike the case in Cartesian geometry, where any initial half step which is at least first order accurate does not compromise the second order accuracy of the method, in cylindrical geometry any attempt to use a more accurate initial half step does in fact decrease the accuracy of the scheme to first order. Through the connection with the Strang operator splitting integrator, this counter-intuitive behavior is explained by the fact that the error in the half step velocities of the Boris mover is proportional to the time step of the simulation. For the case of a uniform and static magnetic field, we discuss the leap-frog cyclotronic mover, cylindrical analogue of the cyclotronic mover of Ref. [L. Patacchini and I. Hutchinson, J. Comput. Phys. 228 (7), 2009], where the step involving acceleration due to inertial forces is combined with the acceleration due to the magnetic part of the Lorentz force. The advantage of a cyclotronic mover is that the gyration of a charged particle in a magnetic field is treated analytically and therefore only the dynamics associated with the electric field needs to be resolved.

  15. Simulations of Dynamic Relativistic Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle Patrick

    Neutron stars and black holes are generally surrounded by magnetospheres of highly conducting plasma in which the magnetic flux density is so high that hydrodynamic forces are irrelevant. In this vanishing-inertia—or ultra-relativistic—limit, magnetohydrodynamics becomes force-free electrodynamics, a system of equations comprising only the magnetic and electric fields, and in which the plasma response is effected by a nonlinear current density term. In this dissertation I describe a new pseudospectral simulation code, designed for studying the dynamic magnetospheres of compact objects. A detailed description of the code and several numerical test problems are given. I first apply the code to the aligned rotator problem, in which a star with a dipole magnetic field is set rotating about its magnetic axis. The solution evolves to a steady state, which is nearly ideal and dissipationless everywhere except in a current sheet, or magnetic field discontinuity, at the equator, into which electromagnetic energy flows and is dissipated. Magnetars are believed to have twisted magnetospheres, due to internal magnetic evolution which deforms the crust, dragging the footpoints of external magnetic field lines. This twisting may be able to explain both magnetars' persistent hard X-ray emission and their energetic bursts and flares. Using the new code, I simulate the evolution of relativistic magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. The field lines expand outward, forming a strong current layer; eventually the configuration loses equilibrium and a dynamic rearrangement occurs, involving large-scale rapid magnetic reconnection and dissipation of the free energy of the twisted magnetic field. When the star is rotating, the magnetospheric twisting leads to a large increase in the stellar spin-down rate, which may take place on the long twisting timescale or in brief explosive events, depending on where the twisting is applied and the history of the system

  16. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  17. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).

  18. A simulation of a capacitively coupled oxygen discharge using the oopd1 particle-in-cell Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lieberman, M. A.; Wang, Ying; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2009-10-01

    The oopd1 particle-in-cell Monte Carlo (PIC-MC) code is used to simulate a capacitively coupled discharge in oxygen. oopd1 is a one-dimensional object-oriented PIC-MC code [1] in which the model system has one spatial dimension and three velocity components. It contains models for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries and replaces the XPDx1 series [2], which is not object-oriented. The revised oxygen model includes, in addition to electrons, the oxygen molecule in ground state, the oxygen atom in ground state, the negative ion O^-, and the positive ions O^+ and O2^+. The cross sections for the collisions among the oxygen species have been significantly revised from earlier work using the xpdp1 code [3]. Here we explore the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) and the density profiles for various pressures and driving frequencies. In particular we investigate the influence of the O^+ ion on the IEDF, we explore the influence of multiple driving frequencies, and we do comparisons to the previous xpdx1 codes. [1] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon, and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Physics 104 (1993) 321 [2] V. Vahedi and M. Surendra, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 179

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma experiments on Shenguang-II facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui; Dong, Quanli; Zhu, Jianqiang; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-15

    Recently, magnetic reconnection has been realized in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas. Plasma bubbles with self-generated magnetic fields are created by focusing laser beams to small-scale spots on a foil. The bubbles expand into each other, which may then drive magnetic reconnection. The reconnection experiment in laser-produced plasmas has also been conducted at Shenguang-II (SG-II) laser facility, and the existence of a plasmoid was identified in the experiment [Dong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215001 (2012)]. In this paper, by performing two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate such a process of magnetic reconnection based on the experiment on SG-II facility, and a possible explanation for the formation of the plasmoid is proposed. The results show that before magnetic reconnection occurs, the bubbles squeeze strongly each other and a very thin current sheet is formed. The current sheet is unstable to the tearing mode instability, and we can then observe the formation of plasmoid(s) in such a multiple X-lines reconnection.

  20. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. I. Insights from particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-15

    Using a 1D particle-in-cell simulation with perpendicular electric, E{sub 0}, and magnetic, B{sub 0}, fields, and modelling the azimuthal direction (i.e., the E{sub 0} × B{sub 0} direction), we study the cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs). For low plasma densities, the electron transport is found to be well described by classical electron-neutral collision theory, but at sufficiently high densities (representative of typical HETs), a strong instability is observed to significantly enhance the electron mobility, even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. This instability is associated with correlated high-frequency (of the order of MHz) and short-wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and the plasma density, which are shown to be the cause of the anomalous transport. Saturation of the instability is observed to occur due to a combination of ion-wave trapping in the E{sub 0} × B{sub 0} direction, and convection in the E{sub 0} direction.

  1. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of a miniature plasma source for a microwave discharge ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional particle model for a miniature microwave discharge ion thruster to elucidate the mechanism of ECR discharges confined in a small space. The model consists of a particle-in-cell simulation with a Monte Carlo collision algorithm (PIC-MCC) for the kinetics of charged particles, a finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetic fields of 4.2 GHz microwaves, and a finite element analysis for the magnetostatic fields of permanent magnets. The PIC-MCC results have shown that the electrons are well confined owing to the mirror magnetic fields and can be effectively heated in the ECR layer downstream of a ring-shaped antenna. The confinement results in the ring-shaped profiles of the plasma density along the antenna. The visual appearance of the plasma discharge of the thruster in operation was also ring-shaped. Moreover, the ions are expected to be accelerated effectively through the grid electrode without a large loss of ions toward side walls, that is, the plasma source developed here would be desirable in ion thrusters.

  2. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Matthew Richard

    1995-06-01

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  3. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Monte Carlo Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Critical Ionization Velocity Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Biasca, R.; Liewer, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    Although the existence of the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is known from laboratory experiments, no agreement has been reached as to whether CIV exists in the natural space environment. In this paper we move towards more realistic models of CIV and present the first fully three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations of typical space-based CIV experiments. In our model, the released neutral gas is taken to be a spherical cloud traveling across a magnetized ambient plasma. Simulations are performed for neutral clouds with various sizes and densities. The effects of the cloud parameters on ionization yield, wave energy growth, electron heating, momentum coupling, and the three-dimensional structure of the newly ionized plasma are discussed. The simulations suggest that the quantitative characteristics of momentum transfers among the ion beam, neutral cloud, and plasma waves is the key indicator of whether CIV can occur in space. The missing factors in space-based CIV experiments may be the conditions necessary for a continuous enhancement of the beam ion momentum. For a typical shaped charge release experiment, favorable CIV conditions may exist only in a very narrow, intermediate spatial region some distance from the release point due to the effects of the cloud density and size. When CIV does occur, the newly ionized plasma from the cloud forms a very complex structure due to the combined forces from the geomagnetic field, the motion induced emf, and the polarization. Hence the detection of CIV also critically depends on the sensor location.

  4. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  5. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; ...

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  6. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection. I. Macroscopic effects of the electron flows

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, P. A. Kilian, P.; Büchner, J.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we compare gyrokinetic (GK) with fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of magnetic reconnection in the limit of strong guide field. In particular, we analyze the limits of applicability of the GK plasma model compared to a fully kinetic description of force free current sheets for finite guide fields (b{sub g}). Here, we report the first part of an extended comparison, focusing on the macroscopic effects of the electron flows. For a low beta plasma (β{sub i} = 0.01), it is shown that both plasma models develop magnetic reconnection with similar features in the secondary magnetic islands if a sufficiently high guide field (b{sub g} ≳ 30) is imposed in the kinetic PIC simulations. Outside of these regions, in the separatrices close to the X points, the convergence between both plasma descriptions is less restrictive (b{sub g} ≳ 5). Kinetic PIC simulations using guide fields b{sub g} ≲ 30 reveal secondary magnetic islands with a core magnetic field and less energetic flows inside of them in comparison to the GK or kinetic PIC runs with stronger guide fields. We find that these processes are mostly due to an initial shear flow absent in the GK initialization and negligible in the kinetic PIC high guide field regime, in addition to fast outflows on the order of the ion thermal speed that violate the GK ordering. Since secondary magnetic islands appear after the reconnection peak time, a kinetic PIC/GK comparison is more accurate in the linear phase of magnetic reconnection. For a high beta plasma (β{sub i} = 1.0) where reconnection rates and fluctuations levels are reduced, similar processes happen in the secondary magnetic islands in the fully kinetic description, but requiring much lower guide fields (b{sub g} ≲ 3)

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND WAVE EXCITATION IN QUASI-PARALLEL HIGH-MACH-NUMBER COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.

    2015-04-01

    We herein investigate shock formation and particle acceleration processes for both protons and electrons in a quasi-parallel high-Mach-number collisionless shock through a long-term, large-scale, particle-in-cell simulation. We show that both protons and electrons are accelerated in the shock and that these accelerated particles generate large-amplitude Alfvénic waves in the upstream region of the shock. After the upstream waves have grown sufficiently, the local structure of the collisionless shock becomes substantially similar to that of a quasi-perpendicular shock due to the large transverse magnetic field of the waves. A fraction of protons are accelerated in the shock with a power-law-like energy distribution. The rate of proton injection to the acceleration process is approximately constant, and in the injection process, the phase-trapping mechanism for the protons by the upstream waves can play an important role. The dominant acceleration process is a Fermi-like process through repeated shock crossings of the protons. This process is a “fast” process in the sense that the time required for most of the accelerated protons to complete one cycle of the acceleration process is much shorter than the diffusion time. A fraction of the electrons are also accelerated by the same mechanism, and have a power-law-like energy distribution. However, the injection does not enter a steady state during the simulation, which may be related to the intermittent activity of the upstream waves. Upstream of the shock, a fraction of the electrons are pre-accelerated before reaching the shock, which may contribute to steady electron injection at a later time.

  8. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Electron and Ion Dissipation by Whistler Turbulence: Variations with Electron β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Two ensembles of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence have been carried out on a model of collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma with parameters similar to those of the solar wind near Earth. Initial, relatively isotropic, narrowband spectra of relatively long wavelength modes cascade to anisotropic, broadband spectra of magnetic fluctuations at shorter wavelengths. Electron and ion dissipation rates are computed as functions of the initial electron beta, βe, over the range 0.1 ≤ βe ≤ 5.0, where this quantity is varied by changes in the background magnetic field magnitude Bo. Ensemble One holds the value of the dimensionless initial magnetic fluctuation energy density ɛo ≡ Σk | δ {B}{{k}}{| }2/{B}{{o}}2 constant; Ensemble Two follows solar wind observations, imposing the initial condition ɛo = 0.20 βe. In both ensembles, the maximum dissipation rate of the electrons, Qe, and the maximum dissipation rate of the ions, Qi, satisfy Qe ≫ Qi. In Ensemble One, both dissipation rates scale approximately as {β }{{e}}-1, whereas over 0.1 ≤ βe ≤ 1.0 in Ensemble Two, Qe is approximately constant while Qi scales approximately as {β }{{e}}1/2. These results, when combined with conclusions from earlier PIC simulations, suggest that sufficiently long wavelength and sufficiently large-amplitude magnetosonic-whistler turbulence at sufficiently large βe may heat ions more rapidly than electrons.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulation of multipactor discharge on a dielectric in a parallel-plate waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Sakharov, A. S. Ivanov, V. A.; Konyzhev, M. E.

    2016-06-15

    An original 2D3V (two-dimensional in coordinate space and three-dimensional in velocity space) particle-in-cell code has been developed for simulation of multipactor discharge on a dielectric in a parallelplate metal waveguide with allowance for secondary electron emission (SEE) from the dielectric surface and waveguide walls, finite temperature of secondary electrons, electron space charge, and elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons from the dielectric and metal surfaces. The code allows one to simulate all stages of the multipactor discharge, from the onset of the electron avalanche to saturation. It is shown that the threshold for the excitation of a single-surface multipactor on a dielectric placed in a low-profile waveguide with absorbing walls increases as compared to that in the case of an unbounded dielectric surface due to escape of electrons onto the waveguide walls. It is found that, depending on the microwave field amplitude and the SEE characteristics of the waveguide walls, the multipactor may operate in two modes. In the first mode, which takes place at relatively low microwave amplitudes, a single-surface multipactor develops only on the dielectric, the surface of which acquires a positively potential with respect to the waveguide walls. In the second mode, which occurs at sufficiently high microwave intensities, a single-surface multipactor on the dielectric and a two-surface multipactor between the waveguide walls operate simultaneously. In this case, both the dielectric surface and the interwall space acquire a negative potential. It is shown that electron scattering from the dielectric surface and waveguide walls results in the appearance of high-energy tails in the electron distribution function.

  10. Particle Acceleration and Wave Excitation in Quasi-parallel High-Mach-number Collisionless Shocks: Particle-in-cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.

    2015-04-01

    We herein investigate shock formation and particle acceleration processes for both protons and electrons in a quasi-parallel high-Mach-number collisionless shock through a long-term, large-scale, particle-in-cell simulation. We show that both protons and electrons are accelerated in the shock and that these accelerated particles generate large-amplitude Alfvénic waves in the upstream region of the shock. After the upstream waves have grown sufficiently, the local structure of the collisionless shock becomes substantially similar to that of a quasi-perpendicular shock due to the large transverse magnetic field of the waves. A fraction of protons are accelerated in the shock with a power-law-like energy distribution. The rate of proton injection to the acceleration process is approximately constant, and in the injection process, the phase-trapping mechanism for the protons by the upstream waves can play an important role. The dominant acceleration process is a Fermi-like process through repeated shock crossings of the protons. This process is a “fast” process in the sense that the time required for most of the accelerated protons to complete one cycle of the acceleration process is much shorter than the diffusion time. A fraction of the electrons are also accelerated by the same mechanism, and have a power-law-like energy distribution. However, the injection does not enter a steady state during the simulation, which may be related to the intermittent activity of the upstream waves. Upstream of the shock, a fraction of the electrons are pre-accelerated before reaching the shock, which may contribute to steady electron injection at a later time.

  11. Measurements And Particle In Cell vs. Fluid Simulations Of A New Time Domain Impedance Probe For Ionospheric Plasma Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E. A.; Russ, S.; Kerrigan, B.; Leggett, K.; Mullins, J.; Clark, D. C.; Mizell, J.; Gollapalli, R.; Vassiliadis, D.; Lusk, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    A plasma impedance probe is used to obtain plasma parameters in the ionosphere by measuring the magnitude, shape and location of resonances in the frequency spectrum when a probe structure is driven with RF excitation. The measured magnitude and phase response with respect to frequency can be analyzed via analytical and simulational means. We have designed and developed a new Time Domain Impedance Probe capable of making measurements of absolute electron density and electron neutral collision frequency at temporal and spatial resolutions not previously attained. A single measurement can be made in a time as short as 50 microseconds, which yields a spatial resolution of 0.35 meters for a satellite orbital velocity of 7 km/s. The method essentially consists of applying a small amplitude time limited voltage signal into a probe and measuring the resulting current response. The frequency bandwidth of the voltage signal is selected in order that the electron plasma resonances are observable. A prototype of the instrument will be flown in October 2015 on a NASA Undergraduate Student Instrument Progam (USIP) sounding rocket launched out of Wallops Flight Facility. To analyze the measurements, we use a Particle In Cell (PIC) kinetic simulation to calculate the impedance of a dipole antenna immersed in a plasma. The electromagnetic solver utilizes the Finite Difference Time Domain method, while the particle to grid and grid to particle interpolation schemes are standard. The plasma sheath formation electron flux into the dipole surface is not included. The bulk velocity of the plasma around the dipole is assumed to be zero. For completeness, the hot plasma and nonlinear effects of probe plasma interaction are explored, including the appearance of cyclotron harmonics. In this work the electron neutral collisions are simulated via a Poisson process approximation. Our results are compared to sounding rocket data from the NASA Tropical Storms mission in 2007, as well as the

  12. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of rapid start-up in strapped oven magnetrons due to variation in the insulating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, J. W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Neculaes, V. B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jones, M. C.; Frese, M. H.; Watrous, J. J.

    2004-06-01

    A three-dimensional parallel particle-in-cell code, ICEPIC, is used to simulate the geometry and the magnetic field profiles of the recent low-noise, fast startup magnetron experiments at the University of Michigan. The fast startup, the power levels, and the starting currents that have been observed in these experiments are quantitatively reproduced in the simulations. The tendency for low noise operation has also been reproduced with the use of an azimuthally varying magnetic field.

  13. Plasma asymmetry due to the magnetic filter in fusion-type negative ion sources: Comparisons between two and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fubiani, G. Boeuf, J. P.

    2014-07-15

    Previously reported 2D Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) simulations of negative ion sources under conditions similar to those of the ITER neutral beam injection system have shown that the presence of the magnetic filter tends to generate asymmetry in the plasma properties in the extraction region. In this paper, we show that these conclusions are confirmed by 3D PIC-MCC simulations and we provide quantitative comparisons between the 2D and 3D model predictions.

  14. Exact charge-conserving scatter-gather algorithm for particle-in-cell simulations on unstructured grids: A geometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Haksu; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Omelchenko, Yuri A.

    2015-09-01

    We describe a charge-conserving scatter-gather algorithm for particle-in-cell simulations on unstructured grids. Charge conservation is obtained from first principles, i.e., without the need for any post-processing or correction steps. This algorithm recovers, at a fundamental level, the scatter-gather algorithms presented recently by Campos-Pinto et al. (2014) (to first-order) and by Squire et al. (2012), but it is derived here in a streamlined fashion from a geometric viewpoint. Some ingredients reflecting this viewpoint are (1) the use of (discrete) differential forms of various degrees to represent fields, currents, and charged particles and provide localization rules for the degrees of freedom thereof on the various grid elements (nodes, edges, facets), (2) use of Whitney forms as basic interpolants from discrete differential forms to continuum space, and (3) use of a Galerkin formula for the discrete Hodge star operators (i.e., "mass matrices" incorporating the metric datum of the grid) applicable to generally irregular, unstructured grids. The expressions obtained for the scatter charges and scatter currents are very concise and do not involve numerical quadrature rules. Appropriate fractional areas within each grid element are identified that represent scatter charges and scatter currents within the element, and a simple geometric representation for the (exact) charge conservation mechanism is obtained by such identification. The field update is based on the coupled first-order Maxwell's curl equations to avoid spurious modes with secular growth (otherwise present in formulations that discretize the second-order wave equation). Examples are provided to verify preservation of discrete Gauss' law for all times.

  15. Spectral properties and associated plasma energization by magnetosonic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jicheng; Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Chen, Lunjin; Liu, Xu; Wang, Xueyi; Tao, Xin; Wang, Shui

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we perform a 1-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model consisting of three species, cold electrons, cold ions, and energetic ion ring, to investigate spectral structures of magnetosonic waves excited by ring distribution protons in the Earth's magnetosphere, and dynamics of charged particles during the excitation of magnetosonic waves. As the wave normal angle decreases, the spectral range of excited magnetosonic waves becomes broader with upper frequency limit extending beyond the lower hybrid resonant frequency, and the discrete spectra tends to merge into a continuous one. This dependence on wave normal angle is consistent with the linear theory. The effects of magnetosonic waves on the background cold plasma populations also vary with wave normal angle. For exactly perpendicular magnetosonic waves (parallel wave number k|| = 0), there is no energization in the parallel direction for both background cold protons and electrons due to the negligible fluctuating electric field component in the parallel direction. In contrast, the perpendicular energization of background plasmas is rather significant, where cold protons follow unmagnetized motion while cold electrons follow drift motion due to wave electric fields. For magnetosonic waves with a finite k||, there exists a nonnegligible parallel fluctuating electric field, leading to a significant and rapid energization in the parallel direction for cold electrons. These cold electrons can also be efficiently energized in the perpendicular direction due to the interaction with the magnetosonic wave fields in the perpendicular direction. However, cold protons can be only heated in the perpendicular direction, which is likely caused by the higher-order resonances with magnetosonic waves. The potential impacts of magnetosonic waves on the energization of the background cold plasmas in the Earth's inner magnetosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  16. Full Particle-In-Cell simulations on the solar wind interactions with a small-scale magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Hideyuki; Moritaka, Toseo; Matsumoto, Masaharu; Multi-scale PIC Simulation Team

    2013-04-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere which is caused by global interactions with the solar wind has been intensively investigated both by in-situ observations with satellites and global MHD simulations. Since the size of the Earth's magnetosphere is much larger than the ion inertia length in the solar wind, the formation of the magnetosphere and the associated macroscopic plasma phenomena can be examined in the MHD scale. However, as the magnetic dipole scale becomes comparable or smaller than the ion inertia length, plasma kinetics such as the finite Larmor radius effect and the electron-ion coupling cannot be ignored and will play important roles in the formation of a magnetosphere. In the current study, we have been investigating solar wind interactions with a small-scale magnetic dipole by means of a full particle-in-cell electromagnetic simulation. This study is motivated by one of the next-generation interplanetary flight systems which utilizes the momentum transfer of the solar wind to a spacecraft which creates an artificial small-scale magnetic dipole by a superconducting coil. In the simulation, we focus on a magnetic dipole whose size is less than the ion inertial length in the solar wind. In this situation, electron interaction becomes important in the process of the magnetosphere formation. The simulation result shows that the width of the boundary current layer as well as the spatial gradient of the local magnetic field compression found at the dayside can be characterized by the electron Larmor radius. At the boundary region where the magnetic fields are compressed, electrons basically stagnate and form a high density region while ions' trajectories are little affected because of large Larmor radius. However, owing to the electrostatic force induced by the difference of dynamics between electrons and ions, ions dynamics are also indirectly influenced by the presence of the small magnetosphere. In addition, IMF effect such as the formation of shock structure and

  17. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  18. Proton velocity ring-driven instabilities in the inner magnetosphere: Linear theory and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyungguk; Liu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Linear dispersion theory and electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are used to investigate linear growth and nonlinear saturation of the proton velocity ring-driven instabilities, namely, ion Bernstein instability and Alfvén-cyclotron instability, which lead to fast magnetosonic waves and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the inner magnetosphere, respectively. The proton velocity distribution is assumed to consist of 10% of a ring distribution and 90% of a low-temperature Maxwellian background. Here two cases with ring speeds vr/vA=1 and 2 (vA is the Alfvén speed) are examined in detail. For the two cases, linear theory predicts that the maximum growth rate γm of the Bernstein instability is 0.16Ωp and 0.19Ωp, respectively, and γm of the Alfvén-cyclotron instability is 0.045Ωp and 0.15Ωp, respectively, where Ωp is the proton cyclotron frequency. Two-dimensional PIC simulations are carried out for the two cases to examine the instability development and the corresponding evolution of the particle distributions. Initially, Bernstein waves develop and saturate with strong electrostatic fluctuations. Subsequently, electromagnetic Alfvén-cyclotron waves grow and saturate. Despite their smaller growth rate, the saturation levels of the Alfvén-cyclotron waves for both cases are larger than those of the Bernstein waves. Resonant interactions with the Bernstein waves lead to scattering of ring protons predominantly along the perpendicular velocity component (toward both decreasing and, at a lesser extent, increasing speeds) without substantial change of either the parallel temperature or the temperature anisotropy. Consequently, the Alfvén-cyclotron instability can still grow. Furthermore, the free energy resulting from the pitch angle scattering by the Alfvén-cyclotron waves is larger than the free energy resulting from the perpendicular energy scattering, thereby leading to the larger saturation level of the Alfvén-cyclotron waves.

  19. Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The long term evolution of large domain Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: towards a Petschek-like configuration (Gosling 2007) or towards multiple X points (Eriksson et al. 2014). In the simulations presented here and described in [Innocenti2015*], a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminding of Petschek's switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock / rotational discontinuity (SS/RD) compound structure, with the rotation discontinuity downstreamthe slow shock. Two external slow shocks located in correspondence of the separatrices reduce the in plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminding of rotational discontinuities in the internal part of the exhausts then perform the final switch-off. Both the slow shocks and the rotational discontinuities are characterized as such through the analysis of their Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust that prevented switch off in [Liu2012]. Compound SS/RD structures, with the RD located downstream the SS, have been observed in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere in Wind and Geotail data respectively [Whang1998, Whang2004]. Ion trajectiories across the SS/RD structure are followed and the kinetic origin of the SS/RD structure is investigated. * Innocenti, Goldman, Newman, Markidis, Lapenta, Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in collisionless magnetic reconnection, accepted in Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2015 Acknowledgements: NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of

  20. PARTICLE DYNAMICS IN THE RECONNECTING HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET: SOLAR WIND DATA VERSUS THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkova, Valentina V.; Khabarova, Olga V. E-mail: habarova@izmiran.ru

    2012-06-10

    In this paper, we apply an assumption of the reconnecting heliospheric current sheet (HCS) for explanation of some contradictory results in the experimental detection of the sector boundaries (SBs) from the interplanetary magnetic field and electron pitch-angle measurements. Trajectories, densities, velocity, and pitch-angle distributions of particles accelerated by a super-Dreicer electric field are investigated with 2.5D full kinetic particle-in-cell approach in the HCS assumed to undergo a slow magnetic reconnection process with magnetic field configurations deduced from the solar wind observations. This approach reveals that during motion in a current sheet both kinds of particles, electrons and protons, are to be separated, either fully or partially, with respect to its midplane that can lead to their ejection to the opposite semiplanes that was also observed during the HCS crossings. This separation is found to form Hall's currents and polarization electric field across the current sheet, which distribution over the current sheets allows us to reproduce the magnitudes and temporal profiles of proton and ion velocities measured across the SB (current sheet midplane). This separation process, in turn, divides both kinds of particles on 'transit' and 'bounced' ones depending on a side of the current sheet where they enter it and where they are supposed to be ejected. The transit and bounced protons reproduce rather closely the measured distributions of proton/ion densities about the current sheet midplane with a larger maximum occurring at the heliospheric SB to be formed by the bounced protons and the other two smaller maximums on both sides from the central one to be formed by 'transit' protons. The observed electron distributions of density and energy before and after sector boundary crossings are found to fit the simulated ones for electrons accelerated in a current sheet revealing a sharp increase of density from one side from the HCS boundary and a

  1. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of plasmas on a massively parallel computer: Final report on LDRD Core Competency Project, FY 1991--FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, J.A.; Williams, T.J.; Cohen, B.I.; Dimits, A.M.

    1994-04-27

    One of the programs of the Magnetic fusion Energy (MFE) Theory and computations Program is studying the anomalous transport of thermal energy across the field lines in the core of a tokamak. We use the method of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation in this study. For this LDRD project we employed massively parallel processing, new algorithms, and new algorithms, and new formal techniques to improve this research. Specifically, we sought to take steps toward: researching experimentally-relevant parameters in our simulations, learning parallel computing to have as a resource for our group, and achieving a 100 {times} speedup over our starting-point Cray2 simulation code`s performance.

  2. The hierarchical spatial decomposition of three-dimensional particle- in-cell plasma simulations on MIMD distributed memory multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.W.

    1992-07-01

    The hierarchical spatial decomposition method is a promising approach to decomposing the particles and computational grid in parallel particle-in-cell application codes, since it is able to maintain approximate dynamic load balance while keeping communication costs low. In this paper we investigate issues in implementing a hierarchical spatial decomposition on a hypercube multiprocessor. Particular attention is focused on the communication needed to update guard ring data, and on the load balancing method. The hierarchical approach is compared with other dynamic load balancing schemes.

  3. Numerical stability of relativistic beam multidimensional PIC simulations employing the Esirkepov algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly growing numerical instabilities routinely occur in multidimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations of plasma-based particle accelerators, astrophysical phenomena, and relativistic charged particle beams. Reducing instability growth to acceptable levels has necessitated higher resolution grids, high-order field solvers, current filtering, etc. except for certain ratios of the time step to the axial cell size, for which numerical growth rates and saturation levels are reduced substantially. This paper derives and solves the cold beam dispersion relation for numerical instabilities in multidimensional, relativistic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell programs employing either the standard or the Cole–Karkkainnen finite difference field solver on a staggered mesh and the common Esirkepov current-gathering algorithm. Good overall agreement is achieved with previously reported results of the WARP code. In particular, the existence of select time steps for which instabilities are minimized is explained. Additionally, an alternative field interpolation algorithm is proposed for which instabilities are almost completely eliminated for a particular time step in ultra-relativistic simulations.

  4. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  5. Verification of high performance two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggate, Huw; Turner, Miles

    2016-09-01

    We discuss a two-dimensional implementation of the particle-in-cell algorithm with Monte Carlo collisions. This implementation is designed for multiprocessor environments in which each processor is assumed to offer vector capabilities and multiple execution threads. An appropriate implementation therefore combines OpenMP to exploit multithreading with MPI to coupled computing nodes. This approach promises to achieve accelerations of a least a factor of several hundred, relative to to a simple serial implementation. However, the complexity involved also offers many opportunities for error, and makes correctness demonstrations especially desirable. In this presentation we discuss the characteristics of this parallel implementation, and we describe a suite of verification tests that collectively create a strong presumption that the code is correct. Work supported by the EUROfusion consortium.

  6. An alternative to the plasma emission model: Particle-in-cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, David

    2011-05-15

    High-resolution (sub-Debye length grid size and 10 000 particle species per cell), 1.5D particle-in-cell, relativistic, fully electromagnetic simulations are used to model electromagnetic wave emission generation in the context of solar type III radio bursts. The model studies generation of electromagnetic waves by a super-thermal, hot beam of electrons injected into a plasma thread that contains uniform longitudinal magnetic field and a parabolic density gradient. In effect, a single magnetic line connecting Sun to Earth is considered, for which five cases are studied. (i) We find that the physical system without a beam is stable and only low amplitude level electromagnetic drift waves (noise) are excited. (ii) The beam injection direction is controlled by setting either longitudinal or oblique electron initial drift speed, i.e., by setting the beam pitch angle (the angle between the beam velocity vector and the direction of background magnetic field). In the case of zero pitch angle, i.e., when v-vector{sub b{center_dot}}E-vector{sub perpendicular}=0, the beam excites only electrostatic, standing waves, oscillating at local plasma frequency, in the beam injection spatial location, and only low level electromagnetic drift wave noise is also generated. (iii) In the case of oblique beam pitch angles, i.e., when v-vector{sub b{center_dot}}E-vector{sub perpendicular}=0, again electrostatic waves with same properties are excited. However, now the beam also generates the electromagnetic waves with the properties commensurate to type III radio bursts. The latter is evidenced by the wavelet analysis of transverse electric field component, which shows that as the beam moves to the regions of lower density and hence lower plasma frequency, frequency of the electromagnetic waves drops accordingly. (iv) When the density gradient is removed, an electron beam with an oblique pitch angle still generates the electromagnetic radiation. However, in the latter case no frequency

  7. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  8. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  9. RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-06-20

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfvenic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the 'diamond-chain' structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  10. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfv enic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the "diamond-chain" structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  11. General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Jet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Koide, S.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed 3-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of jet formation from an accretion disk with/without initial perturbation around a rotating black hole. We input a sinusoidal perturbation (m = 5 mode) in the rotation velocity of the accretion disk. The simulation results show the formation of a relativistic jet from the accretion disk. Although the initial perturbation becomes weakened by the coupling among different modes, it survives and triggers lower modes. As a result, complex non-axisymmetric density structure develops in the disk and the jet. Newtonian MHD simulations of jet formation with a non-axisymmetric mode show the growth of the m = 2 mode but GRMHD simulations cannot see the clear growth of the m = 2 mode.

  12. Monte Carlo approach to calculate proton stopping in warm dense matter within particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; He, X. T.; Yu, W.; Fritzsche, S.

    2017-02-01

    A Monte Carlo approach to proton stopping in warm dense matter is implemented into an existing particle-in-cell code. This approach is based on multiple electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion binary collision and accounts for both the free and the bound electrons in the plasmas. This approach enables one to calculate the stopping of particles in a more natural manner than existing theoretical treatment. In the low-temperature limit, when "all" electrons are bound to the nucleus, the stopping power coincides with the predictions from the Bethe-Bloch formula and is consistent with the data from the National Institute of Standard and Technology database. At higher temperatures, some of the bound electrons are ionized, and this increases the stopping power in the plasmas, as demonstrated by A. B. Zylstra et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215002 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.215002. At even higher temperatures, the degree of ionization reaches a maximum and thus decreases the stopping power due to the suppression of collision frequency between projected proton beam and hot plasmas in the target.

  13. Monte Carlo approach to calculate proton stopping in warm dense matter within particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; He, X T; Yu, W; Fritzsche, S

    2017-02-01

    A Monte Carlo approach to proton stopping in warm dense matter is implemented into an existing particle-in-cell code. This approach is based on multiple electron-electron, electron-ion, and ion-ion binary collision and accounts for both the free and the bound electrons in the plasmas. This approach enables one to calculate the stopping of particles in a more natural manner than existing theoretical treatment. In the low-temperature limit, when "all" electrons are bound to the nucleus, the stopping power coincides with the predictions from the Bethe-Bloch formula and is consistent with the data from the National Institute of Standard and Technology database. At higher temperatures, some of the bound electrons are ionized, and this increases the stopping power in the plasmas, as demonstrated by A. B. Zylstra et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215002 (2015)]PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.114.215002. At even higher temperatures, the degree of ionization reaches a maximum and thus decreases the stopping power due to the suppression of collision frequency between projected proton beam and hot plasmas in the target.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulation for frequency up-conversion of microwave pulse in a rapidly created plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Liu, Chunliang; Gao, Mingzhu; Chang, Chao

    2017-03-01

    Microwave pulse propagation through a rapidly created plasma and frequency up-conversion has been demonstrated by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. Compared with the finite-difference time-domain method in which the time-varying plasma is simplified as a dielectric medium, the PIC method considering the interaction and motion of charged particles would be much closer to the experimental values. It is found that the source wave amplitude has a stable range to obtain the stable output. If the source wave amplitude is below 103 V/m with the plasma density of 4 ×1019m-3 , the output is mainly the plasma noise. Moreover, the higher amplitude source wave beyond 108 V/m would break the spatial distribution of the plasma so as to have an influence on the conversion efficiency. The stable range of source wave amplitude is affected by the plasma density. The power loss will increase with the increase in the plasma density in the PIC method, and it is more convenient and accurate to discuss the effects of the collision frequency.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and -15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  16. A Fokker-Planck-Landau collision equation solver on two-dimensional velocity grid and its application to particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E. S.; Chang, C. S.

    2014-03-15

    An approximate two-dimensional solver of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operator has been developed using the assumption that the particle probability distribution function is independent of gyroangle in the limit of strong magnetic field. The isotropic one-dimensional scheme developed for nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Landau equation by Buet and Cordier [J. Comput. Phys. 179, 43 (2002)] and for linear Fokker-Planck-Landau equation by Chang and Cooper [J. Comput. Phys. 6, 1 (1970)] have been modified and extended to two-dimensional nonlinear equation. In addition, a method is suggested to apply the new velocity-grid based collision solver to Lagrangian particle-in-cell simulation by adjusting the weights of marker particles and is applied to a five dimensional particle-in-cell code to calculate the neoclassical ion thermal conductivity in a tokamak plasma. Error verifications show practical aspects of the present scheme for both grid-based and particle-based kinetic codes.

  17. Kinetic (particle-in-cell) simulation of nonlinear laser absorption in a finite-size plasma with a background inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H. Kargarian, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field on the high intensity laser absorption rate in a sub-critical plasma has been investigated by employing a relativistic electromagnetic 1.5 dimensional particle-in-cell code. Relying on the effective nonlinear phenomena such as phase-mixing and scattering, this study shows that in a finite-size plasma the laser absorption increases with inhomogeneity of the magnetic field (i.e., reduction of characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, λ{sub p}) before exiting a considerable amount of laser energy from the plasma due to scattering process. On the other hand, the presence of the external inhomogeneous magnetic field causes the maximum absorption of laser to occur at a shorter time. Moreover, study of the kinetic results associated with the distribution function of plasma particles shows that, in a special range of the plasma density and the characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, a considerable amount of laser energy is transferred to the particles producing a population of electrons with kinetic energy along the laser direction.

  18. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interactions and Hot-Electron Generations in the Shock-Ignition Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, R.; Borwick, E.; Betti, R.; Li, J.; Theobald, W.; Ren, C.; Krauland, C.; Wei, M. S.; Zhang, S.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-10-01

    We performed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with parameters relevant to laser-plasma interaction (LPI) experiments on OMEGA EP using high laser intensities (1016 to 1017 W /cm2). Rich physics were observed in this new LPI regime, including laser filamentation and plasma cavitation, plasma waves beyond the Landau cutoff, and significant pump depletion. We will also compare hot-electron generation from the simulations with the experimental measurements. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0012316; by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734; and by Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

  19. Wave-particle interactions with parallel whistler waves: Nonlinear and time-dependent effects revealed by particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, Enrico; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2015-09-01

    We present a self-consistent Particle-in-Cell simulation of the resonant interactions between anisotropic energetic electrons and a population of whistler waves, with parameters relevant to the Earth's radiation belt. By tracking PIC particles and comparing with test-particle simulations, we emphasize the importance of including nonlinear effects and time evolution in the modeling of wave-particle interactions, which are excluded in the resonant limit of quasi-linear theory routinely used in radiation belt studies. In particular, we show that pitch angle diffusion is enhanced during the linear growth phase, and it rapidly saturates well before a single bounce period. This calls into question the widely used bounce average performed in most radiation belt diffusion calculations. Furthermore, we discuss how the saturation is related to the fact that the domain in which the particles pitch angle diffuses is bounded, and to the well-known problem of 90° diffusion barrier.

  20. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 109, degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani’s theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  1. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back BomBardment in a High Average Current RF Photo-Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2009-10-17

    In this paper, we report on study of ion back bombardment in a high average current radio-frequency (RF) photo-gun using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation method. Using this method, we systematically studied effects of gas pressure, RF frequency, RF initial phase, electric field profile, magnetic field, laser repetition rate, different ion species on ion particle line density distribution, kinetic energy spectrum, and ion power line density distribution back bombardment onto the photocathode. Those simulation results suggested that effects of ion back bombardment could increase linearly with the background gas pressure and laser repetition rate. The RF frequency has significantly affected the ion motion inside the gun so that the ion power deposition on the photocathode in an RF gun can be several orders of magnitude lower than that in a DC gun. The ion back bombardment can be minimized by appropriately choosing the electric field profile and the initial phase.

  2. High-Fidelity RF Gun Simulations with the Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the first parallel Finite Element 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, Pic3P, for simulations of RF guns and other space-charge dominated beam-cavity interactions. Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations and thus includes space charge, retardation and wakefield effects from first principles. Pic3P uses higher-order Finite Elementmethods on unstructured conformal meshes. A novel scheme for causal adaptive refinement and dynamic load balancing enable unprecedented simulation accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Application to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun is presented.

  3. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2015-12-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 10(9), degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani's theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  4. Wave-particle interactions with parallel whistler waves: Nonlinear and time-dependent effects revealed by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Camporeale, Enrico; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2015-09-15

    We present a self-consistent Particle-in-Cell simulation of the resonant interactions between anisotropic energetic electrons and a population of whistler waves, with parameters relevant to the Earth's radiation belt. By tracking PIC particles and comparing with test-particle simulations, we emphasize the importance of including nonlinear effects and time evolution in the modeling of wave-particle interactions, which are excluded in the resonant limit of quasi-linear theory routinely used in radiation belt studies. In particular, we show that pitch angle diffusion is enhanced during the linear growth phase, and it rapidly saturates well before a single bounce period. This calls into question the widely used bounce average performed in most radiation belt diffusion calculations. Furthermore, we discuss how the saturation is related to the fact that the domain in which the particles pitch angle diffuses is bounded, and to the well-known problem of 90° diffusion barrier.

  5. Electron field emission Particle-In-Cell (PIC) coupled with MCNPX simulation of a CNT-based flat-panel x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Edwin J.; Posada, Chrystian M.; Castaño, Carlos H.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2011-03-01

    A novel x-ray source based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) field emitters is being developed as an alternative for medical imaging diagnostic technologies. The design is based on an array of millions of micro sized x-ray sources similar to the way pixels are arranged in flat panel displays. The trajectory and focusing characteristics of the field emitted electrons, as well as the x-ray generation characteristics of each one of the proposed micro-sized x-ray tubes are simulated. The electron field emission is simulated using the OOPIC PRO particle-in-cell code. The x-ray generation is analyzed with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. MCNPX is used to optimize both the bremsstrahlung radiation energy spectra and to verify the angular distribution for 0.25-12 μm thick molybdenum, rhodium and tungsten targets. Also, different extracting, accelerating and focusing voltages, as well as different focusing structures and geometries of the micro cells are simulated using the OOPIC Pro particle-in-cell code. The electron trajectories, beam spot sizes, I-V curves, bremsstrahlung radiation energy spectra, and angular distribution are all analyzed for a given cell. The simulation results show that micro x-ray cells can be used to generate suitable electron currents using CNT field emitters and strike a thin tungsten target to produce an adequate bremsstrahlung spectrum. The shape and trajectory of the electron beam was modified using focusing structures in the microcell. Further modifications to the electron beam are possible and can help design a better x-ray transmission source.

  6. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams created via reflection of intense laser light from a water target

    SciTech Connect

    Ngirmang, Gregory K. Orban, Chris; Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T.; Frische, Kyle D.; Chowdhury, Enam A.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2016-04-15

    We present 3D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) modeling of an ultra-intense laser experiment by the Extreme Light group at the Air Force Research Laboratory using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) PIC code. This is the first time PIC simulations have been performed in 3D for this experiment which involves an ultra-intense, short-pulse (30 fs) laser interacting with a water jet target at normal incidence. The laser-energy-to-ejected-electron-energy conversion efficiency observed in 2D(3v) simulations were comparable to the conversion efficiencies seen in the 3D simulations, but the angular distribution of ejected electrons in the 2D(3v) simulations displayed interesting differences with the 3D simulations' angular distribution; the observed differences between the 2D(3v) and 3D simulations were more noticeable for the simulations with higher intensity laser pulses. An analytic plane-wave model is discussed which provides some explanation for the angular distribution and energies of ejected electrons in the 2D(3v) simulations. We also performed a 3D simulation with circularly polarized light and found a significantly higher conversion efficiency and peak electron energy, which is promising for future experiments.

  7. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams created via reflection of intense laser light from a water target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngirmang, Gregory K.; Orban, Chris; Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T.; Frische, Kyle D.; Chowdhury, Enam A.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) modeling of an ultra-intense laser experiment by the Extreme Light group at the Air Force Research Laboratory using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) PIC code. This is the first time PIC simulations have been performed in 3D for this experiment which involves an ultra-intense, short-pulse (30 fs) laser interacting with a water jet target at normal incidence. The laser-energy-to-ejected-electron-energy conversion efficiency observed in 2D(3v) simulations were comparable to the conversion efficiencies seen in the 3D simulations, but the angular distribution of ejected electrons in the 2D(3v) simulations displayed interesting differences with the 3D simulations' angular distribution; the observed differences between the 2D(3v) and 3D simulations were more noticeable for the simulations with higher intensity laser pulses. An analytic plane-wave model is discussed which provides some explanation for the angular distribution and energies of ejected electrons in the 2D(3v) simulations. We also performed a 3D simulation with circularly polarized light and found a significantly higher conversion efficiency and peak electron energy, which is promising for future experiments.

  8. Spectral Methods in General Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, David

    2012-03-01

    In this talk I discuss the use of spectral methods in improving the accuracy of a General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) computer code. I introduce SpecCosmo, a GRMHD code developed as a Cactus arrangement at UHCL, and show simulation results using both Fourier spectral methods and finite differencing. This work demonstrates the use of spectral methods with the FFTW 3.3 Fast Fourier Transform package integrated with the Cactus Framework to perform spectral differencing using MPI.

  9. Substructures in Simulations of Relativistic Jet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael de Oliveira; Oliveira, Samuel Rocha de

    2017-02-01

    We present a set of simulations of relativistic jets from accretion disk initial setup with numerical solutions of a system of general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) partial differential equations in a fixed black hole (BH) spacetime which is able to show substructures formations inside the jet as well as lobe formation on the jet head. For this, we used a central scheme of finite volume method without dimensional split and with no Riemann solvers namely the Nessyahu-Tadmor method. Thus, we were able to obtain stable numerical solutions with spurious oscillations under control and with no excessive numerical dissipation. Therefore, we developed some setups for initial conditions capable of simulating the formation of relativistic jets from the accretion disk falling onto central black hole until its ejection, both immersed in a magnetosphere. In our simulations, we were able to observe some substructure of a jet created from an accretion initial disk, namely, jet head, knots, cocoon, and lobe. Also, we present an explanation for cocoon formation and lobe formation. Each initial scenario was determined by ratio between disk density and magnetosphere density, showing that this relation is very important for the shape of the jet and its substructures.

  10. Substructures in Simulations of Relativistic Jet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael de Oliveira; Oliveira, Samuel Rocha de

    2017-04-01

    We present a set of simulations of relativistic jets from accretion disk initial setup with numerical solutions of a system of general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) partial differential equations in a fixed black hole (BH) spacetime which is able to show substructures formations inside the jet as well as lobe formation on the jet head. For this, we used a central scheme of finite volume method without dimensional split and with no Riemann solvers namely the Nessyahu-Tadmor method. Thus, we were able to obtain stable numerical solutions with spurious oscillations under control and with no excessive numerical dissipation. Therefore, we developed some setups for initial conditions capable of simulating the formation of relativistic jets from the accretion disk falling onto central black hole until its ejection, both immersed in a magnetosphere. In our simulations, we were able to observe some substructure of a jet created from an accretion initial disk, namely, jet head, knots, cocoon, and lobe. Also, we present an explanation for cocoon formation and lobe formation. Each initial scenario was determined by ratio between disk density and magnetosphere density, showing that this relation is very important for the shape of the jet and its substructures.

  11. General relativistic screening in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Paranjape, Aseem

    2016-10-01

    We revisit the issue of interpreting the results of large volume cosmological simulations in the context of large-scale general relativistic effects. We look for simple modifications to the nonlinear evolution of the gravitational potential ψ that lead on large scales to the correct, fully relativistic description of density perturbations in the Newtonian gauge. We note that the relativistic constraint equation for ψ can be cast as a diffusion equation, with a diffusion length scale determined by the expansion of the Universe. Exploiting the weak time evolution of ψ in all regimes of interest, this equation can be further accurately approximated as a Helmholtz equation, with an effective relativistic "screening" scale ℓ related to the Hubble radius. We demonstrate that it is thus possible to carry out N-body simulations in the Newtonian gauge by replacing Poisson's equation with this Helmholtz equation, involving a trivial change in the Green's function kernel. Our results also motivate a simple, approximate (but very accurate) gauge transformation—δN(k )≈δsim(k )×(k2+ℓ-2)/k2 —to convert the density field δsim of standard collisionless N -body simulations (initialized in the comoving synchronous gauge) into the Newtonian gauge density δN at arbitrary times. A similar conversion can also be written in terms of particle positions. Our results can be interpreted in terms of a Jeans stability criterion induced by the expansion of the Universe. The appearance of the screening scale ℓ in the evolution of ψ , in particular, leads to a natural resolution of the "Jeans swindle" in the presence of superhorizon modes.

  12. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  13. Particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distributions on an electrode by applying tailored bias waveforms in the afterglow of a pulsed plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diomede, Paola; Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2011-04-15

    A Particle-in-Cell simulation with Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) was conducted of the application of tailored DC voltage steps on an electrode, during the afterglow of a capacitively-coupled pulsed-plasma argon discharge, to control the energy of ions incident on the counter-electrode. Staircase voltage waveforms with selected amplitudes and durations resulted in ion energy distributions (IED) with distinct narrow peaks, with controlled energies and fraction of ions under each peak. Temporary electron heating at the moment of application of a DC voltage step did not influence the electron density decay in the afterglow. The IED peaks were 'smeared' by collisions, especially at the higher pressures of the range (10-40 mTorr) investigated.

  14. The study of the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method by using the particle-in-cell simulation method in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yang; Xu, Yan-Xia; Qi, Xin E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn; Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn; Yang, Lei

    2014-10-15

    The application scope of the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method is suggested by using the Particle-in-cell (PIC) numerical method to study head-on collision of two solitary waves. Comparisons between the numerical results from PIC simulations and the analytical ones from the PLK method indicate that the both are in good agreement with each other. The dependence of the phase shifts after the head-on collision on both amplitudes of two solitary waves is given from our PIC method. It is found that the phase shifts depended on the amplitude of both waves. The maximum amplitude during the colliding process is approximately equal to the sum of both amplitudes for the small amplitude solitary waves.

  15. Relativistic radiation damping for simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotia, Amodsen

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work is to implement radiation braking into a simulation code. Radiation physics of accelerated charges is not new. It dates from the end of the 19th century, from Maxwell theory and Larmor, Poynting, Thomson, Poincare, Lorentz, Von Laue, Abraham, Schott, Planck, Landau, Einstein, Dirac, Wheeler et Feynmann (and many others). The result reaches out from the length of life of exited levels of atoms, antennas, and lays out through specific production of radiation by bremsstrahlung in particles accelerators but also spatial and stellar astrophysics. In this work we start from Landau Lifchitz equation to express the quadrivector acceleration in term of the fields. Using a result from Pomeranchouck we deduce the energy lost by radiation. We do an instantaneous colinear projection of the velocity vector in order to substract the loss of kinetic energy due to radiation. The equation of motion is then solved based on Boris algorithm. The code is tested on few examples.

  16. Classical Simulation of Relativistic Zitterbewegung in Photonic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tuennermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Longhi, Stefano; Szameit, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    We present the first experimental realization of an optical analog for relativistic quantum mechanics by simulating the Zitterbewegung (trembling motion) of a free Dirac electron in an optical superlattice. Our photonic setting enables a direct visualization of Zitterbewegung as a spatial oscillatory motion of an optical beam. Direct measurements of the wave packet expectation values in superlattices with tuned miniband gaps clearly show the transition from weak-relativistic to relativistic and far-relativistic regimes.

  17. 2D Particle-In-Cell simulations of the electron-cyclotron instability and associated anomalous transport in Hall-Effect Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Péchereau, François; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the electron-cyclotron instability in Hall-Effect Thrusters (HETs) using a 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system where a magnetic field, B0, is aligned along the X-axis (radial direction, including absorbing walls), a constant electric field, E0, along the Z-axis (axial direction, perpendicular to simulation plane), and the E0xB0 direction along the Y-axis (O direction, with periodic boundaries). Although for low plasma densities classical electron-neutral collisions theory describes well electron transport, at sufficiently high densities (as measured in HETs) a strong instability can be observed that enhances the electron mobility, even in the absence of collisions. The instability generates high frequency ( MHz) and short wavelength ( mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and charged particle densities. We investigate the correlation between these fluctuations and their role with anomalous electron transport; complementing previous 1D simulations. Plasma is self-consistently heated by the instability, but since the latter does not reach saturation in an infinitely long 2D system, saturation is achieved through implementation of a finite axial length that models convection in E0 direction. With support of Safran Aircraft Engines.

  18. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for the transport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D.S.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Lyneis, C.M.; Qiang, J.; Grote, D.P.

    2006-03-15

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This article presents the first results of comparisons between the simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He{sup +} and He{sup 2+}) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase-space current-density measurements. Further, measurements of phase-space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space-charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  19. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Particle Energization via Shock Drift Acceleration from Low Mach Number Quasi-perpendicular Shocks in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Ren, Chuang; Workman, Jared C.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2013-03-01

    Low Mach number, high beta fast mode shocks can occur in the magnetic reconnection outflows of solar flares. These shocks, which occur above flare loop tops, may provide the electron energization responsible for some of the observed hard X-rays and contemporaneous radio emission. Here we present new two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of low Mach number/high beta quasi-perpendicular shocks. The simulations show that electrons above a certain energy threshold experience shock-drift-acceleration. The transition energy between the thermal and non-thermal spectrum and the spectral index from the simulations are consistent with some of the X-ray spectra from RHESSI in the energy regime of E <~ 40 ~ 100 keV. Plasma instabilities associated with the shock structure such as the modified-two-stream and the electron whistler instabilities are identified using numerical solutions of the kinetic dispersion relations. We also show that the results from PIC simulations with reduced ion/electron mass ratio can be scaled to those with the realistic mass ratio.

  20. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Particle Energization from Low Mach Number Fast Mode Shocks Using the Moving Wall Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Jared C.; Park, J.; Blackman, E.; Ren, C.; Siller, R.

    2012-05-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often studied in the high Mach number limit but weakly compressive fast shocks can occur in magnetic reconnection outflows and are considered to be a site of particle energization in solar flares. Here we study the microphysics of such perpendicular, low Mach number collisionless shocks using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a reduced ion/electron mass ratio and employ a moving wall boundary method for initial generation the shock. This moving wall method allows for more control of the shock speed, smaller simulation box sizes, and longer simulation times than the commonly used fixed wall, reflection method of shock formation. Our results, which are independent of the shock formation method, reveal the prevalence shock drift acceleration (SDA) of both electron and ions in a purely perpendicular shock with Alfven Mach number MA = 6.8 and ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure β = 8. We determine the respective minimum energies required for electrons and ions to incur SDA. We derive an theoretical electron distribution via SDA that compares favorably to the simulation results. We also show that a modified two-stream instability due to the incoming and reflecting ions in the shock transition region acts as the mechanism to generate collisionless plasma turbulence that sustains the shock.

  1. Simulation of beams or plasmas crossing at relativistic velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.

    2008-05-15

    This paper addresses the numerical issues related to the modeling of beams or plasmas crossing at relativistic velocity using the particle-in-cell method. Issues related to the use of the standard Boris particle pusher are identified and a novel pusher which circumvents them is proposed, whose effectiveness is demonstrated on single particle tests. A procedure for solving the fields is proposed, which retains electrostatic, magnetostatic, and inductive field effects in the direction of the mean velocity of the species, is fully explicit and simpler than the full Darwin approximation. Finally, results are given, from a calculation using the novel features, of an ultrarelativistic beam interacting with a background of electrons.

  2. Appropriate use of the particle-in-cell method in low temperature plasmas: Application to the simulation of negative ion extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigues, L.; Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collision (PIC MCC) method has been used by different authors in the last ten years to describe negative ion extraction in the context of neutral beam injection for fusion. Questionable results on the intensity and profile of the extracted negative ion beamlets have been presented in several recently published papers. Using a standard explicit PIC MCC method, we show that these results are due to a non-compliance with the constraints of the numerical method (grid spacing, number of particles per cell) and to a non-physical generation of the simulated plasma. We discuss in detail the conditions of mesh convergence and plasma generation and show that the results can significantly deviate from the correct solution and lead to unphysical features when the constraints inherent to the method are not strictly fulfilled. This paper illustrates the importance of verification in any plasma simulation. Since the results presented in this paper have been obtained with careful verification of the method, we propose them as benchmarks for future comparisons between different simulation codes for negative ion extraction.

  3. Full particle-in-cell simulations of kinetic equilibria and the role of the initial current sheet on steady asymmetric magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargent, J.; Aunai, N.; Belmont, G.; Dorville, N.; Lavraud, B.; Hesse, M.

    2016-06-01

    > Tangential current sheets are ubiquitous in space plasmas and yet hard to describe with a kinetic equilibrium. In this paper, we use a semi-analytical model, the BAS model, which provides a steady ion distribution function for a tangential asymmetric current sheet and we prove that an ion kinetic equilibrium produced by this model remains steady in a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation even if the electron distribution function does not satisfy the time independent Vlasov equation. We then apply this equilibrium to look at the dependence of magnetic reconnection simulations on their initial conditions. We show that, as the current sheet evolves from a symmetric to an asymmetric upstream plasma, the reconnection rate is impacted and the X line and the electron flow stagnation point separate from one another and start to drift. For the simulated systems, we investigate the overall evolution of the reconnection process via the classical signatures discussed in the literature and searched in the Magnetospheric MultiScale data. We show that they seem robust and do not depend on the specific details of the internal structure of the initial current sheet.

  4. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  5. Comparison of measurements and particle-in-cell simulations of ion energy distribution functions in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Zorat, R.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Turner, M. M.

    2007-10-15

    The ion dynamics in the high-voltage sheath of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasma has been investigated using mass-resolved ion energy analysis in combination with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. A symmetric confined discharge is designed allowing highly accurate comparisons of measured ion energy distribution functions in high-voltage sheaths with simulation results. Under the conditions investigated, the sheaths are not only collisional, but also chemically complex. This situation is common in applications but rare in laboratory experiments. Excellent agreement has been found for a hydrogen discharge benchmarking the code. Hydrogen is of particular interest since its light mass gives detailed insight into sheath dynamics, and an extensive database of collisional cross sections is available. The H{sub 3}{sup +} ion was found to be the dominant ion in the sheaths and the plasma bulk under most conditions investigated. H{sub 3}{sup +} exhibits the typical saddle-shaped ion energy distribution function indicative of ions created in the plasma bulk and traversing the entire sheath potential. H{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +} are predominantly formed through collisions in the high-voltage sheath. H{sub 2}{sup +} ion energy distribution functions show structures resulting from symmetric charge exchange collisions with the background gas. Minor discrepancies between the experimental results and PIC simulations indicate slightly lower plasma densities in the simulation, resulting in larger sheath width.

  6. Comparison of measurements and particle-in-cell simulations of ion energy distribution functions in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.; Zorat, R.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Turner, M. M.

    2007-10-01

    The ion dynamics in the high-voltage sheath of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasma has been investigated using mass-resolved ion energy analysis in combination with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. A symmetric confined discharge is designed allowing highly accurate comparisons of measured ion energy distribution functions in high-voltage sheaths with simulation results. Under the conditions investigated, the sheaths are not only collisional, but also chemically complex. This situation is common in applications but rare in laboratory experiments. Excellent agreement has been found for a hydrogen discharge benchmarking the code. Hydrogen is of particular interest since its light mass gives detailed insight into sheath dynamics, and an extensive database of collisional cross sections is available. The H3+ ion was found to be the dominant ion in the sheaths and the plasma bulk under most conditions investigated. H3+ exhibits the typical saddle-shaped ion energy distribution function indicative of ions created in the plasma bulk and traversing the entire sheath potential. H+ and H2+ are predominantly formed through collisions in the high-voltage sheath. H2+ ion energy distribution functions show structures resulting from symmetric charge exchange collisions with the background gas. Minor discrepancies between the experimental results and PIC simulations indicate slightly lower plasma densities in the simulation, resulting in larger sheath width.

  7. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron–neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron–neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  8. An explicit large time step particle-in-cell scheme for nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in the electromagnetic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiber, R.; Hatzky, R.; Könies, A.; Mishchenko, A.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2016-03-01

    A new algorithm for electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations, the so called "pullback transformation scheme" proposed by Mishchenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 092110 (2014)] is motivated as an explicit time integrator reset after each full timestep and investigated in detail. Using a numerical dispersion relation valid in slab geometry, it is shown that the linear properties of the scheme are comparable to those of an implicit v∥ -scheme. A nonlinear extension of the mixed variable formulation, derived consistently from a field Lagrangian, is proposed. The scheme shows excellent numerical properties with a low statistical noise level and a large time step especially for MHD modes. The example of a nonlinear slab tearing mode simulation is used to illustrate the properties of different formulations of the physical model equations.

  9. Development of a fully implicit particle-in-cell scheme for gyrokinetic electromagnetic turbulence simulation in XGC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Seung-Hoe; Hager, R.; Chang, C. S.; Chacon, L.; Chen, G.; EPSI Team

    2016-10-01

    The cancelation problem has been a long-standing issue for long wavelengths modes in electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC simulations in toroidal geometry. As an attempt of resolving this issue, we implemented a fully implicit time integration scheme in the full-f, gyrokinetic PIC code XGC1. The new scheme - based on the implicit Vlasov-Darwin PIC algorithm by G. Chen and L. Chacon - can potentially resolve cancelation problem. The time advance for the field and the particle equations is space-time-centered, with particle sub-cycling. The resulting system of equations is solved by a Picard iteration solver with fixed-point accelerator. The algorithm is implemented in the parallel velocity formalism instead of the canonical parallel momentum formalism. XGC1 specializes in simulating the tokamak edge plasma with magnetic separatrix geometry. A fully implicit scheme could be a way to accurate and efficient gyrokinetic simulations. We will test if this numerical scheme overcomes the cancelation problem, and reproduces the dispersion relation of Alfven waves and tearing modes in cylindrical geometry. Funded by US DOE FES and ASCR, and computing resources provided by OLCF through ALCC.

  10. Forced Magnetic Reconnection at an X-point: Particle-In-Cell and Ten-Moment Extended MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Bessho, N.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Hakim, A.

    2013-12-01

    We will present comparative numerical studies of current sheet formation and forced magnetic reconnection at an X-point, beginning from a potential field. The problem will be simulated by the fully kinetic Particle Simulation Code (PSC) [1] and an extended ten-moment MHD code Gkeyll [2] that retains important kinetic physics, particularly, electron inertia and full electron/ion pressure tensors. Our goals are to investigate the similarities and differences between the two models, and to seek suitable parameterization of kinetic effects in the fluid models. The simulation domain is restrained in 2-D and is closed by conducting wall boundaries. The reconnection is forced by in-plane flows imposed on two opposite boundaries, where the forcing flows converge at the two boundary centers, and are slow compared to the characteristic Alfvén speed. We will compare results on the time-dependence of the reconnecting electric field (suitably normalized), as well as the structure of current sheets from PSC, Gkeyll, and an MHD code, varying ion-to-electron mass ratio and domain size. This study is carried out under the auspices of a Focus Topic in the NASA Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology Program. [1] Fox, W., A. Bhattacharjee, and K. Germaschewski. "Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas." Physics of Plasmas 19 (2012): 056309. [2] Hakim, Ammar H. "Extended MHD modelling with the ten-moment equations." Journal of Fusion Energy 27.1-2 (2008): 36-43.

  11. Forced Magnetic Reconnection at an X-point: Particle-In-Cell and Ten-Moment Extended MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Germaschewski, Kai; Hakim, Ammar

    2013-10-01

    We will present comparative numerical studies of current sheet formation and forced magnetic reconnection at an X-point, beginning from a potential field. The problem will be simulated by the fully kinetic Particle Simulation Code (PSC) and an extended ten-moment MHD code Gkeyll that retains important kinetic physics, particularly, electron inertia and full electron/ion pressure tensors. Our goals are to investigate the similarities and differences between the two models, and to seek suitable parameterization of kinetic effects in the fluid models. The simulation domain is restrained in 2-D and is closed by conducting wall boundaries. The reconnection is forced by in-plane flows imposed on two opposite boundaries, where the forcing flows converge at the two boundary centers, and are slow compared to the characteristic Alfvén speed. We will compare results on the time-dependence of the reconnecting electric field (suitably normalized), as well as the structure of current sheets from PSC, Gkeyll, and an MHD code, varying ion-to-electron mass ratio and domain size. This study is carried out under the auspices of a Focus Topic in the NASA Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology Program.

  12. Multistage ion acceleration in finite overdense target with a relativistic laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Ujjwal

    2013-07-15

    “Multistage ion acceleration” has been analytically and computationally studied in the relativistic regime. For non-relativistic piston velocities, this phenomenon has been described before. But, as we go to relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results hold no more. We have presented a fully relativistic calculation for second stage ion velocities and energies. To verify our calculations, we performed a fully relativistic 1D3V particle in cell simulations using the code LPIC++. It has been found that the relativistic calculations matched very well with the simulation results. Also, it has been seen that at relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results differed by a significant margin. The feasibility of this process has been further established by three dimensional particle in cell simulations.

  13. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Electromagnetic Wave Scattering From Numerically Generated Flute-type Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, D. S.; Caplinger, J.; Kim, T. C.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves can be influenced by the presence of plasma turbulence. It is known that Flute-type density irregularities can develop during the nonlinear stage of an interchange instability in Earth's ionosphere and can affect radio communication channels. These density structures play an important role in the refraction and scattering of EM waves in Earth's ionosphere and also in laser diagnostic scattering experiments. To generate Flute-type density irregularities, we will use previously obtained numerical solution of nonlinear fluid equations involving the electrostatic potential and density. The solutions to these fluid equations govern the development of an interchange instability and results in the spatial dependence of density irregularities which can be used to analyze scattering of high frequency EM waves. This solution contains both large scale vortex density structures coexisting with short scale density perturbations. Next we will initialize a PIC simulation with the density structure from the fluid simulation to calculate the scattering cross-section and compare the results with an analytic solution obtained using numerically calculated density spectra. Because the linear and non-linear stages are well separated in time, we will compare the effect of scattering from density irregularities which form in both the linear and non-linear stages.

  14. First Observation of Switch-Off Slow Shocks in Fully Kinetic Particle in Cell Simulation of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, G.; Sanna, L.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.

    2014-12-01

    A perduring challenge in the study of reconnection it has long been the failing attempts to reconcile the large scale MHD view based on the Petschek model with the small scale view based on kinetic theory. The first is based on the existence of standing switch off slow shocks (SSS) that eliminate the horizontal (the x component in the usual GSM coordinates) reconnecting magnetic field component forming vertical magnetic field lines. The second is based on nested diffusion regions where the magnetic field lines become decoupled first from ions and then from electrons. The kinetic picture when observed superficially does seem to have seem resemblance to the Petschek topology, despite the nested boxes being more of a Sweet-Parker concept. Nevertheless, the question has always been: if expanded to sufficiently large scales, does the kinetic description eventually lead tot the formation os SSS? The question remains answered. Recently a first negative answer has been proposed in Ref. [1]. The proposed answer is in essence that SSS are made impossible by the presence of a firehose instability in the reconnection exhaust and by the formation of a plateau in the firehose parameter at a value of 0.25 corresponding to the condition where nonlinear slow and intermediate wave become degenerate. We report a new series of simulations where we demonstrate that this is not the case in general. While for the specific case used in Ref [1], we indeed re-obtain the same conclusions reached by the authors. But our study demonstrates that case to be very peculiar and not representative of the more general kinetic answer. We will report direct evidence of the presence of extended SSS (over regions of hundreds of ion inertial lengths) in fully kinetic simulations for parameters typical of the magntotail and of the solar wind. Our results indicate that SSS are the natural extension of kinetic reconnection to large scales. The simulations required for the study are heroic and were conducted

  15. A parametric study for the generation of ion Bernstein modes from a discrete spectrum to a continuous one in the inner magnetosphere. II. Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jicheng; Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Chen, Lunjin; Tao, Xin; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we perform one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the properties of perpendicular magnetosonic waves in a plasma system consisting of three components: cool electrons, cool protons, and tenuous ring distribution protons, where the waves are excited by the tenuous proton ring distribution. Consistent with the linear theory, the spectra of excited magnetosonic waves can change from discrete to continuous due to the overlapping of adjacent unstable wave modes. The increase of the proton to electron mass ratio, the ratio of the light speed to the Alfven speed, or the concentration of protons with a ring distribution tends to result in a continuous spectrum of magnetosonic waves, while the increase of the ring velocity of the tenuous proton ring distribution leads to a broader one, but with a discrete structure. Moreover, the energization of both cool electrons and protons and the scattering of ring distribution protons due to the excited magnetosonic waves are also observed in our simulations, which cannot be predicted by the linear theory. Besides, a thermalized proton ring distribution may lead to the further excitation of several lower discrete harmonics with their frequencies about several proton gyrofrequencies.

  16. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  17. Development of the Plasma Thruster Particle-in-Cell Simulator to Complement Empirical Studies of a Low-Power Cusped-Field Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, Stephen Robert

    Cusped-field plasma thrusters are an electric propulsion concept being investigated by several laboratories in the United States and Europe. This technology was implemented as a low-power prototype in 2007 to ascertain if durability and performance improvements over comparable Hall thruster designs could be provided by the distinct magnetic topologies inherent to these devices. The first device tested at low-powers was eventually designated the "diverging cusped-field thruster" (DCFT) and demonstrated performance capabilities similar to state-of-the-art Hall thrusters. The research presented herein is a continuation of these initial studies, geared toward identifying significant operational characteristics of the thruster using experiments and numerical simulations. After a review of hybrid, fluid, and particle-in-cell Hall thruster models, experimental contributions from this work are presented. Anode current waveform measurements provide the first evidence of the distinct time-dependent characteristics of the two main modes of DCFT operation. The previously named "high-current" mode exhibits oscillation amplitudes several factors larger than mean current values, while magnitudes in "low-current" mode are at least a full order smaller. Results from a long-duration test, exceeding 200 hours of high-current mode operation, demonstrate lifetime-limiting erosion rates about 50% lower than those observed in comparable Hall thrusters. Concurrently, the plasma thruster particle-in-cell (PTpic) simulator was developed by upgrading numerous aspects of a preexisting Hall thruster model. Improvements in performance and accuracy have been achieved through modifications of the particle moving and electrostatic potential solving algorithms. Data from simulations representing both modes of operation are presented. In both cases, despite being unable to predict the correct location of the main potential drop in the thruster chamber, the model successfully reproduces the hollow

  18. Toward Extrapolating Two-Dimensional High-intensity Laser-Plasma Ion Acceleration Particle-in-Cell Simulations to Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, D. J.; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Guo, F.

    2016-10-01

    A PIC study of laser-ion acceleration via relativistic induced transparency points to how 2D-S (laser polarization in the simulation plane) and -P (out-of-plane) simulations may capture different physics characterizing these systems, visible in their entirety in (often cost-prohibitive) 3D simulations. The electron momentum anisotropy induced in the target by the laser pulse is dramatically different in the two 2D cases, manifesting in differences in polarization shift, electric field strength, density threshold for onset of relativistic induced transparency, and target expansion timescales. In particular, a trajectory analysis of individual electrons and ions may allow one to delineate the role of the fields and modes responsible for ion acceleration. With this information, we consider how 2D simulations might be used to develop, in some respects, a fully 3D understanding of the system. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  19. Evolution of metastable state molecules N2(A3 Σu+) in a nanosecond pulsed discharge: A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Sun, Jizhong; Feng, Chunlei; Bai, Jing; Ding, Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo collisions method has been employed to investigate the nitrogen discharge driven by a nanosecond pulse power source. To assess whether the production of the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) can be efficiently enhanced in a nanosecond pulsed discharge, the evolutions of metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density and electron energy distribution function have been examined in detail. The simulation results indicate that the ultra short pulse can modulate the electron energy effectively: during the early pulse-on time, high energy electrons give rise to quick electron avalanche and rapid growth of the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density. It is estimated that for a single pulse with amplitude of -9 kV and pulse width 30 ns, the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density can achieve a value in the order of 109 cm-3. The N2(A3 Σu+) density at such a value could be easily detected by laser-based experimental methods.

  20. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Electron-Impact and Tunneling Ionization Effects for Beam-Plasma and Laser-Plasma Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David

    2002-11-01

    Laser-driven (LWFA) and beam-driven (PWFA) plasma accelerators can sustain electron plasma waves with longitudinal electric fields on the order of the nonrelativistic wave breaking field, which is routinely of order 100 GV/m in table-top LWFA experiments. The laser pulse can create its own plasma from a gas jet via field-induced tunneling ionization of the neutral atoms, which leads to blue-shifting at the leading edge of the pulse, as well as steepening due to pump depletion and other effects. Tunneling ionization is also a critical issue for some proposed PWFA experiments, with gradients exceeding 5 GV/m. In addition, electron impact ionization can lead to important effects like particle trapping in PWFA concepts. We will present simulation results from the particle-in-cell code OOPIC [D.L. Bruhwiler et al., Phys. Rev. S.T. A, Issue 10 (2001); www.techxhome.com/products/oopic/], which demonstrate the physical effects of these ionization processes in a few interesting cases, including detailed comparison with experiments from the l'OASIS lab at LBNL [W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2510 (2001)] and a brief discussion of the algorithms.

  1. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Mizuno, Y.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Using our new 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated long-term particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet propagating in an unmagnetized ambient electron-positron plasma. The simulations were performed using a much longer simulation system than our previous simulations in order to investigate the full nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability and its particle acceleration mechanism. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and ambient electrons are accelerated in the resulting shocks. Acceleration of ambient electrons leads to a maximum ambient electron density three times larger than the original value as predicted by hydrodynamic compression. Behind the bow shock, in the jet shock, strong electromagnetic fields are generated. These fields may lead to time dependent afterglow emission. In order to go beyond the standard synchrotron model used in astrophysical objects we have used PIC simulations and calculated radiation based on first principles. We calculated radiation from electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. We also used the technique to calculate emission from electrons based on simulations with a small system. We obtain spectra which are consistent with those generated from electrons propagating in turbulent magnetic fields. This turbulent magnetic field is similar to the magnetic field generated at an early nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability. A fully developed shock within a larger system may generate a jitter/synchrotron spectrum.

  2. Ion Pre-acceleration in Fully Self-consistent Particle-in-cell Simulations of Supercritical Perpendicular Reforming Shocks in Multiple Ion Species Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekaa, V. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2014-08-01

    Supernova remnant and heliopause termination shock plasmas may contain significant populations of minority heavy ions, with relative number densities n α/ni up to 50%. Preliminary kinetic simulations of collisionless shocks in these environments showed that the reformation cycle and acceleration mechanisms at quasi-perpendicular shocks can depend on the value of n α/ni . Shock reformation unfolds on ion spatio-temporal scales, requiring fully kinetic simulations of particle dynamics, together with the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. This paper presents the first set of particle-in-cell simulations for two ion species, protons (np ) and α-particles (n α), with differing mass and charge-to-mass ratios, that spans the entire range of n α/ni from 0% to 100%. The interplay between the differing gyro length scales and timescales of the ion species is crucial to the time-evolving phenomenology of the shocks, the downstream turbulence, and the particle acceleration at different n α/ni . We show how the overall energization changes with n α/ni , and relate this to the processes individual ions undergo in the shock region and in the downstream turbulence, and to the power spectra of magnetic field fluctuations. The crossover between shocks dominated by the respective ion species happens when n α/ni = 25%, and minority ion energization is strongest in this regime. Energization of the majority ion species scales with injection energy. The power spectrum of the downstream turbulence includes peaks at sequential ion cyclotron harmonics, suggestive of ion ring-beam collective instability.

  3. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of particle acceleration by circularly polarised inertial Alfven waves in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2012-08-15

    The process of particle acceleration by left-hand, circularly polarised inertial Alfven waves (IAW) in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma is studied using 3D particle-in-cell simulation. A cylindrical tube with, transverse to the background magnetic field, inhomogeneity scale of the order of ion inertial length is considered on which IAWs with frequency 0.3{omega}{sub ci} are launched that are allowed to develop three wavelength. As a result time-varying parallel electric fields are generated in the density gradient regions which accelerate electrons in the parallel to magnetic field direction. Driven perpendicular electric field of IAWs also heats ions in the transverse direction. Such numerical setup is relevant for solar flaring loops and earth auroral zone. This first, 3D, fully kinetic simulation demonstrates electron acceleration efficiency in the density inhomogeneity regions, along the magnetic field, of the order of 45% and ion heating, in the transverse to the magnetic field direction, of 75%. The latter is a factor of two times higher than the previous 2.5D analogous study and is in accordance with solar flare particle acceleration observations. We find that the generated parallel electric field is localised in the density inhomogeneity region and rotates in the same direction and with the same angular frequency as the initially launched IAW. Our numerical simulations seem also to suggest that the 'knee' often found in the solar flare electron spectra can alternatively be interpreted as the Landau damping (Cerenkov resonance effect) of IAWs due to the wave-particle interactions.

  4. Ion pre-acceleration in fully self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of supercritical perpendicular reforming shocks in multiple ion species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rekaa, V. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2014-08-10

    Supernova remnant and heliopause termination shock plasmas may contain significant populations of minority heavy ions, with relative number densities n{sub α}/n{sub i} up to 50%. Preliminary kinetic simulations of collisionless shocks in these environments showed that the reformation cycle and acceleration mechanisms at quasi-perpendicular shocks can depend on the value of n{sub α}/n{sub i} . Shock reformation unfolds on ion spatio-temporal scales, requiring fully kinetic simulations of particle dynamics, together with the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. This paper presents the first set of particle-in-cell simulations for two ion species, protons (n{sub p} ) and α-particles (n{sub α}), with differing mass and charge-to-mass ratios, that spans the entire range of n{sub α}/n{sub i} from 0% to 100%. The interplay between the differing gyro length scales and timescales of the ion species is crucial to the time-evolving phenomenology of the shocks, the downstream turbulence, and the particle acceleration at different n{sub α}/n{sub i} . We show how the overall energization changes with n{sub α}/n{sub i} , and relate this to the processes individual ions undergo in the shock region and in the downstream turbulence, and to the power spectra of magnetic field fluctuations. The crossover between shocks dominated by the respective ion species happens when n{sub α}/n{sub i} = 25%, and minority ion energization is strongest in this regime. Energization of the majority ion species scales with injection energy. The power spectrum of the downstream turbulence includes peaks at sequential ion cyclotron harmonics, suggestive of ion ring-beam collective instability.

  5. Relativistic MHD simulations of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leismann, T.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Martí, J. M.; Miralles, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    We have performed a comprehensive parameter study of the morphology and dynamics of axisymmetric, magnetized, relativistic jets by means of numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with an upgraded version of the GENESIS code which is based on a second-order accurate finite volume method involving an approximate Riemann solver suitable for relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamic flows, and a method of lines. Starting from pure hydrodynamic models we consider the effect of a magnetic field of increasing strength (up to β ≡ |b|2/2p ≈ 3.3 times the equipartition value) and different topology (purely toroidal or poloidal). We computed several series of models investigating the dependence of the dynamics on the magnetic field in jets of different beam Lorentz factor and adiabatic index. We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field leads to diverse effects which contrary to Newtonian magnetohydrodynamics models do not always scale linearly with the (relative) strength of the magnetic field. The relativistic models show, however, some clear trends. Axisymmetric jets with toroidal magnetic fields produce a cavity which consists of two parts: an inner one surrounding the beam which is compressed by magnetic forces, and an adjacent outer part which is inflated due to the action of the magnetic field. The outer border of the outer part of the cavity is given by the bow-shock where its interaction with the external medium takes place. Toroidal magnetic fields well below equipartition (β = 0.05) combined with a value of the adiabatic index of 4/3 yield extremely smooth jet cavities and stable beams. Prominent nose cones form when jets are confined by toroidal fields and carry a high Poynting flux (σ≡ |b|2/ρ>0.01 and β≥ 1). In contrast, none of our models possessing a poloidal field develops such a nose cone. The size of the nose cone is correlated with the propagation speed of the Mach disc (the smaller the speed the larger is the size). If two

  6. Stability property of numerical Cherenkov radiation and its application to relativistic shock simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Naoki; Matsumoto, Yosuke

    2015-08-01

    We studied the stability property of numerical Cherenkov radiation in relativistic plasma flows employing particle-in-cell simulations. Using the implicit finite-difference time-domain method to solve the Maxwell equations, we found that nonphysical instability was greatly inhibited with a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number of 1.0. The present result contrasts with recently reported results (Vay et al. 2011, J. Comp. Phys., 230, 5908; Godfrey & Vay 2013, J. Comp. Phys., 248, 33; Xu et al. 2013, Comput. Phys. Commun., 184, 2503) in which magical CFL numbers in the range 0.5-0.7 were obtained with explicit field solvers. In addition, we found employing higher-order shape functions and an optimal implicitness factor further suppressed long-wavelength modes of the instability. The findings allowed the examination of the long-term evolution of a relativistic collisionless shock without the generation of nonphysical wave excitations in the upstream. This achievement will allow us to investigate particle accelerations in relativistic shocks associated with, for example, gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Oka, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a new 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code, we have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. The simulation has been performed using a long simulation system in order to study the nonlinear stages of the Weibel instability, the particle acceleration mechanism, and the shock structure. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic (HD) like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of <_ 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. We discuss the possible implication of our simulation results within the AGN and GRB context. We have calculated the time evolution of the spectrum from two electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. The same technique will be used to calculate radiation from accelerated electrons (positrons) in turbulent magnetic fields generated by Weibel instability.

  8. Bidimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations for laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-high contrast laser

    SciTech Connect

    Scisciò, M.; Palumbo, L.; D'Humières, E.; Fourmaux, S.; Kieffer, J. C.; Antici, P.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we report on bi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations performed in order to reproduce the laser-driven proton acceleration obtained when a commercial 200 TW Ti:Sa Laser hits a solid target. The laser-to prepulse contrast was enhanced using plasma mirrors yielding to a main-to-prepulse contrast of ∼10{sup 12}. We varied the pulse duration from 30 fs to 500 fs and the target thickness from 30 nm to several tens of μm. The on-target laser energy was up to 1.8 J leading to an intensity in excess of 10{sup 20 }W cm{sup −2}. A comparison between numerical and existing experimental data [S. Fourmaux et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 013110 (2013)] is performed, showing a good agreement between experimental results and simulations which confirms that for ultra-thin targets there is an optimum expansion regime. This regime depends on the target thickness and on the laser intensity: if the target is too expanded, the laser travels through the target without being able to deposit its energy within the target. If the target is not sufficiently expanded, the laser energy is reflected by the target. It is important to note that maximum proton energies are reached at longer pulse durations (in the 100 fs regime) than what is currently the best compression pulse length for this type of lasers (typically 20–30 fs). This duration, around 50–100 fs, can be considered a minimum energy transfer time between hot electrons to ions during the considered acceleration process.

  9. OOPIC: Object oriented particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    Verboncoeur, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    OOPIC is an object oriented particle-in-cell (PIC) code framework designed as a testbed for PIC algorithms. OOPIC consists of three principal components: the graphical user interface (GUI), the expert advisor, and the physics kernel. The GUI includes a geometry editor, an interactive, windowing visualization system, printing and file output capability, and simulation control capability. The expert advisor handles parsing parameter input files, saving modified parameter sets, and applying rules and constraints to ensure the consistency of the simulation. The physics kernel is a framework for diverse models which can be selected dynamically at run time. OOPIC currently includes electrostatic and electromagnetic field solvers, a Boltzmann electron option, cartesian and cylindrical non-uniform grids in two-dimensions. Particle modeling includes relativistic and non-relativistic optimizations, a number of models for collecting charge and current densities, and current corrections including full Poisson and Marder corrections. Electromagnetic boundary conditions include TEM, TE and TM wave launchers, a number of wave absorbing models, conductors, and surface impedance models. A number of particle emission models and symmetry boundaries work in both EM and ES, and any boundaries can be configured as complex internal structures.

  10. Simulation studies of relativistic gyroklystron amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Saraph, G.P.; Anderson, J.P.; Lawson, W.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1997-12-31

    High power, pulsed gyroklystrons operating in the X, Ku, and Ka bands are being developed for driving future linear colliders. Various design aspects of two and three cavity, coaxial, relativistic gyroklystron systems are studied. Nonlinear simulations predict that over 40% efficiency, 45--50 dB gain, and 100--160 MW power levels are possible for the fundamental and second harmonic designs operating at 8.6, 17.1, and 35.0 GHz frequencies. Gyroklystron designs should also satisfy phase and frequency synchronization criteria for driving large accelerators. Small manufacturing tolerances can lead to 10--20 MHz changes in cold cavity frequencies. It is desirable to have some frequency tunability to compensate for this effect. It is shown that the desired frequency tunability can be achieved by making small adjustments in the axial magnetic field level. Effect of voltage pulse on the device efficiency and output phase is studied using time-dependent simulations. The pulse-shape plays an important role in determining phase stability. Advance design features such as radial coupling slots in the input and output cavities and dielectric loading are studied using HFSS simulations. An improved three cavity, Ku band design will be presented based on these features. In addition, a possible implementation scheme for energy recovery using a single-stage depressed collector will be presented. It is shown that the energy recovery could boost the net device efficiency above 50%.

  11. RELATIVISTIC TWO-FLUID SIMULATIONS OF GUIDE FIELD MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2009-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection in sheared magnetic configuration (with a guide field) is investigated by using two-dimensional relativistic two-fluid simulations. Relativistic guide field reconnection features the charge separation and the guide field compression in and around the outflow channel. As the guide field increases, the composition of the outgoing energy changes from enthalpy-dominated to Poynting-dominated. The inertial effects of the two-fluid model play an important role to sustain magnetic reconnection. Implications for the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic approach and the physics models of relativistic reconnection are briefly addressed.

  12. Conformal Electromagnetic Particle in Cell: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, Collin S.; Greenwood, Andrew D.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-10-26

    We review conformal (or body-fitted) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) numerical solution schemes. Included is a chronological history of relevant particle physics algorithms often employed in these conformal simulations. We also provide brief mathematical descriptions of particle-tracking algorithms and current weighting schemes, along with a brief summary of major time-dependent electromagnetic solution methods. Several research areas are also highlighted for recommended future development of new conformal EM-PIC methods.

  13. Conformal Electromagnetic Particle in Cell: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Meierbachtol, Collin S.; Greenwood, Andrew D.; Verboncoeur, John P.; ...

    2015-10-26

    We review conformal (or body-fitted) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) numerical solution schemes. Included is a chronological history of relevant particle physics algorithms often employed in these conformal simulations. We also provide brief mathematical descriptions of particle-tracking algorithms and current weighting schemes, along with a brief summary of major time-dependent electromagnetic solution methods. Several research areas are also highlighted for recommended future development of new conformal EM-PIC methods.

  14. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Interaction Mechanisms Under Varying Solar Wind Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Markidis, Stefano; Horányi, Mihály

    2015-04-01

    We present three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions, and focus afterwards on the ion and electron kinetic behavior of the system. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. We identify a population of backstreaming ions, the deflection of magnetized electrons via the ExB-drift motion and the subsequent formation of a halo region of elevated density around the dipole source. Finally, it is shown that the presence and efficiency of the latter mechanisms are heavily impacted by the upstream plasma conditions and, on their turn, influence the overall structure and evolution of the LMA system. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The

  15. Multiparametric PIC simulations of electron vortices in relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazev, Alexey R.; Solovyev, Sergei V.; Kamenets, Fedor F.; Lezhnin, Kirill V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2017-05-01

    This work is dedicated to the multiparametric numerical simulations of the dynamics of electron vortices - one of the coherent structures that can form due to the interaction of high-intensity laser pulses with plasmas. Using a two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations it is demonstrated that the postsoliton stage of the evolution of the electron vortex is described well by the "snow plow" model. The dependence between the parameters of the vortex and the characteristic time of the vortex boundary disintegration is absorbed.

  16. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin; Chen, Zhong-Ping; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2017-03-01

    Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The "relativistic" filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  17. Particle-In-Cell modeling of Fast Ignition experiments on the Titan Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Anthony; Akli, K. U.; Beg, F.; Chen, C. D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Li, K.; McLean, H. S.; Morace, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schumacher, D. W.; Sorokovikova, A. V.; Stephens, R.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Wertepny, D.; Westhover, B.

    2012-10-01

    We report on particle-in-cell-modeling (PIC) of fast ignition experiments conducted on the Titan laser. The Titan laser was used to irradiate multilayer planar targets at intensities greater than 10^20 Wcm-2 to diagnose the laser to electron coupling, electron beam divergence, and energy spectrum of the hot electrons at relativistic intensities. Hot electron beam properties were inferred through buried fluors, escaping electrons and bremsstrahlung measurements. The PIC simulations of the experiment were conducted in two stages: a high resolution laser plasma interaction (LPI) simulation using measured on shot laser parameters but with a subscale target; and a lower resolution transport simulation containing the full scale multilayer target. The transport simulation utilized the electron source based on the output of the LPI simulation and included necessary models to simulate the experimental diagnostics. Comparison of the predicted electron source properties and the experimental data will be presented.

  18. Numerical simulation of limiting currents for transport of intense relativistic electron beams in conducting waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Guillory, J. U.

    1995-11-01

    The space-charge limiting current for an intense, magnetized, relativistic electron beam injected into a grounded metallic pipe is investigated with a 2(1/2)-dimensional particle-in-cell code. Comparisons between the simulation results, the well known Bogdankevich-Rukhadze limiting current, and more recent theoretical estimates of the limiting current are presented. Transmitted currents ≳15% above those predicted by the Bogdankevich-Rukhadze and other limiting current estimates are observed. However, good agreement between the simulation results and the analytic estimates of Uhm [Phys. Fluids B 5, 1919 (1993)] and Fessenden [Lawrence Livermore Lab. Rep. No. UCID-16527 (1974)] is found. For an injected current above the limiting value, a virtual cathode is formed which alters the transmitted current density profile of the beam. A theoretical estimate of the magnitude of the transmitted current under this condition is compared with simulation results. The predicted transmitted current is found to be valid only for injected currents slightly above the limiting current. In addition, the transition between vacuum and ion-focused-regime transport, with and without an applied axial magnetic field is simulated. For ion-focus-regime densities (np ˜ nb), the effect of the virtual cathode in limiting the beam transmission is greatly diminished as expected.

  19. Short and long term simulations of relativistic, magnetized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    We will present a series of numerical simulations addressed to understand the morphology and dynamics of relativistic, magnetized, axisymmetric jets. Some of the simulations have been specifically set up to follow the long term evolution of extragalactic jets under idealized conditions. The simulations have been done with an extension of the GENESIS code (Aloy et al 1999a} suitable for relativistic magnetohydrodynamcs applications. The code is based on a Godunov-type scheme whose building block is a method of lines. The numerical algorithm can provide up to third order of accuracy and makes use of a constrained transport method in order to keep the divergence--free condition of the magnetic field.

  20. Mitigating Particle Integration Error in Relativistic Laser-Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, Adam; Weichmann, Kathleen; Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John

    2016-10-01

    In particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield accelerators with a0 greater than unity, errors in particle trajectories produce incorrect beam charges and energies, predicting performance not realized in experiments such as the Texas Petawatt Laser. In order to avoid these errors, the simulation time step must resolve a time scale smaller than the laser period by a factor of a0. If the Yee scheme advances the fields with this time step, the laser wavelength must be over-resolved by a factor of a0 to avoid dispersion errors. Here is presented and demonstrated with Vorpal simulations, a new electromagnetic algorithm, building on previous work, correcting Yee dispersion for arbitrary sub-CFL time steps, reducing simulation times by a0.

  1. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer and General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Accretion and Outflows of Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Wu, Kinwah

    2007-01-01

    We have calculated the emission from relativistic flows in black hole systems using a fully general relativistic radiative transfer, with flow structures obtained by general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We consider thermal free-free emission and thermal synchrotron emission. Bright filament-like features are found protruding (visually) from the accretion disk surface, which are enhancements of synchrotron emission when the magnetic field is roughly aligned with the line-of-sight in the co-moving frame. The features move back and forth as the accretion flow evolves, but their visibility and morphology are robust. We propose that variations and location drifts of the features are responsible for certain X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in black-hole X-ray binaries.

  2. Relativistic interpretation of Newtonian simulations for cosmic structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Christian; Tram, Thomas; Rampf, Cornelius; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    The standard numerical tools for studying non-linear collapse of matter are Newtonian N-body simulations. Previous work has shown that these simulations are in accordance with General Relativity (GR) up to first order in perturbation theory, provided that the effects from radiation can be neglected. In this paper we show that the present day matter density receives more than 1% corrections from radiation on large scales if Newtonian simulations are initialised before z=50. We provide a relativistic framework in which unmodified Newtonian simulations are compatible with linear GR even in the presence of radiation. Our idea is to use GR perturbation theory to keep track of the evolution of relativistic species and the relativistic space-time consistent with the Newtonian trajectories computed in N-body simulations. If metric potentials are sufficiently small, they can be computed using a first-order Einstein-Boltzmann code such as CLASS. We make this idea rigorous by defining a class of GR gauges, the Newtonian motion gauges, which are defined such that matter particles follow Newtonian trajectories. We construct a simple example of a relativistic space-time within which unmodified Newtonian simulations can be interpreted.

  3. Kinetic Simulations of the Lowest-order Unstable Mode of Relativistic Magnetostatic Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; Yuan, Yajie; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of particle-in-cell numerical pair plasma simulations of relativistic two-dimensional magnetostatic equilibria known as the “Arnold-Beltrami-Childress” fields. In particular, we focus on the lowest-order unstable configuration consisting of two minima and two maxima of the magnetic vector potential. Breaking of the initial symmetry leads to exponential growth of the electric energy and to the formation of two current layers, which is consistent with the picture of “X-point collapse” first described by Syrovatskii. Magnetic reconnection within the layers heats a fraction of particles to very high energies. After the saturation of the linear instability, the current layers are disrupted and the system evolves chaotically, diffusing the particle energies in a stochastic second-order Fermi process, leading to the formation of power-law energy distributions. The power-law slopes harden with the increasing mean magnetization, but they are significantly softer than those produced in simulations initiated from Harris-type layers. The maximum particle energy is proportional to the mean magnetization, which is attributed partly to the increase of the effective electric field and partly to the increase of the acceleration timescale. We describe in detail the evolving structure of the dynamical current layers and report on the conservation of magnetic helicity. These results can be applied to highly magnetized astrophysical environments, where ideal plasma instabilities trigger rapid magnetic dissipation with efficient particle acceleration and flares of high-energy radiation.

  4. Particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo collision simulations of the cathode sheath in an atmospheric direct-current arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Guo, Heng; Jiang, Wei; Li, He-Ping; Li, Zeng-Yao; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    A sheath is the transition region from plasma to a solid surface, which also plays a critical role in determining the behaviors of many lab and industrial plasmas. However, the cathode sheath properties in arc discharges are not well understood yet due to its multi-scale and kinetic features. In this letter, we have adopted an implicit particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) method to study the cathode sheath in an atmospheric arc discharge plasma. The cathode sheath thickness, number densities and averaged energies of electrons and ions, the electric field distribution, as well as the spatially averaged electron energy probability function (EEPF), are predicted self-consistently by using this newly developed kinetic model. It is also shown that the thermionic emission at the hot cathode surface is the dominant electron emission process to sustain the arc discharges, while the effects from secondary and field electron emissions are negligible. The present results verify the previous conjectures and experimental observations.

  5. Global three-dimensional simulation of Earth's dayside reconnection using a two-way coupled magnetohydrodynamics with embedded particle-in-cell model: initial results: 3D MHD-EPIC simulation of magnetosphere

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yuxi; Tóth, Gábor; Cassak, Paul; ...

    2017-09-18

    Here, we perform a three-dimensional (3D) global simulation of Earth's magnetosphere with kinetic reconnection physics to study the flux transfer events (FTEs) and dayside magnetic reconnection with the recently developed magnetohydrodynamics with embedded particle-in-cell model (MHD-EPIC). During the one-hour long simulation, the FTEs are generated quasi-periodically near the subsolar point and move toward the poles. We also find the magnetic field signature of FTEs at their early formation stage is similar to a ‘crater FTE’, which is characterized by a magnetic field strength dip at the FTE center. After the FTE core field grows to a significant value, it becomesmore » an FTE with typical flux rope structure. When an FTE moves across the cusp, reconnection between the FTE field lines and the cusp field lines can dissipate the FTE. The kinetic features are also captured by our model. A crescent electron phase space distribution is found near the reconnection site. A similar distribution is found for ions at the location where the Larmor electric field appears. The lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) along the current sheet direction also arises at the interface of magnetosheath and magnetosphere plasma. Finally, the LHDI electric field is about 8 mV/m and its dominant wavelength relative to the electron gyroradius agrees reasonably with MMS observations.« less

  6. Intensity-dependent criteria for PIC simulations of relativistic electrons in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Ginevra E.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Chen, Guangye

    2014-10-01

    We present a study of particle-in-cell simulation error in modeling a free electron in an ultraintense laser field, comparing the codes PSC and LSP. We find an unexpectedly small timestep is required for both codes to resolve the classical electron motion, decreasing with increasing ao, the normalized vector potential. We consider grid dispersion, the field solver, and the particle pusher as sources of error, and find by comparing the codes with a simple particle pusher that the particle pusher error dominates the results. We derive the constraint imposed by use of the relativistic Boris particle pusher on the timestep and find that it must decrease inversely as ao. We find the particle pusher error accumulates on the small trajectory segments where the gamma-factor is approximately unity and the laser fields are strong, and present a sub-cycled version of the simple particle pusher code which reduces error. This work was supported in part by an allocation of computing time from the Ohio Supercomputer Center. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract Nos. DE-FC52-06NA26262 and DE-FG02-04ER54742, and National Nuclear Security Administration Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512.

  7. photon-plasma: A modern high-order particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    Haugbølle, Troels; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Nordlund, Åke

    2013-06-15

    We present the photon-plasma code, a modern high order charge conserving particle-in-cell code for simulating relativistic plasmas. The code is using a high order implicit field solver and a novel high order charge conserving interpolation scheme for particle-to-cell interpolation and charge deposition. It includes powerful diagnostics tools with on-the-fly particle tracking, synthetic spectra integration, 2D volume slicing, and a new method to correctly account for radiative cooling in the simulations. A robust technique for imposing (time-dependent) particle and field fluxes on the boundaries is also presented. Using a hybrid OpenMP and MPI approach, the code scales efficiently from 8 to more than 250.000 cores with almost linear weak scaling on a range of architectures. The code is tested with the classical benchmarks particle heating, cold beam instability, and two-stream instability. We also present particle-in-cell simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and new results on radiative collisionless shocks.

  8. Load-balancing techniques for a parallel electromagnetic particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    PLIMPTON,STEVEN J.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; PASIK,MICHAEL F.; COATS,REBECCA S.

    2000-01-01

    QUICKSILVER is a 3-d electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code developed and used at Sandia to model relativistic charged particle transport. It models the time-response of electromagnetic fields and low-density-plasmas in a self-consistent manner: the fields push the plasma particles and the plasma current modifies the fields. Through an LDRD project a new parallel version of QUICKSILVER was created to enable large-scale plasma simulations to be run on massively-parallel distributed-memory supercomputers with thousands of processors, such as the Intel Tflops and DEC CPlant machines at Sandia. The new parallel code implements nearly all the features of the original serial QUICKSILVER and can be run on any platform which supports the message-passing interface (MPI) standard as well as on single-processor workstations. This report describes basic strategies useful for parallelizing and load-balancing particle-in-cell codes, outlines the parallel algorithms used in this implementation, and provides a summary of the modifications made to QUICKSILVER. It also highlights a series of benchmark simulations which have been run with the new code that illustrate its performance and parallel efficiency. These calculations have up to a billion grid cells and particles and were run on thousands of processors. This report also serves as a user manual for people wishing to run parallel QUICKSILVER.

  9. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Self-Consistent Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs at shocked regions. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields and particle acceleration. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation, which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants. We will present detailed spectra for conditions relevant of various astrophysical sites of shock formation via the Weibel instability. In particular we will discuss the application to GRBs and SNRs.

  10. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Hughes, J. P.

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system without the axisymmetry. We have investigated how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation. We will perform simulations with various incoming flows from an accompanying star.

  11. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Frank, J.; Sol, H.

    1999-05-01

    Koide et al have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state or in hydrostatic equilibrium) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code on a full 3-dimensional system. We will investigate how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics. 3-D RMHD simulations wil be also performed to investigate the dynamics of a jet with a helical mangetic field in it.

  12. Jet Formation with 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Preece, R.; Hardee, P.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Hughes, J. P.; Fishman, J.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. The magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the accretion disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by the J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and the magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system without the axisymmetry. We have investigated how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation. We will perform simulations with various incoming flows from an accompanying star.

  13. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Shibata, Kazunari; Kudoh, Takashiro; Sol, Helene; Hughes, John

    2002-04-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J × B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system without the axisymmetry. We have investigated how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation. We will perform simulations with various incoming flows from an accompanying star.

  14. Relativistic Modeling Capabilities in PERSEUS Extended MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as hybrid X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. A major challenge of a relativistic fluid implementation is the recovery of primitive variables (density, velocity, pressure) from conserved quantities at each time step of a simulation. This recovery, which reduces to straightforward algebra in non-relativistic simulations, becomes more complicated when the equations are made relativistic, and has thus far been a major impediment to two-fluid simulations of relativistic HED plasmas. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm's law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the central part of the primitive variable recovery problem to a straightforward algebraic computation, which enables efficient and accurate relativistic two-fluid simulations. Our code recovers expected non-relativistic results and reveals new physics in the relativistic regime. Work supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836.

  15. Analysis of plasma and neutral gas flow inside of a PET bottle under PIII condition by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Ikeyama, M.; Nakao, S.; Choi, J.; Miyagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma behavior inside of a PET bottle has been simulated under the condition of plasma immersed ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses the "PIC-MCCM" module for the plasma analysis and the "DSMCM" module for the gas flow field analysis. DSMCM gives densities, velocities, fluxes, temperatures and pressures of each neutral species such as the fed gas species and radicals. By coupling PIC-MCCM with DSMCM simulation, the plasma behavior in the flowing Ar gas and N2 gas has been simulated. The gas was injected from the tip of the gas inlet which was inserted into the center of the bottle. The base gas pressure was 1-50 Pa and a positive pulse voltage (maximum voltage = 0.1-1 kV) was applied to the center rod. A two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system was used. Time evolution of the spacial distribution was obtained for densities of electrons, N2+ ions, N2∗ radicals and N atoms in N2 gas, and Ar+ ions, Ar∗ and Ar∗(4s) radicals in Ar gas. Time evolution of the particle flux and the energy flux of electrons and ions on the target surface was also obtained.

  16. Two Dimensional Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) Simulation of Radio Frequency Capacitively Coupled Plasmas with a Dielectric Side Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal; cold plasma Team, LPP Team

    2016-09-01

    The majority of previous two dimensional (usually fluid) simulations of radio frequency capacitively coupled plasmas have focused on geometrically-asymmetric reactors (with a much larger grounded electrode than power electrode), which produces a strong dc self-bias. However, a commonly-used geometry comprises electrodes of equal area surrounded by a dielectric side wall, but this has not been widely simulated. We have developed a two dimensional (Cartesian) PIC/MC code based on the work of Hongyu Wang, Wei Jiang and Younian Wang, to simulate argon plasmas in this kind of chamber. Even using a thick dielectric, a peak in plasma density and electron power deposition is adjacent to the dielectric. The profiles of the electron and ion fluxes show that the period-averaged currents to the powered electrode are not locally balanced; the electron flux peaks closer to the dielectric edge, before dropping sharply. Finally, the effect of the dielectric thickness on the surface charge distribution and the angular distributions of ions arriving at boundaries is examined. This work is supported by China Scholarship Council.

  17. Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator Simulation Code Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven; Ryne, Robert

    1997-05-01

    We present recent work on the development and testing of a 3-D simu- lation code for relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators (RK-TBAs). This new code utilizes symplectic integration techniques to push macro- particles, coupled to a circuit equation framework that advances the fields in the cavities. Space charge effects are calculated using a Green's function approach, and pipe wall effects are included in the electrostatic approximation. We present simulations of the LBNL/LLNL RK-TBA device, emphasizing cavity power development and beam dynamics, including the high- and low-frequency beam break-up instabilities.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. III. ROTATING RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-09-20

    We have investigated the influence of jet rotation and differential motion on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box. Displacement of the initial helical magnetic field leads to the growth of the CD kink instability. We find that, in accordance with the linear stability theory, the development of the instability depends on the lateral distribution of the poloidal magnetic field. If the poloidal field significantly decreases outward from the axis, then the initial small perturbations grow strongly, and if multiple wavelengths are excited, then nonlinear interaction eventually disrupts the initial cylindrical configuration. When the profile of the poloidal field is shallow, the instability develops slowly and eventually saturates. We briefly discuss implications of our findings for Poynting-dominated jets.

  19. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Waves in a Plasma Described by Kappa Velocity Distribution as Observed in the Saturńs Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. V.; Barbosa, M. V. G.; Simoes, F. J. L., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Observations have shown that several regions in space plasmas exhibit non-Maxwellian distributions with high energy superthermal tails. Kappa velocity distribution functions can describe many of these regions and have been used since the 60's. They suit well to represent superthermal tails in solar wind as well as to obtain plasma parameters of plasma within planetary magnetospheres. A set of initial velocities following kappa distribution functions is used in KEMPO1 particle simulation code to analyze the normal modes of wave propagation. Initial conditions are determined using observed characteristics for Saturńs magnetosphere. Two electron species with different temperatures and densities and ions as a third species are used. Each electron population is described by a different kappa index. Particular attention is given to perpendicular propagation, Bernstein modes, and parallel propagation, Langmuir and electron-acoustic modes. The dispersion relation for the Bernstein modes is strongly influenced by the shape of the velocity distribution and consequently by the value of kappa index. Simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the dispersion relation obtained in the literature and they are in good agreement.

  20. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Michael David; Huang, Chengkun; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Sunghwan; Albright, Brian James

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  1. Inertial electrostatic confinement and nuclear fusion in the interelectrode plasma of a nanosecond vacuum discharge. II: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilenkov, Yu. K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2010-12-15

    Results of particle-in-sell simulations of ion acceleration by using the KARAT code in a cylindrical geometry in the problem formulation corresponding to an actual experiment with a low-energy vacuum discharge with a hollow cathode are presented. The fundamental role of the formed virtual cathode is analyzed. The space-time dynamics of potential wells related to the formation of the virtual cathode is discussed. Quasi-steady potential wells (with a depth of {approx}80% of the applied voltage) cause acceleration of deuterium ions to energies about the electron beam energy ({approx}50 keV). In the well, a quasi-isotropic velocity distribution function of fast ions forms. The results obtained are compared with available data on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF). In particular, similar correlations between the structure of potential wells and the neutron yield, as well as the scaling of the fusion power density, which increases with decreasing virtual cathode radius and increasing potential well depth, are considered. The chosen electrode configuration and potential well parameters provide power densities of nuclear DD fusion in a nanosecond vacuum discharge noticeably higher than those achieved in other similar IECF systems.

  2. General mechanism and dynamics of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies from 3-D particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lembège, Bertrand; Horányi, Mihály; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We present a general model of the solar wind interaction with a dipolar lunar crustal magnetic anomaly (LMA) using three-dimensional full-kinetic and electromagnetic simulations. We confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface, forming a so-called "minimagnetosphere," as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. We show that the LMA configuration is driven by electron motion because its scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. We identify a population of back-streaming ions, the deflection of magnetized electrons via the E × B drift motion, and the subsequent formation of a halo region of elevated density around the dipole source. Finally, it is shown that the presence and efficiency of the processes are heavily impacted by the upstream plasma conditions and, on their turn, influence the overall structure and evolution of the LMA system. Understanding the detailed physics of the solar wind interaction with LMAs, including magnetic shielding, particle dynamics and surface charging is vital to evaluate its implications for lunar exploration.

  3. General relativistic corrections to N -body simulations and the Zel'dovich approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Christian; Rampf, Cornelius; Tram, Thomas; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David

    2015-12-01

    The initial conditions for Newtonian N -body simulations are usually generated by applying the Zel'dovich approximation to the initial displacements of the particles using an initial power spectrum of density fluctuations generated by an Einstein-Boltzmann solver. We show that in most gauges the initial displacements generated in this way receive a first-order relativistic correction. We define a new gauge, the N -body gauge, in which this relativistic correction vanishes and show that a conventional Newtonian N -body simulation includes all first-order relativistic contributions (in the absence of radiation) if we identify the coordinates in Newtonian simulations with those in the relativistic N -body gauge.

  4. Relativistic MHD simulations of poynting flux-driven jets

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2014-01-20

    Relativistic, magnetized jets are observed to propagate to very large distances in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations to study the propagation of Poynting flux-driven jets in AGNs. These jets are already assumed to be being launched from the vicinity (∼10{sup 3} gravitational radii) of supermassive black holes. Jet injections are characterized by a model described in Li et al., and we follow the propagation of these jets to ∼parsec scales. We find that these current-carrying jets are always collimated and mildly relativistic. When α, the ratio of toroidal-to-poloidal magnetic flux injection, is large the jet is subject to nonaxisymmetric current-driven instabilities (CDI) which lead to substantial dissipation and reduced jet speed. However, even with the presence of instabilities, the jet is not disrupted and will continue to propagate to large distances. We suggest that the relatively weak impact by the instability is due to the nature of the instability being convective and the fact that the jet magnetic fields are rapidly evolving on Alfvénic time scales. We present the detailed jet properties and show that far from the jet launching region, a substantial amount of magnetic energy has been transformed into kinetic energy and thermal energy, producing a jet magnetization number σ < 1. In addition, we have also studied the effects of a gas pressure supported 'disk' surrounding the injection region, and qualitatively similar global jet behaviors were observed. We stress that jet collimation, CDIs, and the subsequent energy transitions are intrinsic features of current-carrying jets.

  5. Efficient GPU implementation for Particle in Cell algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Rejith George; Ravunnikutty, Girish; Ranka, Sanjay; Klasky, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Particle in cell method is widely used method in the plasma physics to study the trajectories of charged particles under electromagnetic fields. The PIC algorithm is computationally intensive and its time requirements are proportional to the number of charged particles involved in the simulation. The focus of the paper is to parallelize the PIC algorithm on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). We present several performance tradeoffs related to the small shared memory and atomic operations on the GPU to achieve high performance.

  6. TWO-FLUID MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the large-scale evolution of a relativistic magnetic reconnection in an electron-positron pair plasma by a relativistic two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. We introduce an interspecies friction force as an effective resistivity to dissipate magnetic fields. We demonstrate that magnetic reconnection successfully occurs in our two-fluid system, and that it involves Petschek-type bifurcated current layers in a later stage. We further observe a quasi-steady evolution thanks to an open boundary condition, and find that the Petschek-type structure is stable over the long time period. Simulation results and theoretical analyses exhibit that the Petschek outflow channel becomes narrower when the reconnection inflow contains more magnetic energy, as previously claimed. Meanwhile, we find that the reconnection rate goes up to {approx}1 in extreme cases, which is faster than previously thought. The role of the resistivity, implications for reconnection models in the magnetically dominated limit, and relevance to kinetic reconnection works are discussed.

  7. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency.

    PubMed

    Stark, David J; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V; Toncian, Toma; Hazeltine, R D; Mahajan, S M

    2015-07-10

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. For an anisotropic electron distribution, propagation characteristics, like the critical density, will depend on the polarization of the electromagnetic wave. Despite the onset of the Weibel instability in such plasmas, the anisotropy can persist long enough to affect laser propagation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization.

  8. A new approach to theoretical investigations of high harmonics generation by means of fs laser interaction with overdense plasma layers. Combining particle-in-cell simulations with machine learning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, A.

    2016-12-01

    Within the past decade, various experimental and theoretical investigations have been performed in the field of high-order harmonics generation (HHG) by means of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses interacting with laser produced plasmas. Numerous potential future applications thus arise. Beyond achieving higher conversion efficiency for higher harmonic orders and hence harmonic power and brilliance, there are more ambitious scientific goals such as attaining shorter harmonic wavelengths or reducing harmonic pulse durations towards the attosecond and even the zeptosecond range. High order harmonics are also an attractive diagnostic tool for the laser-plasma interaction process itself. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are known to be one of the most important numerical instruments employed in plasma physics and in laser-plasma interaction investigations. The novelty brought by this paper consists in combining the PIC method with several machine learning approaches. For predictive modelling purposes, a universal functional approximator is used, namely a multi-layer perceptron (MLP), in conjunction with a self-organizing map (SOM). The training sets have been retrieved from the PIC simulations and also from the available literature in the field. The results demonstrate the potential utility of machine learning in predicting optimal interaction scenarios for gaining higher order harmonics or harmonics with particular features such as a particular wavelength range, a particular harmonic pulse duration or a certain intensity. Furthermore, the author will show how machine learning can be used for estimations of electronic temperatures, proving that it can be a reliable tool for obtaining better insights into the fs laser interaction physics.

  9. 3D RMHD Simulations of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of weakly and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly and strongly magnetized stationary or mildly relativistic (0.5c) sheath flow using the RAISHIN code. In the numerical simulations a jet with Lorentz factor gamma=2.5 is processed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. Results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized RMHD equations describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized sheath flow. The prediction of increased stability of a weakly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the stabilization of a strongly magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow is confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  10. 3D RMHD Simulations of Magnetized Spine-sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Phillip; Ken-Ichi, Nishikawa

    2008-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of weakly and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly and strongly magnetized stationary or mildly relativistic'(0.5c) sheath flow using the RAISHIN code. In the numerical simulations a jet with Lorentz factor gamma=2.5 is processed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. Results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized RMHD equations describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized sheath flow. The prediction of increased stability of a weakly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the stabilization of a strongly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow is confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  11. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer and GeneralRelativistic MHD Simulations of Accretion and Outflows of Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.

    2007-01-05

    We calculate the emission from relativistic flows in black hole systems using a fully general relativistic radiative transfer formulation, with flow structures obtained by general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. We consider thermal free-free emission and thermal synchrotron emission. Bright filament-like features protrude (visually) from the accretion disk surface, which are enhancements of synchrotron emission where the magnetic field roughly aligns with the line-of-sight in the co-moving frame. The features move back and forth as the accretion flow evolves, but their visibility and morphology are robust. We propose that variations and drifts of the features produce certain X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in black-hole X-ray binaries.

  12. A General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Jet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation ofjet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity approx.0.3c) is created, as shown by previous two-dimensional axi- symmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The three-dimensional simulation ran over 100 light crossing time units (T(sub s) = r(sub s)/c, where r(sub s = 2GM/c(sup 2), which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted owing in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting of the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r = 3r(sub s). At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface ofthe thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outward with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward-moving torsional Alfven waves. This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk because of the iack of streaming materiai from an accompanying star.

  13. Diagnosing particle acceleration in relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.; Liang, Edison P.; Summerlin, Errol J.; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian A.; Roustazadeh, Parisa

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy emission from blazars and other relativistic jet sources indicates that electrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic (GeV - TeV) energies in these systems. This paper summarizes recent results from numerical studies of two fundamentally different particle acceleration mechanisms potentially at work in relativistic jets: Magnetic-field generation and relativistic particle acceleration in relativistic shear layers, which are likely to be present in relativistic jets, is studied via Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic shocks is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting magnetic-field configurations and thermal + non-thermal particle distributions are then used to predict multi-wavelength radiative (synchrotron + Compton) signatures of both acceleration scenarios. In particular, we address how anisotropic shear-layer acceleration may be able to circumvent the well-known Lorentz-factor crisis, and how the self-consistent evaluation of thermal + non-thermal particle populations in diffusive shock acceleration simulations provides tests of the bulk Comptonization model for the Big Blue Bump observed in the SEDs of several blazars.

  14. Noninvariance of Energy-Momentum Scale Ranges in Vlasov Simulations of Relativistic Interactions and Warm Wavebreaking of Relativistic Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alec

    2015-11-01

    For certain classes of relativistic plasma problems, using a Lorentz boosted frame can be even more advantageous for gridded momentum space-position space-time simulations than Vay [Vay PRL 2007] showed was the case for position space-time simulations, resulting in speed up proportional to γboost6. The technique was applied using a Spectral Vlasov code to the problem of warm wavebreaking limits in relativistic plasma and demonstrates numerical results consistent with the analytic conclusions of Schroeder et al. [Schroeder PRE 2005]. By appropriate normalization, a self-similar behavior for the Vlasov equation in different Lorentz frames is found. These results are relevant to beam and laser driven plasma based accelerators and the potential for Vlasov simulation of them. National Science Foundation Career grant 1054164 and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Young Investigator Program grant FA9550-12-1-0310 and grant FA9550-14-1-0156.

  15. Mitigating the hosing instability in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceurvorst, L.; Ratan, N.; Levy, M. C.; Kasim, M. F.; Sadler, J.; Scott, R. H. H.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Huang, T. W.; Skramic, M.; Vranic, M.; Silva, L. O.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    A new physical model of the hosing instability that includes relativistic laser pulses and moderate densities is presented and derives the density dependence of the hosing equation. This is tested against two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. These simulations further examine the feasibility of using multiple pulses to mitigate the hosing instability in a Nd:glass-type parameter space. An examination of the effects of planar versus cylindrical exponential density gradients on the hosing instability is also presented. The results show that strongly relativistic pulses and more planar geometries are capable of mitigating the hosing instability which is in line with the predictions of the physical model.

  16. Apar-T: code, validation, and physical interpretation of particle-in-cell results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzani, Mickaël; Winisdoerffer, Christophe; Walder, Rolf; Folini, Doris; Favre, Jean M.; Krastanov, Stefan; Messmer, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present the parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) code Apar-T and, more importantly, address the fundamental question of the relations between the PIC model, the Vlasov-Maxwell theory, and real plasmas. First, we present four validation tests: spectra from simulations of thermal plasmas, linear growth rates of the relativistic tearing instability and of the filamentation instability, and nonlinear filamentation merging phase. For the filamentation instability we show that the effective growth rates measured on the total energy can differ by more than 50% from the linear cold predictions and from the fastest modes of the simulation. We link these discrepancies to the superparticle number per cell and to the level of field fluctuations. Second, we detail a new method for initial loading of Maxwell-Jüttner particle distributions with relativistic bulk velocity and relativistic temperature, and explain why the traditional method with individual particle boosting fails. The formulation of the relativistic Harris equilibrium is generalized to arbitrary temperature and mass ratios. Both are required for the tearing instability setup. Third, we turn to the key point of this paper and scrutinize the question of what description of (weakly coupled) physical plasmas is obtained by PIC models. These models rely on two building blocks: coarse-graining, i.e., grouping of the order of p ~ 1010 real particles into a single computer superparticle, and field storage on a grid with its subsequent finite superparticle size. We introduce the notion of coarse-graining dependent quantities, i.e., quantities depending on p. They derive from the PIC plasma parameter ΛPIC, which we show to behave as ΛPIC ∝ 1/p. We explore two important implications. One is that PIC collision- and fluctuation-induced thermalization times are expected to scale with the number of superparticles per grid cell, and thus to be a factor p ~ 1010 smaller than in real plasmas, a fact that we confirm with

  17. General relativistic magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the jet in M 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościbrodzka, Monika; Falcke, Heino; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2016-02-01

    Context. The connection between black hole, accretion disk, and radio jet can be constrained best by fitting models to observations of nearby low-luminosity galactic nuclei, in particular the well-studied sources Sgr A* and M 87. There has been considerable progress in modeling the central engine of active galactic nuclei by an accreting supermassive black hole coupled to a relativistic plasma jet. However, can a single model be applied to a range of black hole masses and accretion rates? Aims: Here we want to compare the latest three-dimensional numerical model, originally developed for Sgr A* in the center of the Milky Way, to radio observations of the much more powerful and more massive black hole in M 87. Methods: We postprocess three-dimensional GRMHD models of a jet-producing radiatively inefficient accretion flow around a spinning black hole using relativistic radiative transfer and ray-tracing to produce model spectra and images. As a key new ingredient in these models, we allow the proton-electron coupling in these simulations depend on the magnetic properties of the plasma. Results: We find that the radio emission in M 87 is described well by a combination of a two-temperature accretion flow and a hot single-temperature jet. Most of the radio emission in our simulations comes from the jet sheath. The model fits the basic observed characteristics of the M 87 radio core: it is "edge-brightened", starts subluminally, has a flat spectrum, and increases in size with wavelength. The best fit model has a mass-accretion rate of Ṁ ~ 9 × 10-3M⊙ yr-1 and a total jet power of Pj ~ 1043 erg s-1. Emission at λ = 1.3 mm is produced by the counter-jet close to the event horizon. Its characteristic crescent shape surrounding the black hole shadow could be resolved by future millimeter-wave VLBI experiments. Conclusions: The model was successfully derived from one for the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way by appropriately scaling mass and

  18. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M. D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S. A.; Albright, B. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models.

  19. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S.A.; Albright, B.J.

    2015-09-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models.

  20. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  1. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  2. THE SUBMILLIMETER BUMP IN Sgr A* FROM RELATIVISTIC MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Jason; Agol, Eric; Fragile, P. Chris; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2010-07-10

    Recent high resolution observations of the Galactic center black hole allow for direct comparison with accretion disk simulations. We compare two-temperature synchrotron emission models from three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to millimeter observations of Sgr A*. Fits to very long baseline interferometry and spectral index measurements disfavor the monochromatic face-on black hole shadow models from our previous work. Inclination angles {<=}20{sup 0} are ruled out to 3{sigma}. We estimate the inclination and position angles of the black hole, as well as the electron temperature of the accretion flow and the accretion rate, to be i=50{sup o+35o}{sub -15}{sup o}, {xi}=-23{sup o+97o}{sub -22}{sup o}, T{sub e} = (5.4 {+-} 3.0) x 10{sup 10} K, and M-dot =5{sup +15}{sub -2}x10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, with 90% confidence. The black hole shadow is unobscured in all best-fit models, and may be detected by observations on baselines between Chile and California, Arizona, or Mexico at 1.3 mm or .87 mm either through direct sampling of the visibility amplitude or using closure phase information. Millimeter flaring behavior consistent with the observations is present in all viable models and is caused by magnetic turbulence in the inner radii of the accretion flow. The variability at optically thin frequencies is strongly correlated with that in the accretion rate. The simulations provide a universal picture of the 1.3 mm emission region as a small region near the midplane in the inner radii of the accretion flow, which is roughly isothermal and has {nu}/{nu} {sub c} {approx} 1-20, where {nu} {sub c} is the critical frequency for thermal synchrotron emission.

  3. Simulations and analytic models of relativistic magnetized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoi, Alexandre Dmitrievich

    Astrophysical jets are tightly collimated streams that are often observed to move at velocities close to the speed of light. While many such systems are known, understanding and explaining how jets collimate and accelerate has been a long-standing challenge and is currently an area of active research. Finding analytic solutions for jets is extremely hard because the equations that describe the jets are highly nonlinear and difficult to solve analytically. Only in the last few years has it become possible to simulate ultrarelativistic jets computationally, which has led to unprecedented insights into their structure. We now think that many relativistic jets are produced by magnetic fields twisted by the rotation of a central compact object, which can be a black hole or a neutron star. In this thesis I present numerical and analytical studies of relativistic jets. In Chapter 2, I start with a discussion of a simple, idealized model that has the bare minimum of ingredients needed for the production of jets: regular magnetic field, spinning central compact object, and externally imposed collimation. The model assumes that magnetic field in the jet is so strong that plasma inertia is negligible and can be ignored. The simplicity of this model allows for a fully analytic description and an intuitive understanding of the results. Despite being simple, this model possesses non-trivial properties and has important applications to various astrophysical systems --- compact object binaries, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei. Chapters 3 -- 7 add an extra level of realism (and sophistication) into jet models: they account for mass inertia of the jet fluid and study its effects on the jet structure. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of jet confinement on the acceleration of the jet. Chapter 5 shows that deconfinement can also have a dramatic effect on the jet. Chapter 6 studies how the structure of the jet changes if the central object driving the jet is a black hole

  4. Sparse grid techniques for particle-in-cell schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, L. F.; Cerfon, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    We propose the use of sparse grids to accelerate particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes. By using the so-called ‘combination technique’ from the sparse grids literature, we are able to dramatically increase the size of the spatial cells in multi-dimensional PIC schemes while paying only a slight penalty in grid-based error. The resulting increase in cell size allows us to reduce the statistical noise in the simulation without increasing total particle number. We present initial proof-of-principle results from test cases in two and three dimensions that demonstrate the new scheme’s efficiency, both in terms of computation time and memory usage.

  5. Relativistic high harmonics and (sub-)attosecond pulses: relativistic spikes and relativistic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, A.; Baeva, T.; An der Brügge, D.; Münster, S.

    2009-11-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study high harmonic generation from overdense plasmas in the relativistic regime. Different incidence angles as well as different laser polarizations are considered and scalings are recovered. It is shown that the theory of relativistic spikes and the BGP power-law spectra [Phys. Rev. E 74, 046404 (2006)] describes well the normal incidence and s-polarized obliquely incident laser pulses. In the case of p-polarized laser pulses, exceptions from the BGP theory can appear when the quasi-static vector potential build-up at the plasma boundary becomes equal to that of the laser. In this case, the spectrum flattens significantly and has a lower cutoff.

  6. Effects of relativistic electron temperature on parametric instabilities for intense laser propagation in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Min; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Ren, Chuang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming E-mail: zhengming.sheng@strath.ac.uk

    2014-11-15

    Effects of relativistic electron temperature on stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilities for high intensity lasers propagating in underdense plasma are studied theoretically and numerically. The dispersion relations for these instabilities are derived from the relativistic fluid equation. For a wide range of laser intensity and electron temperature, it is found that the maximum growth rate and the instability region in k-space can be reduced at relativistic electron temperature. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out, which confirm the theoretical analysis.

  7. Anisotropic Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Markus; Liang, Edison P.; Fu, Wen

    2017-08-01

    We present results of Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic shear layers as relevant to the relativistic jets of acive galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. We study the self-generation of electro-magnetic fields and particle acceleration for various different plasma compositions (electron-ion vs. electron-positron pair vs. hybrid). Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution of accelerated particles. We find that electron-ion shear layers lead to highly anisotropic particle distributions in the frame of the fast-moving inner spine. The beaming pattern of the highest-energy particles is much narrower than the characteristic beaming angle of 1/Gamma resulting from relativistic aberration of a co-moving isotropic distribution. This may pose a possible solution to the Lorentz-Factor crisis in blazars and explain very hard X-ray / soft gamma-ray spectra of some gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Novel methods in the Particle-In-Cell accelerator Code-Framework Warp

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J-L; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.

    2012-12-26

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Code-Framework Warp is being developed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) to guide the development of accelerators that can deliver beams suitable for high-energy density experiments and implosion of inertial fusion capsules. It is also applied in various areas outside the Heavy Ion Fusion program to the study and design of existing and next-generation high-energy accelerators, including the study of electron cloud effects and laser wakefield acceleration for example. This study presents an overview of Warp's capabilities, summarizing recent original numerical methods that were developed by the HIFS-VNL (including PIC with adaptive mesh refinement, a large-timestep 'drift-Lorentz' mover for arbitrarily magnetized species, a relativistic Lorentz invariant leapfrog particle pusher, simulations in Lorentz-boosted frames, an electromagnetic solver with tunable numerical dispersion and efficient stride-based digital filtering), with special emphasis on the description of the mesh refinement capability. In addition, selected examples of the applications of the methods to the abovementioned fields are given.

  9. High-order nodal discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell method on unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.B. . E-mail: gjacobs2@dam.brown.edu; Hesthaven, J.S. . E-mail: Jan.Hesthaven@brown.edu

    2006-05-01

    We present a high-order particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm for the simulation of kinetic plasmas dynamics. The core of the algorithm utilizes an unstructured grid discontinuous Galerkin Maxwell field solver combining high-order accuracy with geometric flexibility. We introduce algorithms in the Lagrangian framework that preserve the favorable properties of the field solver in the PIC solver. Fast full-order interpolation and effective search algorithms are used for tracking individual particles on the general grid and smooth particle shape functions are introduced to ensure low noise in the charge and current density. A pre-computed levelset distance function is employed to represent the geometry and facilitates complex particle-boundary interaction. To enforce charge conservation we consider two different techniques, one based on projection and one on hyperbolic cleaning. Both are found to work well, although the latter is found be too expensive when used with explicit time integration. Examples of simple plasma phenomena, e.g., plasma waves, instabilities, and Landau damping are shown to agree well with theoretical predictions and/or results found by other computational methods. We also discuss generic well known problems such as numerical Cherenkov radiation and grid heating before presenting a few two-dimensional tests, showing the potential of the current method to handle fully relativistic plasma dynamics in complex geometries.

  10. Massively parallel microscopic particle-in-cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, G.; Peltz, C.; Bigaouette, N.; Fennel, T.; Brabec, T.; Varin, C.

    2017-10-01

    The microscopic particle-in-cell (MicPIC) method was developed to model classical light-matter interaction in strongly-coupled plasma systems. It effectively overcomes the limitations of the particle-in-cell and molecular dynamics techniques by combining them into a single, unified framework to solve for both electromagnetic wave propagation and atomic-scale collision processes in a self-consistent treatment. Its effective time complexity is O(N) , where N is the number of model particles, which is ideal for studying the dynamics of large ensembles. In this paper, we show that through massively parallel, distributed computations, current implementations of the MicPIC approach can handle up to 1011 particles on an IBM Blue Gene/Q computer with 65 536 physical cores. This allows modelling volumes of matter of approximately 1 μm3 at solid gold density, opening a wealth of potential applications of MicPIC in nanophotonics, diffractive X-ray imaging, and strong-field science.

  11. Laser prepulse induced plasma channel formation in air and relativistic self focusing of an intense short pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok; Dahiya, Deepak; Sharma, A. K.

    2011-02-15

    An analytical formalism is developed and particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to study plasma channel formation in air by a two pulse technique and subsequent relativistic self focusing of the third intense laser through it. The first prepulse causes tunnel ionization of air. The second pulse heats the plasma electrons and establishes a prolonged channel. The third pulse focuses under the combined effect of density nonuniformity of the channel and relativistic mass nonlinearity. A channel with 20% density variation over the spot size of the third pulse is seen to strongly influence relativistic self focusing at normalized laser amplitude {approx}0.4-1. In deeper plasma channels, self focusing is less sensitive to laser amplitude variation. These results are reproduced in particle-in-cell simulations. The present treatment is valid for millimeter range plasma channels.

  12. Three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons.

    PubMed

    Esirkepov, Timur; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Bulanov, Sergei V; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2002-12-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons were observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of an intense short-laser-pulse propagation in an underdense plasma. Their structure resembles that of an oscillating electric dipole with a poloidal electric field and a toroidal magnetic field that oscillate in phase with the electron density with frequency below the Langmuir frequency. On the ion time scale, the soliton undergoes a Coulomb explosion of its core, resulting in ion acceleration, and then evolves into a slowly expanding quasineutral cavity.

  13. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Deng, Yuqun; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen

    2014-11-01

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM02 mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM01 mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  14. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Frank, J.; Sol, H.

    1999-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state or in hydrostatic equilibrium) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system. We will investigate how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation.

  15. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Hughes, J. P.

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system. We will investigate how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation.

  16. Simulations of planar channeling of relativistic nuclei in a bent crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    The motion of relativistic nuclei through an oriented bent crystal was considered on the basis of a developed computer code. To get the angular distributions of projectiles behind the crystals and to estimate the influence of multiple scattering on beam deflection, a detailed study of the beam dynamics due to the processes of channeling, dechanneling and quasichanneling of the particles is presented. The analysis of the beam redistribution in a crystal was performed simulating the main features of the scattering of relativistic Pb ions and protons in the field of bent crystal planes. The comparison of simulated data with experimental ones has been also carried out.

  17. Three-dimensional evolution of a relativistic current sheet: triggering of magnetic reconnection by the guide field.

    PubMed

    Zenitani, S; Hoshino, M

    2005-08-26

    The linear and nonlinear evolution of a relativistic current sheet of pair (e(+/-)) plasmas is investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In a Harris configuration, it is obtained that the magnetic energy is fast dissipated by the relativistic drift kink instability (RDKI). However, when a current-aligned magnetic field (the so-called "guide field") is introduced, the RDKI is stabilized by the magnetic tension force and it separates into two obliquely propagating modes, which we call the relativistic drift-kink-tearing instability. These two waves deform the current sheet so that they trigger relativistic magnetic reconnection at a crossover thinning point. Since relativistic reconnection produces a lot of nonthermal particles, the guide field is of critical importance to study the energetics of a relativistic current sheet.

  18. Coherent kilo-electron-volt backscattering from plasma-wave boosted relativistic electron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F. Y.; Chen, M. Liu, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sheng, Z. M. E-mail: zmsheng@sjtu.edu.cn; Wu, H. C.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2014-10-20

    A different parameter regime of laser wakefield acceleration driven by sub-petawatt femtosecond lasers is proposed, which enables the generation of relativistic electron mirrors further accelerated by the plasma wave. Integrated particle-in-cell simulation, including both the mirror formation and Thomson scattering, demonstrates that efficient coherent backscattering up to keV photon energy can be obtained with moderate driving laser intensities and high density gas targets.

  19. Relativistic Electron Accleration by a Laser of Intensity in Excess of 1020 W cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangles, S. P. D.; Walton, B.; Wei, M. S.; Clarke, R. J.; Fritzler, S.; Gopal, A.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Krushelnick, K.; Najmudin, Z.; Dangor, A. E.

    Relativistic electrons with energies in excess of 300 MeV have been observed resulting from the interaction of a 0.3 PW laser beam focused to intensities of around 3 × 1020 W cm-2 interacting with an underdense plasma. Two dimensional particle in cell simulation of the interaction show that an interaction directly between preheated electrons and the intense laser field is responsible for the maximum acceleration.

  20. Pseudospectral Maxwell solvers for an accurate modeling of Doppler harmonic generation on plasma mirrors with particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaclard, G.; Vincenti, H.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    With the advent of petawatt class lasers, the very large laser intensities attainable on target should enable the production of intense high-order Doppler harmonics from relativistic laser-plasma mirror interactions. At present, the modeling of these harmonics with particle-in-cell (PIC) codes is extremely challenging as it implies an accurate description of tens to hundreds of harmonic orders on a broad range of angles. In particular, we show here that due to the numerical dispersion of waves they induce in vacuum, standard finite difference time domain (FDTD) Maxwell solvers employed in most PIC codes can induce a spurious angular deviation of harmonic beams potentially degrading simulation results. This effect was extensively studied and a simple toy model based on the Snell-Descartes law was developed that allows us to finely predict the angular deviation of harmonics depending on the spatiotemporal resolution and the Maxwell solver used in the simulations. Our model demonstrates that the mitigation of this numerical artifact with FDTD solvers mandates very high spatiotemporal resolution preventing realistic three-dimensional (3D) simulations even on the largest computers available at the time of writing. We finally show that nondispersive pseudospectral analytical time domain solvers can considerably reduce the spatiotemporal resolution required to mitigate this spurious deviation and should enable in the near future 3D accurate modeling on supercomputers in a realistic time to solution.

  1. A study of the discharge characteristics and energy balance of a Ne/Xe pulsed planar dielectric barrier: simulation via the one-dimensional particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benstâali, W.; Harrache, Z.; Belasri, A.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma display panels (PDPs) are one of the leading technologies in the flat panels market. However, they are facing intense competition. Different fluid models, both one-dimensional (1D) and 2D, have been used to analyze the energy balance in PDP cells in order to find out how the xenon excitation part can be improved to optimize the luminous efficiency. The aim of this work is to present a 1D particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model for PDPs. The discharge takes place in a Xe10-Ne gas mixture at 560 Torr. The applied voltage is 381 V. We show at first that this model reproduces the electric characteristics of a single PDP discharge pulse. Then, we calculate the energy deposited by charged particles in each collision. The total energy is about 19 μJ cm-2, and the energy used in xenon excitation is of the order of 12.5% compared to the total energy deposited in the discharge. The effect of xenon content in a Xe-Ne mixture is also analyzed. The energies deposited in xenon excitation and ionization are more important when the xenon percentage has been increased from 1 to 30%. The applied voltage increases the energy deposited in xenon excitation.

  2. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on the influence of electron and ion temperature on the sheath expansion process in the post-arc stage of vacuum circuit breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun

    2015-02-01

    The inter-contact region of vacuum circuit breakers is filled with residual plasma at the moment when the current is zero after the burning of metal vapor arc. The residual plasma forms an ion sheath in front of the post-arc cathode. The sheath then expands towards the post-arc anode under the influence of a transient recovery voltage. In this study, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model is developed to investigate the post-arc sheath expansion. The influence of ion and electron temperatures on the decrease in local plasma density at the post-arc cathode side and post-arc anode side is discussed. When the decay in the local plasma density develops from the cathode and anode sides into the high-density region and merges, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region begins to decrease. Meanwhile, the ion sheath begins to expand faster. Furthermore, the theory of ion rarefaction wave only explains quantitatively the decrease in the overall plasma density at relatively low ion temperatures. With the increase of ion temperature to certain extent, another possible reason for the decrease in the overall plasma density is proposed and results from the more active thermal diffusion of plasma.

  3. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on the influence of electron and ion temperature on the sheath expansion process in the post-arc stage of vacuum circuit breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun

    2015-02-15

    The inter-contact region of vacuum circuit breakers is filled with residual plasma at the moment when the current is zero after the burning of metal vapor arc. The residual plasma forms an ion sheath in front of the post-arc cathode. The sheath then expands towards the post-arc anode under the influence of a transient recovery voltage. In this study, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model is developed to investigate the post-arc sheath expansion. The influence of ion and electron temperatures on the decrease in local plasma density at the post-arc cathode side and post-arc anode side is discussed. When the decay in the local plasma density develops from the cathode and anode sides into the high-density region and merges, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region begins to decrease. Meanwhile, the ion sheath begins to expand faster. Furthermore, the theory of ion rarefaction wave only explains quantitatively the decrease in the overall plasma density at relatively low ion temperatures. With the increase of ion temperature to certain extent, another possible reason for the decrease in the overall plasma density is proposed and results from the more active thermal diffusion of plasma.

  4. GRMHD/RMHD Simulations and Stability of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    A new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD ) code "RAISHIN" used to simulate jet generation by rotating and non-rotating black holes with a geometrically thin Keplarian accretion disk finds that the jet develops a spine-sheath structure in the rotating black hole case. Spine-sheath structure and strong magnetic fields significantly modify the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven instability. The RAISHIN code has been used in its relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) configuration to study the effects of strong magnetic fields and weakly relativistic sheath motion, cl2, on the KH instability associated with a relativistic, Y = 2.5, jet spine-sheath interaction. In the simulations sound speeds up to ? c/3 and Alfven wave speeds up to ? 0.56 c are considered. Numerical simulation results are compared to theoretical predictions from a new normal mode analysis of the RMHD equations. Increased stability of a weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and stabilization of a strongly magnetized system resulting from d 2 sheath speeds is found.

  5. rf mode switching in a relativistic magnetron with diffraction output

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Meiqin; Michel, Cedric; Prasad, Sarita; Fuks, Mikhail I.; Schamiloglu, Edl; Liu Chunliang

    2010-12-20

    The relativistic magnetron with diffraction output (RMDO) has demonstrated nearly 70% efficiency in recent simulations. This letter reports a rapid mode switching technique in the RMDO using a low power, short-pulse, external single frequency signal. The MAGIC electromagnetic finite-difference-time-domain particle-in-cell code used in simulations demonstrated that an input signal of 300 kW is sufficient to switch neighboring modes in a gigawatt output power A6 RMDO with a transparent cathode, whereas for the original A6 magnetron configuration with radial extraction driven by a transparent cathode 30 MW is required. This frequency agility adds additional versatility to this high power microwave source.

  6. Numerical simulations of relativistic heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffin, Frank Cecil

    Bulk quantities of nuclear matter exist only in the compact bodies of the universe. There the crushing gravitational forces overcome the Coulomb repulsion in massive stellar collapses. Nuclear matter is subjected to high pressures and temperatures as shock waves propagate and burn their way through stellar cores. The bulk properties of nuclear matter are important parameters in the evolution of these collapses, some of which lead to nucleosynthesis. The nucleus is rich in physical phenomena. Above the Coulomb barrier, complex interactions lead to the distortion of, and as collision energies increase, the destruction of the nuclear volume. Of critical importance to the understanding of these events is an understanding of the aggregate microscopic processes which govern them. In an effort to understand relativistic heavy-ion reactions, the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (Ueh33) (BUU) transport equation is used as the framework for a numerical model. In the years since its introduction, the numerical model has been instrumental in providing a coherent, microscopic, physical description of these complex, highly non-linear events. This treatise describes the background leading to the creation of our numerical model of the BUU transport equation, details of its numerical implementation, its application to the study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and some of the experimental observables used to compare calculated results to empirical results. The formalism evolves the one-body Wigner phase-space distribution of nucleons in time under the influence of a single-particle nuclear mean field interaction and a collision source term. This is essentially the familiar Boltzmann transport equation whose source term has been modified to address the Pauli exclusion principle. Two elements of the model allow extrapolation from the study of nuclear collisions to bulk quantities of nuclear matter: the modification of nucleon scattering cross sections in nuclear matter, and the

  7. Numerical simulations of relativistic heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffin, Frank Cecil

    Bulk quantities of nuclear matter exist only in the compact bodies of the universe. There the crushing gravitational forces overcome the Coulomb repulsion in massive stellar collapses. Nuclear matter is subjected to high pressures and temperatures as shock waves propagate and burn their way through stellar cores. The bulk properties of nuclear matter are important parameters in the evolution of these collapses, some of which lead to nucleosynthesis. The nucleus is rich in physical phenomena. Above the Coulomb barrier, complex interactions lead to the distortion of, and as collision energies increase, the destruction of the nuclear volume. Of critical importance to the understanding of these events is an understanding of the aggregate microscopic processes which govern them. In an effort to understand relativistic heavy-ion reactions, the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (Ueh33) (BUU) transport equation is used as the framework for a numerical model. In the years since its introduction, the numerical model has been instrumental in providing a coherent, microscopic, physical description of these complex, highly non-linear events. This treatise describes the background leading to the creation of our numerical model of the BUU transport equation, details of its numerical implementation, its application to the study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and some of the experimental observables used to compare calculated results to empirical results. The formalism evolves the one-body Wigner phase-space distribution of nucleons in time under the influence of a single-particle nuclear mean field interaction and a collision source term. This is essentially the familiar Boltzmann transport equation whose source term has been modified to address the Pauli exclusion principle. Two elements of the model allow extrapolation from the study of nuclear collisions to bulk quantities of nuclear matter: the modification of nucleon scattering cross sections in nuclear matter, and the

  8. RELATIVISTIC POSITRON-ELECTRON-ION SHEAR FLOWS AND APPLICATION TO GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian; Roustazadeh, Parisa; Boettcher, Markus

    2013-12-20

    We present particle-in-cell simulation results of relativistic shear flows for hybrid positron-electron-ion plasmas and compare to those for pure e {sup +} e {sup –} and pure e {sup –} ion plasmas. Among the three types of relativistic shear flows, we find that only hybrid shear flow is able to energize the electrons to form a high-energy spectral peak plus a hard power law tail. Such electron spectra are needed to model the observational properties of gamma-ray bursts.

  9. Relativistic solutions for one- and two-dimensional space-charge limited current in coaxial diode

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhanfeng; Liu, Guozhi; Shao, Hao; Yan, Teng; Zhang, Yuchuan

    2013-05-15

    This paper reports the two-dimensional physics and space-charge limited current (SLC) of coaxial diodes with a finite-length emitter. A full-voltage and one-dimensional approximate solution is first obtained by matching the non-relativistic solution to the super-relativistic solution. Including the effects of fields induced by the anode current and the beam itself yields the pinch-limited current in the coaxial diode. The SLC of a practically applied coaxial diode with a finite length emitter is obtained by a semi-analytical method. The solutions well agree with numerical solutions and particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. Towards robust algorithms for current deposition and dynamic load-balancing in a GPU particle in cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Sgattoni, Andrea; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    We present `jasmine', an implementation of a fully relativistic, 3D, electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, capable of running simulations in various laser plasma acceleration regimes on Graphics-Processing-Units (GPUs) HPC clusters. Standard energy/charge preserving FDTD-based algorithms have been implemented using double precision and quadratic (or arbitrary sized) shape functions for the particle weighting. When porting a PIC scheme to the GPU architecture (or, in general, a shared memory environment), the particle-to-grid operations (e.g. the evaluation of the current density) require special care to avoid memory inconsistencies and conflicts. Here we present a robust implementation of this operation that is efficient for any number of particles per cell and particle shape function order. Our algorithm exploits the exposed GPU memory hierarchy and avoids the use of atomic operations, which can hurt performance especially when many particles lay on the same cell. We show the code multi-GPU scalability results and present a dynamic load-balancing algorithm. The code is written using a python-based C++ meta-programming technique which translates in a high level of modularity and allows for easy performance tuning and simple extension of the core algorithms to various simulation schemes.

  11. Implementation of a 3D version of ponderomotive guiding center solver in particle-in-cell code OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven accelerators gained an increased attention over the past decades. Typical modeling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC simulations, however, are very computationally expensive due to the disparity of the relevant scales ranging from the laser wavelength, in the micrometer range, to the acceleration length, currently beyond the ten centimeter range. To minimize the gap between these despair scales the ponderomotive guiding center (PGC) algorithm is a promising approach. By describing the evolution of the laser pulse envelope separately, only the scales larger than the plasma wavelength are required to be resolved in the PGC algorithm, leading to speedups in several orders of magnitude. Previous work was limited to two dimensions. Here we present the implementation of the 3D version of a PGC solver into the massively parallel, fully relativistic PIC code OSIRIS. We extended the solver to include periodic boundary conditions and parallelization in all spatial dimensions. We present benchmarks for distributed and shared memory parallelization. We also discuss the stability of the PGC solver.

  12. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-02-20

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  14. Effects of high energy photon emissions in laser generated ultra-relativistic plasmas: Real-time synchrotron simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Erik; Gonoskov, Arkady; Marklund, Mattias

    2015-03-01

    We model the emission of high energy photons due to relativistic charged particle motion in intense laser-plasma interactions. This is done within a particle-in-cell code, for which high frequency radiation normally cannot be resolved due to finite time steps and grid size. A simple expression for the synchrotron radiation spectra is used together with a Monte-Carlo method for the emittance. We extend previous work by allowing for arbitrary fields, considering the particles to be in instantaneous circular motion due to an effective magnetic field. Furthermore, we implement noise reduction techniques and present validity estimates of the method. Finally, we perform a rigorous comparison to the mechanism of radiation reaction, and find the emitted energy to be in excellent agreement with the losses calculated using radiation reaction.

  15. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs at shocked regions. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields and particle acceleration. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation, which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants. We will present detailed spectra for conditions relevant of various astrophysical sites of shock formation via the Weibel instability. In particular we will discuss the application to GRBs and SNRs

  16. Simulations and synchrotron radiation from the relativistic jet base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.

    The central acceleration region of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is simulated for a two-component spine and sheath jet. For the steady jet component we perform the spatially resolved polarized synchrotron transfer producing observables as radio maps, spectra and derived rotation measures. The wealth of detail obtained this way helps to assess the physical processes (such as internal Faraday rotation) and model assumptions.

  17. A reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, M.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph; Santos, J. J.; Gremillet, L.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-07-01

    A hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport based on the angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation with a special closure is presented. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the relativistic electrons by plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing their energy distribution evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a monodirectional and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense plasma and hybrid particle-in-cell simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport case.

  18. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  19. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  20. Using computer simulations to study relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joelle Lynn

    1998-12-01

    One of the most exciting topics in high-energy nuclear physics is the study of the potential phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Information about this transition, if it exists and can be experimentally determined, would be vital in understanding confinement of quarks and gluons inside hadrons. New accelerators, RHIC and LIIC, will be online in the next few years and will focus on finding evidence for this transition. RHIC will collide Au on Au at center of mass energies equal to 200 GeV/nucleon and create a high density, high temperature state of matter. To study the large particle multiplicities that will occur at these experiments, computer simulations are being developed. Within this thesis, one type of simulation will be detailed and used to study the invariant mass spectrum of leptons pairs measured at CERN SPS and several hadronic observables that could be measured at RHIC.

  1. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Stark, David J.; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Mahajan, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. We consider here the simplest problem: the propagation of a low amplitude pulse through a preformed relativistically hot anisotropic electron plasma to explore its intrinsic dielectric properties. We find that: 1) the critical density for propagation depends strongly on the pulse polarization, 2) two plasmas with the same density and average energy per electron can exhibit profoundly different responses to electromagnetic pulses, 3) the anisotropy-driven Weibel instability develops as expected; the timescales of the growth and back reaction (on anisotropy), however, are long enough that sufficient anisotropy persists for the entire duration of the simulation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract Nos. DE-FG02-04ER54742 and DE-AC05-06OR23100 (D. J. S.) and NNSA Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512.

  2. GPU acceleration of particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John; Meiser, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become key components in many supercomputing systems, as they can provide more computations relative to their cost and power consumption than conventional processors. However, to take full advantage of this capability, they require a strict programming model which involves single-instruction multiple-data execution as well as significant constraints on memory accesses. To bring the full power of GPUs to bear on plasma physics problems, we must adapt the computational methods to this new programming model. We have developed a GPU implementation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, one of the mainstays of plasma physics simulation. This framework is highly general and enables advanced PIC features such as high order particles and absorbing boundary conditions. The main elements of the PIC loop, including field interpolation and particle deposition, are designed to optimize memory access. We describe the performance of these algorithms and discuss some of the methods used. Work supported by DARPA contract W31P4Q-15-C-0061 (SBIR).

  3. Slurm: An innovative Particle-in-Cell Method for Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchini, Fabio; Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    We present a new Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulations. This is based on the original algorithm of FLIP-MHD, which uses a Lagrangian formulation of the macroscopic equations. A finite-difference approximation of the equations of motion is solved on a fixed (non-moving) grid, while convection of the quantities is modelled with the support of Lagrangian particles. Interpolation with first-order b-splines is used to project the conserved quantities from particles to the grid and back. In this work, we introduce two modifications of the original scheme. A particle volume evolution procedure is adopted to reduce the computational error, based on the Material Point Method for solid mechanics. The additional step introduces little to none computational diffusion and efficiently suppresses the so-called ringing instability, allowing the use of explicit time differencing. Furthermore, we eliminate the need for a Poisson solver in the magnetic field computation with the use of a vector potential. The vector potential evolution is modelled with a moving grid and interpolated to the fixed grid points to obtain a solenoidal magnetic field. The results of a number of HD and MHD tests show good agreement with the reference solutions and rather fast time and space convergence. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Air Force Materiel Command, USAF under Award No. FA9550-14-1-0375. European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) via the DEEP-ER project under Grant Agreement No. 610476.

  4. GPU Acceleration of Particle-In-Cell Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John; Sides, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become key components in many supercomputing systems, as they can provide more computations relative to their cost and power consumption than conventional processors. However, to take full advantage of this capability, they require a strict programming model which involves single-instruction multiple-data execution as well as significant constraints on memory accesses. To bring the full power of GPUs to bear on plasma physics problems, we must adapt the computational methods to this new programming model. We have developed a GPU implementation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, one of the mainstays of plasma physics simulation. This framework is highly general and enables advanced PIC features such as high order particles and absorbing boundary conditions. The main elements of the PIC loop, including field interpolation and particle deposition, are designed to optimize memory access. We describe the performance of these algorithms and discuss some of the methods used. Work supported by DARPA Contract No. W31P4Q-16-C-0009.

  5. Electromagnetic fluctuations and normal modes of a drifting relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyer, C.; Gremillet, L.; Bénisti, D.; Bonnaud, G.

    2013-11-15

    We present an exact calculation of the power spectrum of the electromagnetic fluctuations in a relativistic equilibrium plasma described by Maxwell-Jüttner distribution functions. We consider the cases of wave vectors parallel or normal to the plasma mean velocity. The relative contributions of the subluminal and supraluminal fluctuations are evaluated. Analytical expressions of the spatial fluctuation spectra are derived in each case. These theoretical results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, showing a good reproduction of the subluminal fluctuation spectra.

  6. Surface electron acceleration in relativistic laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zheng, Jun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Bari, Muhammad; Li, Yu-Tong; Zhang, Jie

    2006-04-01

    Under the grazing incidence of a relativistic intense laser pulse onto a solid target, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that intense quasistatic magnetic and electric fields are generated near the front target surface during the interaction. Some electrons are confined in these quasistatic fields and move along the target surface with betatron oscillations. When this oscillating frequency is close to the laser frequency in the particle frame, these electrons can be accelerated significantly in the reflected laser field, similar to the inverse free-electron-laser acceleration. An analytical model for this surface betatron acceleration is proposed.

  7. Cold atom simulation of interacting relativistic quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Cirac, J Ignacio; Maraner, Paolo; Pachos, Jiannis K

    2010-11-05

    We demonstrate that Dirac fermions self-interacting or coupled to dynamic scalar fields can emerge in the low energy sector of designed bosonic and fermionic cold atom systems. We illustrate this with two examples defined in two spacetime dimensions. The first one is the self-interacting Thirring model. The second one is a model of Dirac fermions coupled to a dynamic scalar field that gives rise to the Gross-Neveu model. The proposed cold atom experiments can be used to probe spectral or correlation properties of interacting quantum field theories thereby presenting an alternative to lattice gauge theory simulations.

  8. High order numerical simulations of the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability in a relativistic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.

    2015-07-01

    We study the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a relativistic perfect fluid by means of high order numerical simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The numerical scheme combines a finite volume reconstruction in space, a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method, a high order one-step time update scheme, and a "cell-by-cell" space-time AMR strategy with time-accurate local time stepping. In this way, third order accurate (both in space and in time) numerical simulations of the RM instability are performed, spanning a wide parameter space. We present results both for the case in which a light fluid penetrates into a higher density one (Atwood number A > 0) and for the case in which a heavy fluid penetrates into a lower density one (Atwood number A < 0). We find that for large Lorentz factors γs of the incident shock wave, the relativistic RM instability is substantially weakened and ultimately suppressed. More specifically, the growth rate of the RM instability in the linear phase has a local maximum which occurs at a critical value of γs ≈ [1.2, 2]. Moreover, we have also revealed a genuinely relativistic effect, absent in Newtonian hydrodynamics, which arises in three dimensional configurations with a non-zero velocity component tangent to the incident shock front. In particular, in A > 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net magnification effect, while in A < 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net suppression effect.

  9. Particle Acceleration and Associated Emission from Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkawa, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    Five talks consist of a research program consisting of numerical simulations and theoretical development designed to provide an understanding of the emission from accelerated particles in relativistic shocks. The goal of this lecture is to discuss the particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and radiation along with the microphysics of the shock process in a self-consistent manner. The discussion involves the collisionless shocks that produce emission from gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows, and producing emission from supernova remnants and AGN relativistic jets. Recent particle-in-cell simulation studies have shown that the Weibel (mixed mode two-stream filamentation) instability is responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic collisionless shocks. 3-D RPIC code parallelized with MPI has been used to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields. In this lecture we will present brief tutorials of RPIC simulations and RMHD simulations, a brief summary of recent RPIC simulations, mechanisms of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks, and calculation of synchrotron radiation by tracing particles. We will discuss on emission from the collisionless shocks, which will be calculated during the simulation by tracing particle acceleration self-consistently in the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated in the shocks. In particular, we will discuss the differences between standard synchrotron radiation and the jitter radiation that arises in turbulent magnetic fields.

  10. Parallel code NSBC: Simulations of relativistic nuclei scattering by a bent crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The presented program was designed to simulate the passage of relativistic nuclei through a bent crystal. Namely, the input data is related to a nuclei beam. The nuclei move into the crystal under planar channeling and quasichanneling conditions. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to evaluate the trajectory of nucleus in the bent crystal. The program output is formed by the projectile motion data including the angular distribution of nuclei behind the crystal. The program could be useful to simulate the particle tracking at the accelerator facilities used the crystal collimation systems. The code has been written on C++ and designed for the multiprocessor systems (clusters).

  11. General-relativistic simulations of binary black hole-neutron stars: Precursor electromagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2013-07-01

    We perform the first general relativistic force-free simulations of neutron star magnetospheres in orbit about spinning and nonspinning black holes. We find promising precursor electromagnetic emission: typical Poynting luminosities at, e.g., an orbital separation of r=6.6RNS are LEM˜6×1042(BNS,p/1013G)2(MNS/1.4M⊙)2erg/s. The Poynting flux peaks within a broad beam of ˜40° in the azimuthal direction and within ˜60° from the orbital plane, establishing a possible lighthouse effect. Our calculations, though preliminary, preview more detailed simulations of these systems that we plan to perform in the future.

  12. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Plasmas around Merging Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Baker, John G.; Miller, M. Coleman; Reynolds, Christopher S.; van Meter, James R.

    2012-06-01

    Coalescing supermassive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies and are the most powerful sources of gravitational waves accessible to space-based gravitational observatories. Some such mergers may occur in the presence of matter and magnetic fields and hence generate an electromagnetic counterpart. In this Letter, we present the first general relativistic simulations of magnetized plasma around merging supermassive black holes using the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky. By considering different magnetic field strengths, going from non-magnetically dominated to magnetically dominated regimes, we explore how magnetic fields affect the dynamics of the plasma and the possible emission of electromagnetic signals. In particular, we observe a total amplification of the magnetic field of ~2 orders of magnitude, which is driven by the accretion onto the binary and that leads to much stronger electromagnetic signals, more than a factor of 104 larger than comparable calculations done in the force-free regime where such amplifications are not possible.

  13. Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized pulse by laser foil interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ouyang, J. M.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, P.

    2013-07-15

    Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse in ultra-intense laser thin-foil interaction is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the plasma foil as a nonlinear optical shutter has an obvious cut-out effect on the laser temporal and spatial profiles. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the high intensity part of a Gaussian laser pulse can be well extracted from the whole pulse. The transmitted pulse with longitudinal steep rise front and transverse super-Gaussian profile is thus obtained which would be beneficial for the radiation pressure acceleration regime. The Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability is observed in the simulations, which destroys the foil and results in the cut-out effect of the pulse in the rise front of a circularly polarized laser.

  14. Pulse shortening via Relativistic Transparency of Nanometer Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Wu, H.-C.; Gautier, D. C.; Jung, D.; Hoerlein, R.; Offermann, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Letzring, S.; Yin, L.; Albright, B.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Intense lasers drive plasma electrons to velocities approaching light-speed. Increase of the electron mass causes optical transparency in otherwise classically over-dense plasma. Simulations indicate relativistic transparency can produce near-single-cycle rise time light pulses. It also lies enables a new mechanism for laser-based ion-acceleration yielding energy increases over earlier approaches. A direct signature of transparency is pulse-shortening thru over-dense plasmas in which relativistic intensity induces transmission. Using nm C foils (LMU) and the high-contrast Trident laser (LANL) we have made auto-correlation measurements showing >2x transmitted pulse duration reduction at intensities corresponding to ˜20-fold increase in electron mass. Spectral measurements agree with pulse shortening thru the target, and 1-D particle-in-cell simulations support the measurements.

  15. Persistence of Precursor Waves in Two-dimensional Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Masanori; Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Yosuke

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the efficiency of coherent upstream large-amplitude electromagnetic wave emission via synchrotron maser instability in relativistic magnetized shocks using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We considered a purely perpendicular shock in an electron-positron plasma. The coherent wave emission efficiency was measured as a function of the magnetization parameter σ, which is defined as the ratio of the Poynting flux to the kinetic energy flux. The wave amplitude was systematically smaller than that observed in one-dimensional simulations. However, it continued to persist, even at a considerably low magnetization rate, where the Weibel instability dominated the shock transition. The emitted electromagnetic waves were sufficiently strong to disturb the upstream medium, and transverse filamentary density structures of substantial amplitude were produced. Based on this result, we discuss the possibility of the wakefield acceleration model to produce nonthermal electrons in a relativistic magnetized ion-electron shock.

  16. Simulation study of the formation of a non-relativistic pair shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Bret, A.

    2017-02-01

    We examine with a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation the collision of two equally dense clouds of cold pair plasma. The clouds interpenetrate until instabilities set in, which heat up the plasma and trigger the formation of a pair of shocks. The fastest-growing waves at the collision speed , where is the speed of light in vacuum, and low temperature are the electrostatic two-stream mode and the quasi-electrostatic oblique mode. Both waves grow and saturate via the formation of phase space vortices. The strong electric fields of these nonlinear plasma structures provide an efficient means of heating up and compressing the inflowing upstream leptons. The interaction of the hot leptons, which leak back into the upstream region, with the inflowing cool upstream leptons continuously drives electrostatic waves that mediate the shock. These waves heat up the inflowing upstream leptons primarily along the shock normal, which results in an anisotropic velocity distribution in the post-shock region. This distribution gives rise to the Weibel instability. Our simulation shows that even if the shock is mediated by quasi-electrostatic waves, strong magnetowaves will still develop in its downstream region.

  17. The spectrum of solar relativistic cosmic ray measurements and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, A. I.; Podgorny, I. M.; Balabin, Yu V.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Vashenyuk

    2017-01-01

    The solar relativistic protons are measured with the worldwide network of neutron monitors. The big pulses of relativistic protons appeared after the flares occurring in the West side of the Sun disk. They arrive to the Earth along Archimedean magnetic lines without collisions in ∼15 min after a flare. This prompt anisotropic flux contains information about the exponential ∼exp(‑E/E 0) spectrum of protons ejected from the solar cosmic ray source. After delay of 15 - 20 min the proton flux becomes isotropic with power spectrum E ‑γ where γ ∼ 5. Apparently, beam instability is developed. The protons accelerated in eastern flares can reach the neutron monitor due to diffusion across the magnetic lines. The magnetic field energy accumulation in the current sheet in the solar corona above the active region is proved by MHD simulations and the position of observed flare thermal X-ray source. During a flare the magnetic field energy is transferred into the particle energy. Proton acceleration up to relativistic energy can occur in the electric field applied along the singular line in a current sheet. The electric field E = -V×B/c is created due to the fast rate of reconnection V. At typical V = 2×107 cm/s the measured spectrum coincides with the calculated spectrum.

  18. An optimization method of relativistic backward wave oscillator using particle simulation and genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue; Qiao, Hailiang; Zhang, Dianhui; Guo, Weijie

    2013-11-15

    Optimal design method of high-power microwave source using particle simulation and parallel genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The output power, simulated by the fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC, of the high-power microwave device is given as the fitness function, and the float-encoding genetic algorithms are used to optimize the high-power microwave devices. Using this method, we encode the heights of non-uniform slow wave structure in the relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWO), and optimize the parameters on massively parallel processors. Simulation results demonstrate that we can obtain the optimal parameters of non-uniform slow wave structure in the RBWO, and the output microwave power enhances 52.6% after the device is optimized.

  19. An optimization method of relativistic backward wave oscillator using particle simulation and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue; Qiao, Hailiang; Zhang, Dianhui; Guo, Weijie

    2013-11-01

    Optimal design method of high-power microwave source using particle simulation and parallel genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The output power, simulated by the fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC, of the high-power microwave device is given as the fitness function, and the float-encoding genetic algorithms are used to optimize the high-power microwave devices. Using this method, we encode the heights of non-uniform slow wave structure in the relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWO), and optimize the parameters on massively parallel processors. Simulation results demonstrate that we can obtain the optimal parameters of non-uniform slow wave structure in the RBWO, and the output microwave power enhances 52.6% after the device is optimized.

  20. Review of multi-dimensional large-scale kinetic simulation and physics validation of ion acceleration in relativistic laser-matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hui-Chun; Hegelich, B.M.; Fernandez, J.C.; Shah, R.C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Jung, D.; Yin, L; Albright, B.J.; Bowers, K.; Huang, C.; Kwan, T.J.

    2012-06-19

    Two new experimental technologies enabled realization of Break-out afterburner (BOA) - High quality Trident laser and free-standing C nm-targets. VPIC is an powerful tool for fundamental research of relativistic laser-matter interaction. Predictions from VPIC are validated - Novel BOA and Solitary ion acceleration mechanisms. VPIC is a fully explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) code: models plasma as billions of macro-particles moving on a computational mesh. VPIC particle advance (which typically dominates computation) has been optimized extensively for many different supercomputers. Laser-driven ions lead to realization promising applications - Ion-based fast ignition; active interrogation, hadron therapy.