Science.gov

Sample records for remote community electrification

  1. Individual and community quality of life in the era of electrification in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, Sugiyanto Eddie

    This study examines the extent to which electrification relates to improvement of quality of life in Indonesia. In this respect, the study addresses two objectives. First, it examines the extent to which electrification accounts for differences in quality of life in Indonesia. Second, it assesses the extent to which rural-urban locations account for differences in the effects of electrification, human capital, social capital, and physical capital on quality of life. Drawing from the 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS), quality of life was defined as child survivability. The results indicated that access to electricity played an important role in enhancing quality of life for both rural and urban communities. Electrification, human capital, and social capital were important factors for quality of life in rural communities. For urban communities, key factors were electrification, human capital, social capital, and physical capital.

  2. A concept of wind-diesel hybrid systems for the electrification of small rural communities in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Pinho, J.T.; Bezerra, U.H.

    1997-12-31

    This work presents the concept of a wind-diesel hybrid system for the electrification of a small rural community in the Northern Region of Brazil, which can be used in many other places with similar characteristics. The system consists of two small diesel units and two wind turbines, one of which was designed and developed as a prototype with the purpose of gaining some insight in the field of wind turbine technology. Some considerations about small communities of the Northern Region of Brazil, and about electrification concepts are also made.

  3. The electrification of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akishin, A. I.; Novikov, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    Physical and applied aspects of the electrification of space vehicles and natural celestial objects are discussed, the factors resulting in electrification of spacecraft are analyzed, and methods of investigating various phenomena associated with this electrification and ways of protecting spacecraft against the influence of static electricity are described. The booklet is intended for the general reader interested in present day questions of space technology.

  4. THUNDERCLOUD ELECTRIFICATION STUDIES, II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The investigation of the generation of electric charges in thunderclouds included experiments to determine the electrification generated by the...thundercloud electrification . Drop-breaking experiments on 3-mm water drops supercooled to -6 deg and 14 deg C yielded average charges of 6.8 x 10 to the...12 power coulombs/drop,respectively. The magnitudes of electrification varied fromdrop to drop by a factor of 100 or more in all cases. Corona-point

  5. Navajo Electrification Demonstraiton Project

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Ahasteen, Project Manager

    2006-07-17

    This is a final technical report required by DOE for the Navajo Electrification Demonstration Program, This report covers the electric line extension project for Navajo families that currently without electric power.

  6. Controversy over rural electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.F.

    1982-10-01

    The disappointing rate of rural electrification in a number of developing countries has raised issues about the equity of utility investments and subsidies since limited connection to the central grid threatens to increase the gap between rich and poor. A review of the arguments for and against central-grid rural electrification cites the efficiency and low cost of electricity, improved productivity, and a way to balance urban and rural investments as the principal benefits. Critics challenge these points and argue that electrification is too costly, has uneven social benefits, and has no direct economic benefits. They feel that the US model of rural electrification may not be applicable to developing countries with a lower per-capita income and that central grid generation lacks the merits of development strategies based on renewable sources and alternative technologies. Studies show that the impact of rural electrification varies among countries, but that even the more successful will require subsidies to ensure that electrification projects are coordinated with social and economic programs. 11 references, 1 table. (DCK)

  7. Electrification and Electric Guns,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-03

    1657-83F/203 N Si FIE FG2/ f i l l ’ I g u I 12 . 8 l . 11111.2 I.UJ M Lfl 00 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 0 .N ELECTRIFICATION AND ELECTRIC GUNS by A.A...available. i I Accessiton For I ’IS op:" I (31odes ELECTRIFICATION AND ELECTRIC GUNS DI t pe:i c A. A. Kr’vProf. Th .~Pis Presen~tly in the stage of...cor.sderaticn; the wrnd’o en "onrr-:- rea -nes the steady state are considered. ’her. se : " rren :n an electric gun is shorted, the power :s ex;end e

  8. Brightness Rural Electrification Program: Renewable Energy in China

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    Fact sheet describes China's New Brightness Rural Electrification Program to provide electricity for 23 million people in remote areas of China using renewable energy such as wind energy and solar power (photovoltaics). Targets, results, and progress are described. Regions targeted are Inner Mongolia, Tibet, and Gansu.

  9. Expanding access to off-grid rural electrification in Africa: An analysis of community-based micro-grids in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubi, Charles Gathu

    Community micro-grids have played a central role in increasing access to off-grid rural electrification (RE) in many regions of the developing world, notably South Asia. However, the promise of community micro-grids in sub-Sahara Africa remains largely unexplored. My study explores the potential and limits of community micro-grids as options for increasing access to off-grid RE in sub-Sahara Africa. Contextualized in five community micro-grids in rural Kenya, my study is framed through theories of collective action and combines qualitative and quantitative methods, including household surveys, electronic data logging and regression analysis. The main contribution of my research is demonstrating the circumstances under which community micro-grids can contribute to rural development and the conditions under which individuals are likely to initiate and participate in such projects collectively. With regard to rural development, I demonstrate that access to electricity enables the use of electric equipment and tools by small and micro-enterprises, resulting in significant improvement in productivity per worker (100--200% depending on the task at hand) and a corresponding growth in income levels in the order of 20--70%, depending on the product made. Access to electricity simultaneously enables and improves delivery of social and business services from a wide range of village-level infrastructure (e.g. schools, markets, water pumps) while improving the productivity of agricultural activities. Moreover, when local electricity users have an ability to charge and enforce cost-reflective tariffs and electricity consumption is closely linked to productive uses that generate incomes, cost recovery is feasible. By their nature---a new technology delivering highly valued services by the elites and other members, limited local experience and expertise, high capital costs---community micro-grids are good candidates for elite-domination. Even so, elite control does not necessarily

  10. Washing machine usage in remote aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, C R

    1998-10-01

    The use of washing machines was investigated in two remote Aboriginal communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara homelands. The aim was to look both at machine reliability and to investigate the health aspect of washing clothes. A total of 39 machines were inspected for wear and component reliability every three months over a one-year period. Of these, 10 machines were monitored in detail for water consumption, hours of use and cycles of operation. The machines monitored were Speed Queen model EA2011 (7 kg washing load) commercial units. The field survey results suggested a high rate of operation of the machines with an average of around 1,100 washing cycles per year (range 150 and 2,300 cycles per year). The results were compared with available figures for the average Australian household. A literature survey, to ascertain the health outcomes relating to washing clothes and bedding, confirmed that washing machines are efficient at removal of bacteria from clothes and bedding but suggested that recontamination of clothing after washing often negated the prior removal. High temperature washing (> 60 degrees C) appeared to be advantageous from a health perspective. With regards to larger organisms, while dust mites and body lice transmission between people would probably be decreased by washing clothes, scabies appeared to be mainly transmitted by body contact and thus transmission would be only marginally decreased by the use of washing machines.

  11. Chile rural electrification cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, L.

    1997-12-01

    The author describes a joint program to use renewables for rural electrification projects in Chile. The initial focus was in a limited part of the country, involving wind mapping, pilot project planning, training, and development of methodologies for comparative evaluations of resources. To this point three wind hybrid systems have been installed in one region, as a part of the regional private utility, and three additional projects are being designed. Additional resource assessment and training is ongoing. The author points out the difficulties in working with utilities, the importance of signed documentation, and the need to look at these programs as long term because of the time involved in introducing such new technologies.

  12. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  13. Interstate Electrification Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Puckette, Margaret; Kim, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The Interstate Electrification Improvement Project, publicly known as the Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP), started in May 2011 and ended in March 2015. The project grant was awarded by the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technology Office in the amount of $22.2 million. It had three overarching missions: 1. Reduce the idling of Class 8 tractors when parked at truck stops, to reduce diesel fuel consumption and thus U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum; 2. Stimulate job creation and economic activity as part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009; 3. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from diesel combustion and the carbon footprint of the truck transportation industry. The project design was straightforward. First, build fifty Truck Stop Electrification (TSE) facilities in truck stop parking lots across the country so trucks could plug-in to 110V, 220V, or 480VAC, and shut down the engine instead of idling. These facilities were strategically located at fifty truck stops along major U.S. Interstates with heavy truck traffic. Approximately 1,350 connection points were installed, including 150 high-voltage electric standby Transport Refrigeration Unit (eTRU) plugs--eTRUs are capable of plugging in to shore power1 to cool the refrigerated trailer for loads such as produce, meats and ice cream. Second, the project provided financial incentives on idle reduction equipment to 5,000 trucks in the form of rebates, to install equipment compatible with shore power. This equipment enables drivers to shut down the main engine when parked, to heat or cool their cab, charge batteries, or use other household appliances without idling—a common practice that uses approximately 1 gallon of diesel per hour. The rebate recipients were intended to be the first fleets to plug into Shorepower to save diesel fuel and ensure there is significant population of shore power capable trucks. This two part project was designed to complement each other by

  14. Creating Virtual Classrooms for Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Kavita; Eady, Michelle; Edelen-Smith, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Students in remote communities face many challenges to get an education. This is especially true for indigenous and native people. To train teachers for these populations, the authors used web-based conferencing, which avoids some of the technological challenges of communicating with students in these communities. The virtual classes also were…

  15. Learning Communities in Remote Retreat Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersch, Gretchen T.; Lund, Carole L.

    2002-01-01

    The example of the formation of a learning community in a Yukon Island retreat center demonstrates the influence of context and the importance of community building. Organic learning occurs through the synthesis of the natural environment, the community, and the learning process. (SK)

  16. ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tony; Blakeslee, Richard; Russell, Larry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV)-based project that will investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES is being conducted to both investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and validate Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements. In addition, as part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, this project will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. Part of the demonstration involves getting approvals from the Federal Aviation Administration and the NASA airworthiness flight safety review board. ACES will employ the ALTUS II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on ALTUS, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES will contribute important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) offers a useful 'cloud-top' perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the ALTUS will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations will enable the UAV measurements to be more completely interpreted and evaluated in the context of the thunderstorm structure, evolution, and

  17. Truckstop -- and Truck!-- Electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Skip Yeakel

    2001-12-13

    The conclusions of this paper are: 0.5-1.5 G/H and/or BUSG/Y--how much time and money will it take to quantify and WHY BOTHER TO DO SO? No shortage of things to do re truckstop--+ truck!-- electrification; Better that government and industry should put many eggs in lots of baskets vs. all in one or few; Best concepts will surface as most viable; Economic appeal better than regulation or brute force; Launch Ground Freight Partnership and give it a chance to work; Demonstration is an effective means to educate, and learn from, customers--learning is a two way street; Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD 3) are all important but only deployment gets results; TSE can start small in numbers of spaces to accommodate economically inspired growth but upfront plans should be made for expansion if meaningful idle reduction is to follow via TE; 110VAC 15A service/ parking space is minimal--if infrastructure starts like this, upfront plans must be made to increase capacity; Increased electrification of truckstop and truck alike will result in much better life on the road; Improved sleep will improve driver alertness and safety; Reduced idling will significantly reduce fuel use and emissions; Universal appeal for DOD, DOE, DOT, EPA, OEMs, and users alike; Clean coal, gas, hydro, nuclear, or wind energy sources are all distinctly American means by which to generate electricity; Nothing can compete with diesel fuel to serve mobile truck needs; stationary trucks are like power plants--they don't move and should NOT be powered by petroleum products whenever possible; Use American fueled power plants--electricity--to serve truck idling needs wherever practical to do so; encourage economic aspect; Create and reward industry initiatives to reduce fuel use; Eliminate FET on new trucks, provide tax credits (non highway fuel use and investment), provide incentives based on results; Encourage newer/ cleaner truck use; solicit BAAs with mandatory OEM/ fleet

  18. Aircraft Electrification in Clouds and Precipitation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The electrification of the airplane may distort the results of micro-physical observation of the clouds, particularly the measurement of the... electrification of the airplane and cloud parameters is discussed. Experimental data on electrification in different meteorological conditions are given. (Author)

  19. The Role of Community Development Employment Projects in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    2004-01-01

    The Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) scheme provides funds to help Indigenous communities in rural and remote Australia provide employment, skills development, and various essential and desirable municipal services. However, there is room to improve the range and quality of employment and community development activities available.…

  20. Tobacco Sales in Community Pharmacies: Remote Decisions and Demographic Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Cory M.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Schneider, John E.; Smith, Brian J.; Armstead, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    This study applied multilevel modeling procedures with data from 678 community pharmacies and 382 residential census tracts in a Midwestern U.S. state to determine if two sets of variables: retail type (e.g., remotely owned, independently owned) and population demographics of the tracts in which outlets were located were associated with retail…

  1. Tobacco Sales in Community Pharmacies: Remote Decisions and Demographic Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Cory M.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Schneider, John E.; Smith, Brian J.; Armstead, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    This study applied multilevel modeling procedures with data from 678 community pharmacies and 382 residential census tracts in a Midwestern U.S. state to determine if two sets of variables: retail type (e.g., remotely owned, independently owned) and population demographics of the tracts in which outlets were located were associated with retail…

  2. Leading Remotely: Exploring the Experiences of Principals in Rural and Remote School Communities in Jamaica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    School leadership is an exciting although challenging job. Principals of schools located in rural and remote communities, particular small schools, experience and encounter many challenges that their counterparts in suburban and urban areas do not experience. Concerns over staffing, the quality and availability of materials, facilities,…

  3. Contact electrification of insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacks, Daniel J.; Mohan Sankaran, R.

    2011-11-01

    The electrostatic charge that is generated when two materials are contacted or rubbed and then separated is a well-known physical process that has been studied for more than 2500 years. Contact electrification occurs in many contexts, both natural and technological. For example, in dust storms the collisions between particles lead to electrostatic charging and in extreme cases, extraordinary lightning displays. In electrophotography, toner particles are intentionally charged to guide their deposition in well-defined patterns. Despite such a long history and so many important consequences, a fundamental understanding of the mechanism behind contact electrification remains elusive. An open question is what type of species are transferred between the surfaces to generate charge—experiments suggest various species ranging from electrons to ions to nanoscopic bits of material, and theoretical work suggests that non-equilibrium states may play an important role. Another open question is the contact electrification that occurs when two insulating materials with identical physical properties touch—since there is no apparent driving force, it is not clear why charge transfer occurs. A third open question involves granular systems—models and experiments have shown that a particle-size dependence for the charging often exists. In this review, we discuss the fundamental aspects of contact electrification and highlight recent research efforts aimed at understanding these open questions.

  4. Antiviral Strategies for Emerging Influenza Viruses in Remote Communities

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Marek; Greer, Amy L.; Moghadas, Seyed M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the lack of timely access to resources for critical care, strategic use of antiviral drugs is crucial for mitigating the impact of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential in remote and isolated communities. We sought to evaluate the effect of antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of close contacts in a Canadian remote northern community. Methods We used an agent-based, discrete-time simulation model for disease spread in a remote community, which was developed as an in-silico population using population census data. Relative and cumulative age-specific attack rates, and the total number of infections in simulated model scenarios were obtained. Results We found that early initiation of antiviral treatment is more critical for lowering attack rates in a remote setting with a low population-average age compared to an urban population. Our results show that a significant reduction in the relative, age-specific attack rates due to increasing treatment coverage does not necessarily translate to a significant reduction in the overall arrack rate. When treatment coverage varies from low to moderate, targeted prophylaxis has a very limited impact in reducing attack rates and should be offered at a low level (below 10%) to avoid excessive waste of drugs. Conclusions In contrast to previous work, for conservative treatment coverages, our results do not provide any convincing evidence for the implementation of targeted prophylaxis. The findings suggest that public health strategies in remote communities should focus on the wider availability (higher coverage) and timely distribution of antiviral drugs for treatment of clinically ill individuals. PMID:24586937

  5. The Role of Community Development Employment Projects in Rural and Remote Communities. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the report, "The Role of Community Development Employment Projects in Rural and Remote Communities," (ED495158) and is an added resource for further information. The contents of this support docment include: (1) Regional Council--Roma; (2) Regional Council--Tennant…

  6. A Numerical Study of Thunderstorm Electrification: Initial Electrification and Thunderstorm Climatology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-15

    UNLIMITED. 13. ABSTRACT (MAfmmuin 200 WOMj Our purpose is to identify those atmospheric conditions that lead to thunderstorm electrification . We have...thunderstorm electrification . We have collected aircraft and radar measurements of atmospheric parameters made during several recent intensive field studies...Initial Electrification and Thunderstorm Climatology Marcia Baker and Robert Solomon Atmospheric Sciences Department AK-40, iniversity of Washington

  7. Nanojets: Electrification, Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    LUvrcry,LL, k........ , I Final Technical Report 115 May 2007 - 30 November 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanojets: Electrification ...are code) Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified (703) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98 Prescribed by ANSI-Std Z39-18 FINAL REPORT Nanojets: Electrification

  8. Nanojets: Electrification, Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    20/2007 FINAL 02/15/2004-12/31/2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanojets: Electrification , Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup...NUMBER finclude area code)UUU64 404.894.3368 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI SId. Z39.18 FINAL REPORT Nanojets: Electrification

  9. Electrification of the Hurricane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert A.; Hallett, John

    1999-06-01

    erosion by ice in downdrafts descending in the outward regions of the eyewall. This ice originates from both primary and secondary ice nucleation in the updraft. This is consistent with an exponential increase in ice concentration, as the rate at which the ice particle concentrations increase depends on the production of secondary particles by preexisting graupel, some of which ultimately grow into new graupel, and its outward transport in the anvil flow aloft. Penetrations at temperatures as low as 15°C show the presence of electric fields consistent with specific laboratory-derived criteria for charge separated during ice-graupel collisions, given that a liquid water-dependent sign reversal temperature may occur. Such a reversal may result from either a changing temperature in the vertical, a changing cloud liquid water content in the horizontal, or a combination of the two.Since cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning can be observed with remote detection networks that provide the polarity and frequency of CG lightning, there is potential that hurricane evolution may be detected remotely and that lightning may be usable as an indicator of a change in the storm intensity and/or track.

  10. Parasitic diseases of remote Indigenous communities in Australia.

    PubMed

    Holt, Deborah C; McCarthy, James S; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2010-08-15

    Indigenous Australians suffer significant disadvantage in health outcomes and have a life expectancy well below that of non-Indigenous Australians. Mortality rates of Indigenous Australians are higher than that of Indigenous populations in developed countries elsewhere in the world. A number of parasitic diseases which are uncommon in the rest of the Australian population contribute to the high burden of disease in many remote Indigenous communities. High rates of infection with enteric parasites such as Strongyloides stercoralis, hookworm and Trichuris have been recorded and infection of the skin with the ecto-parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei is also a substantial problem. Secondary infection of scabies lesions, including with Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus, can produce serious sequelae such as rheumatic fever and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Transmission of many parasites in many remote communities is facilitated by overcrowded living conditions and infrastructure problems which result in poor sanitation and hygiene. Improvements in environmental health conditions must accompany medical initiatives to achieve sustainable improvement in the health of Indigenous Australians.

  11. Community-wide measures of wellness in a remote First Nations community experiencing opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kanate, Dinah; Folk, David; Cirone, Sharon; Gordon, Janet; Kirlew, Mike; Veale, Terri; Bocking, Natalie; Rea, Sara; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To document the development of unique opioid-dependence treatment in remote communities that combines First Nations healing strategies and substitution therapy with buprenorphine-naloxone. Design Quantitative measurements of community wellness and response to community-based opioid-dependence treatment. Setting Remote First Nations community in northwestern Ontario. Participants A total of 140 self-referred opioid-dependent community members. Intervention Community-developed program of First Nations healing, addiction treatment, and substitution therapy. Main outcome measures Community-wide measures of wellness: number of criminal charges, addiction-related medical evacuations, child protection agency cases, school attendance, and attendance at community events. Results The age-adjusted adult rate of opioid-dependence treatment was 41%. One year after the development of the in-community healing and substitution therapy program for opioid dependence, police criminal charges had fallen by 61.1%, child protection cases had fallen by 58.3%, school attendance had increased by 33.3%, and seasonal influenza immunizations had dramatically gone up by 350.0%. Attendance at community events is now robust, and sales at the local general store have gone up almost 20%. Conclusion Community-wide wellness measures have undergone dramatic public health changes since the development of a First Nations healing program involving opioid substitution therapy with buprenorphine-naloxone. Funding for such programs is ad hoc and temporary, and this threatens the survival of the described program and other such programs developing in this region, which has been strongly affected by an opioid-dependence epidemic. PMID:25821874

  12. A Numerical Study of Thunderstorm Electrification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-04

    3460trwofra Rtdum .Prtcjtt M704-011~W18).*4b’r`9’t D~C 20OC3 C. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS A NUMERICAL STUDY OF THUNDERSTORM ELECTRIFICATION ...Maximum 200 words) The purpose of this research was to pursue further understanding of cloud electrification through three separate projects. First... electrification depends on the time during which strong updrafts remain-within.,the charging’zone. II~b Second, a simple numerical lightning model

  13. Assessments of wind-energy potential in selected sites from three geopolitical zones in Nigeria: implications for renewable/sustainable rural electrification.

    PubMed

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Ohunakin, Olayinka Soledayo; Okeniyi, Elizabeth Toyin

    2015-01-01

    Electricity generation in rural communities is an acute problem militating against socioeconomic well-being of the populace in these communities in developing countries, including Nigeria. In this paper, assessments of wind-energy potential in selected sites from three major geopolitical zones of Nigeria were investigated. For this, daily wind-speed data from Katsina in northern, Warri in southwestern and Calabar in southeastern Nigeria were analysed using the Gumbel and the Weibull probability distributions for assessing wind-energy potential as a renewable/sustainable solution for the country's rural-electrification problems. Results showed that the wind-speed models identified Katsina with higher wind-speed class than both Warri and Calabar that were otherwise identified as low wind-speed sites. However, econometrics of electricity power simulation at different hub heights of low wind-speed turbine systems showed that the cost of electric-power generation in the three study sites was converging to affordable cost per kWh of electric energy from the wind resource at each site. These power simulations identified cost/kWh of electricity generation at Kaduna as €0.0507, at Warri as €0.0774, and at Calabar as €0.0819. These bare positive implications on renewable/sustainable rural electrification in the study sites even as requisite options for promoting utilization of this viable wind-resource energy in the remote communities in the environs of the study sites were suggested.

  14. Assessments of Wind-Energy Potential in Selected Sites from Three Geopolitical Zones in Nigeria: Implications for Renewable/Sustainable Rural Electrification

    PubMed Central

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Ohunakin, Olayinka Soledayo; Okeniyi, Elizabeth Toyin

    2015-01-01

    Electricity generation in rural communities is an acute problem militating against socioeconomic well-being of the populace in these communities in developing countries, including Nigeria. In this paper, assessments of wind-energy potential in selected sites from three major geopolitical zones of Nigeria were investigated. For this, daily wind-speed data from Katsina in northern, Warri in southwestern and Calabar in southeastern Nigeria were analysed using the Gumbel and the Weibull probability distributions for assessing wind-energy potential as a renewable/sustainable solution for the country's rural-electrification problems. Results showed that the wind-speed models identified Katsina with higher wind-speed class than both Warri and Calabar that were otherwise identified as low wind-speed sites. However, econometrics of electricity power simulation at different hub heights of low wind-speed turbine systems showed that the cost of electric-power generation in the three study sites was converging to affordable cost per kWh of electric energy from the wind resource at each site. These power simulations identified cost/kWh of electricity generation at Kaduna as €0.0507, at Warri as €0.0774, and at Calabar as €0.0819. These bare positive implications on renewable/sustainable rural electrification in the study sites even as requisite options for promoting utilization of this viable wind-resource energy in the remote communities in the environs of the study sites were suggested. PMID:25879063

  15. Options for rural electrification in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, J.G. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper summarizes a study which examined 19 commercially available options for electrifying remote communities in Mexico. Characteristics of a typical community are defined and, using 7 of the technologies, power systems are designed capable of supporting this community. The performance of these systems is evaluated with respect to their ability to satisfy 11 technical design objectives, 5 socioeconomic objectives, and their impact on the environment. A photovoltaic- diesel generator hybrid system with wind generator option is recommended for the typical community.

  16. Child-caregiver interaction in two remote Indigenous Australian communities

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Jill; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Loakes, Deborah; Disbray, Samantha; Moses, Karin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study in two remote multilingual Indigenous Australian communities: Yakanarra in the Kimberley region of Western Australia and Tennant Creek in the Barkly region of the Northern Territory. In both communities, processes of language shift are underway from a traditional language (Walmajarri and Warumungu, respectively) to a local creole variety (Fitzroy Valley Kriol and Wumpurrarni English, respectively). The study focuses on language input from primary caregivers to a group of preschool children, and on the children's productive language. The study further highlights child-caregiver interactions as a site of importance in understanding the broader processes of language shift. We use longitudinal data from two time-points, approximately 2 years apart, to explore changes in adult input over time and developmental patterns in the children's speech. At both time points, the local creole varieties are the preferred codes of communication for the dyads in this study, although there is some use of the traditional language in both communities. Results show that for measures of turn length (MLT), there are notable differences between the two communities for both the focus children and their caregivers. In Tennant Creek, children and caregivers use longer turns at Time 2, while in Yakanarra the picture is more variable. The two communities also show differing trends in terms of conversational load (MLT ratio). For measures of morphosyntactic complexity (MLU), children and caregivers in Tennant Creek use more complex utterances at Time 2, while caregivers in Yakanarra show less complexity in their language at that time point. The study's findings contribute to providing a more detailed picture of the multilingual practices at Yakanarra and Tennant Creek, with implications for understanding broader processes of language shift. They also elucidate how children's language and linguistic input varies diachronically across time. As such, we contribute to

  17. Child-caregiver interaction in two remote Indigenous Australian communities.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Jill; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Loakes, Deborah; Disbray, Samantha; Moses, Karin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study in two remote multilingual Indigenous Australian communities: Yakanarra in the Kimberley region of Western Australia and Tennant Creek in the Barkly region of the Northern Territory. In both communities, processes of language shift are underway from a traditional language (Walmajarri and Warumungu, respectively) to a local creole variety (Fitzroy Valley Kriol and Wumpurrarni English, respectively). The study focuses on language input from primary caregivers to a group of preschool children, and on the children's productive language. The study further highlights child-caregiver interactions as a site of importance in understanding the broader processes of language shift. We use longitudinal data from two time-points, approximately 2 years apart, to explore changes in adult input over time and developmental patterns in the children's speech. At both time points, the local creole varieties are the preferred codes of communication for the dyads in this study, although there is some use of the traditional language in both communities. Results show that for measures of turn length (MLT), there are notable differences between the two communities for both the focus children and their caregivers. In Tennant Creek, children and caregivers use longer turns at Time 2, while in Yakanarra the picture is more variable. The two communities also show differing trends in terms of conversational load (MLT ratio). For measures of morphosyntactic complexity (MLU), children and caregivers in Tennant Creek use more complex utterances at Time 2, while caregivers in Yakanarra show less complexity in their language at that time point. The study's findings contribute to providing a more detailed picture of the multilingual practices at Yakanarra and Tennant Creek, with implications for understanding broader processes of language shift. They also elucidate how children's language and linguistic input varies diachronically across time. As such, we contribute to

  18. Community Remoteness, Perinatal Outcomes and Infant Mortality among First Nations in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Wassimi, Spogmai; Mchugh, Nancy G. L.; Wilkins, Russell; Heaman, Maureen; Martens, Patricia; Smylie, Janet; Simonet, Fabienne; Fraser, William D; Luo, Zhong-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective Little is known about community remoteness in relation to birth outcomes among Indigenous populations. We assessed whether community remoteness matters for perinatal outcomes and infant mortality in Quebec First Nations communities. Study Design A retrospective cohort study of all births (n=11,033) to residents of First Nations communities in Quebec 1991–2000, using linked vital statistics data. First Nations communities were grouped by community remoteness into four zones from the least to most remote. Results Preterm birth rates declined progressively from the least remote (8.0%) to the most remote (5.7%) zones (p=0.002). In contrast, total fetal and infant mortality rose progressively from the least remote (10.4 per 1000) to the most remote (22.7 per 1000) zones (p<0.001). The excess infant mortality in the more remote zones was mainly due to higher rates of postneonatal mortality. Similar patterns were observed after adjusting for maternal age, education, parity and marital status. Substantially elevated risks in most remote communities remained for perinatal death (adjusted OR=2.1), postneonatal death (adjusted OR=2.7), and total fetal and infant death (adjusted OR=2.3). Conclusion Living in more remote First Nations communities was associated with a substantially higher risk of fetal and infant death, especially postneonatal death, despite a lower risk of preterm delivery. There is a need for more effective perinatal and infant care programs in more remote First Nations communities to reduce perinatal and infant mortality. PMID:22282717

  19. Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. E.; Cruz, C.

    2014-11-01

    The ingredients for the highly successful, ongoing educator professional development program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" came into place in 2006 when representatives of public and private organizations convened a two-day workshop at the National Science Foundation (NSF) to explore issues around integrating remote sensing with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) instruction at two-year (community and Tribal) colleges. The results of that 2006 workshop informed the shape of a grant proposal, and two phases of iGETT-RS were funded by NSF's Advanced Technological Education Program (NSF DUE #0703185, 2007-2011, and NSF DUE #1205069, 2012-2015). 76 GIS instructors from all over the country have been served. Each of them has spent 18 months on the project, participating in monthly webinars and two Summer Institutes, and creating their own integrated geospatial exercises for the classroom. The project will be completed in June 2015. As the external evaluator for iGETT expressed it, the impact on participating instructors "can only be described as transformative." This paper describes how iGETT came about, how it was designed and implemented, how it affected participants and their programs, and what has been learned by the project staff about delivering professional development in geospatial technologies for workforce preparedness.

  20. Birthweight and natural deaths in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Wendy E; Nicol, Jennifer L

    2010-01-04

    To describe associations between birthweight and infant, child and early adult mortality from natural causes in a remote Australian Aboriginal community against a background of rapidly changing mortality due to better health services. Cohort study of 995 people with recorded birthweights who were born between 1956 and 1985 to an Aboriginal mother in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Participants were followed through to the end of 2006. Rates of natural deaths of infants (aged 0 to < 1 year), children (aged 1 to < 15 years) and adults (aged 15 to < 37 years), compared by birth intervals (1956-1965, 1966-1975 and 1976-1985 for infants and children, and 1956-1962 and 1963-1969 for adults) and by birthweight. Birthweights were low, but increased over time. Deaths among infants and children decreased dramatically over time, but deaths among adults did not. Lower birthweights were associated with higher mortality. Adjusted for birth interval, hazard ratios for deaths among infants, children and adults born at weights below their group birthweight medians were 2.30 (95% CI, 1.13-4.70), 1.78 (95% CI, 1.03-3.07) and 3.49 (95% CI, 1.50-8.09), respectively. The associations were significant individually for deaths associated with diarrhoea in infants, with cardiovascular and renal disease in adults, and marginally significant for deaths from pulmonary causes in children and adults. The striking improvements in infant and child survival over time must be applauded. We confirmed a predisposing effect of lower birthweights on deaths in infants and children, and showed, for the first time, an association between lower birthweights and deaths in adults. Together, these factors are probably contributing to the current epidemic of chronic disease in Aboriginal people, an effect that will persist for decades. Similar phenomena are probably operating in developing countries.

  1. Electrification: Mid-term (1985 - 2000)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Electrification, intended to provide a basis for the mid term period of the energy conservation program, was defined as a set of actions and/or policies that leads to an increasing proportion of total energy used in the form of electricity. The important actions within electrification are those with the greatest impacts (coal and nuclear), the greatest technological requirements (peak shaving and transmission) and the greatest response from the decision makers (economic health and growth of utilities in an era of increasing energy costs). The following areas were discussed: increased power generation from coal action, increased use of nuclear power action, improved operation of public utilities action, actions to be taken in industry, transportation and residential/commercial areas. The various ways in which electrification leads to energy conservation were clarified, and a number of specific recommendations relative to electrification were suggested.

  2. 'Achievement, pride and inspiration': outcomes for volunteer role models in a community outreach program in remote Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Renata L; Peralta, Louisa R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing support for the prosocial value of role modelling in programs for adolescents and the potentially positive impact role models can have on health and health behaviours in remote communities. Despite known benefits for remote outreach program recipients, there is limited literature on the outcomes of participation for role models. Twenty-four role models participated in a remote outreach program across four remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, Australia (100% recruitment). Role models participated in semi-structured one-on-one interviews. Transcripts were coded and underwent thematic analysis by both authors. Cultural training, Indigenous heritage and prior experience contributed to general feelings of preparedness, yet some role models experienced a level of culture shock, being confronted by how disparate the communities were to their home communities. Benefits of participation included exposure to and experience with remote Aboriginal peoples and community, increased cultural knowledge, personal learning, forming and building relationships, and skill development. Effective role model programs designed for remote Indigenous youth can have positive outcomes for both role models and the program recipients. Cultural safety training is an important factor for preparing role models and for building their cultural competency for implementing health and education programs in remote Indigenous communities in Australia. This will maximise the opportunities for participants to achieve outcomes and minimise their culture shock.

  3. White LEDs for lighting remote communities in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Stewart; Irvine-Halliday, Dave

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 5 years, the application of white LEDs for ambient lighting has been investigated in the remote villages of Nepal. Currently, lighting is often met using kerosene wick lamps, which emit unhealthy levels of fumes, or by burning sap-filled pine sticks, which are worse than the kerosene lamps. A team of students from Calgary University developed some LED lamps that could easily be fabricated in Nepal using local materials and personnel. To generate power, a pedal DC generator was developed to charge batteries, as well as a simple wind turbine. The Nepal Light Project implemented a series of many projects over the last 2 years in several villages across Nepal, using several different power generating systems. A total of 142 households, two schools and a temple were fitted with lamps in 2000, and more will follow in 2001. A research project has also been undertaken in Nepal for the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) to investigate the potential for energy efficient lamps in the micro hydro industry. The R&D project was very small, and conducted basic testing on locally available compact fluorescent lamps and LED lamps. The report concluded that encouraging the use of CFLs would decrease costs by 30-50%, and that they should be included in the subsidy policy, along with power factor correcting capacitors. LED lamps should not be overly encouraged as the development of the diodes was advancing very rapidly. The real advantage of LED lamps lies in extremely low maintenance costs due to the low power requirements and long life, which is just as important for remote villages as it is for traffic lights and exit signs. It is estimated that these low ongoing costs could be as low as $3/household/year for a rural lighting project. Pilot projects should be encouraged to demonstrate and investigate the potential of WLEDs for lighting in remote communities in developing countries. With 2 billion people without access to electricity, and lighting being

  4. Education resources in remote Australian Indigenous community dog health programs: a comparison of community and extra-community-produced resources.

    PubMed

    Constable, Sophie Elizabeth; Dixon, Roselyn May; Dixon, Robert John

    2013-09-01

    Commercial dog health programs in Australian Indigenous communities are a relatively recent occurrence. Health promotion for these programs is an even more recent development, and lacks data on effective practices. This paper analyses 38 resources created by veterinary-community partnerships in Indigenous communities, to 71 resources available through local veterinary service providers. On average, community-produced resources used significantly more of the resource area as image, more imagery as communicative rather than decorative images, larger fonts and smaller segments of text and used images of people with a range of skin tones. As well as informal registers of Standard Australian English, community-produced resources used Aboriginal English and/or Creole languages in their text, while extra-community (EC)-produced resources did not. The text of EC resources had Flesh-Kincaid reading grade levels that excluded a large proportion of community recipients. Also, they did not cover some topics of importance in communities, used academic, formal and technical language, and did not depict people of a representative range of skin tones. As such, community-produced resources were more relevant to the unique situations in remote communities, while EC resources were often inappropriate and in some cases could even distance recipients by using inappropriate language, formats and imagery.

  5. Sino/American cooperation for rural electrification in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.L.; Tsuo, Y.S.

    1997-02-01

    Rapid growth in economic development, coupled with the absence of an electric grid in large areas of the rural countryside, have created a need for new energy sources both in urban centers and rural areas in China. There is a very large need for new sources of energy for rural electrification in China as represented by 120 million people in remote regions who do not have access to an electric grid and by over 300 coastal islands in China that are unelectrified. In heavily populated regions in China where there is an electric grid, there are still severe shortages of electric power and limited access to the grid by village populations. In order to meet energy demands in rural China, renewable energy in the form of solar, wind, and biomass resources are being utilized as a cost effective alternative to grid extension and use of diesel and gasoline generators. An Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Protocol Agreement was signed by the U.S. Department of Energy with the Chinese State Science and Technology Commission in Beijing in February, 1995. Under this agreement, projects using photovoltaics for rural electrification are being conducted in Gansu Province in western China and Inner Mongolia in northern China, providing the basis for much wider deployment and use of photovoltaics for meeting the growing rural energy demands of China. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Challenges in assessing food environments in northern and remote communities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Kelly; Burnett, Kristin; Williams, Patricia; Martin, Debbie; Stothart, Christopher; LeBlanc, Joseph; Veeraraghavan, Gigi; Sheedy, Amanda

    2016-06-09

    Effective tools for retail food environments in northern and remote communities are lacking. This paper examines the challenges of conducting food environment assessments in northern and remote communities in Canada encountered during our experience with a food costing project. One of the goals of the Paying for Nutrition in the North project is to develop guidelines to improve current food costing tools for northern Canada. Paying for Nutrition illustrates the complex context of measuring food environments in northern and remote communities. Through the development of a food costing methodology guide to assess northern food environments, several contextual issues emerged, including retail store oligopolies in communities; the importance of assessing food quality; informal social food economies; and the challenge of costing the acquisition and consumption of land- and water-based foods. Food environment measures designed for northern and remote communities need to reflect the geographic context in which they are being employed and must include input from local residents.

  7. Anemia in remote interior communities in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sagin, D D; Ismail, G; Mohamad, M; Pang, E K H; Sya, O T

    2002-06-01

    A cross-sectional survey of 365 individuals, (51.9% males, 48.1% females; ages 5-85 years), from five remote interior communities in upper Rejang River basin Sarawak, Malaysia, found 24.4% were anemic. The range and mean of Hb concentration in male and female were: 7.2-17.0 mg/ml and 13.7 mg/ml and 7.9-15.7 mg/ml and 12.9 mg/ml respectively. Amongst the five tribes surveyed, the prevalence of anemia (range: 10.6-46.7%), was higher among the Penans (46.7%), Kenyahs (31.1%), Kajangs (27.8%) and Kayans (19.3%), than amongst the Ukits (10.6%). Anemia is more common among males >40 years and among adolescents and young reproductive females, as well as elderly females > 61 years old. Of the 83 anemic individuals, 6.0% and 3.6% had Trichuris trichiura or hookworm respectively; however there is no clear association with intestinal worm infection.

  8. Role of rural electrification in development. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Cecelski, E.; Glatt, S.

    1982-01-01

    The high capital costs of rural-electrification suggest that the assumption that the benefits experienced in developed countries can be duplicated in developing countries is questionable. This review of major issues involved in rural electrification examines the equity side of the socio-economic impacts of major projects in India and Colombia to see if cheap electricity can, with careful planning, become a stimulus for potential entrepreneurs. While the analysis identifies the need for systematic studies to establish the connection between rural electrification and development, the evidence does show that consumption is lower in rural areas both in the amount of electricity used and the percentage of people using it. Direct benefits occur in the productive sector, although the importance of availability and reliability over cost challenges the value of subsidies. Price does appear to be a major factor for small farmers in addition to credit availability and marketing. 45 references, 26 tables. (DCK)

  9. Flow Induced Electrification of Liquid Insulated Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washabaugh, Andrew Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The transport or motion of semi-insulating liquids has led to flow induced static electrification and catastrophic failures in several industries. While techniques for reducing the hazard have been developed, the roles of seemingly important parameters are poorly understood. The objective of this thesis was to measure and understand the fundamental parameters of the flow electrification process that, together with the laws of electroquasistatics and physicochemical hydrodynamics, can be used to predict the performance of complex flow systems, with particular attention to transformer applications. A rotating cylindrical electrode apparatus, which provided cylindrical Couette flow, was used to simulate flow electrification in an electric power transformer. The apparatus had Shell Diala A transformer oil filling the annulus between coaxial cylindrical stainless steel electrodes that were either bare metal, or covered by a thin copper sheet and/or EHV-Weidmann HiVal pressboard insulation. Extensive experiments characterized the time transient and steady state behavior of the electrification through measurements of the volume charge density, the terminal voltage, and the terminal current as the system was driven out of equilibrium by changes in the flow rate (inner cylinder rotation rates of 100-1400 rpm, Reynolds numbers of 5 times 10^3-5 times 10^5), temperature (15-70 ^circ), insulation moisture content (0.5-20 ppm in the oil), applied voltage (0-2 kV DC), and concentration of the non-ionizable anti-static additive 1,2,3 benzotriazole (BTA, 0-60 ppm). Generally, the electrification increased with flow rate and temperature but the BTA appeared to cause competing effects: it decreased the volume charge density on the liquid side of the interface (by a factor of 4), which reduces the electrification, but also decreased the oil conductivity (by a factor of 10), which enhances the electrification. A critical oil BTA concentration of 5 -8 ppm minimized the electrification

  10. Designing for Learning Engagement in Remote Communities: Narratives from North of Sixty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, Aaron; Henrickson, Jeni

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple challenges to designing learning experiences for schools in remote communities, including technology and infrastructure limitations, high teacher and administrator turnover, and conflicting interests between local culture and school curricula. In this paper, we offer a brief history of educational initiatives in remote Arctic…

  11. Are We Making Education Count in Remote Australian Communities or Just Counting Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, John

    2013-01-01

    For quite some time the achievements of students in remote Australian schools have been lamented. There is not necessarily anything new about the relative difference between the results of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in remote communities and their counterparts in urban, regional and rural schools across Australia. However, in…

  12. Solar-Based Rural Electrification and Micro-Enterprise Development in Latin America: A Gender Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.

    2000-11-16

    Worldwide, an estimated 1.5 to 2 billion people do not have access to electricity, including 100 million in the Latin America region. Depending on the country, 30 to 90% of this unelectrified Latin American population lives in rural areas where geographic remoteness and low energy consumption patterns may preclude the extension of the conventional electricity grid. Women are heavily impacted by the energy scarcity given their role as primary energy procurers and users for the household, agricultural and small industrial subsectors in developing countries. As a result, women spend disproportionately more time engaged in energy-related activities like carrying water and searching for cooking fuel. This paper describes the use of decentralized renewable energy systems as one approach to meet the energy needs of rural areas in Latin America. It outlines the advantages of a decentralized energy paradigm to achieve international development goals, especially as they relate to women. The paper studies Enersol Associates, Inc.'s Solar-Based Rural Electrification model as an example of a decentralized energy program which has merged energy and development needs through the local involvement of energy entrepreneurs, non-governmental organizations and community members.

  13. Bringing remote sensing technology to the user community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenlaub, J. C.; Davis, S. M.; Morrison, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The procedures and services available for educating and training potential users of remote sensing technology are discussed along with approaches for achieving an in-house capability for the analysis of remotely sensed data using numerical techniques based on pattern recognition principles. Cost estimates are provided where appropriate.

  14. Global rural electrification - A different race initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.S. )

    1991-10-01

    The paper considers global rural electrification based on electric power from power stations, built in geosynchronous orbit out of lunar materials. These materials are distributed to individual villages and rural electric cooperatives via microwaves for a cost of about 6-45 cents per kilowatt-hour. Power would be available in modular increments of 25-100 kilowatts with an average capital cost as low as $5000 per kilowatt. The global rural electrification program is aimed at providing electric power from space at competitive costs, relative to current costs, to rural and agricultural areas and diverting resources from weapons development to infrastructure development. 16 refs.

  15. Incubating Innovation for Rural Electrification. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    In June, the team held a workshop on ''Low Carbon Sustainable Rural Electrification'' in Salima, Malawi. Co-organized with the Government of Malawi's Department of Energy, this event gathered participants from the energy, telecom, non-profit, banking sectors as well as from governmental and international agencies to discuss the potential development of private led off-grid electrification in Malawi where only 9% of the population has currently access to electricity. A very active participation provided us with insightful feedback and valuable recommendations.

  16. Global rural electrification - A different race initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.

    1991-10-01

    The paper considers global rural electrification based on electric power from power stations, built in geosynchronous orbit out of lunar materials. These materials are distributed to individual villages and rural electric cooperatives via microwaves for a cost of about 6-45 cents per kilowatt-hour. Power would be available in modular increments of 25-100 kilowatts with an average capital cost as low as $5000 per kilowatt. The global rural electrification program is aimed at providing electric power from space at competitive costs, relative to current costs, to rural and agricultural areas and diverting resources from weapons development to infrastructure development.

  17. Women living in a remote Australian mining community: exploring their psychological well-being.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Jane; Critchley, Jennifer

    2010-06-01

    To explore the factors believed to influence the psychological well-being of women living in a modern remote Australian mining community. A qualitative phenomenological study conducted through focus group discussions. Remote Australian mining town. Sixteen women living in a remote Australian mining town with a partner undertaking shiftwork at one of the local mines. Women in a remote Australian mining community revealed, through focus group discussion, the factors influencing their psychological well-being. Four themes were identified to be of importance for the women. These were the impacts of mining work, isolation, culture and the social environment on their happiness and well-being, and that of their families and the broader community. Psychological well-being of women in a remote mining community might be improved through better local medical services, increased efforts at social inclusion and community connectedness, greater access to child care and better community infrastructure and pleasant surrounds. The findings also question the stereotypes of strong masculinist cultures and limited activities and services in such communities. Further research is highly recommended.

  18. Toward Linking Aboveground Vegetation Properties and Soil Microbial Communities Using Remote Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; Gilbert, Jack A.; Larsen, Peter E.; Norgaard, Madeline J.

    2014-04-01

    Despite their vital role in terrestrial ecosystem function, the distributions and dynamics of soil microbial communities (SMCs) are poorly understood. Vegetation and soil properties are the primary factors that influence SMCs. This paper discusses the potential effectiveness of remote sensing science and technologies for mapping SMC biogeography by characterizing surface biophysical properties (e.g., plant traits and community composition) strongly correlated with SMCs. Using remotely sensed biophysical properties to predict SMC distributions is extremely challenging because of the intricate interactions between biotic and abiotic factors and between above- and belowground ecosystems. However, the integration of biophysical and soil remote sensing with geospatial information about the e nvironment holds great promise for mapping SMC biogeography. Additional research needs invol ve microbial taxonomic definition, soil environmental complexity, and scaling strategies. The collaborative effort of experts from diverse disciplines is essential to linking terrestrial surface biosphere observations with subsurface microbial community distributions using remote sensing.

  19. Environmental justification for railroad electrification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, M.J. III; Thorpe, A.B.

    1993-12-01

    In a 1991 workshop, electric utility managers asked the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to address the question of railroad electrification in light of both urban air problems associated with transportation and our national transportation system`s dependence on petroleum fuels. In response, EPRI presents this economic and environmental analysis. This analysis is different from many previous studies in two ways: it determines the capital and operating cost differentials between diesel locomotive trains and electric locomotive trains; it also assigns a dollar value to the environmental costs associated with air pollution from diesel and electric train operations. This study`s purpose is to compare financial costs of rail electrification with environmental costs from air emissions impacts in four case studies: Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. These urban regions were chosen because they have different railroad characteristics and they all have air quality problems. This study will present a snapshot of the year 2000 to compare the economics in each region of two scenarios: the rail lines remain diesel power or are electrified. Because of the increase in capital and operating cost, rail electrification is not financially viable in any of these regions. Yet when the benefit of reduced air emissions, typically an {open_quotes}external{close_quotes} value, is included in the analysis, rail electrification may be economically viable.

  20. Managing Tensions in Statutory Professional Practice: Living and Working in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jervis-Tracey, Paula; Chenoweth, Lesley; McAuliffe, Donna; O'Connor, Barry; Stehlik, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Delivering essential health, education and human services in rural and remote communities remains a critical problem for Australia. When professionals have mandatory responsibilities (e.g. in child protection, law enforcement, education or mental health), tensions can arise between workers and the communities in which they live. This paper reports…

  1. Managing Tensions in Statutory Professional Practice: Living and Working in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jervis-Tracey, Paula; Chenoweth, Lesley; McAuliffe, Donna; O'Connor, Barry; Stehlik, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Delivering essential health, education and human services in rural and remote communities remains a critical problem for Australia. When professionals have mandatory responsibilities (e.g. in child protection, law enforcement, education or mental health), tensions can arise between workers and the communities in which they live. This paper reports…

  2. Children's Language Input: A Study of a Remote Multilingual Indigenous Australian Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loakes, Deborah; Moses, Karin; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Simpson, Jane; Billington, Rosey

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous children growing up in the remote regions of Australia live in multilingual communities which are often undergoing rapid language shift. In these communities, children are exposed to a range of language input, including the traditional language of the area, a local creole and Standard Australian English. The extent to which the…

  3. Culture, context and therapeutic processes: delivering a parent-child intervention in a remote Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Mares, Sarah; Robinson, Gary

    2012-04-01

    Little is written about the process of delivering mainstream, evidence-based therapeutic interventions for Aboriginal children and families in remote communities. Patterns of interaction between parents and children and expectations about parenting and professional roles and responsibilities vary across cultural contexts. This can be a challenging experience for professionals accustomed to work in urban settings. Language is only a part of cultural difference, and the outsider in a therapeutic group in an Aboriginal community is outside not only in language but also in access to community relationships and a place within those relationships. This paper uses examples from Let's Start, a therapeutic parent-child intervention to describe the impact of distance, culture and relationships in a remote Aboriginal community, on the therapeutic framework, group processes and relationships. Cultural and contextual factors influence communication, relationships and group processes in a therapeutic group program for children and parents in a remote Aboriginal community. Group leaders from within and from outside the community, are likely to have complementary skills. Cultural and contextual factors influence communication, relationships and group processes in a therapeutic group program for children and parents in a remote Aboriginal community. Group leaders from within and from outside the community, are likely to have complementary skills. Program adaptation, evaluation and staff training and support need to take these factors into account to ensure cultural accessibility without loss of therapeutic fidelity and efficacy.

  4. Lighting up the World The first global application of the open source, spatial electrification toolkit (ONSSET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentis, Dimitrios; Howells, Mark; Rogner, Holger; Korkovelos, Alexandros; Siyal, Shahid; Broad, Oliver; Zepeda, Eduardo; Bazilian, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    In September 2015, the international community has adopted a new set of targets, following and expanding on the millennium development goals (MDGs), the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all is one of the 17 set goals that each country should work towards realizing. According to the latest Global Tracking Framework, 15% of the global population live without access to electricity. The majority of those (87%) reside in rural areas. Countries can reach universal access through various electrification options, depending on different levels of energy intensity and local characteristics of the studied areas, such as renewable resources availability, spatially differentiated costs of diesel-fuelled electricity generation, distance from power network and major cities, population density and others, data which are usually inadequate in national databases. This general paucity of reliable energy-related information in developing countries calls for the utilization of geospatial data. This paper presents a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based electrification analysis for all countries that have not yet reached full access to electricity (Sub-Saharan Africa, Developing Asia, Latin America and Middle East). The cost optimal mix of electrification options ranges from grid extensions to mini-grid and stand-alone applications and is identified for all relevant countries. It is illustrated how this mix is influenced by scrolling through various electrification levels and different oil prices. Such an analysis helps direct donors and investors and inform multinational actions with regards to investments related to energy access.

  5. Art therapy: promoting wellbeing in rural and remote communities.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Art therapy encompasses both preventative and curative activities and aims to improve ways of engaging those who might be reticent in seeking more traditional forms of psychological support offered through 'talking therapies'. The Longreach base of the Royal Flying Doctor Service in Queensland provides mental health support to people living in rural and remote locations in central western Queensland and has been complemented since 2006 by the addition of a full-time art therapist. This paper provides an overview of art therapy and a description of this innovative approach to addressing mental health needs in a rural and remote setting.

  6. Do remote community telepharmacies have higher medication error rates than traditional community pharmacies? Evidence from the North Dakota Telepharmacy Project.

    PubMed

    Friesner, Daniel L; Scott, David M; Rathke, Ann M; Peterson, Charles D; Anderson, Howard C

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the differences in medication dispensing errors between remote telepharmacy sites (pharmacist not physically present) and standard community pharmacy sites (pharmacist physically present and no telepharmacy technology; comparison group). Pilot, cross-sectional, comparison study. North Dakota from January 2005 to September 2008. Pharmacy staff at 14 remote telepharmacy sites and 8 comparison community pharmacies. The Pharmacy Quality Commitment (PQC) reporting system was incorporated into the North Dakota Telepharmacy Project. A session was conducted to train pharmacists and technicians on use of the PQC system. A quality-related event (QRE) was defined as either a near miss (i.e., mistake caught before reaching patient; pharmacy discovery), or an error (i.e., mistake discovered after patient received medication; patient discovery). QREs for prescriptions. During a 45-month period, the remote telepharmacy group reported 47,078 prescriptions and 631 QREs compared with 123,346 prescriptions and 1,002 QREs in the standard pharmacy group. Results for near misses (pharmacy discovery) and errors (patient discovery) for the remote and comparison sites were 553 and 887 and 78 and 125, respectively. Percentage of "where the mistake was caught" (i.e., pharmacist check) for the remote and comparison sites were 58% and 69%, respectively. This study reported a lower overall rate (1.0%) and a slight difference in medication dispensing error rates between remote telepharmacy sites (1.3%) and comparison sites (0.8%). Both rates are comparable with nationally reported levels (1.7% error rate for 50 pharmacies).

  7. The comparative cost of food and beverages at remote Indigenous communities, Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Megan; O'Dea, Kerin; Chatfield, Mark; Moodie, Marjory; Altman, Jon; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-04-01

    To determine the average price difference between foods and beverages in remote Indigenous community stores and capital city supermarkets and explore differences across products. A cross-sectional survey compared prices derived from point-of-sale data in 20 remote Northern Territory stores with supermarkets in capital cities of the Northern Territory and South Australia for groceries commonly purchased in remote stores. Average price differences for products, supply categories and food groups were examined. The 443 products examined represented 63% of food and beverage expenditure in remote stores. Remote products were, on average, 60% and 68% more expensive than advertised prices for Darwin and Adelaide supermarkets, respectively. The average price difference for fresh products was half that of packaged groceries for Darwin supermarkets and more than 50% for food groups that contributed most to purchasing. Strategies employed by manufacturers and supermarkets, such as promotional pricing, and supermarkets' generic products lead to lower prices. These opportunities are not equally available to remote customers and are a major driver of price disparity. Food affordability for already disadvantaged residents of remote communities could be improved by policies targeted at manufacturers, wholesalers and/or major supermarket chains. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Benefits of swimming pools in two remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia: intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Deborah; Tennant, Mary T; Silva, Desiree T; McAullay, Daniel; Lannigan, Francis; Coates, Harvey; Stanley, Fiona J

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the health impact of swimming pools built with the aim of improving quality of life and reducing high rates of pyoderma and otitis media. Design Intervention study assessing prevalence of ear disease and skin infections before and at six monthly intervals after opening of swimming pools. Setting Two remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia. Participants 84 boys and 78 girls aged < 17 years. Main outcome measures Changes in prevalence and severity of pyoderma and perforation of tympanic membranes with or without otorrhoea over 18 months after opening of pools. Results In community A, 61 children were seen before the pool was opened, and 41, 46, and 33 children were seen at the second, third, and fourth surveys. Equivalent figures for community B were 60, 35, 39, and 45. Prevalence of pyoderma declined significantly from 62% to 18% in community A and from 70% to 20% in community B during the 18 months after the pools opened. Over the same period, prevalence of severe pyoderma fell from 30% to 15% in community A and from 48% to 0% in community B. Prevalence of perforations of the tympanic membrane fell from 32% in both communities to 13% in community A and 18% in community B. School attendance improved in community A. Conclusion Swimming pools in remote communities were associated with reduction in prevalence of pyoderma and tympanic membrane perforations, which could result in long term benefits through reduction in chronic disease burden and improved educational and social outcomes. PMID:12933727

  9. Increasing Primary Care Access Close to Home for Residents of Remote Communities in Northern Alberta.

    PubMed

    Ross, A Alison; Yap, Tracey L; Nest, Johan van Der; Martin, Keith; Edie, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Residents of Canada's rural and remote communities know the challenges associated with accessing consistent healthcare. Alberta Health Services uses telehealth technology to minimize travel for rural and remote residents who require follow-up with specialists, however until recently, telehealth was only used in specialty care. This article describes a pilot project introduced in two remote northern Alberta communities to determine the feasibility and sustainability of using telehealth in the delivery of primary healthcare. Included in the article are descriptions of each phase of the project from seeking stakeholder approval through interpretation of findings and continuation of the project after it was determined successful. Jurisdictions interested in attempting their own telehealth program will be interested in the challenges and successes identified during the process. Although the project was successful, further studies are needed to determine if similar findings could be expected in other communities and populations.

  10. Primary health care accessibility challenges in remote indigenous communities in Canada's North.

    PubMed

    Oosterveer, Tim Michiel; Young, T Kue

    2015-01-01

    Despite many improvements, health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous populations in Canada's North persist. While a strong primary health care (PHC) system improves the health of a population, the majority of indigenous communities are very remote, and their access to PHC services is likely reduced. Understanding the challenges in accessing PHC services in these communities is necessary to improve the health of the population. The objective of the study was to document and analyze the challenges in accessing PHC services by indigenous people in remote communities in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT) from the perspectives of users and providers of PHC services. Using explorative, qualitative methods, our study involved 14 semi-structured interviews with PHC service providers (SPs) and service users (SUs) in 5 communities across the NWT which varied according to population, remoteness, ethnic composition and health care resources. The interview guide was developed after key informant consultations. Both SPs and SUs understood the constraints in providing equitable access to PHC services in remote communities. The provision of emergency care was found to be particularly challenging, because of the lack of qualified staff in the community and the dependence on aeromedical evacuations. Wider dissemination of first aid skills among community members was seen to cover some gaps and also increase self-confidence. For non-emergency care, the need to travel outside the community was generally disliked. All recognized the need for more preventive services which were often postponed or delayed because of the overwhelming demand for acute care. As long as services were provided in a community, the satisfaction was high among SUs. SPs appreciated the orientation they received and the ability to build rapport with the community. Northern SUs and SPs generally acknowledge the health consequences of living in remote communities. The generally high level of

  11. Primary health care accessibility challenges in remote indigenous communities in Canada's North.

    PubMed

    Michiel Oosterveer, Tim; Kue Young, T

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite many improvements, health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous populations in Canada's North persist. While a strong primary health care (PHC) system improves the health of a population, the majority of indigenous communities are very remote, and their access to PHC services is likely reduced. Understanding the challenges in accessing PHC services in these communities is necessary to improve the health of the population. Objective The objective of the study was to document and analyze the challenges in accessing PHC services by indigenous people in remote communities in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT) from the perspectives of users and providers of PHC services. Methods Using explorative, qualitative methods, our study involved 14 semi-structured interviews with PHC service providers (SPs) and service users (SUs) in 5 communities across the NWT which varied according to population, remoteness, ethnic composition and health care resources. The interview guide was developed after key informant consultations. Results Both SPs and SUs understood the constraints in providing equitable access to PHC services in remote communities. The provision of emergency care was found to be particularly challenging, because of the lack of qualified staff in the community and the dependence on aeromedical evacuations. Wider dissemination of first aid skills among community members was seen to cover some gaps and also increase self-confidence. For non-emergency care, the need to travel outside the community was generally disliked. All recognized the need for more preventive services which were often postponed or delayed because of the overwhelming demand for acute care. As long as services were provided in a community, the satisfaction was high among SUs. SPs appreciated the orientation they received and the ability to build rapport with the community. Conclusions Northern SUs and SPs generally acknowledge the health consequences of living in remote

  12. Atmospheric Electrification in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric electrification is not a purely terrestrial phenomenon: all Solar System planetary atmospheres become slightly electrified by cosmic ray ionisation. There is evidence for lightning on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and it is possible on Mars, Venus and Titan. Controversy surrounds the role of atmospheric electricity in physical climate processes on Earth; here, a comparative approach is employed to review the role of electrification in the atmospheres of other planets and their moons. This paper reviews the theory, and, where available, measurements, of planetary atmospheric electricity which is taken to include ion production and ion aerosol interactions. The conditions necessary for a planetary atmospheric electric circuit similar to Earth’s, and the likelihood of meeting these conditions in other planetary atmospheres, are briefly discussed. Atmospheric electrification could be important throughout the solar system, particularly at the outer planets which receive little solar radiation, increasing the relative significance of electrical forces. Nucleation onto atmospheric ions has been predicted to affect the evolution and lifetime of haze layers on Titan, Neptune and Triton. Atmospheric electrical processes on Titan, before the arrival of the Huygens probe, are summarised. For planets closer to Earth, heating from solar radiation dominates atmospheric circulations. However, Mars may have a global circuit analogous to the terrestrial model, but based on electrical discharges from dust storms. There is an increasing need for direct measurements of planetary atmospheric electrification, in particular on Mars, to assess the risk for future unmanned and manned missions. Theoretical understanding could be increased by cross-disciplinary work to modify and update models and parameterisations initially developed for a specific atmosphere, to make them more broadly applicable to other planetary atmospheres.

  13. Diesel power leads Yemen electrification plan

    SciTech Connect

    Patarino, C.

    1980-10-01

    The Yemen Arab Republic ended a period of political isolation and is now pushing for social and economic development. A seven-year program announced in 1978 aims to establish and extend rural and urban electrification. A key element in this plan is the construction pf a series of diesel power stations to provide base load until larger steam plants are available in the mid-1980s.

  14. Los Sabinos PV rural electrification project: Results after 30 months of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huacuz, J.M.; Agredano, J.; Munguia, G.; Flores, R.

    1994-12-31

    Los Sabinos, a small rural community in the mountains of Mexico has been electrified by means of small distributed PV systems. The systems were designed and built using for the first time the Technical Specification for Photovoltaic Rural Electrification Systems originally developed at IIE. Since 1992 the systems have been monitored. In this paper, the results after two and a half years of operation are presented. The main problems found are pointed out and the lessons learned are discussed.

  15. Feasibility and costs of water fluoridation in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Jonathon P; Bailie, Ross

    2007-01-01

    Background Fluoridation of public water supplies remains the key potential strategy for prevention of dental caries. The water supplies of many remote Indigenous communities do not contain adequate levels of natural fluoride. The small and dispersed nature of communities presents challenges for the provision of fluoridation infrastructure and until recently smaller settlements were considered unfavourable for cost-effective water fluoridation. Technological advances in water treatment and fluoridation are resulting in new and more cost-effective water fluoridation options and recent cost analyses support water fluoridation for communities of less than 1,000 people. Methods Small scale fluoridation plants were installed in two remote Northern Territory communities in early 2004. Fluoride levels in community water supplies were expected to be monitored by local staff and by a remote electronic system. Site visits were undertaken by project investigators at commissioning and approximately two years later. Interviews were conducted with key informants and documentation pertaining to costs of the plants and operational reports were reviewed. Results The fluoridation plants were operational for about 80% of the trial period. A number of technical features that interfered with plant operation were identified and addressed though redesign. Management systems and the attitudes and capacity of operational staff also impacted on the effective functioning of the plants. Capital costs for the wider implementation of these plants in remote communities is estimated at about $US94,000 with recurrent annual costs of $US11,800 per unit. Conclusion Operational issues during the trial indicate the need for effective management systems, including policy and funding responsibility. Reliable manufacturers and suppliers of equipment should be identified and contractual agreements should provide for ongoing technical assistance. Water fluoridation units should be considered as a potential

  16. Population movement can sustain STI prevalence in remote Australian indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ben B; Gray, Richard T; Wilson, David P; Ward, James S; Smith, Anthony M A; Philip, David J; Law, Matthew G; Hocking, Jane S; Regan, David G

    2013-04-25

    For almost two decades, chlamydia and gonorrhoea diagnosis rates in remote Indigenous communities have been up to 30 times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians. The high levels of population movement known to occur between remote communities may contribute to these high rates. We developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study the relationship between population movement and the persistence of gonorrhoea and chlamydia transmission within hypothetical remote communities. Results from our model suggest that short-term population movement can facilitate gonorrhoea and chlamydia persistence in small populations. By fixing the number of short-term travellers in accordance with census data, we found that these STIs can persist if at least 20% of individuals in the population seek additional partners while away from home and if the time away from home is less than 21 days. Periodic variations in travel patterns can contribute to increased sustainable levels of infection. Expanding existing STI testing and treatment programs to cater for short-term travellers is shown to be ineffective due to their short duration of stay. Testing and treatment strategies tailored to movement patterns, such as encouraging travellers to seek testing and treatment upon return from travel, will likely be more effective. High population mobility is likely to contribute to the high levels of STIs observed in remote Indigenous communities of Australia. More detailed data on mobility patterns and sexual behaviour of travellers will be invaluable for designing and assessing STI control programs in highly mobile communities.

  17. An ecological approach to health promotion in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Bailie, Ross; Grace, Jocelyn; Brewster, David

    2010-03-01

    Poor environmental conditions and poor child health in remote Australian Aboriginal communities are a symptom of a disjuncture in the cultures of a disadvantaged (and only relatively recently enfranchised) minority population and a proportionally large, wealthy dominant immigrant population, problematic social policies and the legacy of colonialism. Developing effective health promotion interventions in this environment is a challenge. Taking an ecological approach, the objective of this study was to identify the key social, economic, cultural and environmental factors that contribute to poor hygiene in remote Aboriginal communities, and to determine approaches that will improve hygiene and reduce the burden of infection among children. The methods included a mix of quantitative and qualitative community-based studies and literature reviews. Study findings showed that a combination of crowding, non-functioning health hardware and poor standards of personal and domestic hygiene underlie the high burden of infection experienced by children. Also, models of health promotion drawn from developed and developing countries can be adapted for use in remote Australian Aboriginal community contexts. High levels of disadvantage in relation to social determinants of health underlie the problem of poor environmental conditions and poor child health in remote Australian Aboriginal communities. Measures need to be taken to address the immediate problems that impact on children's health-for example, by ensuring the availability of functional and adequate water and sanitation facilities-but these interventions are unlikely to have a major effect unless the underlying issues are also addressed.

  18. Community health workers improve diabetes care in remote Australian Indigenous communities: results of a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Robyn A; Schmidt, Barbara; Preece, Cilla; Owens, Vickie; Taylor, Sean; Li, Ming; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-02-19

    Health outcomes for Indigenous Australians with diabetes in remote areas remain poor, including high rates of avoidable complications which could be reduced with better primary level care. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based health-worker led case management approach to the care of Indigenous adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in primary care services in remote northern Australia. Two hundred and thirteen adults with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c > 8.5%) and significant comorbidities in 12 remote communities were randomly assigned by service cluster to receive chronic care co-ordination from a community-based health worker supported by a clinical outreach team, or to a waitlist control group which received usual care. At baseline, mean age of participants was 47.9 years, 62.4% were female, half were Aboriginal and half identified as Torres Strait Islander, 67% had less than 12 years of education, 39% were smokers, median income was $18,200 and 47% were unemployed. Mean HbA1c was 10.7% (93 mmol/mol) and BMI 32.5. At follow-up after 18 months, HbA1c reduction was significantly greater in the intervention group (-1.0% vs -0.2%, SE (diff) = 0.2, p = 0.02). There were no significant differences between the groups for blood pressure, lipid profile, BMI or renal function. Intervention group participants were more likely to receive nutrition and dental services according to scheduled care plans. Smoking rates were unchanged. A culturally safe, community level health-worker led model of diabetes care for high risk patients can be effective in improving diabetes control in remote Indigenous Australian communities where there is poor access to mainstream services. This approach can be effective in other remote settings, but requires longer term evaluation to capture accrued benefits. ANZCTR 12610000812099, Registered 29 September 2010.

  19. Preliminary guidelines for the implementation of Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) approaches in rural, remote and Indigenous communities in Australia.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, P; Allen, O

    2004-01-01

    A forum of health professionals was held in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 30-31 August 2003, to discuss the relevance and potential of the Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) model to rural, remote and Indigenous communities in Australia. The forum identified principles and guidelines for the development of CBR, which are presented here as a focus point for future discussion and action by people with disabilities, rural community members, Indigenous people, policy makers and health professionals. Forum members noted that while considerable strengths were evident in the CBR model, it has yet to make a significant impact on the service system in Australia. While recognising that the Australian context is quite different from many countries in which CBR has traditionally been implemented, they suggested that it may have particular application to remote, rural and Indigenous communities. To facilitate the principles of CBR in these communities, the forum called for recognition of the need for greater community involvement in disability services, the need to develop appropriate training frameworks, and the need to redirect resources to such community models. In keeping with the CBR philosophy, forum members noted that if the model is to be implemented effectively, substantial consumer and community involvement will be instrumental in future steps.

  20. On the Electrification of Pyrocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Dolan, Brenda; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Lindsey, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    The electrification (or lack thereof) of pyrocumulus clouds is examined for several different wildfires that occurred during 2012-2013. For example, pyrocumulus clouds above three Colorado wildfires (Hewlett Gulch, High Park, and Waldo Canyon; all occurred during summer 2012) electrified and produced small intracloud discharges whenever the smoke plumes grew to high altitudes (over 10 km above mean sea level, or MSL). This occurred during periods of rapid wildfire growth, as indicated by the shortwave infrared channel on a geostationary satellite, as well as by incident reports. In the Hewlett Gulch case, the fire growth led to increased updrafts within the plume, as inferred by multiple-Doppler radar syntheses, which led to the vertical development and subsequent electrification - a life cycle as short as 30 minutes. The lightning, detected by a three-dimensional lightning mapping network, was favored in high-altitude regions (10 km MSL) containing modest reflectivities (25 dBZ and lower), 0 dB differential reflectivity, and reduced correlation coefficient (0.6-0.7). This indicated the likely presence of ice particles (crystals and aggregates, possibly rimed) mixed with ash. Though neither multiple-Doppler nor polarimetric observations were available during the electrification of the High Park and Waldo Canyon plumes, their NEXRAD observations showed reflectivity structures consistent with Hewlett Gulch. In addition, polarimetric and multiple-Doppler scanning of unelectrified High Park plumes indicated only irregularly shaped ash, and not ice, was present (i.e., reflectivities < 25 dBZ, differential reflectivity > 5 dB, correlation < 0.4), and there was no broaching of the 10 km altitude. Based on these results, the electrification likely was caused by ice-based processes that did not involve significant amounts of graupel. Results for pyrocumulus clouds above notable 2013 wildfires that also experienced rapid growth (e.g., Black Forest, Yarnell Hill, West Fork

  1. A decade of experience evolving visiting dental services in partnership with rural remote Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Dyson, K; Kruger, E; Tennant, M

    2014-06-01

    Embedding research capabilities and workforce development activities with clinical service entities promotes the development of sustainable, innovative, quality-focused oral health care services. Clinical and strategic governance is an important area of consideration for rural and remote dental services, posing particular challenges for smaller service structures. Sustaining remote area dental services has some significant complexities beyond those involved in urban service models. This study describes the sustaining structure of a remote area dental service with a decade of history. In the current climate, chief among these challenges may be those associated with dental workforce shortages as these impact most heavily in the public sector, and most particularly, in remote areas. As sustained workforce solutions come from developing a future workforce, an essential element of the workforce governance framework for remote dental service provision should be the inclusion of a student participation programme. Collaborative partnership approaches with Aboriginal health services promote the development and maintenance of effective, culturally sensitive dental services within rural and remote Aboriginal communities. Having sustained care for 10 years, this collaborative model of integrated research, education and service has demonstrated its effectiveness as a service model for Aboriginal communities in Western Australia. This descriptive study finds the core values for this success have been communication, clinical leadership, mentorship within effective governance systems all linked to an integrated education and research agenda. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  2. Assessing the Impacts of Rural Electrification in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragaw, Mekonnen Lulie

    This study links rural electrification and the transition to modern energy services with poverty reduction and rural development in Ethiopia. Benefits of rural electrification in reducing poverty and accelerating rural development in low-income developing countries have been insufficiently researched. This study analyses available empirical evidence at a local level and examines how electricity access translates into productive use beyond powering radios and lighting. A survey of 336 households was conducted in Northern Ethiopia on impacts of electrification on four rural towns with varying number of years of access to electricity. Evidence at household and community levels shows that access to electricity was followed by an increase in household connectivity rate, and slow transition to modern energy services based on level of household income and number of years of a household's connection to electricity services. The pace of transition to modern energy services was slow, and household energy poverty and dependence on biomass fuels continued in most rural towns, having little impact on improved environmental management practices. Improvement in rural livelihood, poverty reduction, and delivery of public services was highest for those with more years of access to electricity, and higher income households. The fact that impacts of RE depend on number of years of a household's electricity connection implies gradual improvements rather than immediate benefits after connection. In the short-term, households improved their quality of life through better lighting and reduced indoor-air pollution. In the medium and longer-term, households and communities diversified their income and received improved public services such as education, health, and potable water. Further benefits were wider off-farm and non-farm employment, increased rural markets, and improved environment for rural development. Very poor households benefited least, while those better-off utilized

  3. Community Based Informatics Education: Geographical Information Systems, Remote Sensing and Ontology collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, B. D.; Raskin, R.; Rock, B.; Gagnon, M. T.; Hale, S.; Hayden, L. B.

    2009-12-01

    With the United States Department of Education challenged to augment the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pipeline, applied and deliberate focus on geosciences pipelines issue may be at risk. The Geosciences pipeline may require intentional K-12 standard course of study consideration in the form of project based, science based and evidenced based learning. Thus, the K-12 to geosciences to informatics pipeline may benefit from an earth science experience that utilizes a community based “learning by doing” approach. Here, terms such as Community GIS, Community Remotes Sensing, and Community Based Ontology development are termed Community Informatics. Here, approaches of interdisciplinary work to promote and earth science literacy are affordable, consisting of low cost equipment that renders GIS/remote sensing data processing skills necessary in the workforce. Hence, informal community ontology development as a pedagogical rubric may be considered a K-12 paradigm. In civic terms, a spatial thinking community, from its defined ontology base may evolve or mature from a local community towards formal scientific community collaboration. Such consideration may become a means to engage educational policy towards earth science paradigms and needs to address the geospatial technology workforce issues.

  4. Estimating tobacco consumption in remote Aboriginal communities using retail sales data: some challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, David; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle; Clough, Alan

    2010-07-01

    To describe and discuss challenges and opportunities encountered when estimating tobacco consumption in six remote Aboriginal communities using tobacco sales data from retail outlets. We consider tobacco sales data collected from retail outlets selling tobacco to six Aboriginal communities in two similar but separate studies. Despite challenges--including: not all outlets provided data; data not uniform across outlets (sales and invoice data); change in format of data; personnel change or management restructures; and anomalies in data and changes in community populations--tobacco consumption was estimated and returned through project newsletters and community feedback sessions. Amounts of tobacco sold were returned using graphs in newsletters and pictures of items common to the community in community feedback sessions. Despite inherent limitations of estimating tobacco consumption using tobacco sales data, returning the amount of tobacco sold to communities provided an opportunity to discuss tobacco consumption and provide a focal point for individual and community action. Using this method, however, may require large and sustained changes be observed over time to evaluate whether initiatives to reduce tobacco consumption have been effective. Estimating tobacco consumption in remote Aboriginal communities using tobacco sales data from retail outlets requires careful consideration of many logistical, social, cultural and geographic challenges.

  5. Innovations in Literacy Learning: Reaching the Remote Northwestern Communities of Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eady, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The Sioux Hudson Literacy Council in partnership with AlphaPlus Centre in Toronto, Ontario and Confederation College, Sioux Lookout Campus, is making groundbreaking strides to reach adult learners who reside in remote, isolated communities of Northwestern Ontario. Generous funding from the National Literacy Secretariat in collaboration with…

  6. A Service-Learning Immersion in a Remote Aboriginal Community: Enhancing Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavery, Shane; Cain, Glenda; Hampton, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a service-learning immersion undertaken by pre-service primary teachers in a remote indigenous community and school in Western Australia. The article initially presents the purpose and significance for the immersion in the light of the Australian National Professional Standards for Teachers. The article subsequently outlines…

  7. Specialist clinics in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: where rock art meets rocket science.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell; Bailie, Ross

    2004-10-01

    People in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory have greater morbidity and mortality than other Australians, but face considerable barriers when accessing hospital-based specialist services. The Specialist Outreach Service, which began in 1997, was a novel policy initiative to improve access by providing a regular multidisciplinary visiting specialist services to remote communities. It led to two interesting juxtapositions: that of 'state of the art' specialist services alongside under-resourced primary care in remote and relatively traditional Aboriginal communities; and that of attempts to develop an evidence base for the effectiveness of outreach, while meeting the short-term evaluative requirements of policy-makers. In this essay, first we describe the development of the service in the Northern Territory and its initial process evaluation. Through a Cochrane systematic review we then summarise the published research on the effectiveness of specialist outreach in improving access to tertiary and hospital-based care. Finally we describe the findings of an observational population-based study of the use of specialist services and the impact of outreach to three remote communities over 11 years. Specialist outreach improves access to specialist care and may lessen the demand for both outpatient and inpatient hospital care. Specialist outreach is, however, dependent on well-functioning primary care. According to the way in which outreach is conducted and the service is organised, it can either support primary care or it can hinder primary care and, as a result, reduce its own effectiveness.

  8. The Learning Circle: A New Model of BSW Education for Alberta's Rural, Remote, and Aboriginal Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapf, M. K.; Bastien, B.; Bodor, R.; Carriere, J.; Pelech, W.

    In 1998, a consortium including the University of Calgary (Alberta) and representatives from social service agencies and Native organizations developed a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) model for delivery in rural, remote, and Aboriginal communities. The model called for innovative course content that was culturally and geographically relevant to…

  9. An Innovative Australian Outreach Model of Diabetic Retinopathy Screening in Remote Communities

    PubMed Central

    Glasson, Nicola M.; Crossland, Lisa J.; Larkins, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Up to 98% of visual loss secondary to diabetic retinopathy (DR) can be prevented with early detection and treatment. Despite this, less than 50% of Australian and American diabetics receive appropriate screening. Diabetic patients living in rural and remote communities are further disadvantaged by limited access to ophthalmology services. Research Design and Methods. DR screening using a nonmydriatic fundal camera was performed as part of a multidisciplinary diabetes service already visiting remote communities. Images were onforwarded to a distant general practitioner who identified and graded retinopathy, with screen-positive patients referred to ophthalmology. This retrospective, descriptive study aims to compare the proportion of remote diabetic patients receiving appropriate DR screening prior to and following implementation of the service. Results. Of the 141 patients in 11 communities who underwent DR screening, 16.3% had received appropriate DR screening prior to the implementation of the service. In addition, 36.2% of patients had never been screened. Following the introduction of the service, 66.3% of patients underwent appropriate DR screening (p = 0.00025). Conclusion. This innovative model has greatly improved accessibility to DR screening in remote communities, thereby reducing preventable blindness. It provides a holistic, locally appropriate diabetes service and utilises existing infrastructure and health workforce more efficiently. PMID:26798648

  10. Dangerous Practices: The Practicum Experiences of Non-Indigenous Pre-Service Teachers in Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auld, Glenn; Dyer, Julie; Charles, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the risks of providing preservice teachers with professional experiences in remote communities. In particular this paper focuses on the risks associated with this kind of professional experience. Twelve pre-service teachers were interviewed whilst on a three-week practicum around Katherine and in Maningrida in the…

  11. Determinants of Black women's health in rural and remote communities.

    PubMed

    Etowa, Josephine; Wiens, Juliana; Bernard, Wanda Thomas; Clow, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    The On the Margins project investigated health status, health-care delivery, and use of health services among African-Canadian women residing in rural and remote regions of the province of Nova Scotia. A participatory action research approach provided a framework for the study. Triangulation of data-collection methods--interviews, focus groups, and questionnaires--formed the basis of data generation. A total of 237 in-depth one-on-one interviews were conducted and coded verbatim. Atlas-ti data-management software was used to facilitate coding and analysis. Six themes emerged from the data: Black women's multiple roles, perceptions of health, experiences with the health-care system, factors affecting health, strategies for managing health, and envisioning solutions. The authors focus on 1 of these themes, factors affecting Black women's health, and discuss 3 subthemes: race and racism, poverty and unemployment, and access to health care.

  12. Rural electrification for development. Policy analysis and application

    SciTech Connect

    Munasinghe, M.

    1986-01-01

    Combining a rigorous analytical framework with actual case studies, the author analyzes the crucial role rural electrification has played in the economic expansion of both developed and developing countries. Governmental resources devoted to the electrification of rural areas have achieved several social and economic goals, such as increased productivity in agriculture, improvements in the quality of rural life, and the augmentation of rural industrialization.

  13. Learning Preferences and Impacts of Education Programs in Dog Health Programs in Five Rural and Remote Australian Indigenous Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Sophie; Dixon, Roselyn; Dixon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As part of strategies to improve dog and community health in rural and remote Indigenous communities, this study investigated preferences and impacts of dog health education programs. Semistructured interviews with 63 residents from five communities explored learning preferences. Though each community differed, on average yarning was preferred by…

  14. Learning Preferences and Impacts of Education Programs in Dog Health Programs in Five Rural and Remote Australian Indigenous Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Sophie; Dixon, Roselyn; Dixon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As part of strategies to improve dog and community health in rural and remote Indigenous communities, this study investigated preferences and impacts of dog health education programs. Semistructured interviews with 63 residents from five communities explored learning preferences. Though each community differed, on average yarning was preferred by…

  15. Developing and Field Testing a Community Based Youth Initiative to Increase Tuberculosis Awareness in Remote Arctic Inuit Communities

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Gonzalo G.; Van Dyk, Deborah D.; Colquhoun, Heather; Moreau, Katherine A.; Mulpuru, Sunita; Graham, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inuit in Canada have the highest reported tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate in Canada, even higher than other Canadian Indigenous groups. The aim of this study was to increase TB awareness among Inuit youth and their communities by equipping those who can best reach this population with a community based, youth focused, education initiative built on interventions adapted from a previous TB awareness study. Methods The Taima TB Youth Education Initiative was a field test case study of a knowledge translation (KT) strategy aimed at community members who provide health education in these communities. In the first stage of this study, interventions from a larger TB awareness campaign were adapted to focus on youth living in remote Inuit communities. During the second stage of the study, investigators field tested the initiative in two isolated Inuit communities. It was then applied by local implementation teams in two other communities. Evaluation criteria included feasibility, acceptability, knowledge uptake and health behavior change. Results Implementation of the adapted KT interventions resulted in participation of a total of 41 youth (19 females, 22 males) with an average age of 16 years (range 12–21 years) in four different communities in Nunavut. Community celebration events were attended by 271 community members where TB messaging were presented and discussed. All of the health care workers and community members surveyed reported that the adapted interventions were acceptable and a useful way of learning to some extent. Knowledge uptake measures indicated an average TB knowledge score of 64 out of 100. Local partners in all four communities indicated that they would use the Taima TB Youth Education Initiative again to raise awareness about TB among youth in their communities. Conclusions The TB awareness interventions adapted for the Taima TB Youth Education Initiative were acceptable to the Inuit communities involved in the study. They resulted in

  16. Gambling, housing conditions, community contexts and child health in remote indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent government reports have identified gambling, along with alcohol abuse, drug abuse and pornography, as contributing to child neglect and abuse in Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory (NT). These reports also identify gaps in empirical evidence upon which to base sound policy. To address this shortfall, data from ten remote Indigenous communities was analysed to determine the relationship between gambling problems, housing conditions, community contexts and child health in indigenous communities. Methods Logistic regression was used to assess associations between gambling problems, community contexts, housing conditions and child health. Separate multivariable models were developed for carer reported gambling problems in houses and six child health outcomes. Results Carer reported gambling problems in households across the ten communities ranged from 10% to 74%. Inland tropical communities had the highest level of reported gambling problems. Less access to a doctor in the community showed evidence of a multivariable adjusted association with gambling problems in houses. No housing variables showed evidence for a multivariable association with reported gambling problems. There was evidence for gambling problems having a multivariable adjusted association with carer report of scabies and ear infection in children. Conclusions The analyses provide evidence that gambling is a significant problem in Indigenous communities and that gambling problems in households is related to poor child health outcomes. A comprehensive (prevention, treatment, regulation and education) public health approach to harm minimisation associated with gambling amongst the Indigenous population is required that builds on current normative community regulation of gambling. PMID:22632458

  17. Television and delivery of health promotion programs to remote Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Rowena; Castro, Anthony; Parfitt, David; Bailie, Ross S; Richmond, Robyn L; D'Abbs, Peter H

    2005-08-01

    To assess the effect of anti-tobacco television advertising in comparison to other anti-tobacco interventions for Aboriginal people in remote communities in the Northern Territory. This research was carried out as part of a large study evaluating the effect of multi-component, evidence-based tobacco interventions developed in three remote communities. Community surveys (assessing changes in smoking behaviour and exposure to tobacco interventions) were used to assess exposure to and effect of television advertising, relative to other interventions over the intervention year. 351 community members were interviewed. Exposure to anti-tobacco television advertising was high among both smokers and non-smokers (86% vs. 85%, p = 0.78). However, those who recalled seeing anti-tobacco advertising were no more likely to have quit than those who had not (11 exposed (6%) vs. 3 non-exposed (10%), Fisher's Exact Test p = 0.42). Logistic regression showed that exposure to individual tobacco interventions was not associated with an increased chance of cessation during the intervention year. Recall of anti-tobacco television advertising was high in these remote Aboriginal communities; more Aboriginal people recalled exposure to anti-tobacco television advertising than to any other cessation intervention. Although the overall cessation rate was low, a small number of smokers had given up as a result of seeing these television advertisements.

  18. Australian rural, remote and urban community nurses' health promotion role and function.

    PubMed

    Roden, Janet; Jarvis, Lynda; Campbell-Crofts, Sandra; Whitehead, Dean

    2016-09-01

    Community nurses have often been 'touted' as potential major contributors to health promotion. Critical literature, however, often states that this has not been the case. Furthermore, most studies examining nurses' role and function have occurred mainly in hospital settings. This is a sequential mixed-methods study of two groups of community nurses from a Sydney urban area (n = 100) and from rural and remote areas (n = 49) within New South Wales, Australia. A piloted questionnaire survey was developed based on the five action areas of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Following this, 10 qualitative interviews were conducted for both groups, plus a focus group to support or refute survey results. Findings showed that rural and remote nurses had more positive attitudes towards health promotion and its clinical implementation. Survey and interview data confirmed that urban community nurses had a narrower focus on caring for individuals rather than groups, agreeing that time constraints impacted on their limited health promotion role. There was agreement about lack of resources (material and people) to update health promotion knowledge and skills. Rural and remote nurses were more likely to have limited educational opportunities. All nurses undertook more development of personal skills (DPS, health education) than any other action area. The findings highlight the need for more education and resources for community nurses to assist their understanding of health promotion concepts. It is hoped that community nurse leaders will collectively become more effective health promoters and contribute to healthy reform in primary health care sectors.

  19. (Rural electrification: Grid extension, decentralization, and financing)

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D.

    1990-02-22

    H.G. (Mike) Jones and I had numerous meetings with EEGSA staff. We discussed rural electrification plans, reviewed documents, and collaborated on collecting information on decentralized energy alternatives. Meetings were also held with USAID/Guatemala, USAID/ROCAP, NRECA, MEM, PVOs, and equipment vendors. A preliminary draft report and spreadsheet for comparing decentralized power alternatives was completed. The report and findings were presented to EEGSA and the methodology transferred to EEGSA staff. A set of recommended followup activities was also presented to EEGSA.

  20. How do aerosols affect storm electrification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, E. R.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) on cloud microphysics have long been recognized, but the resultant effects on storm electrification are relatively unexplored. In the present study, a high-resolution 3D model is employed with 2-moment microphysics (hydrometeor mass and number concentration) and electrification and lightning processes. CCN concentration is predicted as a single category monodisperse size spectrum approximating small aerosols. Graupel and hail particle densities are also predicted and are mainly determined by rime density. Rime density in turn is a function of droplet size (affected by CCN concentration) and impact speed. Graupel density is also used as a crude roughness parameter to scale the drag coefficient in the fall speed. A range of CCN concentrations (50 to 2000 cm-3) were tested in two cases of low CAPE (Convective Available Potential Energy) that produced unicell or weakly multicell convection. The TELEX and WK cases have CAPE values of 918 J/kg and 795 J/kg, respectively, and storm lifetimes on the order of 30 to 45 minutes and maximum flash rates of 1 to 16 per minute. Higher CCN concentrations reduced collision-coalescence formation of rain/drizzle, but even at the highest CCN concentrations, the primary process of graupel initiation is through drop freezing. Despite high CCN, vapor supply in the updraft remains sufficient for droplets eventually to grow large enough for coalescence to become appreciable. For both cases, time-integrated volume of graupel (above the freezing level) increases monotonically with increasing CCN, although with different power law relationships (Fig. 1). Time-integrated updraft volume generally increases with greater CCN concentrations, as well, but reached a plateau in the TELEX case for CCN greater than 500 cm-3. Other effects of CCN concentration were variable. In the TELEX case, the greatest electrification (total lightning soures) was for CCN concentrations of 1000 cm-3 and

  1. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  2. The role of remote community stores in reducing the harm resulting from tobacco to Aboriginal people.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Rowena G; Castro, Anthony; Parfitt, David; Bailie, Ross S; Richmond, Robyn L; D'Abbs, Peter H

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the potential for reducing the harm resulting from tobacco use through health promotion programmes run in community stores in remote Aboriginal communities. The Tobacco Project utilised data from 111 stakeholder interviews (72 at baseline and 71 at follow-up after 12 months) assessing presence of sales to minors, tobacco advertising, labelling and pricing. It also involved the assessment of observational data from community stores and comments obtained from 29 tobacco vendors derived from community surveys. Sales of tobacco to minors were not reported in community stores and all stores complied with requirements to display the legislated signage. However, tobacco was accessible to minors through a vending machine and through independent vendors. Only one store displayed tobacco advertising; all stores had displayed anti-tobacco health promotion posters or pamphlets. Pricing policies in two stores may have meant that food items effectively subsidised the cost of tobacco. All stores had unofficial no-smoking policies in accessible parts of the store. Remote community stores complied with existing legislation, aside from allowing access of minors to vending machines. There may still be potential for proactive tobacco education campaigns run through community stores and for a trial assessing the effect of changes in tobacco prices on tobacco consumption.

  3. Approaches to dog health education programs in Australian rural and remote Indigenous communities: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Constable, S E; Dixon, R M; Dixon, R J; Toribio, J-A

    2013-09-01

    Dog health in rural and remote Australian Indigenous communities is below urban averages in numerous respects. Many Indigenous communities have called for knowledge sharing in this area. However, dog health education programs are in their infancy, and lack data on effective practices. Without this core knowledge, health promotion efforts cannot progress effectively. This paper discusses a strategy that draws from successful approaches in human health and indigenous education, such as dadirri, and culturally respectful community engagement and development. Negotiating an appropriate education program is explored in its practical application through four case studies. Though each case was unique, the comparison of the four illustrated the importance of listening (community consultation), developing and maintaining relationships, community involvement and employment. The most successful case studies were those that could fully implement all four areas. Outcomes included improved local dog health capacity, local employment and engagement with the program and significantly improved dog health.

  4. Population movement can sustain STI prevalence in remote Australian indigenous communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For almost two decades, chlamydia and gonorrhoea diagnosis rates in remote Indigenous communities have been up to 30 times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians. The high levels of population movement known to occur between remote communities may contribute to these high rates. Methods We developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study the relationship between population movement and the persistence of gonorrhoea and chlamydia transmission within hypothetical remote communities. Results Results from our model suggest that short-term population movement can facilitate gonorrhoea and chlamydia persistence in small populations. By fixing the number of short-term travellers in accordance with census data, we found that these STIs can persist if at least 20% of individuals in the population seek additional partners while away from home and if the time away from home is less than 21 days. Periodic variations in travel patterns can contribute to increased sustainable levels of infection. Expanding existing STI testing and treatment programs to cater for short-term travellers is shown to be ineffective due to their short duration of stay. Testing and treatment strategies tailored to movement patterns, such as encouraging travellers to seek testing and treatment upon return from travel, will likely be more effective. Conclusion High population mobility is likely to contribute to the high levels of STIs observed in remote Indigenous communities of Australia. More detailed data on mobility patterns and sexual behaviour of travellers will be invaluable for designing and assessing STI control programs in highly mobile communities. PMID:23618061

  5. Falls in rural and remote community dwelling older adults: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Jackie; Franklin, Richard C; King, Jemma C

    2014-08-01

    Falls in older adults represent a significant challenge in Australia; however, the focus is often on urban-dwelling older adults. The aim of this review was to explore the literature on falls epidemiology and falls prevention interventions (FPI). A literature review was conducted searching Medline, Scopus, Social Sciences Citation Index, Google Scholar, Google and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare publication catalogue. Rural and remote Australia. Rural and remote community dwelling Australians aged 50 years and older. Literature review. Falls epidemiology and effective falls prevention interventions. Twenty references were identified: 14 related to falls epidemiology and 7 to FPI. No significant differences were found between rural, remote and major cities residents in relation to falls hospitalisation, falls mortality or fall-related injuries sustained. There are a wide assortment of health professionals and non-health professionals who are involved in providing FPI in rural and remote Australia. However, there was limited information on the effectiveness of these interventions in influencing falls outcomes. Few studies explored falls and their prevention in rural and remote Australia. The limited literature on the topic suggests that a change in focus to one that utilises existing services and resources will be required to create sustainable outcomes. Four areas are proposed for concentrated effort to reduce the impact of fall-related injury in rural and remote Australia: integration and collaboration among health professionals, promotion of physical activity across the lifespan, community involvement and ownership of interventions, and evaluation and publication of findings. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  6. Characterizing conditions of California sage scrub communities in Mediterranean-type ecosystems using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuki

    Biodiversity loss is an urgent global issue. For California's Mediterranean-type ecosystems, protecting biologically diverse vegetation communities such as the California sage scrub (CSS) community type is vital to conserving rare, threatened, or endangered species, as well as overall species richness of the southern and Baja California region. While existing monitoring methods such as field surveys and vegetation type mapping provide ecologically valuable information, they do not provide information about internal conditions of CSS communities. Fractional cover of plant life forms is frequently utilized to examine conditions of (semi-)arid vegetation communities. For the CSS community type, however, the utility of life-form fractional cover has not received adequate attention as an effective monitoring variable indicating ecological integrity; thus, no reliable, cost-effective methods have been developed. This dissertation investigates the effectiveness of fractional cover of true shrub, subshrub, herb, and bare ground for quantifying CSS community conditions, tests remote sensing approaches to obtain spatially comprehensive life-form cover fractions, and explores the utility of life-form fractional cover maps for sustainable, effective long-term monitoring of CSS communities of southern California. Past studies indicate that fractional cover of plant life forms is an effective measure for quantifying CSS community integrity, and remote sensing is the only means to estimate spatially exhaustive cover fractions cost-effectively over large extent. Among the remote sensing approaches tested, object-based image analysis using pansharpened QuickBird imagery shows the most promise for estimating life-form fractional cover within CSS communities because of its high accuracy (e.g., RMSE as low as 6.4%) and robustness in estimating cover fractions and ability of providing life-form-level landscape metrics. Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis using SPOT imagery is

  7. Conversations on telemental health: listening to remote and rural First Nations communities.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Kerri L; Coulson, Heather; Miles, Roseanne; Kakekakekung, Christal; Daniels, Elizabeth; O'Donnell, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Telemental health involves technologies such as videoconferencing to deliver mental health services and education, and to connect individuals and communities for healing and health. In remote and rural First Nations communities there are often challenges to obtaining mental healthcare in the community and to working with external mental health workers. Telemental health is a service approach and tool that can address some of these challenges and potentially support First Nations communities in their goal of improving mental health and wellbeing. Community members' perspectives on the usefulness and appropriateness of telemental health can greatly influence the level of engagement with the service. It appears that no research or literature exists on First Nations community members' perspectives on telemental health, or even on community perspectives on the broader area of technologies for mental health services. Therefore, this article explores the perspectives on telemental health of community members living in two rural and remote First Nations communities in Ontario, Canada. METHODS; This study was part of the VideoCom project, a collaborative research project exploring how remote and rural First Nations communities are using ICTs. This current exploration was conducted with the support of Keewaytinook Okimakanak (KO), our partner in Northwestern Ontario. With the full collaboration of the communities' leadership, a team involving KO staff and VideoCom researchers visited the two communities in the spring of 2010. Using a participatory research design, we interviewed 59 community members, asking about their experiences with and thoughts on using technologies and their attitudes toward telemental health, specifically. A thematic analysis of this qualitative data and a descriptive quantitative analysis of the information revealed the diversity of attitudes among community members. Finally, based on a discussion with the community telehealth staff, a 'ways forward

  8. Research on electrostatic electrification during jet kerosene spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanzhen; Zhang, Wentian; Li, Yipeng; Sun, Keping

    2013-03-01

    Multiple electrostatic electrifications during aircraft fuelling process may cause a fire disaster or explosion, so study on the protection measure for electrostatic electrification is very important for the security of aircraft fuelling. This paper investigated the electrostatic voltage and charge of the fuel nozzle and metal parts during the fuel spraying by self-designed jet kerosene spraying electrostatic electrification test system. The experimental results indicate that the voltage on the fuel nozzle and metal parts is very dangerous for electrostatic safety if they are not reliably grounded.

  9. Multiple Zoonotic Pathogens Identified in Canine Feces Collected from a Remote Canadian Indigenous Community

    PubMed Central

    Himsworth, Chelsea G.; Skinner, Stuart; Chaban, Bonnie; Jenkins, Emily; Wagner, Brent A.; Jane Harms, N.; Leighton, Frederick A.; Andrew Thompson, R. C.; Hill, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    Five genera of potentially zoonotic bacteria and parasites were detected in environmentally collected fecal samples from a remote indigenous community in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Organisms identified include Toxocara canis, Echniococcus granulosus, Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Campylobacter spp. The prevalence and intensity of Giardia spp. and Campylobacter spp. in fecal samples was particularly remarkable. Three-quarters of samples tested contained at least one zoonotic species of Campylobacter, and C. jejuni-containing feces had an average of 2.9 × 105 organisms/g. Over one-half of samples tested contained Giardia spp. with an average of 9,266 cysts/g. Zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A was the only Giardia spp. genotype identified. These data suggest that canine feces have the potential to pose a significant health risk to Canadians in rural and remote indigenous communities. PMID:20682878

  10. Transforming Health Care in Remote Communities: report on an international conference.

    PubMed

    Young, T Kue; Chatwood, Susan; Ford, James; Healey, Gwen; Jong, Michael; Lavoie, Josée; White, Mason

    2016-01-01

    An international conference titled "Transforming Health Care in Remote Communities" was held at the Chateau Lacombe Hotel in Edmonton, Canada, April 28-30, 2016. The event was organized by the University of Alberta's School of Public Health, in partnership with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, and the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, Nunavut. There were 150 registrants from 7 countries: Canada (7 provinces and 3 territories), United States, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Australia. They included representatives of academic institutions, health care agencies, government ministries, community organizations, and private industry. The Conference focused on developing solutions to address health care in remote regions. It enabled new networks to be established and existing ones consolidated.

  11. Mixed phase clouds, cloud electrification and remote sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, P.; Borel, C. C.; Klett, James

    2004-01-01

    Most of hypothesis trying to explain charge separation in thunderstorm clouds require presence of ice and supercooled water. Thus the existence of ice or at least mixed phase regions near cloud tops should be a necessary (but not a sufficient) condition for development of lightning. We show that multispectral satellite based instruments, like the DOE MTI (Multispectral Thermal Imager) or NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), using the near infrared and visible spectral bands are able to distinguish between water, ice and mixed phase cloud regions. An analysis of the MTI images of mixed phase clouds - with spatial resolution of about 20 m - shows regions of pure water, pure ice as well as regions of water/ice mixtures. We suggest that multispectral satellite instruments may be useful for a short time forecast of lightning probabilities.

  12. Home hemodialysis in the remote Canadian north: treatment in Manitoba fly-in communities.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, James; Komenda, Paul; Olson, Judy; Bourne, Allison; Franklin, Doug; Bernstein, Keevin

    2011-01-01

    Manitoba has the highest prevalence of ESRD in Canada. Northern Manitoba is a very sparsely settled area with a high proportion of aboriginal ESRD patients. Relocating to urban areas for dialysis is psychosocially and culturally stressful to patients. Delivering dialysis care in a home setting has demonstrated advantages in both clinical, economic, and health related quality of life domains. Establishing home hemodialysis in very remote communities has significant challenges, including poor and inadequate housing, unreliable water supply, limited community medical backup, and poor road access to communities especially for delivery of supplies. These challenges necessitate the development of strong community partnerships, and well documented processes for contingencies. A dedicated interdisciplinary support and training team at the urban hub is essential.

  13. Remotely-sensed predictive models of forest composition: community-unit classification versus continuous gradient modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkenberg, C.; Song, C.; Peet, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially-nested field plots were used in conjunction with LiDAR/hyperspectral data from the Goddard LiDAR, hyperspectral, thermal (G-LiHT) airborne sensor to map forest composition in Duke Forest, NC. Results reveal that the primary dimensions of the data space - including (1) topo-physiognomy from LiDAR last returns, (2) biochemical properties of canopy leaves via image spectroscopy, and (3) biophysical properties of forest structure derived from all LiDAR returns - each map directly, and almost exclusively, unto the first three axes of the compositional ordination space. In addition to maps of forest composition inclusive of all vascular plant species in the under- and over-story, results include weighted trait maps and spatially-explicit uncertainty estimation. Beyond the production of compositional gradient maps for this species-rich Piedmont forest landscape, this research likewise seeks to use remote sensing and machine learning to advance theory on the community-continua debate in community ecology by comparing community-unit classification and continuous gradient modeling. Wall-to-wall community-unit classifications are derived from parsimonious clusterings of ordinated community types. Compositional gradient modeling, on the other hand, is predicated on random forest regression, which predicts compositional identity in terms of continuous ordination space rather than discrete community types. While continuous gradient maps of composition lend themselves to accurate characterization of trait and environmental gradients from which ecosystem models can be parameterized, they suffer from poor interpretability. In comparing these two distinct approaches to remotely-sensed community mapping, no one approach is deemed intrinsically superior for all applications. Instead, the complementarity of the two is demonstrated, such that community-units may serve as landmarks from which the compositional identity of individual pixels in a gradient map can be triangulated.

  14. Assessing the Impacts of Local Knowledge and Technology on Climate Change Vulnerability in Remote Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Christopher; Alessa, Lilian; Altaweel, Mark; Kliskey, Andrew; Lammers, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of new technologies into small remote communities can alter how individuals acquire knowledge about their surrounding environment. This is especially true when technologies that satisfy basic needs, such as freshwater use, create a distance (i.e., diminishing exposure) between individuals and their environment. However, such distancing can potentially be countered by the transfer of local knowledge between community members and from one generation to the next. The objective of this study is to simulate by way of agent-based modeling the tensions between technology-induced distancing and local knowledge that are exerted on community vulnerability to climate change. A model is developed that simulates how a collection of individual perceptions about changes to climatic-related variables manifest into community perceptions, how perceptions are influenced by the movement away from traditional resource use, and how the transmission of knowledge mitigates the potentially adverse effects of technology-induced distancing. The model is implemented utilizing climate and social data for two remote communities located on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. The agent-based model simulates a set of scenarios that depict different ways in which these communities may potentially engage with their natural resources, utilize knowledge transfer, and develop perceptions of how the local climate is different from previous years. A loosely-coupled pan-arctic climate model simulates changes monthly changes to climatic variables. The discrepancy between the perceptions derived from the agent-based model and the projections simulated by the climate model represent community vulnerability. The results demonstrate how demographics, the communication of knowledge and the types of ‘knowledge-providers’ influence community perception about changes to their local climate. PMID:21556176

  15. Assessing the impacts of local knowledge and technology on climate change vulnerability in remote communities.

    PubMed

    Bone, Christopher; Alessa, Lilian; Altaweel, Mark; Kliskey, Andrew; Lammers, Richard

    2011-03-01

    The introduction of new technologies into small remote communities can alter how individuals acquire knowledge about their surrounding environment. This is especially true when technologies that satisfy basic needs, such as freshwater use, create a distance (i.e., diminishing exposure) between individuals and their environment. However, such distancing can potentially be countered by the transfer of local knowledge between community members and from one generation to the next. The objective of this study is to simulate by way of agent-based modeling the tensions between technology-induced distancing and local knowledge that are exerted on community vulnerability to climate change. A model is developed that simulates how a collection of individual perceptions about changes to climatic-related variables manifest into community perceptions, how perceptions are influenced by the movement away from traditional resource use, and how the transmission of knowledge mitigates the potentially adverse effects of technology-induced distancing. The model is implemented utilizing climate and social data for two remote communities located on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. The agent-based model simulates a set of scenarios that depict different ways in which these communities may potentially engage with their natural resources, utilize knowledge transfer, and develop perceptions of how the local climate is different from previous years. A loosely-coupled pan-arctic climate model simulates changes monthly changes to climatic variables. The discrepancy between the perceptions derived from the agent-based model and the projections simulated by the climate model represent community vulnerability. The results demonstrate how demographics, the communication of knowledge and the types of 'knowledge-providers' influence community perception about changes to their local climate.

  16. Deployment and early experience with remote-presence patient care in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Petelin, J B; Nelson, M E; Goodman, J

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of the RP6 (InTouch Health, Santa Barbara, CA, USA) remote-presence "robot" appears to offer a useful telemedicine device. The authors describe the deployment and early experience with the RP6 in a community hospital and provided a live demonstration of the system on April 16, 2005 during the Emerging Technologies Session of the 2005 SAGES Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The RP6 is a 5-ft 4-in. tall, 215-pound robot that can be remotely controlled from an appropriately configured computer located anywhere on the Internet (i.e., on this planet). The system is composed of a control station (a computer at the central station), a mechanical robot, a wireless network (at the remote facility: the hospital), and a high-speed Internet connection at both the remote (hospital) and central locations. The robot itself houses a rechargeable power supply. Its hardware and software allows communication over the Internet with the central station, interpretation of commands from the central station, and conversion of the commands into mechanical and nonmechanical actions at the remote location, which are communicated back to the central station over the Internet. The RP6 system allows the central party (e.g., physician) to control the movements of the robot itself, see and hear at the remote location (hospital), and be seen and heard at the remote location (hospital) while not physically there. Deployment of the RP6 system at the hospital was accomplished in less than a day. The wireless network at the institution was already in place. The control station setup time ranged from 1 to 4 h and was dependent primarily on the quality of the Internet connection (bandwidth) at the remote locations. Patients who visited with the RP6 on their discharge day could be discharged more than 4 h earlier than with conventional visits, thereby freeing up hospital beds on a busy med-surg floor. Patient visits during "off hours" (nights and weekends) were three times more

  17. Rural electrification in multiethnic Arizona: A study of power, urbanization and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Leah Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    From as early as the 1880s until as late as the 1970s, electrical power served as a critical tool for bringing America's diverse western communities into an urban industrial era. This study examines the process of electrification in three demographically diverse rural regions of Eastern Arizona. These three regions include the valleys of the Southeast, the White Mountains, and the Navajo Reservation to the north. While federal programs aided rural residents, local and regional factors determined the timing and nature of electrification and its impact. Access to electricity depended upon economics and technological advances, as well as a combination of local community and regional characteristics such as location, landscape, demographics, politics, and culture. At the turn of the century, electricity, with its elaborate and extensive infrastructure of wires, towers, and poles, emerged across America's cultural landscapes as the industrial era's most prominent symbol of progress, power, and a modern, urban lifestyle. Technological innovations and mechanization flourished, but primarily in the urban areas of the Northeast. People living outside concentrated settlements, of all ethnic backgrounds, had few hopes for delivery due to the cost of building power lines to a limited market. Arizona's rural population has historically been ethnically diverse, and its landscape varies from desert valleys to mountains of alpine forest. The federal government owns much of the land. Aided by federal guidance and funding sources like the New Deal's Rural Electrification Administration (REA), the existing rural communities took the initiative and constructed electrical systems specific to their local and regional needs. While products of the communities that built them, these systems symbolized and defined newly urbanized regions within the context of old rural landscapes, lifestyles, and traditions. In some ways the rural electrification process urbanized rural Arizona. The

  18. 'Hear our stories': child-rearing practices of a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Byers, Lyn; Kulitja, Selina; Lowell, Anne; Kruske, Sue

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about Australian Aboriginal world views related to child rearing and child development. The aim of this qualitative study was to provide an opportunity for remote Aboriginal families in Central Australia to share what they felt was important for non-Aboriginal people, working in the same setting, to know about their parenting methods. A descriptive study was carried out in a remote Central Australian community by an Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researcher, working in partnership, combining ethnographic and participatory approaches. Eight families with children under five were primary participants. Data were collected through participant observation and informal conversational interviews. Three main interlinked themes were identified through this research: 'fitting in' (integration of children into community life), 'growing up' (children's development) and 'staying strong' (children's autonomy within a communal social structure). In this community, the development of independence and self-reliance within a closely nurturing environment are paramount. Children are taught responsibilities and obligations through interaction in community life from birth. Children's growth and development is not linked to chronological time scales. Rather, children are encouraged and praised for their social and emotional maturity as well as physical development, regardless of the age at which milestones are achieved. This descriptive study provided an opportunity for Aboriginal people in one remote community to share their perspectives about child rearing and child development. It provides some insights into positive child-rearing practices and perspectives which can assist non-Aboriginal service providers to work more effectively with Aboriginal families. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  19. Avian influenza prevalence among hunter-harvested birds in a remote Canadian First Nation community.

    PubMed

    Liberda, Eric N; Meldrum, Richard; Charania, Nadia A; Davey, Robert; Tsuji, Leonard Js

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) prevalence has been associated with wild game and other bird species. The contamination of these birds may pose a greater risk to those who regularly hunt and consumed infected species. Due to resident concerns communicated by local Band Council, hunter-harvested birds from a remote First Nation community in subArctic Ontario, Canada were assessed for AIV. Hunters, and especially those who live a subsistence lifestyle, are at higher risk of AIV exposure due to their increased contact with wild birds, which represent an important part of their diet. Cloacal swabs from 304 harvested game birds representing several species of wild birds commonly hunted and consumed in this First Nation community were analyzed for AIV using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subtyping was performed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sequences were assembled using Lasergene, and the sequences were compared to Genbank. In total, 16 of the 304 cloacal swab samples were positive for AIV. Of the 16 positive samples, 12 were found in mallard ducks, 3 were found in snow geese (wavies), and 1 positive sample was found in partridge. The AIV samples were subtyped, when possible, and found to be positive for the low pathogenic avian influenza virus subtypes H3 and H4. No samples were positive for subtypes of human concern, namely H5 and H7. This work represents the first AIV monitoring program results of hunter-harvested birds in a remote subsistence First Nation community. Community-level surveillance of AIV in remote subsistence hunting communities may help to identify future risks, while educating those who may have the highest exposure about proper handling of hunted birds. Ultimately, only low pathogenic strains of AIV were found, but monitoring should be continued and expanded to safeguard those with the highest exposure risk to AIV.

  20. Prevalences of overweight and obesity among children in remote Aboriginal communities in central Australia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Rosalie

    2012-01-01

    The chronic diseases associated with overweight and obesity are major contributors to the excess disease burden of Aboriginal Australians. Surveillance of overweight and obesity is required to monitor these conditions, and to develop and evaluate interventions to improve health and wellbeing. Remote Aboriginal communities in Australia's Northern Territory (NT) are where approximately two-thirds of the NT Aboriginal people live, a proportion which has been stable over many years. However the remote communities suffer significant socioeconomic disadvantage including limited education and employment opportunities, and poor quality and overcrowded housing. Approximately one-third of Aboriginal people in NT live in central Australia, which consists of the Alice Springs and Barkly districts. The Healthy School-Aged Kids Program includes health promotion and child health screening, and is run in remote Aboriginal communities of NT. This report provides estimates of prevalences of overweight and obesity among children in central Australia who participated in health checks as part of Healthy School-Aged Kids Program in 2010. All children in remote central Australian Aboriginal communities were invited to participate in health checks. Children who attended were weighed and measured. Date of birth, sex, height and weight for each child were used to determine prevalence of overweight (≥+1 standard deviation [SD] BMI-for-age) and obesity (≥+2 SD BMI-for-age) according to WHO Growth standards. Differences in proportions of overweight and obesity by age group and sex, and their statistical significance were calculated. Weight, height, sex and age data were available for 996 children from a population of 1764. It was found that 22.1% of girls and 20.7% of boys were overweight; and 5.1% of girls and 5.8% of boys were obese as defined by BMI-for-age. Prevalence of overweight but not obesity increased with age (for overweight z=3.28, p=0.0011; for obesity z=0.68; p=0.50). The

  1. Sleep and academic performance in Indigenous Australian children from a remote community: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Patrick; Kohler, Mark; Blunden, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Disruptions to sleep in childhood are associated with poor behaviour and deficits in academic performance and executive function. Although academic performance of indigenous children from remote communities in Australia is documented as well below that of non-indigenous children, the extent of sleep disruption and its contribution to academic performance among this population has not been assessed. This pilot study aimed to objectively assess the sleep of remote indigenous children and the association between sleep disruption and both academic performance and executive function. Twenty-one children from a remote Australian indigenous community aged 6-13 years wore actigraphy for two consecutive nights, reported subjective sleepiness, and were objectively assessed for academic performance (Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, 2nd Edition) and executive function (NEuroloPSYcological Assessment-II). Results show marked reduction in sleep time, sleep fragmentation, academic performance and auditory attention compared with non-indigenous norms. Sleep duration was not associated with performance, possibly because of reduced sleep and performance observed across the entire group. Sleep fragmentation was associated with reduced reading and numerical skills (P < 0.05). The sleep of indigenous children in remote communities is an important area of future inquiry, and our initial findings of poor sleep and an association between sleep disruption and academic performance may have important implications for intervention strategies aimed at 'closing the gap'. Further studies should assess a broader range of demographic, social and economic factors to better understand the associations reported here and guide future intervention. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Plume Electrification: Laboratory and Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. S.; Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The spectacular lightning strokes observed during eruptions testify to the enormous potentials that can be generated within plumes. Related to the charging of individual ash particles, large electric fields and volcanic lightning have been observed at Eyjafjallajokull, Redoubt, and Chaiten, among other volcanoes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for plume electrification, including triboelectric charging, charging from the brittle failure of rock, and charging due to phase change as material is carried aloft. While the overall electrification of the plume likely results from a combination of these processes, in the following work we focus on triboelectric charging—how a plume charges as particles collide with each other. To explore the role of triboelectric effects in plume charging we have conducted a number of small scale laboratory experiments similar to those designed by Forward et al (2009). Succinctly, the experiments consist of fluidizing an ash bed with nitrogen and monitoring the resulting currents induced by the moving particles. It is important to note that the reaction chamber only allows particle-particle interactions. The entire experimental setup is enclosed in a vacuum chamber, allowing us to carefully control the environment during experiments. Runs were carried out for different ash compositions, and driving pressures. We particularly focused on natural grain size distributions of ash and on quantifying not only the net charge but also the charging rate. Furthermore, we report on our progress to incorporate the collected data, namely charging rates, into a large eularian-eularian-lagrangian multiphase eruption dynamic model. Finally, to validate these results, we present our plans to deploy a large wireless sensor network of electrometers and magnetometers around active volcanoes to directly map the overhead E- and M-fields as an eruption occurs.

  3. The Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Miller, L. Jay; Weisman, Morris; Rutledge, Steven A.; Barker, Llyle J., III; Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.; Detwiler, Andrew; Doesken, Nolan; Helsdon, John; Knight, Charles; Krehbiel, Paul; Lyons, Walter A.; Macgorman, Don; Rasmussen, Erik; Rison, William; Rust, W. David; Thomas, Ronald J.

    2004-08-01

    During May July 2000, the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) occurred in the High Plains, near the Colorado Kansas border. STEPS aimed to achieve a better understanding of the interactions between kinematics, precipitation, and electrification in severe thunderstorms. Specific scientific objectives included 1) understanding the apparent major differences in precipitation output from super-cells that have led to them being classified as low precipitation (LP), classic or medium precipitation, and high precipitation; 2) understanding lightning formation and behavior in storms, and how lightning differs among storm types, particularly to better understand the mechanisms by which storms produce predominantly positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning; and 3) verifying and improving microphysical interpretations from polarimetric radar. The project involved the use of a multiple-Doppler polarimetric radar network, as well as a time-of-arrival very high frequency (VHF) lightning mapping system, an armored research aircraft, electric field meters carried on balloons, mobile mesonet vehicles, instruments to detect and classify transient luminous events (TLEs; e.g., sprites and blue jets) over thunderstorms, and mobile atmospheric sounding equipment. The project featured significant collaboration with the local National Weather Service office in Goodland, Kansas, as well as outreach to the general public. The project gathered data on a number of different cases, including LP storms, supercells, and mesoscale convective systems, among others. Many of the storms produced mostly positive CG lightning during significant portions of their lifetimes and also exhibited unusual electrical structures with opposite polarity to ordinary thunderstorms. The field data from STEPS is expected to bring new advances to understanding of supercells, positive CG lightning, TLEs, and precipitation formation in convective storms.

  4. Food, food choice and nutrition promotion in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Colles, Susan L; Maypilama, Elaine; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary diets of Aboriginal people living in remote Australia are characterised by processed foods high in fat and sugar. Within the 'new' food system, evidence suggests many Aboriginal people understand food in their own terms but lack access to consumer information about store-purchased foods, and parents feel inadequate as role models. In a remote Australian Aboriginal community, purposive sampling identified adults who participated in semistructured interviews guided by food-based themes relating to the contemporary food system, parental guidance of children's food choice and channels through which people learn. Interpretive content analysis was used to identify salient themes. In discussions, people identified more closely with dietary qualities or patterns than nutrients, and valued a balanced, fresh diet that made them feel 'light'. People possessed basic knowledge of 'good' store foods, and wanted to increase familiarity and experience with foods in packets and cans through practical and social skills, especially cooking. Education about contemporary foods was obtained from key family role models and outside the home through community-based organisations, including school, rather than pamphlets and flip charts. Freedom of choice was a deeply held value; carers who challenged children's autonomy used strategic distraction, or sought healthier alternatives that did not wholly deny the child. Culturally safe approaches to information sharing and capacity building that contribute to the health and wellbeing of communities requires collaboration and shared responsibility between policy makers, primary healthcare agencies, wider community-based organisations and families.

  5. The economic feasibility of price discounts to improve diet in Australian Aboriginal remote communities.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Anne; Moodie, Marj L; Ferguson, Megan; Cobiac, Linda J; Liberato, Selma C; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of fiscal measures applied in remote community food stores for Aboriginal Australians. Six price discount strategies on fruit, vegetables, diet drinks and water were modelled. Baseline diet was measured as 12 months' actual food sales data in three remote Aboriginal communities. Discount-induced changes in food purchases were based on published price elasticity data while the weight of the daily diet was assumed constant. Dietary change was converted to change in sodium and energy intake, and body mass index (BMI) over a 12-month period. Improved lifetime health outcomes, modelled for the remote population of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, were converted to disability adjusted life years (DALYs) saved using a proportional multistate lifetable model populated with diet-related disease risks and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rates of disease. While dietary change was small, five of the six price discount strategies were estimated as cost-effective, below a $50,000/DALY threshold. Stakeholders are committed to finding ways to reduce important inequalities in health status between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and non-Indigenous Australians. Price discounts offer potential to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Verification of these results by trial-based research coupled with consideration of factors important to all stakeholders is needed. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. The prevalence and clinical associations of HTLV-1 infection in a remote Indigenous community.

    PubMed

    Einsiedel, Lloyd J; Pham, Hai; Woodman, Richard J; Pepperill, Clinton; Taylor, Kerry A

    2016-10-03

    Hospital and laboratory data indicate that human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic to central Australia, but no community-based studies of its prevalence or disease burden have been reported. We determined the prevalence rates of HTLV-1 infection and of HTLV-1-associated diseases in a remote Indigenous community. A remote Northern Territory community. All residents were asked to complete a health survey and offered a limited clinical examination, together with serological tests for HTLV-1 and Strongyloides, and HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) assessment. HTLV-1 seropositivity rates; HTLV-1 PVL (copies/105 peripheral blood leucocytes [PBL]); presentation with HTLV-1-related clinical disease. HTLV-1 serostatus was determined for 97 of 138 residents (70%). The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection was significantly higher among adults (30 of 74 people tested) than children (1 of 23; P = 0.001). Nine of 30 HTLV-1-positive adults had a clinical syndrome that was potentially attributable to HTLV-1 infection (chronic lung disease, seven; symptomatic strongyloidiasis, two). The median HTLV-1 PVL was significantly higher for adults with chronic lung disease than for those who were asymptomatic (chronic lung disease, 649 copies/105 PBL [IQR, 162-2220]; asymptomatic adults, 40 copies/105 PBL [IQR, 0.9-229]; P = 0.017). Ten of 72 adults tested were seropositive for Strongyloides (six of 28 HTLV-1-positive participants and four of 44 HTLV-1-negative participants; P = 0.17), as were three of 15 children tested; the three children were HTLV-1-negative. The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection and the rate of disease potentially attributable to HTLV-1 were high among adults in this remote community.

  7. Roaming of dogs in remote Indigenous communities in northern Australia and potential interaction between community and wild dogs.

    PubMed

    Bombara, C; Dürr, S; Gongora, J; Ward, M P

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the roaming of Indigenous community dogs and potential interaction with wild dogs and dingoes. Cross-sectional survey and longitudinal follow-up study. Six remote Indigenous communities in Cape York Peninsula and Arnhem Land in northern Australia were selected. Hair samples were collected from community dogs and microsatellite DNA analyses were used to determine hybrid (>10% dingo DNA) status. Dogs were fitted with GPS collars and home range (ha) was estimated during monitoring periods of up to 3 days. In Cape York Peninsula, 6% of the 35 dogs sampled were dingo hybrids, whereas in Arnhem Land 41% of the 29 dogs sampled were hybrids. The median extended home range was estimated to be 4.54 ha (interquartile range, 3.40 - 7.71). Seven community dogs were identified with an estimated home range > 20 ha and home ranges included the bushland surrounding communities. No significant difference in home ranges was detected between hybrid and non-hybrid dogs. Study results provide some evidence (dingo hybridisation, bushland forays) of the potential interaction between domestic and wild dogs in northern Australia. The nature of this interaction needs further investigation to determine its role in disease transmission; for example, in the case of a rabies incursion in this region. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  8. Community-Based Suicide Prevention Research in Remote On-Reserve First Nations Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaak, Corinne A.; Campeau, Mike; Katz, Laurence Y.; Enns, Murray W.; Elias, Brenda; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is a complex problem linked to genetic, environmental, psychological and community factors. For the Aboriginal population more specifically, loss of culture, history of traumatic events, individual, family and community factors may also play a role in suicidal behaviour. Of particular concern is the high rate of suicide among Canadian…

  9. Community-Based Suicide Prevention Research in Remote On-Reserve First Nations Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaak, Corinne A.; Campeau, Mike; Katz, Laurence Y.; Enns, Murray W.; Elias, Brenda; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is a complex problem linked to genetic, environmental, psychological and community factors. For the Aboriginal population more specifically, loss of culture, history of traumatic events, individual, family and community factors may also play a role in suicidal behaviour. Of particular concern is the high rate of suicide among Canadian…

  10. Philippines: rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report No. 15

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, D.H.; Allgeier, P.F.; Wasserman, G.; Hickey, G.; Salazar, R.

    1980-12-01

    AID's overall evaluation of its Philippine Rural Electrification (RE) program, consisting of eight successive projects, had limited effect on the rural poor and the economic development process. This program began in 1965 and has since energized 844 (59% of the national total) Philippine municipalities, 9088 (27%) barrios, 1,159,434 (20%) households, and 101 new cooperatives; resulting in a change of schedule for total national energization from 1980 to 1987. To improve the productive capacity of the poor, cooperatives were organized and lent funds to extend electrical power into their areas. Many of the poor, however, could not afford its installation, continued use, or more than one or two light bulbs a month. Community lighting, such as street-lighting, indirectly helped the poor in various ways, such as by providing greater personal security. Those with sufficient financial resources or skills were able to use the electricity for entrepreneurial activities. RE impact upon development occurred in areas with a concentrated population, available technical skills and capital, and access to large and diverse markets. Active promotion of electricity-dependent investments and projects also increased program impact.

  11. The use of remote presence for health care delivery in a northern Inuit community: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ivar; Jong, Michael; Keays-White, Debra; Turner, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of remote presence for improving the health of residents in a remote northern Inuit community. Study design A pilot study assessed patient's, nurse's and physician's satisfaction with and the use of the remote presence technology aiding delivery of health care to a remote community. A preliminary cost analysis of this technology was also performed. Methods This study deployed a remote presence RP-7 robot to the isolated Inuit community of Nain, Newfoundland and Labrador for 15 months. The RP-7 is wirelessly controlled by a laptop computer equipped with audiovisual capability and a joystick to maneuver the robot in real time to aid in the assessing and care of patients from a distant location. Qualitative data on physician's, patient's, caregiver's and staff's satisfaction were collected as well as information on its use and characteristics and the number of air transports required to the referral center and associated costs. Results A total of 252 remote presence sessions occurred during the study period, with 89% of the sessions involving direct patient assessment or monitoring. Air transport was required in only 40% of the cases that would have been otherwise transported normally. Patients and their caregivers, nurses and physicians all expressed a high level of satisfaction with the remote presence technology and deemed it beneficial for improved patient care, workloads and job satisfaction. Conclusions These results show the feasibility of deploying a remote presence robot in a distant northern community and a high degree of satisfaction with the technology. Remote presence in the Canadian North has potential for delivering a cost-effective health care solution to underserviced communities reducing the need for the transport of patients and caregivers to distant referral centers. PMID:23984292

  12. The use of remote presence for health care delivery in a northern Inuit community: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Ivar; Jong, Michael; Keays-White, Debra; Turner, Gail

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of remote presence for improving the health of residents in a remote northern Inuit community. A pilot study assessed patient's, nurse's and physician's satisfaction with and the use of the remote presence technology aiding delivery of health care to a remote community. A preliminary cost analysis of this technology was also performed. This study deployed a remote presence RP-7 robot to the isolated Inuit community of Nain, Newfoundland and Labrador for 15 months. The RP-7 is wirelessly controlled by a laptop computer equipped with audiovisual capability and a joystick to maneuver the robot in real time to aid in the assessing and care of patients from a distant location. Qualitative data on physician's, patient's, caregiver's and staff's satisfaction were collected as well as information on its use and characteristics and the number of air transports required to the referral center and associated costs. A total of 252 remote presence sessions occurred during the study period, with 89% of the sessions involving direct patient assessment or monitoring. Air transport was required in only 40% of the cases that would have been otherwise transported normally. Patients and their caregivers, nurses and physicians all expressed a high level of satisfaction with the remote presence technology and deemed it beneficial for improved patient care, workloads and job satisfaction. These results show the feasibility of deploying a remote presence robot in a distant northern community and a high degree of satisfaction with the technology. Remote presence in the Canadian North has potential for delivering a cost-effective health care solution to underserviced communities reducing the need for the transport of patients and caregivers to distant referral centers.

  13. Nutrition and older indigenous australians: service delivery implications in remote communities. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Kellie; Lindeman, Melissa A; Reid, John Binda

    2013-12-01

    To describe the nutritional status of older Indigenous people, barriers to achieving optimal nutrition, and the effectiveness of programs aimed at improving nutrition in older Indigenous people in remote communities. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken utilising electronic databases Scopus, CINAHL, Informit, Ovid MEDLINE, ProQuest, Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, ATSI HealthInfoNet and Google Scholar. Grey literature was also accessed. Findings indicated there is a scarcity of representative data on nutritional status and risk in older Indigenous people, and nutrition support programs have not been evaluated. Older Indigenous people suffer from poorer overall health and higher levels of overweight and obesity, and are at increased risk of poor nutritional status and malnutrition than the general population. This risk may be higher in remote areas. More representative data are needed to determine the nutritional status of older Indigenous people, including levels of malnutrition. Support programs also need to be evaluated. © 2013 ACOTA.

  14. Initial electrification to the first lightning flash in New Mexico thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas C.; Krehbiel, Paul R.

    2015-11-01

    The initial electrification of three New Mexico thunderstorms is examined using in situ and remote measurements. The earliest deflection of electric field (E) measured at the surface was 5-8.6 min before the first flash and coincident with the development of substantial radar reflectivity (40 dBZ) above -5°C. Rapid growth of surface E (>5 V/m/s) started 2.4-3.1 min before the first flash, when 40 dBZ reflectivities reached above the -15°C level. In two cases with clear surface E records, radar reflectivity indicators (40 dBZ echo through -10°C and echo top through -15°C) would yield longer warning times before the first flash than the E record. The first flash in each storm initiated at altitudes between 7.4 and 8.8 km; hence, the temperatures where the largest (negative) E for normal intracloud lightning initiation had developed during the initial electrification were -10°C to -20°C. Negative and positive charge regions associated with the first flash in each cell were centered at -8°C to -16°C (6.9-8.0 km) and -20°C to -24°C (9.0-9.2 km), respectively. In two cases, balloon data indicate the only substantial charge regions present before the first flash were those involved in the flash. Another case shows an initial period of opposite polarity E deflection at the surface coincident with substantial low-level positive charge within the cloud, although this charge was not involved in the first 8 min (first 17 flashes) of lightning activity. The findings support the notion that the initial electrification resulted from charging via the noninductive ice-ice collisional mechanism.

  15. Lessons for Aboriginal tobacco control in remote communities: an evaluation of the Northern Territory 'Tobacco Project'.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David; Johnston, Vanessa; Fitz, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate a Northern Territory (NT) government-led pilot 'Tobacco Project' in six remote communities. Monthly surveys of staff, semi-structured interviews with staff and community members, observation of the delivery of tobacco control interventions, review of Project documents, and monitoring of tobacco consumption using sales (or wholesale orders) of tobacco. There was a substantive amount of tobacco control activity delivered in three of the Project communities. In two of these locations, the majority of work was primarily driven and undertaken by resident staff. Overall, most of the Project's efforts related to community education and awareness-raising. There was variable impact of the Project on tobacco consumption across the six communities. More tobacco control activity was consistently associated with a greater reduction in tobacco consumption. An important predictor of local activity was the presence of strong community drivers. A significant obstacle to the Project was the lack of new resources. Despite the minimal impact of this Project on tobacco consumption overall, there was a consistent association between on-the-ground tobacco control activity and reductions in tobacco consumption. New initiatives will not only need to provide new funding, but identify and then support local staff, who are central to improving local tobacco control activity and so reducing smoking and smoking-related illnesses and deaths. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.

  16. Remote links: Redesigning maternity care for Aboriginal women from remote communities in Northern Australia - A comparative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kildea, Sue; Gao, Yu; Rolfe, Margaret; Josif, Cathryn M; Bar-Zeev, Sarah J; Steenkamp, Malinda; Kruske, Sue; Williams, Desley; Dunbar, Terry; Barclay, Lesley M

    2016-03-01

    to compare the quality of care before and after the introduction of the new Midwifery Group Practice. a cohort study. the health centers (HCs) in two of the largest remote Aboriginal communities (population 2200-2600) in the Top End of the Northern Territory (NT), each located approximately 500km from Darwin. The third study site was the Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) which provides tertiary care. a 2004-06 retrospective cohort (n=412 maternity cases) provided baseline data. A clinical redesign of maternity services occurring from 2009 onwards focused on increasing Continuity of Carer, Communication, Choice, Collaboration and Co-ordination of Care (5Cs). Data from a 2009-11 prospective cohort (n=310 maternity cases) were collected to evaluate the service redesign. Outcome measures included indicators on the quality of care delivery, adherence to recommended antenatal guidelines and maternal and neonatal health outcomes. statistically significant improvements were recorded in many areas reflecting improved access to, and quality of, care. For example: fewer women had <4 visits in pregnancy (14% versus 8%), a higher proportion of women had routine antenatal tests recorded (86% versus 97%) and improved screening rates for urine (82% versus 87%) and sexual tract infections (78% versus 93%). However, the treatment of conditions according to recommended guidelines worsened significantly in some areas; for example antibiotics prescribed for urine infections (86% versus 52%) and treatment for anaemia in pregnancy (77% versus 67%). High preterm (21% versus 20%), low birth weight (18% versus 20%) and PPH (29% versus 31%) rates did not change over time. The out of hospital birth rate remained high and unchanged in both cohorts (10% versus 10%). this model addresses some of the disparities in care for remote-dwelling Aboriginal women. However, much work still needs to occur before maternity care and outcomes are equal to that of non-Aboriginal women. Targeted program

  17. Impact and perceptions of tobacco tax increase in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David P; Ferguson, Megan; Johnston, Vanessa; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2013-06-01

    We sought to assess the impact of a 25% tax excise rise on tobacco sales in Aboriginal communities in remote Australia and to explore local perceptions about tobacco tax rises and their impact. Tobacco sales data were collected from 18 stores in small remote Aboriginal communities from October 2009 to December 2010. Sales in the 7 months before and after the tax increase were compared. Interviews were conducted with 54 informants in 6 communities. There was a nonsignificant 2.2% average reduction (95% CI = -5 to 10) in total tobacco sold in a store in the 7 months after the price increase compared with the 7 months before the price increase, with a large variation across the 18 stores. The magnitude of this apparent impact may have been reduced by seasonal effects. There were increased demands to share cigarettes, with a perception that there was increased reliance on those with more disposable income to purchase cigarettes for other smokers. The main reasons given for not quitting or reducing smoking were dependence, the normative nature of smoking, and the lack of support to quit. All Aboriginal interviewees supported price increases as important in reducing smoking. The wide confidence interval around our estimated reduction in consumption means that the tax increase could have either been associated or not with a reduction in consumption. Future excise rises are supported but should be carefully monitored in Australian Indigenous populations.

  18. Monitoring the dynamics of an invasive emergent macrophyte community using operational remote sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albright, Thomas P.; Ode, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Potamogeton crispus L. (curly pondweed) is a cosmopolitan aquatic macrophyte considered invasive in North America and elsewhere. Its range is expanding and, on individual water bodies, its coverage can be dynamic both within and among years. In this study, we evaluate the use of free and low-cost satellite remote sensing data to monitor a problematic emergent macrophyte community dominated by P. crispus. Between 2000 and 2006, we acquired eight satellite images of 24,000-ha Lake Sharpe, South Dakota (USA). During one of the dates for which satellite imagery was acquired, we sampled the lake for P. crispus and other emergent macrophytes using GPS and photography for documentation. We used cluster analysis to assist in classification of the satellite imagery and independently validated results using the field data. Resulting estimates of emergent macrophyte coverage ranged from less than 20 ha in 2002 to 245 ha in 2004. Accuracy assessment indicated 82% of image pixels were correctly classified, with errors being primarily due to failure to identify emergent macrophytes. These results emphasize the dynamic nature of P. crispus-dominated macrophyte communities and show how they can be effectively monitored over large areas using low-cost remote sensing imagery. While results may vary in other systems depending on water quality and local flora, such an approach could be applied elsewhere and for a variety of macrophyte communities.

  19. Traditional food availability and consumption in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Megan; Brown, Clare; Georga, Claire; Miles, Edward; Wilson, Alyce; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2017-06-01

    To explore availability, variety and frequency consumption of traditional foods and their role in alleviating food insecurity in remote Aboriginal Australia. Availability was assessed through repeated semi-structured interviews and consumption via a survey. Quantitative data were described and qualitative data classified. Aboriginal and non-Indigenous key informants (n=30 in 2013; n=19 in 2014) from 20 Northern Territory (NT) communities participated in interviews. Aboriginal primary household shoppers (n=73 in 2014) in five of these communities participated in a survey. Traditional foods were reported to be available year-round in all 20 communities. Most participants (89%) reported consuming a variety of traditional foods at least fortnightly and 71% at least weekly. Seventy-six per cent reported being food insecure, with 40% obtaining traditional food during these times. Traditional food is consumed frequently by Aboriginal people living in remote NT. Implications for public health: Quantifying dietary contribution of traditional food would complement estimated population dietary intake. It would contribute evidence of nutrition transition and differences in intakes across age groups and inform dietary, environmental and social interventions and policy. Designing and conducting assessment of traditional food intake in conjunction with Aboriginal leaders warrants consideration. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. A Study on Integrated Community Based Flood Mitigation with Remote Sensing Technique in Kota Bharu, Kelantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    'Ainullotfi, A. A.; Ibrahim, A. L.; Masron, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study is conducted to establish a community based flood management system that is integrated with remote sensing technique. To understand local knowledge, the demographic of the local society is obtained by using the survey approach. The local authorities are approached first to obtain information regarding the society in the study areas such as the population, the gender and the tabulation of settlement. The information about age, religion, ethnic, occupation, years of experience facing flood in the area, are recorded to understand more on how the local knowledge emerges. Then geographic data is obtained such as rainfall data, land use, land elevation, river discharge data. This information is used to establish a hydrological model of flood in the study area. Analysis were made from the survey approach to understand the pattern of society and how they react to floods while the analysis of geographic data is used to analyse the water extent and damage done by the flood. The final result of this research is to produce a flood mitigation method with a community based framework in the state of Kelantan. With the flood mitigation that involves the community's understanding towards flood also the techniques to forecast heavy rainfall and flood occurrence using remote sensing, it is hope that it could reduce the casualties and damage that might cause to the society and infrastructures in the study area.

  1. The Relation of the Surface Properties of the Teflons to Frictional Electrification by Polystyrene.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The friction and frictional electrification properties of Teflon TFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), Teflon PFA (tetrafluoroethylene-perfluoro-(alkyl...constitution of the fluorocarbon surfaces to kinetic coefficient of friction and frictional electrification properties was investigated by using the

  2. Design and Implementation of Improved Electronic Load Controller for Self-Excited Induction Generator for Rural Electrification

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvel, C.; Porkumaran, K.; Jaganathan, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an alternative technique, namely, Improved Electronic Load Controller (IELC), which is proposal to improve power quality, maintaining voltage at frequency desired level for rural electrification. The design and development of IELC are considered as microhydroenergy system. The proposed work aims to concentrate on the new schemes for rural electrification with the help of different kinds of hybrid energy systems. The objective of the proposed scheme is to maintain the speed of generation against fluctuating rural demand. The Electronic Load Controller (ELC) is used to connect and disconnect the dump load during the operation of the system, and which absorbs the load when consumer are not in active will enhance the lifestyle of the rural population and improve the living standards. Hydroelectricity is a promising option for electrification of remote villages in India. The conventional methods are not suitable to act as standalone system. Hence, the designing of a proper ELC is essential. The improved electronic load control performance tested with simulation at validated through hardware setup. PMID:26783553

  3. Coral communities of the remote atoll reefs in the Nansha Islands, southern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M X; Yu, K F; Shi, Q; Chen, T R; Zhang, H L; Chen, T G

    2013-09-01

    During the months of May and June in the year 2007, a survey was conducted regarding coral reef communities in the remote atolls (Zhubi Reef and Meiji Reef) of Nansha Islands, southern South China Sea. The goals of the survey were to: (1) for the first time, compile a scleractinian coral check-list; (2) estimate the total richness, coral cover, and growth forms of the community; and (3) describe preliminary patterns of community structure according to geomorphological units. Findings of this survey revealed a total of 120 species of scleractinia belonging to 40 genera, while the average coral cover was 21 %, ranging from less than 10 % to higher than 50 %. Branching and massive corals were also found to be the most important growth forms of the whole coral community, while Acropora, Montipora, and Porites were the three dominant genera in the overall region, with their contributions to total coral cover measuring 21, 22, and 23 %, respectively. Overall, coral communities of the Nansha Islands were in a relative healthy condition with high species diversity and coral cover. Spatial pattern of coral communities existed among various geomorphological units. Mean coral cover was highest in the patch reef within the lagoon, followed by the fore reef slope, reef flat, and lagoon slope. The greatest contributors to total coral cover were branching Acropora (45 %) in the lagoon slope, branching Montipora (44 %) in the reef flat, and massive Porites (51 %) in the patch reef. Coral cover in the fore reef revealed a greater range of genera than in other habitats. The leeward fore reef slope had higher coral cover (> 50 %) when compared with the windward slope (< 10 %). The coral communities of the inner reef flat were characterized by higher coral cover (27 %) and dominant branching Montipora corals, while lower coral cover (4 %) was dominated by Psammocora with massive growth forms on the outer reef flat. Destructive fishing and coral bleaching were two major threats to

  4. Positive community responses to an arts-health program designed to tackle diabetes and kidney disease in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Craig; Stokes, Annette; Jeffries-Stokes, Christine; Daly, Jeanne

    2016-08-01

    The Western Desert Kidney Health Project (WDKHP) is an innovative clinical screening, arts-health and community development program, staffed by Aboriginal health workers. The WDKHP is aimed at prevention and early detection, improving the chance of better management of kidney disease among people in 10 predominantly Aboriginal communities in rural Western Australia. This paper aimed to understand community responses to the WDKHP in three of these communities. Interviews were undertaken with 26 Aboriginal people living in three remote communities. Community responses were analysed with attention to the social organisation of participants in each community and a focus on the perspectives of key groups, identified here as 'Community Leaders', 'Homelanders', 'Refuge Seekers' and 'Dislocated'. Participants from all groups reported that the WDKHP was highly acceptable, and an effective means of drawing attention to the need for prevention, early detection and management of diabetes and kidney disease. The integration of Aboriginal health workers to explain the project contributed to the high rates of participation in clinical screening. Outreach clinical services can be an appropriate method of engaging people in remote communities in addressing diabetes and kidney disease. The remote community setting can act as an 'enabler' of healthy lifestyle for Aboriginal people, particularly when augmented by well-designed outreach programs. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  5. Design and implementation of a dental caries prevention trial in remote Canadian Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Rosamund; Veronneau, Jacques; Leroux, Brian

    2010-05-13

    The goal of this cluster randomized trial is to test the effectiveness of a counseling approach, Motivational Interviewing, to control dental caries in young Aboriginal children. Motivational Interviewing, a client-centred, directive counseling style, has not yet been evaluated as an approach for promotion of behaviour change in indigenous communities in remote settings. Aboriginal women were hired from the 9 communities to recruit expectant and new mothers to the trial, administer questionnaires and deliver the counseling to mothers in the test communities. The goal is for mothers to receive the intervention during pregnancy and at their child's immunization visits. Data on children's dental health status and family dental health practices will be collected when children are 30-months of age. The communities were randomly allocated to test or control group by a random "draw" over community radio. Sample size and power were determined based on an anticipated 20% reduction in caries prevalence. Randomization checks were conducted between groups. In the 5 test and 4 control communities, 272 of the original target sample size of 309 mothers have been recruited over a two-and-a-half year period. A power calculation using the actual attained sample size showed power to be 79% to detect a treatment effect. If an attrition fraction of 4% per year is maintained, power will remain at 80%. Power will still be > 90% to detect a 25% reduction in caries prevalence. The distribution of most baseline variables was similar for the two randomized groups of mothers. However, despite the random assignment of communities to treatment conditions, group differences exist for stage of pregnancy and prior tooth extractions in the family. Because of the group imbalances on certain variables, control of baseline variables will be done in the analyses of treatment effects. This paper explains the challenges of conducting randomized trials in remote settings, the importance of thorough

  6. Design and implementation of a dental caries prevention trial in remote Canadian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of this cluster randomized trial is to test the effectiveness of a counseling approach, Motivational Interviewing, to control dental caries in young Aboriginal children. Motivational Interviewing, a client-centred, directive counseling style, has not yet been evaluated as an approach for promotion of behaviour change in indigenous communities in remote settings. Methods/design Aboriginal women were hired from the 9 communities to recruit expectant and new mothers to the trial, administer questionnaires and deliver the counseling to mothers in the test communities. The goal is for mothers to receive the intervention during pregnancy and at their child's immunization visits. Data on children's dental health status and family dental health practices will be collected when children are 30-months of age. The communities were randomly allocated to test or control group by a random "draw" over community radio. Sample size and power were determined based on an anticipated 20% reduction in caries prevalence. Randomization checks were conducted between groups. Discussion In the 5 test and 4 control communities, 272 of the original target sample size of 309 mothers have been recruited over a two-and-a-half year period. A power calculation using the actual attained sample size showed power to be 79% to detect a treatment effect. If an attrition fraction of 4% per year is maintained, power will remain at 80%. Power will still be > 90% to detect a 25% reduction in caries prevalence. The distribution of most baseline variables was similar for the two randomized groups of mothers. However, despite the random assignment of communities to treatment conditions, group differences exist for stage of pregnancy and prior tooth extractions in the family. Because of the group imbalances on certain variables, control of baseline variables will be done in the analyses of treatment effects. This paper explains the challenges of conducting randomized trials in remote

  7. Bridging the gap: innovative approaches to continuing education in rural, remote, and isolated first nation communities.

    PubMed

    Scott, Tracy; Menzies, Cynthia; Chenard, Glen; Spence, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Access to education, communication, and support is essential for achieving and maintaining a skilled healthcare workforce. Delivering affordable and accessible continuing education for healthcare providers in rural, remote, and isolated First Nation communities is challenging due to barriers such as geography, isolation, costs, and staff shortages. The innovative use of technology, such as on-line courses and webinars, will be presented as a highly effective approach to increase access to continuing education for healthcare providers in these settings. A case study will be presented demonstrating how a national, not-for-profit health care organization has partnered with healthcare providers in these communities to support care at the local level through various technology-based knowledge exchange activities.

  8. Community-based clinical education increases motivation of medical students to medicine of remote area: comparison between lecture and practice.

    PubMed

    Tani, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Kondo, Saki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Kawaminami, Shingo; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Ito, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Obata, Fumiaki; Shin, Teruki; Bando, Hiroyasu; Kohno, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we administered a questionnaire to medical students to evaluate the effect of community-based clinical education on their attitudes to community medicine and medicine in remote area. Questionnaires were given 4 times to all the students from first-year to sixth-year. Of 95 students, 65 students (68.4%) who completed all questionnaires, were used in this study. The intensity of students' attitudes was estimated by using visual analogue scale. The intensity of interest, a sense of fulfillment and passion in medicine of remote area was significantly increased after the community-based practice. On the other hand, the level of understanding in medicine in remote area was increased by the lecture not by the practice. The intensity of desire both to become a generalist and a specialist was significantly increased when the grade went up. Most of sixth-year students desired to have abilities of a generalist and a specialist simultaneously. This study shows that the community-based practice is more meaningful in increasing motivation in medicine in remote area than the lecture, and suggests that it is important to prepare more courses to experience community medicine to increase the number of physicians who desire to work in remote area.

  9. Injuries and alcohol management plans in remote Indigenous communities: a two-community comparison.

    PubMed

    West, Caryn; Muller, Reinhold; Clough, Alan R

    2017-08-23

    To curb high rates of alcohol-related violence and injury in Indigenous communities, alcohol management plans (AMPs) were implemented in 2002-2003 and tightened in 2008. This project compares injury presentations and alcohol involvement from two Indigenous Cape York communities, one that entered full prohibition and one that did not. Aclinical file audit was performed for the period 2006-2011, capturing changes in alcohol availability. Medical files were searched for injury presentation documenting type of injury, cause of injury (including alcohol), date of injury and outcomes of all presenting injuries for the time period 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2011, capturing the major changes of the 2008 AMP restrictions. Findings indicated injury presentation rates were higher in both communities before prohibition than afterwards andreduction was more pronounced in community 2 (prohibition). Ongoing research is imperative, as this area is characterised by a near-absence of evidence. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. A review of thunderstorm electrification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, C.P.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Recent developments in the area of thunderstorm electrification processes are reviewed. These processes have two main divisions: (a) convective, in which particles charged by ion capture are moved by convection currents to strengthen the electric field in the cloud, and (b) processes involving charge transfer during particle interactions, following which oppositely charged particles move apart in the updraft to form the observed charge centers. Type-b processes are further subdivided into inductive (relying on the preexistence of an electric field) and noninductive charge-transfer mechanisms, Field and laboratory evidence points to the importance of interactions between particles of the ice phase, in the presence of liquid water droplets, in separating electric charge in thunderstorms. Recent experimental studies have investigated the dependence of charge transfer on the size and relative velocity of the interacting particles and have determined the dependence of the sign of the charge transfer on temperature and cloud liquid water content. Field data upon which the laboratory simulations are based are obtained by increasingly sophisticated airborne and ground-based means. Calculations of electric field growth using experimental charge-transfer data in numerical models of the dynamical and microphysical development of thunderstorms show agreement with observations, although further refinement is required. Some directions for future research are outlined. 121 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Patronage power: Rural electrification, river development, and Lyndon Johnson (1937--1939)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Paul-Michael Mays

    Few historians document Lyndon Johnson's efforts to construct a state-wide political machine at the local level early in his congressional career. The literature glorifies Johnson for hydroelectric river development and rural electrification. This thesis acknowledges the transformative nature of rural electrification in Central Texas through the efforts of Johnson but, more importantly, reveals how extensively Johnson sought to capitalize on the tail-end of the New Deal to utilize government-funded relief projects to establish a state-wide political machine. An analysis of the correspondence between Johnson, his local political operators, members of his state-wide network, and rural constituents reveals another layer to the complexity of Johnson and further exposes his ambitious, calculating nature. Johnson used rural electrification to first create a community of supporters in his congressional district then used rural electrification and multipurpose river development programs to cultivate political contacts across the state of Texas. This thesis explores the first time that Lyndon Johnson used patronage to develop a political community as a publicly elected official. Johnson pushed for constant expansion of operations to ensure a steady supply of new jobs while displaying a cavalier attitude about specific regulations regarding the allocation of funds. His machine manipulated and massaged congressional appropriations restrictions and utilized multiple congressional revenue streams to stretch finances further and lower overhead costs to increase the scope of operations thus further improving the lives of his constituents. Johnson also used this movement to efficiently and effectively construct a foundation for his political machine. This thesis also clarifies an early moment in Johnson's beliefs about civil rights. Instead of standing on principle, Johnson relied on extortion and threats to fight racism at this early juncture in his political career because of

  12. Microgrid Utilities for Rural Electrification in East Africa: Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Nathaniel J.

    Expanding access to electricity is central to development in East Africa but massive increases in investment are required to achieve universal access. Private sector participation in electrification is essential to meeting electricity access targets. Policy makers have acknowledged that grid extension in many remote rural areas is not as cost effective as decentralized alternatives such as microgrids. Microgrid companies have been unable to scale beyond pilot projects due in part to challenges in raising capital for a business model that is perceived to be risky. This thesis aims to identify and quantify the primary sources of investment risk in microgrid utilities and study ways to mitigate these risks to make these businesses more viable. Two modeling tools have been developed to this end. The Stochastic Techno-Economic Microgrid Model (STEMM) models the technical and financial performance of microgrid utilities using uncertain and dynamic inputs to permit explicit modeling of financial risk. This model is applied in an investment risk assessment and case study in Rwanda. Key findings suggest that the most important drivers of risk are fuel prices, foreign exchange rates, demand for electricity, and price elasticity of demand for electricity. The relative importance of these factors is technology dependent with demand uncertainty figuring stronger for solar and high solar penetration hybrid systems and fuel prices driving risk in diesel power and low solar penetration hybrid systems. Considering uncertainty in system sizing presents a tradeoff whereby a decrease in expected equity return decreases downside risk. High solar penetration systems are also found to be more attractive to lenders. The second modeling tool leverages electricity consumption and demographic data from four microgrids in Tanzania to forecast demand for electricity in newly electrified communities. Using statistical learning techniques, improvements in prediction performance was achieved over

  13. Mapping radioactivity in groundwater to identify elevated exposure in remote and rural communities.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Ross; Black, Jeffrey; Akber, Riaz

    2011-03-01

    A survey of radioactivity in groundwater (110 sites) was conducted as a precursor to providing a baseline of radiation exposure in rural and remote communities in Queensland, Australia, that may be impacted upon by exposure pathways associated with the supply, treatment, use and wastewater treatment of the resource. Radionuclides in groundwater, including ²³⁸U, ²²⁶Ra, ²²²Rn, ²²⁸Ra, ²²⁴Ra and ⁴⁰K were measured and found to contain activity concentration levels of up to 0.71 BqL⁻¹, 0.96 BqL⁻¹, 108 BqL⁻¹, 2.8 BqL⁻¹, 0.11 BqL⁻¹ and 0.19 BqL⁻¹ respectively. Activity concentration results were classified by aquifer lithology, showing correlation between increased radium isotope concentration and basic volcanic host rock. The groundwater survey and mapping results were further assessed using an investigation assessment tool to identify seven remote or rural communities that may require additional radiation dose assessment beyond that attributed to ingestion of potable water. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy solutions in rural Africa: mapping electrification costs of distributed solar and diesel generation versus grid extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, S.; Bódis, K.; Huld, T.; Moner-Girona, M.

    2011-07-01

    Three rural electrification options are analysed showing the cost optimal conditions for a sustainable energy development applying renewable energy sources in Africa. A spatial electricity cost model has been designed to point out whether diesel generators, photovoltaic systems or extension of the grid are the least-cost option in off-grid areas. The resulting mapping application offers support to decide in which regions the communities could be electrified either within the grid or in an isolated mini-grid. Donor programs and National Rural Electrification Agencies (or equivalent governmental departments) could use this type of delineation for their program boundaries and then could use the local optimization tools adapted to the prevailing parameters. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent European Commission and UNEP policy.

  15. Assessing the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing mitigation measures for an influenza pandemic in remote and isolated First Nations communities: a qualitative community-based participatory research approach.

    PubMed

    Charania, Nadia A; Tsuji, Leonard Js

    2013-01-01

    The next influenza pandemic is predicted to disproportionately impact marginalized populations, such as those living in geographically remote Aboriginal communities, and there remains a paucity of scientific literature regarding effective and feasible community mitigation strategies. In Canada, current pandemic plans may not have been developed with adequate First Nations consultation and recommended measures may not be effective in remote and isolated First Nations communities. This study employed a community-based participatory research approach. Retrospective opinions were elicited via interview questionnaires with adult key healthcare informants (n=9) regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing 41 interventions to mitigate an influenza pandemic in remote and isolated First Nations communities of sub-Arctic Ontario, Canada. Qualitative data were manually transcribed and deductively coded following a template organizing approach. The results indicated that most mitigation measures could potentially be effective if modified to address the unique characteristics of these communities. Participants also offered innovative alternatives to mitigation measures that were community-specific and culturally sensitive. Mitigation measures were generally considered to be effective if the measure could aid in decreasing virus transmission, protecting their immunocompromised population, and increasing community awareness about influenza pandemics. Participants reported that lack of resources (eg supplies, monies, trained personnel), poor community awareness, overcrowding in homes, and inadequate healthcare infrastructure presented barriers to the implementation of mitigation measures. This study highlights the importance of engaging local key informants in pandemic planning in order to gain valuable community-specific insight regarding the design and implementation of more effective and feasible mitigation strategies. As it is ethically important to address the

  16. Thrombolysis in the air. Air-ambulance paramedics flying to remote communities treat patients before hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, H.; Kelly, L.; Morgan, J.

    2000-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED: First Nations* communities in the North have a high prevalence of coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes and face an increasing incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Many conditions delay timely administration of thrombolysis, including long times between when patients first experience symptoms and when they present to community nursing stations, delays in air transfers to treating hospitals, uncertainty about when planes are available, and poor flying conditions. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To develop a program for administration of thrombolysis on the way to hospital by air ambulance paramedics flying to remote communities to provide more rapid thrombolytic therapy to northern patients experiencing acute MIs. COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Critical care flight paramedics fly to northern communities from Sioux Lookout, Ont; assess patients; communicate with base hospital physicians; review an exclusion criteria checklist; and administer thrombolytics according to the Sioux Lookout District Health Centre/Base Hospital Policy and Procedure Manual. Patients are then flown to hospitals in Sioux Lookout; Winnipeg, Man; or Thunder Bay, Ont. CONCLUSION: This thrombolysis program is being pilot tested, and further evaluation and development is anticipated. Images p1316-a p1317-a p1317-b PMID:10907571

  17. Airport emissions quantification: Impacts of electrification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Geba, V.

    1998-07-01

    Four airports were assessed to demonstrate that electrification of economically viable air- and land-side vehicles and equipment can significantly reduce total airport emissions. Assessments were made using the FAA`s Emissions and Dispersion Modeling System and EPRI Airport Electrification Project data. Development and implementation of cost-effective airport emissions reduction strategies can be complex, requiring successful collaboration of local, state, and federal regulatory agencies with airport authorities. The methodology developed in this study helps to simplify this task. The objectives of this study were: to develop a methodology to quantify annual emissions at US airports from all sources--aircraft, vehicles, and infrastructure; and to demonstrate that electrification of economically viable air- and land-side vehicles and equipment can significantly reduce total airport emissions on-site, even when allowing for emissions from the generation of electricity.

  18. Assessing the Future Vehicle Fleet Electrification: The Impacts on Regional and Urban Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wenwei; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2017-01-17

    There have been significant advancements in electric vehicles (EVs) in recent years. However, the different changing patterns in emissions at upstream and on-road stages and complex atmospheric chemistry of pollutants lead to uncertainty in the air quality benefits from fleet electrification. This study considers the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region in China to investigate whether EVs can improve future air quality. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model enhanced by the two-dimensional volatility basis set module is applied to simulate the temporally, spatially, and chemically resolved changes in PM2.5 concentrations and the changes of other pollutants from fleet electrification. A probable scenario (Scenario EV1) with 20% of private light-duty passenger vehicles and 80% of commercial passenger vehicles (e.g., taxis and buses) electrified can reduce average PM2.5 concentrations by 0.4 to 1.1 μg m(-3) during four representative months for all urban areas of YRD in 2030. The seasonal distinctions of the air quality impacts with respect to concentration reductions in key aerosol components are also identified. For example, the PM2.5 reduction in January is mainly attributed to the nitrate reduction, whereas the secondary organic aerosol reduction is another essential contributor in August. EVs can also effectively assist in mitigating NO2 concentrations, which would gain greater reductions for traffic-dense urban areas (e.g., Shanghai). This paper reveals that the fleet electrification in the YRD region could generally play a positive role in improving regional and urban air quality.

  19. Cannabis use and violence in three remote Aboriginal Australian communities: Analysis of clinic presentations.

    PubMed

    Kylie Lee, K S; Sukavatvibul, Krisakorn; Conigrave, Katherine M

    2015-12-01

    Anecdotal reports have linked cannabis use to violence in some remote Australian Aboriginal communities. We examine the relationship between cannabis use and presentations to local clinics for violence-related trauma at a population level. As part of a larger study, estimates of cannabis and alcohol use status were obtained for 264 randomly selected individuals aged 14-42. These estimates were collected from Aboriginal health workers and respected community informants using a previously validated approach. Clinic records for the sample were audited for physical trauma presentations between January 2004 and June 2006. One in 3 individuals (n = 88/264) presented to the clinic with physical trauma. Of these, the majority (65.9%, n = 58/88) had at least one presentation that was violence-related. Nearly 2 in every 3 of the total presentations for trauma following violence (n = 40/63) involved the use of a weapon. Hunting tools were most often used, followed by wooden or rock implements. Individuals who reported any current cannabis use were nearly 4 times more likely than nonusers to present at least once for violent trauma after adjusting for current alcohol use, age, and sex (OR = 3.8, 95% CI [1.5, 9.8]). Aboriginal individuals in these remote communities experience high rates of physical trauma and violence, often involving weapons. A comprehensive study is needed to explore the association between cannabis and violence. At the same time, an investment in local programmes is needed to address cannabis use and underlying risk factors for substance use and for violence. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Cost of best-practice primary care management of chronic disease in a remote Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Gador-Whyte, Andrew P; Wakerman, John; Campbell, David; Lenthall, Sue; Struber, Janet; Hope, Alex; Watson, Colin

    2014-06-16

    To estimate the cost of completing all chronic care tasks recommended by the Central Australian Rural Practitioners Association Standard Treatment Manual (CARPA STM) for patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study was conducted at a health service in a remote Central Australian Aboriginal community between July 2010 and May 2011. The chronic care tasks required were ascertained from the CARPA STM. The clinic database was reviewed for data on disease prevalence and adherence to CARPA STM guidelines. Recommended tasks were observed in a time-and-motion study of clinicians' work. Clinicians were interviewed about systematic management and its barriers. Expenditure records were analysed for salary and administrative costs. Diabetes and CKD prevalence; time spent on chronic disease care tasks; completion of tasks recommended by the CARPA STM; barriers to systematic care identified by clinicians; and estimated costs of optimal primary care management of all residents with diabetes or CKD. Projected annual costs of best-practice care for diabetes and CKD for this community of 542 people were $900 792, of which $645 313 would be met directly by the local primary care service. Estimated actual expenditure for these conditions in 2009-10 was $446 585, giving a projected funding gap of $198 728 per annum, or $1733 per patient. High staff turnover, acute care workload and low health literacy also hindered optimal chronic disease care. Barriers to optimal care included inadequate funding and workforce issues. Reduction of avoidable hospital admissions and overall costs necessitates adequate funding of primary care of chronic disease in remote communities.

  1. Development and trialling of a tool to support a systems approach to improve social determinants of health in rural and remote Australian communities: the healthy community assessment tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The residents of many Australian rural and remote communities do not have the essential infrastructure and services required to support healthy living conditions and community members choosing healthy lifestyle options. Improving these social determinants of health is seen to offer real opportunities to improve health among such disadvantaged populations. In this paper, we describe the development and trialling of a tool to measure, monitor and evaluate key social determinants of health at community level. Methods The tool was developed and piloted through a multi-phase and iterative process that involved a series of consultations with community members and key stakeholders and trialling the tool in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory of Australia. Results The indicators were found to be robust, and by testing the tool on a number of different levels, face validity was confirmed. The scoring system was well understood and easily followed by Indigenous and non-Indigenous study participants. A facilitated small group process was found to reduce bias in scoring of indicators. Conclusion The Healthy Community Assessment Tool offers a useful vehicle and process to help those involved in planning, service provision and more generally promoting improvements in community social determinants of health. The tool offers many potential uses and benefits for those seeking to address inequities in the social determinants of health in remote communities. Maximum benefits in using the tool are likely to be gained with cross-sector involvement and when assessments are part of a continuous quality improvement program. PMID:23442804

  2. Ecuador rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, J.L.; Ballantyne, J.; Maushammer, R.; Simancas, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    The direct and indirect benefits of rural electrification in Ecuador warrant A.I.D.'s continued sponsorship of such programs. This assessment of A.I.D.'s 1964-75 sponsorship of four electrification projects in Ecuador concludes that, although implemented along with other development projects such as road construction, the program was a key factor in upgrading the towns of Santa Elena, Santo Domingo de los Colorados, Daule, and Ambato into regional market and service centers. The main benefits of this program, which was not originally designed to benefit the poor, were job creation, access to agricultural product processing facilities, and increased opportunities for small commercial enterprises.

  3. Connective power: Solar electrification and social change in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Arne Edward

    Household solar photovoltaic systems have emerged as a key alternative to grid-based rural electrification in many developing countries. This may seem a victory for appropriate technology advocates, but my research indicates that the social significance of solar electrification in Kenya, which is among the largest developing country solar markets per capita, is far removed from the classic "small is beautiful" neo-populist vision of building small-scale alternatives to global capitalism. Instead, solar electrification is more closely connected to neo-liberal goals of market-based service provision and economic integration. In this study I combine quantitative and qualitative methods, including surveys, intra-household energy allocation studies, and historical analysis, to analyze the social significance of solar electrification in Kenya. I find that "connective" applications, including television, radio, and cellphones, are centrally important. Television is especially notable; the expansion of TV broadcasting to rural areas was a key condition for solar market development. Solar electricity is also used for lighting. In Kenya, income and work related uses of solar lighting are modest, while education uses are more significant. However, in many households, especially those with small systems, intra-household dynamics constrain key social uses (e.g. children's studying), as the energy is allocated to other uses. Social use patterns combine with access dynamics in Kenya's unsubsidized market to shape the social significance of solar electrification. Solar ownership is dominated by the rural upper and middle classes. Thus, productivity and education uses make small contributions to differentiation and middle class formation. Additionally, solar electrification's role in supporting rural television and radio use improves business advertisers' ability to expand consumer goods markets. These findings link solar electrification to important processes of rural development

  4. Electrification life cycle of incipient thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Williams, Earle R.; Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2017-04-01

    This work evaluates how clouds evolve to thunderstorms in terms of microphysical characteristics to produce the first intracloud (IC) and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes. Observations of 46 compact isolated thunderstorms during the 2011/2012 spring-summer in Southeast Brazil with an X-band polarimetric radar and two- and three-dimensional Lightning Location Systems demonstrated key parameters in a cloud's vertical structure that produce the initial electrification and lightning activity. The majority (98%) of the first CG flashes were preceded (by approximately 6 min) by intracloud (IC) lightning. The most important aspect of the observations going into this paper, which came originally from the visual examination of a large number of thunderstorms, is that an initial positive differential reflectivity (ZDR) (associated with supercooled raindrops) evolved to reduced ZDR (and even negative values) in the cloud layer between 0° and to -15°C before and during the time of the initial lightning, suggesting evolution from supercooled raindrops to frozen particles promoting the formation of conical graupel. An enhanced negative specific differential phase (KDP) (down to -0.5° km-1) in the glaciated layer (above -40°C) was predominantly observed at the time of the first CG flash, indicating that ice crystals, such as plates and columns, were being vertically aligned by a strong electric field. These results demonstrate that the observations of ZDR evolution in the mixed layer and negative KDP in the upper levels of convective cores may provide useful information on thunderstorm vigor and lightning nowcasting.

  5. Remote applications of photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, H.N.; Jones, G.J.; Thomas, M.G.; Casbarro, J.J.; Firor, K.

    1989-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems can meet the energy needs of small and remote grid-independent applications. These applications are characterized by the need for a highly reliable source of electrical energy to meet relatively small loads in areas where conventional sources are too costly to install and/or cannot be maintained. A major application for PV is for use in rural electrification both in the US and in the developing countries. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Zonation of High Disaster Potential Communities for Remote Mountainous Areas in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yie-Ruey; Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Chang, Chwen-Ming; Chen, Jing-Wen; Chiang, Jie-Lun; Lu, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Hui-Wen

    2017-04-01

    About three-quarters of Taiwan are covered by hillside areas. Most of the hillside regions in Taiwan are sedimentary and metamorphic rocks which are fragile and highly weathered. In recent years, human development coupled with the global impact of extreme weather, typhoons and heavy rains have caused the landslide disasters and leaded to human causalities and properties loss. The landslides also endanger the major public works and almost make the overall industrial economic development and transport path overshadowed by disasters. Therefore, this research assesses the exploration of landslide potential analysis and zonation of high disaster potential communities for remote mountainous areas in southern Taiwan. In this study, the time series of disaster records and land change of remote mountainous areas in southern Taiwan are collected using techniques of interpretation from satellite images corresponding to multi-year and multi-rainfall events. To quantify the slope hazards, we adopt statistical analysis model to analyze massive data of slope disasters and explore the variance, difference and trend of influence factors of hillside disaster; establish the disaster potential analysis model under the climate change and construct the threshold of disaster. Through analysis results of disaster potential assessment, the settlement distribution with high-risk hazard potential of study area is drawn with geographic information system. Results of image classification show that the values of coefficient of agreement for different time periods are at high level. Compared with the historical disaster records of research areas, the accuracy of predicted landslide potential is in reasonable confidence level. The spatial distribution of landslide depends on the interaction of rainfall patterns, slope and elevation of the research area. The results also show that the number and scale of secondary landslide sites are much larger than those of new landslide sites after rainfall

  7. Community-based Monitoring of Water Resources in Remote Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, W.; Hannah, D. M.; Dewulf, A.; Clark, J.; Zulkafli, Z. D.; Karpouzoglou, T.; Mao, F.; Ochoa-Tocachi, B. F.

    2016-12-01

    Remote mountain regions are often represented by pockets of poverty combined with accelerated environmental change. The combination of harsh climatic and topographical conditions with limited infrastructure puts severe pressures on local livelihoods, many of which rely strongly on local ecosystem services (ESS) such as agricultural production and water supply. It is therefore paramount to optimise the management of ESS for the benefit of local people. This is hindered by a scarcity of quantitative data about physical processes such as precipitation and river flow as well as qualitative data concerning the management of water and land. National and conventional scientific monitoring networks tend to be insufficient to cover adequately the spatial and temporal gradients. Additionally, the data that are being collected often fail to be converted into locally relevant and actionable knowledge for ESS management. In such conditions, community-based monitoring of natural resources may be an effective way to reduce this knowledge gap. The participatory nature of such monitoring also enhances knowledge co-production and integration in locally-based decision-making processes. Here, we present the results of a 4-year consortium project on the use of citizen science technologies for ecosystem services management (Mountain-EVO). The project analyzed ecosystem service dynamics and decision-making processes and implemented a comparative analysis of experiments with community-based monitoring of water resources in 4 remote mountain regions, i.e. Peru, Nepal, Kyrgyzstan, and Ethiopia. We find that community-based monitoring can have a transformative impact on local ESS management, because of its potential to be more inclusive, polycentric, and context-driven as compared to conventional monitoring. However, the results and effectiveness of community-based approaches depend strongly on the natural and socio-economic boundary conditions. As such, this requires a tailored and bottom

  8. Roaming behaviour of dogs in four remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, Australia: preliminary investigations.

    PubMed

    Molloy, S; Burleigh, A; Dürr, S; Ward, M P

    2017-03-01

    To estimate the home range (HR) and investigate the potential predictors for roaming of 58 dogs in four Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. Prospective study. Global positioning system (GPS) collars were attached to the dogs for 1-4 days, recording location fixes every 1-3 min. Utilisation distributions (UDs) and extended (95% isopleth) and core (50% isopleth) HRs of dogs were determined. Potential predictors of roaming were assessed. Estimated core (median, 0.27 ha) and extended (median, 3.1 ha) HRs differed significantly (P = 0.0225 and 0.0345, respectively) between the four communities; dogs in the coastal community travelled significantly (P < 0.0001) more per day than dogs in the three inland communities studied. Significant associations were found between extended HR size and sex (P = 0.0050) and sex + neuter (P = 0.0218), and between core HR size and sex (P = 0.0010), neuter status (P = 0.0255) and sex + neuter (P = 0.0025). Entire males roamed more than neutered females. The core HR of dogs with poor/fair body condition scores (BCSs) was larger than dogs with ideal/obese BCSs (P = 0.0394). Neutered male dogs also travelled more per day than entire female dogs (P = 0.0475). Roaming information can be used to inform the management of dogs in remote communities and to design disease control programs. Widespread data collection across the Northern Territory should be undertaken to further investigate the associations found in this study, considering that data were collected during relatively short periods of time in one season. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Epidemic history of hepatitis C virus infection in two remote communities in Nigeria, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Forbi, Joseph C; Purdy, Michael A; Campo, David S; Vaughan, Gilberto; Dimitrova, Zoya E; Ganova-Raeva, Lilia M; Xia, Guo-Liang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology and population dynamics of HCV infection among indigenes of two semi-isolated communities in North-Central Nigeria. Despite remoteness and isolation, ~15% of the population had serological or molecular markers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Phylogenetic analysis of the NS5b sequences obtained from 60 HCV-infected residents showed that HCV variants belonged to genotype 1 (n=51; 85%) and genotype 2 (n=9; 15%). All sequences were unique and intermixed in the phylogenetic tree with HCV sequences from people infected from other West African countries. The high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of the HCV hypervariable region 1 and an empirical threshold error correction algorithm were used to evaluate intra-host heterogeneity of HCV strains of genotype 1 (n=43) and genotype 2 (n=6) from residents of the communities. Analysis revealed a rare detectable intermixing of HCV intra-host variants among residents. Identification of genetically close HCV variants among all known groups of relatives suggests a common intra-familial HCV transmission in the communities. Applying Bayesian coalescent analysis to the NS5b sequences, the most recent common ancestors for genotype 1 and 2 variants were estimated to have existed 675 and 286 years ago, respectively. Bayesian skyline plots suggest that HCV lineages of both genotypes identified in the Nigerian communities experienced epidemic growth for 200-300 years until the mid-20th century. The data suggest a massive introduction of numerous HCV variants to the communities during the 20th century in the background of a dynamic evolutionary history of the hepatitis C epidemic in Nigeria over the past three centuries.

  10. Needs, Acceptability, and Value of Humanitarian Medical Assistance in Remote Peruvian Amazon Riverine Communities

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Juan F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Bayer, Angela M.; Beltran, Martin; Razuri, Hugo R.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Quispe, Antonio M.; Maves, Ryan C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Sanders, John W.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Much debate exists regarding the need, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 457 children under 5 years from four remote riverine communities in the Peruvian Amazon and collected anthropometric measures, blood samples (1–4 years), and stool samples. Focus groups and key informant interviews assessed perspectives regarding medical aid delivered by foreigners. The prevalence of stunting, anemia, and intestinal parasites was 20%, 37%, and 62%, respectively. Infection with multiple parasites, usually geohelminths, was detected in 41% of children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites both individual and polyparasitism increased with age. Participants from smaller communities less exposed to foreigners expressed lack of trust and fear of them. However, participants from all communities were positive about foreigners visiting to provide health support. Prevalent health needs such as parasitic infections and anemia may be addressed by short-term medical interventions. There is a perceived openness to and acceptability of medical assistance delivered by foreign personnel. PMID:25846293

  11. Effectiveness of water fluoridation in caries reduction in a remote Indigenous community in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N W; Lalloo, R; Kroon, J; Fernando, S; Tut, O

    2014-09-01

    Children in remote Indigenous communities in Australia have levels of dental caries much greater than the national average. One such, the Northern Peninsula Area of Far North Queensland (NPA), had an oral health survey conducted in 2004, shortly before the introduction of fluoridated, reticular water. Children were again surveyed in 2012, following five years exposure. An oral examination was conducted on all consenting children enrolled in schools across the community, using WHO Basic Oral Health Survey methodology. Few teeth had restorations in both surveys. Age-weighted overall caries prevalence and severity declined from 2005 to 2012 by 37.3%. The effect was most marked in younger children, dmft decreasing by approximately 50% for ages 4-9 years; at age 6, mean decayed score decreased from 5.20 to 3.43. DMFT levels also decreased by almost half in 6-9 year olds. However, significant unmet treatment needs exist at all ages. There has been considerable improvement in child dental health in the NPA over the past 6-7 years. In light of continued poor diet and oral hygiene, water fluoridation is the most likely explanation. The cost-effectiveness for this small community remains an issue which, in the current climate of political antagonism to water fluoridation in many quarters, requires continued study. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Evapotranspiration for domestic wastewater reuse in remote indigenous communities of Australia.

    PubMed

    Anda, M; Mathew, K; Ho, G

    2001-01-01

    In the past sewage ponding in indigenous settlements was commonplace as a result of overcrowding combined with inappropriate septic tank and leach drain design, installation and operation. The response over the past 10 years has been to develop reticulated sewerage systems to lagoons when the funds become available. These are often successful in terms of operation, improved public health and low maintenance but are expensive and wasteful of limited water supplies. Evapotranspiration (ET) is an effective method for on-site domestic effluent disposal in areas of Western Australia with soils of low permeability. Evapotranspiration systems have been established in a number of communities both for research/demonstration and as specified by architects. The systems usually follow two septic tanks for the disposal of all domestic effluent. A case study will be presented for a remote indigenous community where the ET systems installed for greywater only have been monitored over the last two years since installation. The use of evapotranspiration has enabled reuse of effluent for successful examples of revegetation and food production and points to the need for a holistic approach to design and service delivery in these communities that includes a total environmental management plan.

  13. Evaluating a massage therapy training and treatment programme in a remote Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Charlotte; Vindigni, Dein; Polus, Barbara; Browell, Tuesday; Edgecombe, Gay

    2008-08-01

    To describe a massage therapy and training programme in a remote Aboriginal community in Australia and to develop the frameworks, procedures and processes necessary for future research. Self-report health questionnaires (MYMOP and W-BQ12) and an ethnographic enquiry that included participant observation and 15 interviews with clients and key informants. The project was disrupted by typhoons. Baseline questionnaire responses indicate they may be suitable for this context. Qualitative analysis resulted in a conceptual model of the effects of the programme, which is consistent with a system theory approach. People's accounts were rooted in discussions of the community's history, emotional and physical distress, and limited health care resources. Community-level effects included increasing participation; strengthening local health and educational projects; and opening up new opportunities. Individual level effects included improvement in physical and emotional symptoms, improved function and the receipt of preventative care. As a result of this early stage research, future studies have a conceptual model to guide them and evidence that a mixed method and a participatory methodology may be the most appropriate design.

  14. Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. an obliqately anaerobic bacterium isolated from a remote Amazonian community in Peru

    PubMed Central

    O’Neal, Lindsey; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J.; Tito, Raul Y.; Ozga, Andrew T.; Polo, Susan I.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Lawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic Gram-stain positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium designated NE08VT, was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a remote Amazonian community in Peru. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed the organism belonged to the genus Clostridium and is most closely related to Clostridium vulturis (97.4% sequence similarity) and was further characterized using biochemical and chemotaxonomic methods. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso C13:0 and C16:0 with a genomic DNA G + C content of 31.6 mol%. Fermentation products during growth on glucose were acetate and butyrate. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic information, strain NE08V was identified as representing a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE08VT (DSM 23598T = CCUG 59712T). PMID:26123611

  15. High Incidence of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northwestern Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Cai-lei; Loewen, Kassandra; Teatero, Sarah; Marchand-Austin, Alex; Gordon, Janet; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; McGeer, Allison

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Worldwide, indigenous populations appear to be at increased risk for invasive group A streptococcal (iGAS) infections. Although there is empirical evidence that the burden of iGAS disease is significant among remote First Nations communities in Northwestern Ontario, Canada, the epidemiology of iGAS infections in the area remains poorly characterized. Methods. Individuals that met case definition for iGAS disease and whose laboratory specimens were processed by Meno Ya Win Health Centre in Sioux Lookout, Canada or who were reported to Thunder Bay District Health Unit, Canada were identified for the period 2009 to 2014. Case demographics, clinical severity, comorbidities, and risk factors were collected through chart review. Strain typing and antibiotic susceptibility were determined when possible. Basic descriptive statistics were calculated. Results. Sixty-five cases of iGAS disease were identified, for an annualized incidence of 56.2 per 100 000. Primary bacteremia was present in 26.2% of cases, and cellulitis was identified in 55.4% of cases. The most common comorbidities identified were diabetes (38.5%) and skin conditions (38.5%). Prevalent risk factors included alcohol dependence (25%). Fourteen different emm types were identified among 42 isolates, with the most common being emm114 (17.4%), emm11 (15.2%), and emm118 (13.0%). Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 24.6% of isolates. Conclusions. Rural and remote First Nations communities in Northwestern Ontario experience iGAS infections at a rate 10 times the provincial and national average. Compared with other North American series, a lower proportion of isolates causing infection were of emm types included in candidate GAS vaccines. PMID:28480241

  16. Capacity Building in NASA Remote Sensing Data for Meteorological and Agricultural Communities in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, S. L.; Andreadis, K.; Das, N. N.; Macharia, D.

    2015-12-01

    Across the globe, planners and decision makers are hampered by a lack of historic data and scant in situ observations on which to base policy and action plans. Data is often sorely lacking in poorly developed regions such as East Africa where people are vulnerable to a changing climate, extreme weather events, and economies and food security are tied directly to rain fed agriculture or pastoral cultures. NASA global remote sensing observations and research are promising in this regard, as they have great potential to inform policy- and decision-making at global, regional and even local scales the world over, However that potential is not realized as often as it should for a variety of reasons: the data stores are often impenetrable requiring special expertise to "crack the code", sustainability of observations remains a concern, and research and data are not focused on applications, thus results don't "fit" in existing tools or are developed for a short-term science objective without long-term use in mind. Although there are good examples of the use of NASA Earth Science research and observations for applications, capacity is lacking and must be built to advance the use of remote sensing for applications and to ease transition of research to the stakeholder. Capacity building is a critical component to transition Earth science research results to stakeholder communities, and is more than traditional training,, it has been described as…."the process of developing and strengthening the skills, instincts, abilities, processes and resources that organizations and communities need to survive, adapt, and thrive in the fast-changing world. Best practices and lessons learned from recent capacity building efforts for Agricultural and Environmental Ministires in East African in support of a NASA-SERVIR Applied Science Project to provide estimates of hydrologic extremes tied to crop yield are described.

  17. Rural electrification in Bangladesh: management, engineering, and financial assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deverick, B.; Gellerson, M.; Stovall, J.; Shelton, R.

    1986-07-01

    This report represents the partial findings of a five-member, multidisciplinary team requested by USAID to assess the progress of the Rural Electrification Program in Bangladesh. Four areas are assessed in this report: the effectiveness of the management system; the system planning and engineering capabilities; RE tariffs and energy sector pricing policies; and the effectiveness of technical assistance.

  18. An environmental scan of emergency response systems and services in remote First Nations communities in Northern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Mew, E. J.; Ritchie, S. D.; VanderBurgh, D.; Beardy, J. L.; Gordon, J.; Fortune, M.; Mamakwa, S.; Orkin, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Approximately 24,000 Ontarians live in remote Indigenous communities with no road access. These communities are a subset of Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN), a political grouping of 49 First Nations communities in Northern Ontario, Canada. Limited information is available regarding the status of emergency care in these communities. Objective: We aimed to understand emergency response systems, services, and training in remote NAN communities. Design: We used an environmental scan approach to compile information from multiple sources including community-based participatory research. This included the analysis of data collected from key informant interviews (n=10) with First Nations community health leaders and a multi-stakeholder roundtable meeting (n=33) in October 2013. Results: Qualitative analysis of the interview data revealed four issues related to emergency response systems and training: (1) inequity in response capacity and services, (2) lack of formalised dispatch systems, (3) turnover and burnout in volunteer emergency services, and (4) challenges related to first aid training. Roundtable stakeholders supported the development of a community-based emergency care system to address gaps. Conclusions: Existing first response, paramedical, and ambulance service models do not meet the unique geographical, epidemiological and cultural needs in most NAN communities. Sustainable, context-appropriate, and culturally relevant emergency care systems are needed. PMID:28494638

  19. Impact of a Telehealth Program That Delivers Remote Consultation and Longitudinal Mentorship to Community HIV Providers

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brian R.; Unruh, Kenton T.; Martinez-Paz, Natalia; Annese, Mary; Ramers, Christian B.; Harrington, Robert D.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Kimmerly, Lisa; Scott, John D.; Spach, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. To increase human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care capacity in our region, we designed a distance mentorship and consultation program based on the Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) model, which uses real-time interactive video to regularly connect community providers with a multidisciplinary team of academic specialists. This analysis will (1) describe key components of our program, (2) report types of clinical problems for which providers requested remote consultation over the first 3.5 years of the program, and (3) evaluate changes in participants′ self-assessed HIV care confidence and knowledge over the study period. Methods. We prospectively tracked types of clinical problems for which providers sought consultation. At baseline and regular intervals, providers completed self-efficacy assessments. We compared means using paired-samples t test and examined the statistical relationship between each survey item and level of participation using analysis of variance. Results. Providers most frequently sought consultation for changing antiretroviral therapy, evaluating acute symptomatology, and managing mental health issues. Forty-five clinicians completed a baseline and at least 1 repeat assessment. Results demonstrated significant increase (P < .05) in participants' self-reported confidence to provide a number of essential elements of HIV care. Significant increases were also reported in feeling part of an HIV community of practice and feeling professionally connected to academic faculty, which correlated with level of program engagement. Conclusions. Community HIV practitioners frequently sought support on clinical issues for which no strict guidelines exist. Telehealth innovation increased providers' self-efficacy and knowledge while decreasing professional isolation. The ECHO model creates a virtual network for peer-to-peer support and longitudinal mentorship, thus strengthening capacity of the HIV workforce. PMID

  20. A case study of physical and social barriers to hygiene and child growth in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Bailie, Ross; Grace, Jocelyn; Brewster, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite Australia's wealth, poor growth is common among Aboriginal children living in remote communities. An important underlying factor for poor growth is the unhygienic state of the living environment in these communities. This study explores the physical and social barriers to achieving safe levels of hygiene for these children. Methods A mixed qualitative and quantitative approach included a community level cross-sectional housing infrastructure survey, focus groups, case studies and key informant interviews in one community. Results We found that a combination of crowding, non-functioning essential housing infrastructure and poor standards of personal and domestic hygiene underlie the high burden of infection experienced by children in this remote community. Conclusion There is a need to address policy and the management of infrastructure, as well as key parenting and childcare practices that allow the high burden of infection among children to persist. The common characteristics of many remote Aboriginal communities in Australia suggest that these findings may be more widely applicable. PMID:19761623

  1. Learning from Anangu Histories: Population Centralisation and Decentralisation Influences and the Provision of Schooling in Tri-State Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Remote Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander schools and communities are diverse and complex sites shaped by contrasting geographies, languages, histories and cultures, including historical and ongoing relationships with colonialism, and connected yet contextually unique epistemologies, ontologies and cosmologies. This paper explores…

  2. "They Are the Government's Children." School and Community Relations in a Remote Area Dweller (Basarwa) Settlement in Kweneng District, Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tshireletso, Lucky

    1996-01-01

    Examines school-community relations in a Botswana settlement of Basarwa, remote rural nomads with a minority language and culture. Surveys of parents and students in grades 5-7 indicate that all held positive educational attitudes and believed schooling would help children to find future employment, but that schools were authoritarian and operated…

  3. Boyfriends, Babies and Basketball: Present Lives and Future Aspirations of Young Women in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Kate A.; Chenhall, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the aspirations of a group of young women in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory of Australia. It examines how their hopes and expectations are influenced by the reality of their everyday lives and the extent to which they are able to influence the course of their lives and become agents for change in their…

  4. Social Support Networks: An Effective Means for Coping with the Unique Problems of Rural and Remote Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Don M.

    Intervention aimed at the development of social support networks provides a means for preventing some of the physical, emotional, and social problems of both long-term and transient rural residents. Individuals living in rural and remote communities face several contextual problems, including distance, personal and professional isolation, unique…

  5. Learning from Anangu Histories: Population Centralisation and Decentralisation Influences and the Provision of Schooling in Tri-State Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Remote Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander schools and communities are diverse and complex sites shaped by contrasting geographies, languages, histories and cultures, including historical and ongoing relationships with colonialism, and connected yet contextually unique epistemologies, ontologies and cosmologies. This paper explores…

  6. Boyfriends, Babies and Basketball: Present Lives and Future Aspirations of Young Women in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Kate A.; Chenhall, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the aspirations of a group of young women in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory of Australia. It examines how their hopes and expectations are influenced by the reality of their everyday lives and the extent to which they are able to influence the course of their lives and become agents for change in their…

  7. Developing a School-Based Preventive Life Skills Program for Youth in a Remote Indigenous Community in North Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Gary; Leckning, Bernard; Midford, Richard; Harper, Helen; Silburn, Sven; Gannaway, Jess; Dolan, Kylie; Delphine, Tim; Hayes, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of development and the pilot implementation of a preventive life skills curriculum for Indigenous middle school students in a very remote community college in the West Arnhem region of North Australia. The curriculum integrates proven educational and psychological techniques with…

  8. Developing a School-Based Preventive Life Skills Program for Youth in a Remote Indigenous Community in North Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Gary; Leckning, Bernard; Midford, Richard; Harper, Helen; Silburn, Sven; Gannaway, Jess; Dolan, Kylie; Delphine, Tim; Hayes, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of development and the pilot implementation of a preventive life skills curriculum for Indigenous middle school students in a very remote community college in the West Arnhem region of North Australia. The curriculum integrates proven educational and psychological techniques with…

  9. Cultural and Social Capital and Talent Development: A Study of a High-Ability Aboriginal Student in a Remote Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostenko, Karen; Merrotsy, Peter

    2009-01-01

    During the course of a school year, a study was conducted on the cultural context, the social milieu and the personal characteristics of a high ability Aboriginal student in a remote community in Canada. Using the lenses of cultural capital, social capital and human capital, the study explores the development of the student's talent through his…

  10. Sharing Place, Learning Together: Perspectives and Reflections on an Educational Partnership Formation with a Remote Indigenous Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godinho, Sally Caroline; Woolley, Marilyn; Webb, Jessie; Winkel, Kenneth Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable partnership formation in a remote Indigenous community involves social, cultural and political considerations. This article reports on the project, "Sharing Place, Learning Together: Supporting Sustainable Educational Partnerships to Advance Social Equity," funded by the Melbourne Social Equity Institute (MSEI) at the…

  11. Contact de-electrification of electrostatically charged polymers.

    PubMed

    Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Liu, Helena; Whitesides, George M

    2012-12-12

    The contact electrification of insulating organic polymers is still incompletely understood, in part because multiple fundamental mechanisms may contribute to the movement of charge. This study describes a mechanism previously unreported in the context of contact electrification: that is, "contact de-electrification", a process in which polymers charged to the same polarity discharge on contact. Both positively charged polymeric beads, e.g., polyamide 6/6 (Nylon) and polyoxymethylene (Delrin), and negatively charged polymeric beads, e.g., polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) and polyamide-imide (Torlon), discharge when the like-charged beads are brought into contact. The beads (both with charges of ∼±20 μC/m(2), or ∼100 charges/μm(2)) discharge on contact regardless of whether they are made of the same material, or of different materials. Discharge is rapid: discharge of flat slabs of like-charged Nylon and Teflon pieces is completed on a single contact (∼3 s). The charge lost from the polymers during contact de-electrification transfers onto molecules of gas in the atmosphere. When like-charged polymers are brought into contact, the increase in electric field at the point of contact exceeds the dielectric breakdown strength of the atmosphere and ionizes molecules of the gas; this ionization thus leads to discharge of the polymers. The detection (using a Faraday cup) of charges transferred to the cup by the ionized gas is compatible with the mechanism. Contact de-electrification occurs for different polymers and in atmospheres with different values of dielectric breakdown strength (helium, argon, oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride): the mechanism thus appears to be general.

  12. Patterns of resident health workforce turnover and retention in remote communities of the Northern Territory of Australia, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Russell, Deborah J; Zhao, Yuejen; Guthridge, Steven; Ramjan, Mark; Jones, Michael P; Humphreys, John S; Wakerman, John

    2017-08-15

    The geographical maldistribution of the health workforce is a persisting global issue linked to inequitable access to health services and poorer health outcomes for rural and remote populations. In the Northern Territory (NT), anecdotal reports suggest that the primary care workforce in remote Aboriginal communities is characterised by high turnover, low stability and high use of temporary staffing; however, there is a lack of reliable information to guide workforce policy improvements. This study quantifies current turnover and retention in remote NT communities and investigates correlations between turnover and retention metrics and health service/community characteristics. This study used the NT Department of Health 2013-2015 payroll and financial datasets for resident health workforce in 53 remote primary care clinics. Main outcome measures include annual turnover rates, annual stability rates, 12-month survival probabilities and median survival. At any time point, the clinics had a median of 2.0 nurses, 0.6 Aboriginal health practitioners (AHPs), 2.2 other employees and 0.4 additional agency-employed nurses. Mean annual turnover rates for nurses and AHPs combined were extremely high, irrespective of whether turnover was defined as no longer working in any remote clinic (66%) or no longer working at a specific remote clinic (128%). Stability rates were low, and only 20% of nurses and AHPs remain working at a specific remote clinic 12 months after commencing. Half left within 4 months. Nurse and AHP turnover correlated with other workforce measures. However, there was little correlation between most workforce metrics and health service characteristics. NT Government-funded remote clinics are small, experience very high staff turnover and make considerable use of agency nurses. These staffing patterns, also found in remote settings elsewhere in Australia and globally, not only incur higher direct costs for service provision-and therefore may compromise long

  13. Exploring relationships between racism, housing and child illness in remote indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Priest, Naomi; Paradies, Yin; Stevens, Matthew; Bailie, Ross

    2012-05-01

    Although racism is increasingly acknowledged as a determinant of health, few studies have examined the relationship between racism, housing and child health outcomes. Cross-sectional data from the Housing Improvement and Child Health study collected in ten remote indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, Australia were analysed using hierarchical logistic regression. Carer and householder self-reported racism was measured using a single item and child illness was measured using a carer report of common childhood illnesses. A range of confounders, moderators and mediators were considered, including socio-demographic and household composition, psychosocial measures for carers and householders, community environment, and health-related behaviour and hygienic state of environment. Carer self-reported racism was significantly associated with child illness in this sample after adjusting for confounders (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.48). Carer negative affect balance was identified as a significant mediator of this relationship. Householder self-reported racism was marginally significantly associated with child illness in this sample after adjusting for confounders (OR 1.43; 95% CI 0.94 to 2.18, p=0.09). Householder self-reported drug use was identified as a significant mediator of this relationship. Consistent with evidence from adult populations and children from other ethnic minorities, this study found that vicarious racism is associated with poor health outcomes among an indigenous child population.

  14. Promising performance of a juvenile justice diversion programme in remote Aboriginal communities, Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Clough, Alan R; Kim San Lee, Kylie; Conigrave, Katherine M

    2008-07-01

    Diversion from court and prison has been recommended for Indigenous Australian youth who commit offences. As no evaluations of such programmes have been published, we describe processes and early outcomes of a diversion programme in the Northern Territory. From 2003 to 2006, among 1700 remote Indigenous community residents, 35 young people (aged 11-18 years, median 15 years) committed offences. They were diverted from criminal justice and referred to a community-based diversion initiative. Client assessment records and staff interviews furnished data to examine clients' diversion pathways and early programme results. Eighteen clients were reportedly using a substance at the time of their offence; cannabis (n = 9), petrol (n = 5), alcohol (n = 4). The remaining 17 had histories of using one or more of these. Two clients could not complete local diversion programs because they moved to other regions; one case was not pursued for legal reasons, leaving 32 clients exposed to the local programme. By July 2006, four clients were continuing in their programmes, three had breached them, but 25 had completed them in periods ranging from 2 to 60 weeks (median = 26 weeks), a completion rate of 89% (25/28). Just one client re-offended after completing diversion. A high completion rate was achieved despite: a dearth of locally available drug and alcohol treatment services and diversion options; shifts in police approaches; heavy administrative burdens to meet legal requirements; and difficulties communicating across cultural barriers.

  15. Prevalence of cardiovascular health risk behaviors in a remote rural community of Sindhuli district, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is emerging as a public health menace among low and middle income countries. It has particularly affected the poorest. However, there is paucity of information about CVD risk factors profile among Nepalese rural communities where the majority of people live in poverty. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular health risk behaviors in an outback community of Nepal. Methods We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study in Tinkanya Village Development Committee (VDC), Sindhuli between January and March, 2014. Total 406 participants of age 20 to 50 years were selected randomly. Data were collected using WHO-NCD STEPwise approach questionnaires and analyzed with SPSS V.16.0 and R i386 2.15.3 software. Result The mean age of participants was 36.2 ± 9 years. Majority of participants (76.3%) were from lower socio-economic class, Adibasi/Janajati (63.1%), and without formal schooling (46.3%). Smoking was present in 28.6%, alcohol consumption in 47.8%, insufficient fruits and vegetables intake in 96.6%, insufficient physical activity in 48.8%; 25.6% had high waist circumference, 37.4% had overweight and obesity. Average daily salt intake per capita was 14.4 grams ±4.89 grams. Hypertension was detected in 12.3%. It had an inverse relationship with education and socio-economic status. In binary logistic regression analysis, age, smoking, body mass index (BMI) and daily salt intake were identified as significant predictors of hypertension. Conclusion Present study showed high prevalence of smoking, alcohol consumption, insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, daily salt intake, overweight and obesity and hypertension among remote rural population suggesting higher risk for developing CVD in future. Nepalese rural communities, therefore, are in need of population-wide comprehensive intervention approaches for reducing CVD health risk behaviors. PMID:25066117

  16. Relationships between reef fish communities and remotely sensed rugosity measurements in Biscayne National Park, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Brock, John C.; Grober-Dunsmore, Rikki; Bonito, Victor E.; Hickey, T. Donald; Wright, C. Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The realization that coral reef ecosystem management must occur across multiple spatial scales and habitat types has led scientists and resource managers to seek variables that are easily measured over large areas and correlate well with reef resources. Here we investigate the utility of new technology in airborne laser surveying (NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL)) in assessing topographical complexity (rugosity) to predict reef fish community structure on shallow (n = 10–13 per reef). Rugosity at each station was assessed in situ by divers using the traditional chain-transect method (10-m scale), and remotely using the EAARL submarine topography data at multiple spatial scales (2, 5, and 10 m). The rugosity and biological datasets were analyzed together to elucidate the predictive power of EAARL rugosity in describing the variance in reef fish community variables and to assess the correlation between chain-transect and EAARL rugosity. EAARL rugosity was not well correlated with chain-transect rugosity, or with species richness of fishes (although statistically significant, the amount of variance explained by the model was very low). Variance in reef fish community attributes was better explained in reef-by-reef variability than by physical variables. However, once the reef-by-reef variability was taken into account in a two-way analysis of variance, the importance of rugosity could be seen on individual reefs. Fish species richness and abundance were statistically higher at high rugosity stations compared to medium and low rugosity stations, as predicted by prior ecological research. The EAARL shows promise as an important mapping tool for reef resource managers as they strive to inventory and protect coral reef resources.

  17. Hydrologic signals and patterns in coastal mangrove communities using space-borne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Price, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    The coastal mangrove ecotone, along the southern edge of the Florida Everglades, is the transition zone between the marine waters of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida Bay, and the freshwater from the "River of Grass". Hydrologically-dependent ecosystems, like the Florida Everglades, have been experiencing greater threats in the past decade from climate change, increased fresh water demand, and urban growth and development. Identifying changes to water chemistry and evapotranspiration (ET) over the coastal landscape is important to understanding the ecosystem response and adaptation with respect to environmental restoration projects, water management practices and sea-level rise. Space-borne remote sensing can be a cost-effective tool to remotely measure water chemistry and ET changes in remote areas of the coastal Everglades on a regional scale. The objectives of this research were to; 1) to measure surface and subsurface water chemistry by building relationships between satellite-based mangrove reflectance data and the ionic and nutrient concentrations in the surface water and groundwater across the coastal mangrove ecotone; and 2) to estimate ET across the coastal everglades. Water chemistry and Landsat 5TM satellite data were used to develop a linear model to quantitatively predict water chemistry on the landscape scale within the coastal mangrove communities of south Florida on seasonal and annual timescales. A satellite-based energy balance approach was used to determine regional scale ET estimates. Using this satellite-energy balance approach, we were able to account for the spatial variability in surface temperature, changes in albedo, and vegetation reflectance. Water samples were collected from the surface water and groundwater from five Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) sites that spanned a variety of mangrove communities and biomass production. Surface water samples were collected from 2008-2012 and groundwater samples were collected from 2009-2012. All

  18. Getting better at chronic care in remote communities: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled of community based management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prevalence and incidence of diabetes and other common comorbid conditions (hypertension, coronary heart disease, renal disease and chronic lung disease) are extremely high among Indigenous Australians. Recent measures to improve quality of preventive care in Indigenous community settings, while apparently successful at increasing screening and routine check-up rates, have shown only modest or little improvements in appropriate care such as the introduction of insulin and other scaled-up drug regimens in line with evidence-based guidelines, together with support for risk factor reduction. A new strategy is required to ensure high quality integrated family-centred care is available locally, with continuity and cultural safety, by community-based care coordinators with appropriate system supports. Methods/design The trial design is open parallel cluster randomised controlled trial. The objective of this pragmatic trial is to test the effectiveness of a model of health service delivery that facilitates integrated community-based, intensive chronic condition management, compared with usual care, in rural and remote Indigenous primary health care services in north Queensland. Participants are Indigenous adults (aged 18–65 years) with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c>=8.5) and at least one other chronic condition. The intervention is to employ an Indigenous Health Worker to case manage the care of a maximum caseload of 30 participants. The Indigenous Health Workers receive intensive clinical training initially, and throughout the study, to ensure they are competent to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions. The Indigenous Health Workers, supported by the local primary health care (PHC) team and an Indigenous Clinical Support Team, will manage care, including coordinating access to multidisciplinary team care based on best practice standards. Allocation by cluster to the intervention and control groups is by simple randomisation after participant

  19. Electrification pathways for Kenya–linking spatial electrification analysis and medium to long term energy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moksnes, Nandi; Korkovelos, Alexandros; Mentis, Dimitrios; Howells, Mark

    2017-09-01

    In September 2015 UN announced 17 Sustainable Development goals (SDG) from which goal number 7 envisions universal access to modern energy services for all by 2030. In Kenya only about 46% of the population currently has access to electricity. This paper analyses hypothetical scenarios, and selected implications, investigating pathways that would allow the country to reach its electrification targets by 2030. Two modelling tools were used for the purposes of this study, namely OnSSET and OSeMOSYS. The tools were soft-linked in order to capture both the spatial and temporal dynamics of their nature. Two electricity demand scenarios were developed representing low and high end user consumption goals respectively. Indicatively, results show that geothermal, coal, hydro and natural gas would consist the optimal energy mix for the centralized national grid. However, in the case of the low demand scenario a high penetration of stand-alone systems is evident in the country, reaching out to approximately 47% of the electrified population. Increasing end user consumption leads to a shift in the optimal technology mix, with higher penetration of mini-grid technologies and grid extension.

  20. Land Use Influences Mosquito Communities and Disease Risk on Remote Tropical Islands: A Case Study Using a Novel Sampling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Meyer Steiger, Dagmar B.; Ritchie, Scott Alex; Laurance, Susan G. W.

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes, such as deforestation and urbanization, can influence interactions between vectors, hosts, and pathogens. The consequences may result in the appearance and rise of mosquito-borne diseases, especially in remote tropical regions. Tropical regions can be the hotspots for the emergence of diseases due to high biological diversity and complex species interactions. Furthermore, frontier areas are often haphazardly surveyed as a result of inadequate or expensive sampling techniques, which limit early detection and medical intervention. We trialed a novel sampling technique of nonpowered traps and a carbon dioxide attractant derived from yeast and sugar to explore how land use influences mosquito communities on four remote, tropical islands in the Australian Torres Strait. Using this technique, we collected > 11,000 mosquitoes from urban and sylvan habitats. We found that human land use significantly affected mosquito communities. Mosquito abundances and diversity were higher in sylvan habitats compared with urban areas, resulting in significantly different community compositions between the two habitats. An important outcome of our study was determining that there were greater numbers of disease-vectoring species associated with human habitations. On the basis of these findings, we believe that our novel sampling technique is a realistic tool for assessing mosquito communities in remote regions. PMID:26711512

  1. Land Use Influences Mosquito Communities and Disease Risk on Remote Tropical Islands: A Case Study Using a Novel Sampling Technique.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Dagmar B Meyer; Ritchie, Scott Alex; Laurance, Susan G W

    2016-02-01

    Land use changes, such as deforestation and urbanization, can influence interactions between vectors, hosts, and pathogens. The consequences may result in the appearance and rise of mosquito-borne diseases, especially in remote tropical regions. Tropical regions can be the hotspots for the emergence of diseases due to high biological diversity and complex species interactions. Furthermore, frontier areas are often haphazardly surveyed as a result of inadequate or expensive sampling techniques, which limit early detection and medical intervention. We trialed a novel sampling technique of nonpowered traps and a carbon dioxide attractant derived from yeast and sugar to explore how land use influences mosquito communities on four remote, tropical islands in the Australian Torres Strait. Using this technique, we collected > 11,000 mosquitoes from urban and sylvan habitats. We found that human land use significantly affected mosquito communities. Mosquito abundances and diversity were higher in sylvan habitats compared with urban areas, resulting in significantly different community compositions between the two habitats. An important outcome of our study was determining that there were greater numbers of disease-vectoring species associated with human habitations. On the basis of these findings, we believe that our novel sampling technique is a realistic tool for assessing mosquito communities in remote regions. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Remote Sensing observations of Cecropia communities along Amazonian rivers: Mapping and monitoring habitat dynamics with time series datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinteros Casaverde, N. L.; McDonald, K.

    2016-12-01

    Riverine habitats host more than 14% of non-aquatic birds in the Amazon basin, some of them considered vulnerable by the UICN due to habitat destruction. Plant species of the genus Cecropia are known for being a late pioneer species in these riverine habitats creating monospecific stands along the Amazonian rivers. Cecropia biomes are thought to have significant impacts on the avifauna communities and their diversity. Nowadays, these habitats are threatened by the on-going development in the Amazonian countries. There are plans to build hydroelectric facilities, damming important tributaries of the Amazon river. Such large scale land cover change threatens Cecropia communities and the habitats they support and associated biodiversity. Thus, it is imperative to understand the fragility of these ecosystems, their extent and spatial distribution, and seasonal influences to their environments. We employ multiple sources of remote sensing data to assess the ability to use high resolution imagery to map Cecropia communities and multi-temporal observations to assess their seasonal dynamics. This research aims to facilitate the understanding of these communities through time series analyses using remote sensing products such as high resolution images from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Landsat to identify the Cecropia stands along the rivers and lower resolution products such as satellite-borne radiometers and scatterometers to assess seasonality. Our goal is to employ combined remote sensing data sources at map and monitor these important habitats.

  3. Introduction of portable computed tomography scanners, in the treatment of acute stroke patients via telemedicine in remote communities.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, A; Khan, K; Whittaker, T; Amlani, S; Crumley, P

    2010-04-01

    Thrombolysis is an established treatment in selected patients who present early to hospital after symptoms of acute ischaemic stroke. Treatment can only be offered after the patient has been assessed by highly trained physicians and imaging studies have ruled out a brain haemorrhage. This limits the wider availability of thrombolysis to patients in remote communities, especially in countries with limited resources. There has been considerable success with the use of TeleStroke to overcome such barriers. TeleStroke is feasible in remote hospitals provided there is an available computed tomography scanner, a fundamental prerequisite in the assessment of acute stroke and thrombolysis. This is a luxury not widely available, especially in remote sites. Recently, Neurologica introduced a portable computed tomography scanner that can be operated after minimal training. We report our preliminary experience with the portable computed tomography scanner in a remote community where Telemedicine was successfully used to evaluate and treat patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of an acute ischaemic stroke. The University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton, Canada was the 'hub' site and Wainwright Community Hospital was the 'spoke' site. Over a 3-month period, 18 patients were evaluated in the emergency department of the remote hospital where the referring physician felt that symptoms indicated potential for thrombolysis. All patients were evaluated remotely by a stroke neurologist in a TeleStroke service situated 207 km from the rural site. After clinical examination, cranial computed tomography scans were obtained with the portable scanner and evaluated by the stroke neurologist. In three patients, thrombolysis was not offered because the computed tomography showed evidence of brain haemorrhage: two intracerebral haemorrhage and one subarachnoid haemorrhage. Three patients meeting the standard criteria received thrombolysis within 4.5 h from onset of symptoms. There was a

  4. Impact of an Ivermectin Mass Drug Administration on Scabies Prevalence in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Thérèse M.; Speare, Richard; Cheng, Allen C.; McCarthy, James; Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Holt, Deborah C.; Currie, Bart J.; Page, Wendy; Shield, Jennifer; Gundjirryirr, Roslyn; Bundhala, Leanne; Mulholland, Eddie; Chatfield, Mark; Andrews, Ross M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Scabies is endemic in many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, with 69% of infants infected in the first year of life. We report the outcomes against scabies of two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Methods Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured scabies prevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined disease acquisition and treatment failures. Scabies infestations were diagnosed clinically with additional laboratory investigations for crusted scabies. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 2–3 weeks if scabies was diagnosed, others followed a standard alternative algorithm. Principal Findings We saw >1000 participants at each population census. Scabies prevalence fell from 4% at baseline to 1% at month 6. Prevalence rose to 9% at month 12 amongst the baseline cohort in association with an identified exposure to a presumptive crusted scabies case with a higher prevalence of 14% amongst new entries to the cohort. At month 18, scabies prevalence fell to 2%. Scabies acquisitions six months after each MDA were 1% and 2% whilst treatment failures were 6% and 5% respectively. Conclusion Scabies prevalence reduced in the six months after each MDA with a low risk of acquisition (1–2%). However, in a setting where living conditions are conducive to high scabies transmissibility, exposure to presumptive crusted scabies and population mobility, a sustained reduction in prevalence was not achieved. Clinical Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Register (ACTRN—12609000654257). PMID:26516764

  5. Impact of an Ivermectin Mass Drug Administration on Scabies Prevalence in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Thérèse M; Speare, Richard; Cheng, Allen C; McCarthy, James; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Holt, Deborah C; Currie, Bart J; Page, Wendy; Shield, Jennifer; Gundjirryirr, Roslyn; Bundhala, Leanne; Mulholland, Eddie; Chatfield, Mark; Andrews, Ross M

    2015-10-01

    Scabies is endemic in many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, with 69% of infants infected in the first year of life. We report the outcomes against scabies of two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured scabies prevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined disease acquisition and treatment failures. Scabies infestations were diagnosed clinically with additional laboratory investigations for crusted scabies. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 2-3 weeks if scabies was diagnosed, others followed a standard alternative algorithm. We saw >1000 participants at each population census. Scabies prevalence fell from 4% at baseline to 1% at month 6. Prevalence rose to 9% at month 12 amongst the baseline cohort in association with an identified exposure to a presumptive crusted scabies case with a higher prevalence of 14% amongst new entries to the cohort. At month 18, scabies prevalence fell to 2%. Scabies acquisitions six months after each MDA were 1% and 2% whilst treatment failures were 6% and 5% respectively. Scabies prevalence reduced in the six months after each MDA with a low risk of acquisition (1-2%). However, in a setting where living conditions are conducive to high scabies transmissibility, exposure to presumptive crusted scabies and population mobility, a sustained reduction in prevalence was not achieved. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Register (ACTRN-12609000654257).

  6. Monitoring rangeland plant community composition using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochdi, Nadia; Eddy, Peter; Staenz, Karl; Zhang, Jinkai; Lutz, Christian

    2008-10-01

    This paper investigates the abundance mapping of rangeland plant communities using hyperspectral remote sensing data. Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) was used to estimate the cover fraction of five rangeland components: green grass, yellow grass, litter, shrubs and soil. Two types of endmembers were assessed using canopy reflectance modeling and tested over real data. The first type is the leaf endmember based on the laboratory reflectance measurements of different samples of leaves. The second is the canopy endmember based on reflectance simulation using the canopy radiative transfer model SAIL. These two endmember types were first assessed in SMA using a number of homogenous canopy simulations with different Leaf Area Index (LAI). Subsequently, the leaf and the canopy endmembers were evaluated using ground spectra, and cover fractions were compared to actual data. Finally, both endmember types were applied in SMA to CHRIS/PROBA data to estimate the rangeland component cover fractions. Performances of leaf and canopy endmembers were evaluated based on the field knowledge of the area of interest. Results showed overall that the cover fraction estimates using the canopy endmembers tend to better agree with actual data.

  7. Are primary healthcare services culturally appropriate for Aboriginal people? Findings from a remote community.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kaye; Fatima, Yaqoot; Knight, Sabina

    2017-04-13

    This study explored the views of key stakeholders on cultural appropriateness of primary health care (PHC) services for Aboriginal people. A total of 78 participants, including healthcare providers, administrative team members (n=24, ~30% of study sample) and Aboriginal community members (n=54, ~70% of study sample) living in remote North West Queensland participated in the study. Outcome measures were assessed by administering survey questionnaires comprising qualitative questions and various subscales (e.g. provider behaviours and attitudes, communication, physical environment and facilities, and support from administrative staff). Descriptive statistics were used to present quantitative findings, whereas inductive thematic analysis was used for qualitative data. In contrast to the views of PHC providers, a significant number of Aboriginal people did not perceive that they were receiving culturally appropriate services. Although PHC providers acknowledged cultural awareness training for familiarising themselves with Aboriginal culture, they found the training to be general, superficial and lacking prospective evaluation. PHC providers should understand that culturally inappropriate clinical encounters generate mistrust and dissatisfaction. Therefore, a broad approach involving culturally respectful association between PHC providers, Aboriginal consumers and administrative staff is required to bring sustainable changes at the practice level to improve the health of Aboriginal people.

  8. Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. an obliqately anaerobic bacterium isolated from a remote Amazonian community in Peru.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Lindsey; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J; Tito, Raul Y; Ozga, Andrew T; Polo, Susan I; Lewis, Cecil M; Lawson, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    A strictly anaerobic Gram-stain positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium designated NE08V(T), was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a remote Amazonian community in Peru. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed the organism belonged to the genus Clostridium and is most closely related to Clostridium vulturis (97.4% sequence similarity) and was further characterized using biochemical and chemotaxonomic methods. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso C13:0 and C16:0 with a genomic DNA G + C content of 31.6 mol%. Fermentation products during growth with PYG were acetate and butyrate. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic information, strain NE08V was identified as representing a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE08V(T) (DSM 23598(T) = CCUG 59712(T)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrification and Charge Distribution in Vertically Shaken Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ruben; Nordsiek, Freja; Lathrop, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Granular charging of particle laden flows at large scales is a widespread phenomenon and has long been observed in nature: Volcanic ash clouds, desert sandstorms, dust devils, thunderstorms and snowstorms all undergo electrification at large scale. As a first approach to understand this phenomenon, we confined granular particles to a vertically oscillating cylindrical chamber with top and bottom conducting plates. Long term voltage transients between the plates and a high dependence on the total particle surface area suggested the preponderance of collective effects in the electrification processes. In order to further explore this hypothesis, we reduced the electrode area for the measurement with two 2-cm circular flat probes on the top plate. With this setup we detected differences in the charge distribution among the particles due to a more localized measurement of the voltage. This research was supported by the Julian Schwinger Foundation.

  10. The use of photovoltaics for rural electrification in northwestern China

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.L.; Li Jingming; Gao Shangbin

    1998-09-01

    The use of renewable energy technologies in China is becoming increasingly important to meet the needs of a large rural population. Solar and wind renewable resources in particular are available in regions of China that at present have no access to conventional grid power. Two regions in China that have an acute lack of electricity are a large region in northern and western China and the coastal island region of China. These regions have attracted the attention of the Chinese government in terms of increasing the quality of life and standard of living conditions of the rural population. These regions have also attracted the attention of domestic Chinese companies and of international companies, governments, and multilateral development organizations as a potential market for renewable energy rural electrification systems. This paper focuses on the bilateral cooperation between the US Department of Energy and China in providing assistance for the use of renewable technologies for rural electrification in northwestern China.

  11. Efficient System Design and Sustainable Finance for China's Village Electrification Program: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, S.; Yin, H.; Kline, D. M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes a joint effort of the Institute for Electrical Engineering of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IEE), and the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support China's rural electrification program. This project developed a design tool that provides guidelines both for off-grid renewable energy system designs and for cost-based tariff and finance schemes to support them. This tool was developed to capitalize on lessons learned from the Township Electrification Program that preceded the Village Electrification Program. We describe the methods used to develop the analysis, some indicative results, and the planned use of the tool in the Village Electrification Program.

  12. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  13. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - Cumulative through June 2014

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  14. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 2013 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  15. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - Cumulative through February 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  16. Living on climate-changed country: indigenous health, well-being and climate change in remote Australian communities.

    PubMed

    Green, Donna; Minchin, Liz

    2014-06-01

    Closing the gap between the health and well-being status of Indigenous people living in remote areas of northern Australia and non-Indigenous Australians has long been a major target of federal health policy. With climate projections suggesting large increases in hot spells in desert regions and more extremes in rainfall in other areas of the north, direct and indirect impacts resulting from these changes are likely to further entrench this health and well-being disparity. This paper argues that it is time to explicitly draw on Indigenous definitions of health, which directly address the need to connect individual and community health to the health of their country, in order to develop effective climate adaptation and health strategies. We detail how current health policies overlook this 'missing' dimension of Indigenous connection to country, and why that is likely to be detrimental to the health and well-being of people living in remote communities in a climate-changed future.

  17. Thundercloud electrification models in atmospheric electricity and meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    A survey is presented of presently-available theoretical models. The models are classified into three main groups: (1) convection models, (2) precipitation models, and (3) general models. The strengths and weaknesses of the models, their dimensionalities and degrees of sophistication, the nature of their inputs and outputs, and the various specific charging mechanisms treated by them, are considered. In results obtained to date, the convection models predict no significant electrification enhancement based on conductivity gradients and convection alone, with the assumed air circulation patterns. Results of the precipitation models show that the initial electrification can occur rapidly and stably through noninductive collision mechanisms involving ice, and breakdown-strength electric fields can relatively easily be achieved subsequently through the collisional-inductive mechanism. A critical difficulty of the collision mechanisms is imprecise knowledge of relaxation times versus contact times, which can easily lead to overestimates of electrification. The general model results tend to support those of the precipitation models in emphasizing the high potential effectiveness of the collisional-inductive mechanism.

  18. Strongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Bart J.; Cheng, Allen C.; McCarthy, James; Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Holt, Deborah C.; Page, Wendy; Shield, Jennifer; Gundjirryirr, Roslyn; Mulholland, Eddie; Ward, Linda; Andrews, Ross M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Strongyloides seroprevalence is hyper-endemic in many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, ranging from 35–60%. We report the impact on Strongyloides seroprevalence after two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Methods Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured Strongyloides seroprevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined changes in serostatus. Serodiagnosis was undertaken by ELISA that used sonicated Strongyloides ratti antigen to detect anti-Strongyloides IgG. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 10–42 days if Strongyloides and/or scabies was diagnosed; others followed a standard alternative algorithm. A questionnaire on clinical symptoms was administered to identify adverse events from treatment and self-reported symptoms associated with serostatus. Findings We surveyed 1013 participants at the baseline population census and 1060 (n = 700 from baseline cohort and 360 new entrants) at month 12. Strongyloides seroprevalence fell from 21% (175/818) at baseline to 5% at month 6. For participants from the baseline cohort this reduction was sustained at month 12 (34/618, 6%), falling to 2% at month 18 after the second MDA. For new entrants to the cohort at month 12, seroprevalence reduced from 25% (75/297) to 7% at month 18. Strongyloides positive seroconversions for the baseline cohort six months after each MDA were 2.5% (4/157) at month 6 and 1% at month 18, whilst failure to serorevert remained unchanged at 18%. At 12 months, eosinophilia was identified in 59% of baseline seropositive participants and 89% of seropositive new entrants, compared with 47%baseline seronegative participants and 51% seronegative new entrants. Seropositivity was not correlated with haemoglobin or any

  19. Teaching wilderness first aid in a remote First Nations community: the story of the Sachigo Lake Wilderness Emergency Response Education Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Born, Karen; Orkin, Aaron; VanderBurgh, David; Beardy, Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand how community members of a remote First Nations community respond to an emergency first aid education programme. Study design A qualitative study involving focus groups and participant observation as part of a community-based participatory research project, which involved the development and implementation of a wilderness first aid course in collaboration with the community. Methods Twenty community members participated in the course and agreed to be part of the research focus groups. Three community research partners validated and reviewed the data collected from this process. These data were coded and analysed using open coding. Results Community members responded to the course in ways related to their past experiences with injury and first aid, both as individuals and as members of the community. Feelings of confidence and self-efficacy related access to care and treatment of injury surfaced during the course. Findings also highlighted how the context of the remote First Nations community influenced the delivery and development of course materials. Conclusions Developing and delivering a first aid course in a remote community requires sensitivity towards the response of participants to the course, as well as the context in which it is being delivered. Employing collaborative approaches to teaching first aid can aim to address these unique needs. Though delivery of a first response training programme in a small remote community will probably not impact the morbidity and mortality associated with injury, it has the potential to impact community self-efficacy and confidence when responding to an emergency situation. PMID:23110258

  20. Barriers and facilitators of sexually transmissible infection testing in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: results from the Sexually Transmitted Infections in Remote Communities, Improved and Enhanced Primary Health Care (STRIVE) Study.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Belinda; Guy, Rebecca; Garton, Linda; Ward, James; Rumbold, Alice; Taylor-Thomson, Debbie; Silver, Bronwyn; McGregor, Skye; Dyda, Amalie; Knox, Janet; Kaldor, John; Maher, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    Background Remote Australian Aboriginal communities experience high rates of bacterial sexually transmissible infections (STI). A key strategy to reduce STIs is to increase testing in primary health care centres. The current study aimed to explore barriers to offering and conducting STI testing in this setting. A qualitative study was undertaken as part of the STI in Remote communities, Improved and Enhanced Primary Health Care (STRIVE) project; a large cluster randomised controlled trial of a sexual health quality improvement program. We conducted 36 in-depth interviews in 22 participating health centres across four regions in northern and central Australia. Participants identified barriers including Aboriginal cultural norms that require the separation of genders and traditional kinship systems that prevent some staff and patients from interacting, both of which were exacerbated by a lack of male staff. Other common barriers were concerns about client confidentiality (lack of private consulting space and living in small communities), staff capacity to offer testing impacted by the competing demands for staff time, and high staff turnover resulting in poor understanding of clinic systems. Many participants also expressed concerns about managing positive test results. To address some of these barriers, participants revealed informal strategies, such as team work, testing outside the clinic and using adult health checks. Results identify cultural, structural and health system issues as barriers to offering STI testing in remote communities, some of which were overcome through the creativity and enthusiasm of individuals rather than formal systems. Many of these barriers can be readily addressed through strengthening existing systems of cultural and clinical orientation and educating staff to view STI in a population health framework. However others, particularly issues in relation to culture, kinship ties and living in small communities, may require testing

  1. The influence of geographical and social distance on nursing practice and continuity of care in a remote First Nations community.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J; Johnson, Joy

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this article, which draws on the findings of a larger ethnographic study, is to explore the influences of geographical and social distancing on nursing practice and continuity of care in a remote First Nations community in Canada. Employing an ethnographic design, the authors use multiple data sources to ground the analysis in the unique context of health services in the selected community. The findings suggest that remote geographical location, the inequitable social conditions that shape the health and well-being of First Nations people, and nurses' level of preparedness to practise in this complex environment fostered patterns of social distancing in nurse-patient relationships. These patterns constrained nurses' ability to engage in practice that promotes continuity of care. In some cases, social distancing took the form of Othering practices and relational disengagement from patients. Changing the social determinants of Aboriginal people's health in remote communities is an important first step in supporting the changes in nurses' practice that are key to improving continuity of care and to effecting long-term, sustainable health improvements.

  2. Supporting a Diverse Community of Undergraduate Researchers in Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Liou-Mark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. remains in grave danger of losing its global competitive edge in STEM. To find solutions to this problem, the Obama Administration proposed two new national initiatives: the Educate to Innovate Initiative and the $100 million government/private industry initiative to train 100,000 STEM teachers and graduate 1 million additional STEM students over the next decade. To assist in ameliorating the national STEM plight, the New York City College of Technology has designed its NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program in satellite and ground-based remote sensing to target underrepresented minority students. Since the inception of the program in 2008, a total of 45 undergraduate students of which 38 (84%) are considered underrepresented minorities in STEM have finished or are continuing with their research or are pursuing their STEM endeavors. The program is comprised of the three primary components. The first component, Structured Learning Environments: Preparation and Mentorship, provides the REU Scholars with the skill sets necessary for proficiency in satellite and ground-based remote sensing research. The students are offered mini-courses in Geographic Information Systems, MATLAB, and Remote Sensing. They also participate in workshops on the Ethics of Research. Each REU student is a member of a team that consists of faculty mentors, post doctorate/graduate students, and high school students. The second component, Student Support and Safety Nets, provides undergraduates a learning environment that supports them in becoming successful researchers. Special networking and Brown Bag sessions, and an annual picnic with research scientists are organized so that REU Scholars are provided with opportunities to expand their professional community. Graduate school support is provided by offering free Graduate Record Examination preparation courses and workshops on the graduate school application process. Additionally, students are supported by college

  3. Extreme Heat and Health: Perspectives from Health Service Providers in Rural and Remote Communities in South Australia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Susan; Bi, Peng; Newbury, Jonathan; Robinson, Guy; Pisaniello, Dino; Saniotis, Arthur; Hansen, Alana

    2013-01-01

    Among the challenges for rural communities and health services in Australia, climate change and increasing extreme heat are emerging as additional stressors. Effective public health responses to extreme heat require an understanding of the impact on health and well-being, and the risk or protective factors within communities. This study draws on lived experiences to explore these issues in eleven rural and remote communities across South Australia, framing these within a socio-ecological model. Semi-structured interviews with health service providers (n = 13), and a thematic analysis of these data, has identified particular challenges for rural communities and their health services during extreme heat. The findings draw attention to the social impacts of extreme heat in rural communities, the protective factors (independence, social support, education, community safety), and challenges for adaptation (vulnerabilities, infrastructure, community demographics, housing and local industries). With temperatures increasing across South Australia, there is a need for local planning and low-cost strategies to address heat-exacerbating factors in rural communities, to minimise the impact of extreme heat in the future. PMID:24173140

  4. VET Retention in Remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities. Good Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2017

    2017-01-01

    This good practice guide is based on the research project "Enhancing training advantage for remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners" by John Guenther et al. on behalf of Ninti One Limited. The project examines five unique and successful vocational education and training (VET) programs in remote areas and identifies how…

  5. Creating Physical Education in Remote Australian Schools: Overcoming the Tyranny of Distance through Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Tony; Sirna, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative case study undertaken in a remote part of Queensland, Australia. While there is some modest agreement about the capacity of contemporary information technologies to overcome the problems of schooling in areas of extreme remoteness, generally, children educated in such contexts are considered to be disadvantaged.…

  6. OUT Success Stories: Rural Electrification in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Strawn, N.

    2000-08-31

    The United States and Brazil are collaborating to bring electricity to some 5 million households in rural Brazil. Over the next decade, there is a potential to install approximately 500 megawatts (MW) of solar home systems and 1000 MW of community systems, bringing light to households, schools, and health clinics throughout rural Brazil.

  7. Historical evidence that electrification caused the 20th century epidemic of "diseases of civilization".

    PubMed

    Milham, Samuel

    2010-02-01

    The slow spread of residential electrification in the US in the first half of the 20th century from urban to rural areas resulted by 1940 in two large populations; urban populations, with nearly complete electrification and rural populations exposed to varying levels of electrification depending on the progress of electrification in their state. It took until 1956 for US farms to reach urban and rural non-farm electrification levels. Both populations were covered by the US vital registration system. US vital statistics tabulations and census records for 1920-1960, and historical US vital statistics documents were examined. Residential electrification data was available in the US census of population for 1930, 1940 and 1950. Crude urban and rural death rates were calculated, and death rates by state were correlated with electrification rates by state for urban and rural areas for 1940 white resident deaths. Urban death rates were much higher than rural rates for cardiovascular diseases, malignant diseases, diabetes and suicide in 1940. Rural death rates were significantly correlated with level of residential electric service by state for most causes examined. I hypothesize that the 20th century epidemic of the so called diseases of civilization including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes and suicide was caused by electrification not by lifestyle. A large proportion of these diseases may therefore be preventable.

  8. Navajo Electrification for Sustainable Development: The Potential Economic and Social Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballentine, Crystal; DeSouza, Anil; Bain, Craig; Majure, Lisa; Smith, Dean Howard; Turek, Jill

    2004-01-01

    The concomitant secondary consequences of an electrification program and the potential long-term benefits of such a program are described. An electrification program can stimulate a move toward true self-determination and self-sufficiency for the Navajo nation.

  9. Detection of 12.5% and 25% Salt Reduction in Bread in a Remote Indigenous Australian Community.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Emma; Clarke, Rozlynne; Jaenke, Rachael; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-03-16

    Food reformulation is an important strategy to reduce the excess salt intake observed in remote Indigenous Australia. We aimed to examine whether 12.5% and 25% salt reduction in bread is detectable, and, if so, whether acceptability is changed, in a sample of adults living in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory of Australia. Convenience samples were recruited for testing of reduced-salt (300 and 350 mg Na/100 g) versus Standard (~400 mg Na/100 g) white and wholemeal breads (n = 62 for white; n = 72 for wholemeal). Triangle testing was used to examine whether participants could detect a difference between the breads. Liking of each bread was also measured; standard consumer acceptability questionnaires were modified to maximise cultural appropriateness and understanding. Participants were unable to detect a difference between Standard and reduced-salt breads (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using binomial probability). Further, as expected, liking of the breads was not changed with salt reduction (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using ANOVA). Reducing salt in products commonly purchased in remote Indigenous communities has potential as an equitable, cost-effective and sustainable strategy to reduce population salt intake and reduce risk of chronic disease, without the barriers associated with strategies that require individual behaviour change.

  10. Detection of 12.5% and 25% Salt Reduction in Bread in a Remote Indigenous Australian Community

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Emma; Clarke, Rozlynne; Jaenke, Rachael; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Food reformulation is an important strategy to reduce the excess salt intake observed in remote Indigenous Australia. We aimed to examine whether 12.5% and 25% salt reduction in bread is detectable, and, if so, whether acceptability is changed, in a sample of adults living in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory of Australia. Convenience samples were recruited for testing of reduced-salt (300 and 350 mg Na/100 g) versus Standard (~400 mg Na/100 g) white and wholemeal breads (n = 62 for white; n = 72 for wholemeal). Triangle testing was used to examine whether participants could detect a difference between the breads. Liking of each bread was also measured; standard consumer acceptability questionnaires were modified to maximise cultural appropriateness and understanding. Participants were unable to detect a difference between Standard and reduced-salt breads (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using binomial probability). Further, as expected, liking of the breads was not changed with salt reduction (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using ANOVA). Reducing salt in products commonly purchased in remote Indigenous communities has potential as an equitable, cost-effective and sustainable strategy to reduce population salt intake and reduce risk of chronic disease, without the barriers associated with strategies that require individual behaviour change. PMID:26999196

  11. A community-based participatory approach and engagement process creates culturally appropriate and community informed pandemic plans after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: remote and isolated First Nations communities of sub-arctic Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Charania, Nadia A; Tsuji, Leonard J S

    2012-04-03

    Public health emergencies have the potential to disproportionately impact disadvantaged populations due to pre-established social and economic inequalities. Internationally, prior to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, existing pandemic plans were created with limited public consultation; therefore, the unique needs and characteristics of some First Nations communities may not be ethically and adequately addressed. Engaging the public in pandemic planning can provide vital information regarding local values and beliefs that may ultimately lead to increased acceptability, feasibility, and implementation of pandemic plans. Thus, the objective of the present study was to elicit and address First Nations community members' suggested modifications to their community-level pandemic plans after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The study area included three remote and isolated First Nations communities located in sub-arctic Ontario, Canada. A community-based participatory approach and community engagement process (i.e., semi-directed interviews (n = 13), unstructured interviews (n = 4), and meetings (n = 27)) were employed. Participants were purposively sampled and represented various community stakeholders (e.g., local government, health care, clergy, education, etc.) involved in the community's pandemic response. Collected data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis. The data subsequently informed the modification of the community-level pandemic plans. The primary modifications incorporated in the community-level pandemic plans involved adding community-specific detail. For example, 'supplies' emerged as an additional category of pandemic preparedness and response, since including details about supplies and resources was important due to the geographical remoteness of the study communities. Furthermore, it was important to add details of how, when, where, and who was responsible for implementing recommendations

  12. Mining in subarctic Canada: airborne PM2.5 metal concentrations in two remote First Nations communities.

    PubMed

    Liberda, Eric N; Tsuji, Leonard J S; Peltier, Richard E

    2015-11-01

    Airborne particulate matter arising from upwind mining activities is a concern for First Nations communities in the western James Bay region of Ontario, Canada. Aerosol chemical components were collected in 2011 from two communities in northern Ontario. The chemical and mass concentration data of particulate matter collected during this study shows a significant difference in PM2.5 in Attawapiskat compared to Fort Albany. Elemental profiles indicate enhanced levels of some tracers thought to arise from mining activities, such as, K, Ni, and crustal materials. Both communities are remote and isolated from urban and industrial pollution sources, however, Attawapiskat First Nation has significantly enhanced levels of particulate matter, and it is likely that some of this arises from upwind mining activities.

  13. From targets to ripples: tracing the process of developing a community capacity building appraisal tool with remote Australian Indigenous communities to tackle food security.

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, Julie; van den Boogaard, Christel; Ritchie, Jan; Bailie, Ross; Coveney, John; Liberato, Selma

    2014-09-04

    The issue of food security is complex and requires capacity for often-unrelated groups to work together. We sought to assess the relevance and meaning of a commonly used set of community capacity development constructs in the context of remote Indigenous Australia and through this propose a model to support capacity. The assessment was conducted with four communities and took place over five steps that involved: (i) test of clarity of construct meaning; (ii) inductive derivation of community capacity constructs; (iii) application of these constructs to the capacity of community multi-sector food-interest groups; (iv) a cross-check of these constructs and their meanings to literature-derived constructs, and; (v) achieving consensus on tool constructs. Data were collected over a three-year period (2010-2012) that involved two on-site visits to one community, and two urban-based workshops. These data were augmented by food-interest group meeting minutes and reports. Eleven community capacity development constructs were included in the proposed model: community ownership, building on strengths, strong leadership and voice, making decisions together, strong partnerships, opportunities for learning and skill development, way of working, getting together the things you need, good strong communication, sharing the true story, and continuing the process and passing on to the next generation. The constructs derived from the literature and commonly used to appraise community capacity development were well accepted and could be used to identify areas needing strengthening. The specifics of each construct however differed from those derived from the literature yet were similar across the four communities and had particular meaning for those involved. The involvement of elders and communication with the wider community seemed paramount to forming a solid foundation on which capacity could be further developed. This study explored an approach for ascribing context specific

  14. The development of a culturally appropriate school based intervention for Australian Aboriginal children living in remote communities: A formative evaluation of the Alert Program(®) intervention.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bree; Fitzpatrick, James; Symons, Martyn; Jirikowic, Tracy; Cross, Donna; Latimer, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated the benefits of targeting self-regulation in non-Aboriginal children, it is unclear whether such programs would be effective for Aboriginal children attending school in remote communities. Some of these children have been diagnosed with a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) impairing their ability to self-regulate. The aim of this article is to describe a three phase formative process to develop and pilot a curriculum version of the Alert Program(®) , a promising intervention for improving self-regulation that could be used in remote community schools. This modified version of the program will be subsequently tested in a cluster randomised controlled trial. A mixed methods approach was used. Modifications to the Alert Program(®) , its delivery and evaluation were made after community and stakeholder consultation facilitated by a senior Aboriginal community researcher. Changes to lesson plans and program resources were made to reflect the remote community context, classroom environment and the challenging behaviours of children. Standardised study outcome measures were modified by removing several questions that had little relevance to the lives of children in remote communities. Program training for school staff was reduced in length to reduce staff burden. This study identified aspects of the Alert Program(®) training, delivery and measures for evaluation that need modification before their use in assessing the efficacy of the Alert Program(®) in remote Aboriginal community primary schools. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  15. Whole genome sequencing to investigate a putative outbreak of the virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST93 clone in a remote Indigenous community.

    PubMed

    Meumann, Ella M; Andersson, Patiyan; Yeaman, Fiona; Oldfield, Sarah; Lilliebridge, Rachael; Bentley, Stephen D; Krause, Vicki; Beaman, Miles; Currie, Bart J; Holt, Deborah C; Giffard, Philip M; Tong, Steven Y C

    2016-12-01

    We report two cases of severe pneumonia due to clone ST93 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) presenting from a remote Australian Indigenous community within a 2-week period, and the utilization of whole genome sequences to determine whether these were part of an outbreak. S. aureus was isolated from 12 of 92 nasal swabs collected from 25 community households (including the two index households); one isolate was ST93. Three of five skin lesion S. aureus isolates obtained at the community were ST93. Whole genome sequencing of the ST93 isolates from this study and a further 20 ST93 isolates from the same region suggested that recent transmission and progression to disease had not taken place. The proximity in time and space of the two severe pneumonia cases is probably a reflection of the high burden of disease due to ST93 MRSA in this population where skin infections and household crowding are common.

  16. Whole genome sequencing to investigate a putative outbreak of the virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST93 clone in a remote Indigenous community

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Patiyan; Yeaman, Fiona; Oldfield, Sarah; Lilliebridge, Rachael; Bentley, Stephen D.; Krause, Vicki; Beaman, Miles; Currie, Bart J.; Holt, Deborah C.; Giffard, Philip M.; Tong, Steven Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of severe pneumonia due to clone ST93 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) presenting from a remote Australian Indigenous community within a 2-week period, and the utilization of whole genome sequences to determine whether these were part of an outbreak. S. aureus was isolated from 12 of 92 nasal swabs collected from 25 community households (including the two index households); one isolate was ST93. Three of five skin lesion S. aureus isolates obtained at the community were ST93. Whole genome sequencing of the ST93 isolates from this study and a further 20 ST93 isolates from the same region suggested that recent transmission and progression to disease had not taken place. The proximity in time and space of the two severe pneumonia cases is probably a reflection of the high burden of disease due to ST93 MRSA in this population where skin infections and household crowding are common. PMID:28348837

  17. Lungurra Ngoora--a pilot model of care for aged and disabled in a remote Aboriginal community--can it work?

    PubMed

    LoGiudice, D C; Smith, K; Shadforth, G; Lindeman, M; Carroll, E; Atkinson, D; Schaper, F; Lautenschlager, N; Murphy, R; Flicker, L

    2012-01-01

    The literature on the health of and services for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is relatively sparse. This study explored the development and implementation of a locally designed community service model of care for older people, and people with disability and/or mental health problems in remote Aboriginal Australia. Based on extensive community consultation with older people, families, carers, community members and stakeholders, a model of care was developed to address unmet needs for the target population and their carers in the remote community of Looma, in the Kimberley region of Australia. The model was implemented and evaluated over 12 months. The main outcome measures included the number of services (including home services, meals, transport, respite, personal care and advocacy) provided. Outcomes of community participation, capacity building, resources, partnerships, workforce, service delivery and cultural protection were assessed qualitatively by an external evaluator. The number of people receiving community care services in Looma increased from eight to 22, and services increased in all domains from 140 total services delivered for 1 month at baseline to 2356 by the final month of the program. The Lungurra Ngoora community care service model pilot project demonstrated a successful collaborative service model that addressed the care needs of older persons, those with disability and mental illness, and their carers in this remote community. The developmental approach, and model structure, could serve as a template for future delivery of services in remote Aboriginal communities.

  18. Part of the problem or part of the solution? Communication assessments of Aboriginal children residing in remote communities using videoconferencing.

    PubMed

    Eriks-Brophy, Alice; Quittenbaum, Jacqueline; Anderson, Deborah; Nelson, Tina

    2008-08-01

    The current article describes the results, inter-scorer reliability, and potential sources of bias in conducting speech-language assessments with Aboriginal children in remote Ontario communities using videoconferencing. A main focus of this pilot study was to examine scoring bias, an issue that might arise with videoconferencing for any population but that could potentially interact with test and cultural bias to negatively affect the diagnosis of Aboriginal children. Assessments were administered by a remote-site speech-language pathologist (SLP), while an on-site SLP served as an assistant. Responses were scored simultaneously by both SLPs and the results and their degree of correspondence were compared. Percentage agreement ranged from 96-100% for language tests and from 66-100% for the articulation measure. Results suggest that videoconferencing can be an effective complement to service provision when procedures are organized so as to minimize bias in test administration and in the interpretation of test performance.

  19. How the Use of Remote Sensing is Transferred to Diverse User Communities Through Capacity Building at Columbia University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, P.; Bell, M. A.; Mantilla, G.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of capacity-building activities developed by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society to help diverse stakeholder communities use remote sensing to monitor climate and environmental factors that influence public health, natural disasters and food security. Teaching at a graduate level at Columbia University, at summer institutes and in counties, we developed training modules and case studies on how to combine remote sensing data to monitor precipitation, temperature, vegetation, and water bodies with climate information and field data (e.g. fires, infectious disease incidence, Desert Locusts) to 1) understand the relationship between climate, environmental factors and specific challenges to development and 2) provide methodologies and tools to forecast and better manage the problems. At Columbia University, we have developed a graduate course that provides the practical and theoretical foundations for the application of remote sensing techniques to the identification and monitoring of environmental change. We use the IRI Data Library, an online tool, to i) manage diverse data, ii) visualize data, iii) analyze remote sensing images and iii) combine data from different sources (e.g., fires, public health, natural disasters, agriculture). The IRI Data Library tool allows the users to analyze on-line climatic and environmental factors in relation to particular problems at various space and time scales. A Summer Institute on Climate Information for Public Health, first developed in 2008, has brought together experts from the public health and climate communities at the IRI to learn how to integrate climate and environmental factors with public health issues. In countries and regions, we also provide training for climate and public health working professionals in Madagascar, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Colombia and the Mercosur Region (including Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil and Argentina).

  20. Bolivia: rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report No. 16

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, E.; Poe, K.M.; Tendler, J.

    1980-12-01

    Two rural electrification systems initiated in Bolivia in 1973 and 1974 are the subject of this report. By 1979, all distribution networks were completed, except in the La Paz region. Power was supplied to 42,000 consumers and was used primarily for residential lighting. Although demand outpaced supply, consumption per household was lower than projected, and irrigation and industrial use was negligible. The preponderant positive impact of the projects was social. Household lighting improved the physical quality of life for 7% of Bolivia's rural population.

  1. User-owned utility models for rural electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Waddle, D.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses the history of rural electric cooperatives (REC) in the United States, and the broader question of whether such organizations can serve as a model for rural electrification in other countries. The author points out the features of such cooperatives which have given them stability and strength, and emphasizes that for success of such programs, many of these same features must be present. He definitely feels the cooperative models are not outdated, but they need strong local support, and a governmental structure which is supportive, and in particular not negative.

  2. The Green Ocean Over the Amazon: Implications for Cloud Electrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E.; Blakeslee, R.; Boccippio, D.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A convective regime with distinct maritime characteristics (weak updraft, low CCN, prevalent coalescence and rainout, weak mixed phase reflectivity, low glaciation temperature, and little if any lightning) is documented over the Amazon basin of the South American continent, and dubbed the "green ocean". Radar, lightning, thermodynamic and AVHRR satellite observations are examined to shed light on the roles of updraft and aerosol in providing departures from the green ocean regime toward continental behavior. Extreme case studies are identified in which the updraft control is dominant and in which the aerosol control is dominant. The tentative conclusion gives importance to both updrafts and aerosol in shaping the electrification of tropical convection.

  3. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 1Q - 2Q 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved. the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  4. Does Electrification Spur the Fertility Transition? Evidence From Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Michael; Sparrow, Robert; Tasciotti, Luca

    2015-10-01

    We analyze various pathways through which access to electricity affects fertility in Indonesia, using a district difference-in-difference approach. The electrification rate increased by 65 % over the study period, and our results suggest that the subsequent effects on fertility account for about 18 % to 24 % of the overall decline in fertility. A key channel is increased exposure to television. Using in addition several waves of Demographic and Health Surveys, we find suggestive evidence that increased exposure to TV affects, in particular, fertility preferences and increases the effective use of contraception. Reduced child mortality seems to be another important pathway.

  5. The Green Ocean Over the Amazon: Implications for Cloud Electrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E.; Blakeslee, R.; Boccippio, D.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A convective regime with distinct maritime characteristics (weak updraft, low CCN, prevalent coalescence and rainout, weak mixed phase reflectivity, low glaciation temperature, and little if any lightning) is documented over the Amazon basin of the South American continent, and dubbed the "green ocean". Radar, lightning, thermodynamic and AVHRR satellite observations are examined to shed light on the roles of updraft and aerosol in providing departures from the green ocean regime toward continental behavior. Extreme case studies are identified in which the updraft control is dominant and in which the aerosol control is dominant. The tentative conclusion gives importance to both updrafts and aerosol in shaping the electrification of tropical convection.

  6. Using a SWOT analysis to inform healthy eating and physical activity strategies for a remote First Nations community in Canada.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Kelly; Hanning, Rhona M; Sutherland, Celine; Edwards-Wheesk, Ruby; Tsuji, Leonard J S

    2012-01-01

    To plan community-driven health promotion strategies based on a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of the healthy eating and physical activity patterns of First Nation (FN) youth. Cross-sectional qualitative and quantitative data used to develop SWOT themes and strategies. Remote, subarctic FN community of Fort Albany, Ontario, Canada. Adult (n  =  25) and youth (n  =  66, grades 6-11) community members. Qualitative data were collected using five focus groups with adults (two focus groups) and youth (three focus groups), seven individual interviews with adults, and an environmental scan of 13 direct observations of events/locations (e.g., the grocery store). Quantitative data on food/physical activity behaviors were collected using a validated Web-based survey with youth. Themes were identified from qualitative and quantitative data and were analyzed and interpreted within a SWOT matrix. Thirty-two SWOT themes were identified (e.g., accessibility of existing facilities, such as the gymnasium). The SWOT analysis showed how these themes could be combined and transformed into 12 strategies (e.g., expanding and enhancing the school snack/breakfast program) while integrating suggestions from the community. SWOT analysis was a beneficial tool that facilitated the combination of local data and community ideas in the development of targeted health promotion strategies for the FN community of Fort Albany.

  7. A community-based participatory approach and engagement process creates culturally appropriate and community informed pandemic plans after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: remote and isolated First Nations communities of sub-arctic Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Public health emergencies have the potential to disproportionately impact disadvantaged populations due to pre-established social and economic inequalities. Internationally, prior to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, existing pandemic plans were created with limited public consultation; therefore, the unique needs and characteristics of some First Nations communities may not be ethically and adequately addressed. Engaging the public in pandemic planning can provide vital information regarding local values and beliefs that may ultimately lead to increased acceptability, feasibility, and implementation of pandemic plans. Thus, the objective of the present study was to elicit and address First Nations community members’ suggested modifications to their community-level pandemic plans after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Methods The study area included three remote and isolated First Nations communities located in sub-arctic Ontario, Canada. A community-based participatory approach and community engagement process (i.e., semi-directed interviews (n = 13), unstructured interviews (n = 4), and meetings (n = 27)) were employed. Participants were purposively sampled and represented various community stakeholders (e.g., local government, health care, clergy, education, etc.) involved in the community’s pandemic response. Collected data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis. The data subsequently informed the modification of the community-level pandemic plans. Results The primary modifications incorporated in the community-level pandemic plans involved adding community-specific detail. For example, ‘supplies’ emerged as an additional category of pandemic preparedness and response, since including details about supplies and resources was important due to the geographical remoteness of the study communities. Furthermore, it was important to add details of how, when, where, and who was responsible

  8. Riding the rural radio wave: The impact of a community-led drug and alcohol radio advertising campaign in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Munro, Alice; Allan, Julaine; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Snijder, Mieke

    2017-02-24

    Aboriginal people experience a higher burden of disease as a consequence of drug and alcohol (D&A) abuse. Although media campaigns can be a popular tool for disseminating health promotion messages, evidence of the extent to which they reduce the impact of substance abuse is limited, especially for rural Aboriginal communities. This paper is the first to examine the impact a locally designed D&A radio advertising campaign for Aboriginal people in a remote community in Western NSW. A post-intervention evaluation. The radio campaign was implemented in Bourke, (population 2465, 30% Aboriginal). Fifty-three community surveys were completed. The self-reported level of awareness of the campaign and the number of self-referrals to local D&A workers in the intervention period. Most respondents (79%) reported they listen to radio on a daily basis, with 75% reporting that they had heard one or more of the advertisements. The advertisement that was remembered best contained the voice of a respected, local person. There was one self-referral to local health services during the intervention timeframe. The community-led radio advertising campaign increased community awareness of substance abuse harms, but had limited impact on formal help-seeking. This paper highlights the value of radio as a commonly used, trusted and culturally relevant health promotion medium for rural communities, especially when engaging local respected Aboriginal presenters. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  9. Exploring the Potential for Technology-Based Nutrition Education Among WIC Recipients in Remote Alaska Native Communities.

    PubMed

    Power, Julianne M; Braun, Kathryn L; Bersamin, Andrea

    Estimate media technology use in Alaska Native communities to inform the feasibility of technology-based nutrition education. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random selection of about 50% of Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) authorized representatives in remote Alaska Native communities (n = 975). Media technology use, interest in media technology-based nutrition education, and potential barriers were assessed. Chi-square tests were used to investigate associations among technology use, age, and education. Technology use was common among respondents (n = 368); use was significantly more common among younger age groups and participants with a higher level of education. Smartphone (78.8%) and Facebook (95.8%) use was comparable to national averages, but having a computer at home (38.4%) was much less likely. Less than 50% of participants have Internet access at home. Findings shed light on new opportunities for WIC and other programs to deliver nutrition education to Alaska Native people in remote communities. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Aboriginal Practical Experience and Its Impact on Pre-Service Teacher's Decisions about Living and Working in Remote in Indigenous Communities in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Jenny; Moss, Lynette; Cherednichenko, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008, 10 pre-service teachers and 2 teacher educators from Edith Cowan University (ECU) participated in an existing community education program in rural and remote Indigenous communities in central Australia. From an intrepid start with a mountain of overloaded baggage and camping cutlery setting off the scanning machine at the airport,…

  11. The Aboriginal Practical Experience and Its Impact on Pre-Service Teacher's Decisions about Living and Working in Remote in Indigenous Communities in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Jenny; Moss, Lynette; Cherednichenko, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008, 10 pre-service teachers and 2 teacher educators from Edith Cowan University (ECU) participated in an existing community education program in rural and remote Indigenous communities in central Australia. From an intrepid start with a mountain of overloaded baggage and camping cutlery setting off the scanning machine at the airport,…

  12. Quinolone Resistance in Absence of Selective Pressure: The Experience of a Very Remote Community in the Amazon Forest

    PubMed Central

    Riccobono, Eleonora; Fernandez, Connie; Mantella, Antonia; Magnelli, Donata; Mannini, Dario; Strohmeyer, Marianne; Bartalesi, Filippo; Rodriguez, Hugo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background Quinolones are potent broad-spectrum bactericidal agents increasingly employed also in resource-limited countries. Resistance to quinolones is an increasing problem, known to be strongly associated with quinolone exposure. We report on the emergence of quinolone resistance in a very remote community in the Amazon forest, where quinolones have never been used and quinolone resistance was absent in 2002. Methods The community exhibited a considerable level of geographical isolation, limited contact with the exterior and minimal antibiotic use (not including quinolones). In December 2009, fecal carriage of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli was investigated in 120 of the 140 inhabitants, and in 48 animals reared in the community. All fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were genotyped and characterized for the mechanisms of plasmid- and chromosomal-mediated quinolone resistance. Principal Findings Despite the characteristics of the community remained substantially unchanged during the period 2002–2009, carriage of quinolone-resistant E. coli was found to be common in 2009 both in humans (45% nalidixic acid, 14% ciprofloxacin) and animals (54% nalidixic acid, 23% ciprofloxacin). Ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates of human and animal origin showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, a high level of genetic heterogeneity, and a combination of GyrA (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn) and ParC (Ser80Ile) substitutions commonly observed in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli. Conclusions Remoteness and absence of antibiotic selective pressure did not protect the community from the remarkable emergence of quinolone resistance in E. coli. Introduction of the resistant strains from antibiotic-exposed settings is the most likely source, while persistence and dissemination in the absence of quinolone exposure is likely mostly related with poor sanitation. Interventions aimed at reducing the spreading of resistant isolates (by improving sanitation and water

  13. Quinolone resistance in absence of selective pressure: the experience of a very remote community in the Amazon forest.

    PubMed

    Pallecchi, Lucia; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Riccobono, Eleonora; Fernandez, Connie; Mantella, Antonia; Magnelli, Donata; Mannini, Dario; Strohmeyer, Marianne; Bartalesi, Filippo; Rodriguez, Hugo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2012-01-01

    Quinolones are potent broad-spectrum bactericidal agents increasingly employed also in resource-limited countries. Resistance to quinolones is an increasing problem, known to be strongly associated with quinolone exposure. We report on the emergence of quinolone resistance in a very remote community in the Amazon forest, where quinolones have never been used and quinolone resistance was absent in 2002. The community exhibited a considerable level of geographical isolation, limited contact with the exterior and minimal antibiotic use (not including quinolones). In December 2009, fecal carriage of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli was investigated in 120 of the 140 inhabitants, and in 48 animals reared in the community. All fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were genotyped and characterized for the mechanisms of plasmid- and chromosomal-mediated quinolone resistance. Despite the characteristics of the community remained substantially unchanged during the period 2002-2009, carriage of quinolone-resistant E. coli was found to be common in 2009 both in humans (45% nalidixic acid, 14% ciprofloxacin) and animals (54% nalidixic acid, 23% ciprofloxacin). Ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates of human and animal origin showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, a high level of genetic heterogeneity, and a combination of GyrA (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn) and ParC (Ser80Ile) substitutions commonly observed in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli. Remoteness and absence of antibiotic selective pressure did not protect the community from the remarkable emergence of quinolone resistance in E. coli. Introduction of the resistant strains from antibiotic-exposed settings is the most likely source, while persistence and dissemination in the absence of quinolone exposure is likely mostly related with poor sanitation. Interventions aimed at reducing the spreading of resistant isolates (by improving sanitation and water/food safety) are urgently needed to preserve the efficacy

  14. No germs on me: a social marketing campaign to promote hand-washing with soap in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Slavin, Nicola; Bailie, Ross; Schobben, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    A social marketing campaign promoting hand-washing with soap was implemented to reduce the high burden of infection experienced by Australian Aboriginal children living in remote communities. Epidemiological evidence of effect and other evidence were used to identify the hygiene intervention and health promotion approach for the project. We drew on the findings of: (i) a systematic literature review to identify the intervention for which there is strong effect in similar populations and contexts; and (ii) a narrative literature review to determine our health promotion approach. This process provided practitioners with confidence and understanding so they could address a complex problem in a politically and otherwise sensitive context.

  15. Outcomes of a peritoneal dialysis program in remote communities within Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Mauricio; Devia, Martha; Hernández, Gilma; Astudillo, Kindar; Trillos, Carlos; Uribe, Mauricio; Latorre, Catalina; Bernal, Astrid; Rivera, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Colombia is a country of diverse geographic regions, some with mountainous terrain that can make access to urban areas difficult for individuals who live in remote areas. In 2005, a program was initiated to establish remote peritoneal dialysis (PD) centers in Colombia to improve access to PD for patients with end-stage renal disease who face geographic or financial access barriers. The present study was a multi-center cohort observational study of prevalent home PD patients who were at least 18 years of age and were being managed by one of nine established remote PD centers in Colombia over a 2-year period. Data were collected from clinical records, databases, and patient interviews. Patient survival, incidence of peritonitis, and rate of withdrawal from PD therapy were assessed. A total of 345 patients were eligible for the study. The majority (87.8%) of patients lived on one to two times a minimum monthly salary (equivalent to US$243 - US$486). On average, patients traveled 1.2 hours and 4.3 hours from their home to their remote PD center or an urban reference renal clinic, respectively. The incidence rate of peritonitis was 2.54 episodes per 100 patient-months of therapy. A bivariate analysis showed a significantly higher risk of peritonitis in patients who were living on less than one times a monthly minimum salary (p < 0.05) or who had a dirt, cement, or unfinished wood floor (p < 0.05). The 1-year and 2-year patient survival rates were 92.44% and 81.55%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year technique survival rates were 97.27% and 89.78%, respectively. With the support of remote PD centers that mitigate geographic and financial barriers to healthcare, home PD therapy is a safe and appropriate treatment option for patients who live in remote areas in Colombia. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  16. Outcomes of a Peritoneal Dialysis Program in Remote Communities Within Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria, Mauricio; Devia, Martha; Hernández, Gilma; Astudillo, Kindar; Trillos, Carlos; Uribe, Mauricio; Latorre, Catalina; Bernal, Astrid; Rivera, Angela

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background and Objective: Colombia is a country of diverse geographic regions, some with mountainous terrain that can make access to urban areas difficult for individuals who live in remote areas. In 2005, a program was initiated to establish remote peritoneal dialysis (PD) centers in Colombia to improve access to PD for patients with end-stage renal disease who face geographic or financial access barriers. ♦ Patients and Methods: The present study was a multi-center cohort observational study of prevalent home PD patients who were at least 18 years of age and were being managed by one of nine established remote PD centers in Colombia over a 2-year period. Data were collected from clinical records, databases, and patient interviews. Patient survival, incidence of peritonitis, and rate of withdrawal from PD therapy were assessed. ♦ Results: A total of 345 patients were eligible for the study. The majority (87.8%) of patients lived on one to two times a minimum monthly salary (equivalent to US$243 – US$486). On average, patients traveled 1.2 hours and 4.3 hours from their home to their remote PD center or an urban reference renal clinic, respectively. The incidence rate of peritonitis was 2.54 episodes per 100 patient-months of therapy. A bivariate analysis showed a significantly higher risk of peritonitis in patients who were living on less than one times a monthly minimum salary (p < 0.05) or who had a dirt, cement, or unfinished wood floor (p < 0.05). The 1-year and 2-year patient survival rates were 92.44% and 81.55%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year technique survival rates were 97.27% and 89.78%, respectively. ♦ Conclusions: With the support of remote PD centers that mitigate geographic and financial barriers to healthcare, home PD therapy is a safe and appropriate treatment option for patients who live in remote areas in Colombia. PMID:24497583

  17. Photovoltaics for rural electrification in the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.D.; Martin, J.G.

    1987-08-21

    Enersol Associates, Inc., has begun to structure a program for the introduction of photovoltaics in rural areas, and started to refer to this as the SOBASEC (SOlar-BASed Rural Electrification Concept) program. Throughout the report we have used the acronym SOBASEC to refer to the specific approach to electrification in rural areas with photovoltaics, as developed by Enersol Associates, Inc. This report documents the efforts to date and describes SOBASEC so that a variety of readers may benefit. This report provides an overall background on the Dominican Republic and a history of the project developed by Enersol in the Puerto Plata region. It describes the electric grid system that is owned and operated by the Dominican Government, and which serves urban dwellers and approximately 30% of the rural population. This paper is dedicated to describing the technical and institutional details of SOBASEC as developed by experience in implementing the program and installing the first 100 PV systems. Also discussed is the logical expansion that can take place with adequate financing and institutional support. This is done by describing a reasonable investment scenario. A key catalytic role of this financing is placed in the hands of the organizations that aim toward economic and social development in less developed countries. Recommendations and concluding comments on where this all may lead in the years to come is finally discussed. 61 refs., 59 figs.

  18. Joint U.S./Brazilian Renewable Energy Rural Electrification Project

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.; Leboeuf, C.; Moszkowicz, M.; Valente, L.G.

    1994-12-31

    The Joint US/Brazilian Renewable Energy Rural Electrification Project was established following the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. Installation of the hardware for Phase 1 of the project has been completed; the nearly 800 photovoltaic (PV) lighting systems are now operational, and a 3-year period of monitored operating and maintenance experience has begun. Procurement for equipment in a Phase 2 project expansion into 6 additional states was completed during the summer of 1994. In Phase 2, the project emphasis has expanded into other applications (water pumping by both PV ad wind, stand-aloe home electrification with basic ac power, two 50-kW village-scale hybrid power systems for diesel fuel displacement in the amazon Basin, and additional home, school, and health clinic dc power systems). The objectives of these pilot projects are to establish technical, institutional, and economic confidence in using renewable energy (PV and wind) system to meet the needs of the citizens of rural Brazil.

  19. A numerical study of aerosol effects on electrification of thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. B.; Shi, Z.; Chen, Z. L.; Peng, L.; Yang, Y.; Guo, X. F.; Chen, H. R.

    2017-02-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effect of aerosol on microphysical and electrification in thunderstorm clouds. A two-dimensional (2-D) cumulus model with electrification scheme including non-inductive and inductive charge separation is used. The concentration of aerosol particles with distribution fitted by superimposing three log-normal distributions rises from 50 to 10,000 cm-3. The results show that the response of charge separation rate to the increase of aerosol concentration is nonmonotonic. When aerosol concentration is changed from 50 to 1000 cm-3, a stronger formation of cloud droplet, graupel and ice crystal results in increasing charge separation via non-inductive and inductive mechanism. However, in the range of 1000-3000 cm-3, vapor competition arises in the decrease of ice crystal mixing ratio and the reduction of ice crystals size leads to a slightly decrease in non-inductive charge rate, while inductive charging rate has no significant change in magnitude. Above aerosol concentration of 3000 cm-3, the magnitude of charging rate which keeps steady is insensitive to the increase in aerosol concentration. The results also suggest that non-inductive charge separation between ice crystal and graupel contributes to the main upper positive charge region and the middle negative charge region. Inductive graupel-cloud droplet charge separation, on the other hand, is found to play an important role in the development of lower charge region.

  20. Investigations of Sprites During the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, W. A.; Nelson, T. E.; Cummer, S. A.; Wiens, K. C.; Bedard, A. J.; Williams, E. R.; Lyons, L. N.

    2002-12-01

    During the summer of 2000, a large multi-organization field program was conducted on the U.S. High Plains, near Goodland, KS. STEPS (the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study) focused on improving our understanding of the co-evolving dynamical, microphysical and electrical properties of convective storms, especially those producing positive cloud-to-ground lightning (+CGs). The New Mexico Tech 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) provided measurements of the height from which electrical charge was lowered to ground, along with the areal coverage of the discharge. Coincident with these measurements, remote low-light television cameras detected many sprites and transient luminous events above the storms from the Yucca Ridge Field Station. ELF transients were recorded in Rhode Island (by MIT) and North Carolina (by Duke). These two systems use similar, but not identical, methodologies to estimate total charge moment changes for lightning discharges. Detailed analyses of LMA and ELF charge moment data have been condcuted for a number of sprite producing +CGs for the 19 July MCS finding, as expected, large charge moment changes (>500-1000 C km) and rather low charge removal heights (~4 km AGL). A detailed study is now underway to assess the charge moment changes for those +CGs in this storm for which no sprites were observed. A similar analysis is being conducted for the storms of 29 - 30 June 2000. The initial phase of this storm contained numerous +CGs associated with a tornadic supercell. The height from which charges were lowered were characteristically higher than in the MCS. We anticipate that the charge moment changes, however, will be substantially lower for those sprite-producing +CGs which occurred later in this storm's evolution. Additionally, infrasound (0.5 to 5 Hz) measurements were obtained by NOAA ETL both at Goodland, KS and Boulder, CO. The 19 July storm produced unique infrasound signatures which temporally matched many sprite

  1. Evolution of a Community-Based Participatory Approach in a Rural and Remote Dementia Care Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Debra; Crossley, Margaret; Stewart, Norma; Kirk, Andrew; Forbes, Dorothy; D’Arcy, Carl; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; McBain, Lesley; O’Connell, Megan; Bracken, Joanne; Kosteniuk, Julie; Cammer, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches are valuable strategies for addressing complex health and social problems and powerful tools to support effective transformation of social and health policy to better meet the needs of diverse stakeholders. Objectives Since 1997, our team has utilized CBPR approaches to improve health service delivery for persons with dementia and their caregivers in rural and remote settings. We describe the evolution of our approach, including benefits, challenges, and lessons learned over the last 15 years. Methods A multistage approach initiated an ongoing CBPR research program in rural dementia care and shaped its direction based on stakeholders’ recommendation to prioritize both community and facility-based care. Strategies to develop and foster collaborative partnerships have included travel to rural and remote regions, province-wide community meetings, stakeholder workshops, creation of a Decision-Maker Advisory Council to provide ongoing direction to the overall program, development of diverse project-specific advisory groups, and a highly successful and much anticipated annual knowledge exchange and team-building event. Lessons Learned Partnering with stakeholders in the full research process has enhanced the research quality, relevance, application, and sustainability. These benefits have supported the team’s evolution from a relatively traditional focus to an integrated approach guiding all aspects of our research. Conclusions Developing and sustaining the full range of stakeholder and decision-maker partnerships is resource-and time-intensive, but our experience shows that community-based participatory strategies are highly suited to health services research that is designed to support sustainable service delivery improvements. PMID:25435560

  2. Successful Mathematics Lessons in Remote Communities: A Case Study of Balargo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the lesson practices at one very remote school that has been highly successful in numeracy. Drawing on a significant body of diverse research that promotes quality teaching and learning, this case study describes the features of the practice that have been implemented across the school. Teachers' voices provide both…

  3. Language, Culture and Access to Mathematics: A Case of One Remote Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    For many students, coming to learn mathematics is as much about the pedagogical relay through which concepts are conveyed as it is about the mathematics per se. This relay comprises social, cultural and linguistic norms as well as the mathematical discourse. In this study, I outline the practices of one remote school and how the teaching practices…

  4. Universal Access to Preschool Education: Approaches to Integrating Preschool with School in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the government of South Australia responded to Federal agreements aimed at universal access to preschool education for children in the year before starting formal schooling by introducing a trial designed to "integrate" preschool children into first year of school programmes in rural and remote areas of the state. This paper…

  5. Universal Access to Preschool Education: Approaches to Integrating Preschool with School in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the government of South Australia responded to Federal agreements aimed at universal access to preschool education for children in the year before starting formal schooling by introducing a trial designed to "integrate" preschool children into first year of school programmes in rural and remote areas of the state. This paper…

  6. Staffing an Empty Schoolhouse: Attracting and Retaining Teachers in Rural, Remote and Isolated Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Phil

    2004-01-01

    Attracting and retaining staff in rural and remote schools has been a perennial problem n Australia virtually since federation in 1901. In this report the author uses a mixed method approach of an on-line survey, unstructured interviews and policy analysis to develop a comprehensive overview of approaches to overcome these staffing problems…

  7. Language, Culture and Access to Mathematics: A Case of One Remote Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    For many students, coming to learn mathematics is as much about the pedagogical relay through which concepts are conveyed as it is about the mathematics per se. This relay comprises social, cultural and linguistic norms as well as the mathematical discourse. In this study, I outline the practices of one remote school and how the teaching practices…

  8. Electrification : A New Approach To Evaluate Slip Velocity During Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Fabrice; Allal, Ahmed; Guerret-Piècourt, Christelle

    2007-04-01

    The original feature of this work consists in the parallel study, in extrusion, of the polymer electrification and flow instabilities. On one hand, the Mhetar and Archer model has been used to predict the evolution of slip velocity versus shear stress and on the other hand, the double layer theory seem to be the better theory to explain electrification. We have shown that electrification measurements allow us to measure the slip velocity. The slip velocity values calculated via double layer theory are consistent with those calculated with the Methar and Archer model and allow us to validate our approach. The conclusion is that it's possible to determine the slip velocity during flow instabilities.

  9. High diversity of protistan plankton communities in remote high mountain lakes in the European Alps and the Himalayan mountains

    PubMed Central

    Kammerlander, Barbara; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Filker, Sabine; Sommaruga, Ruben; Sonntag, Bettina; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the genetic diversity (V4 region of the 18S rRNA) of planktonic microbial eukaryotes in four high mountain lakes including two remote biogeographic regions (the Himalayan mountains and the European Alps) and distinct habitat types (clear and glacier-fed turbid lakes). The recorded high genetic diversity in these lakes was far beyond of what is described from high mountain lake plankton. In total, we detected representatives from 66 families with the main taxon groups being Alveolata (55.0% OTUs97%, operational taxonomic units), Stramenopiles (34.0% OTUs97%), Cryptophyta (4.0% OTUs97%), Chloroplastida (3.6% OTUs97%) and Fungi (1.7% OTUs97%). Centrohelida, Choanomonada, Rhizaria, Katablepharidae and Telonema were represented by <1% OTUs97%. Himalayan lakes harbored a higher plankton diversity compared to the Alpine lakes (Shannon index). Community structures were significantly different between lake types and biogeographic regions (Fisher exact test, P < 0.01). Network analysis revealed that more families of the Chloroplastida (10 vs 5) and the Stramenopiles (14 vs 8) were found in the Himalayan lakes than in the Alpine lakes and none of the fungal families was shared between them. Biogeographic aspects as well as ecological factors such as water turbidity may structure the microbial eukaryote plankton communities in such remote lakes. PMID:25764458

  10. Food and beverage price discounts to improve health in remote Aboriginal communities: mixed method evaluation of a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Megan; O'Dea, Kerin; Holden, Stacey; Miles, Eddie; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2017-02-01

    Retrospectively evaluate food price discounts in remote Aboriginal community stores. Four price discount strategies of 10% were designed in 2010, aiming to influence grocery, fruit, vegetables and diet soft-drink sales. This natural experiment across a group of stores was evaluated using an explanatory, sequential mixed method design through analysis of store point-of-sale, document, observation and interview data. The outcome was measured by change in: 1) percentage of grocery sales to total food and beverage; 2) fruit and vegetable sales; and 3) diet soft-drink sales. Qualitative data enabled the interpretation of outcomes through understanding perceived success and benefits, and enablers and barriers to implementation. Eighteen community stores and 54 informants participated. While targeted price discounts were considered important to improving health, no discernible effect was evident, due to inadequate design and communication of discount promotion, and probably inadequate magnitude of discount. Strategy impact on food and beverage sales was limited by promotion and magnitude of discount. Implication for Public Health: This study demonstrates key factors and commitment required to design, communicate, implement and monitor strategies to improve health in this challenging remote retail context. Evaluation of natural experiments can contribute evidence to policy-making. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. High diversity of protistan plankton communities in remote high mountain lakes in the European Alps and the Himalayan mountains.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, Barbara; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Filker, Sabine; Sommaruga, Ruben; Sonntag, Bettina; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed the genetic diversity (V4 region of the 18S rRNA) of planktonic microbial eukaryotes in four high mountain lakes including two remote biogeographic regions (the Himalayan mountains and the European Alps) and distinct habitat types (clear and glacier-fed turbid lakes). The recorded high genetic diversity in these lakes was far beyond of what is described from high mountain lake plankton. In total, we detected representatives from 66 families with the main taxon groups being Alveolata (55.0% OTUs 97%, operational taxonomic units), Stramenopiles (34.0% OTUs 97%), Cryptophyta (4.0% OTUs 97%), Chloroplastida (3.6% OTUs 97%) and Fungi (1.7% OTUs 97%). Centrohelida, Choanomonada, Rhizaria, Katablepharidae and Telonema were represented by <1% OTUs 97%. Himalayan lakes harbored a higher plankton diversity compared to the Alpine lakes (Shannon index). Community structures were significantly different between lake types and biogeographic regions (Fisher exact test, P < 0.01). Network analysis revealed that more families of the Chloroplastida (10 vs 5) and the Stramenopiles (14 vs 8) were found in the Himalayan lakes than in the Alpine lakes and none of the fungal families was shared between them. Biogeographic aspects as well as ecological factors such as water turbidity may structure the microbial eukaryote plankton communities in such remote lakes.

  12. Evaluating a handwashing with soap program in Australian remote Aboriginal communities: a pre and post intervention study design.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Cunningham, Teresa; Slavin, Nicola

    2015-11-27

    The No Germs on Me (NGoM) Social Marketing Campaign to promote handwashing with soap to reduce high rates of infection among children living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities has been ongoing since 2007. Recently three new television commercials were developed as an extension of the NGoM program. This paper reports on the mass media component of this program, trialling an evaluation design informed by the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). A survey questionnaire taking an ecological approach and based on the principals and constructs of the TPB was developed. Surveys were completed in six discrete Aboriginal communities immediately before and on completion of four weeks intensive televising of the three new commercials. Across the six communities access in the home to a television that worked ranged from 49 to 83 % (n = 415). Seventy-seven per cent (n = 319) of participants reported having seen one or more of the new commercials. Levels of acceptability and comprehension of the content of the commercials was high (97 % n = 308). Seventy-five per cent (n = 651) of participants reported they would buy more soap, toilet paper and facial tissues if these were not so expensive in their communities. For TPB constructs demonstrated to have good internal reliability the findings were mixed and these need to be interpreted with caution due to limitations in the study design. Cultural, social-economic and physical barriers in remote communities make it challenging to promote adults and children wash their hands with soap and maintain clean faces such that these behaviours become habit. Low levels of access to a television in the home illustrate the extreme level of disadvantage experienced in these communities. Highlighting that social marketing programs have the potential to increase disadvantage if expensive items such as television sets are needed to gain access to information. This trial of a theory informed evaluation design allowed for new and rich

  13. Participatory action research (PAR): an approach for improving black women's health in rural and remote communities.

    PubMed

    Etowa, Josephine B; Bernard, Wanda Thomas; Oyinsan, Bunmi; Clow, Barbara

    2007-10-01

    Women are among the most disadvantaged members of any community, and they tend to be at greatest risk of illness. Black women are particularly vulnerable and more prone than White women to illnesses associated with social and economic deprivation, including heart disease and diabetes. They utilize preventive health services less often, and when they fall ill, the health of their families and communities typically suffers as well. This article discusses the process of doing innovative participatory action research (PAR) in southwest Nova Scotia Black communities. The effort resulted in the generation of a database, community action, and interdisciplinary analysis of the intersecting inequities that compromise the health and health care of African Canadian women, their families, and their communities. This particular research effort serves as a case study for explicating the key tenets of PAR and the barriers to and contradictions in implementing PAR in a community-academic collaborative research project.

  14. Creature co-op: Achieving robust remote operations with a community of low-cost robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonasso, R. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The concept is advanced of carrying out space based remote missions using a cooperative of low cost robot specialists rather than monolithic, multipurpose systems. A simulation is described wherein a control architecture for such a system of specialists is being investigated. Early results show such co-ops to be robust in the face of unforeseen circumstances. Descriptions of the platforms and sensors modeled and the beacon and retriever creatures that make up the co-op are included.

  15. Lessons from Providing Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Two-year colleges and Tribal colleges are important centers for workforce education and training. A professional development program funded by the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education Program, 2007-2011 and 2012-2015, is providing the resources needed by instructors at those colleges to develop courses and programs in remote sensing. The highly successful program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" will complete its currently funded work in May 2015. 76 instructors of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) from all over the country will have been served. Each of them will have spent 18 months on the project, participating in two Summer Institutes at NASA and USGS and in monthly webinars on science and technology of remote sensing. iGETT-RS participants have created their own exercises and "concept modules" for the classroom, and many have created new courses and new programs across the country. As the external evaluator for iGETT-RS expressed it, the impact on project participants can "only be described as transformational." Viewers of this presentation will learn about the iGETT-RS project design and approach; successes, failures and lessons learned by the staff; and how to access the workshop materials and participant-authored classroom resources. Viewers will also learn about the Geospatial Technology Competency Model at the US Department of Labor, and about specifications for the Remote Sensing Model Course recently developed by the National Geospatial Technology Center to provide invaluable frameworks for faculty, students, administrators and employers.

  16. Enhancing psychosocial care for people with cancer in rural communities: what can remote counselling offer?

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Louise; Goldstein, David; Olver, Ian; Parle, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Rural cancer patients are often disadvantaged in access to psychological services. We reviewed remote counselling research for psychological support using telephone, videoconferencing, and the Internet as a potential solution. Telephone counselling is the most extensively researched, while there are encouraging findings in emerging research about videoconferencing and Internet-based psychological care. Where no face-to-face psychological service exists, these technologies are promising, yet unproven. Less variable methods are needed to better assess the technology and therapeutic approach for stronger evidence.

  17. Conceptions of Art Education Programs Held by a Rural and Remote Australian Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Tara

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a one-year study in a physically isolated school community in Queensland, Australia. The decision-making processes in the selection of school subjects became the focus for interviews conducted with the school community (students, parents, and teachers) and the vehicle for identifying the held conceptions of…

  18. Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) load and resource profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, Lauren; Skolnik, Edward G.; Marchionini, Brian; Fall, Ndeye K.

    2007-07-01

    In 1997, an international team interested in the development of Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) systems for rural electrification projects around the world was organized by the International Lead Zinc Research Organization (ILZRO) with the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The team focused on defining load and resource profiles for RAPS systems. They identified single family homes, small communities, and villages as candidates for RAPS applications, and defined several different size/power requirements for each. Based on renewable energy and resource data, the team devised a ''strawman'' series of load profiles. A RAPS system typically consists of a renewable and/or conventional generator, power conversion equipment, and a battery. The purpose of this report is to present data and information on insolation levels and load requirements for ''typical'' homes, small communities, and larger villages around the world in order to facilitate the development of robust design practices for RAPS systems, and especially for the storage battery component. These systems could have significant impact on areas of the world that would otherwise not be served by conventional electrical grids.

  19. Runaway Electrification of Friable Self-Replicating Granular Matter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  20. Rural cooperatives: Information on two rural electrification administration proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    In response to the Rural Electrification Administration's proposal to eliminate its engineering standards divisions, GAO found that (1) the advantages of retaining REA's technical standards-setting functions far exceed the disadvantages; (2) adopting and applying industry standards would not be an acceptable alternative to REA's standards; (3) it would be impractical for REA to impose a fee to all users of its engineering standards but a fee charged to the cooperatives, as a percent of the loans they receive, appears practical; (4) abolishing all technical standards would have an adverse effect on REA's program to assist rural utilities; and (5) approved staffing pattern for both standards divisions stayed at the same level from FY 1983 to FY 1985. GAO also responded to REA's proposal to revise its criteria for loans and advances.

  1. Indonesia solar home systems project for rural electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghvi, A.P.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents, from a financing aspect the broad issues involved in a plan to provide solar home systems (SHS) to provide rural electrification in several areas of rural Indonesia. The paper discusses the approaches being used to provide funding, develop awareness of the technology, and assure the success of the project. The plan involves the use of grant money to help with some of the initial costs of such systems, and thereby to encourage local financing on a terms rather than cash basis. There are needs for market development, and development of a business structure in the country to support this type of technology. Provided this plan can succeed, it may serve as a model for further efforts.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic generation of millimetric drops and control of electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungchan

    2017-07-01

    We report a simple method for millimetric drop generation by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) detachment using a conventional nozzle-ring device. The EHD detachment method provides distinct features of uniform-size and controlled electrification of millimetric drops. The drop dynamics of detachment and shape oscillation are recorded using a high-speed camera and analyzed for several dc voltages applied to the electrode. Experimental studies show that an oscillation frequency can be closely related to the amount of electric charge, which can be explained based on both effective interfacial tension and inviscid Rayleigh and Lamb frequency. Furthermore, we present a concept to generate a neutral drop by adjusting the duration time of a pulse signal and discuss a drop oscillation induced by the detachment. This study can provide potential implications for drop manipulation, such as transporting, merging, and mixing, in microfluidic platforms.

  3. An intracloud lightning parameterization scheme for a storm electrification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Wu, Gang; Farley, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in the present storm electrification model. The initiation, propagation direction, and termination of the discharge are computed using the magnitude and direction of the electric field vector as the determining criteria. The charge redistribution due to the lightning is approximated assuming the channel to be an isolated conductor with zero net charge over its entire length. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred and distribution of charges have been done. Values of charge transfer, dipole moment change, and electrical energy dissipation computed in the model are consistent with observations. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges and electric field components depend strongly on the amount of charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge shows favorable agreement. Limitations of the parameterization scheme are discussed.

  4. Rural areas electrification (Latin America), Guatemala City, Guatemala, June 4--7, 1989: Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, M.T.

    1989-01-01

    ORNL serves the function of monitoring the Central American Rural Electrification Support Program (CARES) of US Agency for International Development (USAID), which is administered by NRECA. The results of the Demand Assessment Model, presented at the conference, were reviewed, and a paper on the use of marginal cost analysis for rural electrification was delivered for presentation by NRECA staff. Discussions on the acceptability of the model were discussed with utility representatives.

  5. Further Research on the Electrification of Pyrocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Laroche, Kendell; Baum, Bryan; Bateman, Monte; Mach, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Past research on pyrocumulus electrification has demonstrated that a variety of lightning types can occur, including cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes, sometimes of dominant positive polarity, as well as small intra-cloud (IC) discharges in the upper levels of the pyro-cloud. In Colorado during summer 2012, the first combined polarimetric radar, multi-Doppler radar, and three-dimensional lightning mapping array (LMA) observations of lightning-producing pyrocumulus were obtained. These observations suggested that the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) was not sensitive enough to detect the small IC flashes that appear to be the dominant mode of lightning in these clouds. However, after an upgrade to the network in late 2012, the NLDN began detecting some of this pyrocumulus lightning. Multiple pyrocumulus clouds documented by the University of Wisconsin for various fires in 2013 and 2014 (including over the Rim, West Fork Complex, Yarnell Hill, Hardluck, and several other incidents) are examined and reported on here. This study exploits the increased-sensitivity NLDN as well as the new nationwide U.S. network of polarimetric Next-generation Radars (NEXRADs). These observations document the common occurrence of a polarimetric "dirty ice" signature - modest reflectivities (20-40+ dBZ), near-zero differential reflectivity, and reduced correlation coefficient (less than 0.9) - prior to the production of lightning. This signature is indicative of a mixture of ash and ice particles in the upper levels of the pyro-cloud (less than -20 C), with the ice interpreted as being necessary for pyro-cloud electrification. Pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data will be produced from the 2012 LMA observations, and the ability of GLM to detect small pyrocumulus ICs will be assessed. The utility of lightning and polarimetric radar for documenting rapid wildfire growth, as well as for documenting pyrocumulus impacts on the composition of the upper troposphere

  6. The Effects of Ice on the Frictional Electrification of Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez Harper, J.; Courtland, L. M.; Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    Studies of the Redoubt (2009), Eyjafjallajökull (2010), and the Cordón Caulle (2011) eruptions and associated electrical activity suggest that ice is a catalyst for the generation of plume lightning [Behnke et al., 2012; Arason et al., 2011; Nicora et al., 2013]. Indeed, the number lightning flashes in the umbrella and convective regions of the plume seems to correlate with lower, ice-forming temperatures. As in conventional thunderstorms, electric charge accumulation and separation in cold plumes may arise from the interplay between ice grains and graupel. However, charging may also be driven by triboelectrification (frictional charging), resulting from collisions between ice and ash grains. Decades of research have shown that fluidized granular materials comprising species of distinct composition often produce more efficient electrification than the interaction of chemically identical particles under similar hydrodynamic regime [e.g. Forward et al., 2009]. Thus, tribocharging in a combined ice and silicate granular flow is likely to yield grains with higher charges than those encountered in a flow composed solely of silicate grains, facilitating the generation of lightning [Méndez Harper and Dufek, 2015, submitted]. To indagate this hypothesis, we have developed a novel methodology to measure the time-dependent charging of individual micron-sized particles in both dry, silicate flows and silicate plus ice flows. Pure ash runs are conducted in a dry (<1 % humidity) environment with a temperature variation of -40o to 25o C. Runs involving ice are performed between -40o and 2o C, permitting us to quantify charging in the mixture as water transmogrifies from solid ice to a more mush-like substance. Additionally, we report on how collisional energy and rates influence electrification in these granular materials. We show that, although the variations in ash composition (basalt to rhyolite) tend to be of little consequence for charging, the presence of a water phase

  7. Simulating storm electrification with bin and bulk microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, E. R.

    2013-12-01

    Simulated storm electrification can be highly dependent on the parameterizations of microphysical processes, particularly those involving ice particles. Commonly-used bulk microphysics assume a functional form of the particle size distribution and predict one or more moments of the distribution, such as total mass, number concentration, and reflectivity. Bin schemes, on the other hand, allow the particle spectrum to evolve by predicting the number of particles in discrete size ranges (bins). Bin schemes are often promoted as benchmark solutions, but have much greater computational expense and can have other disadvantages. Only a few studies have compared results for bin and bulk schemes within the same model framework, which controls for differences in model numerics and other physics. Here, the bin microphysics scheme of Takahashi has been incorporated into the COMMAS model for comparison with the 2-3-moment bulk scheme. The resulting electrification, charge structure and lightning are compared, as well. Charge separation and transfer have been newly added to the bin scheme, along with some updates to the physics, such as improved ice melting. Thus the same laboratory-based charging schemes from previous work can be used with both microphysics packages. The bulk and bin schemes generally have similar microphysical features in the simulations. Differences can result in part from differences the parameterizations of partical interactions (and particle types) as much as from the simple difference in size distributions. For example both the bin and bulk schemes are sensitive to the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei, as shown in recent work from the bulk scheme. Results will be presented for idealized 2-dimensional cases and for fully 3D simulations of a small multicell thunderstorms.

  8. From Pixels to Population Stress: Global Multispectral Remote Sensing for Vulnerable Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashad, L.; Kaplan, E.; Letouze, E.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Luengo-Oroz, M.; Christensen, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) School of Earth and Space Exploration's Mars Space Flight Facility (MSFF) and 100 Cities Project, in collaboration with the United Nations Global Pulse initiative are utilizing NASA multispectral satellite data to visualize and analyze socioeconomic characteristics and human activity in Uganda. The Global Pulse initiative is exploring how new kinds of real-time data and innovative technologies can be leveraged to detect early social impacts of slow-onset crisis and global shocks. Global Pulse is developing a framework for real-time monitoring, assembling an open-source toolkit for analyzing new kinds of data and establishing a global network of country-level "Pulse Labs" where governments, UN agencies, academia and the private sector learn together how to harness the new world of "big data" to protect the vulnerable with targeted and agile policy responses. The ASU MSFF and 100 Cities Project are coordinating with the Global Pulse team to utilize NASA remote sensing data in this effort. Human behavior and socioeconomic parameters have been successfully studied via proxy through remote sensing of the physical environment by measuring the growth of city boundaries and transportation networks, crop health, soil moisture, and slum development from visible and infrared imagery. The NASA/ NOAA image of Earth's "Lights at Night" is routinely used to estimate economic development and population density. There are many examples of the conventional uses of remote sensing in humanitarian-related projects including the Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) and the UN's operational satellite applications programme (UNOSAT), which provides remote sensing for humanitarian and disaster relief. Since the Global Pulse project is focusing on new, innovative uses of technology for early crisis detection, we are focusing on three non-conventional uses of satellite remote sensing to understand what role NASA multispectral satellites can play

  9. Bacterial ‘cosmopolitanism’ and importance of local environmental factors for community composition in remote high-altitude lakes

    PubMed Central

    SOMMARUGA, RUBEN; CASAMAYOR, EMILIO O.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In October 2004, plankton samples were collected from six permanent lakes located between 4960 and 5440 m a.s.l. in the Mount Everest region (Nepal) to assess how spatial and local environmental factors affect natural bacterial community composition. Fingerprinting analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment was done by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The number of DGGE bands (range: 12–23) was not correlated with lake area or remoteness, but there was a strong negative correlation with the ratio of catchment to lake area (r = −0.826, P < 0.05), suggesting that hydraulic retention time affects the establishment of the bacterial community in these seepage lakes. Most dominant sequences belonged to Betaproteobacteria except in two lakes where members of Bacteroidetes made the largest relative contribution. Up to 81% of the phylotypes had high similarity (>98 to 100%) in partial 16S rRNA gene sequence to those reported from other alpine lakes and glaciers around the world, suggesting the presence of ‘cosmopolitan’ bacteria. An analysis based on dissimilarity matrices and the Mantel test revealed the existence of dissimilarities in bacterial community composition related to geographical distance over a small spatial scale (<6 km), but determined by local environmental constraints. Our results suggest that several bacterial phylotypes are ubiquitous in the freshwater aquatic realm, but taxon sorting by local environmental constraints is important. PMID:20543908

  10. Changing perspectives on community identity and function: A remote sensing and artifactual re-analysis of Barton Ramie, Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Errin Teresa

    This dissertation presents the results of the remote sensing and artifact re-analysis of the archaeological site of Barton Ramie, Belize. The site was the focus of Dr. Gordon R. Willey's innovative archaeological program in the Belize River Valley to study ancient Maya settlement, environment, and population in 1954-1956. Through the use of artifact analysis combined with the examination of high-resolution Worldview-1 imagery and a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based spatial analysis, I consider how the inhabitants of Barton Ramie forged community functioning and identity. I focus on the range of intra-site diversity including differential access to labor, goods, land, and the activities evidenced in households and non-domestic structures. Using a community theory framework, emphasizing the many practices that tied the community together, I underscore the variability expressed in architectural elaboration, sumptuary goods, ritual, and specialization. That variability has profound implications for understanding community diversity and economic, social, and ritual functioning. High-resolution panchromatic Worldview-1 satellite imagery successfully detected the remains of Barton Ramie settlement. Surface archaeology has been largely destroyed due to extensive agricultural activities in recent decades. GIS analysis and ground-truthing determined that mound size is the primary factor enabling detection of ancient features. The confirmation of features in an intensively plowed environment has implications including settlement, survey, and population for other disturbed environments. I argue that the Barton Ramie community developed from a complex interaction of networks and practices. These include activities at the household level, articulation between households to form sub-communities (or neighborhoods), and a larger imagined community of the Barton Ramie polity. Individual households articulated to form seven discrete sub-communities, bounded by landscape

  11. Epidemiological and molecular features of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus transmission in a remote rural community in central Africa.

    PubMed

    François-Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Bisvigou, Ulrich; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis delta virus (HDV) occur worldwide and are prevalent in both urban and remote rural communities. In a remote village in Gabon, central Africa, we observed a high prevalence of HBsAg carriage and HDV infection, particularly in children and adolescents. The prevalence of HBsAg differed significantly by gender and age, females being more likely than males to carry the HBsAg during the first 10 years of life, while the prevalence was higher among males than females aged 11-20 years. We also characterised HBV and HDV strains circulating in the village. The principal HBV strains belonged to genotype HBV-E and subgenotype QS-A3. Complete genome analysis revealed for the first time the presence of the HBV-D genotype in Gabon, in the form of an HBV-D/E recombinant. Molecular analysis of HDV strains and their complete genomic characterisation revealed two distinct groups within the dominant HDV clade 8. Molecular analysis of HBV and HDV strains did not reveal vertical transmission within the families studied but rather horizontal, intrafamilial transmission among children aged 0-10 years. Our findings indicate that HBV is transmitted in early childhood by body fluids rather than by sexual contact. Health education adapted to the different age groups might therefore help to reduce HBV transmission. Young children should be vaccinated to control HBV infection in areas of extremely high prevalence.

  12. Field performance of lead-acid batteries in photovoltaic rural electrification kits

    SciTech Connect

    Huacuz, J.M.; Flores, R.; Agredano, J.; Munguia, G.

    1995-12-31

    A field survey was carried out in 83 rural communities within seven different states in Mexico, to assess the performance of photovoltaic (PV) rural electrification systems previously installed and to sense the degree of user satisfaction with PV technology. The present work reports on the performance of lead-acid batteries associated with domestic PV lighting kits. A sample of 555 batteries, from a total of 2512 PV kits installed in the region of study at the time of the survey, was randomly taken for analysis. Batteries were rated using a semiquantitative methodology developed at the Electrical Research Institute of Mexico (IIE). Results obtained from the survey are on the positive side, meaning that car-type batteries (representing 87% of the sample) perform reasonably well as part of PV lighting kits. However, there may be reasons for concern. A number of factors of technical, environmental and socio cultural nature, can negatively influence the performance of batteries in the field. Results from the survey show that undersized storage capacity is one of the main technical factors contributing to a rapid decrease in battery performance. However, improper operation and maintenance practices, derived from socio cultural factors and a lack of proper user training, are important recurring elements that may result in battery lifes shorter than anticipated. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of 6 remote First Nations community-based buprenorphine programs in northwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Mamakwa, Solomon; Kahan, Meldon; Kanate, Dinah; Kirlew, Mike; Folk, David; Cirone, Sharon; Rea, Sara; Parsons, Pierre; Edwards, Craig; Gordon, Janet; Main, Fiona; Kelly, Len

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate established opioid addiction treatment programs that use traditional healing in combination with buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment in 6 First Nations communities in the Sioux Lookout region of northwestern Ontario. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Six First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario. Participants A total of 526 First Nations participants in opioid-dependence treatment programs. Intervention Buprenorphine-naloxone substitution therapy and First Nations healing programming. Main outcome measures Retention rates and urine drug screening (UDS) results. Results Treatment retention rates at 6, 12, and 18 months were 84%, 78%, and 72%, respectively. We estimate that the rate at 24 months will also be more than 70%. The UDS programming varied and was implemented in only 1 community. Initially urine testing was voluntary and it then became mandatory. Screening with either method found the proportion of urine samples with negative results for illicit opioids ranged between 84% and 95%. Conclusion The program’s treatment retention rates and negative UDS results were higher than those reported for most methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone programs, despite a patient population where severe posttraumatic stress disorder is endemic, and despite the programs’ lack of resources and addiction expertise. Community-based programs like these overcome the initial challenge of cultural competence. First Nations communities in other provinces should establish their own buprenorphinenaloxone programs, using local primary care physicians as prescribers. Sustainable core funding is needed for programming, long-term aftercare, and trauma recovery for such initiatives. PMID:28209683

  14. Community Management of Endemic Scabies in Remote Aboriginal Communities of Northern Australia: Low Treatment Uptake and High Ongoing Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    La Vincente, Sophie; Kearns, Therese; Connors, Christine; Cameron, Scott; Carapetis, Jonathan; Andrews, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Background Scabies and skin infections are endemic in many Australian Aboriginal communities. There is limited evidence for effective models of scabies treatment in high prevalence settings. We aimed to assess the level of treatment uptake amongst clinically diagnosed scabies cases and amongst their household contacts. In addition, we aimed to determine the likelihood of scabies acquisition within these households over the 4 weeks following treatment provision. Methods and Findings We conducted an observational study of households in two scabies-endemic Aboriginal communities in northern Australia in which a community-based skin health program was operating. Permethrin treatment was provided for all householders upon identification of scabies within a household during home visit. Households were visited the following day to assess treatment uptake and at 2 and 4 weeks to assess scabies acquisition among susceptible individuals. All 40 households in which a child with scabies was identified agreed to participate in the study. Very low levels of treatment uptake were reported among household contacts of these children (193/440, 44%). Household contacts who themselves had scabies were more likely to use the treatment than those contacts who did not have scabies (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.1, 5.4), whilst males (OR 0.6, 95%CI 0.42, 0.95) and individuals from high-scabies-burden households (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.08, 0.77) were less likely to use the treatment. Among 185 susceptible individuals, there were 17 confirmed or probable new diagnoses of scabies recorded in the subsequent 4 weeks (9.2%). The odds of remaining scabies-free was almost 6 times greater among individuals belonging to a household where all people reported treatment uptake (OR 5.9, 95%CI 1.3, 27.2, p = 0.02). Conclusion There is an urgent need for a more practical and feasible treatment for community management of endemic scabies. The effectiveness and sustainability of the current scabies program was compromised

  15. Developing a Sustainable Model of Oral Health Care for Disadvantaged Aboriginal People Living in Rural and Remote Communities in NSW, Using Collective Impact Methodology.

    PubMed

    Gwynne, Kylie; Irving, Michelle J; McCowen, Debbie; Rambaldini, Boe; Skinner, John; Naoum, Steve; Blinkhorn, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    A sustainable model of oral health care for disadvantaged Aboriginal people living in rural and remote communities in New South Wales was developed using collective impact methodology. Collective impact is a structured process which draws together organizations to develop a shared agenda and design solutions which are jointly resourced, measured and reported upon.

  16. Developing a Sustainable Model of Oral Health Care for Disadvantaged Aboriginal People Living in Rural and Remote Communities in NSW, Using Collective Impact Methodology.

    PubMed

    Gwynne, Kylie; Irving, Michelle J; McCowen, Debbie; Rambaldini, Boe; Skinner, John; Naoum, Steve; Blinkhorn, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    A sustainable model of oral health care for disadvantaged Aboriginal people living in rural and remote communities in New South Wales was developed using collective impact methodology. Collective impact is a structured process which draws together organizations to develop a shared agenda and design solutions which are jointly resourced, measured and reported upon.

  17. Community based saving groups: an innovative approach to overcome the financial and social barriers in health care seeking by the women in the rural remote communities of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Babar Tasneem; Noorani, Qayyum; Abbas, Shazia

    2017-01-01

    In remote rural areas of Pakistan, access to the maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) care provided by a skilled health provider is quite difficult. There are many reasons such as women's restricted social mobility, lack of education, disenfranchised in decision making and poverty. To overcome these barriers and impediments in district Chitral, which is the largest territory in terms of geography in province Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, local women of reproductive age, were mobilized to form the Community Based Saving Groups (CBSGs) at the village level. In these CBSGs, they pool-in their money, and then provide soft loans to the expecting mothers to meet the expenses of delivery. Simultaneously, young literate women were identified from the local communities; they were trained as Community Midwives (CMWs), using national MNCH curriculum, and later deployed in their respective villages within the district. This study captured their perceptions about the formation of CBSGs to overcome the financial and social barriers, and subsequent use of CMW services. A qualitative enquiry was conducted with the delivered mothers and their husbands through gender specific separate focus group discussions, with CBSG members and with non-members in four different sites of District Chitral. CBSG member women were far more aware on health issues. Information sought from these forums brought a noticeable change in the health seeking practices. Seeking care from a trained birth attendant in the community became easier. Women associated with the CBSGs as members, expressed an increased access to money for utilizing the CMW services, better awareness on MNCH issues, and empowerment to decide for seeking care. CBSG have been an instrumental platform for social networking, helping each other in other household matters. Women have started using the services of CMW and the CBSGs have actually helped them overcome the financial barriers in health care seeking. Moreover, the CBSGs became a medium

  18. Differentiating aquatic plant communities in a eutrophic river using hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tian, Y.Q.; Yu, Q.; Zimmerman, M.J.; Flint, S.; Waldron, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of remote sensing technology to monitor species composition, areal extent and density of aquatic plants (macrophytes and filamentous algae) in impoundments where their presence may violate water-quality standards. Multispectral satellite (IKONOS) images and more than 500 in situ hyperspectral samples were acquired to map aquatic plant distributions. By analyzing field measurements, we created a library of hyperspectral signatures for a variety of aquatic plant species, associations and densities. We also used three vegetation indices. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), near-infrared (NIR)-Green Angle Index (NGAI) and normalized water absorption depth (DH), at wavelengths 554, 680, 820 and 977 nm to differentiate among aquatic plant species composition, areal density and thickness in cases where hyperspectral analysis yielded potentially ambiguous interpretations. We compared the NDVI derived from IKONOS imagery with the in situ, hyperspectral-derived NDVI. The IKONOS-based images were also compared to data obtained through routine visual observations. Our results confirmed that aquatic species composition alters spectral signatures and affects the accuracy of remote sensing of aquatic plant density. The results also demonstrated that the NGAI has apparent advantages in estimating density over the NDVI and the DH. In the feature space of the three indices, 3D scatter plot analysis revealed that hyperspectral data can differentiate several aquatic plant associations. High-resolution multispectral imagery provided useful information to distinguish among biophysical aquatic plant characteristics. Classification analysis indicated that using satellite imagery to assess Lemna coverage yielded an overall agreement of 79% with visual observations and >90% agreement for the densest aquatic plant coverages. Interpretation of biophysical parameters derived from high-resolution satellite or airborne imagery should prove to be a

  19. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-based Investigation of Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is a NASA-sponsored and -led science investigation that utilizes an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) to investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, ACES will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES will employ the Altus 11 aircraft, built by General Atomics-Aeronautical Systems, Inc. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high-altitude flight (up to 55,000 feet), the Altus will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on Altus, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. The ACES field campaign will be conducted during July 2002 with a goal of performing 8 to 10 UAV flights. Each flight will require about 4 to 5 hours on station at altitudes from 40,000 ft to 55,000 ft. The ACES team is comprised of scientists from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers partnered with General Atomics and IDEA, LLC.

  20. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-Based Science Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Croskey, C. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Houser, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Mach, D. M.; Mitchell, J. D.; Stoneburner, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)- based project that investigated thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES was conducted to investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and to validate satellite-based lightning measurements. In addition, as part of the NASA sponsored UAV-based science demonstration program, this project provided a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES employed the Altus II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload included electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES contributed important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) provided cloud-top perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the Altus was flown near, and when possible, over (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time that allowed investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. An innovative real time weather system was used to identify and vector the aircraft to selected thunderstorms and safely fly around these storms, while, at the same time monitor the weather near our base of operations. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations that included radar (Miami and Key West WSRBD, NASA NPOL), satellite imagery, and lightning (NALDN and Los Alamos EDOT) enable the UAV measurements to be more completely

  1. Developing an Early Childhood Teacher Workforce Development Strategy for Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Anne; Jackson-Barrett, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The North West Early Childhood and Primary Teacher Workforce Development Strategy offers students in the Pilbara and Kimberley the opportunity to enrol in a Western Australian University's fully accredited Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood and Primary) part time and externally--so they can continue to live and work in their communities. The…

  2. Adaptations of Professional Ethics among Counselors Living and Working in a Remote Native Canadian Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wihak, Christine; Merali, Noorfarah

    2007-01-01

    Eight non-Native counselors who temporarily relocated to the Native Canadian community of Nunavut were interviewed upon their return about experiences working with Inuit clients that challenged their professional training. Analysis of the counselors' narratives suggested that they used a social constructivism approach to manage confidentiality,…

  3. Planning for disaster resilience in rural, remote, and coastal communities: moving from thought to action.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brenda L; Anderson, Gregory S; Bowles, Ron; Cox, Robin S

    2014-01-01

    Disaster resilience is the cornerstone of effective emergency management across all phases of a disaster from preparedness through response and recovery. To support community resilience planning in the Rural Disaster Resilience Project (RDRP) Planning Framework, a print-based version of the guide book and a suite of resilience planning tools were field tested in three communities representing different regions and geographies within Canada. The results provide a cross-case study analysis from which lessons learned can be extracted. The authors demonstrate that by encouraging resilience thinking and proactive planning even very small rural communities can harness their inherent strengths and resources to enhance their own disaster resilience, as undertaking the resilience planning process was as important as the outcomes.The resilience enhancement planning process must be flexible enough to allow each community to act independently to meet their own needs. The field sites demonstrate that any motivated group of individuals, representing a neighborhood or some larger area could undertake a resilience initiative, especially with the assistance of a bridging organization or tool such as the RDRP Planning Framework.

  4. Making Inclusive Education Happen: The Impact of Initial Teacher Education in Remote Aboriginal Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the "Growing Our Own" initial teacher education (ITE) pilot programme which allowed Indigenous assistant teachers in their own communities to study to become a teacher with the support of a non-Indigenous teacher. There are five sections in this paper, including: (1) the underpinning theory and philosophy of one…

  5. A Regional Initiative to Reduce Skin Infections amongst Aboriginal Children Living in Remote Communities of the Northern Territory, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Ross M.; Kearns, Therese; Connors, Christine; Parker, Colin; Carville, Kylie; Currie, Bart J.; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Linked to extreme rates of chronic heart and kidney disease, pyoderma is endemic amongst Aboriginal children in Australia's Northern Territory (NT). Many of those with pyoderma will also have scabies. We report the results of a community-based collaboration within the East Arnhem Region, which aimed to reduce the prevalence of both skin infections in Aboriginal children. Methodology/Principal Findings Commencing September 2004, we conducted an ecological study that included active surveillance for skin infections amongst children aged <15 years in five remote East Arnhem communities over a three year period. Screening was undertaken by trained local community workers, usually accompanied by another project team member, using a standard data collection form. Skin infections were diagnosed clinically with the aid of a pictorial flip chart developed for the purpose. Topical 5% permethrin was provided for age-eligible children and all household contacts whenever scabies was diagnosed, whilst those with pyoderma were referred to the clinic for treatment in accordance with current guidelines. In addition, annual mass scabies treatment (5% permethrin cream) was offered to all community residents in accordance with current guidelines but was not directly observed. Pyoderma and scabies prevalence per month was determined from 6038 skin assessments conducted on 2329 children. Pyoderma prevalence dropped from 46.7% at baseline to a median of 32.4% (IQR 28.9%–41.0%) during the follow-up period – an absolute reduction of 14.7% (IQR 4.7%–16.8%). Compared to the first 18 months of observation, there was an absolute reduction in pyoderma prevalence of 18 cases per 100 children (95%CI −21.0, −16.1, p≤0.001) over the last 18 months. Treatment uptake increased over the same period (absolute difference 13.4%, 95%CI 3.3, 23.6). While scabies prevalence was unchanged, the prevalence of infected scabies (that is with superimposed pyoderma) decreased from 3.7% (95

  6. A numerical study of thunderstorm electrification: Model development and case study

    SciTech Connect

    Norville, K.; Baker, M. ); Latham, J. )

    1991-04-20

    The authors have developed a numerical model for examining the thunderstorm electrification process in which they assume the electrification is entirely due to noinductive charge transfer between colliding ice crystals and hail. Since this ice-hail charge mechanism is very independent on particle sizes and distributions, they use an explicit microphysical framework. To maintain simplicity, the electrification model is kinematic; thus the temperature and velocity fields are input into the electrification model. These fields can be either calculated by a background model or retrieved from observations. For this study, they have used the cloud model of Taylor (1989) to generate the temperature and velocity fields to examine the July 19, 1981, CCOPE thundercloud. Using these fields, the electrification model produced time-dependent ice particle concentrations, radar reflectives, charge and vertical electric field distributions in good general agreement with those observed. The model produced a maximum electric field strength of 1.27 kV/cm, which is on the order of that needed for lightning initiation, and this maximum occured very close to the time of the observed discharge (as inferred by the sailplane measurements). Thus the ice-hail charge mechanism appears to have played an important role in the electrical development of the July 19 cloud. The details of the electrification depended on the liquid water content and the glaciation processes, and particularly on the ice crystal characteristics. Rapid growth of the crystals to riming sizes (>400{mu}) yielded the most efficient charging. The electrification was also sensitive to the ice-ice sticking efficiency but not to the characteristics of the large riming ice.

  7. Establishment of the world's first telerobotic remote surgical service: for provision of advanced laparoscopic surgery in a rural community.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Mehran; McKinley, Craig; Stein, Harvey

    2005-03-01

    To establish a telerobotic surgical service between a teaching hospital and a rural hospital for provision of telerobotic surgery and assistance to aid rural surgeons in providing a variety of advanced laparoscopic surgery to their community patients. The above service was established between St. Joseph's Hospital in Hamilton and North Bay General Hospital 400 km north of Hamilton on February 28, 2003. The service uses an IP-VPN (15 Mbps of bandwidth) commercially available network to connect the robotic console in Hamilton with 3 arms of the Zeus-TS surgical system in North Bay. To date, 21 telerobotic laparoscopic surgeries have taken place between North Bay and Hamilton, including 13 fundoplications, 3 sigmoid resections, 2 right hemicolectomies, 1 anterior resection, and 2 inguinal hernia repairs. The 2 surgeons were able to operate together using the same surgical footprint and interchange roles seamlessly when desired. There have been no serious intraoperative complications and no cases have had to be converted to open surgeries. The mean hospital stays were equivalent to mean laparoscopic LOS in the tertiary institution. Telerobotic remote surgery is now in routine use, providing high-quality laparoscopic surgical services to patients in a rural community and providing a superior degree of collaboration between surgeons in teaching hospitals and rural hospitals. Further refinement of the robotic and telecommunication technology should ensure its wider application in the near future.

  8. Provocative poliomyelitis causing postpolio residual paralysis among select communities of two remote villages of North Karnataka in India: a community survey.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Amitesh; Ganesan, Sailakshmi; Shenoy, U V; Narayanan, E

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular injections can provoke muscular paralysis especially, if the child has had exposure to polio virus. The purpose of the study was to determine the association with known risk factors for motor disabilities in two remote villages of North Karnataka (India), where an increased number of disabled people among select communities had been reported. A community based survey was conducted. The selection of study subjects was done through screening, history related with occurrence of musculoskeletal disability, screening and general examination of the affected joints and muscles. Data analysis was done by estimation of percentages. Among the physical disabilities identified, the most common was post-polio residual paralysis. 35.65% (n = 41) subjects had developed paralysis following the administration of an intramuscular injection when they had acute viremia in childhood, indicating that (probably) muscle paralysis would have been provoked by intramuscular injections, resulting in provocative poliomyelitis. Unnecessary injection must be avoided in children during acute viremia state and use of oral polio vaccine should be encouraged.

  9. Benthic communities at two remote Pacific coral reefs: effects of reef habitat, depth, and wave energy gradients on spatial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Eric J.; Gove, Jamison M.; Sala, Enric; Sandin, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific are among the most remote coral reefs on the planet. Here we describe spatial patterns in their benthic communities across reef habitats and depths, and consider these in the context of oceanographic gradients. Benthic communities at both locations were dominated by calcifying organisms (54–86% cover), namely hard corals (20–74%) and crustose coralline algae (CCA) (10–36%). While turf algae were relatively common at both locations (8–22%), larger fleshy macroalgae were virtually absent at Kingman (<1%) and rare at Palmyra (0.7–9.3%). Hard coral cover was higher, but with low diversity, in more sheltered habitats such as Palmyra’s backreef and Kingman’s patch reefs. Almost exclusive dominance by slow-growing Porites on Kingman’s patch reefs provides indirect evidence of competitive exclusion, probably late in a successional sequence. In contrast, the more exposed forereef habitats at both Kingman and Palmyra had higher coral diversity and were characterized by fast-growing corals (e.g., Acropora and Pocillopora), indicative of more dynamic environments. In general at both locations, soft coral cover increased with depth, likely reflecting increasingly efficient heterotrophic abilities. CCA and fleshy macroalgae cover decreased with depth, likely due to reduced light. Cover of other calcified macroalgae, predominantly Halimeda, increased with depth. This likely reflects the ability of many calcifying macroalgae to efficiently harvest light at deeper depths, in combination with an increased nutrient supply from upwelling promoting growth. At Palmyra, patterns of hard coral cover with depth were inconsistent, but cover peaked at mid-depths at Kingman. On Kingman’s forereef, benthic community composition was strongly related to wave energy, with hard coral cover decreasing and becoming more spatially clustered with increased wave energy, likely as a result of physical damage leading to patches of

  10. Benthic communities at two remote Pacific coral reefs: effects of reef habitat, depth, and wave energy gradients on spatial patterns.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth J; Smith, Jennifer E; Conklin, Eric J; Gove, Jamison M; Sala, Enric; Sandin, Stuart A

    2013-01-01

    Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific are among the most remote coral reefs on the planet. Here we describe spatial patterns in their benthic communities across reef habitats and depths, and consider these in the context of oceanographic gradients. Benthic communities at both locations were dominated by calcifying organisms (54-86% cover), namely hard corals (20-74%) and crustose coralline algae (CCA) (10-36%). While turf algae were relatively common at both locations (8-22%), larger fleshy macroalgae were virtually absent at Kingman (<1%) and rare at Palmyra (0.7-9.3%). Hard coral cover was higher, but with low diversity, in more sheltered habitats such as Palmyra's backreef and Kingman's patch reefs. Almost exclusive dominance by slow-growing Porites on Kingman's patch reefs provides indirect evidence of competitive exclusion, probably late in a successional sequence. In contrast, the more exposed forereef habitats at both Kingman and Palmyra had higher coral diversity and were characterized by fast-growing corals (e.g., Acropora and Pocillopora), indicative of more dynamic environments. In general at both locations, soft coral cover increased with depth, likely reflecting increasingly efficient heterotrophic abilities. CCA and fleshy macroalgae cover decreased with depth, likely due to reduced light. Cover of other calcified macroalgae, predominantly Halimeda, increased with depth. This likely reflects the ability of many calcifying macroalgae to efficiently harvest light at deeper depths, in combination with an increased nutrient supply from upwelling promoting growth. At Palmyra, patterns of hard coral cover with depth were inconsistent, but cover peaked at mid-depths at Kingman. On Kingman's forereef, benthic community composition was strongly related to wave energy, with hard coral cover decreasing and becoming more spatially clustered with increased wave energy, likely as a result of physical damage leading to patches of coral in localized

  11. The Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, S. A.; Lang, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    During May-July 2000, the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) was conducted in the High Plains, near the Colorado-Kansas border, in order to achieve a better understanding of the interactions between kinematics, precipitation, and electrification in severe thunderstorms. Specific scientific objectives included: 1) understanding the apparent major differences in precipitation output from supercells that have led to them being classified as low-precipitation (LP), classic or medium-precipitation, and high-precipitation; 2) understanding lightning formation and behavior in storms, and how lightning differs among storm types, particularly to better understand the mechanisms by which storms produce predominantly positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning; and 3) to verify and improve microphysical interpretations from polarimetric radar. The project involved the use of a multiple-Doppler and polarimetric radar network, as well as a time-of-arrival VHF lightning mapping system, the T-28 armored research aircraft, electric field meters carried on balloons, mobile mesonet vehicles, instruments to detect and classify transient luminous events over thunderstorms (TLEs; e.g., sprites and blue jets), and mobile atmospheric sounding equipment. The project was a major success, gathering unprecedented data on a wealth of diverse cases, including LP storms, supercells, and mesoscale convective systems, among others. Many of the storms produced mostly positive CG lightning during their lifetimes, and also exhibited unusual electrical structures such as a possibly inverted dipole. The 29 June supercell case has received considerable study to date including the analysis of polarimetric radar data to demonstrate couplings between storm dynamics and the formation of hail and graupel, which lead to formation of significant positive charge in the mid-levels and copious amounts of positive cloud-to-ground lightning. The charge structure in the 29 June case

  12. Climate change and human health: infrastructure impacts to small remote communities in the north.

    PubMed

    Warren, John A; Berner, James E; Curtis, Tine

    2005-12-01

    In northern regions, climate change can include changes in precipitation magnitude and frequency, reductions in sea ice extent and thickness, and climate warming and cooling. These changes can increase the frequency and severity of storms, flooding, or erosion; other changes may include drought or degradation of permafrost. Climate change can result in damage to sanitation infrastructure resulting in the spread of disease or threatening a community's ability to maintain its economy, geographic location and cultural tradition, leading to mental stress. Through monitoring of some basic indicators communities can begin to develop a response to climate change. With this information, planners, engineers, health care professionals and governments can begin to develop approaches to address the challenges related to climate change.

  13. Technology, Performance, and Market Report of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.; Dabo, M.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind-diesel technology and its applications, the current research activities, and the remaining system technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems will be discussed, as well as how recent development to explore distributed energy generation solutions for wind generation can benefit from the performance experience of operating systems. The paper also includes a detailed discussion of the performance of wind-diesel applications in Alaska, where 10 wind-diesel stations are operating and additional systems are currently being implemented. Additionally, because this application represents an international opportunity, a community of interest committed to sharing technical and operating developments is being formed. The authors hope to encourage this expansion while allowing communities and nations to investigate the wind-diesel option for reducing their dependence on diesel-driven energy sources.

  14. Technology, Performance, and Market Report of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.; Dabo, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind-diesel technology and its applications, the current research activities, and the remaining system technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems will be discussed, as well as how recent development to explore distributed energy generation solutions for wind generation can benefit from the performance experience of operating systems. The paper also includes a detailed discussion of the performance of wind-diesel applications in Alaska, where 10 wind-diesel stations are operating and additional systems are currently being implemented. Additionally, because this application represents an international opportunity, a community of interest committed to sharing technical and operating developments is being formed. The authors hope to encourage this expansion while allowing communities and nations to investigate the wind-diesel option for reducing their dependence on diesel-driven energy sources.

  15. Technology, Performance, and Market of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, E. I.; Dabo, M.

    2009-05-01

    The market for wind-diesel power systems in Alaska and other areas has proven that the integration of wind turbines with conventional isolated generation is a commercial reality. During the past few years, the use of wind energy to reduce diesel fuel consumption has increased, providing economic, environmental, social, and security benefits to communities' energy supply. This poster provides an overview of markets, project examples, technology advances, and industry challenges.

  16. Design of a hybrid wind power storage and generation system for a remote community

    SciTech Connect

    Devgan, S.S.; Walker, D.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    There are thousands of small communities in various parts of the world, even in developed countries, that are too far away to be economically connected to an electric supply system. Clean water is essential for health and well being and electric energy is essential for economic development of the community. This paper describes the design of a {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} Wind/Diesel power generation and storage system. and the electric power distribution system for a small rural community of 50 persons and live stock. The most cost effective and reliable system designed to satisfy reasonable growth over the next twenty-five years consists of three 10 kW wind turbines, a 30 kWh storage battery and a 17.5 kW backup diesel generator. This paper also describe efforts to train a neural network to predict wind power over the next time interval and few more time intervals. This is very essential for significant penetration of wind power systems.

  17. Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) in a Remote and Isolated Community in Samar Province, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Almazan, J U

    2014-01-01

    Diarrheal disease is one of the leading causes of death in children under five years old, most people who die from this disease actually die from severe dehydration and fluid loss. Moreover, 88% of its global diarrheal disease is attributed to unsafe water supply, inadequate sanitation, and hygiene. This investigation was developed to determine the effect of Participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) program in an isolated community of Mabini,Samar Province, Philippines. Longitudinal research design was used in order to determine the effect of the program one year was implemented in the community. A purposive sampling was utilized in this investigation which accounts a total of 39 households in Mabini community, Basey, Samar, without toilet facilities. The instrument used was the modified questionnaire of Philippine Red Cross in water and sanitation before and after the program was implemented. Results showed that there was improvement of knowledge on water and sanitation, handwashing practice, household waste practices drinking practices, defecation practices. Thus, program reaching the most isolated and difficult area experiencing the most detrimental effects which improve poor hygiene and sanitation, improving health, equality and social justice.

  18. Characterization of Fecal Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in a Remote Community during a Long Time Period

    PubMed Central

    Angebault, Cécile; Jacquier, Hervé; Clermont, Olivier; El Mniai, Assyia; Moreau, Brigitte; Djossou, Félix; Peroz, Gilles; Catzeflis, François; Denamur, Erick; Andremont, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing enterobacteria (ESBL-E) has increased in community settings. Little is known about their long-term evolution. French Guiana Amerindians living in a very remote village, already sampled in 2001 and 2006 for ESBL-E fecal carriage, were screened again in October 2010. Sociodemographic data and antibiotic intake data were collected during the previous year. ESBL-E strains collected in 2010 and their plasmid contents were typed. The results were compared to those of the previous campaigns. The prevalence of ESBL-E carriage in 2010 was 5.3%, whereas it was 8.0% and 3.2% in 2006 and 2001, respectively. As previously determined, no individual factor was associated with carriage, including personal antibiotic exposure. However, overall antibiotic use had decreased to a 0.67 treatments/subject/year in 2010 versus 1.09 in 2006 (P < 0.001), which supports the idea that population exposure to antibiotics impacts on ESBL-E community carriage rates. A wide diversity of ESBL Escherichia coli strains belonging to the A0, A1, B1, and D2 phylogroups and producing the CTX-M-1, CTX-M-2, and CTX-M-8 enzymes were isolated. Despite the overall genetic diversity of the strains evaluated by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) and multilocus sequence typing, two CTX-M-1-producing clones were found to have spread. In contrast, similar ESBL-bearing I1/Iγ plasmids were present in various strains both within and between carriers, suggesting high rates of plasmid transfer. Our results suggest that overall antibiotic exposure affects ESBL-E fecal carriage in the community. ESBL-E spread may be the result of both strain dissemination and the transfer of plasmids in intestinal microbiota. PMID:23917313

  19. Declining prevalence of pulmonary paragonimiasis following treatment & community education in a remote tribal population of Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Narain, Kanwar; Devi, K Rekha; Bhattacharya, S; Negmu, K; Rajguru, S K; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-05-01

    In India, human pulmonary paragonimiasis is an important public health problem in the northeastern (NE) region. In 2005 we reported a hyperendemic focus of paragonimiasis in a remote tribal village in the hills of Changlang district in Arunachal Pradesh. The community was made aware of the disease and all active cases were treated. This study was aimed to assess the decline in the prevelance of paragonimiasis in the same area after a re-survey done in 2011 after a gap of six years. Re-surveys were carried to determine the reduction in the prevalence of paragonimiasis. Community education was given to the villagers to raise their awareness about paragonimiasis. A total of 624 individuals including 301 children (age 15 yr) were included in the study. Sputum and stool samples were examined for eggs of lung flukes. Serum samples were screened for IgG antibodies against lung fluke antigen by ELISA. A significant (P<0.001) decline in the prevalence of paragonimiasis was found. There was decline in both ELISA positivity and egg positivity. Antibody positivity against excretory-secretary (ES) antigen in children (age 15 yr) fell down from earlier 51.7 to 15.9 per cent and in individuals 16 - 30 yr of age the serological prevalence fell down from 22.4 to 8.2 per cent and in individuals aged th > 31 yr, the decline in prevalence was from 15.3 to 3.7 per cent. Gender-wise analysis revealed that the decline in ELISA positivity was similar in both genders and fell down from 33.9 to 11.5 per cent in males and from 29.8 to 10.7 per cent in females. Similarly, there was a significant decline rate in egg positivity also. The strategy of hotspot targeted active paragonimiasis case detection and treatment of infected cases together with community education appears to be feasible methods to achieve control of paragonimiasis in this region.

  20. Characterization of fecal extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in a remote community during a long time period.

    PubMed

    Woerther, Paul-Louis; Angebault, Cécile; Jacquier, Hervé; Clermont, Olivier; El Mniai, Assyia; Moreau, Brigitte; Djossou, Félix; Peroz, Gilles; Catzeflis, François; Denamur, Erick; Andremont, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    Carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing enterobacteria (ESBL-E) has increased in community settings. Little is known about their long-term evolution. French Guiana Amerindians living in a very remote village, already sampled in 2001 and 2006 for ESBL-E fecal carriage, were screened again in October 2010. Sociodemographic data and antibiotic intake data were collected during the previous year. ESBL-E strains collected in 2010 and their plasmid contents were typed. The results were compared to those of the previous campaigns. The prevalence of ESBL-E carriage in 2010 was 5.3%, whereas it was 8.0% and 3.2% in 2006 and 2001, respectively. As previously determined, no individual factor was associated with carriage, including personal antibiotic exposure. However, overall antibiotic use had decreased to a 0.67 treatments/subject/year in 2010 versus 1.09 in 2006 (P < 0.001), which supports the idea that population exposure to antibiotics impacts on ESBL-E community carriage rates. A wide diversity of ESBL Escherichia coli strains belonging to the A0, A1, B1, and D2 phylogroups and producing the CTX-M-1, CTX-M-2, and CTX-M-8 enzymes were isolated. Despite the overall genetic diversity of the strains evaluated by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) and multilocus sequence typing, two CTX-M-1-producing clones were found to have spread. In contrast, similar ESBL-bearing I1/Iγ plasmids were present in various strains both within and between carriers, suggesting high rates of plasmid transfer. Our results suggest that overall antibiotic exposure affects ESBL-E fecal carriage in the community. ESBL-E spread may be the result of both strain dissemination and the transfer of plasmids in intestinal microbiota.

  1. Measuring landscape-scale spread and persistence of an invaded submerged plant community from airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria J; Khanna, Shruti; Hestir, Erin L; Greenberg, Jonathan A; Ustin, Susan L

    2016-09-01

    Processes of spread and patterns of persistence of invasive species affect species and communities in the new environment. Predicting future rates of spread is of great interest for timely management decisions, but this depends on models that rely on understanding the processes of invasion and historic observations of spread and persistence. Unfortunately, the rates of spread and patterns of persistence are difficult to model or directly observe, especially when multiple rates of spread and diverse persistence patterns may be co-occurring over the geographic distribution of the invaded ecosystem. Remote sensing systematically acquires data over large areas at fine spatial and spectral resolutions over multiple time periods that can be used to quantify spread processes and persistence patterns. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy data acquired once a year for 5 years from 2004 to 2008 to map an invaded submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) community across 2220 km(2) of waterways in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, and measured its spread rate and its persistence. Submerged aquatic vegetation covered 13-23 km(2) of the waterways (6-11%) every year. Yearly new growth accounted for 40-60% of the SAV area, ~50% of which survived to following year. Spread rates were overall negative and persistence decreased with time. From this dataset, we were able to identify both radial and saltatorial spread of the invaded SAV in the entire extent of the Delta over time. With both decreasing spread rate and persistence, it is possible that over time the invasion of this SAV community could decrease its ecological impact. A landscape-scale approach allows measurements of all invasion fronts and the spatial anisotropies associated with spread processes and persistence patterns, without spatial interpolation, at locations both proximate and distant to the focus of invasion at multiple points in time. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. When the tide goes out: health workforce in rural, remote and Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard B; Wronski, Ian

    2006-07-03

    There is compelling evidence for the success of the "rural pipeline" (rural student recruitment and rurally based education and professional training) in increasing the rural workforce. The nexus between clinical education and training, sustaining the health care workforce, clinical research, and quality and safety needs greater emphasis in regional areas. A "teaching health system" for non-metropolitan Australia requires greater commitment to teaching as core business, as well as provision of infrastructure, including accommodation, and access to the private sector. Workforce flexibility is mostly well accepted in rural and remote areas. There is room for expanding the scope of clinical practice by non-medical clinicians in both an independent codified manner (eg, nurse practitioners) and through flexible local medical delegation (eg, practice nurses, Aboriginal health workers, and therapists). The imbalance between subspecialist and generalist medical training needs to be addressed. Improved training and recognition of Aboriginal health workers, as well as continued investment in Indigenous entry to other health professional programs, remain policy priorities.

  3. Water systems, sanitation, and public health risks in remote communities: Inuit resident perspectives from the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Daley, Kiley; Castleden, Heather; Jamieson, Rob; Furgal, Chris; Ell, Lorna

    2015-06-01

    Safe drinking water and wastewater sanitation are universally recognized as critical components of public health. It is well documented that a lack of access to these basic services results in millions of preventable deaths each year among vulnerable populations. Water and wastewater technologies and management practices are frequently tailored to local environmental conditions. Also important, but often overlooked in water management planning, are the social, cultural and economic contexts in which services are provided. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify and understand residents' perceptions of the functionality of current water and wastewater sanitation systems in one vulnerable context, that of a remote Arctic Aboriginal community (Coral Harbour, Nunavut), and to identify potential future water related health risks. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 Inuit residents and 9 key informants in 2011 and 2012. Findings indicate that the population's rapid transition from a semi-nomadic hunting and gathering lifestyle to permanent settlements with municipally provided utilities is influencing present-day water usage patterns, public health perceptions, and the level of priority decision-makers place on water and wastewater management issues. Simultaneously environmental, social and cultural conditions conducive to increased human exposure to waterborne health risks were also found to exist and may be increasing in the settlements. While water and wastewater system design decisions are often based on best practices proven suitable in similar environmental conditions, this study reinforces the argument for inclusion of social, cultural, and economic variables in such decisions, particularly in remote and economically challenged contexts in Canada or elsewhere around the world. The results also indicate that the addition of qualitative data about water and wastewater systems users' behaviours to technical knowledge of systems and

  4. Successful application of a simple specimen transport method for the conduct of respiratory virus surveillance in remote Indigenous communities in Australia.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Torzillo, Paul J; Rockett, Rebecca J; Whiley, David M; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P; Lambert, Stephen B

    2011-06-01

    Surveillance programs and research for acute respiratory infections in remote Aboriginal communities are complicated by difficulties in the storage and transport of frozen samples to urban laboratories for testing. This study assessed the sensitivity of a simple method for transporting respiratory samples from a remote setting for viral PCR compared with frozen specimens. We sampled every individual who presented to a remote Aboriginal community clinic in a non-epidemic respiratory season. Two anterior nasal swabs were collected from each participant. The left nare specimen was mailed to the laboratory via routine postal services. The right nare specimen was transported frozen. Testing for 16 viruses was undertaken using real-time multiplex PCR. A total of 140 participants were enrolled who contributed 150 study visits. Respiratory illnesses accounted for 10% of the reasons for presentation. Sixty-one viruses were identified in 50 (33.3%) presentations for 40 (28.6%) individuals; bocavirus and rhinovirus were the most common viruses identified (14.0% and 12.6% of episodes respectively). The sensitivity for any virus detected in mailed specimens was 67.2% (95%CI 55.4, 78.9) compared to 65.6% (95%CI 53.7, 77.5) for frozen specimens. The mailing of unfrozen nasal specimens from remote communities does not compromise the viability of the specimen for viral studies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Mobilizing citizen science to build human and environmental resilience: a synthesis study of four remote mountain communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, Zed; Buytaert, Wouter; Karpouzoglou, Timothy; Dewulf, Art; Gurung, Praju; Regmi, Santosh; Pandeya, Bhopal; Isaeva, Aiganysh; Mamadalieva, Zuura; Perez, Katya; Alemie, Tilashwork C.; Grainger, Sam; Clark, Julian; Hannah, David M.

    2015-04-01

    Communities that are the most vulnerable to environmental change and hazards, also tend to be those with the least institutional and financial resilience and capacity to cope with consequent impacts. Relevant knowledge generation is a key requisite for empowering these communities and developing adaptation strategies. Technological innovations in data collection, availability, processing, and exchange, are creating new opportunities for knowledge co-generation that may benefit vulnerable communities and bridge traditional knowledge divides. The use of open, web-based technologies and ICT solutions such as mobile phone apps is particularly promising in this regard, because they allow for participation of communities bypassed by traditional mechanisms. Here, we report on efforts to implement such technologies in a citizen science context. We focus on the active engagement of multiple actors (international and local scientists, government officials, NGOs, community associations, and individuals) in the entire process of the research. This ranges from problem framing, to identifying local monitoring needs, to determining the mode of exchange and forms of knowledge relevant for improving resilience related to water dependency. We present 4 case studies in arid, remote mountain regions of Nepal, the Kyrgyz Republic, Peru, and Ethiopia. In these regions, livelihoods depend on the water and soil systems undergoing accelerated degradation from extreme climates, poor agricultural management practices, and changing environmental conditions. However, information on the interlinkages of these processes with people's livelihoods is typically poor and there lies the opportunity for identifying novel forms of joint-creation and sharing of knowledge. Using a centrally-coordinated but locally-adaptable methodological framework comprising of field visits, systematic reviews of white and grey literature, focus group discussions, household questionnaires, semi-structured interviews

  6. Composition of microbial communities in aerosol, snow and ice samples from remote glaciated areas (Antarctica, Alps, Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, J.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Řeháková, K.

    2007-06-01

    analysed samples comprises two communities, without a sharp boundary between them: i) the first community includes ubiquitous organisms including contaminants, ii) the second community represents individuals frequently occurring in remote terrestrial cold or hot desert/semi-desert and/or marginal soil-snow-ice ecosystems.

  7. Remote monitoring of sitting behaviors for community-dwelling manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y-S; Chang, G-L; Hsu, M-J; Chang, J-J

    2009-01-01

    A case series study. To describe the sitting behaviors in community-dwelling manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with spinal cord injury (SCI) by using a custom data logger and to compare the sitting time parameters between the groups with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Data were collected from the MWUs living in the community area of Kaohsiung, Taiwan. A custom data logger with six force sensor resistors was designed and installed on a personal daily-use wheelchair. Twenty MWU participants were instructed to disregard the activation of data logger and pursue their regular activities of daily living. Cumulative sitting time, averaged uninterrupted sitting time, lift-off frequency, and the symmetry ratio of sitting weight distribution for 24 h per day over a 1-week period were recorded. Manual wheelchair users spent an average of 9.2 h (median 9.7, range 3.2-12.2 h) per day in their own wheelchair. They sat for an average of 97 min (median 62, range 24-284 min) without displaying any lift-off behavior. The average lift-off frequency was 9.4 times (median 9.2, range 2-20 times) per day. During sitting, the median value of symmetrical right-left and front-rear weight distribution ratio was 0.9 (range 0.5-1.4), and 0.5 (range 0.01-1.6), respectively. There was no significant difference in sitting time parameters between MWUs with paraplegia and those with tetraplegia. Community-dwelling MWUs spent long periods of time in their wheelchairs and did not engage frequently in pressure relief activities. Regardless of their neurological levels, education on the pressure relief activity is still a core component for all MWUs.

  8. (Monitoring and evaluation of the Central American Rural Electrification Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A. III )

    1990-03-20

    CARES has been successful in leveraging its effort with similar programs in other countries. NRECA has done an exceptional job of coordinating the related activities of other AID contracts. The informal lines of communication appear to work well with a relaxed and productive environment evident. ROCAP has expressed confidence in the ability of NRECA to carry out the Workplan successfully. Recent initiatives by Mr. Funes in the area of indicators are seen by the review team as a positive and mutual step to articulate specific goals and accomplishments. Communication and coordination among the ROCAP staff and the local AID Mission appears to have improved since last mentioned in the Engineering Standards Review. This is especially true in Guatemala and Costa Rica. Better reporting procedures would facilitate NRECA-ROCAP-AID Mission communication. Impressive progress has been made in the way local officials approach rural electrification. This is very evident in the areas of engineering design and the productive uses campaign. The Planning and Engineering sections of INDE and CEL rapidly adopted the new mechanical strength based standards as reasonable design solutions. Similarly, productive uses has received much greater attention by all of the various divisions of the utilities in El Salvador, Guatemala and Costa Rica. This was not the case previous to the CARES Project. The final report specifically addresses several areas that should be de-emphasized or given more attention. 26 refs.

  9. Radial-arrayed rotary electrification for high performance triboelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Tiejun; Jing, Qingshen; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-03-04

    Harvesting mechanical energy is an important route in obtaining cost-effective, clean and sustainable electric energy. Here we report a two-dimensional planar-structured triboelectric generator on the basis of contact electrification. The radial arrays of micro-sized sectors on the contact surfaces enable a high output power of 1.5 W (area power density of 19 mW cm(-2)) at an efficiency of 24%. The triboelectric generator can effectively harness various ambient motions, including light wind, tap water flow and normal body movement. Through a power management circuit, a triboelectric-generator-based power-supplying system can provide a constant direct-current source for sustainably driving and charging commercial electronics, immediately demonstrating the feasibility of the triboelectric generator as a practical power source. Given exceptional power density, extremely low cost and unique applicability resulting from distinctive mechanism and structure, the triboelectric generator can be applied not only to self-powered electronics but also possibly to power generation at a large scale.

  10. Role of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions in gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Stewart, Katherine M E; Penlidis, Alexander

    2014-09-06

    Geckos, which are capable of walking on walls and hanging from ceilings with the help of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical fibrils (setae) on their toe pads, have become the main prototype in the design and fabrication of fibrillar dry adhesives. As the unique fibrillar feature of the toe pads of geckos allows them to develop an intimate contact with the substrate the animal is walking on or clinging to, it is expected that the toe setae exchange significant numbers of electric charges with the contacted substrate via the contact electrification (CE) phenomenon. Even so, the possibility of the occurrence of CE and the contribution of the resulting electrostatic interactions to the dry adhesion of geckos have been overlooked for several decades. In this study, by measuring the magnitude of the electric charges, together with the adhesion forces, that gecko foot pads develop in contact with different materials, we have clarified for the first time that CE does contribute effectively to gecko adhesion. More importantly, we have demonstrated that it is the CE-driven electrostatic interactions which dictate the strength of gecko adhesion, and not the van der Waals or capillary forces which are conventionally considered as the main source of gecko adhesion.

  11. Electrification ratio and renewable energy in Papua Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innah, Herbert; Kariongan, Jackobus; Liga, Marthen

    2017-03-01

    Indonesia government through the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, in the beginning of year 2016, introduced a program named "Indonesia Terang" or Bright Indonesia. The aimed of this program is to speed up Electrification Rate (ER) with priority to the six provinces at Eastern area of Indonesia including Papua Province. The target of Indonesian's ER by 2019 is 97%. While the Indonesian's national ER already high (88.30%) in 2015, Papua still the lowest ER (45.93%) among the provinces. The scenario to boost up ER in the Eastern area by connected the consumers at villages which not electrified yet to the new Renewable Energy sources. This paper presents an overview of current situation of Electricity Infrastructure and Operation particularly on the mountain area which has high populated compare to coastal area but the average RE below 10%. Case studies of electricity infrastructure profile from mountain area were conducted to identify and reveal the challenge to achieve the Bright Indonesia objectives. Also, the assessment of the visibility according to the high target from this program will be presented.

  12. Electricity distribution industry restructuring, electrification, and competition in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Galen, P S

    1997-07-01

    This paper reviews the status of the South African electricity supply industry (ESI) and proposals for reorienting and restructuring it. South Africa has been intensely examining its ESI for more than 4 years in an effort to determine whether and how it should be restructured to best support the country`s new economic development and social upliftment goals. The debate has been spirited and inclusive of most ESI stakeholders. The demands on and expectations for the ESI are many and varied. The debate has reflected this diversity of interests and views. In essence, however, there is a consensus on what is expected of the industry, namely, to extend provision of adequate, reliable, and affordable electricity service to all citizens and segments of the economy. This means a large-scale electrification program to reach as many of the nearly 50% of households currently without electricity service as soon as possible, tariff reform to promote equity and efficiency, and the upgrading of service quality now being provided by some of the newly consolidated municipal authorities. The issues involved are how best to achieve these results within the context of the national Reconstruction and Development Program, while accounting for time and resource constraints and balancing the interests of the various parties.

  13. Linear-grating triboelectric generator based on sliding electrification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun; Liu, Ying; Bai, Peng; Zhou, Yu Sheng; Jing, Qingshen; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-05-08

    The triboelectric effect is known for many centuries and it is the cause of many charging phenomena. However, it has not been utilized for energy harvesting until very recently. (1-5) Here we developed a new principle of triboelectric generator (TEG) based on a fully contacted, sliding electrification process, which lays a fundamentally new mechanism for designing universal, high-performance TEGs to harvest diverse forms of mechanical energy in our daily life. Relative displacement between two sliding surfaces of opposite triboelectric polarities generates uncompensated surface triboelectric charges; the corresponding polarization created a voltage drop that results in a flow of induced electrons between electrodes. Grating of linear rows on the sliding surfaces enables substantial enhancements of total charges, output current, and current frequency. The TEG was demonstrated to be an efficient power source for simultaneously driving a number of small electronics. The principle established in this work can be applied to TEGs of different configurations that accommodate the needs of harvesting energy and/or sensing from diverse mechanical motions, such as contacted sliding, lateral translation, and rotation/rolling.

  14. Radial-arrayed rotary electrification for high performance triboelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Tiejun; Jing, Qingshen; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-03-01

    Harvesting mechanical energy is an important route in obtaining cost-effective, clean and sustainable electric energy. Here we report a two-dimensional planar-structured triboelectric generator on the basis of contact electrification. The radial arrays of micro-sized sectors on the contact surfaces enable a high output power of 1.5 W (area power density of 19 mW cm-2) at an efficiency of 24%. The triboelectric generator can effectively harness various ambient motions, including light wind, tap water flow and normal body movement. Through a power management circuit, a triboelectric-generator-based power-supplying system can provide a constant direct-current source for sustainably driving and charging commercial electronics, immediately demonstrating the feasibility of the triboelectric generator as a practical power source. Given exceptional power density, extremely low cost and unique applicability resulting from distinctive mechanism and structure, the triboelectric generator can be applied not only to self-powered electronics but also possibly to power generation at a large scale.

  15. Pyro-electrification of polymer membranes for cell patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rega, R.; Gennari, O.; Mecozzia, L.; Grilli, S.; Pagliarulo, V.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the recent years, much attention has been devoted to the possibility of charging polymer-based materials, due to their potential in developing large-scale and inexpensive flexible thin-film technology. The availability of localized electrostatic fields is in of great interest for a huge amount of applications such as distribution of biomolecules and cells from the liquid phase. Here we report a voltage-free pyro-electrification (PE) process able to induce permanent dipoles into polymer layers; the lithium niobate (LN) crystal is the key component that plays the multi-purpose role of sustaining, heating and poling the polymer layer that is then peeled-off easily in order to have a free-standing charged membrane. The results show the fascinating application for the living cell patterning. It well known that cell behaviour is affected by chemical and topographical cues of substrate. In fact, polymers, such as polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), are naturally cytophobic and require specific functionalization treatments in order to promote cell adhesion. Through our proposal technique, it's possible to obtain spontaneous organization and a driven growth of SH-SY5Y cells that is solely dictated by the nature of the charge polymer surface, opening, in this way, the innovative chance to manipulate and transfer biological samples on a free-standing polymer layer [1].

  16. Pyro-electrification of polymer membranes for cell patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Rega, R.; Gennari, O.; Mecozzia, L.; Grilli, S.; Pagliarulo, V.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-05-18

    In the recent years, much attention has been devoted to the possibility of charging polymer-based materials, due to their potential in developing large-scale and inexpensive flexible thin-film technology. The availability of localized electrostatic fields is in of great interest for a huge amount of applications such as distribution of biomolecules and cells from the liquid phase. Here we report a voltage-free pyro-electrification (PE) process able to induce permanent dipoles into polymer layers; the lithium niobate (LN) crystal is the key component that plays the multi-purpose role of sustaining, heating and poling the polymer layer that is then peeled-off easily in order to have a free-standing charged membrane. The results show the fascinating application for the living cell patterning. It well known that cell behaviour is affected by chemical and topographical cues of substrate. In fact, polymers, such as polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), are naturally cytophobic and require specific functionalization treatments in order to promote cell adhesion. Through our proposal technique, it’s possible to obtain spontaneous organization and a driven growth of SH-SY5Y cells that is solely dictated by the nature of the charge polymer surface, opening, in this way, the innovative chance to manipulate and transfer biological samples on a free-standing polymer layer [1].

  17. A Survey of Dog Owners in Remote Northern Australian Indigenous Communities to Inform Rabies Incursion Planning

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Emily G.; Dhand, Navneet; Dürr, Salome; Ward, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Australia is underprepared for a rabies incursion due to a lack of information about how a rabies outbreak would spread within the susceptible canine populations and which control strategies would be best to control it. The aim of this study was to collect information to parameterize a recently developed dog rabies spread model as well as use this information to gauge how the community would accept potential control strategies. Such information–together with model outputs–would be used to inform decision makers on the best control strategies and improve Australia’s preparedness against a canine rabies incursion. The parameters this study focussed on were detection time, vaccination rates and dog-culling and dog movement restriction compliance. A cross-sectional survey of 31 dog-owners, using a questionnaire, was undertaken in the five communities of the Northern Peninsular Area (NPA) in northern Australia regarding community dog movements, veterinary visits, reporting systems, perceptions of sick dogs and potential human behaviours during hypothetical rabies outbreaks. It highlighted the significant shortfalls in veterinary care that would need to be vastly improved during an outbreak, who educational programs should be targeted towards and which dog movements should be restricted. The results indicate that men were significantly more likely than women to allow their dogs to roam and to move their dogs. The current low vaccination rate of 12% highlighted the limited veterinary services that would need to be substantially increased to achieve effective rabies control. Participation in mass vaccination was accepted by 100% of the respondents. There was lower acceptance for other possible rabies control strategies with 10–20% of the respondents stating a resistance to both a mass culling program and a ban on dog movements. Consequently, movement bans and mass dog culling would have limited effectiveness as a control strategy in the NPA community. More than

  18. A Survey of Dog Owners in Remote Northern Australian Indigenous Communities to Inform Rabies Incursion Planning.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Emily G; Dhand, Navneet; Dürr, Salome; Ward, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Australia is underprepared for a rabies incursion due to a lack of information about how a rabies outbreak would spread within the susceptible canine populations and which control strategies would be best to control it. The aim of this study was to collect information to parameterize a recently developed dog rabies spread model as well as use this information to gauge how the community would accept potential control strategies. Such information-together with model outputs-would be used to inform decision makers on the best control strategies and improve Australia's preparedness against a canine rabies incursion. The parameters this study focussed on were detection time, vaccination rates and dog-culling and dog movement restriction compliance. A cross-sectional survey of 31 dog-owners, using a questionnaire, was undertaken in the five communities of the Northern Peninsular Area (NPA) in northern Australia regarding community dog movements, veterinary visits, reporting systems, perceptions of sick dogs and potential human behaviours during hypothetical rabies outbreaks. It highlighted the significant shortfalls in veterinary care that would need to be vastly improved during an outbreak, who educational programs should be targeted towards and which dog movements should be restricted. The results indicate that men were significantly more likely than women to allow their dogs to roam and to move their dogs. The current low vaccination rate of 12% highlighted the limited veterinary services that would need to be substantially increased to achieve effective rabies control. Participation in mass vaccination was accepted by 100% of the respondents. There was lower acceptance for other possible rabies control strategies with 10-20% of the respondents stating a resistance to both a mass culling program and a ban on dog movements. Consequently, movement bans and mass dog culling would have limited effectiveness as a control strategy in the NPA community. More than half of the

  19. Remote camera-trap methods and analyses reveal impacts of rangeland management on Namibian carnivore communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauffman, M.J.; Sanjayan, M.; Lowenstein, J.; Nelson, A.; Jeo, R.M.; Crooks, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    Assessing the abundance and distribution of mammalian carnivores is vital for understanding their ecology and providing for their long-term conservation. Because of the difficulty of trapping and handling carnivores many studies have relied on abundance indices that may not accurately reflect real abundance and distribution patterns. We developed statistical analyses that detect spatial correlation in visitation data from combined scent station and camera-trap surveys, and we illustrate how to use such data to make inferences about changes in carnivore assemblages. As a case study we compared the carnivore communities of adjacent communal and freehold rangelands in central Namibia. We used an index of overdispersion to test for repeat visits to individual camera-trap scent stations and a bootstrap simulation to test for correlations in visits to camera neighbourhoods. After distilling our presence-absence data to the most defensible spatial scale, we assessed overall carnivore visitation using logistic regression. Our analyses confirmed the expected pattern of a depauparate fauna on the communal rangelands compared to the freehold rangelands. Additionally, the species that were not detected on communal sites were the larger-bodied carnivores. By modelling these rare visits as a Poisson process we illustrate a method of inferring whether or not such patterns are because of local extinction of species or are simply a result of low sample effort. Our Namibian case study indicates that these field methods and analyses can detect meaningful differences in the carnivore communities brought about by anthropogenic influences. ?? 2007 FFI.

  20. Technical Support for China's Village Electrification Program: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00235

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, D.

    2010-07-01

    This work has two main goals: First, it provides for the analysis of data collected from systems developed in the previous phase of China's rural power program, the Township Electrification Program Second, it will comprise joint IEE-NREL work in support of the upcoming phase, 'Electrification of Unelectrified Areas'.

  1. A New Method to Retrieve the Data Requirements of the Remote Sensing Community – Exemplarily Demonstrated for Hyperspectral User Needs

    PubMed Central

    Nieke, Jens; Reusen, Ils

    2007-01-01

    User-driven requirements for remote sensing data are difficult to define, especially details on geometric, spectral and radiometric parameters. Even more difficult is a decent assessment of the required degrees of processing and corresponding data quality. It is therefore a real challenge to appropriately assess data costs and services to be provided. In 2006, the HYRESSA project was initiated within the framework 6 programme of the European Commission to analyze the user needs of the hyperspectral remote sensing community. Special focus was given to finding an answer to the key question, “What are the individual user requirements for hyperspectral imagery and its related data products?”. A Value-Benefit Analysis (VBA) was performed to retrieve user needs and address open items accordingly. The VBA is an established tool for systematic problem solving by supporting the possibility of comparing competing projects or solutions. It enables evaluation on the basis of a multidimensional objective model and can be augmented with expert's preferences. After undergoing a VBA, the scaling method (e.g., Law of Comparative Judgment) was applied for achieving the desired ranking judgments. The result, which is the relative value of projects with respect to a well-defined main objective, can therefore be produced analytically using a VBA. A multidimensional objective model adhering to VBA methodology was established. Thereafter, end users and experts were requested to fill out a Questionnaire of User Needs (QUN) at the highest level of detail - the value indicator level. The end user was additionally requested to report personal preferences for his particular research field. In the end, results from the experts' evaluation and results from a sensor data survey can be compared in order to understand user needs and the drawbacks of existing data products. The investigation – focusing on the needs of the hyperspectral user community in Europe – showed that a VBA is a

  2. Assessing the Impact and Cost of Short-Term Health Workforce in Remote Indigenous Communities in Australia: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, John; Bourke, Lisa; Dunbar, Terry; Jones, Michael; Carey, Timothy A; Guthridge, Steven; Russell, Deborah; Lyle, David; Zhao, Yuejen; Murakami-Gold, Lorna

    2016-01-01

    Background Remote Australia is a complex environment characterized by workforce shortages, isolated practice, a large resident Indigenous population, high levels of health need, and limited access to services. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend of utilizing a short-term visiting (fly-in/fly-out) health workforce in many remote areas. However, there is a dearth of evidence relating to the impact of this transitory workforce on the existing resident workforce, consumer satisfaction, and the effectiveness of current services. Objective This study aims to provide rigorous empirical data by addressing the following objectives: (1) to identify the impact of short-term health staff on the workload, professional satisfaction, and retention of resident health teams in remote areas; (2) to identify the impact of short-term health staff on the quality, safety, and continuity of patient care; and (3) to identify the impact of short-term health staff on service cost and effectiveness. Methods Mixed methods will be used. Administrative data will be extracted that relates to all 54 remote clinics managed by the Northern Territory Department of Health, covering a population of 35,800. The study period will be 2010 to 2014. All 18 Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Services in the Northern Territory will also be invited to participate. We will use these quantitative data to describe staffing stability and turnover in these communities, and then utilize multiple regression analyses to determine associations between the key independent variables of interest (resident staff turnover, stability or median survival, and socioeconomic status, community size, and per capita funding) and dependent variables related to patient care, service cost, quality, and effectiveness. The qualitative component of the study will involve in-depth interviews and focus groups with staff and patients, respectively, in six remote communities. Three communities will be high staff turnover

  3. Developing the future Indigenous health workforce: The feasibility and impact of a student-led placement programme in remote Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Warren, Johanna M; Irish, Georgina L; Purbrick, Brydie; Li, Joule J; Li, Xi; Fitzpatrick, Danielle J; Faull, Randall J

    2016-10-01

    To describe and evaluate a programme where medical students designed and implemented Indigenous health placements for students with an interest in rural/Indigenous health. In 2011, a student-led programme at the University of Adelaide was set up to give medical students the opportunity to undertake outreach trips and clinical placements in remote Indigenous communities. Twenty-four medical students attended trips to remote communities between 2012 and 2014. Here we evaluate our programme using a single-arm experimental design. Responses to questionnaire items before and after attending an outreach placement, scored on 6-point Likert scales. Following their remote Indigenous health placement, participants expressed a significantly higher mean likelihood of working in an Indigenous community in the future (3.17 (2.69-3.64) versus 4.00 (3.65-4.35); P < 0.007). Furthermore, after their placement participants felt better prepared to work in Indigenous communities (mean 1.79 (1.44-2.14) versus 3.21 (2.88-3.54); P < 0.001). A placement programme initiated and run by medical students can provide meaningful exposure to Indigenous health. Implementation of this student-led model in other medical schools may encourage nationwide development of the Indigenous health workforce. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  4. Niyith NiyithWatmam [corrected] (the quiet story): exploring the experiences of Aboriginal women who give birth in their remote community.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Sarah; Wulili Narjic, Concepta; Belton, Suzanne; Kildea, Sue

    2011-10-01

    to investigate the beliefs and practices of Aboriginal women who decline transfer to urban hospitals and remain in their remote community to give birth. an ethnographic approach was used which included: the collection of birth histories and narratives, observation and participation in the community for 24 months, field notes, training and employment of an Aboriginal co-researcher, and consultation with and advice from a local reference group. a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory, Australia. narratives were collected from seven Aboriginal women and five family members. findings showed that women, through their previous experiences of standard care, appeared to make conscious decisions and choices about managing their subsequent pregnancies and births. Women took into account their health, the baby's health, the care of their other children, and designated men with a helping role. narratives described a breakdown of traditional birthing practices and high levels of non-compliance with health-system-recommended care. standard care provided for women relocating for birth must be improved, and the provision of a primary maternity service in this particular community may allow Aboriginal Women's Business roles and cultural obligations to be recognised and invigorated. International examples of primary birthing services in remote areas demonstrate that they can be safe alternatives to urban transfer for childbirth. A primary maternity service would provide a safer environment for the women who choose to avoid standard care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomass assessment of microbial surface communities by means of hyperspectral remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Paul, Max; Tamm, Alexandra; Caesar, Jennifer; Büdel, Burkhard; Escribano, Paula; Hill, Joachim; Weber, Bettina

    2017-05-15

    Dryland vegetation developed morphological and physiological strategies to cope with drought. However, as aridity increases, vascular plant coverage gets sparse and microbially-dominated surface communities (MSC), comprising cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and bryophytes together with heterotropic bacteria, archaea and fungi, gain relevance. Nevertheless, the relevance of MSC net primary productivity has only rarely been considered in ecosystem scale studies, and detailed information on their contribution to the total photosynthetic biomass reservoir is largely missing. In this study, we mapped the spatial distribution of two different MSC (biological soil crusts and quartz fields hosting hypolithic crusts) at two different sites within the South African Succulent Karoo (Soebatsfontein and Knersvlakte). Then we characterized both types of MSC in terms of chlorophyll content, and combining these data with the biocrust and quartz field maps, we estimated total biomass values of MSCs and their spatial patterns within the two different ecosystems. Our results revealed that MSC are important vegetation components of the South African Karoo biome, revealing clear differences between the two sites. At Soebatsfontein, MSC occurred as biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which covered about one third of the landscape reaching an overall biomass value of ~480gha(-1) of chlorophyll a+b at the landscape scale. In the Knersvlakte, which is characterized by harsher environmental conditions (i.e. higher solar radiation and potential evapotranspiration), MSC occurred as biocrusts, but also formed hypolithic crusts growing on the lower soil-immersed parts of translucent quartz pebbles. Whereas chlorophyll concentrations of biocrusts and hypolithic crusts where insignificantly lower in the Knersvlakte, the overall MSC biomass reservoir was by far larger with ~780gha(-1) of chlorophyll a+b. Thus, the complementary microbially-dominated surface communities promoted biomass formation

  6. Multi-Criteria Optimization of the Deployment of a Grid for Rural Electrification Based on a Heuristic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Matos, L.; Aguila-Tellez, A.; Hincapié-Reyes, R. C.; González-Sanchez, J. W.

    2017-07-01

    In order to design electrification systems, recent mathematical models solve the problem of location, type of electrification components, and the design of possible distribution microgrids. However, due to the amount of points to be electrified increases, the solution to these models require high computational times, thereby becoming unviable practice models. This study posed a new heuristic method for the electrification of rural areas in order to solve the problem. This heuristic algorithm presents the deployment of rural electrification microgrids in the world, by finding routes for optimal placement lines and transformers in transmission and distribution microgrids. The challenge is to obtain a display with equity in losses, considering the capacity constraints of the devices and topology of the land at minimal economic cost. An optimal scenario ensures the electrification of all neighbourhoods to a minimum investment cost in terms of the distance between electric conductors and the amount of transformation devices.

  7. Automated Identification of Initial Storm Electrification and End-of-Storm Electrification Using Electric Field Mill Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, Launa M.; Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2017-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operations are located in a region which experiences one of the highest lightning densities across the United States. As a result, on average, KSC loses almost 30 minutes of operational availability each day for lightning sensitive activities. KSC is investigating using existing instrumentation and automated algorithms to improve the timeliness and accuracy of lightning warnings. Additionally, the automation routines will be warning on a grid to minimize under-warnings associated with not being located in the center of the warning area and over-warnings associated with encompassing too large an area. This study discusses utilization of electric field mill data to provide improved warning times. Specifically, this paper will demonstrate improved performance of an enveloping algorithm of the electric field mill data as compared with the electric field zero crossing to identify initial storm electrification. End-of-Storm-Oscillation (EOSO) identification algorithms will also be analyzed to identify performance improvement, if any, when compared with 30 minutes after the last lightning flash.

  8. Utilizing Remote Real-Time Videoconferencing to Expand Access to Cancer Genetic Services in Community Practices: A Multicenter Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Harris, Diana; Stevens, Evelyn; Egleston, Brian; Smith, Kyle; Mueller, Rebecca; Brandt, Amanda; Stopfer, Jill; Rauch, Shea; Forman, Andrea; Kim, Rebecca; Fetzer, Dominique; Fleisher, Linda; Daly, Mary; Domchek, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Videoconferencing has been used to expand medical services to low-access populations and could increase access to genetic services at community sites where in-person visits with genetic providers are not available. To evaluate the feasibility of, patient feedback of, and cognitive and affective responses to remote two-way videoconferencing (RVC) telegenetic services at multiple sociodemographically diverse community practices without access to genetic providers. Patients at 3 community sites in 2 US states outside the host center completed RVC pretest (visit 1, V1) and post-test (visit 2, V2) genetic counseling for cancer susceptibility. Surveys evaluated patient experiences, knowledge, satisfaction with telegenetic and cancer genetics services, anxiety, depression, and cancer worry. A total of 82 out of 100 (82.0%) approached patients consented to RVC services. A total of 61 out of 82 patients (74%) completed pretest counseling and 41 out of 61 (67%) proceeded with testing and post-test counseling. A total of 4 out of 41 (10%) mutation carriers were identified: BRCA2, MSH2, and PMS2. Patients reported many advantages (eg, lower travel burden and convenience) and few disadvantages to RVC telegenetic services. Most patients reported feeling comfortable with the video camera--post-V1: 52/57 (91%); post-V2: 39/41 (95%)--and that their privacy was respected--post-V1: 56/57 (98%); post-V2: 40/41 (98%); however, some reported concerns that RVC might increase the risk of a confidentiality breach of their health information--post-V1: 14/57 (25%); post-V2: 12/41 (29%). While the majority of patients reported having no trouble seeing or hearing the genetic counselor--post-V1: 47/57 (82%); post-V2: 39/41 (95%)--51 out of 98 (52%) patients reported technical difficulties. Nonetheless, all patients reported being satisfied with genetic services. Compared to baseline, knowledge increased significantly after pretest counseling (+1.11 mean score, P=.005); satisfaction with

  9. Utilizing Remote Real-Time Videoconferencing to Expand Access to Cancer Genetic Services in Community Practices: A Multicenter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Patrick-Miller, Linda; Harris, Diana; Stevens, Evelyn; Egleston, Brian; Smith, Kyle; Mueller, Rebecca; Brandt, Amanda; Stopfer, Jill; Rauch, Shea; Forman, Andrea; Kim, Rebecca; Fetzer, Dominique; Fleisher, Linda; Daly, Mary; Domchek, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Videoconferencing has been used to expand medical services to low-access populations and could increase access to genetic services at community sites where in-person visits with genetic providers are not available. Objective To evaluate the feasibility of, patient feedback of, and cognitive and affective responses to remote two-way videoconferencing (RVC) telegenetic services at multiple sociodemographically diverse community practices without access to genetic providers. Methods Patients at 3 community sites in 2 US states outside the host center completed RVC pretest (visit 1, V1) and post-test (visit 2, V2) genetic counseling for cancer susceptibility. Surveys evaluated patient experiences, knowledge, satisfaction with telegenetic and cancer genetics services, anxiety, depression, and cancer worry. Results A total of 82 out of 100 (82.0%) approached patients consented to RVC services. A total of 61 out of 82 patients (74%) completed pretest counseling and 41 out of 61 (67%) proceeded with testing and post-test counseling. A total of 4 out of 41 (10%) mutation carriers were identified: BRCA2, MSH2, and PMS2. Patients reported many advantages (eg, lower travel burden and convenience) and few disadvantages to RVC telegenetic services. Most patients reported feeling comfortable with the video camera—post-V1: 52/57 (91%); post-V2: 39/41 (95%)—and that their privacy was respected—post-V1: 56/57 (98%); post-V2: 40/41 (98%); however, some reported concerns that RVC might increase the risk of a confidentiality breach of their health information—post-V1: 14/57 (25%); post-V2: 12/41 (29%). While the majority of patients reported having no trouble seeing or hearing the genetic counselor—post-V1: 47/57 (82%); post-V2: 39/41 (95%)—51 out of 98 (52%) patients reported technical difficulties. Nonetheless, all patients reported being satisfied with genetic services. Compared to baseline, knowledge increased significantly after pretest counseling (+1

  10. Bridging perspectives from remote sensing and Inuit communities on changing sea-ice cover in the Baffin Bay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Walter N.; Stroeve, Julienne; Gearheard, Shari

    Passive microwave imagery indicates a decreasing trend in Arctic summer sea-ice extent since 1979. The summers of 2002-05 have exhibited particularly reduced extent and have reinforced the downward trend. Even the winter periods have now shown decreasing trends. At the local level, Arctic residents are also noticing changes in sea ice. In particular, indigenous elders and hunters report changes such as earlier break-up, later freeze-up and thinner ice. The changing conditions have profound implications for Arctic-wide climate, but there is also regional variability in the extent trends. These can have important ramifications for wildlife and indigenous communities in the affected regions. Here we bring together observations from remote sensing with observations and knowledge of Inuit who live in the Baffin Bay region. Weaving the complementary perspectives of science and Inuit knowledge, we investigate the processes driving changes in Baffin Bay sea-ice extent and discuss the present and potential future effects of changing sea ice on local activities.

  11. Greenhouse gas implications of fleet electrification based on big data-informed individual travel patterns.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hua; Xu, Ming

    2013-08-20

    Environmental implications of fleet electrification highly depend on the adoption and utilization of electric vehicles at the individual level. Past research has been constrained by using aggregated data to assume all vehicles with the same travel pattern as the aggregated average. This neglects the inherent heterogeneity of individual travel behaviors and may lead to unrealistic estimation of environmental impacts of fleet electrification. Using "big data" mining techniques, this research examines real-time vehicle trajectory data for 10,375 taxis in Beijing in one week to characterize the travel patterns of individual taxis. We then evaluate the impact of adopting plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in the taxi fleet on life cycle greenhouse gas emissions based on the characterized individual travel patterns. The results indicate that 1) the largest gasoline displacement (1.1 million gallons per year) can be achieved by adopting PHEVs with modest electric range (approximately 80 miles) with current battery cost, limited public charging infrastructure, and no government subsidy; 2) reducing battery cost has the largest impact on increasing the electrification rate of vehicle mileage traveled (VMT), thus increasing gasoline displacement, followed by diversified charging opportunities; 3) government subsidies can be more effective to increase the VMT electrification rate and gasoline displacement if targeted to PHEVs with modest electric ranges (80 to 120 miles); and 4) while taxi fleet electrification can increase greenhouse gas emissions by up to 115 kiloton CO2-eq per year with the current grid in Beijing, emission reduction of up to 36.5 kiloton CO2-eq per year can be achieved if the fuel cycle emission factor of electricity can be reduced to 168.7 g/km. Although the results are based on a specific public fleet, this study demonstrates the benefit of using large-scale individual-based trajectory data (big data) to better understand environmental implications

  12. The impact of health promotion on trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) of staff in three work settings in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

    PubMed

    Lange, Fiona D; Jones, Kelly; Ritte, Rebecca; Brown, Haley E; Taylor, Hugh R

    2017-05-01

    Globally, trachoma is the leading cause of infectious blindness and Australia is the only developed country with endemic trachoma. It is found in remote Indigenous communities burdened with poverty, overcrowding and poor hygiene. Lack of culturally appropriate health promotion, a small trachoma workforce and lack of awareness and support for trachoma elimination in general, were early barriers. A cross-sectional pre-post study using a convenience sample, was conducted in clinics, schools and community work-settings from 63 of the 82 remote Aboriginal communities identified as being at risk of trachoma in the Northern Territory (NT). The study assessed the effect of a multi-component health promotion strategy aimed at increasing knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support settings staff. Data were collected between 2010 and 2012. The health promotion initiatives were introduced in communities in staggered delivery over a one-year period; 272 participants were surveyed at baseline and 261 at follow-up. Trachoma related knowledge, attitudes and practice increased across all settings and for all primary outcome measures. Across all settings, there was a significant increase in the proportion of participants reporting the most important thing to do if a child has a 'dirty' face is to 'wash it every time its dirty' (61.6% cf 69.7%; X2p = 0.047), a significant reduction in the proportion of respondents answering 'no' to the question "Is it normal for kids to have dirty faces in your community' (40.5% cf 29.6%; X2p = 0.009) and a significant increase in reported capacity to teach others about trachoma prevention (70.8% cf 83.3%; X2p <0.001). Health promotion was associated with increased trachoma knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support staff working with children and in remote NT communities. In the early stages of the trachoma health promotion program, this increased trachoma awareness and

  13. Reaching rural communities with culturally appropriate care: a model for adapting remote monitoring to American Indian veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Novins, Douglas K; Noe, Tim; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Lowe, Jeff; Richardson, W J Buck; Hawthorne, Kara; Shore, Jay H

    2013-04-01

    Providing specialized healthcare to rural communities can be extremely difficult, and consequently many health organizations are turning to the use of telehealth technologies for care delivery. One such technology, remote monitoring, has been successfully implemented with patients suffering from chronic and other medical conditions. A drawback, however, is that remote monitoring devices are programmed to reach a broad audience, and consequently the content may not be suitable for all patients-especially those who are not a part of the dominant culture. This report provides a model for adapting remote monitoring to specific populations who are undergoing care for posttraumatic stress disorder. Adaptation changes focus on (1) information gathering, (2) process and dialogue changes, (3) testing, and (4) patient and administrative feedback. Data for such modifications were gathered through a series of community meetings, patient interviews, and provider feedback. A case example highlights the successful implementation of the adaptation model for a rural American Indian Veteran population. Patients showed high acceptability of both the programmatic and cultural adaptations. Feasibility of the program also appeared positive, with most patients reporting that the readability of the program was appropriate, the dialogue duration was not burdensome, and technical problems were rare. Remote monitoring provides the ability to be modified for use with certain subpopulations. Procedural recommendations in this report highlight special considerations for working with American Indians living on or near reservation areas, although the model can be broadly adapted to several groups.

  14. Automated test bench for simulation of radiation electrification of spacecraft structural dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. M.; Bezhayev, A. Yu; Zykov, V. M.; Isaychenko, V. I.; Lukashchuk, A. A.; Lukonin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the test bench “Prognoz-2” designed in Testing Center, Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, which can be used: for ground testing of individual samples of spacecraft structural materials (e.g. thermal control coatings or cover glasses for solar batteries) or ceramics of the plasma thruster discharge channel), and whole spacecraft units or instruments (e.g. instruments of solar and stellar orientation or correcting plasma thrusters) exposed to radiation electrification factors; to verify the calculation mathematical models of radiation electrification of structural dielectrics under the impact of space factors in different orbits.

  15. Overcoming the challenges of mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) sampling in remote localities: a comparison of CO2 attractants on mosquito communities in three tropical forest habitats.

    PubMed

    Steiger, D B Meyer; Ritchie, S A; Laurance, S G W

    2014-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are on the rise with future outbreaks predicted to occur in frontier regions of tropical countries. Disease surveillance in these hotspots is challenging because sampling techniques often rely on vector attractants that are either unavailable in remote localities or difficult to transport. We examined whether a novel method for producing CO2 from yeast and sugar produces similar mosquito species captures compared with a standard attractant such as dry ice. Across three different vegetation communities, we found traps baited with dry ice frequently captured more mosquitoes than yeast-baited traps; however, there was little effect on mosquito community composition. Based on our preliminary experiments, we find that this method of producing CO2 is a realistic alternative to dry ice and would be highly suitable for remote field work.

  16. Processes causing electrification of ice crystals in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonnegut, B.; Moore, C. B.

    Jayaratne and Saunders (1991) have performed a useful service by reporting their laboratory experiments demonstrating, contrary to the findings of Odencrantz and Buecher (1967), that ice crystal charging does not take place in an unmixed cloud of ice crystals. Jayaratne and Saunders' further cold box experiments showing that the ice crystals become electrified when a fan in the cold box is turned on, support their view that an ice-ice charging process takes place on the surfaces of the moving ice-covered fan-blades. Their conclusion, that this phenomenon might be capable of producing each second the several coulombs of charged cloud particles necessary to maintain the electrification of a thundercloud, appears justified. However, because their paper is lacking in experimental details and because it is unknown whether the conditions in their cold chamber accurately duplicate those in a thunderstorm, this point is not possible to resolve. There is good reason to doubt J and S's final conclusion, that "… in thunderstorms, ice crystal charges are similarly acquired by collision processes RATHER THAN BY ANY OTHER MECHANISM". It is puzzling to understand why the authors have chosen to ignore ion attachment, an important ice crystal charging process that does not involve collisions between ice crystals. Beginning with Gish and Wait (1950), numerous investigators have demonstrated that ion currents flow to the tops of thunderclouds as predicted by Wilson (1920). Marshall et al. (1989) and Byrne et al. (1989) have found that ice particles at cloud top carry appreciable charges that appear to be derived from the Wilson current. In an average storm there can be little doubt that this mechanism too could be producing charged ice crystals at the required rate of about a coulomb per second (Vonnegut, 1990).

  17. Transportation Electrification Load Development For a Renewable Future Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, Tony; Mai, Trieu; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2010-09-30

    Electrification of the transportation sector offers the opportunity to significantly reduce petroleum consumption. The transportation sector accounts for 70% of US petroleum consumption. The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. In support of a recent US Department of Energy funded activity that analyzed a future generation scenario with high renewable energy technology contributions, a set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles were developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. These load profiles with their underlying assumptions will be presented in this paper. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Two market saturation scenarios of 30% of sales and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average {approx}6 kWh per day were considered. Results were generated for 3109 counties and were consolidated to 134 Power Control Areas (PCA) for the use NREL's's regional generation planning analysis tool ReEDS. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across 4 daily time slices under optimal control from the utility perspective. No other literature has addressed the potential flexibility in energy delivery to electric vehicles in connection with a regional power generation study. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios. EVS25 Copyright.

  18. Visual health screening by schoolteachers in remote communities of Peru: implementation research

    PubMed Central

    Latorre-Arteaga, Sergio; Gil-González, Diana; Bascarán, Covadonga; Núñez, Richard Hurtado; Morales, María del Carmen Peral; Orihuela, Guillermo Carrillo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the adaptation and scaling-up of an intervention to improve the visual health of children in the Apurimac region, Peru. Methods In a pilot screening programme in 2009–2010, 26 schoolteachers were trained to detect and refer visual acuity problems in schoolchildren in one district in Apurimac. To scale-up the intervention, lessons learnt from the pilot were used to design strategies for: (i) strengthening multisector partnerships; (ii) promoting the engagement and participation of teachers and (iii) increasing children’s attendance at referral eye clinics. Implementation began in February 2015 in two out of eight provinces of Apurimac, including hard-to-reach communities. We made an observational study of the processes and outcomes of adapting and scaling-up the intervention. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were made of data collected from March 2015 to January 2016 from programme documents, routine reports and structured evaluation questionnaires completed by teachers. Findings Partnerships were expanded after sharing the results of the pilot phase. Training was completed by 355 teachers and directors in both provinces, belonging to 315 schools distributed in 24 districts. Teachers’ appraisal of the training achieved high positive scores. Outreach eye clinics and subsidies for glasses were provided for poorer families. Data from six districts showed that attendance at the eye clinic increased from 66% (45/68 children referred) in the pilot phase to 92% (237/259) in the implementation phase. Conclusion Adaptation to the local context allowed the scaling-up of an intervention to improve visual health in children and enhanced the equity of the programme. PMID:27708470

  19. Preparing the remote sensing community toward the NPP/NPOESS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuciauskas, A. P.; Lee, T. F.; Turk, F. J.; Richardson, K. A.; Hawkins, J. D.; Kent, J. E.; Miller, S. D.; McWilliams, G.

    2008-12-01

    Under the auspices of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Integrated Program Office (IPO), the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey (NRLMRY) was tasked to develop NexSat, a weather satellite web-based resource, to illustrate future sensing capabilities within the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor onboard the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and NPOESS era. NexSat acquires and processes data from polar orbiters (AVHRR, MODIS, SeaWiFS, DMSP, and TRMM) that serve as heritage instruments to the VIIRS. Geostationary sensors and numerical weather prediction (NWP) overlays supplement the image products suite, making NexSat a one-stop shop for current and future environmental monitoring. NRLMRY collaborates with the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) for product development. Together with the Cooperative Program for Operational Meteorology, Education and Training (COMET®), NRLMRY provides educational outreach to research and development communities as well as to the general public. This paper intends to describe the products within the NexSat webpage and its training resources. The product suite consists of generic and state of the art images. Along with the standard visible, IR, and water vapor products, NexSat also includes dust enhancement, cloud properties, cloud profiling, snow cloud discrimination, volcanic ash plumes, hot spots, aerosol content over land and water. NexSat training resources will be described, including on-line product tutorials, a course module, as well as outreach efforts to the National Weather Service, government agencies, academic institutions, and international organizations.

  20. Incorporating remote sensing-based ET estimates into the Community Land Model version 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dagang; Wang, Guiling; Parr, Dana T.; Liao, Weilin; Xia, Youlong; Fu, Congsheng

    2017-07-01

    Land surface models bear substantial biases in simulating surface water and energy budgets despite the continuous development and improvement of model parameterizations. To reduce model biases, Parr et al. (2015) proposed a method incorporating satellite-based evapotranspiration (ET) products into land surface models. Here we apply this bias correction method to the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and test its performance over the conterminous US (CONUS). We first calibrate a relationship between the observational ET from the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) product and the model ET from CLM4.5, and assume that this relationship holds beyond the calibration period. During the validation or application period, a simulation using the default CLM4.5 (CLM) is conducted first, and its output is combined with the calibrated observational-vs.-model ET relationship to derive a corrected ET; an experiment (CLMET) is then conducted in which the model-generated ET is overwritten with the corrected ET. Using the observations of ET, runoff, and soil moisture content as benchmarks, we demonstrate that CLMET greatly improves the hydrological simulations over most of the CONUS, and the improvement is stronger in the eastern CONUS than the western CONUS and is strongest over the Southeast CONUS. For any specific region, the degree of the improvement depends on whether the relationship between observational and model ET remains time-invariant (a fundamental hypothesis of the Parr et al. (2015) method) and whether water is the limiting factor in places where ET is underestimated. While the bias correction method improves hydrological estimates without improving the physical parameterization of land surface models, results from this study do provide guidance for physically based model development effort.

  1. Herbivore Impact on Tundra Plant Community Dynamics Using Long-term Remote Sensing Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Engstrom, R.; Shiklomanov, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic tundra biome is now experiencing dramatic environmental changes accentuated by summer sea-ice decline, permafrost thaw, and shrub expansion. Multi-decadal time-series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, a spectral metric of vegetation productivity) shows an overall "greening" trend across the Arctic tundra biome. Regional trends in climate plausibly explain large-scale patterns of increasing plant productivity, as diminished summer sea-ice extent warms the adjacent land causing tundra vegetation to respond positively (increased photosynthetic aboveground biomass). However, at more local scales, there is a great deal of spatial variability in NDVI trends that likely reflects differences in hydrology and soil conditions, disturbance history, and use by wildlife and humans. Particularly, habitat use by large herbivores, such as reindeer and caribou, has large impacts on vegetation dynamics at local and regional scales, but the role of herbivores in modulating the response of vegetation to warming climate has received little attention. This study investigates regional tundra plant community dynamics within inhabits of different sizes of wild caribou/reindeer herds across the Arctic using GIMMS NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) 3g data product. The Taimyr herd in Russia is one of the largest herds in the world with a population increase from 450,000 in 1975 to about 1 million animals in 2000. The population of the porcupine caribou herd has fluctuated in the past three decades between 100,000 and 180,000. Time-series of the maximum NDVI within the inhabit area of the Taimyr herd has increased about 2% per decade over the past three decades, while within the inhabit area of the Porcupine herd the maximum NDVI has increased about 5% per decade. Our results indicate that the impact of large herbivores can be detected from space and further analyses on seasonal dynamics of vegetation indices and herbivore behavior may provide more

  2. Scaling Sap Flux Measurements of Shrub communities with Fine and Coarse-Resolution Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, E.; Morino, K.; Didan, K.; Jordan, F.; Carroll, K.; Nagler, P. L.; Hultine, K.; Waugh, J.; Sheader, L.

    2008-12-01

    We measured transpiration by black greasewood (Sarcobatus ermiculatus) (SAVE) and fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens) (ATCA) over a nitrate-contaminated aquifer in Monument Valley, Arizona, on the Colorado Plateau. Heat-balance sap flow sensors were used to measure transpiration by shrubs in 2006 and 2007 and results were scaled to larger landscape units and longer time scales using leaf area index, fractional vegetation cover, meteorological data, and the Enhanced Vegetation Index from MODIS sensors on the Terra satellite. Transpiration was high on a leaf-area basis (2.95 - 6.72 mm m-2 d-1) and was controlled by vapor pressure deficit (D) in the atmosphere. SAVE tended to have higher transpiration rates than ATCA and had a steeper response to D, but both exhibited midday depression of leaf conductance. Over most of the site, fractional vegetation cover (fc) and area-wide leaf area index (LAI), were low (0.10 and 0.37, respectively), due to heavy grazing by cattle and sheep. However, a portion of the plume that had been protected from grazing for ten years had fc = 0.75, LAI = 2.88. Transpiration rates on a ground area basis varied with LAI, with mid-summer daily values ranging from 1.44 mm d-1 (LAI = 0.36) to 13.1 mm d-1 (LAI = 2.88 mm) over the site, corresponding to projected annual values of 159 mm yr-1 to 1447 mm yr-1. Controlling grazing could theoretically slow or halt the movement of the contamination plume by allowing the shrub community to extract more water than is recharged in the aquifer.

  3. Giving voice to food insecurity in a remote indigenous community in subarctic Ontario, Canada: traditional ways, ways to cope, ways forward

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Food insecurity is a serious public health issue for Aboriginal people (First Nations [FN], Métis, and Inuit) living in Canada. Food security challenges faced by FN people are unique, especially for those living in remote and isolated communities. Conceptualizations of food insecurity by FN people are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of food insecurity by FN adults living in a remote, on-reserve community in northern Ontario known to have a high prevalence of moderate to severe food insecurity. Methods A trained community research assistant conducted semi-directed interviews, and one adult from each household in the community was invited to participate. Questions addressed traditional food, coping strategies, and suggestions to improve community food security and were informed by the literature and a community advisory committee. Thematic data analyses were carried out and followed an inductive, data-driven approach. Results Fifty-one individuals participated, representing 67% of eligible households. The thematic analysis revealed that food sharing, especially with family, was regarded as one of the most significant ways to adapt to food shortages. The majority of participants reported consuming traditional food (wild meats) and suggested that hunting, preserving and storing traditional food has remained very important. However, numerous barriers to traditional food acquisition were mentioned. Other coping strategies included dietary change, rationing and changing food purchasing patterns. In order to improve access to healthy foods, improving income and food affordability, building community capacity and engagement, and community-level initiatives were suggested. Conclusions Findings point to the continued importance of traditional food acquisition and food sharing, as well as community solutions for food systems change. These data highlight that traditional and store-bought food are both part of the

  4. Giving voice to food insecurity in a remote indigenous community in subarctic Ontario, Canada: traditional ways, ways to cope, ways forward.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Kelly; Hanning, Rhona M; Desjardins, Ellen; Tsuji, Leonard J S

    2013-05-02

    Food insecurity is a serious public health issue for Aboriginal people (First Nations [FN], Métis, and Inuit) living in Canada. Food security challenges faced by FN people are unique, especially for those living in remote and isolated communities. Conceptualizations of food insecurity by FN people are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of food insecurity by FN adults living in a remote, on-reserve community in northern Ontario known to have a high prevalence of moderate to severe food insecurity. A trained community research assistant conducted semi-directed interviews, and one adult from each household in the community was invited to participate. Questions addressed traditional food, coping strategies, and suggestions to improve community food security and were informed by the literature and a community advisory committee. Thematic data analyses were carried out and followed an inductive, data-driven approach. Fifty-one individuals participated, representing 67% of eligible households. The thematic analysis revealed that food sharing, especially with family, was regarded as one of the most significant ways to adapt to food shortages. The majority of participants reported consuming traditional food (wild meats) and suggested that hunting, preserving and storing traditional food has remained very important. However, numerous barriers to traditional food acquisition were mentioned. Other coping strategies included dietary change, rationing and changing food purchasing patterns. In order to improve access to healthy foods, improving income and food affordability, building community capacity and engagement, and community-level initiatives were suggested. Findings point to the continued importance of traditional food acquisition and food sharing, as well as community solutions for food systems change. These data highlight that traditional and store-bought food are both part of the strategies and solutions participants suggested

  5. Culture shock and healthcare workers in remote Indigenous communities of Australia: what do we know and how can we measure it?

    PubMed

    Muecke, A; Lenthall, S; Lindeman, M

    2011-01-01

    Culture shock or cultural adaptation is a significant issue confronting non-Indigenous health professionals working in remote Indigenous communities in Australia. This article is presented in two parts. The first part provides a thorough background in the theory of culture shock and cultural adaptation, and a comprehensive analysis of the consequences, causes, and current issues around the phenomenon in the remote Australian healthcare context. Second, the article presents the results of a comprehensive literature review undertaken to determine if existing studies provide tools which may measure the cultural adaptation of remote health professionals. A comprehensive literature review was conducted utilising the meta-databases CINAHL and Ovid Medline. While there is a plethora of descriptive literature about culture shock and cultural adaptation, empirical evidence is lacking. In particular, no empirical evidence was found relating to the cultural adaptation of non-Indigenous health professionals working in Indigenous communities in Australia. In all, 15 international articles were found that provided empirical evidence to support the concept of culture shock. Of these, only 2 articles contained tools that met the pre-determined selection criteria to measure the stages of culture shock. The 2 instruments identified were the Culture Shock Profile (CSP) by Zapf and the Culture Shock Adaptation Inventory (CSAI) by Juffer. There is sufficient evidence to determine that culture shock is a significant issue for non-Indigenous health professionals working in Indigenous communities in Australia. However, further research in this area is needed. The available empirical evidence indicates that a measurement tool is possible but needs further development to be suitable for use in remote Indigenous communities in Australia.

  6. The impact of health promotion on trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) of staff in three work settings in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory

    PubMed Central

    Ritte, Rebecca; Brown, Haley E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally, trachoma is the leading cause of infectious blindness and Australia is the only developed country with endemic trachoma. It is found in remote Indigenous communities burdened with poverty, overcrowding and poor hygiene. Lack of culturally appropriate health promotion, a small trachoma workforce and lack of awareness and support for trachoma elimination in general, were early barriers. Methods A cross-sectional pre-post study using a convenience sample, was conducted in clinics, schools and community work-settings from 63 of the 82 remote Aboriginal communities identified as being at risk of trachoma in the Northern Territory (NT). The study assessed the effect of a multi-component health promotion strategy aimed at increasing knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support settings staff. Data were collected between 2010 and 2012. The health promotion initiatives were introduced in communities in staggered delivery over a one-year period; 272 participants were surveyed at baseline and 261 at follow-up. Results Trachoma related knowledge, attitudes and practice increased across all settings and for all primary outcome measures. Across all settings, there was a significant increase in the proportion of participants reporting the most important thing to do if a child has a ‘dirty’ face is to ‘wash it every time its dirty’ (61.6% cf 69.7%; X2p = 0.047), a significant reduction in the proportion of respondents answering ‘no’ to the question “Is it normal for kids to have dirty faces in your community’ (40.5% cf 29.6%; X2p = 0.009) and a significant increase in reported capacity to teach others about trachoma prevention (70.8% cf 83.3%; X2p <0.001). Conclusion Health promotion was associated with increased trachoma knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support staff working with children and in remote NT communities. In the early stages of the trachoma health

  7. Effect of 25% Sodium Reduction on Sales of a Top-Selling Bread in Remote Indigenous Australian Community Stores: A Controlled Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Emma; Webster, Jacqui; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Reducing sodium in the food supply is key to achieving population salt targets, but maintaining sales is important to ensuring commercial viability and maximising clinical impact. We investigated whether 25% sodium reduction in a top-selling bread affected sales in 26 remote Indigenous community stores. After a 23-week baseline period, 11 control stores received the regular-salt bread (400 mg Na/100 g) and 15 intervention stores received the reduced-salt version (300 mg Na/100 g) for 12-weeks. Sales data were collected to examine difference between groups in change from baseline to follow-up (effect size) in sales (primary outcome) or sodium density, analysed using a mixed model. There was no significant effect on market share (−0.31%; 95% CI −0.68, 0.07; p = 0.11) or weekly dollars ($58; −149, 266; p = 0.58). Sodium density of all purchases was not significantly reduced (−8 mg Na/MJ; −18, 2; p = 0.14), but 25% reduction across all bread could significantly reduce sodium (−12; −23, −1; p = 0.03). We found 25% salt reduction in a top-selling bread did not affect sales in remote Indigenous community stores. If achieved across all breads, estimated salt intake in remote Indigenous Australian communities would be reduced by approximately 15% of the magnitude needed to achieve population salt targets, which could lead to significant health gains at the population-level. PMID:28264485

  8. Tools and Techniques to Collaborate and Connect with At-Risk Climate Communities UsingSensors, Remote Sensing Data, and Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapkin, J. K.; Ramamurthy, P.; Vant-Hull, B.; Yuen, K.; Glenn, A.; Jusino, C.; Corbin, C.; Schuerman, M.; Keefe, J.; Brooke, H.

    2016-12-01

    Those most at risk during heat waves and floods are often the socio-economically vulnerable. Yet very few studies exist of indoor temperatures during heat waves or of standing water events at the neighborhood level during extreme events. ISeeChange, a community weather and climate journal, is developing tools and testing techniques in a series of community pilots in Harlem and New Orleans to assess if a combination of citizen science, remote sensing, and journalism can bridge the gap. Our consortium of media (WNYC,Adapt NYC, ISeeChange), scientists (CUNY, CoCoRaHS, NASAJPL), and community partners (WE ACT for Environmental Justice, tenant, and neighborhood associations) are collaborating to engage with residents, report radio stories, as well as develop scientifically valuableinformation for decision-making. Community volunteers place temperature and humidity sensors inside residences (Harlem) or photograph standing water using specific methodologies (New Orleans). Sensordata, photographs, and text documenting the impacts of extreme weather on residents are posted on the ISeeChange platform via mobile app or community ambassadors and compared to other remote sensing data products (surface temperature, precipitation, subsidence) Preliminary results of the Harlem pilot show that indoor temperatures are far more stable than outdoor temperatures, so can be both cooler during the day but warmer at night; preliminary work on the New Orleans pilot is set to begin in fall 2016. A full analysis of the Harlem pilot will be presented along with preliminary results of the New Orleans pilot.

  9. Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Electrification with a Dual- Polarization, Coherent, Wideband Radar System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-10

    now engaged in detailed analyses of selected storm cases for preparation of his doctoral dissertation. Radar Scientist/ Engineer : Mr. Grant Gray, a radar... engineer starting 1 July, 1991. Publications/Presentations: The following publication and presentations have result- ed from the work on this grant...frequency mode is used for coherent measurements, such as Doppler ye - 4. DSPs locity or complex cross-polar correlation magni- The system employs the

  10. Technical Study of a Standalone Photovoltaic–Wind Energy Based Hybrid Power Supply Systems for Island Electrification in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Samrat, Nahidul Hoque; Ahmad, Norhafizan; Choudhury, Imtiaz Ahmed; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important factors in the socioeconomic development of a country. In a developing country like Malaysia, the development of islands is mostly related to the availability of electric power. Power generated by renewable energy sources has recently become one of the most promising solutions for the electrification of islands and remote rural areas. But high dependency on weather conditions and the unpredictable nature of these renewable energy sources are the main drawbacks. To overcome this weakness, different green energy sources and power electronic converters need to be integrated with each other. This study presents a battery storage hybrid standalone photovoltaic-wind energy power supply system. In the proposed standalone hybrid system, a DC-DC buck-boost bidirectional converter controller is used to accumulates the surplus hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the load during the hybrid power shortage by maintaining the constant dc-link voltage. A three-phase voltage source inverter complex vector control scheme is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the voltage amplitude and frequency. Based on the simulation results obtained from MATLAB/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under variable weather and load conditions. PMID:26121032

  11. Technical Study of a Standalone Photovoltaic-Wind Energy Based Hybrid Power Supply Systems for Island Electrification in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Nahidul Hoque; Ahmad, Norhafizan; Choudhury, Imtiaz Ahmed; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important factors in the socioeconomic development of a country. In a developing country like Malaysia, the development of islands is mostly related to the availability of electric power. Power generated by renewable energy sources has recently become one of the most promising solutions for the electrification of islands and remote rural areas. But high dependency on weather conditions and the unpredictable nature of these renewable energy sources are the main drawbacks. To overcome this weakness, different green energy sources and power electronic converters need to be integrated with each other. This study presents a battery storage hybrid standalone photovoltaic-wind energy power supply system. In the proposed standalone hybrid system, a DC-DC buck-boost bidirectional converter controller is used to accumulates the surplus hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the load during the hybrid power shortage by maintaining the constant dc-link voltage. A three-phase voltage source inverter complex vector control scheme is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the voltage amplitude and frequency. Based on the simulation results obtained from MATLAB/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under variable weather and load conditions.

  12. Key factors for the implementation of successful, stand-alone village electrification schemes in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Campos, Teodoro

    The hypothesis of this work is that there are social, financial, technical, managerial institutional and political key factors that may either support or prevent the success of small stand alone energy systems in rural areas. This research work aims at contributing to the identification of such factors and study their relevance to the performance and sustainability of stand alone energy systems in rural areas; to meet its purpose, a wide range of literature was reviewed including rural electrification programmes and projects, research and development projects on access to electricity in rural areas, impact studies and others, and a field research survey was done the Andes and Upper Jungle regions in Peru. Nineteen possible critical factors were identified, thirteen with relevance at the local context (the community or village), and six with relevance at the national (or wider) context. From literature review it was found that the possible local critical factors were relevant only to four categories of factors instead of the six considered initially (i.e. social, financial, technological and managerial): the other two categories, political and institutional were found to be more relevant to the national context, therefore those were included in the group of possible critical factors of wider context. A series of questionnaires were designed to collect field data information, which was later used to analyse and establish the relation of each identified factor with the success of the systems studied. The survey research was implemented in 14 villages, 7 with small diesel sets and 7 with small hydropower schemes, all spread in the Andes and Upper Jungle of Peru, which were carefully selected to be representative of regions with isolated stand alone systems and with different socioeconomic background. Out of the 13 possible critical factors of local context, it was found that only 3 are really critical, the others are important but not critical; one of them (technical

  13. Exploring cross-sectional associations between common childhood illness, housing and social conditions in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is limited epidemiological research that provides insight into the complex web of causative and moderating factors that links housing conditions to a variety of poor health outcomes. This study explores the relationship between housing conditions (with a primary focus on the functional state of infrastructure) and common childhood illness in remote Australian Aboriginal communities for the purpose of informing development of housing interventions to improve child health. Methods Hierarchical multi-level analysis of association between carer report of common childhood illnesses and functional and hygienic state of housing infrastructure, socio-economic, psychosocial and health related behaviours using baseline survey data from a housing intervention study. Results Multivariate analysis showed a strong independent association between report of respiratory infection and overall functional condition of the house (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.00; 95%CI 1.36-6.63), but no significant association between report of other illnesses and the overall functional condition or the functional condition of infrastructure required for specific healthy living practices. Associations between report of child illness and secondary explanatory variables which showed an OR of 2 or more included: for skin infection - evidence of poor temperature control in the house (OR 3.25; 95%CI 1.06-9.94), evidence of pests and vermin in the house (OR 2.88; 95%CI 1.25-6.60); for respiratory infection - breastfeeding in infancy (OR 0.27; 95%CI 0.14-0.49); for diarrhoea/vomiting - hygienic state of food preparation and storage areas (OR 2.10; 95%CI 1.10-4.00); for ear infection - child care attendance (OR 2.25; 95%CI 1.26-3.99). Conclusion These findings add to other evidence that building programs need to be supported by a range of other social and behavioural interventions for potential health gains to be more fully realised. PMID:20302661

  14. Direct probing of contact electrification by using optical second harmonic generation technique

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangyu; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Contact electrification between two different materials is one of the oldest fields of study in solid-state physics. Here, we introduced an innovative system based on optical electric-field-induced second harmonic generation (EFI-SHG) technique that can directly monitor the dynamic performance of the contact electrification on the surface of polyimide film. After the contact, the EFI-SHG system visualized briefly three relaxations of the tribo-induced charges on the surface of a polyimide film, a fast relaxation within 3 min followed by two much slower relaxations, which were possibly related to different charge diffusion routes. The contact electrification under several special experimental conditions (wind, water and steam) was studied to demonstrate the high flexibility and material selectivity of the EFI-SHG. The EFI-SHG studies confirmed the motion of the water can remove the surface charge, while the appearance and the evaporation of a thin water layer cannot enhance the charge diffusion. We anticipate that this experimental technique will find a variety of applications in the field of contact electrification and the development of the recently invented triboelectric nano generator. PMID:26272162

  15. Direct probing of contact electrification by using optical second harmonic generation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-08-01

    Contact electrification between two different materials is one of the oldest fields of study in solid-state physics. Here, we introduced an innovative system based on optical electric-field-induced second harmonic generation (EFI-SHG) technique that can directly monitor the dynamic performance of the contact electrification on the surface of polyimide film. After the contact, the EFI-SHG system visualized briefly three relaxations of the tribo-induced charges on the surface of a polyimide film, a fast relaxation within 3 min followed by two much slower relaxations, which were possibly related to different charge diffusion routes. The contact electrification under several special experimental conditions (wind, water and steam) was studied to demonstrate the high flexibility and material selectivity of the EFI-SHG. The EFI-SHG studies confirmed the motion of the water can remove the surface charge, while the appearance and the evaporation of a thin water layer cannot enhance the charge diffusion. We anticipate that this experimental technique will find a variety of applications in the field of contact electrification and the development of the recently invented triboelectric nano generator.

  16. Laboratory studies of aerosol electrification and experimental evidence for electrical breakdown at different scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alois, Stefano; Merrison, Jonathan; Iversen, Jens Jacob; Sesterhenn, Joern

    2017-04-01

    Contact electrification between different particles size/material can lead to electric field generation high enough to produce electrical breakdown. Experimental studies of solid aerosol contact electrification (Alois et al., 2016) has shown various electrical breakdown phenomena; these range from field emission at the contact site (nm-scale) limiting particle surface charge concentration, to visible electrical discharges (cm-scale) observed both with the use of an electrometer and high-speed camera. In these experiments micron-size particles are injected into a low-pressure chamber, where they are deviated by an applied electric field. A laser Doppler velocimeter allows the simultaneous determination of particle size and charge of single grains. Results have shown an almost constant surface charge concentration, which is likely to be due to charge limitation by field emission at the contact site between particle and injector. In a second measurement technique, the electrically isolated injector tube (i.e. a Faraday cage) is connected to an oscilloscope and synchronised to a high speed camera filming the injection. Here the electrification of a large cloud of particles can be quantified and discharging effects studied. This study advances our understanding on the physical processes leading to electrification and electrical breakdown mechanisms.

  17. Post-dispersion electrification of droplets in a system with pneumatic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzyk, R.; Lewandowski, M.

    2011-06-01

    The process of electrifying aerosol particles dispersed by a pneumatic sprayer with supersonic air flow is presented. To avoid the electric-field shielding effect, confirmed by investigations of induction charging of aerosol droplets with application of a concentric induction electrode placed in the region of liquid dispersion, the droplet electrification process following the dispersion of liquid was proposed. The supersonic atomizing head was equipped with an external high voltage contact electrode placed concentrically and perpendicularly to the droplets stream and closely to the atomizing head. Experiments were conducted in air, at ambient conditions (T = 18±2 °C, RH = 55±3%), for standard air feeding rate (0.5 m3/min, 0.4 MPa) and regulated dispersed liquid rate (0.1 - 0.55 l/min). Results of the applied electrification process, characterized by a (Q/m) factor measured as a function of liquid feed rate, have shown that the (Q/m) values achieved for post-dispersion electrification are comparable to the values obtained for typical induction electrification with application of a concentric electrode.

  18. SELCO: A model for solar rural electrification in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hande, H. Harish

    1999-11-01

    The following thesis presents the concept of a Rural Energy Service Company in India, known as SELCO. The model is being set up as a sustainable proposition for the implementation of solar photovoltaics as a viable alternative to provide reliable home lighting in the rural areas of India. The SELCO approach has already achieved noteworthy social and commercial results. Institutional, policy and operational problems have long plagued the rural electrification programs in India, resulting in thousands of villages without access to electricity. SELCO is a solar energy service company operating in Southern India since 1995, focusing on the enormous untapped market for home lighting where thousands of households have no access to electricity and severe power shortages face those already connected to the electric grid. The Company has installed nearly 2,000 solar home lighting systems. From a modest two employees company in 1995, it has grown to 35 in 1997 and from one office to eight. The hypothesis to be tested in this study is that in rural India, in a market not subsidized by the government, a solar service company with available loans from local banks and cooperatives and with sales, installation, and maintenance personnel in the villages can be successful in introducing photovoltaic systems to provide basic amenities such as lighting and water pumping for the improvement of the quality of life, public health, and the environment. The initial success of SELCO lends considerable evidence to the acceptance of the hypothesis. To accomplish its mission, SELCO works with commercial, retail, and rural development banks with large rural branch networks to stimulate loans to SELCO's customers based on a standard set of attractive financing terms. SELCO through its successful model has convinced the policy makers that a way to increase rural families' access to consumer financing for solar home lighting systems is through the existing financial network available in the

  19. Wind-blown Sand Electrification Inspired Triboelectric Energy Harvesting Based on Homogeneous Inorganic Materials Contact: A Theoretical Study and Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenwen; Wu, Weiwei; Zhou, Hao-miao

    2016-01-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification between heterogeneous materials has been widely studied. Inspired from wind-blown sand electrification, we design a novel kind of TENG based on size dependent electrification using homogeneous inorganic materials. Based on the asymmetric contact theory between homogeneous material surfaces, a calculation of surface charge density has been carried out. Furthermore, the theoretical output of homogeneous material based TENG has been simulated. Therefore, this work may pave the way of fabricating TENG without the limitation of static sequence. PMID:26817411

  20. Wind-blown Sand Electrification Inspired Triboelectric Energy Harvesting Based on Homogeneous Inorganic Materials Contact: A Theoretical Study and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenwen; Wu, Weiwei; Zhou, Hao-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification between heterogeneous materials has been widely studied. Inspired from wind-blown sand electrification, we design a novel kind of TENG based on size dependent electrification using homogeneous inorganic materials. Based on the asymmetric contact theory between homogeneous material surfaces, a calculation of surface charge density has been carried out. Furthermore, the theoretical output of homogeneous material based TENG has been simulated. Therefore, this work may pave the way of fabricating TENG without the limitation of static sequence.

  1. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC)-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    PubMed Central

    Warmington, Kelly; Flewelling, Carol; Kennedy, Carol A; Shupak, Rachel; Papachristos, Angelo; Jones, Caroline; Linton, Denise; Beaton, Dorcas E; Lineker, Sydney

    2017-01-01

    Objective Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA) living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd) program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities. Materials and methods Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented. Results In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites) participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the video-conference (% agree/strongly agree): could hear the presenter (92.9%) and discussion between sites (82.4%); could see who was speaking at other remote sites (85.7%); could see the slides (95.3%); and interaction between sites adequately facilitated (94.0%). Educator and participant feedback were consistent. Suggested improvements included: use of two screens (speaker and slides); frontal camera angles; equal interaction with remote sites; and slide modifications to improve the readability on screen. Interview data included similar constructive feedback but highlighted the educational and social benefits of the program, which participants noted would have been inaccessible if not offered via telemedicine. Conclusion Study findings confirm the feasibility of delivering the RxEd program

  2. Factors associated with reported service use for mental health problems by residents of rural and remote communities: cross-sectional findings from a baseline survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The patterns of health service use by rural and remote residents are poorly understood and under-represented in national surveys. This paper examines professional and non-professional service use for mental health problems in rural and remote communities in Australia. Methods A stratified random sample of adults was drawn from non-metropolitan regions of New South Wales, Australia as part of a longitudinal population-based cohort. One-quarter (27.7%) of the respondents were from remote or very remote regions. The socio-demographic, health status and service utilization (professional and non-professional) characteristics of 2150 community dwelling residents are described. Hierarchical logistic regressions were used to identify cross-sectional associations between socio-demographic, health status and professional and non-professional health service utilization variables. Results The overall rate of professional contacts for mental health problems during the previous 12 months (17%) in this rural population exceeded the national rate (11.9%). Rates for psychologists and psychiatrists were similar but rates for GPs were higher (12% vs. 8.1%). Non-professional contact rates were 12%. Higher levels of help seeking were associated with the absence of a partner, poorer finances, severity of mental health problems, and higher levels of adversity. Remoteness was associated with lower utilization of non-professional support. A Provisional Service Need Index was devised, and it demonstrated a broad dose–response relationship between severity of mental health problems and the likelihood of seeking any professional or non-professional help. Nevertheless, 47% of those with estimated high service need had no contact with professional services. Conclusions An examination of self-reported patterns of professional and non-professional service use for mental health problems in a rural community cohort revealed relatively higher rates of general practitioner attendance for

  3. Better health outcomes at lower costs: the benefits of primary care utilisation for chronic disease management in remote Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuejen; Thomas, Susan L; Guthridge, Steven L; Wakerman, John

    2014-10-04

    Indigenous residents living in remote communities in Australia's Northern Territory experience higher rates of preventable chronic disease and have poorer access to appropriate health services compared to other Australians. This study compared health outcomes and costs at different levels of primary care utilisation to determine if primary care represents an efficient use of resources for Indigenous patients with common chronic diseases namely hypertension, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal disease. This was an historical cohort study involving a total of 14,184 Indigenous residents, aged 15 years and over, who lived in remote communities and used a remote clinic or public hospital from 2002 to 2011. Individual level demographic and clinical data were drawn from primary care and hospital care information systems using a unique patient identifier. A propensity score was used to improve comparability between high, medium and low primary care utilisation groups. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and acceptability curves were used to analyse four health outcome measures: total and, avoidable hospital admissions, deaths and years of life lost. Compared to the low utilisation group, medium and high levels of primary care utilisation were associated with decreases in total and avoidable hospitalisations, deaths and years of life lost. Higher levels of primary care utilisation for renal disease reduced avoidable hospitalisations by 82-85%, deaths 72-75%, and years of life lost 78-81%. For patients with ischaemic heart disease, the reduction in avoidable hospitalisations was 63-78%, deaths 63-66% and years of life lost 69-73%. In terms of cost-effectiveness, primary care for renal disease and diabetes ranked as more cost-effective, followed by hypertension and ischaemic heart disease. Primary care for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the least cost-effective of the five conditions. Primary care in remote

  4. Collaborative Approaches to Increase the Utility of Spatial Data for the Wildfire Management Community Through NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullum, A. J. K.; Schmidt, C.; Blevins, B.; Weber, K.; Schnase, J. L.; Carroll, M.; Prados, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The utility of spatial data products and tools to assess risk and effectively manage wildfires has increased, highlighting the need for communicating information about these new capabilities to decision makers, resource managers, and community leaders. NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) program works directly with agencies and policy makers to develop in-person and online training courses that teach end users how to access, visualize, and apply NASA Earth Science data in their profession. The expansion of ARSET into wildfire applications began in 2015 with a webinar and subsequent in-person training hosted in collaboration with Idaho State University's (ISU) GIS Training and Research Center (TReC). These trainings featured presentations from the USDA Forest Service's Remote Sensing Training and Applications Center, the Land Processes DAAC, Northwest Nazarene University, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and ISU's GIS TReC. The webinar focused on providing land managers, non-governmental organizations, and international management agencies with an overview of 1) remote sensing platforms for wildfire applications, 2) products for pre- and post-fire planning and assessment, 3) the use of terrain data, 4) new techniques and technologies such as Unmanned Aircraft Systems and the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP), and 5) the RECOVER Decision Support System. This training highlighted online tools that engage the wildfire community through collaborative monitoring and assessment efforts. Webinar attendance included 278 participants from 178 organizations in 42 countries and 33 US states. The majority of respondents (93%) from a post-webinar survey indicated they displayed improvement in their understanding of specific remote-sensing data products appropriate for their work needs. With collaborative efforts between federal, state, and local agencies and academic institutions, increased use of NASA Earth Observations may lead to improved near real

  5. Transportation Electrification Education Partnership for Green Jobs and Sustainable Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Huei; Mi, Chris; Gover, James

    2013-06-28

    This collaborative educational project between the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, University of Michigan—Dearborn and the Kettering University successfully executed almost all the elements we proposed to do. In the original proposal, we proposed to develop four graduate courses, six undergraduate courses, four professional short courses, a K-12 electric vehicle education kit, a Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material to support the advancement of transportation electrification. The first four deliverables were all successfully developed and offered. When we held the kick-off meeting in NETL in Morgantown back in early 2010 with all the ten ARRA education teams, however, it quickly became clear that among the ten ARRA education grantee teams, our proposed “consume education” activities are not better or with the potential to create bigger impact than some of activities proposed in other teams. For example, the Odyssey 2010 event held by the West Virginia University team had planned and successfully reached to more than 230,000 attendees, which is way more than what our proposed 100k event could ever reach. It was under the suggestion of Joseph Quaranta, the ARRA education Program Director at that time, that we should coordinate and eliminate redundancy. The resources should then be focused on activities that have less overlap. Therefore, the originally proposed activities: Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material were dropped from our scope. We expanded the scope of our “education kit” activity to include some educational materials, mainly in the form of videos. The target audience also changed from general public to K-12 students. The majority of the project cost (~70%) goes toward the establishment of three undergraduate laboratories, which provides critically needed hands-on learning experience for next-generation green mobility engineers. We are very proud that the ARRA money

  6. What sort of medical care is ideal? Differences in thoughts on medical care among residents of urban and rural/remote Japanese communities.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Tomoki; Suzuki, Tomio; Oshima, Tamiki; Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasawa, Hidekazu

    2015-09-27

    Studies of aspirational ideals of medical care generally focus on patients rather than on ordinary people receiving or not receiving medications at the time of interview. The literature has not accurately conveyed the distinct ideals in individual communities or undertaken inter-regional comparisons. This current qualitative study focused on ideal medical care as perceived by residents of distinct Japanese communities in their everyday lives. Between December 2011 and November 2012, one-on-one and group-based semi-structured interviews were conducted with 105 individuals, each of whom had continuously lived for 20 years or more in one of the four types of communities classified as either 'metropolitan area', 'provincial city', 'mountain/fishing village' or 'remote island' in Japan. Interviews were transcribed from digital audio recordings and then analysed (in tandem with non-verbal data including participants' appearances, attitudes and interview atmospheres) using constructivist grounded theory, in which we could get the voice and mind of the participant concerning ideal medical care. The common themes observed among the four community types included 'peace of mind because of the availability of medical care' and 'trust in medical professionals'. Themes that were characteristic of urban communities were the tendency to focus on the content of medical care, including 'high-level medical care', 'elimination of unnecessary medical care' and 'faster, cheaper medical care', whereas those that were characteristic of rural communities were the tendency to focus on lifestyle-oriented medical care such as 'support for local lifestyles', 'locally appropriate standards of medical care' and 'being free from dependence on medical care'. The sense of ideal medical care in urban communities tended to centre around the satisfaction with the content of medical care, whereas that in rural communities tended to centre around the ability to lead a secure life. By considering

  7. Best practices for photovoltaic household electrification programs: Lessons from experiences in selected countries. World Bank Technical Paper No. 324

    SciTech Connect

    Cabraal, A.; Cosgrove-Davies, M.; Schaeffer, L.

    1996-09-01

    The report draws on case studies of recent experiences in the Dominican Republic, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka to the identify key ingredients of successful residential photovoltaic (PV) electrification programs and ways of overcoming financial and institutional barriers to the use of PV systems. The report concludes that PV systems are a viable complement to grid-based energy services delivery and that these systems have a cost-effective niche and market potential within the rural electrification framework.

  8. Red Dirt Thinking on Child Wellbeing in Indigenous, Rural and Remote Australian Communities: The SpICE Model "I Just Don't Want my Kid to Struggle Like I Did at School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kendall; Denton, Marijke

    2013-01-01

    Supporting children in their early development and learning has long-term benefits for both them and the broader community. Yet in Australia we still have significant examples of inequality of opportunity (Allan, 2010) and other structural barriers to family wellbeing, particularly in Indigenous and rural and remote communities (Bourke, Humphreys,…

  9. Red Dirt Thinking on Child Wellbeing in Indigenous, Rural and Remote Australian Communities: The SpICE Model "I Just Don't Want my Kid to Struggle Like I Did at School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kendall; Denton, Marijke

    2013-01-01

    Supporting children in their early development and learning has long-term benefits for both them and the broader community. Yet in Australia we still have significant examples of inequality of opportunity (Allan, 2010) and other structural barriers to family wellbeing, particularly in Indigenous and rural and remote communities (Bourke, Humphreys,…

  10. Translation of tobacco policy into practice in disadvantaged and marginalized subpopulations: a study of challenges and opportunities in remote Australian Indigenous communities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Australia generally, smoking prevalence more than halved after 1980 and recently commenced to decline among Australia's disadvantaged Indigenous peoples. However, in some remote Indigenous Australian communities in the Northern Territory (NT), extremely high rates of up to 83% have not changed over the past 25 years. The World Health Organisation has called for public health and political leadership to address a global tobacco epidemic. For Indigenous Australians, unprecedented policies aim to overcome disadvantage and close the 'health gap' with reducing tobacco use the top priority. This study identifies challenges and opportunities to implementing these important new tobacco initiatives in remote Indigenous communities. Methods: With little empirical evidence available, we interviewed 82 key stakeholders across the NT representing operational- and management-level service providers, local Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants to identify challenges and opportunities for translating new policies into successful tobacco interventions. Data were analysed using qualitative approaches to identify emergent themes. Results The 20 emergent themes were classified using counts of occasions each theme occurred in the transcribed data as challenge or opportunity. The 'smoke-free policies' theme occurred most frequently as opportunity but infrequently as challenge while 'health workforce capacity' occurred most frequently as challenge but less frequently as opportunity, suggesting that policy implementation is constrained by lack of a skilled workforce. 'Smoking cessation support' occurred frequently as opportunity but also frequently as challenge suggesting that support for individuals requires additional input and attention. Conclusions These results from interviews with local and operational-level participants indicate that current tobacco policies in Australia targeting Indigenous smoking are sound and comprehensive. However, for remote Indigenous

  11. Sustaining oral health services in remote and indigenous communities: a review of 10 years experience in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Estie; Jacobs, Alissa; Tennant, Marc

    2010-04-01

    In line with findings throughout Australia, rural, remote and Indigenous Western Australians suffer from a higher burden of oral disease and have less access to dental practitioners and care than their urban and non-Indigenous counterparts. With workforce projections indicating an increase in the shortage of dental practitioners, especially in rural and remote areas, the Centre for Rural and Remote Oral Health (CRROH) in Western Australia set out to establish a sustainable programme to service such increasingly disadvantaged populations. Via the vertical integration of education, service and research CRROH pioneered a sustainable model to deliver much needed oral health services to some of Western Australia's most remote areas, while primarily focused on addressing the oral health needs of Indigenous Australians. One of the key lessons from the programme has been the development of a strong clinical governance framework and a support network to sustain services in remote locations. This study offers one way to provide and sustain dental care for those most in need, yet largely left out.

  12. Evaluation of grid connected rural electrification projects in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Siyambalapitiya, D.J.T.; Rajapakse, S.T.K. ); de Mel, S.J.S.; Fernando, S.I.T.; Perera, B.L.P.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Extension of the power grid to rural and remote locations in a country has to be considered after detailed evaluation of technical, economic and social implications. The paper presents the application of conventional economic analytical techniques to evaluate proposed rural distribution systems in an oil-importing developing country environment. The parameters involved in the analyses are described in detail. Case studies are presented from a typical developing country. Revalidation of such evaluations incorporating socio-economic analysis is introduced.

  13. Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of a single annual professional intervention for the prevention of childhood dental caries in a remote rural Indigenous community.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Kroon, Jeroen; Tut, Ohnmar; Kularatna, Sanjeewa; Jamieson, Lisa M; Wallace, Valda; Boase, Robyn; Fernando, Surani; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Scuffham, Paul A; Johnson, Newell W

    2015-08-29

    The aim of the study is to reduce the high prevalence of tooth decay in children in a remote, rural Indigenous community in Australia, by application of a single annual dental preventive intervention. The study seeks to (1) assess the effectiveness of an annual oral health preventive intervention in slowing the incidence of dental caries in children in this community, (2) identify the mediating role of known risk factors for dental caries and (3) assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the intervention. The intervention is novel in that most dental preventive interventions require regular re-application, which is not possible in resource constrained communities. While tooth decay is preventable, self-care and healthy habits are lacking in these communities, placing more emphasis on health services to deliver an effective dental preventive intervention. Importantly, the study will assess cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness for broader implementation across similar communities in Australia and internationally. There is an urgent need to reduce the burden of dental decay in these communities, by implementing effective, cost-effective, feasible and sustainable dental prevention programs. Expected outcomes of this study include improved oral and general health of children within the community; an understanding of the costs associated with the intervention provided, and its comparison with the costs of allowing new lesions to develop, with associated treatment costs. Findings should be generalisable to similar communities around the world. The research is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), registration number ACTRN12615000693527; date of registration: 3rd July 2015.

  14. Assessing Caribbean Shallow and Mesophotic Reef Fish Communities Using Baited-Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) and Diver-Operated Video (DOV) Survey Techniques.

    PubMed

    Andradi-Brown, Dominic A; Macaya-Solis, Consuelo; Exton, Dan A; Gress, Erika; Wright, Georgina; Rogers, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Fish surveys form the backbone of reef monitoring and management initiatives throughout the tropics, and understanding patterns in biases between techniques is crucial if outputs are to address key objectives optimally. Often biases are not consistent across natural environmental gradients such as depth, leading to uncertainty in interpretation of results. Recently there has been much interest in mesophotic reefs (reefs from 30-150 m depth) as refuge habitats from fishing pressure, leading to many comparisons of reef fish communities over depth gradients. Here we compare fish communities using stereo-video footage recorded via baited remote underwater video (BRUV) and diver-operated video (DOV) systems on shallow and mesophotic reefs in the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Caribbean. We show inconsistent responses across families, species and trophic groups between methods across the depth gradient. Fish species and family richness were higher using BRUV at both depth ranges, suggesting that BRUV is more appropriate for recording all components of the fish community. Fish length distributions were not different between methods on shallow reefs, yet BRUV recorded more small fish on mesophotic reefs. However, DOV consistently recorded greater relative fish community biomass of herbivores, suggesting that studies focusing on herbivores should consider using DOV. Our results highlight the importance of considering what component of reef fish community researchers and managers are most interested in surveying when deciding which survey technique to use across natural gradients such as depth.

  15. Assessing Caribbean Shallow and Mesophotic Reef Fish Communities Using Baited-Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) and Diver-Operated Video (DOV) Survey Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Macaya-Solis, Consuelo; Exton, Dan A.; Gress, Erika; Wright, Georgina; Rogers, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Fish surveys form the backbone of reef monitoring and management initiatives throughout the tropics, and understanding patterns in biases between techniques is crucial if outputs are to address key objectives optimally. Often biases are not consistent across natural environmental gradients such as depth, leading to uncertainty in interpretation of results. Recently there has been much interest in mesophotic reefs (reefs from 30–150 m depth) as refuge habitats from fishing pressure, leading to many comparisons of reef fish communities over depth gradients. Here we compare fish communities using stereo-video footage recorded via baited remote underwater video (BRUV) and diver-operated video (DOV) systems on shallow and mesophotic reefs in the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Caribbean. We show inconsistent responses across families, species and trophic groups between methods across the depth gradient. Fish species and family richness were higher using BRUV at both depth ranges, suggesting that BRUV is more appropriate for recording all components of the fish community. Fish length distributions were not different between methods on shallow reefs, yet BRUV recorded more small fish on mesophotic reefs. However, DOV consistently recorded greater relative fish community biomass of herbivores, suggesting that studies focusing on herbivores should consider using DOV. Our results highlight the importance of considering what component of reef fish community researchers and managers are most interested in surveying when deciding which survey technique to use across natural gradients such as depth. PMID:27959907

  16. Case Report: Using a Remote Presence Robot to Improve Access to Physical Therapy for People with Chronic Back Disorders in an Underserved Community.

    PubMed

    Lovo Grona, Stacey; Bath, Brenna; Bustamante, Luis; Mendez, Ivar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the delivery of an inter-professional (IP) spinal triage management approach to chronic back disorders using remote presence robotic technology as an innovative form of telerehabilitation in a northern Saskatchewan community. Methods: The IP team, consisting of a local nurse practitioner (NP) and a physical therapist in an urban centre, completed a comprehensive neuromusculoskeletal assessment of, and one follow-up visit with, a post-surgical spinal patient. Treatment included detailed education regarding self-management after spinal surgery, provision and progression of home exercises, and reassurance. The patient was then referred to regional, in-person physical therapy care to complete her treatment. Results: A semi-structured interview with the NP revealed a high level of satisfaction; qualitative themes included the value of IP practice and the benefit to the patient of telerehabilitation achieved through patient-centred care. In a post-treatment survey, the patient expressed a high level of satisfaction with and appreciation for the patient-centred approach and the IP team. Objective clinical improvements in spinal and straight-leg raise movements were noted at the final telerehabilitation session. Conclusion: This report demonstrates the feasibility of delivering IP spinal triage management using telerehabilitation, specifically remote presence robotics, in a remote setting. Further research should include larger scale studies that investigate health, system, and economic outcomes as well as comparative studies for other forms of telehealth technology.

  17. Contact Electrification of Regolith Particles and Chloride Electrolysis: Synthesis of Perchlorates on Mars.

    PubMed

    Tennakone, K

    2016-10-01

    Contact electrification of chloride-impregnated martian regolith particles due to eolian agitation and moisture condensation on coalesced oppositely charged grains may lead to spontaneous electrolysis that generates hypochlorite, chlorite, chlorate, and perchlorate with a concomitant reduction of water to hydrogen. This process is not curtailed even if moisture condenses as ice because chloride ionizes on the surface of ice. Limitations dictated by potentials needed for electrolysis and breakdown electric fields enable estimation of the required regolith grain size. The estimated dimension turns out to be of the same order of magnitude as the expected median size of martian regolith, and a simple calculation yields the optimum rate of perchlorate production. Key Words: Mars oxidants-Perchlorate-Dust electrification-Electrolysis. Astrobiology 16, 811-816.

  18. List of materials acceptable for use on systems of REA electrification borrowers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The publication provides a convenient informational and updated reference list of the items of materials and equipment that have been determined by the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) to be acceptable for use on systems of REA Electrification Borrowers. The items include material and equipment for transmission and distribution facilities. Items not listed include office equipment, tools and work equipment, items of electric general plant and consumer owned wiring facilities. The listings apply only to new items of material and equipment and not to used items. In addition to items accepted on a general basis, this list also includes items accepted on a conditional basis. As one of the conditions in the listing of an item on a conditional basis, contractors are required to obtain the borrower's concurrence prior to its use.

  19. Photovoltaics for rural electrification in the People`s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.L.; Tsuo, Y.S.

    1997-12-31

    Rapid growth in economic development, coupled with the absence of an electric grid in large areas of the rural countryside, has created a need for new energy sources both in urban centers and rural areas in China. The most critical need for rural electrification exists in northern and western China, where 80 million people had no access to grid electricity at the end of 1995. In February 1995, the US Department of Energy signed an Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Protocol Agreement with the Chinese State Science and Technology Commission in Beijing. Under this agreement, NREL is providing assistance to several central government and provincial government agencies in China to develop photovoltaic and photovoltaic hybrid applications for rural electrification.

  20. A study of utilization of photovoltaics for rural electrification in the Republic of Kiribati

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahide; Semba, Hideo; Kashizaki, Kenji; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Wade, H.; Kamiyacho, Shuwa

    1994-12-31

    Kiribati consists of 33 islands in three main groups located in the mid-Pacific, astride both the equator and the International Date Line. The total land area, which amounts to only 725 square km. is distributed over approximately 3.5 million square km. In 1989, the Government of Kiribati had requested the Japanese government for technical assistance for a feasibility study of rural electrification by photovoltaics. According to this request, JICA had sent two preliminary study teams in 1989 and 1991. Then in 1992 JICA decided to implement this study. The paper describes results from the implementation phase which consisted of a preliminary verification of the desire of villages for electrification and the installation and operation of a pilot photovoltaic plant. Performance of the pilot plant is described and recommendations are made.

  1. Electrification of Shaken Granular Flows as a Model of Natural Storm Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, O.; Nordsiek, F.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The charging of particulates in nature is widespread and observed in thunderstorms, volcanic ash clouds, thunder-snow, and dust storms. However the mechanism of charge separation at large (> 1km) scale is poorly understood. We perform simple laboratory experiments to better understand the collective phenomena involved in granular electrification. We confine granular particles in an oscillating cylindrical chamber which is enclosed and sealed by two conducting plates. The primary measurement is the voltage difference between the two plates. We find that collective effects occurring in the bulk of the material play a significant role in the electrification process. We extend that by addition of photodetection capabilities to the experimental chamber to detect electrical discharges between the particles and each other and the plates. We present measurements of electrical discharges in addition to the slower dynamics of voltage variation in the system.

  2. The product is progress: rural electrification in Costa Rica. Project impact evaluation No. 22

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, G.; Goddard, P.O.; Gomez, G.; Harrison, P.

    1981-10-01

    Because Costa Rica had abundant hydroelectric potential and a government which was strongly committed to equitable growth, a considerable return was reaped from a relatively small investment in rural electrification (RE). This report details this success and A.I.D.'s contribution (1965-69). Aiming to diversify agriculture, increase income, expand agroindustry, and develop replicable RE cooperatives (REC's), the project produced positive but not wholly anticipated results.

  3. Annihilating time and space: The electrification of the United States Army, 1875--1920

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shannon Allen

    2000-10-01

    The United States Army embraced electrical technology in the 1870s as part of a wider initiative to meet the challenge of the coastal defense mission. As commercial power storage, generation, and transmission technology improved and the army came to recognize the value of the energy source as a means and method of improving command and control, localized electrical networks were integrated into the active service of the military. New vulnerabilities emerged as the army became ever more reliant upon electric power, however, and electrification---the institutional adoption and adaptation of electrical technologies---emerged as a very expensive and contentious process guided by technical, political, and economic pressures, and influenced by conflicting personalities within the service. This study considers the institutional evolution of the U.S. Army before and during World War I with respect to the adoption and application of electrical technology. The changing relationships between the military and electrical manufacturing and utilities industries during the period 1875--1920 are also explored. Using a combination of military archival sources and published primary materials, this study traces the effects of electrification on the army. In the end, this study proves that electrification was, at first, a symptom of, and later, a partial solution to the army's struggle to modernize and centralize during the period under consideration. Electrification produced a set of conditions that encouraged a new maturity within the ranks of the army, in technical, doctrinal, and administrative terms. This growth eventually led to the development of new capabilities, new forms of military organization, new missions, and new approaches to warfare.

  4. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Short Form is reliable in children living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Barbara R; Latimer, Jane; Doney, Robyn; Ferreira, Manuela L; Adams, Roger; Hawkes, Genevieve; Fitzpatrick, James P; Hand, Marmingee; Oscar, June; Carter, Maureen; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2013-09-06

    The Lililwan Project is the first population-based study to determine Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) prevalence in Australia and was conducted in the remote Fitzroy Valley in North Western Australia. The diagnostic process for FASD requires accurate assessment of gross and fine motor functioning using standardised cut-offs for impairment. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2) is a norm-referenced assessment of motor function used worldwide and in FASD clinics in North America. It is available in a Complete Form with 53 items or a Short Form with 14 items. Its reliability in measuring motor performance in children exposed to alcohol in utero or living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities is unknown. A prospective inter-rater and test-retest reliability study was conducted using the BOT-2 Short Form. A convenience sample of children (n = 30) aged 7 to 9 years participating in the Lililwan Project cohort (n = 108) study, completed the reliability study. Over 50% of mothers of Lililwan Project children drank alcohol during pregnancy. Two raters simultaneously scoring each child determined inter-rater reliability. Test-retest reliability was determined by assessing each child on a second occasion using predominantly the same rater. Reliability was analysed by calculating Intra-Class correlation Coefficients, ICC(2,1), Percentage Exact Agreement (PEA) and Percentage Close Agreement (PCA) and measures of Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) were calculated. Thirty Aboriginal children (18 male, 12 female: mean age 8.8 years) were assessed at eight remote Fitzroy Valley communities. The inter-rater reliability for the BOT-2 Short Form score sheet outcomes ranged from 0.88 (95%CI, 0.77 - 0.94) to 0.92 (95%CI, 0.84 - 0.96) indicating excellent reliability. The test-retest reliability (median interval between tests being 45.5 days) for the BOT-2 Short Form score sheet outcomes ranged from 0.62 (95%CI, 0.34 - 0.80) to 0

  5. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Short Form is reliable in children living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Lililwan Project is the first population-based study to determine Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) prevalence in Australia and was conducted in the remote Fitzroy Valley in North Western Australia. The diagnostic process for FASD requires accurate assessment of gross and fine motor functioning using standardised cut-offs for impairment. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2) is a norm-referenced assessment of motor function used worldwide and in FASD clinics in North America. It is available in a Complete Form with 53 items or a Short Form with 14 items. Its reliability in measuring motor performance in children exposed to alcohol in utero or living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities is unknown. Methods A prospective inter-rater and test-retest reliability study was conducted using the BOT-2 Short Form. A convenience sample of children (n = 30) aged 7 to 9 years participating in the Lililwan Project cohort (n = 108) study, completed the reliability study. Over 50% of mothers of Lililwan Project children drank alcohol during pregnancy. Two raters simultaneously scoring each child determined inter-rater reliability. Test-retest reliability was determined by assessing each child on a second occasion using predominantly the same rater. Reliability was analysed by calculating Intra-Class correlation Coefficients, ICC(2,1), Percentage Exact Agreement (PEA) and Percentage Close Agreement (PCA) and measures of Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) were calculated. Results Thirty Aboriginal children (18 male, 12 female: mean age 8.8 years) were assessed at eight remote Fitzroy Valley communities. The inter-rater reliability for the BOT-2 Short Form score sheet outcomes ranged from 0.88 (95%CI, 0.77 – 0.94) to 0.92 (95%CI, 0.84 – 0.96) indicating excellent reliability. The test-retest reliability (median interval between tests being 45.5 days) for the BOT-2 Short Form score sheet outcomes ranged from

  6. Culture at the centre of community based aged care in a remote Australian Indigenous setting: a case study of the development of Yuendumu Old People's Programme.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kay; Grundy, John J; Nelson, Harry J

    2010-01-01

    aged care in remote Indigenous communities in Australia and elsewhere.

  7. Preliminary results on the control of Aedes spp. in a remote Guatemalan community vulnerable to dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus: community participation and use of low-cost ecological ovillantas for mosquito control

    PubMed Central

    Ulibarri, Gerard; Betanzos, Angel; Betanzos, Mireya; Rojas, Juan Jacobo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the effectiveness of an integrated intervention of health worker training, a low-cost ecological mosquito ovitrap, and community engagement on Aedes spp. mosquito control over 10 months in 2015 in an urban remote community in Guatemala at risk of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus transmission. Methods: We implemented a three-component integrated intervention consisting of: web-based training of local health personnel in vector control, cluster-randomized assignment of an ecological modified ovitrap (ovillantas: ovi=egg, llanta=tire) or standard ovitraps to capture Aedes spp. mosquito eggs (no efforts have been taken to determine the exact Aedes species at this moment), and community engagement to promote participation of community members and health personnel in the understanding and maintenance of ovitraps for mosquito control. The intervention was implemented in local collaboration with Guatemala’s  Ministry of Health’s Vector Control Programme, and in international collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico. Findings: Eighty percent of the 25 local health personnel enrolled in the training programme received accreditation of their improved knowledge of vector control. When ovillantas were used in a cluster of ovitraps (several in proximity), significantly more eggs were trapped by  ecological ovillantas than standard ovitraps over the 10 month (42 week) study period (t=5.2577; p<0.05). Repetitive filtering and recycling of the attractant solution (or water) kept the ovillanta clean, free from algae growth. Among both community members and health workers, the levels of knowledge, interest, and participation in community mosquito control and trapping increased. Recommendations for enhancing and sustaining community mosquito control were identified. Conclusion: Our three-component integrated intervention proved beneficial to this remote community at risk of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and

  8. Preliminary results on the control of Aedes spp. in a remote Guatemalan community vulnerable to dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus: community participation and use of low-cost ecological ovillantas for mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Ulibarri, Gerard; Betanzos, Angel; Betanzos, Mireya; Rojas, Juan Jacobo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effectiveness of an integrated intervention of health worker training, a low-cost ecological mosquito ovitrap, and community engagement on Aedes spp. mosquito control over 10 months in 2015 in an urban remote community in Guatemala at risk of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus transmission. Methods: We implemented a three-component integrated intervention consisting of: web-based training of local health personnel in vector control, cluster-randomized assignment of an ecological modified ovitrap (ovillantas: ovi=egg, llanta=tire) or standard ovitraps to capture Aedes spp. mosquito eggs (no efforts have been taken to determine the exact Aedes species at this moment), and community engagement to promote participation of community members and health personnel in the understanding and maintenance of ovitraps for mosquito control. The intervention was implemented in local collaboration with Guatemala's  Ministry of Health's Vector Control Programme, and in international collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico. Findings: Eighty percent of the 25 local health personnel enrolled in the training programme received accreditation of their improved knowledge of vector control. When ovillantas were used in a cluster of ovitraps (several in proximity), significantly more eggs were trapped by  ecological ovillantas than standard ovitraps over the 10 month (42 week) study period (t=5.2577; p<0.05). Repetitive filtering and recycling of the attractant solution (or water) kept the ovillanta clean, free from algae growth. Among both community members and health workers, the levels of knowledge, interest, and participation in community mosquito control and trapping increased. Recommendations for enhancing and sustaining community mosquito control were identified. Conclusion: Our three-component integrated intervention proved beneficial to this remote community at risk of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and

  9. Comparisons of air quality impacts of fleet electrification and increased use of biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhajeri, Nawaf S.; McDonald-Buller, Elena C.; Allen, David T.

    2011-04-01

    The air quality impacts of the partial electrification of the transportation fleet and the use of biofuels (E85) were modeled for the Austin Metropolitan Statistical Area, based on a 2030 vision of regional development. Changes in ozone precursor emissions and predicted ozone, carbon monoxide and aldehyde concentrations were estimated for multiple electrification and biofuel scenarios. Maximum changes in hourly ozone concentration from the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) for 17% of the vehicle miles traveled ranged from - 8.5 to 2.2 ppb, relative to a base case with no electrification and minimal biofuel use, depending on time of day and location. Differences in daily maximum 1 h ozone concentration ranged from - 2.3 to 0.004 ppb. Replacement of all gasoline fuels with E85 had a smaller effect than PHEVs on maximum daily ozone concentrations. Maximum ozone changes for this scenario ranged from - 2.1 to 2.8 ppb and the difference in daily maximum 1 h ozone concentrations ranged from - 1.53 to 0 ppb relative to the base case. The smaller improvements in maximum ozone concentrations associated with extensive (100%) use of biofuels, compared to a smaller (17%) penetration of PHEVs, suggests that higher levels of PHEV penetration may lead to even greater improvements; however, the higher penetration would require expansion of the electrical grid capacity. The air quality impacts of the PHEVs would then depend on the emissions associated with the added generation.

  10. Fifty mega watt peak (50 MWp) photovoltaic rural electrification in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Dasuki, A.S.; Djamin, M.

    1994-12-31

    Indonesia is the world`s largest archipelago which comprises more than 17,500 islands. According to national census, the population is now approaching 190 million inhabitants where 60% of them are living in rural areas. Many rural areas have sparsely populated areas, therefore providing electrical energy through conventional approach needs intensive capital investment for distribution networks and power plant construction. Some of the goals of the long term national energy development as described in the Second Stage Long-Term (twenty-five year) Development Strategy are to optimize the use of nonexportable energy resources, to increase the share of renewable energy use, and to achieve 100% rural electrification at the end of Five Year Development Plan 7. In order to achieve this Indonesian long-term energy development for rural electrification, the attractive solution is to apply photovoltaic system especially Solar Home System. Therefore the Government of Indonesia via the Agency for Assessment and Application of Technology has launched a project which is called ``Fifty Mega Watt Peak (50 MWp) Photovoltaic Rural Electrification in Indonesia``. This project target is to electrified one million households in ten years. This paper discusses and elaborates current status of Solar Home System in Indonesia, project implementation and scope of the project.

  11. Railroad electrification in America's future: an assessment of prospects and impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.K.; Yabroff, I.W.; Dickson, E.M.; Zink, R.A.; Gray, M.E.; Moon, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Such considerations as the level of traffic, the relative financial health of individual railroads, the capacity of the associated supply and engineering/construction industries, and the logical connecting points at classifying yards, as well as the national interest value of creating a continuous system, continental in scope, were used to construct a scenario for railroad electrification that closely approximates how an electrification program might be implemented. For the economic reasons cited, much of the US railroad system would remain conventionally powered. This scenario provides for an electrified network involving 14 mainlines operated by 10 companies that could transport much of the nation's rail-borne freight. Five years of planning and engineering work would be required for each link before construction could begin. With 1000 miles or less of electrified route per year, 14 years would be needed to construct the 9000-mile network of our scenario. (The scenario constructed runs from 1980 to 1998.) The analysis was aided with the construction of the SRI Railroad Industry Model. Basically a model of industry operations and finances, the model produces income statements and balance sheets at yearly intervals. Railroad energy costs, railroad freight levels, maintenance costs, purchases and leases of rooling stock, electrification facility investments, future inflation, rate setting practices, annual depreciation, taxes, and profits were calculated.

  12. Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M I; Towers, R J; Fagan, P; Carapetis, J R; Currie, B J

    2007-11-01

    Aboriginal Australians in remote communities have high rates of rheumatic heart disease (RHD); yet pharyngitis is reportedly rare whilst pyoderma is common. Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) have preference for the throat and others for the skin depending on M protein type. A study in three remote communities provided 350 GAS isolates for emm sequence typing, 244 were also emm pattern typed. There was 100% correlation between emm sequence and pattern type. Patterns D and E (non-throat tropic) made up 71% of throat and 87% of skin isolates although patterns A-C (throat tropic) were more common in the throat than the skin (RR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.8) whilst the opposite was found for pattern D (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.7-3.0). Pattern E favoured the throat (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8). Where environmental factors predispose to skin infection, emm pattern types D and E prevail, whatever the recovery site.

  13. Stages of Change, Smoking Behaviour and Readiness to Quit in a Large Sample of Indigenous Australians Living in Eight Remote North Queensland Communities

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sandra; Bohanna, India; Swinbourne, Anne; Cadet-James, Yvonne; McKeown, Dallas; McDermott, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a major health issue for Indigenous Australians, however there are few interventions with demonstrated efficacy in this population. The Transtheoretical Model may provide a useful framework for describing smoking behaviour and assessing readiness to quit, with the aim of developing better interventions. Interviews were conducted with 593 Indigenous Australians in eight rural and remote communities in north Queensland, to examine stages of change and smoking behaviour. Among current smokers, 39.6% and 43.4% were in Precontemplation and Contemplation stages respectively. A further 13.9% were making preparations to quit (Preparation) whilst only 3.2% said they were actively trying to quit (Action). When analysed by stage of change, the pattern of smoking-related behaviours conformed to the results of past research using the model. Importantly however, distribution of individuals across the stages opposes those observed in investigations of smoking behaviour in non-Indigenous Australian populations. The Transtheoretical Model can be used to meaningfully classify Indigenous smokers in remote north Queensland according to stages along the behaviour change continuum. Importantly, in this large sample across eight communities, most Indigenous smokers were not making preparations to change their smoking behaviour. This suggests that interventions should focus on promoting movement toward the Preparation and Action stages of change. PMID:23591787

  14. A qualitative study of a social and emotional well-being service for a remote Indigenous Australian community: implications for access, effectiveness, and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Carey, Timothy A

    2013-03-04

    People living in rural and remote Australia experience increased mental health problems compared with metropolitan Australians. Moreover, Indigenous Australians are twice as likely as non Indigenous Australians to report high or very high levels of mental health problems. It is imperative, therefore, that effective and sustainable social and emotional wellbeing services (Indigenous Australians prefer the term "social and emotional wellbeing" to "mental health") are developed for Indigenous Australians living in remote communities. In response to significant and serious events such as suicides and relationship violence in a remote Indigenous community, a social and emotional wellbeing service (SEWBS) was developed. After the service had been running for over three years, an independent evaluation was initiated by the local health board. The aim of the evaluation was to explore the impact of SEWBS, including issues of effectiveness and sustainability, from the experiences of people involved in the development and delivery of the service. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 21 people with different involvement in the service such as service providers, service participants, and referrers. These people were interviewed and their interviews were transcribed. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyse the interview transcripts to identify superordinate themes and subthemes in the data. Two superordinate themes and nine subthemes were developed from the interview transcripts. The first superordinate theme was called "The Big Picture" and it had the sub themes: getting started; organizational factors; funding; the future, and; operational problems. The second superordinate theme was called "On the Ground" and it had the subthemes: personal struggles; program activities; measuring outcomes, and; results. While the evaluation indicated that the service had been experienced as an effective local response to serious problems, recommendations and

  15. Store turnover as a predictor of food and beverage provider turnover and associated dietary intake estimates in very remote Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Wycherley, Thomas; Ferguson, Megan; O'Dea, Kerin; McMahon, Emma; Liberato, Selma; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Determine how very-remote Indigenous community (RIC) food and beverage (F&B) turnover quantities and associated dietary intake estimates derived from only stores, compare with values derived from all community F&B providers. F&B turnover quantity and associated dietary intake estimates (energy, micro/macronutrients and major contributing food types) were derived from 12-months transaction data of all F&B providers in three RICs (NT, Australia). F&B turnover quantities and dietary intake estimates from only stores (plus only the primary store in multiple-store communities) were expressed as a proportion of complete F&B provider turnover values. Food types and macronutrient distribution (%E) estimates were quantitatively compared. Combined stores F&B turnover accounted for the majority of F&B quantity (98.1%) and absolute dietary intake estimates (energy [97.8%], macronutrients [≥96.7%] and micronutrients [≥83.8%]). Macronutrient distribution estimates from combined stores and only the primary store closely aligned complete provider estimates (≤0.9% absolute). Food types were similar using combined stores, primary store or complete provider turnover. Evaluating combined stores F&B turnover represents an efficient method to estimate total F&B turnover quantity and associated dietary intake in RICs. In multiple-store communities, evaluating only primary store F&B turnover provides an efficient estimate of macronutrient distribution and major food types. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  16. An aircraft study of rapid precipitation development and electrification in a growing convective cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. T.; Hallett, J.; Black, R. A.; Hendricks, W.

    The rapid initial precipitation growth and initial electrification of a convective cloud, growing as a new cell on the upshear side of a cloud system in Florida, is traced from radar data and aircraft penetrations at the -7°C to -10°C level. This study combines radar, microphysical and electrical measurements so that an examination of the interactions between the cloud dynamics, microphysics and electrification is possible. The first pass (-7°C) was characterized by a strong 23 m/s updraft, all liquid cloud water, no precipitation, and no significant electrification. In the 300 s between the two penetrations, precipitation developed very rapidly from < 15 dBZ to < 45 dBZ, and the vertical component of the electric field increased from below the measurement threshold to - 25 kv/m. The second penetration, which started at - 7°C and ended at - 10°C, was still exclusively updraft, but with lesser peak velocities and a more complex structure; i.e., no downdraft, but with relative minima in the updraft. The microphysics of the second pass displayed a segment of exclusively cloud liquid water (no precipitation size hydrometeors), a small segment of all liquid precipitation size hydrometeors, a small region of mixed hydrometeors and an extensive region of graupel hydrometeors, ranging in size from 100 μm to several mm. High cloud liquid water coexisted with the liquid and graupel hydrometeors in the strong updrafts. The electrification was observed to occur exclusively in the segments of the cloud pass where graupel were observed. Within this graupel region, where the graupel often coexisted with supercooled cloud liquid water, significant electric field occurred only at relative minima in the updraft. These relative velocity minima were also minima in the cloud liquid water content. The observed updraft velocities in these relative minima were close to balance velocities for the observed larger graupel hydrometeors. The strongest updrafts, where the formation and

  17. Visible absorbance spectra: A basis for in situ and passive remote sensing of phytoplankton concentration and community composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, F. H.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration and composition of phytoplankton populations are measured by an optical method which can be used either in situ or remotely. This method is based upon the in vivo light absorption characteristics of phytoplankton. To provide a data base for testing assumptions relative to the proposed method, visible absorbance spectra of pure cultures of 20 marine phytoplankton were obtained under laboratory conditions. Descriptive and analytical statistics were computed for the absorbance spectra and were used to make comparisons between members of major taxonomic groups and between groups. Spectral variation between the members of the major taxonomic groups was observed to be considerably less than the spectral variation between these groups. In several cases the differences between the mean absorbance spectra of major taxonomic groups are significant enough to be detected with passive remote sensing techniques.

  18. Processes and outcomes for a successful engagement between a medical school and a remote Indigenous community in North Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Glenda; Ross, Simone J; Woolley, Torres S; Sivamalai, Sundram; Whaleboat, Donald; Miller, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Medical students should be equipped with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes to engage with local communities on placement, and later act as agents of change in addressing health system priorities and inequities. Determining what are the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes requires the medical school to collect input from the local communities they serve. This study describes the steps taken by the James Cook University (JCU) School of Medicine & Dentistry (SMD) to develop a systematic process for collecting input from a local Indigenous community. This 2011 study utilised a participatory action research design. An Indigenous Reference Group (IRG) consisting of 13 local Indigenous people including health professionals, Elders and community members was established by the JCU SMD in the North Queensland town of Mount Isa. 'Yarning Circle' discussions between SMD representatives and the IRG developed a Terms of Reference (ToR) to guide the engagement process, and negotiated reciprocal benefits to compensate participants for time involved in consultations and to promote sustainability. A framework for engaging with the Mount Isa Indigenous community was developed. Benefits for the SMD included a list of the good and bad engagement strategies with the local Indigenous community. Benefits for the IRG members included assistance with grant applications, media skills and organizing a community-wide health event. Successful and sustainable community partnerships between a medical school and an Indigenous community can be achieved, with Indigenous researchers and community members guiding the engagement process, and for stakeholders to follow through in providing the negotiated reciprocal benefits. Having an established IRG should increase Indigenous input and participation into the medical curriculum, and into future research and community activities to improve the health of the Indigenous people.

  19. Assessing clinical support and inter-professional interactions among front-line primary care providers in remote communities in northern Canada: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephanie K.; Young, T. Kue

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care in remote communities in northern Canada is delivered primarily by nurses who receive clinical support from physicians in regional centres and the patient transportation system. To improve continuity, quality and access to care in remote northern communities, it is important to understand the perspectives of front-line providers and the complex challenges they face. Objective To design and implement a survey of primary care providers to identify issues relating to inter-professional communication, clinical support and patient evacuation. Methods In collaboration with the territorial government and regional health authority partners, we developed a 21-item self-administered questionnaire survey, which could be completed online. The survey was sent to 218 physicians and nurses who were employed in the Northwest Territories (NWT) at the time of the survey and were involved in sending patients out of the community and/or receiving patients. The survey also contained an open-ended question at the end seeking comments regarding primary health care. Results The overall low response rate of 39% among nurses and 19% among physicians threatens the validity of the quantitative results. The majority of providers were satisfied with their ability to communicate with other providers in a timely manner, their freedom to make clinical decisions and their overall experience practicing in the NWT. The patient transfer system appears to work from both the sender and receiver perspectives. However, a common theme reported by nurses was that physicians providing clinical advice, especially short-term locums, were not familiar with the local situation, whilst physicians at the receiving end remarked that the clinical information provided to them often lacked clarity. Conclusions Important lessons were learnt from the pilot study, especially in better engagement of providers in planning and dissemination. The questionnaire design and the online method of delivery

  20. A Community of Teachers: Using Activity Theory to Investigate the Implementation of ICTE in a Remote Indigenous School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Margaret; Cronin, Rebecca

    Since 1999, most secondary students from the Indigenous community of Lockhart River in far north Queensland (Australia) have attended boarding schools in other places. In 2001-02, a project in Lockhart River called Reach In-Reach Out initiated classroom and community activities using information and communication technology (ICT). Activities…

  1. Advancing High Spatial and Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing for Observing Plant Community Response to Environmental Variability and Change in the Alaskan Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Zesati, Sergio A.

    The Arctic is being impacted by climate change more than any other region on Earth. Impacts to terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to manifest through feedbacks with other components of the Earth System. Of particular concern is the potential for the massive store of soil organic carbon to be released from arctic permafrost to the atmosphere where it could exacerbate greenhouse warming and impact global climate and biogeochemical cycles. Even though substantial gains to our understanding of the changing Arctic have been made, especially over the past decade, linking research results from plot to regional scales remains a challenge due to the lack of adequate low/mid-altitude sampling platforms, logistic constraints, and the lack of cross-scale validation of research methodologies. The prime motivation of this study is to advance observational capacities suitable for documenting multi-scale environmental change in arctic terrestrial landscapes through the development and testing of novel ground-based and low altitude remote sensing methods. Specifically this study addressed the following questions: • How well can low-cost kite aerial photography and advanced computer vision techniques model the microtopographic heterogeneity of changing tundra surfaces? • How does imagery from kite aerial photography and fixed time-lapse digital cameras (pheno-cams) compare in their capacity to monitor plot-level phenological dynamics of arctic vegetation communities? • Can the use of multi-scale digital imaging systems be scaled to improve measurements of ecosystem properties and processes at the landscape level? • How do results from ground-based and low altitude digital remote sensing of the spatiotemporal variability in ecosystem processes compare with those from satellite remote sensing platforms? Key findings from this study suggest that cost-effective alternative digital imaging and remote sensing methods are suitable for monitoring and quantifying plot to

  2. How Do Pre-Service Teachers Cope with a Literacy Intervention Program in a Remote Indigenous Community? The Community Action Support Program in the Northern Territory, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Loshini

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a new community education initiative, Community Action Support (CAS) that helps facilitate learning in Indigenous young people from Tennant Creek in the Northern Territory. CAS is an innovative partnership program between the Australian Literacy and Numeracy Foundation and the University of Western Sydney. The core aim of the…

  3. Energy storage in remote area power supply (RAPS) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Patrick T.

    Preliminary cost analyses indicate that hybrid RAPS systems are more economically attractive as a means to provide electricity to remote villages than are alternatives such as 24 h diesel generation. A hybrid remote area power supply (RAPS) system is being deployed to provide 24 h electricity to villages in the Amazon region of Peru. The RAPS system consists of modules designed to provide 150 kWh per day of utility grade ac electricity over a 24 h period. Each module contains a diesel generator, battery bank using heavy-duty 2 V VRLA gelled electrolyte batteries, a battery charger, a photovoltaic array and an inverter. Despite early difficulties, the system in the first village has now commenced operation and the promise of RAPS schemes as a means for providing sustainable remote electrification appears to be bright.

  4. Comparison of three methods for the recovery of skin pathogens from impetigo swabs collected in a remote community of Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Asha C; Tong, Steven Y C; Chatfield, Mark D; Andrews, Ross M; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2013-06-01

    Impetigo is a common infection in children living in remote areas. Immediate plating of impetigo swabs is the gold standard for bacterial recovery but is rarely feasible in remote regions. Bacterial culture increases our understanding of antibiotic resistance and strain diversity, which guides treatment protocols and epidemiological monitoring. We investigated three practical alternatives for recovering Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus from transported swabs: dry swabs transported at 4°C with desiccant and plated within 48 h; swabs inoculated into skim milk tryptone glucose glycerol broth (STGGB), transported at 4°C, stored at -70°C and plated within 61 days; and ESwabs inoculated into Amies broth, transported at 4°C and plated within 48 h. Detection of Strep. pyogenes and Staph. aureus from simultaneously collected swabs was compared for the dry vs STGGB (36 sores) and the STGGB vs Amies (39 sores) methods. Swabs were collected from 43 children (75 sores sampled) in a remote community of Northern Territory, Australia in November 2011. The children had impetigo and were participating in the Skin Sore Trial [Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000858291]. Recovery of Strep. pyogenes for dry vs STGGB was 72% (26/36) and 92% (33/36) and for STGGB vs Amies was 92% (36/39) for both methods. Staphylococcus aureus recovery for dry vs STGGB was 69% (25/36) and 72% 26/36) and for STGGB vs Amies was 74% (29/39) and 85% (33/39). STGGB and Amies media provided higher recovery of Strep. pyogenes than dry swabs. These results and the opportunity to batch and store specimens for molecular studies support the use of STGGB transport media for future impetigo research.

  5. Elevated contaminants contrasted with potential benefits of ω-3 fatty acids in wild food consumers of two remote first nations communities in northern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Seabert, Timothy A; Pal, Shinjini; Pinet, Bernard M; Haman, Francois; Robidoux, Michael A; Imbeault, Pascal; Krümmel, Eva M; Kimpe, Linda E; Blais, Jules M

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous communities in Boreal environments rely on locally-harvested wild foods for sustenance. These foods provide many nutritional benefits including higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs; such as ω-3) than what is commonly found in store-bought foods. However, wild foods can be a route of exposure to dietary mercury and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Here, we show a strong association between the frequency of wild food consumption in adults (N=72) from two remote First Nations communities of Northern Ontario and environmental contaminants in blood (POPs) and hair (mercury). We observed that POPs and mercury were on average 3.5 times higher among those consuming wild foods more often, with many frequent wild food consumers exceeding Canadian and international health guidelines for PCB and mercury exposures. Contaminants in locally-harvested fish and game from these communities were sufficiently high that many participants exceeded the monthly consumption limits for methylmercury and PCBs. Those consuming more wild foods also had higher proportions of potentially beneficial ω-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These results show that the benefits of traditional dietary choices in Boreal regions of Canada must be weighed against the inherent risks of contaminant exposure from these foods.

  6. “We Made the Rule, We Have to Stick to It”: Towards Effective Management of Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Remote Australian Aboriginal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jan; Pointing, Boris Shane; Stevenson, Leah; Clough, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Smoking prevalence in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remains extraordinarily high, with rates reported of up to 82%. Widespread exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is exacerbated by overcrowded housing. Implementation of existing smoke-free policies is challenged by the normalization of smoking and a lack of appropriate regulation resources. This paper celebrates a grassroots approach to control of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in these settings. We report on selected findings from a tobacco intervention study in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory in 2007–2012. In community-level tobacco use surveys at baseline (n = 400 ≥ 16 years), participants reported concern about the constant exposure of non-smokers to tobacco smoke. Suggestions for action included restricting smoking in private and public spaces. We selected three case studies illustrating management of ETS from observational data during the study’s intervention phase. Using a critical realist approach, the context and mechanisms that contributed to specific strategies, or outcomes, were examined in order to develop a hypothesis regarding more effective management of ETS in these environments. Our results suggest that in discrete, disadvantaged communities, enhanced local ownership of smoke-free policies and development of implementation strategies at the grassroots level that acknowledge and incorporate cultural contexts can contribute to more effective management of ETS. PMID:24157514

  7. Elevated Contaminants Contrasted with Potential Benefits of ω-3 Fatty Acids in Wild Food Consumers of Two Remote First Nations Communities in Northern Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Seabert, Timothy A.; Pal, Shinjini; Pinet, Bernard M.; Haman, Francois; Robidoux, Michael A.; Imbeault, Pascal; Krümmel, Eva M.; Kimpe, Linda E.; Blais, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous communities in Boreal environments rely on locally-harvested wild foods for sustenance. These foods provide many nutritional benefits including higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs; such as ω-3) than what is commonly found in store-bought foods. However, wild foods can be a route of exposure to dietary mercury and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Here, we show a strong association between the frequency of wild food consumption in adults (N = 72) from two remote First Nations communities of Northern Ontario and environmental contaminants in blood (POPs) and hair (mercury). We observed that POPs and mercury were on average 3.5 times higher among those consuming wild foods more often, with many frequent wild food consumers exceeding Canadian and international health guidelines for PCB and mercury exposures. Contaminants in locally-harvested fish and game from these communities were sufficiently high that many participants exceeded the monthly consumption limits for methylmercury and PCBs. Those consuming more wild foods also had higher proportions of potentially beneficial ω-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These results show that the benefits of traditional dietary choices in Boreal regions of Canada must be weighed against the inherent risks of contaminant exposure from these foods. PMID:24598815

  8. Evaluation of the Outreach School Garden Project: building the capacity of two Indigenous remote school communities to integrate nutrition into the core school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Viola, Antonietta

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the Outreach School Garden Project, which was conducted in two remote Indigenous school communities in north-west Queensland. This project integrated nutrition into the key learning areas of the core school curriculum by using a school-based garden as a nutritional education tool. Evaluation was by a descriptive qualitative approach supplemented by some quantitative data consistent with Indigenous research methods. The objectives were linked to the Health Promoting Schools Framework, using concepts of community capacity building, action research, social capital and experiential learning. Nutrition was extensively integrated into the core school curriculum by the teaching staff, who required no specific nutrition knowledge or gardening skills prior to the implementation. Students' knowledge and skills in nutrition and gardening were increased over the six-month period and positive improvements in the physical and social environment at the school were observed. A school-based nutrition garden enables the teaching and learning of basic nutrition through the core school curriculum. This concept was an innovative, practical nutritional education tool to engage and build the capacity of Indigenous students, school staff and the broader community in nutrition.

  9. Group A streptococci from a remote community have novel multilocus genotypes but share emm types and housekeeping alleles with isolates from worldwide sources.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Karen F; Bilek, Nicole; Bennett, Alicia; Kalia, Awdhesh; Beall, Bernard; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Currie, Bart J; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; Spratt, Brian G; Bessen, Debra E

    2004-02-15

    Group A streptococci (GAS) cause several human diseases that differentially affect distinct host populations. Genotypes were defined by multilocus sequence typing and emm typing for 137 organisms collected from individuals in a remote aboriginal island community in tropical Australia and compared with >200 isolates obtained from sources elsewhere in the world. The majority of aboriginal-derived isolates shared emm types and housekeeping alleles with GAS isolates recovered from outside Australia, but these emm types and alleles were in novel combinations. There were many examples in which isolates from aboriginal and non-Australian subjects shared the same emm type, but for approximately 50% of emm types, the multilocus genotypes of isolates of the same emm type but from different regions were very different. A single emm type may typically define a single clone within the United States and on the remote island that is the focus of this study, but in many cases, these clones will be different, and this finding has implications for attempts to make global associations between emm types and certain disease manifestations.

  10. Remote Sensing Spinoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Delta Data Systems Inc., founded by ex-NASA engineers, used ELAS, a COSMIC-provided computer program for processing remotely sensed data as a starting point for its development of ATLAS. ATLAS is used to process satellite and aircraft data, to digitize soil topographic maps, and to generate land use maps. Among its applications are medical digital processing, food processing, and specialized services for the remote sensing community.

  11. The power of light: socio-economic and environmental implications of a rural electrification program in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges da Silveira Bezerra, Paula; Ludovique Callegari, Camila; Ribas, Aline; Lucena, André F. P.; Portugal-Pereira, Joana; Koberle, Alexandre; Szklo, Alexandre; Schaeffer, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Universal access to electricity is deemed critical for improving living standards and indispensable for eradicating poverty and achieving sustainable development. In 2003, the ‘Luz para Todos’ (LpT—Light for All) program was launched aiming to universalize access to electricity in Brazil. The program focused on rural and isolated areas, also targeting to bring development to those regions along with electrification. This paper evaluates the results of the LpT program in improving socio-economic development in the poorest regions of Brazil. After an initial qualitative analysis, an empirical quantitative assessment of the influence of increased electrification rates on the components of the Human Development Index (HDI) is performed. The empirical results of this study showed that electrification had a positive influence on all dimensions of the HDI, with the education component having the strongest effect. Although complementary policies were needed to achieve this, results show that electricity access is a major requirement to improve quality of life.

  12. Market definition study of photovoltaic power for remote villages in developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, C.; Quashie, P.

    1980-01-01

    The potential market of photovoltaic systems in remote village applications in developing countries is assessed. It is indicated that photovoltaic technology is cost-competitive with diesel generators in many remote village applications. The major barriers to development of this market are the limited financial resources on the part of developing countries, and lack of awareness of photovoltaics as a viable option in rural electrification. A comprehensive information, education and demonstration program should be established as soon as possible to convince the potential customer countries and the various financial institutions of the viability of photovoltaics as an electricity option for developing countries.

  13. The impacts of low-cost treatment options upon scale formation potential in remote communities reliant on hard groundwaters. A case study: Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kinsela, Andrew S; Jones, Adele M; Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2012-02-01

    The majority of small, remote communities within the Northern Territory (NT) in Central Australia are reliant on groundwater as their primary supply of domestic, potable water. Saturation indices for a variety of relevant minerals were calculated using available thermodynamic speciation codes on collected groundwater data across the NT. These saturation indices were used to assess the theoretical formation of problematic mineral-scale, which manifests itself by forming stubborn coatings on domestic appliances and fixtures. The results of this research show that 63% of the measured sites within the NT have the potential to form calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) scale, increasing to 91% in arid, central regions. The data also suggests that all groundwaters are over-saturated with respect to amorphous calcium-bridged ferric-silica polymers, based on the crystalline mineral index (Ca(3)Fe(2)Si(3)O(12)), although the quantitative impact of this scale is limited by low iron concentrations. An assessment of possible low-cost/low-technology management options was made, including; lowering the temperature of hot-water systems, diluting groundwater with rainwater and modifying the pH of the source water. Source water pH modification (generally a reduction to pH 7.0) was shown to clearly alleviate potential carbonate-based scale formation, over and above the other two options, albeit at a greater technical and capital expense. Although low-cost/low-technology treatment options are unlikely to remove severe scale-related issues, their place in small, remote communities with minor scale problems should be investigated further, owing to the social, technical and capital barriers involved with installing advanced treatment plants (e.g. reverse osmosis) in such locations.

  14. The Lililwan Project: study protocol for a population-based active case ascertainment study of the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Elizabeth J; Latimer, Jane; Carter, Maureen; Oscar, June; Ferreira, Manuela; Olson, Heather Carmichael; Lucas, Barbara; Doney, Robyn; Salter, Claire; Peadon, Elizabeth; Hawkes, Genevieve; Hand, Marmingee

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Anecdotal reports suggest that high-risk drinking in pregnancy is common in some remote Australian communities. Alcohol is teratogenic and may cause a range of lifelong conditions termed ‘fetal alcohol spectrum disorders’ (FASD). Australia has few diagnostic services for FASD, and prevalence of these neurodevelopmental disorders remains unknown. In 2009, Aboriginal leaders in the remote Fitzroy Valley in North Western Australia identified FASD as a community priority and initiated the Lililwani Project in partnership with leading research organisations. This project will establish the prevalence of FASD and other health and developmental problems in school-aged children residing in the Fitzroy Valley, providing data to inform FASD prevention and management. Methods and analysis This is a population-based active case ascertainment study of all children born in 2002 and 2003 and residing in the Fitzroy Valley. Participants will be identified from the Fitzroy Valley Population Project and Communicare databases. Parents/carers will be interviewed using a standardised diagnostic questionnaire modified for local language and cultural requirements to determine the demographics, antenatal exposures, birth outcomes, education and psychosocial status of each child. A comprehensive interdisciplinary health and neurodevelopmental assessment will be performed using tests and operational definitions adapted for the local context. Internationally recognised diagnostic criteria will be applied to determine FASD prevalence. Relationships between pregnancy exposures and early life trauma, neurodevelopmental, health and education outcomes will be evaluated using regression analysis. Results will be reported according to STROBE guidelines for observational studies. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee, the Western Australian Aboriginal Health Information and Ethics Committee, the Western

  15. Remote sensing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipson, W. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Built on Cornell's thirty years of experience in aerial photographic studies, the NASA-sponsored remote sensing program strengthened instruction and research in remote sensing, established communication links within and beyond the university community, and conducted research projects for or with town, county, state, federal, and private organizations in New York State. The 43 completed applied research projects are listed as well as 13 spinoff grants/contracts. The curriculum offered, consultations provided, and data processing facilities available are described. Publications engendered are listed including the thesis of graduates in the remote sensing program.

  16. Rural electrification: Waste biomass Russian northern territories. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, S.

    1998-02-01

    The primary objective of this pre-feasibility evaluation is to examine the economic and technical feasibility of replacing distillate fuel with local waste biomass in the village of Verkhni-Ozerski, Arkhangelsk Region, Russia. This village is evaluated as a pilot location representing the off-grid villages in the Russian Northern Territories. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to provide technical assistance to the Ministry of Fuel and Energy (MFE). MFE has identified the Northern Territories as a priority area requiring NREL`s assistance. The program initially affects about 900 off-grid villages. Biomass and wind energy, and to a lesser extent small hydro (depending on resource availability) are expected to play the dominant role in the program, Geothermal energy may also have a role in the Russian Far East. The Arkhangelsk, Kariela, and Krasnoyarsk Regions, all in the Russian Northern Territories, have abundant forest resources and forest products industries, making them strong candidates for implementation of small-scale waste biomass-to-energy projects. The 900 or so villages included in the renewable energy program span nine administrative regions and autonomous republics. The regional authorities in the Northern Territories proposed these villages to MFE for consideration in the renewable energy program according to the following selection criteria: (a) Remote off-grid location, (b) high cost of transporting fuel, old age of existing power generation equipment, and (d) preliminary determination as to availability of alternative energy resources. Inclusion of indigenous minorities in the program was also heavily emphasized. The prefeasibility study demonstrates that the project merits continuation and a full feasibility analysis. The demonstrated rate of return and net positive cash flow, the willingness of Onegales and local/regional authorities to cooperate, and the immense social benefits are all good reasons to continue the project.

  17. Measuring impacts of community forestry program through repeat photography and satellite remote sensing in the Dolakha district of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Niraula, Rabin Raj; Gilani, Hammad; Pokharel, Bharat Kumar; Qamer, Faisal Mueen

    2013-09-15

    During the 1990's community-based forest management gained momentum in Nepal. This study systematically evaluates the impacts that this had on land cover change and other associated aspects during the period 1990-2010 using repeat photography and satellite imagery in combination with interviews with community members. The results of the study clearly reflect the success of community-based forest management in the Dolakha district of the mid-hills of Nepal: during the study period, the rate of conversion of sparse forest into dense forest under community-based management was found to be between 1.13% and 3.39% per year. Similarly, the rate of conversion of non-forest area into forest was found to be between 1.11% and 1.96% per year. Community-based forest management has resulted in more efficient use of forest resources, contributed to a decline in the use of slash-and-burn agricultural practices, reduced the incidence of forest fires, spurred tree plantation, and encouraged the conservation and protection of trees on both public and private land. The resulting reclamation of forest in landside areas and river banks and the overall improvement in forest cover in the area has reduced flash floods and associated landslides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A qualitative study of a social and emotional well-being service for a remote Indigenous Australian community: implications for access, effectiveness, and sustainability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People living in rural and remote Australia experience increased mental health problems compared with metropolitan Australians. Moreover, Indigenous Australians are twice as likely as non Indigenous Australians to report high or very high levels of mental health problems. It is imperative, therefore, that effective and sustainable social and emotional wellbeing services (Indigenous Australians prefer the term “social and emotional wellbeing” to “mental health”) are developed for Indigenous Australians living in remote communities. In response to significant and serious events such as suicides and relationship violence in a remote Indigenous community, a social and emotional wellbeing service (SEWBS) was developed. After the service had been running for over three years, an independent evaluation was initiated by the local health board. The aim of the evaluation was to explore the impact of SEWBS, including issues of effectiveness and sustainability, from the experiences of people involved in the development and delivery of the service. Methods Purposive sampling was used to recruit 21 people with different involvement in the service such as service providers, service participants, and referrers. These people were interviewed and their interviews were transcribed. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyse the interview transcripts to identify superordinate themes and subthemes in the data. Results Two superordinate themes and nine subthemes were developed from the interview transcripts. The first superordinate theme was called “The Big Picture” and it had the sub themes: getting started; organizational factors; funding; the future, and; operational problems. The second superordinate theme was called “On the Ground” and it had the subthemes: personal struggles; program activities; measuring outcomes, and; results. Conclusions While the evaluation indicated that the service had been experienced as an effective local

  19. Dietary sodium and iodine in remote Indigenous Australian communities: will salt-reduction strategies increase risk of iodine deficiency? A cross-sectional analysis and simulation study.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Emma; Webster, Jacqui; O'Dea, Kerin; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2015-12-30

    Excess salt intake is a global issue. Effective salt-reduction strategies are needed, however, as salt is a vehicle for iodine fortification, these strategies may also reduce iodine intake. This study examines the case of the remote Indigenous Australian population; we employed an innovative, objective method to assess sodium and iodine intakes against requirements and modelled the potential effects of salt-reduction strategies on estimated sodium and iodine intakes. Store-sales data were collected from 20 remote Indigenous community stores in 2012-14 representing the main source of food for 2 years for ~8300 individuals. Estimated average sodium and iodine intakes were compared against recommendations (nutrient reference values weighted to age and gender distribution). Linear programming was employed to simulate potential effects of salt-reduction strategies on estimated sodium and iodine intakes. Estimated average sodium intake was 2770 (range within communities 2410-3450) mg/day, far exceeding the population-weighted upper limit (2060 mg/day). Discretionary (added) salt, bread and processed meat were the biggest contributors providing 46% of all sodium. Estimated average iodine intake was within recommendations at 206 (186-246) μg/day. The following scenarios enabled modelling of estimated average salt intake to within recommendations: 1) 67% reduction in sodium content of bread and discretionary salt intake, 2) 38% reduction in sodium content of all processed foods, 3) 30% reduction in sodium content of all processed foods and discretionary salt intake. In all scenarios, simulated average iodine intakes remained within recommendations. Salt intakes of the remote Indigenous Australian population are far above recommendations, likely contributing to the high prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular mortality experienced by this population. Salt-reduction strategies could considerably reduce salt intake in this population without increasing risk of iodine

  20. Phytoplankton community structure in the North Sea: coupling between remote sensing and automated in situ analysis at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyssen, M.; Alvain, S.; Lefèbvre, A.; Dessailly, D.; Rijkeboer, M.; Guiselin, N.; Creach, V.; Artigas, L.-F.

    2014-11-01

    Phytoplankton observation in the ocean can be a challenge in oceanography. Accurate estimations of their biomass and dynamics will help to understand ocean ecosystems and refine global climate models. This requires relevant datasets of phytoplankton at a functional level and on a daily and sub meso scale. In order to achieve this, an automated, high frequency, dedicated scanning flow cytometer (SFC, Cytobuoy, NL), has been developed to cover the entire size range of phytoplankton cells whilst simultaneously taking pictures of the largest of them. This cytometer was directly connected to the water inlet of a~pocket Ferry Box during a cruise in the North Sea, 8-12 May 2011 (DYMAPHY project, INTERREG IV A "2 Seas"), in order to identify the phytoplankton community structure of near surface waters (6 m) with a high resolution spacial basis (2.2 ± 1.8 km). Ten groups of cells, distinguished on the basis of their optical pulse shapes, were described (abundance, size estimate, red fluorescence per unit volume). Abundances varied depending on the hydrological status of the traversed waters, reflecting different stages of the North Sea blooming period. Comparisons between several techniques analyzing chlorophyll a and the scanning flow cytometer, using the integrated red fluorescence emitted by each counted cell, showed significant correlations. The community structure observed from the automated flow cytometry was compared with the PHYSAT reflectance anomalies over a daily scale. The number of matchups observed between the SFC automated high frequency in situ sampling and the remote sensing was found to be two to three times better than when using traditional water sampling strategies. Significant differences in the phytoplankton community structure within the two days for which matchups were available, suggest that it is possible to label PHYSAT anomalies not only with dominant groups, but at the level of the community structure.

  1. Transport in Rayleigh-stable experimental Taylor-Couette flow and granular electrification in a shaking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordsiek, Freja

    This dissertation consists of two projects: Rayleigh-stable Taylor-Couette flow and granular electrification. Taylor-Couette flow is the fluid flow in the gap between two cylinders rotating at different rates. Azimuthal velocity profiles, dye visualization, and inner cylinder torques were measured on two geometrically similar Taylor-Couettes with axial boundaries attached to the outer cylinder, the Maryland and Twente T3C experiments. This was done in the Rayleigh stable regime, where the specific angular momentum increases radially, which is relevant to astrophysical and geophysical flows and in particular, stellar and planetary accretion disks. The flow substantially deviates from laminar Taylor-Couette flow beginning at moderate Reynolds number. Angular momentum is primarily transported to the axial boundaries instead of the outer cylinder due to Ekman pumping when the inner cylinder is rotating faster than the outer cylinder. A phase diagram was constructed from the transitions identified from torque measurements taken over four decades of the Reynolds number. Flow angular velocities larger and smaller than both cylinders were found. Together, these results indicate that experimental Taylor-Couette with axial boundaries attached to the outer cylinder is an imperfect model for accretion disk flows. Thunderstorms, thunder-snow, volcanic ash clouds, and dust storms all display lightning, which results from electrification of droplets and particles in the atmosphere. While lightning is fairly well understood (plasma discharge), the mechanisms that result in million-volt differences across the storm are not. A novel granular electrification experiment was upgraded and used to study some of these mechanisms in the lab. The relative importance of collective interactions between particles versus particle properties (material, size, etc.) on collisional electrification was investigated. While particle properties have an order of magnitude effect on the strength of

  2. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  3. Community, Diversity and Innovation in Rural and Remote Education and Training. Proceedings of the National Rural Education Conference of the Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (22nd, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, July 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Colin, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The papers contained in this document represent the keynote addresses, refereed and non-refereed conference papers from the 22nd National Conference of Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA). The theme for this national conference was: Community Diversity and Innovation in Rural and Remote Education and Training. Keynote…

  4. Contact Electrification of Regolith Particles and Chloride Electrolysis: Synthesis of Perchlorates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennakone, K.

    2016-10-01

    Contact electrification of chloride-impregnated martian regolith particles due to eolian agitation and moisture condensation on coalesced oppositely charged grains may lead to spontaneous electrolysis that generates hypochlorite, chlorite, chlorate, and perchlorate with a concomitant reduction of water to hydrogen. This process is not curtailed even if moisture condenses as ice because chloride ionizes on the surface of ice. Limitations dictated by potentials needed for electrolysis and breakdown electric fields enable estimation of the required regolith grain size. The estimated dimension turns out to be of the same order of magnitude as the expected median size of martian regolith, and a simple calculation yields the optimum rate of perchlorate production.

  5. Les cooperatives et l'electrification rurale du Quebec, 1945--1964

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorion, Marie-Josee

    Cette these est consacree a l'histoire de l'electrification rurale du Quebec, et, plus particulierement, a l'histoire des cooperatives d'electricite. Fondees par vagues successives a partir de 1945, les cooperatives rurales d'electricite ont ete actives dans plusieurs regions du Quebec et elles ont electrifie une partie significative des zones rurales. Afin de comprendre le contexte de la creation des cooperatives d'electricite, notre these debute (premiere partie) par une analyse du climat sociopolitique des annees precedant la naissance du systeme cooperatif d'electrification rurale. Nous y voyons de quelle facon l'electrification rurale devient progressivement, a partir de la fin des annees 1920, une question d'actualite a laquelle les divers gouvernements qui se succedent tentent de trouver une solution, sans engager---ou si peu---les fonds de l'Etat. En ce sens, la premiere etatisation et la mise sur pied d'Hydro-Quebec, en 1944, marquent une rupture quant au mode d'action privilegie jusque-la. La nouvelle societe d'Etat se voit cependant retirer son mandat d'electrifier le monde rural un an apres sa fondation, car le gouvernement Duplessis, de retour au pouvoir, prefere mettre en place son propre modele d'electrification rurale. Ce systeme repose sur des cooperatives d'electricite, soutenues par un organisme public, l'Office de l'electrification rurale (OER). L'OER suscite de grandes attentes de la part des ruraux et c'est par centaines qu'ils se manifestent. Cet engouement pour les cooperatives complique la tache de l'OER, qui doit superviser de nouvelles societes tout en assurant sa propre organisation. Malgre des hesitations et quelques delais introduits par un manque de connaissances techniques et de personnel qualifie, les commissaires de l'OER se revelent perspicaces et parviennent a mettre sur pied un systeme cooperatif d'electrification rurale qui produit des resultats rapides. Il leur faudra cependant compter sur l'aide des autres acteurs engages

  6. Changing times, changing stories: Generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Herman-Mercer; Elli Matkin; Melinda J. Laituri; Ryan C. Toohey; Maggie Massey; Kelly Elder; Paul F. Schuster; Edda A. Mutter

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK) and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation...

  7. Humans, dogs and parasitic zoonoses--unravelling the relationships in a remote endemic community in northeast India using molecular tools.

    PubMed

    Traub, R J; Robertson, I D; Irwin, P; Mencke, N; Monis, P; Thompson, R C A

    2003-07-01

    Canine parasitic zoonoses pose a continuing public health problem, especially in developing countries and communities that are socioeconomically disadvantaged. Our study combined the use of conventional and molecular epidemiological tools to determine the role of dogs in transmission of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites such as hookworms, Giardiaand Ascarisin a parasite endemic tea-growing community in northeast India. A highly sensitive and specific PCR-RFLP was developed to detect and differentiate the zoonotic species of canine hookworm eggs directly from faeces. This allowed epidemiological screening of canine hookworm species in this community to be conducted with ease and accuracy. Seventy two percent of dogs were found to harbour A. caninum, 60% A. braziliense and 37% harboured mixed infections with both hookworms. No A. ceylanicum was detected in the dog population. The zoonotic potential of canine Giardiawas also investigated by characterising Giardia duodenalisrecovered from humans and dogs living in the same locality and households, at three different loci. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis provided compelling evidence to support the zoonotic transmission of canine Giardia. Molecular tools were also used to identify the species of Ascarisegg present in over 30% of dog faecal samples. The results demonstrated the role of dogs as a significant disseminator and environmental contaminator of Ascaris lumbricoidesin communities where promiscuous defecation practices exist. Our study demonstrated the usefulness of combining conventional and molecular parasitological and epidemiological tools to help solve unresolved relationships with regards to parasitic zoonoses.

  8. Oocysts and high seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in dogs living in remote Aboriginal communities and wild dogs in Australia.

    PubMed

    King, Jessica S; Brown, Graeme K; Jenkins, David J; Ellis, John T; Fleming, Peter J S; Windsor, Peter A; Slapeta, Jan

    2012-06-08

    Canines are definitive hosts of Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa). For horizontal transmission from canines to occur, viable oocysts of N. caninum must occur in the environment of susceptible intermediate hosts. Canids in Australia include wild dogs and Aboriginal community dogs. Wild dogs are those dogs that are not dependent on humans for survival and consist of the dingo, feral domestic dog and their hybrid genotypes. Aboriginal community dogs are dependent on humans, domesticated and owned by a family, but are free-roaming and have free access throughout the community. In this study the extent of N. caninum infection was determined in a total of 374 dogs (75 wild dogs and 299 Aboriginal community dogs) using a combination of microscopic, molecular and serological techniques. Oocysts of N. caninum were observed in the faeces of two juvenile Aboriginal community dogs (2/132; 1.5%). To estimate N. caninum prevalence, a new optimised cut-off of 18.5% inhibition for a commercial competitive ELISA was calculated using a two-graph receiver-operating characteristic (TG-ROC) analysis and IFAT as the gold standard resulting in equal sensitivity and specificity of 67.8%. Of the 263 dog sera tested the true prevalence of N. caninum antibodies was 27.0% (95% confidence limit: 10.3-44.1%). The association between the competitive ELISA results in dogs less than 12 month old and older dogs was significant (P=0.042). To our knowledge this is the first large scale parasitological survey of the Aboriginal community dogs and wild dogs from Australia. The high prevalence of N. caninum infection in Aboriginal community dogs illustrates that horizontal transmission of N. caninum is occurring in Australia. These results demonstrated that N. caninum in dogs is widespread, including the semi-arid to arid regions of north-western New South Wales and the Northern Territory. The populations of free-ranging dogs are likely to be important contributors to the sylvatic life cycle of N. caninum.

  9. Changing times, changing stories: Generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman-Mercer, Nicole M.; Matkin, Elli; Laituri, Melinda J.; Toohey, Ryan C; Massey, Maggie; Kelly Elder,; Schuster, Paul F.; Mutter, Edda A.

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK) and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation research; however, the cultural dimensions of climate change are equally important because cultural dimensions inform perceptions of risk. Furthermore, many Arctic and Subarctic IK climate change studies document observations of change and knowledge of the elders and older generations in a community, but few include the perspectives of the younger population. These observations by elders and older generations form a historical baseline record of weather and climate observations in these regions. However, many indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities are composed of primarily younger residents. We focused on the differences in the cultural dimensions of climate change found between young adults and elders. We outlined the findings from interviews conducted in four indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska. The findings revealed that (1) intergenerational observations of change were common among interview participants in all four communities, (2) older generations observed more overall change than younger generations interviewed by us, and (3) how change was perceived varied between generations. We defined “observations” as the specific examples of environmental and weather change that were described, whereas “perceptions” referred to the manner in which these observations of change were understood and contextualized by the interview participants. Understanding the differences in generational observations and perceptions of change are key issues in the development of climate change adaptation strategies.

  10. Tjirtamai--'to care for': a nursing education model designed to increase the number of Aboriginal nurses in a rural and remote Queensland community.

    PubMed

    West, Roianne; West, Leeona; West, Karen; Usher, Kim

    In 2009, a nursing education model was locally designed and delivered to support the interest of a group of Aboriginal community members living in a rural and remote town in Queensland, specifically to prepare for entry into further nursing education. Named 'Tjirtamai' by the traditional owners of the area, the program was offered in recognition of the challenges faced by Aboriginal people when they enter nursing education courses and as a way to increase the local number of Aboriginal nurses. This program, while funded by the Government, had unprecedented support and involvement from both the local Aboriginal and wider community. The model offered multiple exit points, assistance with financial and other known challenges for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, and included contextualised literacy and numeracy. Of the 38 Aboriginal students who enrolled in the course, 26 students completed. Of those students, 18 have since enrolled in a bachelor degree in nursing while another 4 enrolled in a diploma of nursing. This paper provides an overview of the course and its outcomes.

  11. Diagnosis of malaria in a remote area of the Philippines: comparison of techniques and their acceptance by health workers and the community.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, D.; Go, R.; Miguel, C.; Walker, J.; Cacal, L.; Saul, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacies of remote symptom-based diagnosis of malaria, rapid diagnostic tests and microscopy in an area of low endemicity in the Philippines. METHODS: In Trial I, 350 symptomatic patients were tested within their villages using malaria Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)/Plasmodium vivax (Pv) immunochromatographic tests (ICT tests) and blood films stored and read under local conditions. The slides were later restained and read. In Trial II, unsupervised volunteer barangay health workers prepared ICT tests and slides after brief training. These slides were read at rural health units. Twenty-seven barangay health workers and 72 community members were later questioned about the three diagnostic strategies. FINDINGS: A history of fever alone was sensitive (95.4%) but poorly specific (16.5%) for predicting parasitaemia. The inclusion of other symptoms reduced the sensitivity to below 85%, while specificity remained low. The axillary temperature was poorly predictive. ICT tests achieved high sensitivity (97.9%) but many cases indicated as positive by ICT tests were negative by microscopy. Further analysis of these cases in Trial I indicated that ICT tests were detecting low-level parasitaemias missed by microscopy, and that local microscopy had poor accuracy. ICT tests were well accepted and accurately performed by barangay health workers. CONCLUSION: These tests meet a strong desire in the community for blood-based diagnosis and may increase the compliance and treatment-seeking behaviour of patients. PMID:11693975

  12. Health, healthcare access, and use of traditional versus modern medicine in remote Peruvian Amazon communities: a descriptive study of knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jonathan; Ramirez, Ronald; Wingfield, Tom

    2015-04-01

    There is an urgent need for healthcare research, funding, and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon. We performed a descriptive study of health, health knowledge and practice, and healthcare access of 13 remote communities of the Manatí and Amazon Rivers in northeastern Peru. Eighty-five adults attending a medical boat service were interviewed to collect data on socioeconomic position, health, diagnosed illnesses, pain, healthcare access, and traditional versus modern medicine use. In this setting, poverty and gender inequality were prevalent, and healthcare access was limited by long distances to the health post and long waiting times. There was a high burden of reported pain (mainly head and musculoskeletal) and chronic non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension (19%). Nearly all participants felt that they did not completely understand their diagnosed illnesses and wanted to know more. Participants preferred modern over traditional medicine, predominantly because of mistrust or lack of belief in traditional medicine. Our findings provide novel evidence concerning transitional health beliefs, hidden pain, and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence in marginalized communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Healthcare provision was limited by a breach between health education, knowledge, and access. Additional participatory research with similar rural populations is required to inform regional healthcare policy and decision-making. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Health, Healthcare Access, and Use of Traditional Versus Modern Medicine in Remote Peruvian Amazon Communities: A Descriptive Study of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Jonathan; Ramirez, Ronald; Wingfield, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for healthcare research, funding, and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon. We performed a descriptive study of health, health knowledge and practice, and healthcare access of 13 remote communities of the Manatí and Amazon Rivers in northeastern Peru. Eighty-five adults attending a medical boat service were interviewed to collect data on socioeconomic position, health, diagnosed illnesses, pain, healthcare access, and traditional versus modern medicine use. In this setting, poverty and gender inequality were prevalent, and healthcare access was limited by long distances to the health post and long waiting times. There was a high burden of reported pain (mainly head and musculoskeletal) and chronic non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension (19%). Nearly all participants felt that they did not completely understand their diagnosed illnesses and wanted to know more. Participants preferred modern over traditional medicine, predominantly because of mistrust or lack of belief in traditional medicine. Our findings provide novel evidence concerning transitional health beliefs, hidden pain, and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence in marginalized communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Healthcare provision was limited by a breach between health education, knowledge, and access. Additional participatory research with similar rural populations is required to inform regional healthcare policy and decision-making. PMID:25688165

  14. Impact of a school snack program on the dietary intake of grade six to ten First Nation students living in a remote community in northern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Kelly; Hanning, Rhona M; Metatawabin, Joan; Martin, Ian D; Tsuji, Leonard J S

    2012-01-01

    School snack and breakfast programs may be especially important in remote northern communities where many households are food insecure. Despite the strong potential for school programs to improve the dietary intake and eating behaviours of children and youth, very few studies have reported on the effects of school nutrition programs in Aboriginal communities. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a school snack program on the dietary intake of grade six to ten First Nation students living in a remote community in northern Ontario. Data were collected in November 2004 and December 2007 with grade six to ten (aged 10-18 years) students (n=63 and n=50, respectively) using a validated web-based 24 hour diet recall survey, the WEB-Q. Food group consumption and nutrient intake of students participating in the school snack program on the previous day were compared with students who chose not to participate. In each year, ANOVA was used to assess differences between participants and non-participants, genders, and grade groups. The second data collection in December of 2007 included five questions asking students about their participation, preferences, and impressions of the snack program. Students participating in the snack program during the 2004 data collection (37%; n=23) compared with those who did not (63%; n=40) had significantly (p<0.05) higher mean intakes from the 'Vegetables and Fruit' food group (7.5 vs 3.4 servings), folate (420 vs 270 μg), dietary fiber (18 vs 8 g), vitamin C (223 vs 94 mg), calcium (1055 vs 719 mg) and iron (16.5 vs 11.7 mg). For the 2007 data collection, snack program participants (52%; n=26) had higher intakes from the 'Milk and Alternatives' food group (3.3 vs 2.2 servings), vitamin A (697 vs 551 RE [retinol equivalents]), calcium (1186 vs 837 mg), and vitamin D (6.9 vs 4.4 μg) and significantly lower intakes of 'Other' foods (6.0 vs 7.2 servings) compared with non-participants (48%; n=24). For 2004 and 2007, differences

  15. Enterprising social wellbeing: social entrepreneurial and strengths based approaches to mental health and wellbeing in "remote" Indigenous community contexts.

    PubMed

    Tedmanson, Deirdre; Guerin, Pauline

    2011-07-01

    Social enterprises are market-based activities that provide social benefits through the direct engagement of people in productive activities. Participation in social enterprise development brings psychosocial wellbeing benefits, by strengthening family networks, enhancing trust, increasing self-reliance and social esteem and promoting cultural safety. Our objective is to explore how social enterprise activities can meet community needs and foster self-sustainability while generating profits for redistribution as social investment into other ventures that aid social functioning and emotional well-being. Social entrepreneurship enhances both interdependence and independence. Concomitant mental health and social wellbeing dividends accrue overtime to communities engaged in self-determined enterprise activities. Social entrepreneurship builds social capital that supports social wellbeing. Strengths-based approaches to social entrepreneurship can assuage disempowering effects of the "welfare economy" through shifting the focus onto productive activities generated on people's own terms.

  16. Benefits and Limitations of a Community-Engaged Emergency Referral System in a Remote, Impoverished Setting of Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sneha; Koku Awoonor-Williams, John; Asuru, Rofina; Boyer, Christopher B; Awopole Yepakeh Tiah, Janet; Sheff, Mallory C; Schmitt, Margaret L; Alirigia, Robert; Jackson, Elizabeth F; Phillips, James F

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Ghana has a well-organized primary health care system, it lacks policies and guidelines for developing or providing emergency referral services. In 2012, an emergency referral pilot—the Sustainable Emergency Referral Care (SERC) initiative—was launched by the Ghana Health Service in collaboration with community stakeholders and health workers in one subdistrict of the Upper East Region where approximately 20,000 people reside. The pilot program was scaled up in 2013 to a 3-district (12-subdistrict) plausibility trial that served a population of approximately 184,000 over 2 years from 2013 to 2015. The SERC initiative was fielded as a component of a 6-year health systems strengthening and capacity-building project known as the Ghana Essential Health Intervention Program. Implementation research using mixed methods, including quantitative analysis of key process and health indicators over time in the 12 intervention subdistricts compared with comparison districts, a survey of health workers, and qualitative systems appraisal with community members, provided data on effectiveness of the system as well as operational challenges and potential solutions. Monitoring data show that community exposure to SERC was associated with an increased volume of emergency referrals, diminished reliance on primary care facilities not staffed or equipped to provide surgical care, and increased caseloads at facilities capable of providing appropriate acute care (i.e., district hospitals). Community members strongly endorsed the program and expressed appreciation for the service. Low rates of adherence to some care protocols were noted: referring facilities often failed to alert receiving facilities of incoming patients, not all patients transported were accompanied by a health worker, and receiving facilities commonly failed to provide patient outcome feedback to the referring facility. Yet in areas where SERC worked to bypass substandard points of care, overall

  17. Benefits and Limitations of a Community-Engaged Emergency Referral System in a Remote, Impoverished Setting of Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sneha; Koku Awoonor-Williams, John; Asuru, Rofina; Boyer, Christopher B; Awopole Yepakeh Tiah, Janet; Sheff, Mallory C; Schmitt, Margaret L; Alirigia, Robert; Jackson, Elizabeth F; Phillips, James F

    2016-12-23

    Although Ghana has a well-organized primary health care system, it lacks policies and guidelines for developing or providing emergency referral services. In 2012, an emergency referral pilot-the Sustainable Emergency Referral Care (SERC) initiative-was launched by the Ghana Health Service in collaboration with community stakeholders and health workers in one subdistrict of the Upper East Region where approximately 20,000 people reside. The pilot program was scaled up in 2013 to a 3-district (12-subdistrict) plausibility trial that served a population of approximately 184,000 over 2 years from 2013 to 2015. The SERC initiative was fielded as a component of a 6-year health systems strengthening and capacity-building project known as the Ghana Essential Health Intervention Program. Implementation research using mixed methods, including quantitative analysis of key process and health indicators over time in the 12 intervention subdistricts compared with comparison districts, a survey of health workers, and qualitative systems appraisal with community members, provided data on effectiveness of the system as well as operational challenges and potential solutions. Monitoring data show that community exposure to SERC was associated with an increased volume of emergency referrals, diminished reliance on primary care facilities not staffed or equipped to provide surgical care, and increased caseloads at facilities capable of providing appropriate acute care (i.e., district hospitals). Community members strongly endorsed the program and expressed appreciation for the service. Low rates of adherence to some care protocols were noted: referring facilities often failed to alert receiving facilities of incoming patients, not all patients transported were accompanied by a health worker, and receiving facilities commonly failed to provide patient outcome feedback to the referring facility. Yet in areas where SERC worked to bypass substandard points of care, overall facility

  18. Highly diverse community structure in a remote central Tibetan geothermal spring does not display monotonic variation to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Yim, Lau Chui; Hongmei, Jing; Aitchison, Jonathan C; Pointing, Stephen B

    2006-07-01

    We report an assessment of whole-community diversity for an extremely isolated geothermal location with considerable phylogenetic and phylogeographic novelty. We further demonstrate, using multiple statistical analyses of sequence data, that the response of community diversity is not monotonic to thermal stress along a gradient of 52-83 degrees C. A combination of domain- and division-specific PCR was used to obtain a broad spectrum of community phylotypes, which were resolved by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Among 58 sequences obtained from microbial mats and streamers, some 95% suggest novel archaeal and bacterial diversity at the species level or higher. Moreover, new phylogeographic and thermally defined lineages among the Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Eubacterium and Thermus are identified. Shannon-Wiener diversity estimates suggest that mats at 63 degrees C supported highest diversity, but when alternate models were applied [Average Taxonomic Distinctness (AvTD) and Variation in Taxonomic Distinctness (VarTD)] that also take into account the phylogenetic relationships between phylotypes, it is evident that greatest taxonomic diversity (AvTD) occurred in streamers at 65-70 degrees C, whereas greatest phylogenetic distance between taxa (VarTD) occurred in streamers of 83 degrees C. All models demonstrated that diversity is not related to thermal stress in a linear fashion.

  19. Changes in the Seasonal Sea-Ice Cycle and Implications for Coastal Communities in Alaska: Community-Based Observations, Remote Sensing Data and Participatory Scenarios Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicken, H.; Johnson, M. A.; Lee, O. A.; Kaufman, M. R.; Mueller-stoffels, M.; Lovecraft, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    While major reductions in the extent of Arctic summer sea ice have been well studied, changes in the seasonal cycle of sea ice have received less attention. Here, we discuss decadal scale changes and interannual variability in the timing of the transition seasons, spring break-up and fall freeze-up, with a focus on coastal communities in Arctic Alaska. Break-up and freeze-up determine the timing and extent of a number of human activities, ranging from ice use by Indigenous hunters to coastal shipping or resource exploration activities. The seasonal sea-ice cycle is also closely tied to the life cycle of Arctic marine organisms. Observations of ice conditions by Indigenous sea-ice experts since 2006 indicate significant interannual variability in both the character and timing of freeze-up and break-up in coastal Alaska. Based on these observations, we developed a simple algorithm to extract the timing of these events from passive microwave satellite data. Data from 1979 to 2013 show significant trends for the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, with break-up start arriving earlier by 5-9 days per decade and freeze-up start arriving earlier by 7-14 days per decade. The observed trends and the nature of changes in winter ice, including reduced stability of coastal landfast ice, allow for projections of the ice cycle's evolution in coming years. To evaluate the implications of these observed and projected changes, we draw on a participatory scenarios project focusing on sustainable healthy communities, with a broad range of experts and citizens from northern Alaska participating in a series of three workshops. Participants identified climate and sea-ice change as one of the key drivers of community health and sustainability. Analysis of workshop products and associated data indicates that linkages between sea-ice or climate change and community health and sustainability are complicated, with shifts in the seasonal ice cycle emerging as an issue of major concern.

  20. Photovoltaics for rural electrification in the People`s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.L.; Tsuo, Y.S.

    1997-12-31

    Rapid growth in economic development coupled with the absence of an electric grid in large areas of the rural countryside have created a need for new energy sources both in urban centers and rural areas in China. The most critical need for rural electrification exists in northern and western China, where 120 million rural people have no access to grid electricity, and in over 300 coastal islands that are unelectrified. The availability of solar and wind resources tends to correlate highest with those regions of China where the population density is low and grid extension is too costly and impractical to reach the rural population. In February, 1995, the US Department of Energy signed an Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Protocol Agreement with the Chinese State Science and Technology Commission in Beijing, China. Under this agreement, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is providing assistance to several central government and provincial government agencies in China to develop photovoltaic and photovoltaic hybrid systems for rural electrification.

  1. Dependence of contact electrification on the magnitude of strain in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, Mamadou; Lacks, Daniel J.; Mohan Sankaran, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental approach to systematically study the effect of material strain on contact electrification. Thin sheets of latex rubber are variably strained by stretching over a hollow cylinder, analogous to a drum. The strained sheets are repeatedly contacted with another surface by a computer-controlled apparatus. The surface potential on the latex rubber is measured in real time by a non-contact electrostatic voltmeter. For unstrained latex rubber, we find that contact with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) leads to a negative surface potential that progressively increases in magnitude to more negative values with increasing number of contacts. When the latex rubber is strained, contact with PTFE causes the surface potential of the latex rubber to shift to less negative values. At strains of more than ˜50%, the polarity of the surface potential is reversed, such that contact with PTFE causes the latex rubber to charge positively. These results indicate that contact electrification intimately depends on the degree of material strain, and may explain how spatial inhomogeneities of charge exist on contacted surfaces and why there is a lack of reproducibility in contact charging experiments.

  2. Electrification of sand on Titan and its influence on sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez Harper, J. S.; McDonald, G. D.; Dufek, J.; Malaska, M. J.; Burr, D. M.; Hayes, A. G.; McAdams, J.; Wray, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Triboelectric, or frictional, charging is a ubiquitous yet poorly understood phenomenon in granular flows. Recognized in terrestrial volcanic plumes and sand storms, such electrification mechanisms are possibly present on Titan. There, dunes and plains of low-density organic particles blanket extensive regions of the surface. Unlike Earth, Titan hosts granular reservoirs whose physical and chemical properties possibly enhance the effects of charging on particle motion. Here we demonstrate in laboratory tumbler experiments under atmospheric conditions and using organic materials analogous to Titan that Titan sands can readily charge triboelectrically. We suggest that the resulting electrostatic forces are strong enough to promote aggregation of granular materials and affect sediment transport on Titan. Indeed, our experiments show that electrostatic forces may increase the saltation threshold for grains by up to an order of magnitude. Efficient electrification may explain puzzling observations on Titan such as the mismatch between dune orientations and inferred wind fields. We conclude that, unlike other Solar System bodies, nanometre-scale electrostatic processes may shape the geomorphological features of Titan across the moon’s surface.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of powder electrification in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, Holger; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2016-11-01

    Particle electrification is often encountered in process industries. Sometimes it has useful applications, such as the control of particle trajectories through an electric field. In other situations is has negative effects. For example, during pneumatic transport it can cause particle deposition or, even worse, spark discharges and subsequent fires and explosions. Despite its frequent occurrence, due to the complexity of the underlying physical mechanisms, there are still many open questions regarding particle electrification and inconsistent theoretical predictions have been reported. The objective of our work is to gain a better understanding and physical insight of this phenomenon. To this end, we performed Direct Numerical Simulations to analyze the turbulent flow of a carrier fluid with immersed particles in a channel. Moreover, the motion of the particles was computed in a Lagrangian framework and dynamic models accounting for the particle-wall and particle-particle charge exchange were implemented. In our talk, we discuss in detail the effect of the fluid turbulence to the build-up of the electrostatic charge of the particles. Furthermore, we elaborate on the influence of the particle Stokes number and gravitational forces to the process of powder charging. Supported by the National Research Fund of Belgium (FNRS) under the GRANMIX Projet de Recherche Grant.

  4. Rhythm Pattern of Sole through Electrification of the Human Body When Walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kiyoaki; Wada, Takayuki; Tohyama, Shigeki

    The rhythm of automatic cyclic movements such as walking is known to be generated by a rhythm generator called CPG in the spinal cord. The measurement of rhythm characteristics in walking is considered to be important for analyzing human bipedal walking and adaptive walking on irregular terrain. In particular, the soles that contact the terrain surface perform flexible movements similar to the movement of the fins of a lungfish, which is considered to be the predecessor of land animals. The sole movements are believed to be a basic movement acquired during prehistoric times. The detailed rhythm pattern of sole motion is considered to be important. We developed a method for measuring electrification without installing device on a subject's body and footwear for stabilizing the electrification of the human body. We measured the rhythm pattern of 20 subjects including 4 infants when walking by using this system and the corresponding equipment. Therefore, we confirmed the commonality of the correlative rhythm patterns of 20 subjects. Further, with regard to an individual subject, the reproducibility of a rhythm pattern with strong correlation coefficient > 0.93 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD) concerning rhythms of trials that are differently conducted on adult subjects could be confirmed.

  5. Essential telemedicine elements (tele-ments) for connecting the academic health center and remote community providers to enhance patient care.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Brett C; Clarke, Christopher A; Troke, Tana M; Friedman, Lawrence S

    2012-08-01

    The authors draw on their experience with the University of California, San Diego Medical Center's successful enterprise-level clinical telemedicine program to present a paradigm for other academic health centers (AHCs) that wish to develop such a program. They detail key telemedicine program elements, or "tele-ments," that they consider essential to the development of a centralized, structured telemedicine program and relevant to the development of smaller programs. These tele-ments include an overall organizational vision, a centralized telemedicine infrastructure, telemedicine-specific policies and procedures, medical record documentation, relationships between the AHC clinical hub and its remote (spoke) partners, identification of and training for specialty providers, a business plan based on service agreements and/or insurance billing, and licensure/privileging. They discuss the importance of delaying equipment purchases until a plan is in place for sustaining the telemedicine enterprise and of establishing measures to define success at the outset of program development. In addition, they detail the benefits and concerns associated with telemedicine, provide a comprehensive listing of the roles and responsibilities of providers and staff involved in all aspects of telemedicine, and share samples of their program's informed consent forms and workflow checklists. Their goal is to offer support and guidance to other AHCs entering the telemedicine arena, enabling them to replicate key elements of a successful, enterprise-wide telemedicine infrastructure.

  6. Factors affecting job satisfaction of Aboriginal mental health workers working in community mental health in rural and remote New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Cosgrave, Catherine; Maple, Myfanwy; Hussain, Rafat

    2016-12-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the job satisfaction and subsequent retention of Aboriginal mental health workers (AMHWs).Methods Five AMHWs working in New South Wales (NSW) for NSW Health in rural and remote community mental health (CMH) services participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews to understand how employment and rural living factors affected workers' decisions to stay or leave their CMH positions.Results Using a constructivist grounded theory analysis, three aspects negatively impacting the job satisfaction of AMHWs were identified: (1) difficulties being accepted into the team and organisation; (2) culturally specific work challenges; and (3) professional differences and inequality.Conclusions Policy and procedural changes to the AMHW training program may address the lower remuneration and limited career opportunities identified with regard to the Bachelor Health Sciences (Mental Health) qualification. Delivering training to increase levels of understanding about the AMHW training program, and cultural awareness generally, to CMH staff and NSW Health management may assist in addressing the negative team, organisational and cultural issues identified.What is known about the topic? The Bachelor Health Sciences (Mental Health) qualification and traineeship pathway undertaken by AMHWs differs significantly from that of other health professionals working in NSW Health's CMH services. The health workforce literature identifies that each health professional group has its own culture and specific values and that forming and maintaining a profession-specific identity is an extremely important aspect of job satisfaction for health workers.What does the paper add? AMHWs working in rural and remote NSW CMH services commonly experience low levels of job satisfaction, especially while undertaking the embedded training program. Of particular concern is the health sciences qualification not translating into NSW Health

  7. Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch focuses on communities. Ethnic groups, religious groups, schools, families, even the Internet, are used as examples of communities in Iowa. Forced communities are exemplified by migration, law, natural disasters, and sometimes education. Photographs from Iowa's past show the changing nature of communities and encourage…

  8. The role of dogs in transmission of gastrointestinal parasites in a remote tea-growing community in northeastern India.

    PubMed

    Traub, Rebecca J; Robertson, Ian D; Irwin, Peter; Mencke, Norbert; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2002-11-01

    The prevalence and risk factors associated with canine gastrointestinal parasitic zoonoses and the role of dogs in the mechanical transmission of human Ascaris infection was examined in three tea estates in Assam, India. Nearly all (99%) dogs harbored one or more zoonotic species of gastrointestinal parasites, with hookworm infection being most common (94%). Parasitic stages presumed to be host-specific for humans such as Ascaris spp. (31%), Trichuris trichiura (25%), and Isospora belli (2%) were also recovered from dog feces. A polymerase chain reaction-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was used to differentiate the species of Ascaris eggs in dog feces. The results of this study demonstrate the role of the dog as a significant disseminator and environmental contaminator of Ascaris lumbricoides in communities where promiscuous defecation by humans occurs.

  9. British Geological Survey remotely operated sea bed rockdrills and vibrocorers: new advances to meet the needs of the scientific community.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, H. A.; Stevenson, A.; Wilson, M.; Pheasant, I.

    2014-12-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) have developed a number of coring and drilling systems for use in science projects in the UK and internationally. These include 3m and 6m vibrocoring systems; a 5m combined rockdrill and vibrocorer system; an oriented drill designed specifically to recover samples for use in palaeomagnetic studies; and a 55m rockdrill (RockDrill2). Recently, BGS have developed an autonomous, battery-operated vibrocoring system compatible with both the 3m and 6m vibrocorers, which can be used in water depths up to 6000m. Use of a battery system negates the use of an umbilical power cable to operate the vibrocorer, which instead can be deployed using the vessels A-frame and winch. The autonomous battery system comprises six 48V 19Ah batteries connected in series to give a 288V power source, a microprocessor and real-time clock. Data from the sensors are recorded with a time-stamp, giving diagnostic information that can be downloaded once the system is returned to the deck. The vibrocorer is operated via a pre-set program which is set up before deployment.The new system not only allows vibrocoring in greater water depths, but can also be used on smaller vessels where deck space is limited as a separate winch and umbilical is not required. The autonomous system was used for the first time in June 2014 on-board the RV Belgica to acquire samples from 20 sites in the Dangeard and Explorer canyon heads, off the southwest of England in 430m water depth.Another development is the BGS 55m rockdrill (RockDrill2), a remotely operated sampling system capable of coring up to 55m below sea floor in water depths up to 4000m. The rockdrill can be operated via its own launch and recovery system and can be outfitted with additional sensors such as gas flow meters, which have been designed by the BGS for assessing volume of gas hydrate, and down-hole logging tools. The 55m rockdrill has recently been used to sample hydrate-entrained sediments in the Sea of Japan. The

  10. Physical Activity and Fitness of First Nations Youth in a Remote and Isolated Northern Ontario Community: A Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michelle; Hanning, Rhona; Gates, Allison; Stephen, Judy; Fehst, Andrew; Tsuji, Leonard

    2016-02-01

    Among a group of First Nations youth, this research aimed to obtain objective measures of anthropometry, physical activity (PA) and fitness; to identify any group-level differences by sex, body mass index, waist circumference and body fat categories; to assess the barriers and supports to PA. Youth participated in anthropometric measures (BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage), PA assessment (3 days of accelerometry) and fitness testing (guided by the Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness and Lifestyle Approach). Barriers and supports were assessed via environmental scan and focus groups. Descriptive statistics were compared to reference data. Group differences by sex, BMI status, waist circumference and body fat categories were tested using Mann-Whitney U and Chi square tests (p ≤ 0.05). Qualitative data were assembled into one file and coded manually for categories and themes. Seventy-two youth (12.1 ± 1.1 years, 61.1% male) participated in at least one measure; 36 completed the accelerometry. Sixty-three percent were overweight or obese, 51% were abdominally obese and 21% had excess body fat. Most (86.1%) met Canada's PA guidelines. Boys were more active than girls (p = 0.025) and had greater cardiorespiratory endurance (p = 0.003). Overweight, obese, or abdominally obese youth had lower cardiorespiratory endurance than normal weight youth (p < 0.001). Barriers and supports fell under the main themes: motivation, role models, personnel and facilities, environment and programs. Based on this assessment, youth in this community are active, but not sufficiently physically fit, especially among those affected by obesity and abdominal obesity. The findings, in addition to the numerous barriers to PA, support the community's desire for school-based PA programming.

  11. Impact of a community-based perinatal and newborn preventive care package on perinatal and neonatal mortality in a remote mountainous district in Northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Memon, Zahid A; Khan, Gul N; Soofi, Sajid B; Baig, Imam Y; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-04-30

    There is limited evidence from community-based interventions to guide the development of effective maternal, perinatal and newborn care practices and services in developing countries. We evaluated the impact of a low-cost package of community-based interventions implemented through government sector lady health workers (LHWs) and community health workers (CHWs) of a NGO namely Aga Khan Health Services on perinatal and neonatal outcomes in a sub-population of the remote mountainous district of Gilgit, Northern Pakistan. The package was evaluated using quasi experimental design included promotion of antenatal care, adequate nutrition, skilled delivery and healthy newborn care practices. Control areas continued to receive the routine standard health services. The intervention areas received intervention package in addition to the routine standard health services. Outcome measures included changes in maternal and newborn-care practices and perinatal and neonatal mortality rates between the intervention and control areas. The intervention was implemented in a population of 283324 over a 18 months period. 3200 pregnant women received the intervention. Significant improvements in antenatal care (92% vs 76%, p < .001), TT vaccination (67% vs 47%, p < .001), institutional delivery (85% vs 71%, p < .001), cord application (51% vs 71%, p < .001), delayed bathing (15% vs 43%, p < .001), colostrum administration (83% vs 64%, p < .001), and initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth (55% vs 40%, p < .001) were seen in intervention areas compared with control areas. Our results indicate signif