Science.gov

Sample records for remote organ injury

  1. Remote preconditioning-endocrine factors in organ protection against ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Craig S; Liao, Siyun; Gross, Garrett J; Schultz, Jo El J

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and developing world. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a number of interventions including brief periods of ischemia or hypoxia and certain endogenous factors such as opioids, bradykinin, growth factors or pharmacological agents are capable of protecting the heart against post-ischemic contractile dysfunction, arrhythmias and myocardial infarction. This conventional cardioprotection occurs via an autocrine or paracrine action in which these protective factors are released from the heart to act upon itself. Over the last ten years, a growing body of evidence indicates that a brief ischemic insult on one organ releases endogenous factors that protect other organs against a prolonged ischemic insult. This phenomenon, termed remote preconditioning or preconditioning at a distance, implicates an endocrine action, and may involve humoral or neural-endocrine signaling. This review will summarize the endocrine factors identified and implicated in this inter-organ cytoprotection. PMID:17897043

  2. Effect of tiron on remote organ injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Ateyya, Hayam; Wagih, Heba M; El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that can be complicated by involvement of other remote organs. Oxidative stress is known to have a crucial role in the development of pancreatic acinar damage and one of the main causes in multisystem organ failure in experimental AP. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of tiron on pancreas and remote organ damage in L-arginine (L-Arg) induced AP rat model. Thirty-two male rats were divided in random into four groups: control, tiron, L-Arg, and tiron with L-Arg. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were withdrawn for biochemical analysis. The pancreas, lung, kidney, and liver were collected for histopathological examination. Estimation of pancreatic water content was done. Analysis of pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and pancreatic lipid peroxide levels (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were carried out. Finally, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression in pancreatic tissue was determined. Results indicated that treatment with tiron significantly decreased lipid peroxide levels and markedly increased both SOD activity and GSH level. Moreover, histopathological analysis further confirmed that administration of tiron relatively ameliorates pancreatic acinar cells and remote organ damage. Increased immunoreactivity of NF-κB and TGF-β1 were reduced also by tiron treatment. These findings pointed out the protective role of the mitochondrial antioxidant, tiron against AP induced by L-Arg. PMID:27118662

  3. Perioperative Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Karsten; Karhausen, Jörn; Clambey, Eric T.; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the fact that a surgical procedure may have been performed for the appropriate indication and in a technically perfect manner, patients are threatened by perioperative organ injury. For example, stroke, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute kidney injury, or acute gut injury are among the most common causes for morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. In the present review, we discuss the pathogenesis of perioperative organ injury, and provide select examples for novel treatment concepts that have emerged over the past decade. Indeed, we believe that research to provide mechanistic insight into acute organ injury and to identify novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention or treatment of perioperative organ injury represents the most important opportunity to improve outcomes of anesthesia and surgery. PMID:24126264

  4. Core Injuries Remote from the Pubic Symphysis.

    PubMed

    Belair, Jeffrey A; Hegazi, Tarek M; Roedl, Johannes B; Zoga, Adam C; Omar, Imran M

    2016-09-01

    The core, or central musculoskeletal system of the torso, is essential for participating in sports and other physical activities. Core injuries are commonly encountered in athletes and active individuals. The importance of the midline pubic plate and rectus abdominis-adductor aponeurosis for core stability and function is discussed in the literature. This review article examines other important core injuries remote from the pubic symphysis, relevant clinical features, and preferred approaches to imaging. Several specific syndromes encountered in the core are reviewed. By protocoling imaging studies and identifying pathology, radiologists can add value to the clinical decision-making process and help guide therapeutic options. PMID:27545427

  5. An international organization for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Edelson, Burton I.

    1991-01-01

    A recommendation is presented for the formation of a new commercially oriented international organization to acquire or develop, coordinate or manage, the space and ground segments for a global operational satellite system to furnish the basic data for remote sensing and meteorological, land, and sea resource applications. The growing numbers of remote sensing programs are examined and possible ways of reducing redundant efforts and improving the coordination and distribution of these global efforts are discussed. This proposed remote sensing organization could play an important role in international cooperation and the distribution of scientific, commercial, and public good data.

  6. Advance in spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury: Blood-spinal cord barrier and remote ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qijing; Huang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ji; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-06-01

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is the physiological and metabolic substance diffusion barrier between blood circulation and spinal cord tissues. This barrier plays a vital role in maintaining the microenvironment stability of the spinal cord. When the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the structure and function of the BSCB is disrupted, further destroying the spinal cord homeostasis and ultimately leading to neurological deficit. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an approach in which interspersed cycles of preconditioning ischemia is followed by reperfusion to tissues/organs to protect the distant target tissues/organs against subsequent lethal ischemic injuries. RIPC is an innovation of the treatment strategies that protect the organ from I/R injury. In this study, we review the morphological structure and function of the BSCB, the injury mechanism of BSCB resulting from spinal cord I/R, and the effect of RIPC on it.

  7. Local and Remote Postconditioning Decrease Intestinal Injury in a Rabbit Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mu; Dong, Jian-Xin; Li, Lu-Bin; Che, Hai-Jie; Yong, Jun; Song, Fu-Bo; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Jv-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a significant problem that is associated with high morbidity and mortality in critical settings. This injury may be ameliorated using postconditioning protocol. In our study, we created a rabbit intestinal I/R injury model to analyze the effects of local ischemia postconditioning (LIPo) and remote ischemia postconditioning (RIPo) on intestinal I/R injury. We concluded that LIPo affords protection in intestinal I/R injury in a comparable fashion with RIPo by decreasing oxidative stress, neutrophil activation, and apoptosis. PMID:26819600

  8. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction. PMID:25479784

  9. Remote effect of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury on pancreas: role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abogresha, Noha M.; Abdelaziz, Eman Z.; Khalil, Waleed F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have demonstrated remote effects of renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury on some organs such as brain, liver, and lungs. Oxidative stress is reported to be the cornerstone in such ischemic conditions. Associated apoptosis is also reported in remote lung, liver and myocardial injury after acute kidney injury. So, we postulated that renal IR may affect the pancreas by its remote effect. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial mediated apoptosis may play a crucial role in this injury. We investigated the effects of kidney IR on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine functions, antioxidant enzyme activity, and apoptosis. Material and methods The protective effect of vitamin C was also investigated. The animals were submitted to non-traumatic bilateral renal IR, sham operation or treatment with vitamin C after IR. Rats were sacrificed on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th days of the experiment to evaluate the parameters of oxidative stress (catalase, lipid peroxidase, reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase), pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function (amylase, insulin and fasting blood glucose), renal functions (serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen), cellular injury and apoptotic markers (Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3). Results Kidney I/R significantly increased the renal and pancreatic functions at 1, 3 and 7 days, while fasting insulin was significantly increased at day 3 after ischemia. Moreover, I/R significantly increased the studied oxidative stress markers and decreased the antioxidant capacity in pancreatic tissues. In addition, renal I/R induced numerous histopatological lesions in pancreatic tissues and increased the apoptosis-related genes. Treating the rats with vitamin C (100 mg/kg) significantly restored the renal and pancreatic functions, improved the pancreatic antioxidant capacity and protected the pancreatic tissues from apoptotic necrosis. Conclusions The results suggested that bilateral renal ischemia for 45 min caused significant

  10. Remote sensing for organics on Mars.

    PubMed

    Davis, W L; McKay, C P; Hynes, S F

    1999-01-01

    The detection of organics on Mars remains an important scientific objective. Advances in instrumentation and laboratory techniques provide new insight into the lower level detection limit of complex organics in closely packed media. Preliminary results demonstrate that algae present in a palagonite medium do exhibit a spectral reflectance feature in the visible range for dry mass weight ratios of algae to palagonite greater than 6%--which corresponds to 30 mg algae in a 470 mg (just optically thick (< 3 mm) layer) palagonite matrix. This signature most probably represents chlorophyll a, a light harvesting pigment with an emission peak at 678 nm.

  11. Effects of N-acetylcysteine and pentoxifylline on remote lung injury in a rat model of hind-limb ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Hesaraki, Saeed; Razmara, Foad; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Hajizadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and pentoxifylline in a model of remote organ injury after hind-limb ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats, the lungs being the remote organ system. Methods : Thirty-five male Wistar rats were assigned to one of five conditions (n = 7/group), as follows: sham operation (control group); hind-limb ischemia, induced by clamping the left femoral artery, for 2 h, followed by 24 h of reperfusion (I/R group); and hind-limb ischemia, as above, followed by intraperitoneal injection (prior to reperfusion) of 150 mg/kg of NAC (I/R+NAC group), 40 mg/kg of pentoxifylline (I/R+PTX group), or both (I/R+NAC+PTX group). At the end of the trial, lung tissues were removed for histological analysis and assessment of oxidative stress. Results : In comparison with the rats in the other groups, those in the I/R group showed lower superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels, together with higher malondialdehyde levels and lung injury scores (p < 0.05 for all). Interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration of the lungs was also markedly greater in the I/R group than in the other groups. In addition, I/R group rats showed various signs of interstitial edema and hemorrhage. In the I/R+NAC, I/R+PTX, and I/R+NAC+PTX groups, superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione levels, malondialdehyde levels, and lung injury scores were preserved (p < 0.05 for all). The differences between the administration of NAC or pentoxifylline alone and the administration of the two together were not significant for any of those parameters (p > 0.05 for all). Conclusions : Our results suggest that NAC and pentoxifylline both protect lung tissue from the effects of skeletal muscle I/R. However, their combined use does not appear to increase the level of that protection. PMID:26982035

  12. Physiological processes underlying organ injury in alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Lang, Charles H; Nagy, Laura E; Bailey, Shannon M; Parsons, Loren H; Murray, Gary J

    2016-09-01

    This review summarizes the American Physiological Society (APS) Presidential Symposium 1 entitled "Physiological Processes Underlying Organ Injury in Alcohol Abuse" at the 2016 Experimental Biology meeting. The symposium was organized by Dr. Patricia Molina, past president of the APS, was held on April 3 at the Convention Center in San Diego, CA, and was funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. The "Physiological Processes Underlying Organ Injury in Alcohol Abuse Symposium" assembled experts and leaders in the field and served as a platform to discuss and share knowledge on the latest developments and scientific advances on the mechanisms underlying organ injury in alcohol abuse. This symposium provided unique, interdisciplinary alcohol research, including several organs, liver, muscle, adipose, and brain, affected by excessive alcohol use. PMID:27436613

  13. Vascular surgery-related organ injury and protective strategies: update and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Fung, A; Pac-Soo, C; Ma, D

    2016-09-01

    Whilst there has been a reduction in the prevalence of peripheral vascular disease worldwide, a significant proportion of the world's growing population is still affected by disease of the aorta, carotid, iliac and lower limb arteries. These if left untreated can result in severe morbidity and mortality. However vascular surgery, the main definitive treatment for such conditions, is associated with subsequent injury to vital organs including the kidneys, heart, brain, intestines and lungs, with a consequent increase in both morbidity and mortality. The current thinking is that the underlying mechanism of injury is direct organ ischaemia and ischaemia induced formation of free radicals, cytokine release and mitochondrial failure. Various methods to alleviate such injuries have been investigated including pre- and postconditioning strategies, pharmacological therapies including volatile anaesthetic and alpha2 adrenoceptor agonist drugs and more recently remote conditioning strategies. Although these interventions have demonstrated some reduction in the biomarkers for organ injury, attempts to translate these benefits into clinical practice have not been successful in terms of morbidity, mortality or length of hospital stay. For this reason, further research is needed in this area to facilitate the translation of the potential interventional benefits from bench to bedside. PMID:27566807

  14. Remote Sensing to Support Monitoring of Soil Organic Carbon (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairn, H.; Pacheco, A.

    2009-12-01

    Soil organic carbon is fundamental to the sustainability of agricultural soils and soils play an important role in the global carbon balance. Estimating soil carbon levels and monitoring changes in these levels over time requires extensive data on climate, soil properties, land cover and land management. Remote sensing technologies are capable of providing some of the data needed in modeling soil organic carbon concentrations and in tracking changes in soil carbon. The characteristics of the vegetation cover influence the amount of organic matter in the soil and cultivation impacts the rate of organic matter decomposition. Consequently land management decisions, which include cropping and tillage practices, play a vital role in determining soil carbon levels. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has developed several methods to map land management practices from multispectral and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite sensors. These include identification of crops grown, estimation of crop residue cover left post-harvest and identification of tillage activities. Optical and SAR data are capable of identifying crop types to accuracies consistently above 85%. Knowledge of crop type also provides information needed to establish biomass levels and residue type, both of which influence the amounts and decomposition rates of organic matter. Scientists with AAFC have also extensively validated a method to estimate percent residue cover using spectral unmixing analysis applied to multispectral satellite data. Percentages for corn, soybean and small grain residues can be estimated to accuracies of 83%, 80% and 82%, respectively. Tillage activity influences residue decomposition and AAFC is investigating methods to identify tillage occurrence using advanced polarimetric SAR information. This presentation will provide an overview of methods and results from research ongoing at AAFC. The potential contribution of these remote sensing approaches to support wide area carbon

  15. Remote monitoring of organic matter in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolai, Filippo; Bazzani, Marco; Cecchi, Giovanna; Innamorati, Mario; Massi, Luca; Nuccio, Caterina; Santoleri, Rosalia

    1999-12-01

    The monitoring of organic matter, suspended or dissolved in the water column, is relevant for the study of the aquatic environment. Actually, the Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) represents a major reservoir of reactive carbon in the global carbon cycle, thus influencing significantly the marine ecosystem. Due to the strong absorption in the near ultraviolet, DOM reduces considerably the extinction path of solar light in the water column, affecting phytoplankton population and its vertical distribution. The measurement of the DOM absorption coefficient has to be regarded as a good parameter for the monitoring of water quality. This paper deals with the measurements carried out during the oceanographic campaign 'Marine Fronts,' which took place in the Western Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean from July 14 to August 5, 1998. In this measurement campaign, a high spectral resolution fluorescence lidar (FLIDAR) was installed on the rear-deck of the O/V 'Urania,' acquiring remote fluorescence spectra both in ship motion and in stations. A particular attention was devoted to the monitoring of DOM distribution in the different water masses in marine frontal areas. The lidar data were compared and integrated with SST satellite data and biological samplings. The results show that FLIDAR data agree with satellite imagery, particularly for marine front detection. The comparison with water sample data gave indications for retrieving the DOM absorption coefficient directly from fluorescence remote spectra. In addition, a protein like fluorescence band was detected in the measurements carried out on total suspended matter filtered from the water samplings.

  16. Acid aspiration-induced acute lung injury causes leukocyte-dependent systemic organ injury.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Kindt, G C; Weisbrode, S E; Moore, S A; Dorinsky, P M

    1993-04-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome is a form of acute lung injury (ALI) that is frequently associated with systemic organ injury and often occurs in the setting of wide-spread inflammatory cell activation. However, whether conditions that lead to ALI result in systemic organ injury is unclear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ALI induced by acid aspiration will not result in systemic organ injury. Morphological alterations and lymph-to-plasma protein ratios were measured in autoperfused cat ileum preparations of four control animals and five animals with ALI produced by the endobronchial instillation of 0.1 N HCl (0.5 ml.kg-1.lung-1). After 2 h, the lymph-to-plasma protein ratio (a measure of microvascular permeability) was increased in the ilea of HCl-injured animals compared with control animals (0.234 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.121 +/- 0.005; P = 0.012) and was accompanied by extensive morphological alterations. Four additional HCl-injured animals were pretreated with an antileukocyte adherence antibody (anti-CD18, 2 mg/kg) that blocked the HCl-induced alterations in the ileum. This study provides evidence for significant systemic organ injury after acid aspiration-induced ALI and suggests that the neutrophil may be a key mediator.

  17. No Effect of Remote Ischemic Conditioning Strategies on Recovery from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Protective Molecular Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Kristensen, Marie Louise Vindvad; Birn, Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Nørregaard, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is the major cause of acute kidney injury. Remote ischemic conditioning (rIC) performed as brief intermittent sub-lethal ischemia and reperfusion episodes in a distant organ may protect the kidney against IRI. Here we investigated the renal effects of rIC applied either prior to (remote ischemic preconditioning; rIPC) or during (remote ischemic perconditioning; rIPerC) sustained ischemic kidney injury in rats. The effects were evaluated as differences in creatinine clearance (CrCl) rate, tissue tubular damage marker expression, and potential kidney recovery mediators. One week after undergoing right-sided nephrectomy, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (n = 7), ischemia and reperfusion (IR; n = 10), IR+rIPC (n = 10), and IR+rIPerC (n = 10). The rIC was performed as four repeated episodes of 5-minute clamping of the infrarenal aorta followed by 5-minute release either before or during 37 minutes of left renal artery clamping representing the IRI. Urine and blood were sampled prior to ischemia as well as 3 and 7 days after reperfusion. The kidney was harvested for mRNA and protein isolation. Seven days after IRI, the CrCl change from baseline values was similar in the IR (δ: 0.74 mL/min/kg [-0.45 to 1.94]), IR+rIPC (δ: 0.21 mL/min/kg [-0.75 to 1.17], p > 0.9999), and IR+rIPerC (δ: 0.41 mL/min/kg [-0.43 to 1.25], p > 0.9999) groups. Kidney function recovery was associated with a significant up-regulation of phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAkt), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), and heat shock proteins (HSPs) pHSP27, HSP32, and HSP70, but rIC was not associated with any significant differences in tubular damage, inflammatory, or fibrosis marker expression. In our study, rIC did not protect the kidney against IRI. However, on days 3–7 after IRI, all groups recovered renal function. This was associated with pAkt and pERK1/2 up-regulation and increased HSP expression at day 7. PMID:26720280

  18. No Effect of Remote Ischemic Conditioning Strategies on Recovery from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Protective Molecular Mediators.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Kristensen, Marie Louise Vindvad; Birn, Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Nørregaard, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is the major cause of acute kidney injury. Remote ischemic conditioning (rIC) performed as brief intermittent sub-lethal ischemia and reperfusion episodes in a distant organ may protect the kidney against IRI. Here we investigated the renal effects of rIC applied either prior to (remote ischemic preconditioning; rIPC) or during (remote ischemic perconditioning; rIPerC) sustained ischemic kidney injury in rats. The effects were evaluated as differences in creatinine clearance (CrCl) rate, tissue tubular damage marker expression, and potential kidney recovery mediators. One week after undergoing right-sided nephrectomy, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (n = 7), ischemia and reperfusion (IR; n = 10), IR+rIPC (n = 10), and IR+rIPerC (n = 10). The rIC was performed as four repeated episodes of 5-minute clamping of the infrarenal aorta followed by 5-minute release either before or during 37 minutes of left renal artery clamping representing the IRI. Urine and blood were sampled prior to ischemia as well as 3 and 7 days after reperfusion. The kidney was harvested for mRNA and protein isolation. Seven days after IRI, the CrCl change from baseline values was similar in the IR (δ: 0.74 mL/min/kg [-0.45 to 1.94]), IR+rIPC (δ: 0.21 mL/min/kg [-0.75 to 1.17], p > 0.9999), and IR+rIPerC (δ: 0.41 mL/min/kg [-0.43 to 1.25], p > 0.9999) groups. Kidney function recovery was associated with a significant up-regulation of phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAkt), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), and heat shock proteins (HSPs) pHSP27, HSP32, and HSP70, but rIC was not associated with any significant differences in tubular damage, inflammatory, or fibrosis marker expression. In our study, rIC did not protect the kidney against IRI. However, on days 3-7 after IRI, all groups recovered renal function. This was associated with pAkt and pERK1/2 up-regulation and increased HSP expression at day 7. PMID:26720280

  19. Blue light reduces organ injury from ischemia and reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Du; Collage, Richard D.; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Xianghong; Kautza, Benjamin C.; Lewis, Anthony J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Tsung, Allan; Angus, Derek C.; Rosengart, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that light and circadian rhythms profoundly influence the physiologic capacity with which an organism responds to stress. However, the ramifications of light spectrum on the course of critical illness remain to be determined. Here, we show that acute exposure to bright blue spectrum light reduces organ injury by comparison with bright red spectrum or ambient white fluorescent light in two murine models of sterile insult: warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and unilateral renal I/R. Exposure to bright blue light before I/R reduced hepatocellular injury and necrosis and reduced acute kidney injury and necrosis. In both models, blue light reduced neutrophil influx, as evidenced by reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) within each organ, and reduced the release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a neutrophil chemotactant and key mediator in the pathogenesis of I/R injury. The protective mechanism appeared to involve an optic pathway and was mediated, in part, by a sympathetic (β3 adrenergic) pathway that functioned independent of significant alterations in melatonin or corticosterone concentrations to regulate neutrophil recruitment. These data suggest that modifying the spectrum of light may offer therapeutic utility in sterile forms of cellular injury. PMID:27114521

  20. Olmesartan restores the protective effect of remote ischemic perconditioning against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Bi, Yan-Wen; Chen, Ke-Biao

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Remote ischemic perconditioning is the newest technique used to lessen ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, its effect in hypertensive animals has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the effect of remote ischemic perconditioning in spontaneously hypertensive rats and determine whether chronic treatment with Olmesartan could influence the effect of remote ischemic perconditioning. METHODS: Sixty rats were randomly divided into six groups: vehicle-sham, vehicle-ischemia/reperfusion injury, vehicle-remote ischemic perconditioning, olmesartan-sham, olmesartan-ischemia/reperfusion and olmesartan-remote ischemic perconditioning. The left ventricular mass index, creatine kinase concentration, infarct size, arrhythmia scores, HIF–1α mRNA expression, miR-21 expression and miR-210 expression were measured. RESULTS: Olmesartan significantly reduced the left ventricular mass index, decreased the creatine kinase concentration, limited the infarct size and reduced the arrhythmia score. The infarct size, creatine kinase concentration and arrhythmia score during reperfusion were similar for the vehicle-ischemia/reperfusion group and vehicle-remote ischemic perconditioning group. However, these values were significantly decreased in the olmesartan-remote ischemic perconditioning group compared to the olmesartan-ischemia/reperfusion injury group. HIF–1α, miR-21 and miR-210 expression were markedly down-regulated in the Olmesartan-sham group compared to the vehicle-sham group and significantly up-regulated in the olmesartan-remote ischemic perconditioning group compared to the olmesartan-ischemia/reperfusion injury group. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that 1 the protective effect of remote ischemic perconditioning is lost in vehicle-treated rats and that chronic treatment with Olmesartan restores the protective effect of remote ischemic perconditioning; 2 chronic treatment with Olmesartan down-regulates HIF–1α, miR-21 and miR-210 expression and

  1. Classical and remote post-conditioning effects on ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute oxidant kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Najafi, Atefeh; Seifi, Behjat

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed to analyze and compare the effects of classical and remote ischemic postconditioning (POC) on rat renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-induced acute kidney injury. After right nephrectomy, male rats were randomly assigned into four groups (n = 8). In the IR group, 45 min of left renal artery occlusion was induced followed by 24 h of reperfusion. In the classical POC group, after induction of 45 min ischemia, 4 cycles of 10 s of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion were applied to the kidney before complete restoring of renal blood. In the remote POC group, 4 cycles of 5 min ischemia and reperfusion of left femoral artery were applied after 45 min renal ischemia and right at the time of renal reperfusion. There was a reduction in renal function (increase in blood urea and creatinine) in the IR group. Application of both forms of POC prevented the IR-induced reduction in renal function and histology. There were also significant improvements in kidney oxidative stress status in both POC groups demonstrated by a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) formation and preservation of antioxidant levels comparing to the IR group. We concluded that both methods of POC have protective effects on renal function and histology possibly by a reduction in IR-induced oxidative stress.

  2. Mixed Organic Solvents Induce Renal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Weisong; Xu, Zhongxiu; Lu, Yizhou; Zeng, Caihong; Zheng, Chunxia; Wang, Shengyu; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the injury effects of organic solvents on kidney, an animal model of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats treated with mixed organic solvents via inhalation was generated and characterized. The mixed organic solvents consisted of gasoline, dimethylbenzene and formaldehyde (GDF) in the ratio of 2∶2:1, and were used at 12,000 PPM to treat the rats twice a day, each for 3 hours. Proteinuria appeared in the rats after exposure for 5–6 weeks. The incidences of proteinuria in male and female rats after exposure for 12 weeks were 43.8% (7/16) and 25% (4/16), respectively. Urinary N-Acetyl-β-(D)-Glucosaminidase (NAG) activity was increased significantly after exposure for 4 weeks. Histological examination revealed remarkable injuries in the proximal renal tubules, including tubular epithelial cell detachment, cloud swelling and vacuole formation in the proximal tubular cells, as well as proliferation of parietal epithelium and tubular reflux in glomeruli. Ultrastructural examination found that brush border and cytoplasm of tubular epithelial cell were dropped, that tubular epithelial cells were partially disintegrated, and that the mitochondria of tubular epithelial cells were degenerated and lost. In addition to tubular lesions, glomerular damages were also observed, including segmental foot process fusion and loss of foot process covering on glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Immunofluorescence staining indicated that the expression of nephrin and podocin were both decreased after exposure of GDF. In contrast, increased expression of desmin, a marker of podocyte injury, was found in some areas of a glomerulus. TUNEL staining showed that GDF induced apoptosis in tubular cells and glomerular cells. These studies demonstrate that GDF can induce both severe proximal tubular damage and podocyte injury in rats, and the tubular lesions appear earlier than that of glomeruli. PMID:23029287

  3. Charge transfer at organic-organic heterojunctions, and remote doping of a pentacene transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei

    Organic-organic heterojunctions (OOHs) are the fundamental building blocks of organic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic photovoltaic cells, and photo detectors. Transport of free electrons and holes, exciton formation, recombination or dissociation, and various other physical processes all take place in OOHs. Understanding the electronic structures of OOH is critical for studying device physics and further improving the performance of organic devices. This work focuses on the electronic structure, i.e., the energy level alignment, at OOHs, investigated by ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and IPES). The weak interaction that generally prevails at OOH interfaces leads to small interface dipoles of 0˜0.5eV. The experimental observations on the majority of OOHs studied can be semi-quantitatively predicted by the model derived from the induced density of interface states and charge neutrality level (IDIS/CNL). However, we also find that the electronic structure of interfaces between two small-band-gap semiconductors, e.g., using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as the donor and a tris(thieno)-hexaazatriphenylene derivative (THAP) as the acceptor, is strongly influenced by changes in the substrate work function. In these cases, the charge transfer that takes place at the interface is governed by thermodynamic equilibrium, dominating any subtle interaction due to IDIS/CNL. The impact of doping on the energy level alignment of OOHs is also studied. The charges donated by the dopant molecules transfer from the parent doped layer to the adjacent undoped layer, taking advantage of the molecular level offset, and are then spatially separated from the dopant molecules. Remote doping, based on this charge transfer mechanism, is demonstrated with the heterojunction formed between pentacene and N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)-1,1'bisphenyl-4,4'diazine (alpha-NPD) p-doped with tris[1,2-bis(trifluoromethyl) ethane-1,2-dithiolene] (Mo

  4. Role of necroptosis in the pathogenesis of solid organ injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, H; Jaffer, T; Eguchi, S; Wang, Z; Linkermann, A; Ma, D

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a type of regulated cell death dependent on the activity of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein (RIP) kinases. However, unlike apoptosis, it is caspase independent. Increasing evidence has implicated necroptosis in the pathogenesis of disease, including ischemic injury, neurodegeneration, viral infection and many others. Key players of the necroptosis signalling pathway are now widely recognized as therapeutic targets. Necrostatins may be developed as potent inhibitors of necroptosis, targeting the activity of RIPK1. Necrostatin-1, the first generation of necrostatins, has been shown to confer potent protective effects in different animal models. This review will summarize novel insights into the involvement of necroptosis in specific injury of different organs, and the therapeutic platform that it provides for treatment. PMID:26583318

  5. Global Transport of Organic Pollutants: Ambient Concentrations in the Remote Marine Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, E.; Giam, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Concentrations of organic pollutants in the air and in precipitation have been measured at Enewetak Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. These data from a site removed from industrial and human activity indicate the present concentrations of synthetic organic pollutants in the atmosphere and establish the long-range atmospheric transport of organic pollutants to remote marine areas. Hexachlorobenzene and hexachlorocyclohexane isomers are present in the remote marine atmosphere. Polychlorobiphenyls, total DDT, dieldrin, chlordane, and two phthalate ester plasticizers were also found in the samples. The concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere remote from continental sources are good measures of the minimum concentrations of air pollutants on Earth.

  6. Effects of different periods of renal ischemia on liver as a remote organ

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Golab, Fereshteh; Zahmatkesh, Maryam; Ghaznavi, Rana; Hedayati, Mehdi; Arab, Hossein Ali; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the hepatic changes after induction of different periods of renal ischemia. METHODS: Rats were subjected to either sham operation or ischemia (30, 45 and 60 min) followed by 60 min reperfusion. Liver and renal functional indices were measured. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power levels and the concentration of interleukin (IL)-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) were evaluated. Portions of liver and kidney tissues were fixed for histological evaluation. RESULTS: Forty-five minutes renal ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion caused significant changes in liver structure and a significant reduction in renal function. These rats showed a significant decrease in liver GSH, as well as a significant increase in TNF-α and IL-10 concentrations. These results demonstrated that renal ischemia caused changes in liver histology, function, oxidative stress and inflammatory status, which led to a reduction in hepatic antioxidant capacity. With 30 min ischemia, the magnitude of these changes was less than those with 45 or 60 min ischemia. CONCLUSION: A minimum of 45 min ischemia is needed to study the effects of renal injury on the liver as a remote organ. PMID:19266605

  7. Using remote sensing to monitor herbicide injury and biomass of waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Wilfredo

    Aquatic vegetation plays an important role in the ecological interactions and processes within a water body. However, the presence of the invasive exotic aquatic plant species, waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms], negatively affects those interactions as well as interfering with water use for recreation and navigation. An implemented management plan for waterhyacinth control relies on the use of herbicides. Efficacy is commonly assessed using visual injury and control ratings as well as estimating biomass. The problem is that those approaches are labor intensive only assessing single points throughout the entire water body. Therefore, technology like remote sensing, which is the focus of this research, is recommended as an additional tool to assess implemented management plans. Studies were conducted in a mesocosm research facility to evaluate the relationship between simulated spectral bands 3, 4, 5, and 7 Landsat 5 TM and waterhyacinth treated with the herbicides imazapyr and glyphosate. Results indicate that injury is better detected and predicted with band 4 and that relationship is negative when either herbicide was used. However, prediction is better when plants have developed sufficient injury to influence the spectral response of band 4. In the second study, the biomass of waterhyacinth was estimated using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) using simulated data from Landsat 5 TM. This study was conducted over natural populations of waterhyacinth in Lakes Columbus and Aberdeen, MS over two growing seasons. Results indicate that the use of NDVI alone is a weak predictor of biomass; however, its combination with morphometric parameters like leaf area index enhanced predictive capabilities. In order to assess field herbicide treatments for waterhyacinth control and its consequent impact on native aquatic vegetation, lake-wide surveys were performed in Lake Columbus, MS using a point-intercept method. The herbicide assessed was 2

  8. C1 Inhibitor Limits Organ Injury and Prolongs Survival in Swine Subjected to Battlefield Simulated Injury.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James C; Li, Yansong; van Amersfoort, Edwin; Relan, Anurag; Dubick, Michael; Sheppard, Forest; Pusateri, Anthony; Niemeyer, Debra; Tsokos, George C; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J

    2016-09-01

    Complement system activation is recognized as a deleterious component of the mammalian physiological response to traumatic injury with severe hemorrhage (TH). Female Yorkshire swine were subjected to a simulated austere prehospital battlefield scenario. Each animal underwent controlled hemorrhage of 22 mL/kg at 100 mL/min rate for approximately 10 min followed by soft tissue injury, femur fracture, and spleen injury. Subsequent blood loss was uncontrolled. Twenty-eight minutes postinjury the animals were randomized into treatment or no treatment with recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) (500 IU/kg, n = 11) and into receiving or not permissive hypotensive resuscitation (n = 14) with infusion of 45 mL/kg lactated Ringer's solution (2× blood lost). Observation and animal maintenance continued for 6 h at which time the animals had either expired or were euthanized. Heart, lung, and small intestine tissue samples were collected. Pharmacokinetic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters as well as survival time, plasma complement activity and tissue deposition, cytokine levels, and tissue injury were determined. We found that administration of C1INH protected tissues from damage, reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines, and improved blood chemistry. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that C1INH administration following TH markedly reduced complement activation and deposition in tissues. Importantly, C1INH administration prolonged survival of animals particularly in those which received resuscitation fluid infusion. Our data urge early administration of C1INH to limit organ damage and prolong survival of those injured in the battlefield. PMID:27405065

  9. Sympathetic nervous response to ischemia-reperfusion injury in humans is altered with remote ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Colleen J; Hemmes, Robyn; Eikelis, Nina; Pathak, Atul; Schlaich, Markus P; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic neural activation may be detrimentally involved in tissue injury caused by ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We examined the effects of experimental IR in the forearm on sympathetic nerve response, finger reactive hyperemia, and oxidative stress, and the protection afforded by applying remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). Ischemia was induced in the forearm for 20 min in healthy volunteers. RIPC was induced by applying two cycles, 5 min each, of ischemia and reperfusion to the upper leg immediately before IR. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral leg using microneurography, finger reactive hyperemia [ischemic reactive hyperemia index (RHI)], erythrocyte production of reduced gluthathione (GSH), and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentration. In controls (no RIPC; n = 15), IR increased MSNA in the early and late phase of ischemia (70% at 5 min; 101% at 15 min). In subjects who underwent RIPC (n = 15), the increase in MSNA was delayed to the late phase of ischemia and increased only by 40%. GSH increased during ischemia in the control group (P = 0.05), but not in those who underwent RIPC. Nitrate and nitrite concentration, taken as an index of NO availability, decreased during the reperfusion period in control individuals (P < 0.05), while no change was observed in those who underwent RIPC. Experimental IR did not affect RHI in the control condition, but a significant vasodilatory response occurred in the RIPC group (P < 0.05). RIPC attenuated ischemia-induced sympathetic activation, prevented the production of an erythrocyte marker of oxidative stress and the reduction of NO availability, and ameliorated RHI. PMID:27288436

  10. Inflammatory Signalling Associated with Brain Dead Organ Donation: From Brain Injury to Brain Stem Death and Posttransplant Ischaemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Ryan P.; Thom, Ogilvie; Fraser, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Brain death is associated with dramatic and serious pathophysiologic changes that adversely affect both the quantity and quality of organs available for transplant. To fully optimise the donor pool necessitates a more complete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of organ dysfunction associated with transplantation. These injurious processes are initially triggered by catastrophic brain injury and are further enhanced during both brain death and graft transplantation. The activated inflammatory systems then contribute to graft dysfunction in the recipient. Inflammatory mediators drive this process in concert with the innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of deleterious immunological pathways in organ grafts occurs, priming them for further inflammation after engraftment. Finally, posttransplantation ischaemia reperfusion injury leads to further generation of inflammatory mediators and consequent activation of the recipient's immune system. Ongoing research has identified key mediators that contribute to the inflammatory milieu inherent in brain dead organ donation. This has seen the development of novel therapies that directly target the inflammatory cascade. PMID:23691272

  11. Circulating Extracellular Histones Are Clinically Relevant Mediators of Multiple Organ Injury.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Chihiro; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Ishida, Tokiko; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular histones are a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases. The mechanisms of histone-mediated injury in certain organs have been extensively studied, but an understanding of the pathophysiological role of histone-mediated injury in multiple organ injury remains elusive. To elucidate this role, we systemically subjected C57BL/6 mice to various doses of histones and performed a chronological evaluation of the morphological and functional changes in the lungs, liver, and kidneys. Notably, histone administration ultimately led to death after a dose-dependent aggravation of multiple organ injury. In chronological studies, pulmonary and hepatic injuries occurred within 15 minutes, whereas renal injuries presented at a later phase, suggesting that susceptibility to extracellular histones varies among organs. Histones bound to pulmonary and hepatic endothelial cells immediately after administration, leading to endothelial damage, which could be ameliorated by pretreatment with heparin. Furthermore, release of another DAMP, high-mobility group protein box 1, followed the histone-induced tissue damage, and an antibody against the molecule ameliorated hepatic and renal failure in a late phase. These findings indicate that extracellular histones induce multiple organ injury in two progressive stages-direct injury to endothelial cells and the subsequent release of other DAMPs-and that combination therapies against extracellular histones and high-mobility group protein box 1 may be a promising strategy for treating multiple organ injury.

  12. TLR9 Mediates Remote Liver Injury following Severe Renal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Pieter J.; Scantlebery, Angelique M.; Butter, Loes M.; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury is a common cause of acute kidney injury and is characterized by tubular damage. Mitochondrial DNA is released upon severe tissue injury and can act as a damage-associated molecular pattern via the innate immune receptor TLR9. Here, we investigated the role of TLR9 in the context of moderate or severe renal ischemia reperfusion injury using wild-type C57BL/6 mice or TLR9KO mice. Moderate renal ischemia induced renal dysfunction but did not decrease animal well-being and was not regulated by TLR9. In contrast, severe renal ischemia decreased animal well-being and survival in wild-type mice after respectively one or five days of reperfusion. TLR9 deficiency improved animal well-being and survival. TLR9 deficiency did not reduce renal inflammation or tubular necrosis. Rather, severe renal ischemia induced hepatic injury as seen by increased plasma ALAT and ASAT levels and focal hepatic necrosis which was prevented by TLR9 deficiency and correlated with reduced circulating mitochondrial DNA levels and plasma LDH. We conclude that TLR9 does not mediate renal dysfunction following either moderate or severe renal ischemia. In contrast, our data indicates that TLR9 is an important mediator of hepatic injury secondary to ischemic acute kidney injury. PMID:26361210

  13. Effect of one-cycle remote ischemic preconditioning to reduce myocardial injury during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Theodoros A; Katritsis, George D; Tsiafoutis, Ioannis; Bourboulis, Nikolaos; Katsivas, Apostolos; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2014-06-15

    Up to 1/3 of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) are complicated by troponin release. Remote ischemic preconditioning (IPC) confers effective cardioprotection; however, a 30-minute remote IPC protocol may be difficult to implement during ad hoc PCI. This study was performed to assess the ability of a brief remote IPC protocol to attenuate cardiac troponin I (cTnI) release after ad hoc PCI. Ninety-four patients undergoing ad hoc PCI for stable coronary artery disease, with undetectable preprocedural cTnI, were recruited and randomized to receive remote IPC (induced by one 5-minute inflation of a blood pressure cuff to 200 mm Hg around the upper arm) or control after the decision for PCI was made. The primary outcome was the difference between cTnI levels 24 hours after PCI and cTnI levels before coronary angiography (ΔcTnI). ΔcTnI in the remote IPC group was significantly lower compared with the control group (0.04 ng/ml [interquartile range 0.01 to 0.14] vs 0.19 ng/ml [interquartile range 0.18 to 0.59], p <0.001). The incidence of PCI-related myocardial infarction (MI) was greater in the control group (42.6% vs 19.1%, p = 0.014). In multivariate analysis, remote IPC was independently associated with ΔcTnI and PCI-related MI. In conclusion, our results suggest that even 1 cycle of remote IPC immediately before ad hoc PCI attenuates periprocedural cTnI release and reduces the incidence of type 4a MI.

  14. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  15. Mechanisms and consequences of injury and repair in older organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Slegtenhorst, Bendix R; Dor, Frank J M F; Elkhal, Abdala; Rodriguez, Hector; Yang, Xiaoyong; Edtinger, Karoline; Quante, Markus; Chong, Anita S; Tullius, Stefan G

    2014-06-15

    Donor organ scarcity remains a significant clinical challenge in transplantation. Older organs, increasingly utilized to meet the growing demand for donor organs, have been linked to inferior transplant outcomes. Susceptibility to organ injury, reduced repair capacity, and increased immunogenicity are interrelated and impacted by physiological and pathological aging processes. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are needed to develop age-specific interventional strategies with regards to organ preservation, immunosuppression, and allocation. In this overview, we summarize current knowledge of injury and repair mechanisms and the effects of aging relevant to transplantation.

  16. Estimating dissolved organic carbon concentration in turbid coastal waters using optical remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Ford, Phillip W.; Matear, Richard J.; Oubelkheir, Kadija; Clementson, Lesley A.; Suber, Ken; Steven, Andrew D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) is an important component in the global carbon cycle. It also plays an important role in influencing the coastal ocean biogeochemical (BGC) cycles and light environment. Studies focussing on DOC dynamics in coastal waters are data constrained due to the high costs associated with in situ water sampling campaigns. Satellite optical remote sensing has the potential to provide continuous, cost-effective DOC estimates. In this study we used a bio-optics dataset collected in turbid coastal waters of Moreton Bay (MB), Australia, during 2011 to develop a remote sensing algorithm to estimate DOC. This dataset includes data from flood and non-flood conditions. In MB, DOC concentration varied over a wide range (20-520 μM C) and had a good correlation (R2 = 0.78) with absorption due to coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and remote sensing reflectance. Using this data set we developed an empirical algorithm to derive DOC concentrations from the ratio of Rrs(412)/Rrs(488) and tested it with independent datasets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to estimate DOC using remotely sensed optical observations in turbid coastal waters.

  17. Rib fracture patterns predict thoracic chest wall and abdominal solid organ injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Hassani, Ammar; Abdulrahman, Husham; Afifi, Ibrahim; Almadani, Ammar; Al-Den, Ahmed; Al-Kuwari, Abdulaziz; Recicar, John; Nabir, Syed; Maull, Kimball I

    2010-08-01

    Blunt trauma patients with rib fractures were studied to determine whether the number of rib fractures or their patterns were more predictive of abdominal solid organ injury and/or other thoracic trauma. Rib fractures were characterized as upper zone (ribs 1 to 4), midzone (ribs 5 to 8), and lower zone (ribs 9 to 12). Findings of sternal and scapular fractures, pulmonary contusions, and solid organ injures (liver, spleen, kidney) were characterized by the total number and predominant zone of ribs fractured. There were 296 men and 14 women. There were 38 patients with scapular fracture and 19 patients with sternal fractures. There were 90 patients with 116 solid organ injuries: liver (n = 42), kidney (n = 27), and spleen (n = 47). Lower rib fractures, whether zone-limited or overlapping, were highly predictive of solid organ injury when compared with upper and midzones. Scapular and sternal fractures were more common with upper zone fractures and pulmonary contusions increased with the number of fractured ribs. Multiple rib fractures involving the lower ribs have a high association with solid organ injury, 51 per cent in this series. The increasing number of rib fractures enhanced the likelihood of other chest wall and pulmonary injuries but did not affect the incidence of solid organ injury. PMID:20726423

  18. Assessing winter oilseed rape freeze injury based on Chinese HJ remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    She, Bao; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Wang, Hong-bin; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    The winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) accounts for about 90% of the total acreage of oilseed rape in China. However, it suffers the risk of freeze injury during the winter. In this study, we used Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors, which have a revisit frequency of 2 d as well as 30 m spatial resolution, to monitor the freeze injury of oilseed rape. Mahalanobis distance-derived growing regions in a normal year were taken as the benchmark, and a mask method was applied to obtain the growing regions in the 2010-2011 growing season. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was chosen as the indicator of the degree of damage. The amount of crop damage was determined from the difference in the NDVI before and after the freeze. There was spatial variability in the amount of crop damage, so we examined three factors that may affect the degree of freeze injury: terrain, soil moisture, and crop growth before the freeze. The results showed that all these factors were significantly correlated with freeze injury degree (P<0.01, two-tailed). The damage was generally more serious in low-lying and drought-prone areas; in addition, oilseed rape planted on south- and west-oriented facing slopes and those with luxuriant growth status tended to be more susceptible to freeze injury. Furthermore, land surface temperature (LST) of the coldest day, soil moisture, pre-freeze growth and altitude were in descending order of importance in determining the degree of damage. The findings proposed in this paper would be helpful in understanding the occurrence and severity distribution of oilseed rape freeze injury under certain natural or vegetation conditions, and thus help in mitigation of this kind of meteorological disaster in southern China.

  19. Assessing winter oilseed rape freeze injury based on Chinese HJ remote sensing data*

    PubMed Central

    She, Bao; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Wang, Hong-bin; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) accounts for about 90% of the total acreage of oilseed rape in China. However, it suffers the risk of freeze injury during the winter. In this study, we used Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors, which have a revisit frequency of 2 d as well as 30 m spatial resolution, to monitor the freeze injury of oilseed rape. Mahalanobis distance-derived growing regions in a normal year were taken as the benchmark, and a mask method was applied to obtain the growing regions in the 2010–2011 growing season. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was chosen as the indicator of the degree of damage. The amount of crop damage was determined from the difference in the NDVI before and after the freeze. There was spatial variability in the amount of crop damage, so we examined three factors that may affect the degree of freeze injury: terrain, soil moisture, and crop growth before the freeze. The results showed that all these factors were significantly correlated with freeze injury degree (P<0.01, two-tailed). The damage was generally more serious in low-lying and drought-prone areas; in addition, oilseed rape planted on south- and west-oriented facing slopes and those with luxuriant growth status tended to be more susceptible to freeze injury. Furthermore, land surface temperature (LST) of the coldest day, soil moisture, pre-freeze growth and altitude were in descending order of importance in determining the degree of damage. The findings proposed in this paper would be helpful in understanding the occurrence and severity distribution of oilseed rape freeze injury under certain natural or vegetation conditions, and thus help in mitigation of this kind of meteorological disaster in southern China. PMID:25644468

  20. Assessing winter oilseed rape freeze injury based on Chinese HJ remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    She, Bao; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Wang, Hong-bin; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    The winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) accounts for about 90% of the total acreage of oilseed rape in China. However, it suffers the risk of freeze injury during the winter. In this study, we used Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors, which have a revisit frequency of 2 d as well as 30 m spatial resolution, to monitor the freeze injury of oilseed rape. Mahalanobis distance-derived growing regions in a normal year were taken as the benchmark, and a mask method was applied to obtain the growing regions in the 2010-2011 growing season. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was chosen as the indicator of the degree of damage. The amount of crop damage was determined from the difference in the NDVI before and after the freeze. There was spatial variability in the amount of crop damage, so we examined three factors that may affect the degree of freeze injury: terrain, soil moisture, and crop growth before the freeze. The results showed that all these factors were significantly correlated with freeze injury degree (P<0.01, two-tailed). The damage was generally more serious in low-lying and drought-prone areas; in addition, oilseed rape planted on south- and west-oriented facing slopes and those with luxuriant growth status tended to be more susceptible to freeze injury. Furthermore, land surface temperature (LST) of the coldest day, soil moisture, pre-freeze growth and altitude were in descending order of importance in determining the degree of damage. The findings proposed in this paper would be helpful in understanding the occurrence and severity distribution of oilseed rape freeze injury under certain natural or vegetation conditions, and thus help in mitigation of this kind of meteorological disaster in southern China. PMID:25644468

  1. Organic micropollutants in marine plastics debris from the open ocean and remote and urban beaches.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hisashi; Takada, Hideshige; Ogata, Yuko; Yamashita, Rei; Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Saha, Mahua; Kwan, Charita; Moore, Charles; Gray, Holly; Laursen, Duane; Zettler, Erik R; Farrington, John W; Reddy, Christopher M; Peacock, Emily E; Ward, Marc W

    2011-08-01

    To understand the spatial variation in concentrations and compositions of organic micropollutants in marine plastic debris and their sources, we analyzed plastic fragments (∼10 mm) from the open ocean and from remote and urban beaches. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alkylphenols and bisphenol A were detected in the fragments at concentrations from 1 to 10,000 ng/g. Concentrations showed large piece-to-piece variability. Hydrophobic organic compounds such as PCBs and PAHs were sorbed from seawater to the plastic fragments. PCBs are most probably derived from legacy pollution. PAHs showed a petrogenic signature, suggesting the sorption of PAHs from oil slicks. Nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and PBDEs came mainly from additives and were detected at high concentrations in some fragments both from remote and urban beaches and the open ocean. PMID:21719036

  2. Organic micropollutants in marine plastics debris from the open ocean and remote and urban beaches.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hisashi; Takada, Hideshige; Ogata, Yuko; Yamashita, Rei; Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Saha, Mahua; Kwan, Charita; Moore, Charles; Gray, Holly; Laursen, Duane; Zettler, Erik R; Farrington, John W; Reddy, Christopher M; Peacock, Emily E; Ward, Marc W

    2011-08-01

    To understand the spatial variation in concentrations and compositions of organic micropollutants in marine plastic debris and their sources, we analyzed plastic fragments (∼10 mm) from the open ocean and from remote and urban beaches. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alkylphenols and bisphenol A were detected in the fragments at concentrations from 1 to 10,000 ng/g. Concentrations showed large piece-to-piece variability. Hydrophobic organic compounds such as PCBs and PAHs were sorbed from seawater to the plastic fragments. PCBs are most probably derived from legacy pollution. PAHs showed a petrogenic signature, suggesting the sorption of PAHs from oil slicks. Nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and PBDEs came mainly from additives and were detected at high concentrations in some fragments both from remote and urban beaches and the open ocean.

  3. Organization and management of mass remotely sensed data for content-based retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qimin; Zhu, Guangxi

    2007-11-01

    Nowadays increasing attention has been paid to reasonable organization and effective management of vast amounts of remotely sensed data for the goal of quick browse, convenient query and Retrieval-on-Demand service. In this paper, in order to reach compromise among precision, efficiency and storage and to realize ROI coding, data partition based on Nona-tree data structure and data compression based on JPEG2000 are adopted to organize and manage original remotely sensed images. Afterwards, a prototype system in three-tier B/S mode is developed to test the validity of our data organization and management strategy for content-based retrieval mentioned above. In this system, texture-based and shape-based feature extraction algorithms based on wavelet transformation, math morphology and other relative theory are applied. Corresponding feature descriptor and similarity calculation are also given. At last, experimental results are given to show that the strategy proposed in this paper is valid, followed by brief conclusions and future directions. The work of this paper is useful to push the development of geo-spatial information services and promote content-based retrieval of remotely sensed images from experimentation to practicality.

  4. Prothrombin complex concentrate use in coagulopathy of lethal brain injuries increases organ donation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Aziz, Hassan; Pandit, Viraj; Hays, Daniel; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Wynne, Julie; O' Keeffe, Terence; Green, Donald J; Friese, Randall S; Gruessner, Rainer; Rhee, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Coagulopathy is a defined barrier for organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. The purpose of this study was to document our experience with the use of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to facilitate organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. We performed a 4-year retrospective analysis of all patients with devastating gunshot wounds to the brain. The data were analyzed for demographics, change in international normalized ratio (INR), and subsequent organ donation. The primary end point was organ donation. Eighty-eight patients with lethal traumatic brain injury were identified from the trauma registry of whom 13 were coagulopathic at the time of admission (mean INR 2.2 ± 0.8). Of these 13 patients, 10 patients received PCC in an effort to reverse their coagulopathy. Mean INR before PCC administration was 2.01 ± 0.7 and 1.1 ± 0.7 after administration (P < 0.006). Correction of coagulopathy was attained in 70 per cent (seven of 10) patients. Of these seven patients, consent for donation was obtained in six patients and resulted in 19 solid organs being procured. The cost of PCC per patient was $1022 ± 544. PCC effectively reveres coagulopathy associated with lethal traumatic brain injury and enabled patients to proceed to organ donation. Although various methodologies exist for the treatment of coagulopathy to facilitate organ donation, PCC provides a rapid and cost-effective therapy for reversal of coagulopathy in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries.

  5. Prothrombin complex concentrate use in coagulopathy of lethal brain injuries increases organ donation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Aziz, Hassan; Pandit, Viraj; Hays, Daniel; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Wynne, Julie; O' Keeffe, Terence; Green, Donald J; Friese, Randall S; Gruessner, Rainer; Rhee, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Coagulopathy is a defined barrier for organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. The purpose of this study was to document our experience with the use of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to facilitate organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. We performed a 4-year retrospective analysis of all patients with devastating gunshot wounds to the brain. The data were analyzed for demographics, change in international normalized ratio (INR), and subsequent organ donation. The primary end point was organ donation. Eighty-eight patients with lethal traumatic brain injury were identified from the trauma registry of whom 13 were coagulopathic at the time of admission (mean INR 2.2 ± 0.8). Of these 13 patients, 10 patients received PCC in an effort to reverse their coagulopathy. Mean INR before PCC administration was 2.01 ± 0.7 and 1.1 ± 0.7 after administration (P < 0.006). Correction of coagulopathy was attained in 70 per cent (seven of 10) patients. Of these seven patients, consent for donation was obtained in six patients and resulted in 19 solid organs being procured. The cost of PCC per patient was $1022 ± 544. PCC effectively reveres coagulopathy associated with lethal traumatic brain injury and enabled patients to proceed to organ donation. Although various methodologies exist for the treatment of coagulopathy to facilitate organ donation, PCC provides a rapid and cost-effective therapy for reversal of coagulopathy in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. PMID:24887662

  6. Biological and remote sensing perspectives of pigmentation in coral reef organisms.

    PubMed

    Hedley, John D; Mumby, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    Coral reef communities face unprecedented pressures on local, regional and global scales as a consequence of climate change and anthropogenic disturbance. Optical remote sensing, from satellites or aircraft, is possibly the only means of measuring the effects of such stresses at appropriately large spatial scales (many thousands of square kilometres). To map key variables such as coral community structure, percentages of living coral or percentages of dead coral, a remote sensing instrument must be able to distinguish the reflectance spectra (i.e. "spectral signature", reflected light as a function of wavelength) of each category. For biotic classes, reflectance is a complex function of pigmentation, structure and morphology. Studies of coral "colour" fall into two disparate but potentially complementary types. Firstly, biological studies tend to investigate the structure and significance of pigmentation in reef organisms. These studies often lack details that would be useful from a remote sensing perspective such as intraspecific variation in pigment concentration or the contribution of fluorescence to reflectance. Secondly, remote sensing studies take empirical measurements of spectra and seek wavelengths that discriminate benthic categories. Benthic categories used in remote sensing sometimes consist of species groupings that are biologically or spectrally inappropriate (e.g. merging of algal phyla with distinct pigments). Here, we attempt to bridge the gap between biological and remote sensing perspectives of pigmentation in reef taxa. The aim is to assess the extent to which spectral discrimination can be given a biological foundation, to reduce the ad hoc nature of discriminatory criteria, and to understand the fundamental (biological) limitations in the spectral separability of biotic classes. Sources of pigmentation in reef biota are reviewed together with remote sensing studies where spectral discrimination has been effectively demonstrated between benthic

  7. Role of Opioid Receptors Signaling in Remote Electrostimulation - Induced Protection against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Tsou, Meng-Ting; Wang, Hsiao-Ting; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our previous studies demonstrated that remote electro-stimulation (RES) increased myocardial GSK3 phosphorylation and attenuated ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. However, the role of various opioid receptors (OR) subtypes in preconditioned RES-induced myocardial protection remains unknown. We investigated the role of OR subtype signaling in RES-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury of the rat heart. Methods & Results Male Spraque-Dawley rats were used. RES was performed on median nerves area with/without pretreatment with various receptors antagonists such as opioid receptor (OR) subtype receptors (KOR, DOR, and MOR). The expressions of Akt, GSK3, and PKCε expression were analyzed by Western blotting. When RES was preconditioned before the I/R model, the rat's hemodynamic index, infarction size, mortality and serum CK-MB were evaluated. Our results showed that Akt, GSK3 and PKCε expression levels were significantly increased in the RES group compared to the sham group, which were blocked by pretreatment with specific antagonists targeting KOR and DOR, but not MOR subtype. Using the I/R model, the duration of arrhythmia and infarct size were both significantly attenuated in RES group. The mortality rates of the sham RES group, the RES group, RES group + KOR antagonist, RES group + DOR/MOR antagonists (KOR left), RES group + DOR antagonist, and RES group + KOR/MOR antagonists (DOR left) were 50%, 20%, 67%, 13%, 50% and 55%, respectively. Conclusion The mechanism of RES-induced myocardial protection against I/R injury seems to involve multiple target pathways such as Akt, KOR and/or DOR signaling. PMID:26430750

  8. Remotely operated organic liquid waste incinerator for the fuels and materials examination facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, W.L.; Barker, R.E.; Hershey, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The search for a practical method for the disposal of small quantities of oraganic liquid waste, a waste product of metallographic sample preparation at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility has led to the design of an incinerator/off-gas system to burn organic liquid wastes and selected organic solids. The incinerator is to be installed in a shielded inert-atmosphere cell, and will be remotely operated and maintained. The off-gas system is a wet-scrubber and filter system designed to release particulate-free off-gas to the FMEF Building Exhaust System.

  9. Overcoming the organization-practice barrier in sports injury prevention: A nonhierarchical organizational model.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Ö; Jacobsson, J; Timpka, T

    2015-08-01

    The organization of sports at the national level has seldom been included in scientific discussions of sports injury prevention. The aim of this study was to develop a model for organization of sports that supports prevention of overuse injuries. The quality function deployment technique was applied in seminars over a two-season period to develop a national organizational structure for athletics in Sweden that facilitates prevention of overuse injuries. Three central features of the resulting model for organization of sports at the national level are (a) diminishment of the organizational hierarchy: participatory safety policy design is introduced through annual meetings where actors from different sectors of the sporting community discuss training, injury prevention, and sports safety policy; (b) introduction of a safety surveillance system: a ubiquitous system for routine collection of injury and illness data; and (c) an open forum for discussion of safety issues: maintenance of a safety forum for participants from different sectors of the sport. A nonhierarchical model for organization of sports at the national level - facilitated by modern information technology - adapted for the prevention of overuse injuries has been developed. Further research is warranted to evaluate the new organizational model in prospective effectiveness studies.

  10. Organic Aerosols in Rural and Remote Atmospheric Environments: Insights from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Ulbrich, I.; Dunlea, E.; Decarlo, P.; Huffman, A.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Alfarra, R.; Canagaratna, M.; Onasch, T.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D.; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Shimono, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Drewnick, F.; Schneider, J.; Middlebrook, A.; Bahreini, R.; Cotrell, L.; Griffin, R.; Leaitch, R.; Li, S.; Hayden, K.; Rautiainen, J.

    2006-12-01

    Organic matter usually accounts for a large fraction of the fine particle mass in rural and remote atmospheres. However, little is known about the sources and properties of this material. Here we report findings on the characteristics and the major types of organic aerosols (OA) in urban downwind, high elevation, forested, and marine atmospheres based on analyses of more than 20 highly time resolved AMS datasets sampled from various locations in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere. Organic aerosol components are extracted from these datasets using a custom multiple component mass spectral analysis technique and the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) method. These components are evaluated according to their extracted mass spectra and correlations to aerosol species, such as sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon, and gas-phase tracer compounds, such as CO and NOx. We have identified a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) component similar in mass spectra to the hydrocarbon substances observed at urban locations. We have also identified several oxygenated OA (OOA) components that show different fragmentation patterns and oxygen to carbon ratios in their mass spectra. Two OOA components a highly oxygenated that has mass spectrum resembling that of fulvic acid (a model compound representative for highly processed/oxidized organics in the environment) and a less oxygenated OOA component, whose spectrum is dominated with ions that are mainly associated with carbonyls and alcohols, are very frequently observed at various rural/remote sites. The oxygenated OOA component is more prevalent at downwind sites influenced by urban transport and the less oxygenated shows correlation to biogenic chamber OA at some locations. Compared to the total OOA concentration, HOA is generally very small and accounts for < 10% of the total OA mass at rural/remote sites. The comparisons between the concentrations of HOA and primary OA (POA) that would be predicted according to inert

  11. The Protective Effect of Remote Renal Preconditioning Against Hippocampal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: Role of KATP Channels.

    PubMed

    Mehrjerdi, Fatemeh Zare; Aboutaleb, Nahid; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Ajami, Marjan; Khaksari, Mehdi; Safari, Fatemeh; Habibey, Rouhollah

    2015-12-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), which consists of several brief ischemia/reperfusion applied at the remote site of lethal ischemia reperfusion, can, through activating different mechanisms, increase the ability of the body's endogenous protection against prolonged ischemia/reperfusion. Recent studies have shown that RIPC has neuroprotective effects, but its mechanisms are not well elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether activation of KATP channels in remote renal preconditioning decreases hippocampus damage induced by global cerebral ischemia. RIPC was induced by ischemia of the left renal artery (IPC); 24 h later, global cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) was induced by common carotid arteries occlusion. 5hydroxydecanoate (5HD) and glibenclamide (Gli) were injected before of IPC. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and catalase (CAT) activity were assessed in hippocampus. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was assessed to detect apoptotic cells in hippocampus. RIPC inhibited apoptosis by decreasing positive TUNEL cells (P < 0.05). KATP channels blocking with 5HD and Gli markedly increased apoptosis in hippocampal cells in RIPC group (P < 0.001). RIPC decreased MDA level and increased CAT activity in ischemic hippocampus (P < 0.01). Also, 5HD and Gli inhibited the effect of RIPC on MDA level and CAT activity (P < 0.05). The present study shows that RIPC can effectively attenuate programmed cell death, increase activity of CAT, and reduce MDA levels. Blocking of KATP channels inhibited the protective effects of RIPC. PMID:26254913

  12. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  13. [Female homicides involving deep injuries to sexual organs].

    PubMed

    Konopka, Tomasz; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Kunz, Jerzy; Fraczek, Dagna; Kozioł, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    In a search for motives that drive perpetrators of sexual homicides who perforate the vagina of a victim, an analysis was performed of such cases referred to the Krakow Department of Forensic Medicine. In the period 1981-2006, nine cases of this type were examined. In one instance, a forensic sexologist found evidence of sadism; similar observations were made in another three cases, where no perpetrator was determined. In four cases, in the course of sexual practices termed fisting, the perpetrator tore the vagina with his hand and inflicted extensive injuries within the abdominal cavity. In three of these cases, the intercourse was consensual, with the victim deeply intoxicated, while in the fourth instance, an inebriated perpetrator took advantage of the victim's infirmity. In a single case, vaginal tears were an effect of acute alcohol psychosis in the offender.

  14. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Diabetics Receiving Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Balbir Singh, Gillian; Ann, Soe Hee; Park, Jongha; Chung, Hyun Chul; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Eun-Sook; Choi, Jung Il; Lee, Jiho; Kim, Shin-Jae; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) induces transient episodes of ischemia by the occlusion of blood flow in non-target tissue, before a subsequent ischemia-reperfusion injury. When RIPC is applied before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the kidneys may be protected against ischemia-reperfusion injury and subsequently contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RIPC for the prevention of CI-AKI in patients with diabetes with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing elective PCI. Methods This randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study enrolled patients with diabetes scheduled for elective PCI with eGFR ≤60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or urinary albumin creatinine ratio of >300 mg/g to receive either RIPC or the sham ischemic preconditioning. Results One hundred and two patients (68.9 ± 8.2 years old, 47.1% men) were included. Baseline eGFR, creatinine and serum NGAL was similar between RIPC and control groups (48.5 ± 12 ml/min vs. 46.6 ± 10 ml/min, p = 0.391; 1.42 ± 0.58 mg/dl vs. 1.41 ± 0.34 mg/dl, p = 0.924; and 136.0 ± 45.0 ng/ml vs. 137.6 ± 43.3 ng/ml, p = 0.961, respectively). CI-AKI occurred in 13.7% (14/102) of the total subjects, with both RIPC and control groups having an equal incidence of 13.7% (7/51). No significant differences were seen in creatinine, NGAL, cardiac enzymes (troponin T, CKMB) and hs-CRP between the groups post-procedure. Conclusions In this study, RIPC applied prior to elective PCI was not effective in preventing CI-AKI in patients with diabetes with pre-existing CKD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02329444 PMID:27723839

  15. Quantitative retrieving of soil organic matter using field spectrometer and hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Luo; Liu, Yaolin; Chen, Jie; Hu, Changji; Wu, Jian

    2008-12-01

    As the important component of soil, soil organic matter not only provides every nutrient element for crop, but also has determinant effect for forming of soil structure and melioration the soil physical character. Mapping and dating soil organic matter is of great importance in soil use and evaluation. In this study we examine the feasibility of soil organic matter content by using Hyperspectrally reflective remote sensing methodology. This technique was tested in Xiaochang County located in Hubei province. The soil reflectance properties of samples were measured in the laboratory by ASD field spectrometer. The correlation analysis related with organic matter content was processed from three factors: the spectral reflectance parameter ((lgρ)', ρ/ ρ450-750 and (1/lgρ623)'/ (1/lgρ564)'). The results show that the correlation coefficients of r values were: organic matter identification index (ρ/ ρ450-750) > logarithmic first derivative of reflectivity ((lgρ)') > organic matter mix identification index ((1/lgρ623)'/(1/lgρ564)'). Knowing these correlations we were able to use the best prominence correlation of organic matter identification index of 1850nm wavelength as the variable regression to build up statistical regression analysis. We used five model types (Linear Function, Logarithmic Function, Quadratic Function, Power Function and Exponential Function) to forecast the soil organic matter content Hyperion model. The accuracy assessment (R2= 0.8484) by relating forecasted organic matter values with Quadratic Function regression showed that the model is reliable and significantly correlative with known stabilization processes throughout the study area. The quantitative methodology developed in this study for refutations soil organic matter content can be adapted to other regions throughout the world.

  16. The Expression implication of GDNF in ventral horn and associated remote cortex in rhesus monkeys with hemisected spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, De-Lu; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can effectively promote axonal regeneration, limit axonal retraction, and produce a statistically significant improvement in motor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the role in primate animals with SCI is not fully cognized. Materials and Methods: 18 healthy juvenile rhesuses were divided randomly into six groups, observed during the periods of 24 hr, 7 days, 14 days, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months after T11 hemisecting. The GDNF localization, changes in the injured region, and the remote associate cortex were detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results: Immunohistochemical staining showed that GDNF was located in the cytoplasm and the neurite of the neurons. Following SCI, the number of GDNF positive neurons in the ventral horn and the caudal part near the lesion area were apparently reduced at detected time points (P<0.05). Moreover, the number in the rostral part of the ventral horn in 7 day, 14 day, and 1 month groups were fewer than those in the caudal part. Importantly, in the contralateral cortex motor area, the positive neurons decreased sharply after hemi-SCI, while gradually increased and went back to normal in 3 months after hemi-SCI. Conclusion: To sum up, GDNF disruption in neurons occurred after SCI especially in cortex motor area. Intrinsic GDNF in the spinal cord, plays an essential role in neuroplasticity. Thereafter extrinsic GDNF supplementing may be a useful strategy to promote recovery after SCI. PMID:27803784

  17. Remote-controlled eradication of astrogliosis in spinal cord injury via electromagnetically-induced dexamethasone release from "smart" nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen; Borgens, Richard Ben

    2015-08-10

    We describe a system to deliver drugs to selected tissues continuously, if required, for weeks. Drugs can be released remotely inside the small animals using pre-implanted, novel vertically aligned electromagnetically-sensitive polypyrrole nanowires (PpyNWs). Approximately 1-2mm(2) dexamethasone (DEX) doped PpyNWs was lifted on a single drop of sterile water by surface tension, and deposited onto a spinal cord lesion in glial fibrillary acidic protein-luc transgenic mice (GFAP-luc mice). Overexpression of GFAP is an indicator of astrogliosis/neuroinflammation in CNS injury. The corticosteroid DEX, a powerful ameliorator of inflammation, was released from the polymer by external application of an electromagnetic field for 2h/day for a week. The GFAP signal, revealed by bioluminescent imaging in the living animal, was significantly reduced in treated animals. At 1week, GFAP was at the edge of detection, and in some experimental animals, completely eradicated. We conclude that the administration of drugs can be controlled locally and non-invasively, opening the door to many other known therapies, such as the cases that dexamethasone cannot be safely applied systemically in large concentrations. PMID:25979326

  18. Spatial And Temporal Trends Of Organic Pollutants In Vegetation From Remote And Rural Areas.

    PubMed

    Bartrons, Mireia; Catalan, Jordi; Penuelas, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) used in agricultural, industrial, and domestic applications are widely distributed and bioaccumulate in food webs, causing adverse effects to the biosphere. A review of published data for 1977-2015 for a wide range of vegetation around the globe indicates an extensive load of pollutants in vegetation. On a global perspective, the accumulation of POPs and PAHs in vegetation depends on the industrialization history across continents and distance to emission sources, beyond organism type and climatic variables. International regulations initially reduced the concentrations of POPs in vegetation in rural areas, but concentrations of HCB, HCHs, and DDTs at remote sites did not decrease or even increased over time, pointing to a remobilization of POPs from source areas to remote sites. The concentrations of compounds currently in use, PBDEs and PAHs, are still increasing in vegetation. Differential congener specific accumulation is mostly determined by continent-in accordance to the different regulations of HCHs, PCBs and PBDEs in different countries-and by plant type (PAHs). These results support a concerning general accumulation of toxic pollutants in most ecosystems of the globe that for some compounds is still far from being mitigated in the near future. PMID:27146722

  19. Spatial And Temporal Trends Of Organic Pollutants In Vegetation From Remote And Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Bartrons, Mireia; Catalan, Jordi; Penuelas, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) used in agricultural, industrial, and domestic applications are widely distributed and bioaccumulate in food webs, causing adverse effects to the biosphere. A review of published data for 1977–2015 for a wide range of vegetation around the globe indicates an extensive load of pollutants in vegetation. On a global perspective, the accumulation of POPs and PAHs in vegetation depends on the industrialization history across continents and distance to emission sources, beyond organism type and climatic variables. International regulations initially reduced the concentrations of POPs in vegetation in rural areas, but concentrations of HCB, HCHs, and DDTs at remote sites did not decrease or even increased over time, pointing to a remobilization of POPs from source areas to remote sites. The concentrations of compounds currently in use, PBDEs and PAHs, are still increasing in vegetation. Differential congener specific accumulation is mostly determined by continent—in accordance to the different regulations of HCHs, PCBs and PBDEs in different countries—and by plant type (PAHs). These results support a concerning general accumulation of toxic pollutants in most ecosystems of the globe that for some compounds is still far from being mitigated in the near future. PMID:27146722

  20. Sleep deprivation-induced multi-organ injury: role of oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Srinivasan; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Fu, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation affects all aspects of health. Adverse health effects by sleep deviation are still underestimated and undervalued in clinical practice and, to a much greater extent in monitoring human health. We hypothesized that sleep deprivation-induced mild organ injuries; oxidative stress and inflammation might play a crucial role in inducing multi-organ injury. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 6-7) were sleep-deprived for 0-72 h using a modified multiple platform boxes method. Blood and tissue were collected. Liver, heart, kidney, lung, and pancreatic injuries were evaluated using biochemical and histological analyses. Glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), total billirubin (TBIL), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), creatine phosphokinase-myocardial band (CKMB), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine (CRE), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were assayed in blood. Malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were measured. Histology revealed mild-to-moderate liver and lung injury in sleep-deprived mice. Sleep-deprived mice had significantly higher GOT, GPT, TBIL, CPK, CKMB, LDH, BUN, and α-amylase (AMYL) levels, which indicated liver, heart, kidney, and pancreatic injuries. Serum IL-1β at 24 h and IL-6 at 72 h were significantly higher in sleep-deprived than in control mice. Hepatic TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly higher, but IL-6 significantly lower in mice that had been sleep-deprived for 72 h. Sleep deprivation-mediated inflammation may be associated with mild to moderate multi-organ damage in mice. The implication of this study indicates sleep deprivation in humans may induce multi-organ injury that negatively affects cardiovascular and gastrointestinal health. PMID:26648820

  1. Sleep deprivation-induced multi-organ injury: role of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Srinivasan; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Fu, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation affects all aspects of health. Adverse health effects by sleep deviation are still underestimated and undervalued in clinical practice and, to a much greater extent in monitoring human health. We hypothesized that sleep deprivation-induced mild organ injuries; oxidative stress and inflammation might play a crucial role in inducing multi-organ injury. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 6-7) were sleep-deprived for 0-72 h using a modified multiple platform boxes method. Blood and tissue were collected. Liver, heart, kidney, lung, and pancreatic injuries were evaluated using biochemical and histological analyses. Glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), total billirubin (TBIL), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), creatine phosphokinase-myocardial band (CKMB), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine (CRE), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were assayed in blood. Malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were measured. Histology revealed mild-to-moderate liver and lung injury in sleep-deprived mice. Sleep-deprived mice had significantly higher GOT, GPT, TBIL, CPK, CKMB, LDH, BUN, and α-amylase (AMYL) levels, which indicated liver, heart, kidney, and pancreatic injuries. Serum IL-1β at 24 h and IL-6 at 72 h were significantly higher in sleep-deprived than in control mice. Hepatic TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly higher, but IL-6 significantly lower in mice that had been sleep-deprived for 72 h. Sleep deprivation-mediated inflammation may be associated with mild to moderate multi-organ damage in mice. The implication of this study indicates sleep deprivation in humans may induce multi-organ injury that negatively affects cardiovascular and gastrointestinal health. PMID:26648820

  2. Cardiac injury after 10 gy total body irradiation: indirect role of effects on abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Lam, Vy; Jensen, Eric; Fish, Brian L; Su, Jidong; Koprowski, Stacy; Komorowski, Richard A; Harmann, Leanne; Migrino, Raymond Q; Li, X Allen; Hopewell, John W; Moulder, John E; Baker, John E

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced injury to the heart after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) is direct or indirect. Young male WAG/RijCmcr rats received a 10 Gy single dose using TBI, upper hemi-body (UHB) irradiation, lower hemi-body (LHB) irradiation, TBI with the kidneys shielded or LHB irradiation with the intestines shielded. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. The lipid profile, kidney injury, heart and liver morphology and cardiac function were determined up to 120 days after irradiation. LHB, but not UHB irradiation, increased the risk factors for cardiac disease as well as the occurrence of cardiac and kidney injury in a way that was quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that observed after TBI. Shielding of the kidneys prevented the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease. Shielding of the intestines did not prevent the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease. There was no histological evidence of liver injury 120 days after irradiation. Injury to the heart from irradiation appears to be indirect, supporting the notion that injury to abdominal organs, principally the kidneys, is responsible for the increased risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after TBI and LHB irradiation.

  3. Aerosol water soluble organic nitrogen and carbon over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Liam; Baker, Alex; Jickels, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting or co-limiting nutrient in large parts of the world's oceans particularly in oligotrophic regions such as gyres. In the open ocean there are two pathways by which new nutrient nitrogen can enter the oligotrophic system: biological nitrogen fixation and atmospheric deposition. Aerosol matter contributes to the latter route via dry and wet deposition, therefore it is important to understand and quantify the nitrogen containing material in aerosols and establish its major sources. Until recently, the organic nitrogen component of aerosol nitrogen was largely ignored, however, it is now known to contribute between 25-30 % of total water soluble nitrogen in aerosols, globally. This organic nitrogen is known to be chemically complex, shows high spatial and temporal variability and a large proportion of it has been shown to be bioavailable. It is important that this material is further quantified and characterised (including its carbon component) to determine its biogeochemical impact. Data gathered from fine and coarse mode aerosol samples collected on three Atlantic cruises (AMT21, AMT22 and ANT26-4) will be presented. Bulk and water soluble organic carbon and nitrogen data will be shown alongside major ion and inorganic nitrogen data. Potential sources of organic nitrogen and carbon material will be evaluated using a combination of inter-component correlations with known tracers and air-parcel back trajectories, allowing estimates of the anthropogenic impact on nutrient deposition to the remote Atlantic Ocean to be made.

  4. Hollow-organ perforation following thoracolumbar spinal injuries of fall from height

    PubMed Central

    Yudoyono, Farid; Dahlan, Rully Hanafi; Tjahjono, Firman Priguna; Imron, Akhmad; Arifin, Muhammad Zafrullah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spinal trauma is the cause of high mortality and morbidity, the fall from height as mechanism that can cause a wide variety of lesions, associated both with the direct impact on the ground and with the deceleration. In such fall cases greater heights and higher mortality are involved. Presentation of case We report the successful management of life-threatening hollow-organ perforation following thoracolumbar spinal injury. Discussion Perforation of the hollow-organ in the setting of thoracolumbar trauma may delay the diagnosis and can have devastating consequences. Conclusions This case supports the recommendation for neurosurgeon in the setting of thoracolumbar injury that perforation of the hollow-organ can have devastating consequences. It is vital to achieve an early diagnosis to improve survival rate. PMID:25967553

  5. Remote Stabilization of Copper Paddlewheel Based Molecular Building Blocks in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Cai, Rong; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Hogan, Adam; Nugent, Patrick; Williams, Kia; Wojtas, Lukasz; Luebke, Ryan; Weseliinski, Lukasz J.; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Space, Brian; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Shi, Xiaodong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-08-21

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu₂(O₂C-)₄], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu₃O(N4–x(CH)xC-)₃] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1.

  6. Long-range atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to remote lacustrine environments.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Fernández, Ana Carolina; Ontiveros-Cuadras, Jorge Feliciano; Sericano, José L; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Liong Wee Kwong, Laval; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Pérez-Bernal, Libia Hascibe; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2014-09-15

    Concentrations, temporal trends and fluxes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs: PAHs, PCBs and PBDEs) were determined in soil and (210)Pb-dated sediment cores from remote lacustrine environments (El Tule and Santa Elena lakes) in rural areas of Central Mexico. In both areas, the concentrations of target analytes in soil and sediment samples were comparable and indicative of slightly contaminated environments. The prevalence of low-molecular-weight PAHs in soils suggested their mainly atmospheric origin, in contrast to the aquatic sediments where runoff contribution was also significant. Increasing contamination trends of PCBs and PBDEs were evident, showing maximum fluxes of 4.8 ± 2.1 and 0.3 ± 0.1 ng cm(-2) a(-1) for PCBs and PBDEs, respectively. The predominance of lower-brominated PBDEs and lower-chlorinated PCBs in soils and sediments indicated that their presence is mostly due to long-range atmospheric transport. PMID:24971459

  7. Remote sensing capacity of Raman spectroscopy in identification of mineral and organic constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Stoker, Carol; Cabrol, Nathalie; McKay, Christopher P.

    2007-09-01

    We present design, integration and test results for a field Raman spectrometer science payload, integrated into the Mars Analog Research and Technology (MARTE) drilling platform. During the drilling operation, the subsurface Raman spectroscopy inspection system has obtained signatures of organic and mineral compositions. We also performed ground truth studies using both this field unit and a laboratory micro Raman spectrometer equipped with multiple laser excitation wavelengths on series of field samples including Mojave rocks, Laguna Verde salty sediment and Rio Tinto topsoil. We have evaluated laser excitation conditions and optical probe designs for further improvement. We have demonstrated promising potential for Raman spectroscopy as a non-destructive in situ, high throughput, subsurface detection technique, as well as a desirable active remote sensing tool for future planetary and space missions.

  8. Caspase-3–Dependent Organ Apoptosis Early After Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzuka, Kunitaro; Rosenberg, Jason J.; Gaines, Gregory C.; Edwards, Carl K.; Clare-Salzler, Michael; MacKay, Sally L. D.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mozingo, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine the role played by endotoxin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and caspase-3 in the increased apoptosis seen in solid organs in the early period after a burn injury. Summary Background Data Burn injury is often associated with immune suppression. Bacterial translocation and systemic endotoxemia have been reported after a burn injury, and caspase-3 activation due to TNF-α and Fas ligand (FasL) are presumed to initiate apoptosis. We hypothesized that endotoxin-induced TNF-α expression and caspase-3 activation could be the stimulus for the apoptosis after burn injury. Methods A 20% full-thickness scald burn was used in C57BL/6 mice. Three hours after burn injury, tissue samples were obtained from the thymus, lung, liver, and spleen. Lipopolysaccharide-nonresponsive (C3H/HeJ) and TNFα null B6x129tnf−/− mice were also used. To detect apoptosis, hematoxylin and eosin stain, in situTUNEL, DNA extraction, and gel electrophoresis were all performed. Caspase-3 activity and TNF-α and FasL mRNA were also measured. Results Increased apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were observed in the thymus and spleen 3 hours after burn injury but were not seen in liver or lung. In the thymus and spleen, increased expression of FasL mRNA was also observed, whereas increased TNF-α mRNA was not. Increased apoptosis in thymus and spleen were also observed in C3H/HeJ and B6x129tnf−/− mice after burn injury. An inhibitor of the caspase-3 (Z-VAD-fmk) reduced apoptosis in both thymus and spleen. Conclusions In the early period after a burn injury, increased apoptosis is observed primarily in the lymphoid organs and is independent of endotoxin or TNF-α. The increased caspase-3 activity in thymus and spleen contributes to apoptosis in these organs. PMID:10363899

  9. Remote detection and mapping of organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere using ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Nixon, Conor A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Palmer, Maureen; Mumma, Michael J.; Molter, Edward; Teanby, Nicholas; Irwin, Patrick GJ; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Serigano, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Titan is the largest moon of Saturn, with a thick (1.45 bar) atmosphere composed primarily of molecular nitrogen and methane. Atmospheric photochemistry results in the production of a wide range of complex organic molecules, including hydrocarbons, nitriles, aromatics and species of possible pre-biotic relevance. Studies of Titan's atmospheric chemistry thus provide a unique opportunity to explore the origin and evolution of complex organic matter in a primitive (terrestrial) planetary atmosphere. Underpinned by laboratory measurements, remote and in-situ observations of hydrocarbons, nitriles and oxygen-bearing species provide important new insights in this regard. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new facility, well suited to the study of molecular emission from Titan's upper and middle-atmosphere. This presentation will focus on results from our ongoing studies of Titan using ALMA during the period 2012-2014, including detection and mapping of rotational emission lines from molecules including HNC, CO, HC3N, CH3CN, C2H3CN and C2H5CN, as well minor isotopologues. Possible chemical formation pathways for these species will be discussed, and the the scope for improved understanding of non-aqueous organic chemistry through laboratory experiments and atmospheric/liquid-phase simulations under Titan-like conditions will be examined.

  10. Single Pulse Remote Raman Detection of Minerals and Organics Under Illuminated Condition from 10 Meters Distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.

    2005-01-01

    A directly coupled portable remote Raman instrument developed by the University of Hawaii has been shown here to identify several minerals, chemicals and organics from a distance of 10 m using a single laser pulse in a well illuminated background. Raman spectra, obtained during a very short period of time, of common minerals e.g., dolomite, calcite, marble, barite, gypsum, quarts, rutile, fluorapatite etc. clearly show Raman features which could be used as fingerprints for mineral identification. Raman features of organics such as benzene, cyclohexane, 2-propanol, naphthalene, etc. and other chemicals containing various functional groups like oxides, silicates, sulphates, nitrates, phosphates and carbonates were also easily detected. Ability to measure Raman spectra with a single laser pulse would be promising for future space missions where power consumption is critical and a rapid survey of the minerals with moderate to high Raman cross section might be desirable for selecting rocks that would provide high scientific return or for acquiring rocks for sample return to the Earth.

  11. Organic contaminants in western pond turtles in remote habitat in California.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erik; Eskew, Evan A; Chibwe, Leah; Schrlau, Jill; Massey Simonich, Staci L; Todd, Brian D

    2016-07-01

    Remote aquatic ecosystems are exposed to an assortment of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) originating from current and historic uses, of local and global origin. Here, a representative suite of 57 current- and historic-use pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were surveyed in the plasma of the western pond turtle (Emys marmorata) and their potential prey items and habitat. California study sites included Sequoia National Park, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, and Six Rivers National Forest. Each was downstream of undeveloped watersheds and varied in distance from agricultural and urban pollution sources. SOCs were detected frequently in all sites with more found in turtle plasma and aquatic macroinvertebrates in the two sites closest to agricultural and urban sources. Summed PCBs were highest in Whiskeytown National Recreation Area turtle plasma (mean; 1.56 ng/g ww) compared to plasma from Sequoia National Park (0.16 ng/g ww; p = 0.002) and Six Rivers National Forest (0.07 ng/g ww; p = 0.001). While no current-use pesticides were detected in turtle plasma at any site, both current- and historic-use pesticides were found prominently in sediment and macroinvertebrates at the Sequoia National Park site, which is immediately downwind of Central Valley agriculture. SOC classes associated with urban and industrial pollution were found more often and at higher concentrations at Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. These findings demonstrate a range of SOC exposure in a turtle species with current and proposed conservation status and shed additional light on the fate of environmental contaminants in remote watersheds.

  12. Organic contaminants in western pond turtles in remote habitat in California.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erik; Eskew, Evan A; Chibwe, Leah; Schrlau, Jill; Massey Simonich, Staci L; Todd, Brian D

    2016-07-01

    Remote aquatic ecosystems are exposed to an assortment of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) originating from current and historic uses, of local and global origin. Here, a representative suite of 57 current- and historic-use pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were surveyed in the plasma of the western pond turtle (Emys marmorata) and their potential prey items and habitat. California study sites included Sequoia National Park, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, and Six Rivers National Forest. Each was downstream of undeveloped watersheds and varied in distance from agricultural and urban pollution sources. SOCs were detected frequently in all sites with more found in turtle plasma and aquatic macroinvertebrates in the two sites closest to agricultural and urban sources. Summed PCBs were highest in Whiskeytown National Recreation Area turtle plasma (mean; 1.56 ng/g ww) compared to plasma from Sequoia National Park (0.16 ng/g ww; p = 0.002) and Six Rivers National Forest (0.07 ng/g ww; p = 0.001). While no current-use pesticides were detected in turtle plasma at any site, both current- and historic-use pesticides were found prominently in sediment and macroinvertebrates at the Sequoia National Park site, which is immediately downwind of Central Valley agriculture. SOC classes associated with urban and industrial pollution were found more often and at higher concentrations at Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. These findings demonstrate a range of SOC exposure in a turtle species with current and proposed conservation status and shed additional light on the fate of environmental contaminants in remote watersheds. PMID:27060641

  13. Temporary arterial stenting in a full-house spaghetti wrist injury in a remote rural setting: benefit for hand perfusion or risk of increased morbidity?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Stefan; Savundra, James

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of temporary arterial plastic tube stenting of the ulnar and radial artery in a complete spaghetti wrist injury in a remote rural setting. Exploration in a specialist centre 18 h postinjury revealed that the tubes were clotted off with adjacent thrombi but hand perfusion was maintained. Intimal damage required vein grafting of both arteries 24 h postinjury. Hand perfusion was not compromised at follow-up. This case highlights that arterial hand perfusion can be maintained without the ulnar and radial artery. Arterial manipulation and tube insertion outside a specialist centre bears the risk of increased morbidity and potential microembolism and must therefore not be attempted.

  14. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β attenuates organ injury and dysfunction associated with liver ischemia-reperfusion and thermal injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Joao; Figueira, Maria-Eduardo; Barateiro, Andreia; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Pinto, Rui; Freitas, Marisa; Fernandes, Eduarda; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Sepodes, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a serine-threonine kinase discovered decades ago to have an important role in glycogen metabolism. Today, we know that this kinase is involved in the regulation of many cell functions, including insulin signaling, specification of cell fate during embryonic development, and the control of cell division and apoptosis. Insulin and TDZD-8 (4-benzyl-2-methyl-1,2,4-thiadiazolidine-3,5-dione) are inhibitors of GSK-3β that have been shown to possess organ-protective effects in inflammatory-mediated organ injury models. We aimed to evaluate the cytoprotective effect of GSK-3β inhibition on rat models of liver ischemia-reperfusion and thermal injury. In the liver ischemia-reperfusion model, TDZD-8 and insulin were administered at 5 mg/kg (i.v.) and 1.4 IU/kg (i.v.), respectively, 30 min before induction of ischemia and led to the significant reduction of the serum concentration of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Beneficial effects were found to be independent from blood glucose levels. In the thermal injury model, TDZD-8 was administered at 5 mg/kg (i.v.) 5 min before induction of injury and significantly reduced multiple organ dysfunction markers (liver, neuromuscular, and lung). In the lung, TDZD-8 reduced the histological signs of tissue injury, inflammatory markers (cytokines), and neutrophil chemotaxis/infiltration; reduced GSK-3β, nuclear factor-κB, and Akt activation; reduced caspase-3 and metalloproteinase-9 activation. Our study provides a new insight on the beneficial effects of GSK-3β inhibition on systemic inflammation and further elucidates the mechanism and pathway crosstalks by which TDZD-8 reduces the multiple organ injury elicited by thermal injury.

  15. Aberrant reflexes and function of the pelvic organs following spinal cord injury in man.

    PubMed

    Craggs, Michael D; Balasubramaniam, Amirthe Vernie; Chung, Eric A L; Emmanuel, Anton V

    2006-06-30

    Spinal cord injuries can be devastating on quality of life and lost opportunities due to their impact on bladder, bowel and sexual functions. Supra-sacral spinal lesions can cause incontinence by interrupting those pathways, which normally coordinate the bladder, bowel and sphincters. From a scientific perspective, neural control of the pelvic organs is one of the most intriguing in the body, involving both somatic and autonomic pathways participating in an exquisitely fine integration of lumbo-sacral reflexes. This review details the interactions of somatic and autonomic lumbo-sacral pathways responsible for coordinating the bladder and sphincters, the nature of their aberration post-injury and those aspects of neural control of the pelvic organs that are amenable to neurophysiological examination in man. It will focus in greater detail on how measurement of pelvic floor and sphincter reflexes can be used to assess the modulatory effects of sacral autonomic pathways on sacral somatic reflexes and vice versa including the so called "guarding reflex" and vesical inhibitory reflexes. The effects of volitional modulation of these reflexes will be discussed in relation to people with both complete and incomplete lesions. Finally the possible utility of such neurophysiological measures for complementing the established neurological classification and the assessment of somatic sensory-motor impairment in spinal cord injury will be discussed.

  16. The effect of taurine on mesenteric blood flow and organ injury in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Sevgili, A M; Akbiyik, F; Atilla, P; Cakar, N; Balkanci, Z D; Iskit, A B; Guc, M O

    2008-08-01

    Endotoxin decreases mesenteric blood flow and inflicts organ injury via free radicals. We investigated whether taurine, an endogenous antioxidant and vasodilator, could attenuate the deleterious effects of endotoxin in a mouse model of sepsis. Swiss albino mice were allocated into four groups and treated either with taurine (150 mg/kg, i.p. at 0(th), 8(th), 16(th) h) or its solvent sterile saline (NaCl 0.9%, w/v) while E. coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or its solvent saline were also given at 8(th) h. At 24(th) h the animals were anaesthetized and the mesenteric blood flow was measured by using perivascular ultrasonic Doppler-flowmeter. The animals were then exsanguinated, the spleen, liver, and kidneys were isolated for histopathological examination. Thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), glutathione, and myeloperoxidase activity were determined in the liver samples. Endotoxin significantly decreased the mesenteric blood flow and glutathione levels in liver while TBARS and myeloperoxidase activity were increased. However, taurine did not block the deleterious effects of endotoxin nor it did attenuate the histopathological injury. Therefore, we concluded that endotoxin-induced organ injury via free radicals is resistant to blockade by taurine. PMID:18163178

  17. Organ-Protective Effects of Red Wine Extract, Resveratrol, in Oxidative Stress-Mediated Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol extracted from red wine, possesses potential antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, including the reduction of free radicals and proinflammatory mediators overproduction, the alteration of the expression of adhesion molecules, and the inhibition of neutrophil function. A growing body of evidence indicates that resveratrol plays an important role in reducing organ damage following ischemia- and hemorrhage-induced reperfusion injury. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in decreasing the formation and reaction of reactive oxygen species and pro-nflammatory cytokines, as well as the mediation of a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, including the nitric oxide synthase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, deacetylase sirtuin 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha, hemeoxygenase-1, and estrogen receptor-related pathways. Reperfusion injury is a complex pathophysiological process that involves multiple factors and pathways. The resveratrol is an effective reactive oxygen species scavenger that exhibits an antioxidative property. In this review, the organ-protective effects of resveratrol in oxidative stress-related reperfusion injury will be discussed. PMID:26161238

  18. Analysis and modeling of space-time organization of remotely sensed soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Dyi-Huey

    The characterization and modeling of the spatial variability of soil moisture is an important problem for various hydrological, ecological, and atmospheric processes. A compact representation of interdependencies among soil moisture distribution, mean soil moisture, soil properties and topography is necessary. This study attempts to provide such a compact representation using two complimentary approaches. In the first approach, we develop a stochastic framework to evaluate the influence of spatial variability in topography and soil physical properties, and mean soil moisture on the spatial distribution of soil moisture. Topography appears to have dominant control on soil moisture distribution when the area is dominated by coarse-texture soil or by mixed soil with small correlation scale for topography (i.e., small lambdaZ). Second, soil properties is likely to have dominant control on soil moisture distribution for fine-texture soil or for mixed soil with large lambda Z. Finally, both topography and soil properties appear to have similar control for medium-texture soil with moderate value of lambda Z. In the second approach, we explore the recent developments in Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to develop nonparametric space-time relationships between soil moisture and readily available remotely sensed surface variables. We have used remotely sensed brightness temperature data in a single drying cycle from Washita '92 Experiment and two different ANN architectures (Feed-Forward Neural Network (FFNN), Self Organizing Map (SOM)) to classify soil types into three categories. The results show that FFNN yield better classification accuracy (about 80%) than SOM (about 70% accuracy). Our attempt to classify soil types into more than three categories resulted in about 50% accuracy when a FFNN was used and even lesser accuracy when a SOM was used. To classify soil into more than three groups and to explore the limits of classification accuracy, this study suggests the use of

  19. Cell-based therapy for acute organ injury: preclinical evidence and ongoing clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver, or brain. Genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of promitotic, antiapoptotic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, the authors review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. (ANESTHESIOLOGY 2014; 121:1099-121).

  20. Biological effects of weak blast waves and safety limits for internal organ injury in the human body.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Wang, Z; Tang, C; Ying, Y

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventeen adult sheep of both sexes, each weighing 15.2-42.4 kg, were used for this study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of the physical parameters of the waves to internal organ injury by exposing sheep to weak blast waves in TNT (trinitrotoluene) explosions, biological shock tube, and gun muzzle blasts. The results showed that the organ most sensitive to the TNT explosion was the lungs, whereas the upper respiratory tract was most sensitive to muzzle blast waves. The injury thresholds of overpressure were 29.0, 29.5, and 41.2 kPa for upper respiratory tract, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract respectively at a single exposure. Repeated exposure to 60 blasts reduced the injury threshold of the internal organs. The injury thresholds for upper respiratory tract, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract were 21.0, 18.0, and 40.4 kPa, respectively. The duration of overpressure of weak blast waves was 2.4-4.2 milliseconds, which did not significantly affect the severity of injury. The safety limits of weak blast waves to internal organ injury of human body were as follows: Ps = 37-3Ln.Tc.N/4(Tc.N < or = 1000) and Ps = 20.4(Tc.N > 1000). The results suggest that repeated exposures decrease the injury threshold of the internal organs. The safety limits proposed could protect 90% of the exposed population against internal organ injury caused by weak blast waves. PMID:8606431

  1. Changes in susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced liver injury by the organic anion indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Silva, V M; Chen, C; Hennig, G E; Whiteley, H E; Manautou, J E

    2001-03-01

    The non-metabolizable organic anion indocyanine green (ICG) has been shown previously to reduce markedly the biliary secretion of acetaminophen, particularly the glutathione conjugate of APAP (APAP-GSH), suggesting that this APAP metabolite may compete with other xenobiotics for excretion into the bile via a canalicular organic anion transport process. This study was conducted to determine whether changes in the biliary disposition of APAP induced by ICG could lead to alterations in susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity. To investigate this, groups of overnight-fasted male CD-1 mice received 30 micromol ICG/kg, intravenously, immediately prior to APAP dosing (500 mg/kg, ip). Controls were given propylene glycol vehicle. Mice were killed at 4 h after APAP challenge for immunochemical analysis of cytosolic protein arylation and determination of non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) depletion, or at 12 and 24 h for biochemical and histological assessment of liver injury. Elevated plasma sorbitol dehydrogenase activity and centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis was present in control mice receiving APAP at 12 and 24 h. Treatment with ICG did not alter susceptibility to APAP toxicity when measured at 12 h after challenge. However, the severity of histologic lesions in the ICG-APAP group was significantly lower at 24 h after challenge. Furthermore, treatment with ICG did not alter APAP-induced glutathione depletion or cytosolic protein arylation. These data suggest that the organic anion ICG has a protective effect on APAP toxicity that promotes a faster recovery from liver injury.

  2. [Peculiarities of neuro-psychological and autonomic disorders in patients with remote consequences of closed craniocerebral injury].

    PubMed

    Glebova, O S

    2007-01-01

    62 patients who had undergone mild craniocerebral injury have taken part in the study. All patients had a complex examination before the treatment. This examination included together with laboratory and instrumental methods the following scales: vegetovascular Vein's scale for a patient and physician, feeling scale (psychological scale). All patients received the following treatment: analgetics, vasoactive agents, tranquilizers, vitamins of the group B, magnesium sulfate, biostimulants, amino acids, physiotherapy, acupuncture, Patients of the first group received additionally noofen and patients of the second group received aminalon. The duration of the treatment was about two months. Positive dynamics of the course of the disease was noted in patients with late closed craniocerebral injury effect after a complex treatment including nootropic agents was done. However noofen was more effective in patients with closed craniocerebral injury late effect who had asthenic syndrome and vegetative disorders.

  3. Inhibition of IκB Kinase Attenuates the Organ Injury and Dysfunction Associated with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sordi, Regina; Chiazza, Fausto; Johnson, Florence L; Patel, Nimesh S A; Brohi, Karim; Collino, Massimo; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation is widely implicated in multiple organ failure (MOF); however, a direct inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK), which plays a pivotal role in the activation of NF-κB, has not been investigated in shock. Thus, the aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of an IKK inhibitor on the MOF associated with hemorrhagic shock (HS). Therefore, rats were subjected to HS and were resuscitated with the shed blood. Rats were treated with the inhibitor of IKK or vehicle at resuscitation. Four hours later, blood and organs were assessed for organ injury and signaling events involved in the activation of NF-κB. Additionally, survival following serum deprivation was assessed in HK-2 cells treated with the inhibitor of IKK. HS resulted in renal dysfunction, lung, liver and muscular injury, and increases in serum inflammatory cytokines. Kidney and liver tissue from HS rats revealed increases in phosphorylation of IKKαβ and IκBα, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and expression of inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). IKK16 treatment upon resuscitation attenuated NF-κB activation and activated the Akt survival pathway, leading to a significant attenuation of all of the above parameters. Furthermore, IKK16 exhibited cytoprotective effects in human kidney cells. In conclusion, the inhibitor of IKK complex attenuated the MOF associated with HS. This effect may be due to the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and activation of the survival kinase Akt. Thus, the inhibition of the IKK complex might be an effective strategy for the prevention of MOF associated with HS. PMID:26101953

  4. "Blood failure" time to view blood as an organ: how oxygen debt contributes to blood failure and its implications for remote damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bjerkvig, Christopher K; Strandenes, Geir; Eliassen, Håkon S; Spinella, Philip C; Fosse, Theodor K; Cap, Andrew P; Ward, Kevin R

    2016-04-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is both a local and systemic disorder. In the context of systemic effects, blood loss may lead to levels of reduced oxygen delivery (DO2 ) sufficient to cause tissue ischemia. Similar to other physiologic debts such as sleep, it is not possible to incur a significant oxygen debt and suffer no consequences for lack of timely repayment. While the linkage between oxygen debt and traditional organ failure (renal, hepatic, lung, and circulation) has been long recognized, we should consider failure in two additional linked and very dynamic organ systems, the endothelium and blood. These systems are very sensitive to oxygen debt and at risk for failing, having further implications on all other organ systems. The degree of damage to the endothelium is largely modulated by the degree of oxygen debt. Thus hypoperfusion is believed to begin a cascade of events leading to acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). This combination of oxygen debt driven endothelial damage and ATC might be considered collectively as "blood failure" due to the highly connected networks between these drivers. This article presents the implications of oxygen debt for remote damage control resuscitation strategies, such as permissive hypotension and hemostatic resuscitation. We review the impact of whole blood resuscitation and red blood cell efficacy in mitigation of oxygen debt. At last, this article recognizes the need for simple and durable, lightweight equipment that can detect the adequacy of tissue DO2 and thus patient needs for resuscitative care. Point-of-care lactate measuring may be a predictive tool for identifying high-risk trauma patients and occult shock because it provides information beyond that of vital signs and mechanism of injury as it may help predict the level of oxygen debt accumulation and need for resuscitation. Serial measurements may also be valuable as a tool in guiding resuscitative efforts. PMID:27100755

  5. The Effect of Remote Ischemic Conditioning and Glyceryl Trinitrate on Perioperative Myocardial Injury in Cardiac Bypass Surgery Patients: Rationale and Design of the ERIC-GTN Study.

    PubMed

    Hamarneh, Ashraf; Sivaraman, Vivek; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Shanahan, Hilary; Kyle, Bonnie; Ramlall, Manish; Chung, Robin; Jarvis, Claire; Xenou, Maria; Ariti, Cono; Cordery, Roger; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2015-11-01

    Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) using transient limb ischemia/reperfusion has been reported to reduce perioperative myocardial injury in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery. The role of intravenous glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy administered during cardiac surgery as a cardioprotective agent and whether it interferes with RIC cardioprotection is not clear and is investigated in the ERIC-GTN trial ( http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01864252). The ERIC-GTN trial is a single-site, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Consenting adult patients (age > 18 years) undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting ± valve surgery with blood cardioplegia will be eligible for inclusion. Two hundred sixty patients will be randomized to 1 of 4 treatment groups following anesthetic induction: (1) RIC alone, a RIC protocol comprising three 5-minute cycles of simultaneous upper-arm and thigh cuff inflation/deflation followed by an intravenous (IV) placebo infusion; (2) GTN alone, a simulated sham RIC protocol followed by an IV GTN infusion; (3) RIC + GTN, a RIC protocol followed by an IV GTN infusion; and (4) neither RIC nor GTN, a sham RIC protocol followed by IV placebo infusion. The primary endpoint will be perioperative myocardial injury as quantified by the 72-hour area-under-the-curve serum high-sensitivity troponin T. The ERIC-GTN trial will determine whether intraoperative GTN therapy is cardioprotective during cardiac surgery and whether it affects RIC cardioprotection.

  6. Comparison of Remote Sensing Technologies for Determination of Soil Organic Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of global carbon balance in the context of ameliorating the effects of carbon dioxide emissions. Remote sensing methods based upon hyperspectral quantification of soil reflectance can provide rapid and cost-effective assessment of soil properties i...

  7. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Pachunka, Joseph M; Mott, Justin L

    2015-11-20

    Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption.

  8. [Surgical therapeutic strategy in vital risk polytrauma with multiple organ injuries, case report].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Iulia; Stefan, S; Isloi, Anca; Coca, I C; Baroi, Genoveva; Radu, L; Lăpuşneanu, A; Tamaş, Camelia

    2008-01-01

    The medical interest for trauma pathology is incresing, due to the gravity of the given injuries. The surgical therapeutic strategy used is directly related to the localization and to the type of the trauma. The supplementary lesions and their vital risk also matter. The multidisciplinary team approach is the key to resolve this type of lesions with a good outcome. We recently observed an increasing tendency toward the rise of number and variety of patients with trauma, due to the great diversity of the etiopathogenic agents. The most important factor, during the assessment of a politraumatised patient is to diagnose correctly the functional deficits of vital organs and establish the vital prognosis. It is necessary to adopt the best and fast therapeutic strategy in order to obtain rapid life-saving decisions. PMID:20209777

  9. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Pachunka, Joseph M.; Mott, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption. PMID:26610589

  10. Lysophosphatidylcholine reduces the organ injury and dysfunction in rodent models of Gram-negative and Gram-positive shock

    PubMed Central

    Murch, Oliver; Collin, Marika; Sepodes, Bruno; Foster, Simon J; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) modulates the inflammatory response and reduces mortality in animal models of sepsis. Here, we investigate the effects of LPC from synthetic (sLPC) and natural, soy bean derived LPC, (nLPC) sources on the organ injury/dysfunction caused by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PepG) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Rats were subjected to (i) endotoxaemia (LPS 6 mg kg–1 i.v.) and treated with sLPC (1–100 mg kg−1), (ii) endotoxaemia and treated with nLPC (10 mg kg−1) or (iii) Gram-positive shock (PepG 10 mg kg–1 and LTA 3 mg kg–1 i.v.) and treated with sLPC (10 mg kg−1). Endotoxaemia or Gram-positive shock for 6 h resulted in increases in serum makers of renal dysfunction and liver, pancreatic and neuromuscular injury. Administration of sLPC, at 1 or 2 h after LPS, dose dependently (1–10 mg kg−1) reduced the organ injury/dysfunction. High doses of sLPC (30 and 100 mg kg−1) were shown to be detrimental in endotoxaemia. sLPC also afforded protection against the organ injury/dysfunction caused by Gram-positive shock. nLPC was found to be protective in endotoxaemic animals. The beneficial effects of sLPC were associated with an attenuation in circulating levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In conclusion, LPC dose and time dependently reduces the organ injury and circulating IL-1β levels caused by Gram-negative or Gram-positive shock in the rat. Thus, we speculate that appropriate doses of LPC may be useful in reducing the degree of organ injury and dysfunction associated with shock of various aetiologies. PMID:16751791

  11. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 null mice are sensitive to cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Cheng, Xingguo; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1) is predominantly expressed in livers of mice and is thought to transport bile acids (BAs) from blood into liver. Because Oatp1a1 expression is markedly decreased in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). We hypothesized that Oatp1a1-null mice would be protected against liver injury during BDL-induced cholestasis due largely to reduced hepatic uptake of BAs. To evaluate this hypothesis, BDL surgeries were performed in both male wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice. At 24 h after BDL, Oatp1a1-null mice showed higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels and more severe liver injury than WT mice, and all Oatp1a1-null mice died within 4 days after BDL, whereas all WT mice survived. At 24 h after BDL, surprisingly Oatp1a1-null mice had higher total BA concentrations in livers than WT mice, suggesting that loss of Oatp1a1 did not prevent BA accumulation in the liver. In addition, secondary BAs dramatically increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null BDL mice but not in WT BDL mice. Oatp1a1-null BDL mice had similar basolateral BA uptake (Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and Oatp1b2) and BA-efflux (multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]-3, Mrp4, and organic solute transporter α/β) transporters, as well as BA-synthetic enzyme (Cyp7a1) in livers as WT BDL mice. Hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner Cyp3a11, Cyp4a14, and Nqo1, which are target genes of farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor 2, respectively, were increased in WT BDL mice but not in Oatp1a1-null BDL mice. These results demonstrate that loss of Oatp1a1 function exacerbates cholestatic liver injury in mice and suggest that Oatp1a1 plays a unique role in liver adaptive responses to obstructive cholestasis.

  12. The new Landsat 8 potential for remote sensing of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM).

    PubMed

    Slonecker, E Terrence; Jones, Daniel K; Pellerin, Brian A

    2016-06-30

    Due to a combination of factors, such as a new coastal/aerosol band and improved radiometric sensitivity of the Operational Land Imager aboard Landsat 8, the atmospherically-corrected Surface Reflectance product for Landsat data, and the growing availability of corrected fDOM data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations, moderate-resolution remote sensing of fDOM may now be achievable. This paper explores the background of previous efforts and shows preliminary examples of the remote sensing and data relationships between corrected fDOM and Landsat 8 reflectance values. Although preliminary results before and after Hurricane Sandy are encouraging, more research is needed to explore the full potential of Landsat 8 to continuously map fDOM in a number of water profiles.

  13. The new Landsat 8 potential for remote sensing of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terry; Jones, Daniel K.; Pellerin, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to a combination of factors, such as a new coastal/aerosol band and improved radiometric sensitivity of the Operational Land Imager aboard Landsat 8, the atmospherically-corrected Surface Reflectance product for Landsat data, and the growing availability of corrected fDOM data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations, moderate-resolution remote sensing of fDOM may now be achievable. This paper explores the background of previous efforts and shows preliminary examples of the remote sensing and data relationships between corrected fDOM and Landsat 8 reflectance values. Although preliminary results before and after Hurricane Sandy are encouraging, more research is needed to explore the full potential of Landsat 8 to continuously map fDOM in a number of water profiles.

  14. The new Landsat 8 potential for remote sensing of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM).

    PubMed

    Slonecker, E Terrence; Jones, Daniel K; Pellerin, Brian A

    2016-06-30

    Due to a combination of factors, such as a new coastal/aerosol band and improved radiometric sensitivity of the Operational Land Imager aboard Landsat 8, the atmospherically-corrected Surface Reflectance product for Landsat data, and the growing availability of corrected fDOM data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations, moderate-resolution remote sensing of fDOM may now be achievable. This paper explores the background of previous efforts and shows preliminary examples of the remote sensing and data relationships between corrected fDOM and Landsat 8 reflectance values. Although preliminary results before and after Hurricane Sandy are encouraging, more research is needed to explore the full potential of Landsat 8 to continuously map fDOM in a number of water profiles. PMID:27004998

  15. Preliminary Evidence of Reduced Urge to Cough and Cough Response in Four Individuals following Remote Traumatic Brain Injury with Tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Carnaby, Giselle; Tsai, Hsiu-Wen; Davenport, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Cough and swallow protect the lungs and are frequently impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This project examined cough response to inhaled capsaicin solution challenge in a cohort of four young adults with a history of TBI within the preceding five years. All participants had a history of tracheostomy with subsequent decannulation and dysphagia after their injuries (resolved for all but one participant). Urge to cough (UTC) and cough response were measured and compared to an existing database of normative cough response data obtained from 32 healthy controls (HCs). Participants displayed decreased UTC and cough responses compared to HCs. It is unknown if these preliminary results manifest as a consequence of disrupted sensory (afferent) projections, an inability to perceive or discriminate cough stimuli, disrupted motor (efferent) response, peripheral weakness, or any combination of these factors. Future work should attempt to clarify if the observed phenomena are borne out in a larger sample of individuals with TBI, determine the relative contributions of central versus peripheral nervous system structures to cough sensory perceptual changes following TBI (should they exist), and formulate recommendations for systematic screening and assessment of cough sensory perception in order to facilitate rehabilitative efforts. This project is identified with the National Clinical Trials NCT02240329. PMID:27774033

  16. Niacinamide abrogates the organ dysfunction and acute lung injury caused by endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Liu, Demeral David; Su, Chain-Fa; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) synthabse (PARS) or polymerase (PARP) is a cytotoxic enzyme causing cellular damage. Niacinamide inhibits PARS or PARP. The present experiment tests the effects of niacinamide (NCA) on organ dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was administered to anesthetized rats and to isolated rat lungs. In anesthetized rats, LPS caused systemic hypotension and increased biochemical factors, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), methyl guanidine (MG), tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In isolated lungs, LPS increased lung weight (LW) to body weight ratio, LW gain, protein and dye tracer leakage, and capillary permeability. The insult also increased NOx, MG, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta in lung perfusate, while decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with an increase in PARP activity in lung tissue. Pathological examination revealed pulmonary edema with inflammatory cell infiltration. These changes were abrogated by posttreatment (30 min after LPS) with NCA. Following LPS, the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased. NCA reduced the iNOS expression. Niacinamide exerts protective effects on the organ dysfunction and ALI caused by endotoxin. The mechanisms may be mediated through the inhibition on the PARP activity, iNOS expression and the subsequent suppression of NO, free radicals, and proinflammatory cytokines with restoration of ATP.

  17. Single-Multiplex Detection of Organ Injury Biomarkers using SPRi based Nano-Immunosensor

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Effat; Li, Siqi; Zhou, Zhiguo; Miller, Jennifer; Sandros, Marinella G.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical assessment of multiple organ dysfunctions at early stages is recognized to be an important factor in prompting definitive treatment decisions that prevent irreversible organ damage. In this article, we propose a real-time, label-free, and multiplex nanoenhanced SPRi platform to quantitatively assess two biomarkers, kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) simultaneously in buffer. Our work involves three major contributions in the design of the immunosensor: (1) we applied site-specific immobilization of antibodies to the solid surface that avoids loss of biological activity caused by covalent attachment; (2) we constructed a well-blocked sensor surface that exhibits minimal non-specific adsorption for singleplex measurements of each biomarker in buffer; and (3) we adopted a sandwich assay that implements functionalized quantum dots (NanoEnhancers) as signal amplifiers to achieve a sensitivity level of 5 pg/mL for KIM-1 and HMGB-1 in buffer. We foresee great potential and success in extending this multiplex and ultra-sensitive platform to assess a variety of other emerging clinical biomarkers at low concentrations and in complex matrices. PMID:27796342

  18. Effects of Endothelial Injury on the Rate of Thrombus Organization in Canine Carotid Arteries Occluded with Microcoils

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzo, T.; Shengelaia, G.G.; Workman, M.; Cloft, H.J.; Miller, D.A.; Dion, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Thrombus organization in canine carotid arteries occluded with platinum microcoils was studied to determine if endothelial injury created with a Xenon Chloride Excimer Laser (XEL) could acclerate endovascular fibrosis. Ten common carotid artery stumps were created in ten dogs. Each of four stumps were schematically divided into four longitudinally contiguous injury zones (thermal ablation injury, non-ablative injury, proximal and distal non-injury zones) to test the effects of ablative and non-ablative injury and to establish a set of internal controls that would account for proximity to circulating blood at the ostium of the occluded artery. Following XEL irradiation of the endothelium through an arteriotomy, each stump was embolized with microcoils. Four control stumps were subjected to sham laser procedures, and embolized in an identical fashion. Two additional stumps were embolized in the absence of sham surgery. Angiographic, gross and histologic analysis was performed after four weeks. Specimens of freshly clotted whole blood mixed with microcoils were used as an additional control. In irradiated stumps and non-irradiated stumps (sham and embolization only), angiography revealed no evidence of coil compaction or recanalization. In all irradiated stumps the thermal ablation zone contained fibrous tissue and neovascularity without unorganized thrombus. The other zones in the irradiated stumps were indistingnishable from each other and from all zones in the non-irradiated sham stumps, containing primarily unorganized thrombus. Stumps embolized in the absence of sham surgery were filled with material that was grossly and microscopically identical to specimens of freshly clotted whole blood containing microcoils. The results indicate that thermal ablation injury of the endothelium accelerates thrombus organization in canine carotid arteries occluded with platinum microcoils. PMID:20591298

  19. Epidemiology of sports injuries in the Swiss organization "Youth and Sports" 1987-1989. Injuries, exposure and risks of main diagnoses.

    PubMed

    de Loës, M

    1995-02-01

    In the Swiss organization "Youth and Sports" all acute injuries that are attended to by a physician are registered by the Military Insurance, and data on the number of participants in 32 sports together with the time of exposure are collected by the organization. Per year there are close to 350,000 participants (age 14-20 years) during 13.2 million hours causing more than 5,000 injuries. In a descriptive study the data on the activities in "Youth and Sports" from 1987-1989 have been combined with the injuries which occurred during the same time period. The exposure to risk per 10,000 hours (incidence rate) has been calculated and is presented as a mean of the three years. Icehockey, handball and soccer had the highest incidences in males (8.6, 7.2, and 6.6) followed by wrestling, hiking and basketball (6.3, 3.6, and 3.5). In females the ranking order was handball, soccer and basketball (7.6, 6.7, and 4.9) succeeded by alpine skiing, volleyball and alpinism (3.9, 3.8, and 3.0). A comparison between males and females of the incidence rates in eleven analogous sports showed five significantly higher rates, four in female sports: basketball, alpine skiing, volleyball and apparatus gymnastics, and one in a male sport, hiking. The overall rate was significantly higher in males, but the higher risk was explained by the predominance of male soccer (56% of the injuries in males). After standardization for total exposure the results were even reversed and female sports had a higher overall risk.

  20. The role of gasotransmitters NO, H2S and CO in myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury and cardioprotection by preconditioning, postconditioning and remote conditioning.

    PubMed

    Andreadou, Ioanna; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Rassaf, Tienush; Schulz, Rainer; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2015-03-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The development of cardioprotective therapeutic agents remains a partly unmet need and a challenge for both medicine and industry, with significant financial and social implications. Protection of the myocardium can be achieved by mechanical vascular occlusions such as preconditioning (PC), when brief episodes of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) are experienced prior to ischaemia; postconditioning (PostC), when the brief episodes are experienced at the immediate onset of reperfusion; and remote conditioning (RC), when the brief episodes are experienced in another vascular territory. The elucidation of the signalling pathways, which underlie the protective effects of PC, PostC and RC, would be expected to reveal novel molecular targets for cardioprotection that could be modulated by pharmacological agents to prevent reperfusion injury. Gasotransmitters including NO, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and carbon monoxide (CO) are a growing family of regulatory molecules that affect physiological and pathological functions. NO, H2S and CO share several common properties; they are beneficial at low concentrations but hazardous in higher amounts; they relax smooth muscle cells, inhibit apoptosis and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In the cardiovascular system, NO, H2S and CO induce vasorelaxation and promote cardioprotection. In this review article, we summarize current knowledge on the role of the gasotransmitters NO, H2S and CO in myocardial I/R injury and cardioprotection provided by conditioning strategies and highlight future perspectives in cardioprotection by NO, H2S, CO, as well as their donor molecules.

  1. The role of gasotransmitters NO, H2S and CO in myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury and cardioprotection by preconditioning, postconditioning and remote conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Andreadou, Ioanna; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Rassaf, Tienush; Schulz, Rainer; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The development of cardioprotective therapeutic agents remains a partly unmet need and a challenge for both medicine and industry, with significant financial and social implications. Protection of the myocardium can be achieved by mechanical vascular occlusions such as preconditioning (PC), when brief episodes of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) are experienced prior to ischaemia; postconditioning (PostC), when the brief episodes are experienced at the immediate onset of reperfusion; and remote conditioning (RC), when the brief episodes are experienced in another vascular territory. The elucidation of the signalling pathways, which underlie the protective effects of PC, PostC and RC, would be expected to reveal novel molecular targets for cardioprotection that could be modulated by pharmacological agents to prevent reperfusion injury. Gasotransmitters including NO, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and carbon monoxide (CO) are a growing family of regulatory molecules that affect physiological and pathological functions. NO, H2S and CO share several common properties; they are beneficial at low concentrations but hazardous in higher amounts; they relax smooth muscle cells, inhibit apoptosis and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In the cardiovascular system, NO, H2S and CO induce vasorelaxation and promote cardioprotection. In this review article, we summarize current knowledge on the role of the gasotransmitters NO, H2S and CO in myocardial I/R injury and cardioprotection provided by conditioning strategies and highlight future perspectives in cardioprotection by NO, H2S, CO, as well as their donor molecules. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24923364

  2. The role of the complement system in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McCullough, James W; Renner, Brandon; Thurman, Joshua M

    2013-11-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common and severe clinical problem. Patients who develop acute kidney injury are at increased risk of death despite supportive measures such as hemodialysis. Research in recent years has shown that tissue inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of renal injury, even after nonimmune insults such as ischemia/reperfusion and toxins. Examination of clinical samples and preclinical models has shown that activation of the complement system is a critical cause of acute kidney injury. Furthermore, complement activation within the injured kidney is a proximal trigger of many downstream inflammatory events within the renal parenchyma that exacerbate injury to the kidney. Complement activation also may account for the systemic inflammatory events that contribute to remote organ injury and patient mortality. Complement inhibitory drugs have now entered clinical use and may provide an important new therapeutic approach for patients suffering from, or at high risk of developing, acute kidney injury.

  3. Functioning and disability analysis of patients with traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury by using the world health organization disability assessment schedule 2.0.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Ying; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Chi, Wen-Chou; Escorpizo, Reuben; Yen, Chia-Feng; Liao, Hua-Fang; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Tsai, Jo-Ting

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and spinal cord injuries (SCI) patients' function and disability by using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0); and to clarify the factors that contribute to disability. We analyzed data available between September 2012 and August 2013 from Taiwan's national disability registry which is based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework. Of the 2664 cases selected for the study, 1316 pertained to TBI and 1348 to SCI. A larger percentage of patients with TBI compared with those with SCI exhibited poor cognition, self-care, relationships, life activities, and participation in society (all p < 0.001). Age, sex, injury type, socioeconomic status, place of residence, and severity of impairment were determined as factors that independently contribute to disability (all p < 0.05). The WHODAS 2.0 is a generic assessment instrument which is appropriate for assessing the complex and multifaceted disability associated with TBI and SCI. Further studies are needed to validate the WHODAS 2.0 for TBI and SCI from a multidisciplinary perspective. PMID:25874682

  4. Effect of suspended particulate and dissolved organic matter on remote sensing of coastal and riverine waters.

    PubMed

    Sydor, M; Arnone, R A

    1997-09-20

    We use remote sensing reflectance (RSR) together with the inherent optical properties of suspended particulates to determine the backscattering ratio b(b)/b for coastal waters. We examine the wavelength dependence of b(b)(lambda) and f(lambda)/Q(lambda) and establish the conditions when C(lambda) in RSR(lambda) approximately or = C(lambda)b(b)(lambda)/a(lambda) can be treated as a constant. We found that for case 2 waters, RSR was insensitive to the natural fluctuations in particle-size distributions. The cross-sectional area of the suspended particulate per unit volume, x(g), showed an excellent correlation with the volume scattering coefficient. PMID:18259562

  5. Integrating Subcellular Location for Improving Machine Learning Models of Remote Homology Detection in Eukaryotic Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Anuj R.; Oehmen, Chris S.; Harper, Jill K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-02-23

    Motivation: At the center of bioinformatics, genomics, and pro-teomics is the need for highly accurate genome annotations. Producing high-quality reliable annotations depends on identifying sequences which are related evolutionarily (homologs) on which to infer function. Homology detection is one of the oldest tasks in bioinformatics, however most approaches still fail when presented with sequences that have low residue similarity despite a distant evolutionary relationship (remote homology). Recently, discriminative approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs) have demonstrated a vast improvement in sensitivity for remote homology detection. These methods however have only focused on one aspect of the sequence at a time, e.g., sequence similarity or motif based scores. However, supplementary information, such as the sub-cellular location of a protein within the cell would give further clues as to possible homologous pairs, additionally eliminating false relationships due to simple functional roles that cannot exist due to location. We have developed a method, SVM-SimLoc that integrates sub-cellular location with sequence similarity information into a pro-tein family classifier and compared it to one of the most accurate sequence based SVM approaches, SVM-Pairwise. Results: The SCOP 1.53 benchmark data set was utilized to assess the performance of SVM-SimLoc. As cellular location prediction is dependent upon the type of sequence, eukaryotic or prokaryotic, the analysis is restricted to the 2630 eukaryotic sequences in the benchmark dataset, evaluating a total of 27 protein families. We demonstrate that the integration of sequence similarity and sub-cellular location yields notably more accurate results than using sequence similarity independently at a significance level of 0.006.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants, brominated flame retardants and synthetic musks in fish from remote alpine lakes in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Peter; Kohler, Martin; Gujer, Erika; Zennegg, Markus; Lanfranchi, Marco

    2007-04-01

    Remote alpine lakes do not receive any direct aquatic inputs from anthropogenic activities. Therefore, these ecosystems may receive persistent organic compounds (POPs) by direct atmospheric deposition, only. Consequently, fish dwelling in these ecosystems represent an excellent indicator for the long-term atmospheric input of bioaccumulating and persistent contaminants. In the present study, fish from seven remote alpine lakes, located between 2062 and 2637 m above sea level in south eastern Switzerland (Grisons), were investigated. Lipid-based fish tissue concentrations of pesticides including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its transformation products (2,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDT, 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), 4,4'-DDD, 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), 4,4'-DDE), as well as dieldrin, heptachlor exo-epoxide (HPEX), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) were measured. In addition, seven synthetic musk compounds (Crysolide (ADBI), Phantolide (AHMI), Fixolide (AHTN), Traseolide (ATII), Galaxolide (HHCB), musk ketone (MK), and musk xylene (MX)) were determined. Concentrations of PCB, PCDD/F, and PBDE were in the same range as in fish from the major lakes situated in the Swiss plateau, indicating mainly atmospheric input of these persistent compounds. In contrast, concentrations of synthetic musks which are used as fragrances in laundry detergents and cosmetic products were distinctly lower than concentrations in fish from Swiss plateau lakes which receive inputs from waste water treatment plants.

  7. Influence of dissolved organic materials on turbid water optical properties and remote-sensing reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Harriss, R. C.; Usry, J. W.; Poole, L. R.; Houghton, W. M.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of dissolved organic materials on turbid-water optical properties are assessed, by means of field measurements and laboratory simulations in which upwelled reflectance, attenuation, absorption, and backscatter spectral properties at wavelengths from 450 to 800 nm are examined in relation to water chemistry. The data show that dissolved organic materials decrease upwelled reflectance from turbid waters, and that the decrease in reflectance is a nonlinear function of concentration with the largest gradients at low carbon concentrations, depending on wavelength. Upwelled reflectance is found to be highly correlated with two backscatter-absorption parameters used in some optical models, which are nonlinear with dissolved organic material concentration change.

  8. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  9. Remotion of organic compounds of actual industrial effluents by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampa, M. H. O.; Duarte, C. L.; Rela, P. R.; Somessari, E. S. R.; Silveira, C. G.; Azevedo, A. L.

    1998-06-01

    Organic compounds has been a great problem of environmental pollution, the traditional methods are not effecient on removing these compounds and most of them are deposited to ambient and stay there for long time causing problems to the environment. Ionizing radiation has been used with success to destroy organic molecules. Actual industrial effluents were irradiated using IPEN's electron beam wastewater pilot plant to study organic compounds degradation. The samples were irradiated with and without air mixture by different doses. Irradiation treatment efficiency was evaluated by the Cromatography Gas Analyses of the samples before and after irradiation. The studied organic compounds were: phenol, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, benzene, toluene and xilene. A degradation superior to 80% was achieved for the majority of the compounds with air addition and 2kGy delivered dose condition. For the samples that were irradiated without air addition the degradation was higher.

  10. Earth view: A business guide to orbital remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: Earth view - a guide to orbital remote sensing; current orbital remote sensing systems (LANDSAT, SPOT image, MOS-1, Soviet remote sensing systems); remote sensing satellite; and remote sensing organizations.

  11. Pressure ulcer-induced oxidative organ injury is ameliorated by beta-glucan treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Sener, Göksel; Sert, Gülten; Ozer Sehirli, A; Arbak, Serap; Uslu, Bahar; Gedik, Nursal; Ayanoglu-Dulger, Gül

    2006-05-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) cause morphological and functional alterations in the skin and visceral organs. In this study we investigated the role of oxidative damage in PUs and the probable beneficial effect of beta-glucan treatment against this damage. beta-glucan is known to have immunomodulatory effects. Experiments were carried on Wistar albino rats. PU was induced by applying magnets over steel plates that were implanted under the skin, to compress the skin and cause ischemia where removing the magnets cause reperfusion of the tissue. Within the first 12 h, rats were subjected to 5 cycles of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), followed by 12 h ischemia. This protocol was repeated for 3 days. In treatment groups, twice a day during reperfusion periods, beta-glucan was either applied locally (25 mg/kg) as an ointment on skin, or administered orally (50 mg/kg) as a gavage. At the end of the experimental periods, tissue samples (skin, liver, kidney, lung, stomach, and ileum) were taken for the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA)--an index of lipid peroxidation--and glutathione (GSH)--a key antioxidant--levels. Neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by the measurement of tissue myeloperoxidase activity, while collagen contents were measured for the evaluation of tissue fibrosis. Skin tissues were also examined microscopically. Liver and kidney functions were assayed in serum samples. Local treatment with beta-glucan inhibited the increase in MDA and MPO levels and the decrease in GSH in the skin induced by PU, but was less efficient in preventing the damage in visceral organs. However, systemic treatment prevented the damage in the visceral organs. Significant increases in creatinine, BUN, ALT, AST, LDH and collagen levels in PU group were prevented by beta-glucan treatment. The light microscopic examination exhibited significant degenerative changes in dermis and epidermis in the PU group. Tissue injury was decreased especially in the locally treated group. Thus, supplementing

  12. Participant's Liability for Injury to a Fellow Participant in an Organized Athletic Event: Nabozny v. Barnhill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lynn A.

    1976-01-01

    In this Illinois case the Appellate Court considered whether one player is liable for the negligent infliction of injury to an opposing player. Alternative interpretations are discussed regarding the circumstances under which a player is held liable. (LBH)

  13. Vena-venous hemofiltration in treating severe injury-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y; Zong, H L; Zhang, L; Wang, Z H; Sun, L M; Zhang, R F

    2016-01-01

    Severe multiple injury (SMI) can induce multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and easily result in complications, as well as having a high mortality rate. To explore the curative effect of continuous vena-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) in treating MODS and its effect on serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α interleukin (IL)-10 and nitric oxide (NO), we selected 200 patients who suffered from SMI and received treatment in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between April 2012 and April 2014 as research subjects. All patients were treated with CVVH. Vital signs, blood oxygen pressure (PaO(2)) and oxygenation index (OI) of artery, electrolyte and acid-base balance were observed before and after treatment. Before treatment, 1 h and 12 h after the start of treatment, and at the end of treatment, TNF-α and IL-10 concentrations in serum and ultrafiltrate were tested using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and NO concentration in serum and ultrafiltrate was detected using nitrate reduction method. After treatment, heart rate and respiratory rate of patients had significant decline (P less than 0.05) and average arterial pressure rose remarkably (P less than 0.05); blood urea nitrogen and creatinine decreased (P less than 0.05 or 0.01); PaO(2) and OI were both significantly increased (P less than 0.01); hyperkalemia and acidosis were effectively corrected (P less than 0.01); but differences of Na+, Ca2+ and Cl- before and after treatment had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Serum IL-10 concentration had a significant increase after treatment, while TNF-α and NO concentrations had a significant decline after treatment. A small quantity of IL-10, but not of TNF-α, was detected from ultrafiltrate. Concentration of NO in ultrafiltrate was higher. It can be concluded that CVVH can effectively relieve clinical symptoms of MODS patients, improve function of organs, correct electrolyte disturbance and acid-base imbalance and eliminate TNF-α and NO in

  14. [The diagnosis of the types of automobile-caused trauma by the nature of the injuries to the internal abdominal organs].

    PubMed

    Solokhin, A A; Tkhakakhov, A A

    1996-01-01

    A total of 307 cases of fatal car injuries with traumas of the abdominal organs are analyzed. There were three types of injuries: those caused by collision of a pedestrian with a moving car (96 cases) injuries inflicted inside a car cabin (n = 157), and inflicted by a car wheel crossing the body (n = 54). Differences in the injuries inflicted in different types of car traumas are described. The authors demonstrate the possibility of differential diagnosis of these types of traumas in cases when the circumstances of the accident are unknown. They offer a differential diagnostic table for practical use, based on their findings.

  15. Drug and herb induced liver injury: Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale for causality assessment.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Schulze, Johannes; Eickhoff, Axel

    2014-01-27

    Causality assessment of suspected drug induced liver injury (DILI) and herb induced liver injury (HILI) is hampered by the lack of a standardized approach to be used by attending physicians and at various subsequent evaluating levels. The aim of this review was to analyze the suitability of the liver specific Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) scale as a standard tool for causality assessment in DILI and HILI cases. PubMed database was searched for the following terms: drug induced liver injury; herb induced liver injury; DILI causality assessment; and HILI causality assessment. The strength of the CIOMS lies in its potential as a standardized scale for DILI and HILI causality assessment. Other advantages include its liver specificity and its validation for hepatotoxicity with excellent sensitivity, specificity and predictive validity, based on cases with a positive reexposure test. This scale allows prospective collection of all relevant data required for a valid causality assessment. It does not require expert knowledge in hepatotoxicity and its results may subsequently be refined. Weaknesses of the CIOMS scale include the limited exclusion of alternative causes and qualitatively graded risk factors. In conclusion, CIOMS appears to be suitable as a standard scale for attending physicians, regulatory agencies, expert panels and other scientists to provide a standardized, reproducible causality assessment in suspected DILI and HILI cases, applicable primarily at all assessing levels involved.

  16. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated. PMID:27682899

  17. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  18. Assessment of Volatile Organic Compound and Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Oil and Natural Gas Well Pads using Mobile Remote and On-site Direct Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from oil and natural gas production were investigated using direct measurements of component-level emissions on well pads in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) Basin and remote measurements of production pad-...

  19. An optical model for the remote sensing of coloured dissolved organic matter in coastal/ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. P.; Shanmugam, P.

    2011-07-01

    An optical model is developed for the remote sensing of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in a wide range of waters within coastal and open ocean environments. The absorption of CDOM (denoted as a g) is generally considered as an exponential form model, which has two important parameters - the slope S and absorption of CDOM at a reference wavelength a g( λ0). The empirical relationships for deriving these two parameters are established using in-situ bio-optical datasets. These relationships use the spectral remote sensing reflectance (R rs) ratio at two wavelengths R rs(670)/R rs(490), which avoids the known atmospheric correction problems and is sensitive to CDOM absorption and chlorophyll in coastal/ocean waters. This ratio has tight relationships with a g(412) and a g(443) yielding correlation coefficients between 0.77 and 0.78. The new model, with the above parameterization applied to independent datasets (NOMAD SeaWiFS match-ups and Carder datasets), shows good retrievals of the a g( λ) with regression slopes close to unity, little bias and low mean relative and root mean square errors. These statistical estimates improve significantly over other inversion models (e.g., Linear Matrix-LM and Garver-Siegel-Maritorena-GSM semi-analytical models) when applied to the same datasets. These results demonstrate a good performance of the proposed model in both coastal and open ocean waters, which has the potential to improve our knowledge of the biogeochemical cycles and processes in these domains.

  20. The World Health Organization's action plan on the road traffic injury pandemic: is there any action for orthopaedic trauma surgeons?

    PubMed

    Moroz, Paul J; Spiegel, David A

    2014-01-01

    Road traffic crash-related death, injury, and chronic disability continue to be a major worldwide burden to drivers, pedestrians, and users of mass transit, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Projections predict worsening of this burden, and while motorization of LMIC increases exponentially, a corresponding improvement in prehospital and acute in-hospital trauma care has not been seen. The WHO now has 2 programs that address different elements of this challenge, namely, the Violence and Injury Prevention department (prevention) and the Emergency and Essential Surgical Care project (treatment). Activities of Violence and Injury Prevention have included developing guidelines for prehospital and essential trauma care, whereas activities of the Emergency and Essential Surgical Care have included developing the Integrated Management of Emergency and Essential Surgical Care toolkit and a textbook, "Surgical Care at the District Hospital." Organized surgical institutions in high-income countries-trauma associations, university departments, surgical nongovernmental organizations, etc.-can benefit from the infrastructure and tools the WHO has developed to better address the deficits in surgical services to improve the equitable distribution of surgical care services and resources to LMIC.

  1. Remote sensing and GIS for the modeling of persistent organic pollutant in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzini, S.; Teggi, S.; Bigi, A.; Ghermandi, G.

    2014-10-01

    The characterization of the marine environment plays an important role in the understanding of the dynamics affecting the transport, fate and persistence (TFP) of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). This work is part of a project funded by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca. The aim of the project is the assessment of the TFP of POPs in the Mediterranean sea. The analysis will be carried out at regionalmesoscale (central Mediterranean), and at local spatial scale considering different Italian test sites (the Delta of the Po River, the Venice Lagoon and the estuary of the Rio Nocella). The first step of this work involves the implementation of GIS geodatabases for the definition of the input dataset. The geodatabases were populated with MERIS and MODIS level 2 and level 3 products of Chlorophyll-a (CHL-a), Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM), Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient (DAC), Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC), Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST). The spatial scale (central Mediterranean sea) and the reference system (Plate Carrée projection) have been imposed as a constraint for the geodatabases. Four geodatabases have been implemented, two for MODIS and two for MERIS products with a monthly, seasonal and climatological temporal scale (2002 -2013). Here, we present a first application of a methodology aimed to identify vulnerable areas to POPs accumulation and persistence. The methodology allowed to assess the spatial distribution of the CHL-a in the central Mediterranean sea. The chlorophyll concentration is related to the amount of nutrients in the water and therefore provides an indicator of the potential presence of POPs. A pilot area of 300 x 200 km located in the North Adriatic sea has been initially considered. The seasonal and climatological MODIS and MERIS CHL-a variability were retrieved and compared with in-situ forcing parameters, i.e. Po River

  2. Donor brain death leads to differential immune activation in solid organs but does not accelerate ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ritschl, Paul Viktor; Ashraf, Muhammad Imtiaz; Oberhuber, Rupert; Mellitzer, Vanessa; Fabritius, Cornelia; Resch, Thomas; Ebner, Susanne; Sauter, Martina; Klingel, Karin; Pratschke, Johann; Kotsch, Katja

    2016-05-01

    A comparative analysis of inflammation between solid organs following donor brain death (BD) is still lacking and the detailed influence of BD accelerating ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) post-transplantation remains to be addressed. Applying a murine model of BD, we demonstrated that 4 h after BD organs were characterized by distinct inflammatory expression patterns. For instance, lipocalin 2 (LCN2), a marker of acute kidney injury, was selectively induced in BD livers but not in kidneys. BD further resulted in significantly reduced frequencies of CD3(+) CD4(+) , CD3(+) CD8(+) T cells and NKp46(+) NK cells in the liver, whereas BD kidneys and hearts were characterized by significantly lower frequencies of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). Syngeneic models of kidney (KTx) and heart transplantation (HTx) illustrated stronger gene expression in engrafted BD hearts only, but 20 h post-transplantation both organs displayed comparable intragraft lymphocyte frequencies, except for NK cells and graft function. Moreover, the complement factor C3d deposit detected in small vessels and capillaries in cardiac syngrafts did not significantly differ between BD and sham-transplanted groups. Finally, no further influence of donor BD on graft survival was detected in an allogeneic heart transplantation setting (C57BL/6 grafts into BALB/c recipients). We show for the first time that BD organs are characterized by a varying inflammatory profile; however, BD does not accelerate IRI in syngeneic KTx and HTx.

  3. Remote Sensing of Particulate Organic Carbon Pools in the High-Latitude Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stramski, Dariusz; Stramska, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    The general goal of this project was to characterize spatial distributions at basin scales and variability on monthly to interannual timescales of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the high-latitude oceans. The primary objectives were: (1) To collect in situ data in the north polar waters of the Atlantic and in the Southern Ocean, necessary for the derivation of POC ocean color algorithms for these regions. (2) To derive regional POC algorithms and refine existing regional chlorophyll (Chl) algorithms, to develop understanding of processes that control bio-optical relationships underlying ocean color algorithms for POC and Chl, and to explain bio-optical differentiation between the examined polar regions and within the regions. (3) To determine basin-scale spatial patterns and temporal variability on monthly to interannual scales in satellite-derived estimates of POC and Chl pools in the investigated regions for the period of time covered by SeaWiFS and MODIS missions.

  4. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simultaneous remotion of organic inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Burkholderia sp.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia sp. F24, originally isolated from soil, was capable of growth on xylose and removed organic inhibitors present in a hemicellulosic hydrolysate and simultaneously produced poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB). Using non-detoxified hydrolysate, Burkholderia sp. F24 reached a cell dry weight (CDW) of 6.8 g L(-1), containing 48 % of P3HB and exhibited a volumetric productivity (PP3HB) of 0.10 g L(-1) h(-1). Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate copolymers (P3HB-co-3HV) were produced using xylose and levulinic acid (LA) as carbon sources. In shake flask cultures, the 3HV content in the copolymer increased from 9 to 43 mol% by adding LA from 1.0 to 5.0 g L(-1). In high cell density cultivation using concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysate F24 reached 25.04 g L(-1) of CDW containing 49 % of P3HB and PP3HB of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1). Based on these findings, second-generation ethanol and bioplastics from sugarcane bagasse is proposed. PMID:25059637

  5. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simultaneous remotion of organic inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Burkholderia sp.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia sp. F24, originally isolated from soil, was capable of growth on xylose and removed organic inhibitors present in a hemicellulosic hydrolysate and simultaneously produced poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB). Using non-detoxified hydrolysate, Burkholderia sp. F24 reached a cell dry weight (CDW) of 6.8 g L(-1), containing 48 % of P3HB and exhibited a volumetric productivity (PP3HB) of 0.10 g L(-1) h(-1). Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate copolymers (P3HB-co-3HV) were produced using xylose and levulinic acid (LA) as carbon sources. In shake flask cultures, the 3HV content in the copolymer increased from 9 to 43 mol% by adding LA from 1.0 to 5.0 g L(-1). In high cell density cultivation using concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysate F24 reached 25.04 g L(-1) of CDW containing 49 % of P3HB and PP3HB of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1). Based on these findings, second-generation ethanol and bioplastics from sugarcane bagasse is proposed.

  6. Hock injury prevalence and associated risk factors on organic and nonorganic dairy farms in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, K M D; Langford, F M; Jack, M C; Sherwood, L; Lawrence, A B; Haskell, M J

    2008-06-01

    The presence of hock injury was assessed in the milking herds of 80 dairy farms (40 organic, 40 nonorganic) across the United Kingdom. A wide range of information on farm management and husbandry was gathered via interview to assess the factors contributing to hock damage for all 80 farms, and a comprehensive building appraisal was conducted for 40 farms visited during the winter housing period. The prevalence of hock lesions was lower on organic compared with nonorganic farms (37.2 vs. 49.1%). Prevalence of hock damage was greater in the spring than fall (59.9 vs. 21.6%) and cows housed in free-stalls had a greater prevalence of hock lesions than those housed on straw (46.0 vs. 25.0%). Prevalence of hock damage increased with lactation number. In the analysis of fall/spring data, the age first mated, herd biosecurity, duration of summer grazing, and cow milk yield were significant factors relating to herd hock damage. Larger herds had a greater proportion of cows with hock swellings. Farms with a shorter calving interval had more cows with hock swellings. Factors relating to housing conditions that were positively associated with the prevalence of hock damage were low feed face space per cow, inferior passageway cleanliness, low total standing area per cow, and the type of bedding added to the free-stall. To assess whether free-stall versus straw-pen or organic versus nonorganic farms had different sets of risk factors, the data were reanalyzed for these types separately. For the straw-pen farms a high culling rate was associated with more hock damage. Within nonorganic farms, the length of summer grazing was significant, with longer periods meaning less hock injury. The prevalence of hock injuries on many UK farms, both organic and non-organic, exceeded levels that are deemed acceptable for cow comfort. Efforts are needed to improve housing standards to reduce the prevalence of hock injury and consequently improve cow welfare.

  7. Quantitative relationships between different injury factors and development of brown rot caused by Monilinia fructigena in integrated and organic apple orchards.

    PubMed

    Holb, I J; Scherm, H

    2008-01-01

    In a 4-year study, the incidence of various types of injuries (caused by insects, birds, growth cracks, mechanical wounding, and other, unidentified factors) was assessed in relation to brown rot development (caused by Monilinia fructigena) on fruit of three apple cultivars (Prima, Jonathan, and Mutsu) in integrated and organic blocks of two apple orchards in Hungary. In addition, populations of male codling moths (Cydia pomonella) were monitored with pheromone traps season-long in both management systems. On average, injury incidence on fruit at harvest was 6.1 and 19.2% in the integrated and organic treatments, respectively. Insect injury, which was caused primarily by C. pomonella, had the highest incidence among the five injury types, accounting for 79.4% of the total injury by harvest in the organic blocks and 36.6% in the integrated blocks. Levels of all other injury types remained close to zero during most of the season, but the incidence of bird injury and growth cracks increased markedly in the final 3 to 5 weeks before harvest in both production systems. Brown rot developed more slowly and reached a lower incidence in the integrated (6.4% final incidence on average) compared with the organic blocks (20.1% average incidence). In addition, the disease developed later but attained higher levels as the cultivar ripening season increased from early-maturing Prima to late-maturing Mutsu. Overall, 94.3 to 98.7% of all injured fruit were also infected by M. fructigena, whereas the incidence of brown-rotted fruit without visible injury was very low (0.8 to 1.6%). Correlation coefficients (on a per plot basis) and association indices (on a per-fruit basis) were calculated between brown rot and the various injury types for two selected assessment dates 4 weeks preharvest and at harvest. At both dates, the strongest significant (P < 0.05) relationships were observed between brown rot and insect injury and between brown rot and the cumulative number of trapped C

  8. A statewide, population-based time-series analysis of the increasing frequency of nonoperative management of abdominal solid organ injury.

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, R; Hunt, J P; Lentz, C W; Fakhry, S M; Meyer, A A; Baker, C C; Sheldon, G F

    1995-01-01

    Emergency operative intervention has been one of the cornerstones of the care of the injured patient. Over the past several years, nonoperative management has increasing been recommended for the care of selected blunt abdominal solid organ injuries. The purpose of this study was to utilize a large statewide, population-based data set to perform a time-series analysis of the practice of physicians caring for blunt solid organ injury of the abdomen. The study was designed to assess the changing frequency and the outcomes of operative and nonoperative treatments for blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. METHODS: Data were obtained from the state hospital discharge data base, which tracks information on all hospitalized patients from each of the 157 hospitals in the state of North Carolina. All trauma patients who had sustained injury to a solid abdominal organ (kidney, liver, or spleen) were selected for initial analysis. RESULTS: During the 5 years of the study, 210,256 trauma patients were admitted to the state's hospitals (42,051 +/- 7802 per year). The frequency of nonoperative interventions for hepatic and splenic injuries increased over the period studied. The frequency of nonoperative management of hepatic injuries increased from 55% in 1988 to 79% in 1992 in patients with hepatic injuries and from 34% to 46% in patients with splenic injuries. The rate of nonoperative management of hepatic injuries increased from 54% to 64% in nontrauma centers compared with an increase from 56% to 74% in trauma centers (p = 0.01). In patients with splenic injuries, the rate of nonoperative management increased from 35% to 44% in nontrauma centers compared with an increase from 33% to 49% in trauma centers (p < 0.05). The rate of nonoperative management was associated with the organ injury severity, ranging from 90% for minor injuries to 19%-40% for severe injuries. Finally, in an attempt to compare blood use in operatively and nonoperatively treated patients, the total charges

  9. On the Use of Ocean Color Remote Sensing to Measure the Transport of Dissolved Organic Carbon by the Mississippi River Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCastillo, Carlos E.; Miller, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the use of ocean color remote sensing to measure transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. From 2000 to 2005 we recorded surface measurements of DOC, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), salinity, and water-leaving radiances during five cruises to the Mississippi River Plume. These measurements were used to develop empirical relationships to derive CDOM, DOC, and salinity from monthly composites of SeaWiFS imagery collected from 1998 through 2005. We used river flow data and a two-end-member mixing model to derive DOC concentrations in the river end-member, river flow, and DOC transport using remote sensing data. We compared our remote sensing estimates of river flow and DOC transport with data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from 1998 through 2005. Our remote sensing estimates of river flow and DOC transport correlated well (r2 0.70) with the USGS data. Our remote sensing estimates and USGS field data showed low variability in DOC concentrations in the river end-member (7-11%), and high seasonal variability in river flow (50%). Therefore, changes in river flow control the variability in DOC transport, indicating that the remote sensing estimate of river flow is the most critical element of our DOC transport measurement. We concluded that it is possible to use this method to estimate DOC transport by other large rivers if there are data on the relationship between CDOM, DOC, and salinity in the river plume.

  10. Cardioprotection by remote ischemic conditioning: Mechanisms and clinical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Aimo, Alberto; Borrelli, Chiara; Giannoni, Alberto; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Barison, Andrea; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC), several cycles of ischemia and reperfusion render distant organ and tissues more resistant to the ischemia-reperfusion injury. The intermittent ischemia can be applied before the ischemic insult in the target site (remote ischemic preconditioning), during the ischemic insult (remote ischemic perconditioning) or at the onset of reperfusion (remote ischemic postconditioning). The mechanisms of RIC have not been completely defined yet; however, these mechanisms must be represented by the release of humoral mediators and/or the activation of a neural reflex. RIC has been discovered in the heart, and has been arising great enthusiasm in the cardiovascular field. Its efficacy has been evaluated in many clinical trials, which provided controversial results. Our incomplete comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the RIC could be impairing the design of clinical trials and the interpretation of their results. In the present review we summarize current knowledge about RIC pathophysiology and the data about its cardioprotective efficacy. PMID:26516416

  11. Improving the Quality of Staff and Participant Interaction in an Acquired Brain Injury Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guercio, John M.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Weekly observations of direct-care staff in a facility for persons with brain injury yielded less than optimal interactional style with facility residents. Following an observational baseline, staff were asked to self-rate a 15-min video sample of their interaction behavior with participants on their unit. They were then asked to compare their…

  12. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning for Prevention of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Undergoing On-Pump Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yabing; Zhang, Xiyang; Chi, Dongmei; Wang, Siyang; Wei, Hua; Yu, Hong; Li, Qian; Liu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) may attenuate acute kidney injury (AKI). However, results of studies evaluating the effect of RIPC on AKI after cardiac surgery have been controversial and contradictory.The aim of this meta-analysis is to examine the association between RIPC and AKI after on-pump cardiac surgery.The authors searched relevant studies in PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library through December 2015.We considered for inclusion all randomized controlled trials that the role of RIPC in reducing AKI and renal replacement therapy (RRT) among patients underwent on-pump cardiac surgical procedures.We collected the data on AKI, initiation of RRT, serum creatinine (sCr) levels, and in-hospital mortality. Random- and fixed-effect models were used for pooling data.Nineteen trials including 5100 patients were included. The results of this meta-analysis showed a significant benefit of RIPC for reducing the incidence of AKI after cardiac interventions (odds ratio [OR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.98; P = 0.02). No significant difference was found in the incidence of RRT between RIPC and control (OR, 0.76, 95% CI, 0.46-1.24; P = 0.36). In addition, compared with standard medical care, RIPC showed no significant difference in postoperative sCr (IV 0.07; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.16; P = 0.20; postoperative day 1; IV 0.00; 95% CI, -0.08 to 0.09; P = 0.92; postoperative day 2; IV 0.04; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.12; P = 0.39; postoperative day 3), and in-hospital mortality (OR, 1.21, 95% CI, 0.64-2.30; P = 0.56).According to the results from present meta-analysis, RIPC was associated with a significant reduction AKI after on-pump cardiac surgery but incidence of RRT, postoperative sCr, and in-hospital mortality. Further high-quality randomized controlled trials and experimental researches comparing RIPC are desirable. PMID:27631199

  13. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  14. Histologic evaluation of organ preservation injury and correlation with cold ischemia time in 13 intestinal grafts.

    PubMed

    López-García, P; Calvo Pulido, J; Colina, F; Jiménez-Romero, C; Ibarrola de andrés, C; López-Alonso, G; Loinaz, C; Martínez González, M A; Justo Alonso, I; Cambra Molero, F; Moreno-González, E

    2014-01-01

    Lesions produced in the graft mucosa due to harvesting, storage, and implantation must be graduated to assess the subsequent protocolized biopsy specimens. The aim is to identify type and intensity of graft mucosal lesions observed immediately after implantation. Congestion, hemorrhage, microthrombi, neutrophilic infiltrates, shortening of villi, epithelial detachment, erosion, and crypt loss were separately evaluated by two pathologists in mucosal biopsy specimens from 13 grafts. Each change was assessed as normal, mild, moderate, or severe and by splintering the summation of points a global score was designed. Cold ischemia time was registered. Correlation between the pathologists' evaluations and between final preservation injury degree and cold ischemia time was determined using the "index of correlation rho (ρ)" (Spearman's test). The same changes were assessed in 19 biopsy specimens from day 2 to day 6 (3.6 ± 1.1) to determine their evolution. Congestion was found in 7 biopsy specimens, microthrombi in 2, hemorrhage in 4, neutrophils in 6, villous atrophy in 8, epithelial detachment in 9, erosions in 2 and/or crypt loss in 2. The maximum degree of preservation injury was expressed as intense congestion and hemorrhage associated with epithelial detachment and villous atrophy. The global preservation score was grade 3 in 2 cases, grade 2 in 5, grade 1 in 2, and grade 0 in 4. There was positive correlation (ρ = 0.915) in the evaluation between pathologists (P < .01), total agreement in 9 biopsy specimens, and partial agreement (only 1 point disagreement) in 4. Mean cold ischemia time was 327 ± 101 min. (135-480). There was positive correlation (ρ = 0.694) between preservation score and cold ischemia time (P < .01). In the follow-up biopsy procedures, histological injury decreased by at least one grade in every case. Additionally, karyorrhexis was observed in 3 grafts and very occasional apoptosis in 2 others. This scale achieves good reproducibility and

  15. Zebrafish as model organisms for studying drug-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Tucker, Carl S; Del Pozo, Jorge; Dear, James W

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major challenge in clinical medicine and drug development. New models are needed for predicting which potential therapeutic compounds will cause DILI in humans, and new markers and mediators of DILI still need to be identified. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of using zebrafish as a high-throughput in vivo model for studying DILI. Although the zebrafish liver architecture is different from that of the mammalian liver, the main physiological processes remain similar. Zebrafish metabolize drugs using similar pathways to those in humans; they possess a wide range of cytochrome P450 enzymes that enable metabolic reactions including hydroxylation, conjugation, oxidation, demethylation and de-ethylation. Following exposure to a range of hepatotoxic drugs, the zebrafish liver develops histological patterns of injury comparable to those of mammalian liver, and biomarkers for liver injury can be quantified in the zebrafish circulation. The zebrafish immune system is similar to that of mammals, but the zebrafish inflammatory response to DILI is not yet defined. In order to quantify DILI in zebrafish, a wide variety of methods can be used, including visual assessment, quantification of serum enzymes and experimental serum biomarkers and scoring of histopathology. With further development, the zebrafish may be a model that complements rodents and may have value for the discovery of new disease pathways and translational biomarkers. PMID:24773296

  16. Model Development and Use of ACE Inhibitors for Preclinical Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Injury to Multiple Organs

    PubMed Central

    Medhora, Meetha; Gao, Feng; Wu, Qingping; Molthen, Robert C.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Moulder, John E.; Fish, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    The NIH/NIAID initiated a countermeasure program to develop mitigators for radiation-induced injuries from a radiological attack or nuclear accident. We have previously characterized and demonstrated mitigation of single organ injuries, such as radiation pneumonitis, pulmonary fibrosis or nephropathy by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Our current work extends this research to examine the potential for mitigating multiple organ dysfunctions occurring in the same irradiated rats. Using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplant, we tested four doses of X radiation (11, 11.25, 11.5 and 12 Gy) to develop lethal late effects. We identified three of these doses (11, 11.25 and 11.5 Gy TBI) that were lethal to all irradiated rats by 160 days to test mitigation by ACE inhibitors of injury to the lungs and kidneys. In this study we tested three ACE inhibitors at doses: captopril (88 and 176 mg/m2/day), enalapril (18, 24 and 36 mg/m2/day) and fosinopril (60 mg/m2/day) for mitigation. Our primary end point was survival or criteria for euthanization of morbid animals. Secondary end points included breathing intervals, other assays for lung structure and function and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) to assess renal damage. We found that captopril at 176 mg/m2/day increased survival after 11 or 11.5 Gy TBI. Enalapril at 18–36 mg/m2/day improved survival at all three doses (TBI). Fosinopril at 60 mg/m2/day enhanced survival at a dose of 11 Gy, although no improvement was observed for pneumonitis. These results demonstrate the use of a single countermeasure to mitigate the lethal late effects in the same animal after TBI. PMID:25361399

  17. Dysregulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Pathway Is Involved in Lipid Disorder-Mediated Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ma, Kun Ling; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is a negative feedback system that plays important roles in the regulation of plasma and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. To maintain a cholesterol homeostasis, LDLR expression is tightly regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in transcriptional level and by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in posttranscriptional level. The dysregulation of LDLR expression results in abnormal lipid accumulation in cells and tissues, such as vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatic cells, renal mesangial cells, renal tubular cells and podocytes. It has been demonstrated that inflammation, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation, and hyperglycemia induce the disruption of LDLR pathway, which might contribute to lipid disorder-mediated organ injury (atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, kidney fibrosis, etc). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical mediator in the disruption of LDLR pathway caused by pathogenic factors. The mTOR complex1 activation upregulates LDLR expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, consequently resulting in lipid deposition. This paper mainly reviews the mechanisms for the dysregulation of LDLR pathway and its roles in lipid disorder-mediated organ injury under various pathogenic conditions. Understanding these mechanisms leading to the abnormality of LDLR expression contributes to find potential new drug targets in lipid disorder-mediated diseases. PMID:27019638

  18. The spatial epidemiology of trauma: the potential of geographic information science to organize data and reveal patterns of injury and services

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, Nadine; Hameed, S. Morad; Fiedler, Robert; Bell, Nathaniel; Simons, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    Despite important advances in the prevention and treatment of trauma, preventable injuries continue to impact the lives of millions of people. Motor vehicle collisions and violence claim close to 3 million lives each year worldwide. Public health agencies have promoted the need for systematic and ongoing surveillance as a foundation for successful injury control. Surveillance has been used to quantify the incidence of injury for the prioritization of further research, monitor trends over time, identify new injury patterns, and plan and evaluate prevention and intervention efforts. Advances in capability to handle spatial data and substantial increases in computing power have positioned geographic information science (GIS) as a potentially important tool for health surveillance and the spatial organization of health care, and for informing prevention and acute care interventions. Two themes emerge in the trauma literature with respect to GIS theory and techniques: identifying determinants associated with the risk of trauma to guide injury prevention efforts and evaluating the spatial organization and accessibility of acute trauma care systems. We review the current literature on trauma and GIS research and provide examples of the importance of accounting for spatial scale when using spatial analysis for surveillance. The examples illustrate the effect of scale on incident analysis, the geographic variation of major injury across British Columbia's health service delivery areas (HSDAs) and the rates of variation of injury within individual HSDAs. PMID:18841227

  19. The spatial epidemiology of trauma: the potential of geographic information science to organize data and reveal patterns of injury and services.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Nadine; Hameed, S Morad; Fiedler, Robert; Bell, Nathaniel; Simons, Richard K

    2008-10-01

    Despite important advances in the prevention and treatment of trauma, preventable injuries continue to impact the lives of millions of people. Motor vehicle collisions and violence claim close to 3 million lives each year worldwide. Public health agencies have promoted the need for systematic and ongoing surveillance as a foundation for successful injury control. Surveillance has been used to quantify the incidence of injury for the prioritization of further research, monitor trends over time, identify new injury patterns, and plan and evaluate prevention and intervention efforts. Advances in capability to handle spatial data and substantial increases in computing power have positioned geographic information science (GIS) as a potentially important tool for health surveillance and the spatial organization of health care, and for informing prevention and acute care interventions. Two themes emerge in the trauma literature with respect to GIS theory and techniques: identifying determinants associated with the risk of trauma to guide injury prevention efforts and evaluating the spatial organization and accessibility of acute trauma care systems. We review the current literature on trauma and GIS research and provide examples of the importance of accounting for spatial scale when using spatial analysis for surveillance. The examples illustrate the effect of scale on incident analysis, the geographic variation of major injury across British Columbia's health service delivery areas (HSDAs) and the rates of variation of injury within individual HSDAs.

  20. Can the normalized soil moisture index improve the prediction of soil organic carbon based on hyperspectral remote sensing data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wesemael, Bas; Nocita, Marco

    2016-04-01

    One of the problems for mapping of soil organic carbon (SOC) at large-scale based on visible - near and short wave infrared (VIS-NIR-SWIR) remote sensing techniques is the spatial variation of topsoil moisture when the images are collected. Soil moisture is certainly an aspect causing biased SOC estimations, due to the problems in discriminating reflectance differences due to either variations in organic matter or soil moisture, or their combination. In addition, the difficult validation procedures make the accurate estimation of soil moisture from optical airborne a major challenge. After all, the first millimeters of the soil surface reflect the signal to the airborne sensor and show a large spatial, vertical and temporal variation in soil moisture. Hence, the difficulty of assessing the soil moisture of this thin layer at the same moment of the flight. The creation of a soil moisture proxy, directly retrievable from the hyperspectral data is a priority to improve the large-scale prediction of SOC. This paper aims to verify if the application of the normalized soil moisture index (NSMI) to Airborne Prima Experiment (APEX) hyperspectral images could improve the prediction of SOC. The study area was located in the loam region of Wallonia, Belgium. About 40 samples were collected from bare fields covered by the flight lines, and analyzed in the laboratory. Soil spectra, corresponding to the sample locations, were extracted from the images. Once the NSMI was calculated for the bare fields' pixels, spatial patterns, presumably related to within field soil moisture variations, were revealed. SOC prediction models, built using raw and pre-treated spectra, were generated from either the full dataset (general model), or pixels belonging to one of the two classes of NSMI values (NSMI models). The best result, with a RMSE after validation of 1.24 g C kg-1, was achieved with a NSMI model, compared to the best general model, characterized by a RMSE of 2.11 g C kg-1. These

  1. Trans-system mechanisms against ischemic myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu Q; Ma, Xin-Liang; Qin, Gangjian; Liu, Qingping; Li, Yan-Chun; Wu, Yu H

    2015-01-01

    A mammalian organism possesses a hierarchy of naturally evolved protective mechanisms against ischemic myocardial injury at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. These mechanisms comprise regional protective processes, including upregulation and secretion of paracrine cell-survival factors, inflammation, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and resident stem cell-based cardiomyocyte regeneration. There are also interactive protective processes between the injured heart, circulation, and selected remote organs, defined as trans-system protective mechanisms, including upregulation and secretion of endocrine cell-survival factors from the liver and adipose tissue as well as mobilization of bone marrow, splenic, and hepatic cells to the injury site to mediate myocardial protection and repair. The injured heart and activated remote organs exploit molecular and cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, mobilization, and/or extracellular matrix production, to establish protective mechanisms. Both regional and trans-system cardioprotective mechanisms are mediated by paracrine and endocrine messengers and act in coordination and synergy to maximize the protective effect, minimize myocardial infarction, and improve myocardial function, ensuring the survival and timely repair of the injured heart. The concept of the trans-system protective mechanisms may be generalized to other organ systems-injury in one organ may initiate regional as well as trans-system protective responses, thereby minimizing injury and ensuring the survival of the entire organism. Selected trans-system processes may serve as core protective mechanisms that can be exploited by selected organs in injury. These naturally evolved protective mechanisms are the foundation for developing protective strategies for myocardial infarction and injury-induced disorders in other organ systems.

  2. Propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism alleviates burn-induced multiple organ injury.

    PubMed

    Sener, Göksel; Sehirli, Ozer; Velioğlu-Oğünç, Ayliz; Ercan, Feriha; Erkanli, Gözde; Gedik, Nursal; Yeğen, Berrak C

    2006-09-01

    Oxidative stress has an important role in the development of multiorgan failure after major burn. This study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of experimental hypothyroidism in hepatic and gastrointestinal injury induced by thermal trauma. Sprague Dawley rats were administered saline or PTU (10 mgkg(-1) i.p.) for 15 days, and hypothyroidism was confirmed by depressed serum T(3) and T(4) concentrations. Under brief ether anesthesia, shaved dorsum of rats was exposed to 90 degrees C (burn group) or 25 degrees C (control group) water bath for 10s. PTU or saline treatment was repeated at the 12th hour of the burn. Rats were decapitated 24h after injury and tissue samples from liver, stomach and ileum were taken for the determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and collagen contents. Formation of reactive oxygen species in tissue samples was monitored by using chemiluminescence (CL) technique with luminol and lucigenin probes. Tissues were also examined microscopically. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assayed in serum samples. Severe skin scald injury (30% of total body surface area) caused a significant decrease in GSH level, which was accompanied with significant increases in MDA level, MPO activity, CL levels and collagen content of the studied tissues (p<0.05-0.001). Similarly, serum TNF-alpha and LDH were elevated in the burn group as compared to control group. On the other hand, PTU treatment reversed all these biochemical indices, as well as histopathological alterations induced by thermal trauma. Our results suggest that PTU-induced hypothyroidism reduces oxidative damage in the hepatic, gastric and ileal tissues probably due to hypometabolism, which is associated with decreased production of reactive oxygen metabolites and enhancement of antioxidant mechanisms.

  3. Repair of avascular meniscal injuries using juvenile meniscal fragments: an in vitro organ culture study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhu; Li, Kanghua; Chen, Zhiwei; Liao, Ying; Yang, Lezhong; Liu, Chunlei; Ding, Wenjun

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether the implantation of juvenile allograft and minced meniscal fragments could improve the healing of avascular meniscal injuries, which cannot heal spontaneously. Concentric cylindrical explants were excised from the inner two-thirds of swine medial menisci. The inner cylinder consisted of a "sandwich" structure, with minced juvenile meniscal fragments, juvenile meniscal columns, minced mature meniscal fragments, or mature meniscal columns implanted in the middle. The explants were cultured in vitro for 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Interfacial meniscal repair was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry, biomechanical testing, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Histology and confocal microscopy results revealed that tissue repair and cell accumulation at the interface were best at all time points in the juvenile meniscal fragments group, followed by the juvenile columns, minced mature fragments, and mature columns groups, respectively. At 6 weeks, the implantation of juvenile allograft and minced meniscal fragments increased the shear strength, peak force, and energy to failure in the peripheral interface. Picosirius red/polarized light microscopy and immunohistochemistry results showed concurrent expression of type I and II collagen in the interfacial repair tissue. In conclusion, implantation of juvenile allograft and minced meniscal fragments could increase the healing of avascular meniscal injury in vitro.

  4. CD14 is a key organizer of microglial responses to CNS infection and injury.

    PubMed

    Janova, Hana; Böttcher, Chotima; Holtman, Inge R; Regen, Tommy; van Rossum, Denise; Götz, Alexander; Ernst, Anne-Sophie; Fritsche, Christin; Gertig, Ulla; Saiepour, Nasrin; Gronke, Konrad; Wrzos, Claudia; Ribes, Sandra; Rolfes, Simone; Weinstein, Jonathan; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Pukrop, Tobias; Kopatz, Jens; Stadelmann, Christine; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Weber, Martin S; Prinz, Marco; Brück, Wolfgang; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M; Priller, Josef; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, sense infection and damage through overlapping receptor sets. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and multiple injury-associated factors. We show that its co-receptor CD14 serves three non-redundant functions in microglia. First, it confers an up to 100-fold higher LPS sensitivity compared to peripheral macrophages to enable efficient proinflammatory cytokine induction. Second, CD14 prevents excessive responses to massive LPS challenges via an interferon β-mediated feedback. Third, CD14 is mandatory for microglial reactions to tissue damage-associated signals. In mice, these functions are essential for balanced CNS responses to bacterial infection, traumatic and ischemic injuries, since CD14 deficiency causes either hypo- or hyperinflammation, insufficient or exaggerated immune cell recruitment or worsened stroke outcomes. While CD14 orchestrates functions of TLR4 and related immune receptors, it is itself regulated by TLR and non-TLR systems to thereby fine-tune microglial damage-sensing capacity upon infectious and non-infectious CNS challenges. PMID:26683584

  5. The phenoptosis problem: what is causing the death of an organism? Lessons from acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Zorov, D B; Plotnikov, E Y; Jankauskas, S S; Isaev, N K; Silachev, D N; Zorova, L D; Pevzner, I B; Pulkova, N V; Zorov, S D; Morosanova, M A

    2012-07-01

    Programmed execution of various cells and intracellular structures is hypothesized to be not the only example of elimination of biological systems - the general mechanism can also involve programmed execution of organs and organisms. Modern rating of programmed cell death mechanisms includes 13 mechanistic types. As for some types, the mechanism of actuation and manifestation of cell execution has been basically elucidated, while the causes and intermediate steps of the process of fatal failure of organs and organisms remain unknown. The analysis of deaths resulting from a sudden heart arrest or multiple organ failure and other acute and chronic pathologies leads to the conclusion of a special role of mitochondria and oxidative stress activating the immune system. Possible mechanisms of mitochondria-mediated induction of the signaling cascades involved in organ failure and death of the organism are discussed. These mechanisms include generation of reactive oxygen species and damage-associated molecular patterns in mitochondria. Some examples of renal failure-induced deaths are presented with mechanisms and settings determined by some hypothetical super system rather than by the kidneys themselves. This system plays the key role in the process of physiological senescence and termination of an organism. The facts presented suggest that it is the immune system involved in mitochondrial signaling that can act as the system responsible for the organism's death. PMID:22817538

  6. Injury Free Coalition for Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites Awards Safety Resources Staff Donate Online! Injury Free News The Great Trade-In Event Returns to ... Free Site -- Injury Free Call for Proposals Injury Free is supported by the generous contributions of organizations ...

  7. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  8. [Organ-preserving method in the surgical treatment of the spleen injuries].

    PubMed

    Khripun, A I; Alimov, A N; Salikov, A V; Priamikov, A D; Alimov, V A; Sukiasian, A A; Popov, T V; Urvantseva, O M

    2014-01-01

    The authors have experience in organ-preserving operations for spleen rupture with the splenic artery ligation in 156 casualties. They consider that such operations let to preserve the spleen, to avoid the postoperative rebleeding and ischemia of pancreas tail and body. Also it is accompanied by the low indications of lethality and postoperative complications. The authors consider that this operation is alternative to splenectomy and other techniques of organ-preserving operations in case of spleen trauma.

  9. THE EPA REMOTE SENSING ARCHIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    What would you do if you were faced with organizing 30 years of remote sensing projects that had been haphazardly stored at two separate locations for years then combined? The EPA Remote Sensing Archive, currently located in Las Vegas, Nevada. contains the remote sensing data and...

  10. The Spleen: The Forgotten Organ in Acute Kidney Injury of Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Gigliotti, Joseph C.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an increasing medical burden and is independently associated with mortality. AKI is a common comorbidity in the intensive care unit (ICU), with sepsis-associated AKI seen in almost a quarter of all ICU patients. Due to the high mortality seen in these patients, improved therapeutic options are needed. Data from experimental studies in animals support observations in humans that the host immune response to sepsis and trauma contributes to multiorgan failure and the high morbidity and mortality seen in critically ill patients. The spleen, a major component of the reticuloendothelial system, appears to be a key player in the ‘cytokine storm’ that develops after infection and trauma, and the resultant systemic inflammation is regulated by the autonomic nervous system. Over the past decade, evidence has suggested that controlling the splenic cytokine response improves tissue function and mortality in sepsis and other inflammatory-mediated diseases. One pathway that controls the response of the spleen to sepsis and trauma is the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, and it may provide a key target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review this concept and highlight the potential use of ultrasound to stimulate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and reduce systemic inflammation and disease severity. PMID:25343841

  11. Remote ischemic conditioning: Current clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Sophie; Prunier, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) constitutes a promising method in which a tissue or organ is exposed to intermittent ischemia/reperfusion periods enabling it to provide protection to a distant target organ. RIC has been tested in various clinical settings through its simple application by means of intermittent inflation of a blood pressure cuff placed on a limb, primarily evaluating its potential abilities to decrease myocardial injury biomarkers. Its use on other organs, such as the kidneys or brain, has recently been a topic of research. To date, no study has yet been powerful enough to reach a conclusion on the potential benefit of RIC on clinical outcomes. The future role of RIC in the clinical arena could be clarified by the large phase III trials currently underway targeting major outcomes as primary endpoints.

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the "World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire--Brief Version" for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan M.; Chan, Fong; Ferrin, James M.; Lin, Chen-Ping; Chan, Jacob Y. C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the factorial structure of the "World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire--Brief Version" in a community sample of Canadians with spinal cord injuries. A confirmatory factor analysis provides evidence that the instrument is a multidimensional measure of quality of life. Additionally, the questionnaire is…

  13. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions.

  14. [Acute Kidney Injury: the nephrology plus value and competence and a good organization can ameliorate the prognosis].

    PubMed

    Fagugli, Riccardo Maria; Guastoni, Carlo Maria; Battistoni, Sara; Patera, Francesco; Quintaliani, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) has changed radically in the past 15 years: we have observed an exponential increase of cases with high mortality and residual disability, particularly in those patients who need dialysis treatment. Those who survive AKI have an increased risk of requiring dialysis after hospital discharge over the short term as well as long term. They have an increased risk of deteriorating residual kidney function and cardiovascular events as well as a shorter life expectancy. Given the severe prognosis, difficulties of treatment, high level of resources needed, increased workload and consequently costs, several aspects of AKI have not been sufficiently investigated. Any national register of AKI has not been developed and its absence has an impact on provisional strategies. Specific training should be planned beginning with University, which should include practical training in Intensive Care Units. A definition of the organizational characteristics and requirements for the care of AKI is needed. Treatment of AKI is not based exclusively on dialysis efficiency or technology, but also on professional skills, volume of activity, clinical experience, model of healthcare organizations, continuity of processes and medical activities to guarantee such as a closed-staff system. Progress in knowledge and technology has only partially modified the outcome and prognosis of AKI patients; consequently, new strategies based on increased awareness, on the implementation of professional skills, and on revision, definition and updating of resources for the organization of AKI management are needed and expected over the short term. PMID:27545634

  15. Stimulation of Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway with Wnt Agonist Reduces Organ Injury after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kuncewitch, Michael; Yang, Weng-Lang; Jacob, Asha; Khader, Adam; Giangola, Matthew; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F.; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in surgery and trauma patients. Despite a large number of preclinical trials conducted to develop therapeutic strategies against hemorrhagic shock, there is still an unmet need exist for effective therapy for hemorrhage victims. Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls developmental processes and cellular regeneration owing to its central role in cell survival and proliferation. We therefore hypothesized that the activation of Wnt signaling reduces systemic injury caused by hemorrhagic shock. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent hemorrhagic shock by controlled bleeding of the femoral artery to maintain a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 30 mmHg for 90 min, followed by resuscitation with crystalloid equal to two times the shed blood volume. After resuscitation, animals were infused with Wnt agonist (5 mg/kg) or Vehicle (20% DMSO in saline). Blood and tissue samples were collected 6 h after resuscitation for analysis. Results Hemorrhagic shock increased serum levels of AST, lactate, and LDH. Treatment with Wnt agonist significantly reduced these levels by 40%, 36%, and 77%, respectively. Wnt agonist also decreased BUN and creatinine by 34% and 56%, respectively. Treatment reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity and IL-6 mRNA by 55% and 68% respectively and, significantly improved lung histology. Wnt agonist treatment increased Bcl-2 protein to Sham values and decreased cleaved caspase-3 by 46% indicating attenuation of hemorrhage-induced apoptosis in the lungs. Hemorrhage resulted in significant reductions of β-catenin protein levels in the lungs as well as down-regulation of a Wnt target gene, Cyclin-D1, while Wnt agonist treatment preserved these levels. Conclusions The administration of Wnt agonist attenuated hemorrhage-induced organ injury, inflammation and apoptosis. This was correlated with preservation of the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin activation could be protective

  16. Liver plays a central role in asymmetric dimethylarginine-mediated organ injury.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Di Pasqua, Laura G; Berardo, Clarissa; Richelmi, Plinio; Vairetti, Mariapia

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetric-dimethylarginine (ADMA) competes with L-arginine for each of the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase: endothelial; neuronal; inducible. ADMA is synthesized by protein methyltransferases followed by proteolytic degradation. ADMA is metabolized to citrulline and dimethylamine, by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) and enters cells through cationic amino-acid transporters extensively expressed in the liver. The liver plays a crucial role in ADMA metabolism by DDAH-1 and, as has been recently demonstrated, it is also responsible for ADMA biliary excretion. A correlation has been demonstrated between plasma ADMA levels and the degree of hepatic dysfunction in patients suffering from liver diseases with varying aetiologies: plasma ADMA levels are increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, alcoholic hepatitis and acute liver failure. The mechanism by which liver dysfunction results in raised ADMA concentrations is probably due to impaired activity of DDAH due to severe inflammation, oxidative stress, and direct damage to DDAH. High plasma ADMA levels are also relevant as they are associated with the onset of multi-organ failure (MOF). Increased plasma concentration of ADMA was identified as an independent risk factor for MOF in critically-ill patients causing enhanced Intensive Care Unit mortality: a significant reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, leading to malperfusion in various organs, eventually culminating in multi organs dysfunction.

  17. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-08-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  18. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M.; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  19. Using remotely sensed information to interpret the distribution of some volatile organic sulfur compounds in the upper ocean along an Atlantic meridional transect (AMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.; Rhee, T. S.; von Hobe, Marc; Andreae, M. O.

    2000-12-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds from an Atlantic Meridional Transect of the RRS James Clark Ros are presented together with optical data and upper ocean chlorophyl data. The latitudinal distribution of DMS and CH3SH is consistent with a biological source with low values in oligotrophic areas and high values in coastal regions. The DMS/CH3SH ratio shows systematic variation between oligotrophic and coastal areas and seems to correlate inversely with absorbance and fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter. The latitudinal distribution of COS and CS2 conform with existing models based on known sources and sinks of these compounds. A system of photochemical provinces is developed for these compounds based on a previously published scheme. An estimate of the global distribution of these provinces is made based on data archives and remotely sensed data.

  20. Self-organization of SiO{sub 2} nanodots deposited by chemical vapor deposition using an atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arnoult, G.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.

    2010-03-08

    Self-organization of SiO{sub 2} nanodots is obtained by chemical vapor deposition out of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and atmospheric pressure remote Ar-O{sub 2} plasma operating at high temperature (1200-1600 K). The dewetting of the film being deposited when it is still thin enough (<500 nm) is found to be partly responsible for this self-organization. When the coating becomes thicker (approx1 mum), and for relatively high contents in HMDSO, SiO{sub 2} walls forming hexagonal cells are obtained on a SiO{sub 2} sublayer. For thicker coatings (>1 mum), droplet-shaped coatings with a Gaussian distribution in thickness over their width are deposited. The coatings are submitted to high compressive stress. When it is relaxed, 'nestlike structures' made of nanoribbons are synthesized.

  1. Use of Geophysical and Remote Sensing Techniques During the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization's Integrated Field Exercise 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labak, Peter; Sussman, Aviva; Rowlands, Aled; Chiappini, Massimo; Malich, Gregor; MacLeod, Gordon; Sankey, Peter; Sweeney, Jerry; Tuckwell, George

    2016-04-01

    The Integrated Field Exercise of 2014 (IFE14) was a field event held in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan (with concurrent activities in Austria) that tested the operational and technical capabilities of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty's (CTBT) on-site inspection (OSI). During an OSI, up to 40 inspectors search a 1000km2 inspection area for evidence of a nuclear explosion. Over 250 experts from ~50 countries were involved in IFE14 (the largest simulation of an OSI to date) and worked from a number of different directions, such as the Exercise Management and Control Teams to execute the scenario in which the exercise was played, to those participants performing as members of the Inspection Team (IT). One of the main objectives of IFE14 was to test Treaty allowed inspection techniques, including a number of geophysical and remote sensing methods. In order to develop a scenario in which the simulated exercise could be carried out, a number of physical features in the IFE14 inspection area were designed and engineered by the Scenario Task Force Group (STF) that the IT could detect by applying the geophysical and remote sensing inspection technologies, as well as other techniques allowed by the CTBT. For example, in preparation for IFE14, the STF modeled a seismic triggering event that was provided to the IT to prompt them to detect and localize aftershocks in the vicinity of a possible explosion. Similarly, the STF planted shallow targets such as borehole casings and pipes for detection by other geophysical methods. In addition, airborne technologies, which included multi-spectral imaging, were deployed such that the IT could identify freshly exposed surfaces, imported materials and other areas that had been subject to modification. This presentation will introduce the CTBT and OSI, explain the IFE14 in terms of goals specific to geophysical and remote sensing methods, and show how both the preparation for and execution of IFE14 meet those goals.

  2. Remote sensing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipson, W. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Built on Cornell's thirty years of experience in aerial photographic studies, the NASA-sponsored remote sensing program strengthened instruction and research in remote sensing, established communication links within and beyond the university community, and conducted research projects for or with town, county, state, federal, and private organizations in New York State. The 43 completed applied research projects are listed as well as 13 spinoff grants/contracts. The curriculum offered, consultations provided, and data processing facilities available are described. Publications engendered are listed including the thesis of graduates in the remote sensing program.

  3. An assessment of injury to sediments and sediment-dwelling organisms in the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Area of Concern, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, D.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Smorong, D.E.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Sparks, D.W.; Smith, J.R.; Simon, T.P.; Hanacek, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This article is the first in a series of three that describe the results of a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) conducted in the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Area of Concern (IHAOC). The assessment area is located in northwest Indiana and was divided into nine reaches to facilitate the assessment. This component of the NRDA was undertaken to determine if sediments and sediment-dwelling organisms have been injured due to exposure to contaminants that have accumulated in sediments as a result of discharges of oil or releases of other hazardous substances from industrial, municipal, and nonpoint sources. To support this assessment, information was compiled on the chemical composition of sediment and pore water; on the toxicity of whole sediments, pore water, and elutriates; and on the status of benthic invertebrate communities. The data on each of these indicators were compared to regionally relevant benchmarks to assess the presence and extent of injury to surface water resources (i.e., sediments) or biological resources (i.e., sediment-dwelling organisms). The results of this assessment indicate that sediment injury has occurred throughout the assessment area, with up to four distinct lines of evidence demonstrating injury within the various reaches. The primary contaminants of concern (i.e., those substances that are present at concentrations that are sufficient to cause or substantially contribute to sediment injury) include metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and total polychlorinated biphenyls.

  4. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris; Larson, David

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  5. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L. ); Kroutil, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  6. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L.; Kroutil, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  7. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  8. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  9. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) in organic and mineral soil horizons from four U.S. remote forests.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Daniel; Zielinska, Barbara; Perlinger, Judith A

    2015-09-01

    We characterized distributions of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Σ23PAH) and nine oxygenated PAHs (Σ9OPAH) in four remote forests. We observed highest Σ23PAH and Σ9OPAH concentrations in a coniferous forest in Florida, particularly in organic layers which we attributed to frequent prescribed burning. Across sites, Σ23PAH and Σ9OPAH concentrations strongly increased from surface to humidified organic layers (+1626%) where concentrations reached up to 584 ng g(-1). Concentrations in mineral soils were lower (average 37 ± 8 ng g(-1)); but when standardized per unit organic carbon (OC), PAH/OC and OPAH/OC ratios were at or above levels observed in organic layers. Accumulation in litter and soils (i.e., enrichment factors with depth) negatively correlated with octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) and therefore was linked to water solubility of compounds. Concentrations of Σ9OPAHs ranged from 6 ± 6 ng g(-1) to 39 ± 25 ng g(-1) in organic layers, and from 3 ± 1 ng g(-1) to 11 ± 3 ng g(-1) in mineral soils, and were significantly and positively correlated to Σ23PAHs concentrations (r(2) of 0.90) across sites and horizons. While OPAH concentrations generally decreased from organic layers to mineral soil horizons, OPAH/OC ratios increased more strongly with depth compared to PAHs, in particular for anthrone, anthraquinone, fluorenone, and acenaphthenequinone. The strong vertical accumulation of OPAH relative to OC was exponentially and negatively correlated to C/N ratios (r(2)=0.67), a measure that often is used for tissue age. In fact, C/N ratios alone explained two-thirds of the variability in OPAH/OC ratios suggesting particularly high retention, sorption, and persistency of OPAHs in old, decomposed carbon fractions. PMID:25929871

  10. Firearm-related injury and death in the United States: a call to action from 8 health professional organizations and the American Bar Association.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Steven E; Hoyt, David B; Lawrence, Hal C; Levin, Saul; Henley, Douglas E; Alden, Errol R; Wilkerson, Dean; Benjamin, Georges C; Hubbard, William C

    2015-04-01

    Deaths and injuries related to firearms constitute a major public health problem in the United States. In response to firearm violence and other firearm-related injuries and deaths, an interdisciplinary, interprofessional group of leaders of 8 national health professional organizations and the American Bar Association, representing the official policy positions of their organizations, advocate a series of measures aimed at reducing the health and public health consequences of firearms. The specific recommendations include universal background checks of gun purchasers, elimination of physician "gag laws," restricting the manufacture and sale of military-style assault weapons and large-capacity magazines for civilian use, and research to support strategies for reducing firearm-related injuries and deaths. The health professional organizations also advocate for improved access to mental health services and avoidance of stigmatization of persons with mental and substance use disorders through blanket reporting laws. The American Bar Association, acting through its Standing Committee on Gun Violence, confirms that none of these recommendations conflict with the Second Amendment or previous rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court.

  11. Firearm-related injury and death in the United States: a call to action from 8 health professional organizations and the American Bar Association.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Steven E; Hoyt, David B; Lawrence, Hal C; Levin, Saul; Henley, Douglas E; Alden, Errol R; Wilkerson, Dean; Benjamin, Georges C; Hubbard, William C

    2015-04-01

    Deaths and injuries related to firearms constitute a major public health problem in the United States. In response to firearm violence and other firearm-related injuries and deaths, an interdisciplinary, interprofessional group of leaders of 8 national health professional organizations and the American Bar Association, representing the official policy positions of their organizations, advocate a series of measures aimed at reducing the health and public health consequences of firearms. The specific recommendations include universal background checks of gun purchasers, elimination of physician "gag laws," restricting the manufacture and sale of military-style assault weapons and large-capacity magazines for civilian use, and research to support strategies for reducing firearm-related injuries and deaths. The health professional organizations also advocate for improved access to mental health services and avoidance of stigmatization of persons with mental and substance use disorders through blanket reporting laws. The American Bar Association, acting through its Standing Committee on Gun Violence, confirms that none of these recommendations conflict with the Second Amendment or previous rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court. PMID:25706470

  12. The Evolving Mcart Multimodal Imaging Core: Establishing a Protocol for Computed Tomography and Echocardiography in the Rhesus Macaque to Perform Longitudinal Analysis of Radiation-Induced Organ Injury.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Eduardo B; Barrow, Kory R; Ruehle, Bradley T; Parker, Jordan T; Swartz, Elisa; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Kieta, Kaitlyn M; Lees, Cynthia J; Sleeper, Meg M; Dobbin, Travis; Baron, Adam D; Mohindra, Pranshu; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) and Echocardiography (EC) are two imaging modalities that produce critical longitudinal data that can be analyzed for radiation-induced organ-specific injury to the lung and heart. The Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Threats (MCART) consortium has a well established animal model research platform that includes nonhuman primate (NHP) models of the acute radiation syndrome and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposure. These models call for a definition of the latency, incidence, severity, duration, and resolution of different organ-specific radiation-induced subsyndromes. The pulmonary subsyndromes and cardiac effects are a pair of interdependent syndromes impacted by exposure to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Establishing a connection between these will reveal important information about their interaction and progression of injury and recovery. Herein, the authors demonstrate the use of CT and EC data in the rhesus macaque models to define delayed organ injury, thereby establishing: a) consistent and reliable methodology to assess radiation-induced damage to the lung and heart; b) an extensive database in normal age-matched NHP for key primary and secondary endpoints; c) identified problematic variables in imaging techniques and proposed solutions to maintain data integrity; and d) initiated longitudinal analysis of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage to the lung and heart.

  13. Lactate Reduces Organ Injury in Toll-like Receptor- and Inflammasome-Mediated Inflammation via GPR81-mediated Suppression of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rafaz; Farooq, Ahmad; Ghani, Ayaz; Gorelick, Fred; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The NLRP3 inflammasome induces inflammation in response to organ injury, but little is known about its regulation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) provide the first signal required for activation of the inflammasome and stimulate aerobic glycolysis to generate lactate. We examined whether lactate and the lactate receptor, GPR81, regulate TLR induction of signal 1 and limit inflammasome activation and organ injury. METHODS Primary mouse macrophages and human monocytes were incubated with TLR4 agonists and lactate and assayed for levels of pro-IL1β, NLRP3, and CASP1; release of IL1β; and activation of NFκB and caspase 1. Small interfering (si)RNAs were used to reduce levels of GPR81andARRB2, and an NFκB luciferase reporter transgene was transfected in RAW 264.7 cells. Cell lysates were analyzed by immunoprecipitation with an antibody against GPR81. Acute hepatitis was induced in C56BL/6N mice by administration of lipopolysaccharaide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Acute pancreatitis was induced by administration of LPS and caerulein. Some mice were given intraperitoneal injections of sodium lactate or siRNA against Gpr81. Activation of NFκB in tissue macrophages was assessed in mice that express a reporter transgene. RESULTS In macrophages and monocytes, increasing concentrations of lactate reduced TLR4-mediated induction of Il1B, Nlrp3, and Casp1; activation of NFκB; release of IL1β; and cleavage of CASP1. GPR81 and ARRB2 physically interacted and were required for these effects. Administration of lactate reduced inflammation and organ injury in mice with immune hepatitis; this reduction required Gpr81 dependence in vivo. Lactate also prevented activation of NFκB in macrophages of mice, and when given following injury, reduced the severity of acute pancreatitis and acute liver injury. CONCLUSIONS Lactate negatively regulates TLR induction of the NLRP3 inflammasome and production of IL1β, via ARRB2 and GPR81. Lactate could be a promising

  14. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  15. Simultaneous measurements of particulate and gas-phase water-soluble organic carbon concentrations at remote and urban-influenced locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Dibb, J. E.; Griffin, R. J.; Bergin, M. H.

    2008-07-01

    The sources, sinks, and overall importance of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the atmosphere are not well understood. Although the primary historical focus has been on particulate WSOC (WSOCP), here we also present results obtained using a newly developed technique that additionally measures gas-phase water-soluble organic carbon (WSOCG). These first-of-their-kind measurements show that WSOCG can often be more than ten times larger than WSOCP at both urban and remote locations. The average fraction of WSOC residing in the gas phase (fg = WSOCG/(WSOCG + WSOCP)) at five various field sites ranged from 0.64 to 0.93, implying significant differences in WSOC phase partitioning between locations. At Houston, TX, and Summit, Greenland, a repeatable diurnal pattern was observed, with minimum values for fg occurring at night. These trends likely are due, at least in part, to temperature and/or relative humidity related gas-to-particle partitioning. These coincident measurements of WSOC in both the gas and particle phases indicate that a relatively large reservoir of water-soluble organic mass is not taken into account by measurements focused only on WSOCP. In addition, a significant amount of WSOCG is available to form WSOCP or enter cloud droplets depending on the chemical and physical properties of the droplets and/or aerosols present.

  16. The composition and flux of water-soluble organic nitrogen and carbon in the marine aerosol of a remote island over the southern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wang, B.; Wang, W.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 194 aerosol samples, collected coarse and fine particles by using a dichotomous sampler from September 2009 to September 2010 at a remote island (Pengchiayu) on the southern East China Sea, for water-soluble major ions, inorganic nitrogen, and high/low organic nitrogen and carbon. To investigate the possible sources of WSON and WSOC, an Ultrafiltration method was used to separate WSON and WSOC into high (HMW; >1kDa) and low (LMW; <1kDa) molecular weight categories. In addition, 4-d back trajectories of air masses arriving daily at the sampling site were calculated to determine the potential aerosol source regions. In this study, the sources of WSON and WSOC were identified by indicator ions (Na+, nss-SO42-, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+), and the fluxes of nitrogen and carbon were calculated by a dual mode model. The obtained concentrations of major ions indicate that a continental source was dominant from January to May and from November to December, a local source derived from Taiwan Island from June and July, and an oceanic source during August. The measured atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen and carbon species show clear seasonal variations and correspond to the different sources and weather conditions. The results indicate that HMW/ LMW of organic nitrogen and carbon contributed 63%/37% and 29%/71%, respectively, to the total dissolved organic species concentration. The results of a factor analysis of combined major ions and organic nitrogen and carbon indicate that biomass burning, crustal sources, and marine sources are the three major controlling factors. The annual fluxes of HMW/ LMW organic nitrogen and carbon were estimated to be 7.61/12.0 and 29.6/12.7 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively.

  17. Remote atomic force microscopy of microscopic organisms: Technological innovations for hands-on science with middle and high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. G.; Andre, T.; Kubasko, D.; Bokinsky, A.; Tretter, T.; Negishi, A.; Taylor, R.; Superfine, R.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined hands-on experiences in the context of an investigation of viruses and explored how and why hands-on experiences may be effective. We sought to understand whether or not touching and manipulating materials and objects could lead to a deeper, more effective type of knowing than that we obtain from sight or sound alone. Four classes of high school biology students and four classes of seventh graders participated in the study that examined students' use of remote microscopy with a new scientific tool called the nanoManipulator, which enabled them to reach out and touch live viruses inside an atomic force microscope. Half of the students received full haptic (tactile and kinesthetic) feedback from a haptic joystick, whereas half of the students were able to use the haptic joystick to manipulate viruses but the tactile feedback was blocked. Results showed that there were significant gains from pre- to postinstruction across treatment groups for knowledge and attitudes. Students in both treatment groups developed conceptual models of viruses that were more consistent with current scientific research, including a move from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional understanding of virus morphology. There were significant changes in students' understandings of scale; after instruction, students were more likely to identify examples of nanosized objects and be able to describe the degree to which a human would have to be shrunk to reach the size of a virus. Students who received full-haptic feedback had significantly better attitudes suggesting that the increased sensory feedback and stimulation may have made the experience more engaging and motivating to students.

  18. Hand injuries as an indicator of other associated severe injuries.

    PubMed

    Vossoughi, Faranak; Krantz, Brent; Fann, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Retrospective data were collected from a level 1 trauma center registry. A total of 472 patients with hand injuries were admitted to the trauma unit between January 2000 and March 2004. Forty-four per cent of patients with hand injuries had life-threatening injuries. Fifty-one per cent of them had motor vehicle crash-related injuries. Motorcycle crashes were the next most common cause followed by explosions, falls, gunshots, machinery, stabs, bites, crushes, and so on. Frequency of associated injuries was as follows: head injuries, 31 per cent, including skull fractures, 22 per cent; spine injuries, 18 per cent, including spine fractures 18 per cent; chest injuries, 36 per cent, including rib fractures, 15 per cent; and abdominal injuries, 13 per cent. The authors focused on the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Motor vehicle crashes were most common cause of hand injuries. The most common organs to be injured were chest and head. The most common head injury was skull fracture. Other injuries in decreasing order were spine and rib fractures. These data may be helpful in assessing ambulatory patients in the emergency room, in those hand injuries maybe indicative of other simultaneous life-threatening or disabling injuries.

  19. Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  20. Potential Use of Remote Telesonography as a Transformational Technology in Underresourced and/or Remote Settings.

    PubMed

    Pian, Linping; Gillman, Lawrence M; McBeth, Paul B; Xiao, Zhengwen; Ball, Chad G; Blaivas, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas R; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity from traumatic injury are twofold higher in rural compared to urban areas. Furthermore, the greater the distance a patient resides from an organized trauma system, the greater the likelihood of an adverse outcome. Delay in timely diagnosis and treatment contributes to this penalty, regardless of whether the inherent barriers are geographic, cultural, or socioeconomic. Since ultrasound is noninvasive, cost-effective, and portable, it is becoming increasingly useful for remote/underresourced (R/UR) settings to avoid lengthy patient travel to relatively inaccessible medical centers. Ultrasonography is a user-dependent, technical skill, and many, if not most, front-line care providers will not have this advanced training. This is particularly true if care is being provided by out-of-hospital, "nontraditional" providers. The human exploration of space has forced the utilization of information technology (IT) to allow remote experts to guide distant untrained care providers in point-of-care ultrasound to diagnose and manage both acute and chronic illness or injuries. This paradigm potentially brings advanced diagnostic imaging to any medical interaction in a setting with internet connectivity. This paper summarizes the current literature surrounding the development of teleultrasound as a transformational technology and its application to underresourced settings.

  1. Potential Use of Remote Telesonography as a Transformational Technology in Underresourced and/or Remote Settings

    PubMed Central

    Pian, Linping; Gillman, Lawrence M.; McBeth, Paul B.; Xiao, Zhengwen; Ball, Chad G.; Blaivas, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity from traumatic injury are twofold higher in rural compared to urban areas. Furthermore, the greater the distance a patient resides from an organized trauma system, the greater the likelihood of an adverse outcome. Delay in timely diagnosis and treatment contributes to this penalty, regardless of whether the inherent barriers are geographic, cultural, or socioeconomic. Since ultrasound is noninvasive, cost-effective, and portable, it is becoming increasingly useful for remote/underresourced (R/UR) settings to avoid lengthy patient travel to relatively inaccessible medical centers. Ultrasonography is a user-dependent, technical skill, and many, if not most, front-line care providers will not have this advanced training. This is particularly true if care is being provided by out-of-hospital, “nontraditional” providers. The human exploration of space has forced the utilization of information technology (IT) to allow remote experts to guide distant untrained care providers in point-of-care ultrasound to diagnose and manage both acute and chronic illness or injuries. This paradigm potentially brings advanced diagnostic imaging to any medical interaction in a setting with internet connectivity. This paper summarizes the current literature surrounding the development of teleultrasound as a transformational technology and its application to underresourced settings. PMID:23431455

  2. Estimation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya river plume regions using above-surface hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weining; Yu, Qian; Tian, Yong Q.; Chen, Robert F.; Gardner, G. Bernard

    2011-02-01

    A method for the inversion of hyperspectral remote sensing was developed to determine the absorption coefficient for chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya river plume regions and the northern Gulf of Mexico, where water types vary from Case 1 to turbid Case 2. Above-surface hyperspectral remote sensing data were measured by a ship-mounted spectroradiometer and then used to estimate CDOM. Simultaneously, water absorption and attenuation coefficients, CDOM and chlorophyll fluorescence, turbidities, and other related water properties were also measured at very high resolution (0.5-2 m) using in situ, underwater, and flow-through (shipboard, pumped) optical sensors. We separate ag, the absorption coefficient a of CDOM, from adg (a of CDOM and nonalgal particles) based on two absorption-backscattering relationships. The first is between ad (a of nonalgal particles) and bbp (total particulate backscattering coefficient), and the second is between ap (a of total particles) and bbp. These two relationships are referred as ad-based and ap-based methods, respectively. Consequently, based on Lee's quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA), we developed the so-called Extended Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA-E) to decompose adg, using both ad-based and ap-based methods. The absorption-backscattering relationships and the QAA-E were tested using synthetic and in situ data from the International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) as well as our own field data. The results indicate the ad-based method is relatively better than the ap-based method. The accuracy of CDOM estimation is significantly improved by separating ag from adg (R2 = 0.81 and 0.65 for synthetic and in situ data, respectively). The sensitivities of the newly introduced coefficients were also analyzed to ensure QAA-E is robust.

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  4. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  5. Sources and photochemistry of volatile organic compounds in the remote atmosphere of western China: results from the Mt. Waliguan Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. K.; Wang, T.; Guo, H.; Blake, D. R.; Tang, J.; Zhang, X. C.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2013-09-01

    The chemistry of the natural atmosphere and the influence by long-range transport of air pollution are key issues in the atmospheric sciences. Here we present two intensive field measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in late spring and summer of 2003 at Mt. Waliguan (WLG, 36.28° N, 100.90° E, 3816 m a.s.l.), a baseline station in the northeast part of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Most VOC species exhibited higher concentrations in late spring than in summer. A typical diurnal variation was observed with higher nighttime levels, in contrast to results from other mountainous sites. Five different air masses were identified from backward trajectory analysis showing distinct VOC speciation. Air masses originating from the central Eurasian continent contained the lowest VOC levels compared to the others that were impacted by anthropogenic emissions from China and the Indian subcontinent. A photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (version 3.2) and constrained by a full suite of measurements was developed to probe the photochemistry of atmosphere at WLG. Our results show net ozone production from in situ photochemistry during both late spring and summer. Oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) by the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) dominates the ozone production relative to the oxidation by the organic peroxy radicals (RO2), and the ozone is primarily destroyed by photolysis and reactions with the HOx (HOx = OH + HO2) radicals. Ozone photolysis is the predominant primary source of radicals (ROx = OH + HO2 + RO2), followed by the photolysis of secondary oxygenated VOCs and hydrogen peroxides. The radical losses are governed by the self and cross reactions among the radicals. Overall, the findings of the present study provide insights into the background chemistry and the impacts of pollution transport on the pristine atmosphere over the Eurasian continent.

  6. Longitudinal changes in the structure and inflammatory response of the intervertebral disc due to stab injury in a murine organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adam C; Liu, Jennifer W; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant public health impact of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and low back pain, it remains challenging to investigate the multifactorial molecular mechanisms that drive the degenerative cascade. Organ culture model systems offer the advantage of allowing cells to live and interact with their native extracellular matrix, while simultaneously reducing the amount of biological variation and complexity present at the organismal level. Murine organ cultures in particular also allow the use of widely available genetically modified animals with molecular level reporters that would reveal insights on the degenerative cascade. Here, we utilize an organ culture system of murine lumbar functional spinal units where we are able to maintain the cellular, metabolic, and structural, and mechanical stability of the whole organ over a 21-day period. Furthermore, we describe a novel approach in organ culture by using tissues from animals with an NF-κB-luc reporter in combination with a mechanical injury model, and are able to show that proinflammatory factors and cytokines such as NF-κB and IL-6 produced by IVD cells can be monitored longitudinally during culture in a stab injury model. Taken together, we utilize a murine organ culture system that maintains the cellular and tissue level behavior of the intervertebral disc and apply it to transgenic animals that allow the monitoring of the inflammatory profile of IVDs. This approach could provide important insights on the molecular and metabolic mediators that regulate the homeostasis of the IVD. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1431-1438, 2016. PMID:27273204

  7. Sources and photochemistry of volatile organic compounds in the remote atmosphere of western China: results from the Mt. Waliguan Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. K.; Wang, T.; Guo, H.; Blake, D. R.; Tang, J.; Zhang, X. C.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2013-05-01

    The chemistry of the natural atmosphere and the influence by long-range transport of air pollution are key issues in the atmospheric sciences. Here we present two intensive field measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in late spring and summer of 2003 at Mt. Waliguan (WLG, 36.28° N, 100.90° E, 3816 m a.s.l.), a baseline station in the northeast part of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Most VOC species exhibited higher concentrations in late spring than in summer. A typical diurnal variation was observed with higher nighttime levels, in contrast to results from other mountainous sites. Five different air masses were identified from backward trajectory analysis showing distinct VOC speciation. Air masses originating from the central Eurasian continent contained the lowest VOC levels compared to the others that were impacted by anthropogenic emissions from China and the Indian sub-continent. The data were compared with the TRACE-P (Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific) data to examine the inflow and outflow of air pollution over the China sub-continent. The results show that the free troposphere over China may be affected by the inflow from the Eurasian continent in spring, and the emissions in China may not have a significant influence on the free tropospheric outflow. A photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (version 3.2) and constrained by a full suite of measurements was developed to probe the photochemistry of atmosphere at WLG. Our results show net ozone production from in-situ photochemistry during both late spring and summer. Oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) by the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) dominates the ozone production relative to the oxidation by the organic peroxy radicals (RO2), and the ozone is primarily destroyed by photolysis and reactions with the HOx(HOx = OH + HO2) radicals. Ozone photolysis is the predominant primary source of radicals (ROx = OH + HO2 + RO2), followed by the photolysis of oxygenated VOCs and

  8. The missing piece: sediment records in remote Mountain lakes confirm glaciers being secondary sources of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Peter; Bogdal, Christian; Blüthgen, Nancy; Anselmetti, Flavio S; Zwyssig, Alois; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    After atmospheric deposition and storage in the ice, glaciers are temporary reservoirs of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Recently, the hypothesis that melting glaciers represent secondary sources of these pollutants has been introduced by investigations of the historical trend of POPs in a dated sediment core from the proglacial Alpine Lake Oberaar. Here, the hypothesis is further confirmed by the comparison of sediment data gathered from two Alpine lakes with a glaciated and a nonglaciated hydrological catchment. The two lakes (Lake Engstlen and Lake Stein in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland) are situated only 8 km apart at similar altitude and in the same meteorological catchment. In the nonglacial lake sediment of Lake Engstlen, PCBs and DDT (polychlorinated biphenyls and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane) levels culminated with the historic usage of these chemicals some 30-50 years ago. In the glacial Lake Stein, this peak was followed by a reincrease in the 1990s, which goes along with the accelerated melting of the adjacent glacier. This study confirms the hypothesis of glaciers being a secondary source of these pollutants and is in accordance with the earlier findings in Lake Oberaar.

  9. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  10. On the origin of self-organization of SiO2 nanodots deposited by CVD enhanced by atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, G.; Belmonte, T.; Kosior, F.; Dossot, M.; Henrion, G.

    2011-05-01

    The origin of organization of nanostructured silica coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates by remote microplasma at atmospheric pressure is investigated. We show by resorting to thermal camera measurements coupled with modelling that deposition, limited to a few seconds in time, occurs at low temperature (~below 420 K) although the gas temperature may reach 1400 K. Raman analyses of deposited films with thicknesses below 1 µm show the presence of oxidized silicon bonded to the metallic surface. The origin of nanodots is explained as follows. Close to the microplasma nozzle, the concentration of oxidizing species and/or the temperature being high enough, a silica thin film is obtained, leading to ceramic-metallic oxide interface that leads to a Volmer-Weber growth mode and to the synthesis of 3D structures over long treatment times. Far from the nozzle, the reactivity decreasing, thin films get a plasma-polymer like behaviour which leads to a Franck-Van der Merwe growth mode and films with a higher density. Other nanostructures, made of hexagonal cells, are observed but remain unexplained.

  11. Air pollution injury to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The injuries to plants by oxidant air pollution can be used as biological indicators of pollution episodes. Bel W3 tobacco is often used as an indicator organism. Dogwood is another potential indicator organism. Specific growing procedures used for indicator organisms are described, as are diagnostic criteria for the type and extent of injuries.

  12. Rationale and timeliness for IL-1beta-targeted therapy to reduce allogeneic organ injury at procurement and to diminish risk of rejection after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Alan A

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) involving allograft transplantation and procured organs may in part be induced by stimulation of a newly described innate pro-inflammatory immune system (i.e., NALP-3-inflammasome), which can cause secretion of IL-1beta and subsequent neutrophilic inflammation. Ischemia and/or hypoxia/anoxia can induce anaerobic metabolism with metabolic acidosis and subsequent development of danger signals known to stimulate IL-1beta secretion from the NALP-3 inflammasome. Observations from IRI studies and hereditary auto-inflammatory syndromes with NALP-3 inflammasome mutations suggest that IL-1beta secretion can induce robust neutrophilic inflammation that is responsive to IL-1beta targeted therapy. Based on these observations and data from transplantation studies, it may be timely to consider commercially available IL-1beta targeted biologic therapy to improve allograft tolerance and viability of procured organs. PMID:20394637

  13. Trial protocol for a randomised controlled trial of red cell washing for the attenuation of transfusion-associated organ injury in cardiac surgery: the REDWASH trial

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, G J; Verheyden, V; Wozniak, M; Sullo, N; Dott, W; Bhudia, S; Bittar, N; Morris, T; Ring, A; Tebbatt, A; Kumar, T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been suggested that removal of proinflammatory substances that accumulate in stored donor red cells by mechanical cell washing may attenuate inflammation and organ injury in transfused cardiac surgery patients. This trial will test the hypotheses that the severity of the postoperative inflammatory response will be less and postoperative recovery faster if patients undergoing cardiac surgery receive washed red cells compared with standard care (unwashed red cells). Methods and analysis Adult (≥16 years) cardiac surgery patients identified at being at increased risk for receiving large volume red cell transfusions at 1 of 3 UK cardiac centres will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to either red cell washing or standard care. The primary outcome is serum interleukin-8 measured at 5 postsurgery time points up to 96 h. Secondary outcomes will include measures of inflammation, organ injury and volumes of blood transfused and cost-effectiveness. Allocation concealment, internet-based randomisation stratified by operation type and recruiting centre, and blinding of outcome assessors will reduce the risk of bias. The trial will test the superiority of red cell washing versus standard care. A sample size of 170 patients was chosen in order to detect a small-to-moderate target difference, with 80% power and 5% significance (2-tailed). Ethics and dissemination The trial protocol was approved by a UK ethics committee (reference 12/EM/0475). The trial findings will be disseminated in scientific journals and meetings. Trial registration number ISRCTN 27076315. PMID:26977309

  14. Circulating tissue antigens. I. Tissue antigens in serum of patients with diseases involving injury of the liver and of other organs

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, E.

    1974-01-01

    Circulating tissue antigens (CTA) were investigated in 143 patients with disorders involving injury of the liver and of other organs and in forty-eight normal subjects by immunodiffusion techniques using rabbit anti-human liver serum containing antibodies to a liver-specific antigen and to tissue antigens of wide organ distribution. Analysis of serum samples by double immunodiffusion showed up to three CTA in the following cases: fifteen out of eighteen, viral hepatitis (VH), two out of thirteen, other infectious diseases, two out of ten, alcoholic cirrhosis, seven out of twenty-one, congestive heart failure (CHF), four out of fourteen, myocardial infarction, ten out of twenty-one, trauma, two out of thirteen, carcinoma and three out of thirty-three, miscellaneous diseases. Forty-eight normal subjects showed no CTA. Immunoelectrophoresis of most of the positive cases showed two to three CTA, while a few cases showed four to six. Absorption tests with organ extracts demonstrated that in most patients, CTA were substances shared by several organs. However, in two cases of VH, in two cases of CHF with liver necrosis and in two cases of trauma to the liver, one of the CTA was shown to be liver specific. The CTA were susceptible to digestion by pronase and were found to be relatively thermolabile. Positive sera showed higher glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and lactic dehydrogenase activities than the negative sera. These preliminary data suggest that further investigation on CTA in disease involving tissue injury and necrosis may be rewarding. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4219874

  15. Remote viewing.

    PubMed

    Scott, C

    1988-04-15

    Remote viewing is the supposed faculty which enables a percipient, sited in a closed room, to describe the perceptions of a remote agent visiting an unknown target site. To provide convincing demonstration of such a faculty poses a range of experimental and practical problems, especially if feedback to the percipient is allowed after each trial. The precautions needed are elaborate and troublesome; many potential loopholes have to be plugged and there will be strong temptations to relax standards, requiring exceptional discipline and dedication by the experimenters. Most reports of remote viewing experiments are rather superficial and do not permit assessment of the experimental procedures with confidence; in many cases there is clear evidence of particular loopholes left unclosed. Any serious appraisal of the evidence would have to go beyond the reports. Meanwhile the published evidence is far from compelling, and certainly insufficient to justify overthrow of well-established scientific principles.

  16. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  17. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  18. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  19. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  20. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs.

  1. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs. PMID:19005358

  2. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  3. Contrasting temporal trends and relationships of total organic carbon, black carbon, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rural low-altitude and remote high-altitude lakes.

    PubMed

    Bogdal, Christian; Bucheli, Thomas D; Agarwal, Tripti; Anselmetti, Flavio S; Blum, Franziska; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Kohler, Martin; Schmid, Peter; Scheringer, Martin; Sobek, Anna

    2011-05-01

    Historical records of total organic carbon (TOC), black carbon (BC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were reconstructed in dated sediment cores from four nearby lakes in central Switzerland. In the sub-Alpine Lake Thun, located at 558 m a.s.l., the proximity to anthropogenic emission sources is reflected in higher input of BC and PAHs into sediments with fluxes only slightly decreasing during the last decades. PAH/BC ratios are relatively high and correlation between levels of total PAHs and BC is almost inexistent in Lake Thun, probably due to the presence of less condensed forms of the BC spectrum (char BC) that is underestimated with the chemothermal oxidation method applied in this study. The sediment profiles of TOC, BC, and PAHs are noticeably different in the mountain lakes located around 2000 m a.s.l. In Lake Engstlen, the PAH/BC ratios, as well as the correlation between PAHs and BC, point towards appreciable amounts of predominantly light soot particles. Light soot particles have higher mobility and can, therefore, be efficiently transported to this remote site. The proglacial Lake Oberaar is shown to be a receptor of BC and PAHs released by the fast melting adjacent glacier acting as a secondary source for these conservative species temporarily stored in the glacier ice. Finally, Lake Stein is in strong contrast to all other lakes. High flux of BC into Lake Stein, combined with constant temporal evolutions of BC and PAHs, and in particular BC/TOC ratios approaching 100% are all strong indications for a geogenic presence of graphite in its catchment area.

  4. Remote Sensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Kover, Allan W.

    1978-01-01

    The steady growth of the Landsat image data base continues to make this kind of remotely sensed data second only to aerial photographs in use by geoscientists who employ image data in their research. Article reviews data uses, meetings and symposia, publications, problems, and future trends. (Author/MA)

  5. Remote sensing procurement package: Remote Sensing Industry Directory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A directory of over 140 firms and organizations which contains detailed information in the types of products, services and equipment which they offer is presented. Also included for each firm or organization are addresses, phone numbers, contact person(s), and experience in the remote sensing field.

  6. Measurement of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in plastic resin pellets from remote islands : Toward establishment of baseline level for International Pellet Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, H.; Heskett, M.; Yamashita, R.; Yuyama, M.; Itoh, M.; Geok, Y. B.; Ogata, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Plastic resin pellets collected from remote islands in open oceans (Canary, St. Helena, Cocos, Hawaii, Maui Islands and Barbados) were sorted and yellowing polyethylene (PE) pellets were measured for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the degradation products (DDTs), and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) by gas chromatograph equipped with mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). PCBs were detected from all the pellet samples, confirming the global dispersion of PCBs. Median concentrations of PCBs (sum of 13 congeners : CB-66, CB-101, CB-110, CB-118, CB-105, CB-149, CB-153, CB-138, CB-128, CB-187, CB-180, CB-170, CB-206) in the remote island pellets ranged from 0.1 to 10 ng/g-pellet. These were one to three orders of magnitude lower than those observed for pellets from industrialized coastal zones (hundreds ng/g in Los Angeles, Boston, Tokyo; Ogata et al., 2009). Because these remote islands are far (>100 km) from industrialized zones, these concentrations (i.e., 0.1 to 10 ng/g-pellet) can be regarded as global "baseline" level of PCB pollution. Concentrations of DDTs in the remote island pellets ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 ng/g-pellet. At some locations, DDT was dominant over the degradation products (DDE and DDD), suggesting current usage of the pesticides in the islands. HCHs concentrations were 0.4 - 1.8 ng/g-pellet and lower than PCBs and DDTs, except for St. Helena Island at 18.8 ng/g-pellet where the current usage of the pesticides are of concern. The analyses of pellets from the remote islands provided "baseline" level of POPs (PCBs < 10 ng/g-pellet, DDTs < 6 ng/g-pellet, HCHs < 2 ng/g-pellet). However, the present samples were from tropical and subtropical areas. To establish global baseline, especially to understand the effects of global distillation, pellet samples from remote islands in higher latitude regions are necessary. From the eco-toxicological point of view, the fact that sporadic high

  7. Remote conditioning the heart overview: translatability and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Redington, Andrew; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2015-01-01

    Conditioning the heart to resist predictable and unpredictable ischaemia–reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the fastest growing areas of bench to bedside research within cardiology. Basic science has provided important insights into signalling pathways and protective mechanisms in the heart, and a growing number of clinical studies have, with important exceptions, shown the potential applicability and beneficial effect of various mechanical conditioning strategies achieved by intermittent short-lasting-induced ischaemia of the heart itself or a remote tissue. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) in particular has been utilized in a number of clinical settings with promising results. However, while many novel ‘downstream’ mechanisms of RIC have been discovered, translation to pharmacological conditioning has not yet been convincingly demonstrated in clinical studies. One explanation for this apparent failure may be that most pharmacological approaches mimic a single instrument in a complex orchestra activated by mechanical conditioning. Recent studies, however, provide important insights into upstream events occurring in RIC, which may allow for development of drugs activating more complex systems of biological organ protection. With this review, we will systematically examine the first generation of pharmacological cardioprotection studies and then provide a summary of the recent discoveries in basic science that could illuminate the path towards more advanced approaches in the next generation of pharmacological agents that may work by reproducing the diverse effects of RIC, thereby providing protection against IR injury. PMID:25219984

  8. Impairment of the Vascular KATP Channel Imposes Fatal Susceptibility to Experimental Diabetes Due to Multi-Organ Injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Shan; Cui, Ningren; Yang, Yang; Trower, Timothy C; Wei, Yu-Min; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Xin; Jiang, Chun

    2015-12-01

    The vascular isoform of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP ) channels regulates blood flow to all organs. The KATP channel is strongly inhibited by reactive oxygen and carbonyl species produced in diabetic tissue inflammation. To address how such channel inhibition impacts vascular regulation as well as tissue viability, we performed studies in experimental diabetic mice. Strikingly, we found that knockout of the Kcnj8 encoding Kir6.1 subunit (Kcnj8-KO) caused mice to be fatally susceptible to diabetes. Organ perfusion studies suggested that the lack of this vascular K(+) channel handicapped activity-dependent vasodilation, leading to hypoperfusion, tissue hypoxia, and multi-organ failure. Morphologically, Kcnj8-KO mice showed greater inflammatory cell infiltration, higher levels of expression of inflammation indicator proteins, more severe cell apoptosis, and worse tissue disruptions. These were observed in the kidney, liver, and heart under diabetic condition in parallel comparison to tissues from WT mice. Patch clamping and molecular studies showed that the KATP channel was S-glutathionylated in experimental diabetes contributing to the inhibition of channel activity as well as the reduced arterial responses to vasodilators. These results suggest that the vascular KATP channel is organ protective in diabetic condition, and since the channel is suppressed by diabetic oxidative stress, therapeutical interventions to the maintenance of functional KATP channels may help to lower or prevent diabetic organ dysfunction.

  9. Impairment of the Vascular KATP Channel Imposes Fatal Susceptibility to Experimental Diabetes Due to Multi-Organ Injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Shan; Cui, Ningren; Yang, Yang; Trower, Timothy C; Wei, Yu-Min; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Xin; Jiang, Chun

    2015-12-01

    The vascular isoform of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP ) channels regulates blood flow to all organs. The KATP channel is strongly inhibited by reactive oxygen and carbonyl species produced in diabetic tissue inflammation. To address how such channel inhibition impacts vascular regulation as well as tissue viability, we performed studies in experimental diabetic mice. Strikingly, we found that knockout of the Kcnj8 encoding Kir6.1 subunit (Kcnj8-KO) caused mice to be fatally susceptible to diabetes. Organ perfusion studies suggested that the lack of this vascular K(+) channel handicapped activity-dependent vasodilation, leading to hypoperfusion, tissue hypoxia, and multi-organ failure. Morphologically, Kcnj8-KO mice showed greater inflammatory cell infiltration, higher levels of expression of inflammation indicator proteins, more severe cell apoptosis, and worse tissue disruptions. These were observed in the kidney, liver, and heart under diabetic condition in parallel comparison to tissues from WT mice. Patch clamping and molecular studies showed that the KATP channel was S-glutathionylated in experimental diabetes contributing to the inhibition of channel activity as well as the reduced arterial responses to vasodilators. These results suggest that the vascular KATP channel is organ protective in diabetic condition, and since the channel is suppressed by diabetic oxidative stress, therapeutical interventions to the maintenance of functional KATP channels may help to lower or prevent diabetic organ dysfunction. PMID:25825210

  10. Dexamethasone pretreatment attenuates lung and kidney injury in cholestatic rats induced by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liangyi; Yao, Xiangqing; Chen, Yanling

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) results in mild to severe organ injury, in which tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) seem to be involved. Thus, we aim to assess the influence of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury on remote organs in addition to cholestasis and consider the possible efficacy of steroid pretreatment in reducing the injury. A common bile duct ligation model was done on 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 7 days, the rats were divided randomly into control group, IR group, and dexamethasone (DEX) group. The IR group showed significant increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine levels compared with the control and DEX groups. By ELISA techniques, higher levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in lung and kidney tissues were measured in the IR group than in the control and DEX groups, these were verified by immunohistochemistry. The lung histology of the IR group rats showed neutrophil infiltration, interstitial edema, and alveolar wall thickening. Kidney histology of the IR group rats showed vacuolization of the proximal tubular epithelial cells and tubular dilatation with granular eosinophilic casts. Better morphological aspects were observed in the DEX-pretreated animals. Minimal lesions were observed in the control. The results suggest that hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in cholestatic rats induced lung and kidney injuries. Pretreatment with dexamethasone reduced the IR-induced injury in addition to cholestasis.

  11. Lithothamnion muelleri Controls Inflammatory Responses, Target Organ Injury and Lethality Associated with Graft-versus-Host Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Barbara M.; Bernardes, Priscila T. T.; Resende, Carolina B.; Arantes, Rosa M. E.; Souza, Danielle G.; Braga, Fernão C.; Castor, Marina G. M.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Pinho, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Lithothamnion muelleri (Hapalidiaceae) is a marine red alga, which is a member of a group of algae with anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunomodulatory properties. The present study evaluated the effects of treatment with Lithothamnion muelleri extract (LM) in a model of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), using a model of adoptive splenocyte transfer from C57BL/6 donors into B6D2F1 recipient mice. Mice treated with LM showed reduced clinical signs of disease and mortality when compared with untreated mice. LM-treated mice had reduced tissue injury, less bacterial translocation, and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5)). The polysaccharide-rich fraction derived from LM could inhibit leukocyte rolling and adhesion in intestinal venules, as assessed by intravital microscopy. LM treatment did not impair the beneficial effects of graft-versus-leukaemia (GVL). Altogether, our studies suggest that treatment with Lithothamnion muelleri has a potential therapeutic application in GVHD treatment. PMID:23873335

  12. Literature relevant to remote sensing of water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Marcell, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    References relevant to remote sensing of water quality were compiled, organized, and cross-referenced. The following general categories were included: (1) optical properties and measurement of water characteristics; (2) interpretation of water characteristics by remote sensing, including color, transparency, suspended or dissolved inorganic matter, biological materials, and temperature; (3) application of remote sensing for water quality monitoring; (4) application of remote sensing according to water body type; and (5) manipulation, processing and interpretation of remote sensing digital water data.

  13. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  14. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  15. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed.

  16. The Injury Profile of an Australian Specialist Policing Unit.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brianna; Aisbett, Brad; Silk, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the injuries sustained by an Australian specialist police division. Injury records spanning four-years were analyzed. The role being performed when the injury occurred, injury cause, body part injured, and injury-related costs were quantified. The percentage of personnel injured multiple times was documented. One hundred and thirty eight personnel reported injuries, 58 of these on multiple occasions. This resulted in 229 injuries and 76 claims being raised. Half of the injuries occurred during operational policing tasks, however training activities accounted for >30% of injuries. The most common injury was strain/sprain, and upper body injuries were 2.5-times more common than lower-body or torso injuries. 1107 shifts were lost, and injuries cost the organization $487,159 (Australian Dollars) over the four-year period. The injury costs (both financial and in manpower) may prompt policy makers to review the current training and post-injury rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27023586

  17. The Injury Profile of an Australian Specialist Policing Unit

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Brianna; Aisbett, Brad; Silk, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the injuries sustained by an Australian specialist police division. Injury records spanning four-years were analyzed. The role being performed when the injury occurred, injury cause, body part injured, and injury-related costs were quantified. The percentage of personnel injured multiple times was documented. One hundred and thirty eight personnel reported injuries, 58 of these on multiple occasions. This resulted in 229 injuries and 76 claims being raised. Half of the injuries occurred during operational policing tasks, however training activities accounted for >30% of injuries. The most common injury was strain/sprain, and upper body injuries were 2.5-times more common than lower-body or torso injuries. 1107 shifts were lost, and injuries cost the organization $487,159 (Australian Dollars) over the four-year period. The injury costs (both financial and in manpower) may prompt policy makers to review the current training and post-injury rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27023586

  18. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-01

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum.

  19. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  20. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  1. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  2. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  3. Blast injury caused by a booby-trapped cellular phone.

    PubMed

    Lapid, Oren; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Glesinger, Ronen; Monos, Tova; Shaked, Gad

    2004-03-01

    Terrorists are recently using cellular phones to remotely detonate bombs. A patient was injured while assembling a bomb connected to a cellular phone. The patient sustained combined injury to the head and to the dominant hand which held the phone. Amputation of the hand was required, the facial injuries were reconstructed. The characteristics of this unusual type of injury are described and compared to injuries caused by other bombs and explosive devices.

  4. Blast injury caused by a booby-trapped cellular phone.

    PubMed

    Lapid, Oren; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Glesinger, Ronen; Monos, Tova; Shaked, Gad

    2004-03-01

    Terrorists are recently using cellular phones to remotely detonate bombs. A patient was injured while assembling a bomb connected to a cellular phone. The patient sustained combined injury to the head and to the dominant hand which held the phone. Amputation of the hand was required, the facial injuries were reconstructed. The characteristics of this unusual type of injury are described and compared to injuries caused by other bombs and explosive devices. PMID:15124808

  5. Tramadol Alleviates Myocardial Injury Induced by Acute Hindlimb Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Asl, Adel Haghighi Khiabanian; Shahzamani, Mehran; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Allahverdi, Amin; Khansari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background Organ injury occurs not only during periods of ischemia but also during reperfusion. It is known that ischemia reperfusion (IR) causes both remote organ and local injuries. Objective This study evaluated the effects of tramadol on the heart as a remote organ after acute hindlimb IR. Methods Thirty healthy mature male Wistar rats were allocated randomly into three groups: Group I (sham), Group II (IR), and Group III (IR + tramadol). Ischemia was induced in anesthetized rats by left femoral artery clamping for 3 h, followed by 3 h of reperfusion. Tramadol (20 mg/kg, intravenous) was administered immediately prior to reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion, animals were euthanized, and hearts were harvested for histological and biochemical examination. Results The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were higher in Groups I and III than those in Group II (p < 0.05). In comparison with other groups, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in Group II were significantly increased (p < 0.05), and this increase was prevented by tramadol. Histopathological changes, including microscopic bleeding, edema, neutrophil infiltration, and necrosis, were scored. The total injuryscore in Group III was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared with Group II. Conclusion From the histological and biochemical perspectives, treatment with tramadol alleviated the myocardial injuries induced by skeletal muscle IR in this experimental model. PMID:26039663

  6. Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing is measuring something without touching it. Most methods measure a portion of the electro-magnetic spectrum using energy reflected from or emitted by a material. Moving the instrument away makes it easier to see more at one time. Airplanes are good but satellites are much better. Many things can not be easily measured on the scale of an individual person. Example - measuring all the vegetation growing at one time in even the smallest country. A satellite can see things over large areas repeatedly and in a consistent way. Data from the detector is reported as digital values for a grid that covers some portion of the Earth. Because it is digital and consistent a computer can extract information or enhance the data for a specific purpose.

  7. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  8. Sandia multispectral analyst remote sensing toolkit (SMART).

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Brian Nelson; Smith, Jody Lynn; Geib, Peter L.; Nandy, Prabal; Wang, Nancy Nairong

    2003-03-01

    This remote sensing science and exploitation work focused on exploitation algorithms and methods targeted at the analyst. SMART is a 'plug-in' to commercial remote sensing software that provides algorithms to enhance the utility of the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) and other multispectral satellite data. This toolkit has been licensed to 22 government organizations.

  9. Some guidelines for remote sensing in hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.; Anderson, Daniel G.

    1969-01-01

    Remote sensing in the field of hydrology is beginning to be applied to significant problems, such as thermal pollution, in many programs of the Federal and State Governments as well as in operation of many private organizations. The purpose of this paper is to guide the hydrologist to a better understanding of how he may collect, synthesize, and interpret remote sensing data.

  10. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  11. Remote preconditioning as a novel "conditioning" approach to repair the broken heart: potential mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ravingerova, T; Farkasova, V; Griecsova, L; Carnicka, S; Murarikova, M; Barlaka, E; Kolar, F; Bartekova, M; Lonek, L; Slezak, J; Lazou, A

    2016-09-19

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a novel strategy of protection against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in the heart (and/or other organs) by brief episodes of non-lethal IR in a distant organ/tissue. Importantly, RIPC can be induced noninvasively by limitation of blood flow in the extremity implying the applicability of this method in clinical situations. RIPC (and its delayed phase) is a form of relatively short-term adaptation to ischemia, similar to ischemic PC, and likely they both share triggering mechanisms, whereas mediators and end-effectors may differ. It is hypothesized that communication between the signals triggered in the remote organs and protection in the target organ may be mediated through substances released from the preconditioned organ and transported via the circulation (humoral pathways), by neural pathways and/or via systemic anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic response to short ischemic bouts. Identification of molecules involved in RIPC cascades may have therapeutic and diagnostic implications in the management of myocardial ischemia. Elucidation of the mechanisms of endogenous cardioprotection triggered in the remote organ could lead to the development of diverse pharmacological RIPC mimetics. In the present article, the authors provide a short overview of RIPC-induced protection, proposed underlying mechanisms and factors modulating RIPC as a promising cardioprotective strategy. PMID:27643940

  12. Use of remote sensing in agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettry, D. E.; Powell, N. L.; Newhouse, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Remote sensing studies in Virginia and Chesapeake Bay areas to investigate soil and plant conditions via remote sensing technology are reported ant the results given. Remote sensing techniques and interactions are also discussed. Specific studies on the effects of soil moisture and organic matter on energy reflection of extensively occurring Sassafras soils are discussed. Greenhouse and field studies investigating the effects of chlorophyll content of Irish potatoes on infrared reflection are presented. Selected ground truth and environmental monitoring data are shown in summary form. Practical demonstrations of remote sensing technology in agriculture are depicted and future use areas are delineated.

  13. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  15. Perfluorinated and other persistent halogenated organic compounds in European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis) and common eider (Somateria mollissima) from Norway: a suburban to remote pollutant gradient.

    PubMed

    Herzke, D; Nygård, T; Berger, U; Huber, S; Røv, N

    2009-12-20

    Samples of two marine bird species, European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis) and common eider (Somateria mollissima) sampled at a remote coastal site in Norway were analysed for POPs and PFCs. Additionally samples of common eider were analysed from two other locations in Norway, representing a gradient from "densely populated" to "remote". The variety, concentration and distribution of lipophilic POPs in comparison to PFCs were investigated. PCBs were the dominating group of contaminants in the analysed egg samples. Shag eggs had median sum PCBs levels of 4,580 ng/g l.w. in 2004. Six different PBDE congeners could be detected in the shag eggs. BDE 47 and 100 were the main contributors with 24 and 27 ng/g l.w. respectively, sum PBDEs was 90 ng/g l.w. Relatively high concentrations of chlordanes were found with a total sum of 903 ng/g l.w. Of other OCs, toxaphene 26 and 52 together (sum 657 ng/g l.w.) and HCB (165 ng/g l.w.) were contributing majorly to the egg burden. Sum HCHs were low; only 54 ng/g l.w. PFOS was the main PFC in egg, plasma and liver samples. Similar median levels of 29, 32 and 27 ng/g w.w. were observed. PFOSA, PFH x S, and PFDcA were observed additionally in all shag samples at minor concentrations with the exception of elevated levels observed in liver for PFOSA and PFDcA with median levels of 7.6 and 7.9 ng/g w.w., respectively. In common eider eggs, the POP concentrations decreased up to 1/8th along the sampled spatial gradient from suburban to remote. Of the 9 detected PFCs, PFOS dominated all samples by one order of magnitude, followed by PFOA. Sum PFC concentrations were twice as high at the two fjord sites compared to the remote site. Shorter chained PFCAs like PFOA and PFNA could be detected in the eider eggs whilst being absent in shag eggs. PMID:19836057

  16. Multiple node remote messaging

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-08-31

    A method for passing remote messages in a parallel computer system formed as a network of interconnected compute nodes includes that a first compute node (A) sends a single remote message to a remote second compute node (B) in order to control the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message. The method includes various steps including controlling a DMA engine at first compute node (A) to prepare the single remote message to include a first message descriptor and at least one remote message descriptor for controlling the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message, including putting the first message descriptor into an injection FIFO at the first compute node (A) and sending the single remote message and the at least one remote message descriptor to the second compute node (B).

  17. Skiing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    In the broad spectrum of orthopedic skiing injuries, ‘second aid’ on the mountain and at the base by the physician is very important. All skiing physicians should carry minimal medical supplies, including narcotic medication. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries at the hospital are outlined. Most ski fractures of the tibia can be treated by conservative methods. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis and treatment of ligamentous injuries of the knee is recommended. PMID:20469236

  18. Diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Dickey, L S

    1984-01-01

    This is a collective review about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of SCUBA and diving injuries by the emergency physician. These injuries can be classified into those resulting from the toxic effects of the inhaled gas, from the pressure changes in the water and gas mixture while diving, and from decompression sickness. With the increasing popularity of SCUBA diving, it is hoped that this discussion will enable a recognition of these injuries and therefore minimize the morbidity and mortality from them.

  19. A short course of infusion of a hydrogen sulfide-donor attenuates endotoxemia induced organ injury via stimulation of anti-inflammatory pathways, with no additional protection from prolonged infusion.

    PubMed

    Aslami, Hamid; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; de Beer, Friso M; Kuipers, Maria T; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hegeman, Maria A; Van der Sluijs, Koen F; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2013-02-01

    Organ failure is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Previously, we showed that a short course of infusion of a hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) donor reduced metabolism with concurrent reduction of lung injury. Here, we hypothesize that prolonged H(2)S infusion is more protective than a short course in endotoxemia with organ failure. Also, as H(2)S has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects, we explored the effect of H(2)S on interleukin production. Endotoxemia was induced by an intravenous bolus injection of LPS (7.5mg/kg) in mechanically ventilated rats. H(2)S donor NaHS (2mg/kg) or vehicle (saline) was infused and organ injury was determined after either 4 or 8h. A short course of H(2)S infusion was associated with reduction of lung and kidney injury. Prolonged infusion did not enhance protection. Systemically, infusion of H(2)S increased both the pro-inflammatory response during endotoxemia, as demonstrated by increased TNF-α levels, as well as the anti-inflammatory response, as demonstrated by increased IL-10 levels. In LPS-stimulated whole blood of healthy volunteers, co-incubation with H(2)S had solely anti-inflammatory effects, resulting in decreased TNF-α levels and increased IL-10 levels. Co-incubation with a neutralizing IL-10 antibody partly abrogated the decrease in TNF-α levels. In conclusion, a short course of H(2)S infusion reduced organ injury during endotoxemia, at least in part via upregulation of IL-10. PMID:23267760

  20. [Thematic Issue: Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Four of the articles in this publication discuss the remote sensing of the Earth and its resources by satellites. Among the topics dealt with are the development and management of remote sensing systems, types of satellites used for remote sensing, the uses of remote sensing, and issues involved in using information obtained through remote…

  1. Occupational Injuries, Illnesses and Fatalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... that was created by Act of Congress and publishes data related to safety, injuries, and fatalities that are both work-related and non-work related. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) - a government organization that is part of ...

  2. Gunshot and Explosion Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Kobi; Aharonson-Daniel, Limor; Stein, Michael; Michaelson, Moshe; Kluger, Yoram; Simon, Daniel; Noji, Eric K.

    2004-01-01

    .8% in the GSW group compared with 5.3% in the explosion group. A larger proportion of gunshot victims died during the first day (97% versus 58%). Conclusions: GSW and injuries from explosions differ in the body region of injury, distribution of severity, LOS, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and time of inpatient death. These findings have implications for treatment and for preparedness of hospital resources to treat patients after a terrorist attack in any region of the world. Tailored protocol for patient evaluation and initial treatment should differ between GSW and explosion victims. Hospital organization toward treating and admitting these patients should take into account the different arrival and injury patterns. PMID:15075646

  3. Peroxisomes and Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Peroxisomes are organelles present in most eukaryotic cells. The organs with the highest density of peroxisomes are the liver and kidneys. Peroxisomes possess more than fifty enzymes and fulfill a multitude of biological tasks. They actively participate in apoptosis, innate immunity, and inflammation. In recent years, a considerable amount of evidence has been collected to support the involvement of peroxisomes in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Recent Advances: The nature of the two most important peroxisomal tasks, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and hydrogen peroxide turnover, functionally relates peroxisomes to mitochondria. Further support for their communication and cooperation is furnished by the evidence that both organelles share the components of their division machinery. Until recently, the majority of studies on the molecular mechanisms of kidney injury focused primarily on mitochondria and neglected peroxisomes. Critical Issues: The aim of this concise review is to introduce the reader to the field of peroxisome biology and to provide an overview of the evidence about the contribution of peroxisomes to the development and progression of kidney injury. The topics of renal ischemia–reperfusion injury, endotoxin-induced kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as the potential therapeutic implications of peroxisome activation, are addressed in this review. Future Directions: Despite recent progress, further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms induced by dysfunctional peroxisomes and the role of the dysregulated mitochondria–peroxisome axis in the pathogenesis of renal injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 217–231. PMID:26972522

  4. Applications of remote sensing data in Alaska: A cooperative program of the University of Alaska with user organizations, including local, state and federal government agencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The development of the coastal-zone-related issues is generating an increasing need for information which is greater in quantity of natural resource data, greater in quality of detail of data, and more frequent in collection of data owing to the need to monitor certain aspects of programs. The array, detail, and frequency of information acquisition required to develop natural resources and to implement and maintain the resulting programs demand improved techniques of data gathering, processing, and interpretation which is conducive to the use of remote-sensing techniques. As Alaska, both in the state and federal domain, gears up to meet the energy-related issues facing the nation there will be a growing role for efforts which adapt state-of-the-art tools to solving existing problems.

  5. Invited commentary on Quality of care indicators for the rehabilitation of children with traumatic brain injury, and Quality of care indicators for the structure and organization of inpatient rehabilitation care of children with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Whyte, John

    2012-03-01

    Measures of structure and process in health care have been shown to be associated with care outcomes in prior research. Two articles in this issue propose measures of structure and process that may be relevant to pediatric traumatic brain injury rehabilitation. This commentary considers how these potential measures may be related to the actual treatments and services that ultimately affect patient outcomes.

  6. Remote monitoring for international safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-09-01

    Remote monitoring is not a new technology, and its application to safeguards relevant activities has been examined for a number of years. On behalf of the US Department of Energy and international partners, remote monitoring systems have been emplaced in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world. The experience gained from these field trials of remote monitoring systems has shown the viability of the concept of using integrated monitoring systems. Although a wide variety of sensors has been used in the remote monitoring field trials conducted to date, the possible range of instrumentation that might be used has scarcely been touched. As the technology becomes widespread, large amounts of data will become available to inspectors responsible for safeguards activities at the sites. Effective use of remote monitoring will require processing, archiving, presenting, and assessing of these data. To provide reasonable efficiency in the application of this technology, data processing should be done in a careful and organized manner. The problem will be not an issue of poring over scant records but of surviving under a deluge of information made possible by modern technology. Fortunately, modern technology, which created the problem of the data glut, is available to come to the assistance of those inundated by data. Apart from the technological problems, one of the most important aspects of remote monitoring is the potential constraint related to the transmission of data out of a facility or beyond national borders. Remote monitoring across national borders can be seriously considered only in the context of a comprehensive, transparent, and open implementation regime.

  7. Injury Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Injuries are now the cause of more deaths to children than the next six most frequent causes combined. Reviews the research evidence on the effectiveness of approaches to injury control such as legislation, health education, and behavioral strategies. Suggests avenues of further research. (Author/BJV)

  8. Rowing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December, 2011) as well as from textbook chapters and rowing coaching manuals. Results: Rowing injuries are primarily overuse related. The knee, lumbar spine, and ribs are most commonly affected. The injury incidence is directly related to the volume of training and technique. Conclusion: Familiarity of the injury patterns and the biomechanical forces affecting the rowing athlete will aid in prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23016093

  9. Effects of the endothelin receptor antagonist, SB 209670, on circulatory failure and organ injury in endotoxic shock in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ruetten, H.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    -selective ETA/ETB receptor antagonist, SB 209670, augments the degree of (i) hypotension, (ii) vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline, (iii) renal dysfunction and (iv) metabolic acidosis caused by endotoxin in the anaesthetized rat. In contrast to rats treated with LPS alone, LPS-rats treated with SB 209670 exhibited liver dysfunction and hepatocellular injury. We propose that the release of endogenous ET-1 serves to maintain blood pressure and subsequently organ perfusion in septic shock. PMID:8733596

  10. Cardioprotection evoked by remote ischaemic preconditioning is critically dependent on the activity of vagal pre-ganglionic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Marina, Nephtali; Gourine, Andrey; Gilbey, Michael P.; Spyer, K. Michael; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Kasparov, Sergey; Trapp, Stefan; Ackland, Gareth L.; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Innate mechanisms of inter-organ protection underlie the phenomenon of remote ischaemic preconditioning (RPc) in which episode(s) of ischaemia and reperfusion in tissues remote from the heart reduce myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The uncertainty surrounding the mechanism(s) underlying RPc centres on whether humoral factor(s) produced during ischaemia/reperfusion of remote tissue and released into the systemic circulation mediate RPc, or whether a neural signal is required. While these two hypotheses may not be incompatible, one approach to clarify the potential role of a neural pathway requires targeted disruption or activation of discrete central nervous substrate(s). Methods and results Using a rat model of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury in combination with viral gene transfer, pharmaco-, and optogenetics, we tested the hypothesis that RPc cardioprotection depends on the activity of vagal pre-ganglionic neurones and consequently an intact parasympathetic drive. For cell-specific silencing or activation, neurones of the brainstem dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DVMN) were targeted using viral vectors to express a Drosophila allatostatin receptor (AlstR) or light-sensitive fast channelrhodopsin variant (ChIEF), respectively. RPc cardioprotection, elicited by ischaemia/reperfusion of the limbs, was abolished when DVMN neurones transduced to express AlstR were silenced by selective ligand allatostatin or in conditions of systemic muscarinic receptor blockade with atropine. In the absence of remote ischaemia/reperfusion, optogenetic activation of DVMN neurones transduced to express ChIEF reduced infarct size, mimicking the effect of RPc. Conclusion These data indicate a crucial dependence of RPc cardioprotection against ischaemia/reperfusion injury upon the activity of a distinct population of vagal pre-ganglionic neurones. PMID:22739118

  11. Applications of Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacha, Charlene

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing is one of the best ways to be able to monitor and see changes in the Earth. The use of satellite images in the classroom can be a practical way to help students understand the importance and use of remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It is essential in helping students to understand that underlying individual data points are converted to a broad spatial form. The use of actual remote sensing data makes this more understandable to the students e.g. an online map of recent earthquake events, geologic maps, satellite imagery. For change detection, images of years ten or twenty years apart of the same area can be compared and observations recorded. Satellite images of different places can be available on the Internet or from the local space agency. In groups of mixed abilities, students can observe changes in land use over time and also give possible reasons and explanations to those changes. Students should answer essential questions like, how does satellite imagery offer valuable information to different faculties e.g. military, weather, environmental departments and others. Before and after images on disasters for example, volcanoes, floods and earthquakes should be obtained and observed. Key questions would be; how can scientists use these images to predict, or to change the future outcomes over time. How to manage disasters and how the archived images can assist developers in planning land use around that area in the future. Other material that would be useful includes maps and aerial photographs of the area. A flight should be organized over the area for students to acquire aerial photographs of their own; this further enhances their understanding of the concept "remote sensing". Environmental issues such as air, water and land pollution can also be identified on satellite images. Key questions for students would include causes, effects and possible solutions to the problem. Conducting a fieldwork exercise around the area would

  12. Annual Survey of Catastrophic Football Injuries, 1977-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Frederick O.; Blyth, Carl S.

    Football injuries which resulted in permanent spinal cord injury are reported in this survey, part of a concerted effort by individuals and research organizations to reduce the steady increase of football head and neck injuries since the late 1950s. In addition to the reporting of injuries, this document describes steps taken to eliminate the…

  13. Badminton injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Krøner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Møller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  14. Identifying the Source of a Humoral Factor of Remote (Pre)Conditioning Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Basalay, Marina; Hosford, Patrick S; Ramage, Andrew G; Gourine, Andrey; Gourine, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Signalling pathways underlying the phenomenon of remote ischaemic preconditioning (RPc) cardioprotection are not completely understood. The existing evidence agrees that intact sensory innervation of the remote tissue/organ is required for the release into the systemic circulation of preconditioning factor(s) capable of protecting a transplanted or isolated heart. However, the source and molecular identities of these factors remain unknown. Since the efficacy of RPc cardioprotection is critically dependent upon vagal activity and muscarinic mechanisms, we hypothesized that the humoral RPc factor is produced by the internal organ(s), which receive rich parasympathetic innervation. In a rat model of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury we determined the efficacy of limb RPc in establishing cardioprotection after denervation of various visceral organs by sectioning celiac, hepatic, anterior and posterior gastric branches of the vagus nerve. Electrical stimulation was applied to individually sectioned branches to determine whether enhanced vagal input to a particular target area is sufficient to establish cardioprotection. It was found that RPc cardioprotection is abolished in conditions of either total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, gastric vagotomy or sectioning of the posterior gastric branch. The efficacy of RPc cardioprotection was preserved when hepatic, celiac or anterior gastric vagal branches were cut. In the absence of remote ischaemia/reperfusion, electrical stimulation of the posterior gastric branch reduced infarct size, mimicking the effect of RPc. These data suggest that the circulating factor (or factors) of RPc are produced and released into the systemic circulation by the visceral organ(s) innervated by the posterior gastric branch of the vagus nerve. PMID:26918777

  15. Identifying the Source of a Humoral Factor of Remote (Pre)Conditioning Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Basalay, Marina; Hosford, Patrick S.; Ramage, Andrew G.; Gourine, Andrey; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Signalling pathways underlying the phenomenon of remote ischaemic preconditioning (RPc) cardioprotection are not completely understood. The existing evidence agrees that intact sensory innervation of the remote tissue/organ is required for the release into the systemic circulation of preconditioning factor(s) capable of protecting a transplanted or isolated heart. However, the source and molecular identities of these factors remain unknown. Since the efficacy of RPc cardioprotection is critically dependent upon vagal activity and muscarinic mechanisms, we hypothesized that the humoral RPc factor is produced by the internal organ(s), which receive rich parasympathetic innervation. In a rat model of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury we determined the efficacy of limb RPc in establishing cardioprotection after denervation of various visceral organs by sectioning celiac, hepatic, anterior and posterior gastric branches of the vagus nerve. Electrical stimulation was applied to individually sectioned branches to determine whether enhanced vagal input to a particular target area is sufficient to establish cardioprotection. It was found that RPc cardioprotection is abolished in conditions of either total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, gastric vagotomy or sectioning of the posterior gastric branch. The efficacy of RPc cardioprotection was preserved when hepatic, celiac or anterior gastric vagal branches were cut. In the absence of remote ischaemia/reperfusion, electrical stimulation of the posterior gastric branch reduced infarct size, mimicking the effect of RPc. These data suggest that the circulating factor (or factors) of RPc are produced and released into the systemic circulation by the visceral organ(s) innervated by the posterior gastric branch of the vagus nerve. PMID:26918777

  16. 16 CFR 1115.6 - Reporting of unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... surgical treatment, fractures, lacerations requiring sutures, concussions, injuries to the eye, ear, or internal organs requiring medical treatment, and injuries necessitating absence from school or work of...

  17. 16 CFR 1115.6 - Reporting of unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... surgical treatment, fractures, lacerations requiring sutures, concussions, injuries to the eye, ear, or internal organs requiring medical treatment, and injuries necessitating absence from school or work of...

  18. 16 CFR 1115.6 - Reporting of unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... surgical treatment, fractures, lacerations requiring sutures, concussions, injuries to the eye, ear, or internal organs requiring medical treatment, and injuries necessitating absence from school or work of...

  19. 16 CFR 1115.6 - Reporting of unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... surgical treatment, fractures, lacerations requiring sutures, concussions, injuries to the eye, ear, or internal organs requiring medical treatment, and injuries necessitating absence from school or work of...

  20. Propeller injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, R J

    1976-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, and pleasure boat cruising are increasing in popularity. As a result the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. In a ten-year period from 1963 to 1973, I collected a total of nine cases. In some amputations were necessary, and in other cases amputations occurred at the time of injury. Problems with bacterial flora occurring in open sea water versus salt water enclosed near docks and fresh lake water are discussed. A review of the orthopedic literature revealed sparse information regarding propeller injuries.

  1. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  2. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  3. Lung Matrix Metalloproteinase Activation following Partial Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Rizzo, Vittoria; Tarantola, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Warm hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acute liver I/R does affect the function and/or structure of remote organs such as lung, kidney, and heart via modulation of extracellular matrix remodelling. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 30 min partial hepatic ischemia by clamping the hepatic artery and the portal vein. After a 60 min reperfusion, liver, lung, kidney, and heart biopsies and blood samples were collected. Serum hepatic enzymes, creatinine, urea, Troponin I and TNF-alpha, and tissue matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and morphology were monitored. Results. Serum levels of hepatic enzymes and TNF-alpha were concomitantly increased during hepatic I/R. An increase in hepatic MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities was substantiated by tissue morphology alterations. Notably, acute hepatic I/R affect the lung inasmuch as MMP-9 activity and MPO levels were increased. No difference in MMPs and MPO was observed in kidney and heart. Conclusions. Although the underlying mechanism needs further investigation, this is the first study in which the MMP activation in a distant organ is reported; this event is probably TNF-alpha-mediated and the lung appears as the first remote organ to be involved in hepatic I/R injury. PMID:24592193

  4. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, to help decrease swelling. The Body’s Healing Process From the moment a bone breaks or a ... what happens at each stage of the healing process: At the moment of injury: Chemicals are released ...

  5. Significance of Adult Pedestrian Torso Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, B. Johan; Henary, Basem; Crandall, Jeff R.; Longhitano, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The current paper uses data from two trauma registries to evaluate the significance of adult pedestrian torso injury relative to head and lower extremity injuries and to determine the relative importance of injuries to individual torso organs/structures. Analyses are conducted with and without adjusting for striking vehicle body type (car versus LTV). Although the incidence of torso injury is approximately 50% higher in pedestrians struck by LTVs than in those struck by cars, torso injury appears to be as an important contributor to the overall cost of pedestrian morbidity as is lower extremity injury. The most frequently injured torso organs/structures include the rib cage, lung & pleura, and liver. The results indicate a need for an increased focus on the prevention of torso injury in the design of pedestrian safety countermeasures. PMID:16179153

  6. Disposable remote zero headspace extractor

    DOEpatents

    Hand, Julie J.; Roberts, Mark P.

    2006-03-21

    The remote zero headspace extractor uses a sampling container inside a stainless steel vessel to perform toxicity characteristics leaching procedure to analyze volatile organic compounds. The system uses an in line filter for ease of replacement. This eliminates cleaning and disassembly of the extractor. All connections are made with quick connect fittings which can be easily replaced. After use, the bag can be removed and disposed of, and a new sampling container is inserted for the next extraction.

  7. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  8. Cooperative role of endogenous leucotrienes and platelet-activating factor in ischaemia–reperfusion-mediated tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Claudia S; Bessi, Valérie L; Huynh, David N; Ménard, Liliane; Lefebvre, Julie S; Lévesque, Tania; Hamdan, Leila; Sohouhenou, Fanny; Faccioli, Lucia H; Borgeat, Pierre; Marleau, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient oxygen delivery to organs leads to tissue dysfunction and cell death. Reperfusion, although vital to organ survival, initiates an inflammatory response that may both aggravate local tissue injury and elicit remote organ damage. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) trafficking to remote organs following ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) is associated with the release of lipid mediators, including leucotriene (LT) B4, cysteinyl-LTs (CysLTs) and platelet-activating factor (PAF). Yet, their potentially cooperative role in regulating I/R-mediated inflammation has not been thoroughly assessed. The present study aimed to determine the cooperative role of lipid mediators in regulating PMN migration, tissue oedema and injury using selective receptor antagonists in selected models of I/R and dermal inflammation. Our results show that rabbits, pre-treated orally with BIIL 284 and/or WEB 2086 and MK-0571, were protected from remote tissue injury following I/R or dermal inflammation in an additive or synergistic manner when the animals were pre-treated with two drugs concomitantly. The functional selectivity of the antagonists towards their respective agonists was assessed in vitro, showing that neither BIIL 284 nor WEB 2086 prevented the inflammatory response to IL-8, C5a and zymosan-activated plasma stimulation. However, these agonists elicited LTB4 biosynthesis in isolated rabbit PMNs. Similarly, a cardioprotective effect of PAF and LTB4 receptor antagonists was shown following myocardial I/R in mice. Taken together, these results underscore the intricate involvement of LTB4 and PAF in each other’s responses and provide further evidence that targeting both LTs and PAF receptors provides a much stronger anti-inflammatory effect, regulating PMN migration and oedema formation. PMID:24373549

  9. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  10. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  11. Diving injuries: a preventable catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Y; Jarosz, D; Paul, D B; Townsend, R N; Diamond, D L

    1994-03-01

    During a 5-year period from January 1987 through January 1992, 58 patients were admitted to the Allegheny General Hospital trauma center for non-scuba, non-suicidal diving injuries. There were 46 men and 12 women (mean age, 23 years). Forty-five patients were injured in swimming pools. Twenty-two patients had blood alcohol levels > 100 mg/dL. Cervical spine injury was the most common pathologic entity encountered in this group of patients. Closed head injury, pelvic fracture, thoracic vertebral fracture, and rib fractures were other injuries identified. Some patients had multiple organ failure syndrome. Aquatic recreational activities carry a risk for injury that is preventable. The mechanism, clinical data, and complications of 58 patients are presented and the importance of prevention is discussed.

  12. Pilot interministerial operation for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamare, J. M.; Bied-Charreton, M.; Couzy, A.; Jahan, A.; Ledder, J.; Pasquet, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of obtaining required information for land and resources management and the possibilities of remote sensing are discussed. The services available, organization and objectives of the pilot operation are presented. Emphasis is placed on multidisciplinary dialog among designers, builders, operators, interpreters and users in all phases. The principles, operation and practical applications of remote sensing systems and processing systems under the pilot operation are presented.

  13. Experiences of Injuries and Injury Reporting among Swedish Skydivers

    PubMed Central

    Jong, Mats; Westman, Anton; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to illuminate the experience of injuries and the process of injury reporting within the Swedish skydiving culture. Data contained narrative interviews that were subsequently analyzed with content analysis. Seventeen respondents (22–44 years) were recruited at three skydiving drop zones in Sweden. In the results injury events related to the full phase of a skydive were described. Risk of injury is individually viewed as an integrated element of the recreational activity counterbalanced by its recreational value. The human factor of inadequate judgment such as miscalculation and distraction dominates the descriptions as causes of injuries. Organization and leadership act as facilitators or constrainers for reporting incidents and injuries. On the basis of this study it is interpreted that safety work and incident reporting in Swedish skydiving may be influenced more by local drop zone culture than the national association regulations. Formal and informal hierarchical structures among skydivers seem to decide how skydiving is practiced, rules are enforced, and injuries are reported. We suggest that initial training and continuing education need to be changed from the current top-down to a bottom-up perspective, where the individual skydiver learns to see the positive implications of safety work and injury reporting. PMID:26464887

  14. Raman spectra of nitrogen-containing organic compounds obtained in high altitude sites using a portable spectrometer: Possible application for remote robotic Titan studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlicka, Jan; Culka, Adam; Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2010-04-01

    Well-resolved Raman spectra of examples of nitrogen-containing compounds were detected using a portable Raman instrument (Ahura First Defender XL) outdoors at a low temperature of -15 °C at an altitude of 2860 m (Pitztall, Austria). The portable Raman spectrometer tested here is equipped with a 785 nm diode laser and fixed frontal probe. Solid forms of formamide, urea, 3-methylpyridine, aniline, indene, 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, benzofuran and indoline were detected unambiguously under field high-mountain conditions. The main Raman features (strong, medium and partially weak bands) were observed at their correct wavenumber positions (spectral resolution 7-10 cm -1) in the range 200-2000 cm -1. The results obtained demonstrate the possibility of applying a miniaturised Raman spectrometer as key instrument for investigating the presence of nitrogen-containing organic compounds and biomolecules under low temperature field conditions. Within the payload designed by ESA and NASA for future missions focusing not only on Mars, Raman spectroscopy will be an important non-destructive analytical tool for the in-situ identification of both organic and inorganic compounds relevant to life detection on planetary surfaces or near sub-surfaces.

  15. Remote Sensing of Glyoxal as a New Atmospheric Tracer for VOC Chemistry and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Shirley, T.; Lesher, R.; Brune, W.; Dzepina, K.; Jimenez, J.

    2004-12-01

    Air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is intimately linked with the photochemical transformation of primary pollutants like VOC (volatile organic compounds) and NOx, which gives rise to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and their associated adverse effects on human health. As part of the field campaign held in the MCMA in April/May 2003, state-of-the-art measurement techniques including open-path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), spectroradiometry, Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) were located at the National Center for Environmental Research and Training (CENICA) in Mexico City to characterize the gas-phase and aerosol-phase composition of relevance to the formation of ozone and SOA. A first-ever spectroscopic detection of glyoxal (DOAS) in the atmosphere is described. Glyoxal is shown to be a very useful new photochemical tracer for the chemistry of VOC. The time-resolved glyoxal measurements reveal a very efficient VOC oxidation process during morning hours, which is found to be relevant for overall smog formation later in the day. In combination with measurements of the radical precursor substances HONO, HCHO, ozone (DOAS), their respective J-values (spectroradiometry), OH- and HO2-radical concentrations (LIF), speciated aromatic hydrocarbons (DOAS) and chemical composition of the aerosol phase (AMS), the glyoxal data enables assessment of the role of VOC oxidation in the formation of secondary pollutants in the gas- and aerosol-phase by placing a lower limit on the extend of VOC turnover.

  16. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  17. Fingertip injuries

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Sanjay; Tiwari, VK

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fingertip injuries are extremely common. Out of the various available reconstructive options, one needs to select an option which achieves a painless fingertip with durable and sensate skin cover. The present analysis was conducted to evaluate the management and outcome of fingertip injuries. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 150 cases of fingertip Injuries of patients aged six to 65 years managed over a period of two years. Various reconstructive options were considered for the fingertip lesions greater than or equal to 1 cm2. The total duration of treatment varied from two to six weeks with follow-up from two months to one year. Results: The results showed preservation of finger length and contour, retention of sensation and healing without significant complication. Conclusion: The treatment needs to be individualized and all possible techniques of reconstruction must be known to achieve optimal recovery. PMID:21139772

  18. Wrestling injuries.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    The sport of wrestling has a history dating back to ancient times as one of the original Olympic sports. It particularly appeals to adolescents as equally matched opponents engage in competition. There can be no argument that participation in sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity, those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. This article will discuss wrestling injuries and recommend prevention strategies to keep athletes safe. PMID:18521035

  19. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  1. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from the terrestrial ecosystem in China using real-time remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Huang, X.; Li, J.; Song, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Because of the high emission intensity and reactivity, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play a significant role in the terrestrial ecosystems, human health, secondary pollution, global climate change and the global carbon cycle. Past estimations of BVOC emissions in China were based on outdated algorithms and limited meteorological data, and there have been significant inconsistences between the land surface parameters of dynamic models and those of BVOC estimation models, leading to large inaccuracies in the estimated results. To refine BVOC emission estimations for China and to further explore the role of BVOCs in atmospheric chemical processes, we used the latest algorithms of MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) with MM5 (the Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model) providing highly resolved meteorological data, to estimate the biogenic emissions of isoprene (C5H8) and seven monoterpene species (C10H16) in 2006. Real-time MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data were introduced to update the land surface parameters and improve the simulation performance of MM5, and to modify the influence of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf age deviation from standard conditions. In this study, the annual BVOC emissions for the whole country totaled 12.97 Tg C, a relevant value much lower than that given in global estimations but higher than the past estimations in China. Therein, the most important individual contributor was isoprene (9.36 Tg C), followed by α-pinene (1.24 Tg C yr-1) and β-pinene (0.84 Tg C yr-1). Due to the considerable regional disparity in plant distributions and meteorological conditions across China, BVOC emissions presented significant spatial-temporal variations. Spatially, isoprene emission was concentrated in South China, which is covered by large areas of broadleaf forests and shrubs. On the other hand, Southeast China was the top-ranking contributor of monoterpenes, in which the dominant vegetation

  2. Comparison of lichen, conifer needles, passive air sampling devices, and snowpack as passive sampling media to measure semi-volatile organic compounds in remote atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Schrlau, Jill E; Geiser, Linda; Hageman, Kimberly J; Landers, Dixon H; Simonich, Staci Massey

    2011-12-15

    A wide range of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs), including pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were measured in lichen, conifer needles, snowpack and XAD-based passive air sampling devices (PASDs) collected from 19 different U.S. national parks in order to compare the magnitude and mechanism of SOC accumulation in the different passive sampling media. Lichen accumulated the highest SOC concentrations, in part because of its long (and unknown) exposure period, whereas PASDs accumulated the lowest concentrations. However, only the PASD SOC concentrations can be used to calculate an average atmospheric gas-phase SOC concentration because the sampling rates are known and the media is uniform. Only the lichen and snowpack SOC accumulation profiles were statistically significantly correlated (r = 0.552, p-value <0.0001) because they both accumulate SOCs present in the atmospheric particle-phase. This suggests that needles and PASDs represent a different composition of the atmosphere than lichen and snowpack and that the interpretation of atmospheric SOC composition is dependent on the type of passive sampling media used. All four passive sampling media preferentially accumulated SOCs with relatively low air-water partition coefficients, while snowpack accumulated SOCs with higher log K(OA) values compared to the other media. Lichen accumulated more SOCs with log K(OA) > 10 relative to needles and showed a greater accumulation of particle-phase PAHs.

  3. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy. PMID:26892551

  4. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  5. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  6. Management of primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Argyros, G J

    1997-07-25

    Blast waves are produced following the detonation of munitions, the firing of large caliber guns, or from any type of explosion. These blast waves can be powerful enough to injure the individuals exposed to them. This type of injury is called primary blast injury (PBI) and the organs most vulnerable to PBI are the gas-filled organs, namely the ear, the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The approach to the casualty with PBI is the same as it would be for any trauma victim, i.e. the initiation of life support measures. Attention should be directed to the common life-threatening manifestation of thoracic and abdominal PBI. Pulmonary manifestations would include hemorrhage, barotrauma and arterial air embolism, while abdominal manifestations would include hemorrhage and hollow organ rupture. Therapy is directed at the specific manifestations as well as avoiding additional iatrogenic injury. PMID:9217319

  7. Investigation of fugitive emissions from petrochemical transport barges using optical remote sensing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent airborne remote sensing survey data acquired with passive gas imaging equipment (PGIE), in this case infrared cameras, have shown potentially significant fugitive volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions from petrochemical transport barges. The experiment found remote sens...

  8. Remote Sensing of Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation: A Review from the Perspective of Remote Sensing Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Franklin, Steven E.; Guo, Xulin; Cattet, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing, the science of obtaining information via noncontact recording, has swept the fields of ecology, biodiversity and conservation (EBC). Several quality review papers have contributed to this field. However, these papers often discuss the issues from the standpoint of an ecologist or a biodiversity specialist. This review focuses on the spaceborne remote sensing of EBC from the perspective of remote sensing specialists, i.e., it is organized in the context of state-of-the-art remote sensing technology, including instruments and techniques. Herein, the instruments to be discussed consist of high spatial resolution, hyperspectral, thermal infrared, small-satellite constellation, and LIDAR sensors; and the techniques refer to image classification, vegetation index (VI), inversion algorithm, data fusion, and the integration of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS). PMID:22163432

  9. Remote sensing of ecology, biodiversity and conservation: a review from the perspective of remote sensing specialists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Franklin, Steven E; Guo, Xulin; Cattet, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing, the science of obtaining information via noncontact recording, has swept the fields of ecology, biodiversity and conservation (EBC). Several quality review papers have contributed to this field. However, these papers often discuss the issues from the standpoint of an ecologist or a biodiversity specialist. This review focuses on the spaceborne remote sensing of EBC from the perspective of remote sensing specialists, i.e., it is organized in the context of state-of-the-art remote sensing technology, including instruments and techniques. Herein, the instruments to be discussed consist of high spatial resolution, hyperspectral, thermal infrared, small-satellite constellation, and LIDAR sensors; and the techniques refer to image classification, vegetation index (VI), inversion algorithm, data fusion, and the integration of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS).

  10. Nonoperative treatment of blunt splenic injury.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J

    2001-11-01

    A spleen-preserving program was implemented at the author's institution during the mid-1980s using a five-part injury-grading scale that is similar and comparable to the AAST classification. Since that time, all patients with splenic injuries admitted to the Department of Surgery at the Karl-Franzens University Hospital in Graz, a level I trauma center, have been prospectively evaluated with respect to splenic preservation. Analysis of the relation of the severity of organ injury to the use of nonoperative management showed that degree I or II injuries were treated nonoperatively, whereas degree III and IV injuries were usually treated with adhesives, partial resection, or mesh splenorrhaphy; only degree V injuries almost always required splenectomy. With increasing experience in nonoperative management of splenic injuries the initial criteria have become less rigid, and there is now a tendency to attempt it in patients who formerly would have undergone surgery. PMID:11760743

  11. Nonoperative treatment of blunt splenic injury.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J

    2001-11-01

    A spleen-preserving program was implemented at the author's institution during the mid-1980s using a five-part injury-grading scale that is similar and comparable to the AAST classification. Since that time, all patients with splenic injuries admitted to the Department of Surgery at the Karl-Franzens University Hospital in Graz, a level I trauma center, have been prospectively evaluated with respect to splenic preservation. Analysis of the relation of the severity of organ injury to the use of nonoperative management showed that degree I or II injuries were treated nonoperatively, whereas degree III and IV injuries were usually treated with adhesives, partial resection, or mesh splenorrhaphy; only degree V injuries almost always required splenectomy. With increasing experience in nonoperative management of splenic injuries the initial criteria have become less rigid, and there is now a tendency to attempt it in patients who formerly would have undergone surgery.

  12. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  13. Patient Injuries?

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    An injured patient may be the last thing dentists want to think about. However, in reality, patients can be injured during dental treatment or as the result of an incident such as a slip and fall in the office. Treatment-related injuries can run the gamut and include burns, lacerations, swallowed objects and allergic reactions, according to The Dentists Insurance Company.

  14. Using Remote Sensing and Field Observations of Colored Dissolved Organic Material (CDOM) to Improve Understanding of Carbon Dynamics at the Land-Ocean Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, L.; Tzortziou, M.; Gilerson, A.; Foster, R.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) and its colored component, (CDOM) are sensitive indicators of environmental pollution, nutrient enrichment, water quality and plays a key role in a broad range of processes and climate-related biogeochemical cycles in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Because of its strong influence on how ocean color is viewed, CDOM can provide an invaluable optical tool for coastal zone environmental assessment and from space. There is a continuous cycle of sources and sinks of CDOM from terrestrial sources to the wetlands to the estuaries and to the ocean waters. Terrestrial inputs from natural processes, anthropogenic activities, exchanges with the atmosphere, rich biodiversity and high primary productivity, physical, photochemical and microbial processes affect not only the amount but also the quality and optical signature of CDOM in near-shore waters. In this study, new measurements are presented of the optical characteristics of CDOM collected from the Chesapeake Bay estuarine environment. Measured parameters include absorption spectra, estimated spectral slopes, slope ratios, DOC-specific CDOM absorption as well as 3D CDOM fluorescence emission-excitation matrices. Such results will provide insight of the measured CDOM in this complex environment and the complex process that affect CDOM quality and amount during transport to the estuary and coastal ocean. New field campaigns will be conducted in August and September in the Chesapeake Bay estuary and the coast of the Gulf of Mexico to collect more samples for analysis of CDOM dynamics and link field observations and measurements to satellite ocean color retrievals of estuarine biogeochemical processes. In addition, advanced satellite CDOM data distribution and usage is discussed as it has considerable operational value and practical application beyond the scientific community and research. Keywords: CDOM, carbon dynamics, estuaries, coastal ecosystems, optical properties, satellite applications

  15. Remote reset circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russell E.

    1987-01-01

    A remote reset circuit acts as a stand-alone monitor and controller by clocking in each character sent by a terminal to a computer and comparing it to a given reference character. When a match occurs, the remote reset circuit activates the system's hardware reset line. The remote reset circuit is hardware based centered around monostable multivibrators and is unaffected by system crashes, partial serial transmissions, or power supply transients.

  16. Remote reset circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, R.E.

    1985-09-12

    A remote reset circuit acts as a stand-along monitor and controller by clocking in each character sent by a terminal to a computer and comparing it to a given reference character. When a match occurs, the remote reset circuit activates the system's hardware reset line. The remote reset circuit is hardware based centered around monostable multivibrators and is unaffected by system crashes, partial serial transmissions, or power supply transients. 4 figs.

  17. Laser remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and advantages of remote sensing lasers are discussed. The theory of nonresonant techniques, which is based on the lidar equation and elastic backscatter, and their applications to aerosol and meteorological parameters are examined. The characteristics and applications of the differential absorption lidar technique, the fluorescence technique, and Raman scattering are described. The use of a laser heterodyne radiometer and fiber optics for remote sensing is studied. Future developments in the field of remote sensing, in particular the improvement of laser sources, the fabrication of compact remote sensing instruments, and space-borne applications for lidar, are considered.

  18. Remote measurement of pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A summary of the major conclusions and recommendations developed by the panels on gaseous air pollution, water pollution, and particulate air pollution is presented. It becomes evident that many of the trace gases are amenable to remote sensing; that certain water pollutants can be measured by remote techniques, but their number is limited; and that a similar approach to the remote measurement of specific particulate pollutants will follow only after understanding of their physical, chemical, and radiative properties is improved. It is also clear that remote sensing can provide essential information in all three categories that can not be obtained by any other means.

  19. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  20. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  1. Indicators of international remote sensing activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The extent of worldwide remote sensing activities, including the use of satellite and high/medium altitude aircraft data was studied. Data were obtained from numerous individuals and organizations with international remote sensing responsibilities. Indicators were selected to evaluate the nature and scope of remote sensing activities in each country. These indicators ranged from attendance at remote sensing workshops and training courses to the establishment of earth resources satellite ground stations and plans for the launch of earth resources satellites. Results indicate that this technology constitutes a rapidly increasing component of environmental, land use, and natural resources investigations in many countries, and most of these countries rely on the LANDSAT satellites for a major portion of their data.

  2. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from the terrestrial ecosystem in China using real-time remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Huang, X.; Li, J.; Song, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Because of the high emission rate and reactivity, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play a significant role in the terrestrial ecosystems, human health, secondary pollution, global climate change and the global carbon cycle. Past estimations of BVOC emissions in China were based on outdated algorithms and coarsely resolved meteorological data, and there have been significant inconsistences between the land surface parameters of dynamic models and those of BVOC estimation models, leading to large inaccuracies in the estimated results. To refine BVOC emission estimations for China and to further explore the role of BVOCs in the atmosphere, we used the latest algorithms of MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature), with MM5 (the Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model) providing highly resolved meteorological data, to estimate the biogenic emissions of isoprene (C5H8) and seven monoterpene species (C10H16) in 2006. Real-time MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data were introduced to update the land surface parameters and to improve the simulation performance of MM5, and to determine the influence of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf age deviation from standard conditions. In this study, the annual BVOC emissions for the whole country totaled 12.97 Tg C, a relevant value compared with past studies. Therein, the most important individual contributor was isoprene (9.36 Tg C yr-1), followed by α-pinene (1.24 Tg C yr-1) and β-pinene (0.84 Tg C yr-1). Due to the considerable regional disparity in plant distributions and meteorological conditions across China, BVOC emissions presented significant spatial and temporal variations. Spatially, isoprene emission was concentrated in South China, which is covered by large areas of broadleaf forests and shrubs. While Southeast China was the top-ranking contributor of monoterpenes, in which the dominant vegetation genera consist of evergreen coniferous forests. Temporally, BVOC emissions

  3. Reorganization of functional connectivity as a correlate of cognitive recovery in acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Nazareth P; Paúl, Nuria; Ordóñez, Victoria E; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomás; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2010-08-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on functional connectivity patterns. Networks were calculated from resting-state magnetoencephalographic recordings from 15 brain injured patients and 14 healthy controls by means of wavelet coherence in standard frequency bands. We compared the parameters defining the network, such as number and strength of interactions as well as their topology, in controls and patients for two conditions: following a traumatic brain injury and after a rehabilitation treatment. A loss of delta- and theta-based connectivity and conversely an increase in alpha- and beta-band-based connectivity were found. Furthermore, connectivity parameters approached controls in all frequency bands, especially in slow-wave bands. A correlation between network reorganization and cognitive recovery was found: the reduction of delta-band-based connections and the increment of those based on alpha band correlated with Verbal Fluency scores, as well as Perceptual Organization and Working Memory Indexes, respectively. Additionally, changes in connectivity values based on theta and beta bands correlated with the Patient Competency Rating Scale. The current study provides new evidence of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity processes after brain injury, and suggests that these changes are related with observed changes at the behavioural level.

  4. Oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers of ischemia and reperfusion injuries.

    PubMed

    Halladin, Natalie Løvland

    2015-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injuries occur when the blood supply to an organ or tissue is temporarily cut-off and then restored. Even though the restoration of blood flow is absolutely essential in preventing tissue death, the reperfusion of oxygenated blood to the oxygen-deprived areas may in itself augment the tissue damage in excess of that produced by the ischemia alone. The process of ischemia-reperfusion is multifactorial and there are several mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. Ample evidence shows that the injury is in part caused by an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species or free radicals. The free radicals consequently initiate an inflammatory response, which in some cases may affect distant organs, thus causing remote organ injuries. Ischemia-reperfusion injuries are a common complication in many diseases (acute myocardial infarctions, stroke) or surgical settings (transplantations, tourniquet-related surgery) and they have potential detrimental and disabling consequences. The tolerance of ischemia-reperfusion has proven to be time-of-day-dependent and the size of myocardial infarctions has proven to be significantly higher when occurring in the dark-to-light period. This period is characterized by and coincides with a rapid decrease in the plasma levels of the hormone melatonin. Melatonin is the body's most potent antioxidant and is capable of both direct free radical scavenging and indirect optimization of other anti-oxidant enzymes. It also possesses anti-inflammatory properties and is known to inhibit the mitochondrial permeability transition pore during reperfusion. This inhibiting property has been shown to be of great importance in reducing ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Furthermore, melatonin is a relatively non-toxic molecule, which has proven to be safe for use in clinical trials. Thus, there is compelling evidence of melatonin's effect in reducing ischemia-reperfusion injuries in many experimental studies, but the number of human

  5. Remote sensing utility in a disaster struck urban environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, M.; Holguin, A.; Vernon, S.

    1974-01-01

    A project to determine the ways in which remote sensing can contribute to solutions of urban public health problems in time of natural disaster is discussed. The objectives of the project are to determine and describe remote sensing standard operating procedures for public health assistance during disaster relief operations which will aid the agencies and organizations involved in disaster intervention. Proposed tests to determine the validity of the remote sensing system are reported.

  6. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  7. Acute injuries from mountain biking.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T K; Bracker, M D; Patrick, K

    1993-01-01

    We questioned members of 2 southern California off-road bicycling organizations about injuries associated with the use of all-terrain bicycles. Cyclists were asked about riding and safety habits, the kind(s) of injury sustained with their most recent accident and whether they sought medical treatment, and the circumstances of the accident. Of 459 mailed surveys, 268 (58.4%) were returned. Respondents (82.8% of whom were male) ranged in age from 14 to 68 years. Of these, 225 (84%) had been injured while riding all-terrain bicycles, 51% in the past year. Although most injuries were characterized as minor, 26% required professional medical care, and 4.4% of those injured were admitted to hospital. Extremity injuries--abrasions, lacerations, contusions--occurred in 201 (90%) cyclists with 27 (12%) sustaining a fracture or dislocation. High levels of helmet use (88%) may explain the low occurrence of head and neck trauma (12%). Frequent riding and riding on paved terrain were associated with increased severity of injury, although most accidents--197 (87.6%)--occurred off paved roads. These results suggest that, compared with regular bicyclists, all-terrain cyclists have more, but not necessarily more severe, injuries. Clinicians and emergency medical personnel should be aware that the increasing popularity of off-road cycling may change the frequency and nature of bicycling injuries. PMID:8212679

  8. Pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter crash injuries.

    PubMed

    McBratney, Colleen M; Rush, Stephen; Kharod, Chetan U

    2014-01-01

    USAF Pararescuemen (PJs) respond to downed aircrew as a fundamental mission for personnel recovery (PR), one of the Air Force's core functions. In addition to responding to these in Military settings, the PJs from the 212 Rescue Squadron routinely respond to small plane crashes in remote regions of Alaska. While there is a paucity of information on the latter, there have been articles detailing injuries sustained from helicopter crashes and while ejecting or parachuting from fixed wing aircraft. The following represents a new chapter added to the Pararescue Medical Operations Handbook, Sixth Edition (2014, editors Matt Wolf, MD, and Stephen Rush, MD, in press). It was designed to be a quick reference for PJs and their Special Operations flight surgeons to help with understanding of mechanism of injury with regard to pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter accident injuries. It outlines the nature of the injuries sustained in such mishaps and provides an epidemiologic framework from which to approach the problem.

  9. Nintendo related injuries and other problems: review

    PubMed Central

    Heineman, Erik; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify all reported cases of injury and other problems caused by using a Nintendo video gaming system. Design Review. Data sources and review methods Search of PubMed and Embase in June 2014 for reports on injuries and other problems caused by using a Nintendo gaming system. Results Most of the 38 articles identified were case reports or case series. Injuries and problems ranged from neurological and psychological to surgical. Traditional controllers with buttons were associated with tendinitis of the extensor of the thumb. The joystick on the Nintendo 64 controller was linked to palmar ulceration. The motion sensitive Wii remote was associated with musculoskeletal problems and various traumas. Conclusions Most problems are mild and prevalence is low. The described injuries were related to the way the games are controlled, which varies according to the video game console. PMID:25515525

  10. Pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter crash injuries.

    PubMed

    McBratney, Colleen M; Rush, Stephen; Kharod, Chetan U

    2014-01-01

    USAF Pararescuemen (PJs) respond to downed aircrew as a fundamental mission for personnel recovery (PR), one of the Air Force's core functions. In addition to responding to these in Military settings, the PJs from the 212 Rescue Squadron routinely respond to small plane crashes in remote regions of Alaska. While there is a paucity of information on the latter, there have been articles detailing injuries sustained from helicopter crashes and while ejecting or parachuting from fixed wing aircraft. The following represents a new chapter added to the Pararescue Medical Operations Handbook, Sixth Edition (2014, editors Matt Wolf, MD, and Stephen Rush, MD, in press). It was designed to be a quick reference for PJs and their Special Operations flight surgeons to help with understanding of mechanism of injury with regard to pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter accident injuries. It outlines the nature of the injuries sustained in such mishaps and provides an epidemiologic framework from which to approach the problem. PMID:25399374

  11. Remote ischemic conditioning: from experimental observation to clinical application: report from the 8th Biennial Hatter Cardiovascular Institute Workshop.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Jack M J; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Crimi, Gabriele; Davidson, Brian; Davidson, Sean M; Dutka, David; Ferdinandy, Peter; Ganske, Rocky; Garcia-Dorado, David; Giricz, Zoltan; Gourine, Alexander V; Heusch, Gerd; Kharbanda, Rajesh; Kleinbongard, Petra; MacAllister, Raymond; McIntyre, Christopher; Meybohm, Patrick; Prunier, Fabrice; Redington, Andrew; Robertson, Nicola J; Suleiman, M Saadeh; Vanezis, Andrew; Walsh, Stewart; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    In 1993, Przyklenk and colleagues made the intriguing experimental observation that 'brief ischemia in one vascular bed also protects remote, virgin myocardium from subsequent sustained coronary artery occlusion' and that this effect'... may be mediated by factor(s) activated, produced, or transported throughout the heart during brief ischemia/reperfusion'. This seminal study laid the foundation for the discovery of 'remote ischemic conditioning' (RIC), a phenomenon in which the heart is protected from the detrimental effects of acute ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), by applying cycles of brief ischemia and reperfusion to an organ or tissue remote from the heart. The concept of RIC quickly evolved to extend beyond the heart, encompassing inter-organ protection against acute IRI. The crucial discovery that the protective RIC stimulus could be applied non-invasively, by simply inflating and deflating a blood pressure cuff placed on the upper arm to induce cycles of brief ischemia and reperfusion, has facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical setting. Despite intensive investigation over the last 20 years, the underlying mechanisms continue to elude researchers. In the 8th Biennial Hatter Cardiovascular Institute Workshop, recent developments in the field of RIC were discussed with a focus on new insights into the underlying mechanisms, the diversity of non-cardiac protection, new clinical applications, and large outcome studies. The scientific advances made in this field of research highlight the journey that RIC has made from being an intriguing experimental observation to a clinical application with patient benefit.

  12. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  13. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  14. Land Remote Sensing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, Ray

    2007-01-01

    A general overview of the USGS land remote sensing program is presented. The contents include: 1) Brief overview of USGS land remote sensing program; 2) Highlights of JACIE work at USGS; 3) Update on NASA/USGS Landsat Data Continuity Mission; and 4) Notes on alternative data sources.

  15. Remote sensing applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The activities of the Mississippi Remote Sensing Center are described in addition to technology transfer and information dissemination, remote sensing topics such as timber identification, water quality, flood prevention, land use, erosion control, animal habitats, and environmental impact studies are also discussed.

  16. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  17. Remote Learning: Technologies & Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turoff, Murray; Hiltz, Starr, Roxanne

    This discussion of the potential for computerized conferencing as the first cost effective technology for the delivery of a classroom environment in a remote learning situation begins by comparing remote learning modes and reviewing various educational experiments that have used the Electronic Information Exchange System (EIES) during the…

  18. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  19. APPLIED REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote Sensing is a scientific discipline of non-contact monitoring. It includes a range of technologies that span from aerial photography to advanced spectral imaging and analytical methods. This Session is designed to demonstrate contemporary practical applications of remote se...

  20. Disrupted modular organization of resting-state cortical functional connectivity in U.S. military personnel following concussive 'mild' blast-related traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihwan; Mac Donald, Christine L; Johnson, Ann M; Barnes, Yolanda; Wierzechowski, Linda; Zonies, David; Oh, John; Flaherty, Stephen; Fang, Raymond; Raichle, Marcus E; Brody, David L

    2014-01-01

    Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been one of the "signature injuries" of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, neuroimaging studies in concussive 'mild' blast-related TBI have been challenging due to the absence of abnormalities in computed tomography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the heterogeneity of the blast-related injury mechanisms. The goal of this study was to address these challenges utilizing single-subject, module-based graph theoretic analysis of resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data. We acquired 20min of resting-state fMRI in 63 U.S. military personnel clinically diagnosed with concussive blast-related TBI and 21 U.S. military controls who had blast exposures but no diagnosis of TBI. All subjects underwent an initial scan within 90days post-injury and 65 subjects underwent a follow-up scan 6 to 12months later. A second independent cohort of 40 U.S. military personnel with concussive blast-related TBI served as a validation dataset. The second independent cohort underwent an initial scan within 30days post-injury. 75% of the scans were of good quality, with exclusions primarily due to excessive subject motion. Network analysis of the subset of these subjects in the first cohort with good quality scans revealed spatially localized reductions in the participation coefficient, a measure of between-module connectivity, in the TBI patients relative to the controls at the time of the initial scan. These group differences were less prominent on the follow-up scans. The 15 brain areas with the most prominent reductions in the participation coefficient were next used as regions of interest (ROIs) for single-subject analyses. In the first TBI cohort, more subjects than would be expected by chance (27/47 versus 2/47 expected, p<0.0001) had 3 or more brain regions with abnormally low between-module connectivity relative to the controls on the initial scans. On the follow-up scans, more subjects than expected by chance (5

  1. Disrupted modular organization of resting-state cortical functional connectivity in U.S. military personnel following concussive 'mild' blast-related traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihwan; Mac Donald, Christine L; Johnson, Ann M; Barnes, Yolanda; Wierzechowski, Linda; Zonies, David; Oh, John; Flaherty, Stephen; Fang, Raymond; Raichle, Marcus E; Brody, David L

    2014-01-01

    Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been one of the "signature injuries" of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, neuroimaging studies in concussive 'mild' blast-related TBI have been challenging due to the absence of abnormalities in computed tomography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the heterogeneity of the blast-related injury mechanisms. The goal of this study was to address these challenges utilizing single-subject, module-based graph theoretic analysis of resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data. We acquired 20min of resting-state fMRI in 63 U.S. military personnel clinically diagnosed with concussive blast-related TBI and 21 U.S. military controls who had blast exposures but no diagnosis of TBI. All subjects underwent an initial scan within 90days post-injury and 65 subjects underwent a follow-up scan 6 to 12months later. A second independent cohort of 40 U.S. military personnel with concussive blast-related TBI served as a validation dataset. The second independent cohort underwent an initial scan within 30days post-injury. 75% of the scans were of good quality, with exclusions primarily due to excessive subject motion. Network analysis of the subset of these subjects in the first cohort with good quality scans revealed spatially localized reductions in the participation coefficient, a measure of between-module connectivity, in the TBI patients relative to the controls at the time of the initial scan. These group differences were less prominent on the follow-up scans. The 15 brain areas with the most prominent reductions in the participation coefficient were next used as regions of interest (ROIs) for single-subject analyses. In the first TBI cohort, more subjects than would be expected by chance (27/47 versus 2/47 expected, p<0.0001) had 3 or more brain regions with abnormally low between-module connectivity relative to the controls on the initial scans. On the follow-up scans, more subjects than expected by chance (5

  2. Remote sensing of wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, N. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of using remote sensing to inventory wetlands and the related topics of proper inventory design and data collection are discussed. The material presented shows that aerial photography is the form of remote sensing from which the greatest amount of wetlands information can be derived. For extensive, general-purpose wetlands inventories, however, the use of LANDSAT data may be more cost-effective. Airborne multispectral scanners and radar are, in the main, too expensive to use - unless the information that these sensors alone can gather remotely is absolutely required. Multistage sampling employing space and high altitude remote sensing data in the initial stages appears to be an efficient survey strategy for gathering non-point specific wetlands inventory data over large areas. The operational role of remote sensing insupplying inventory data for application to several typical wetlands management problems is illustrated by summary descriptions of past ERIM projects.

  3. Remote vehicle survey tool

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L.; Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R.

    1993-05-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs.

  4. Remote vehicle survey tool

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L. ); Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs.

  5. Remote Monitor Alarm System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stute, Robert A. (Inventor); Galloway, F. Houston (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Swindle, Robert W. (Inventor); Bierman, Tracy A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A remote monitor alarm system monitors discrete alarm and analog power supply voltage conditions at remotely located communications terminal equipment. A central monitoring unit (CMU) is connected via serial data links to each of a plurality of remote terminal units (RTUS) that monitor the alarm and power supply conditions of the remote terminal equipment. Each RTU can monitor and store condition information of both discrete alarm points and analog power supply voltage points in its associated communications terminal equipment. The stored alarm information is periodically transmitted to the CMU in response to sequential polling of the RTUS. The number of monitored alarm inputs and permissible voltage ranges for the analog inputs can be remotely configured at the CMU and downloaded into programmable memory at each RTU. The CMU includes a video display, a hard disk memory, a line printer and an audio alarm for communicating and storing the alarm information received from each RTU.

  6. Space technology in remote health care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    1991-01-01

    Crews and passengers on future long-duration Earth orbital and interplanetary missions must be provided quality health services - to combat illnesses and accidental injuries, and for routine preventive care. People on Earth-orbital missions can be returned relatively easily to Earth, but those on interplanetary missions cannot. Accordingly, crews on long-duration missions will likely include at least one specially trained person, perhaps a physician's assistant, hospital corpsman, nurse, or physician who will be responsible for providing onboard health services. Specifically, we must determine the most effective way to administer health care to a remotely located population. NASA with the cooperation of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is pursuing a program for providing health services to remote locations on Earth as a necessary step to developing and verifying this capability on a spacecraft. The STARPAHC program is described.

  7. Remote sensing - A new view for public health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Barnes, C. M.; Fuller, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the technology of remote sensing can be of great importance to the field of public health. This possibility is based on the deepened understanding of the biologies and ecologies of the vector/organism/host interelationships of arthropod-, soil-, and water-borne diseases to result from the information that remote sensing can provide.

  8. The pathology of primary blast overpressure injury.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, M A

    1997-07-25

    Primary blast injury occurs in civilian and military detonations and from the firing of weapon systems. The pathology of primary blast injury has been reported for the last 70 years and has primarily been limited to descriptions of gross pathology and histology. Commonly accepted tenets have not been confirmed as blast overpressure experiments in enclosures and with multiple detonations have been conducted. Organ systems other than the ear and the lung are playing a greater role in injury definition and research importance. This paper is an overview and update of the current understanding of the pathology of primary blast injury.

  9. Lidar: A laser technique for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Hickman, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental airborne lidar systems proved to be useful for shallow water bathymetric measurements, and detection and identification of oil slicks and algae. Dye fluorescence applications using organic dyes was studied. The possibility of remotely inducing dye flourescence by means of pulsed lasers opens up several hydrospheric applications for measuring water currents, water temperature, and salinity. Aerosol measurements by lidar are also discussed.

  10. Incidence of Bicycle-Related Injuries in a Defined Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Diane C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of head injuries and total injuries resulting from bicycle crashes among members of a health maintenance organization. Injuries per 100,000 population, per 100 miles ridden, and according to season and day of the week are reported. Individuals between 5 and 14 are at highest risk. The data can be used in community bicycle helmet campaigns…

  11. Injury epidemiology of U.S. Army Special Operations forces.

    PubMed

    Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Lovalekar, Mita T; Keenan, Karen A; Bozich, Anthony J; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Kane, Shawn F; Benson, Peter J; Lephart, Scott M

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries have long been a problem in general purpose forces, yet anecdotal evidence provided by medical, human performance, and training leadership suggests musculoskeletal injuries are also a readiness impediment to Special Operations Forces (SOF). The purpose of this study was to describe the injury epidemiology of SOF utilizing self-reported injury histories. Data were collected on 106 SOF (age: 31.7 ± 5.3 years, height: 179.0 ± 5.5 cm, mass: 85.9 ± 10.9 kg) for 1 year before the date of laboratory testing and filtered for total injuries and those with the potential to be preventable based on injury type, activity, and mechanism. The frequency of musculoskeletal injuries was 24.5 injuries per 100 subjects per year for total injuries and 18.9 injuries per 100 subjects per year for preventable injuries. The incidence of musculoskeletal injuries was 20.8 injured subjects per 100 subjects per year for total injuries and 16.0 injured subjects per 100 subjects per year for preventable injuries. Preventable musculoskeletal injuries comprised 76.9% of total injuries. Physical training (PT) was the most reported activity for total/preventable injuries (PT Command Organized: 46.2%/60.0%, PT Noncommand Organized: 7.7%/10.0%, PT Unknown: 3.8%/5.0%). Musculoskeletal injuries impede optimal physical readiness/tactical training in the SOF community. The data suggest a significant proportion of injuries are classified as preventable and may be mitigated with human performance programs. PMID:25269128

  12. [Blast injuries of the ear].

    PubMed

    Haralampiev, K; Ristić, B

    1991-01-01

    Blast injury of the ear is the actual military medical problem. The ear, due to its anatomo-physiologic characteristics, is more sensitive to effects of blast waves than other organs and systems. The anatomic and functional ear damages, their symptoms, etiology and clinical course are described. The diagnosis and treatment have been pointed out. PMID:1807053

  13. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  14. [Injuries of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Vasiutkov, V Ia; Murasheva, Z M; Sukhov, D V; Burakov, M B

    1989-08-01

    Trauma of the pancreas was studied in 48 patients. It has a typical mechanisms and is characterized by intensity of the exerted force. Due to the last named circumstance, extensive retroperitoneal hematomas, ruptures of the parenchymatous organs, ligaments, veins, and large arteries often occur A severe condition of the patients with fall of arterial pressure and the development of shock is characteristic. It is difficult to establish the diagnosis of trauma of the pancreas before the operation. The most frequent complication is traumatic pancreatitis which is often attended by the development of cysts, fistulas, and peritonitis. The surgeon's tactics is determined by the character of the injury and is individual in each patient.

  15. Treatment of Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Sadanori

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Radiation exposure as a result of radiation treatment, accident, or terrorism may cause serious problems such as deficiency due to necrosis or loss of function, fibrosis, or intractable ulcers in the tissues and organs. When the skin, bone, oral mucous membrane, guts, or salivary glands are damaged by ionizing radiation, the management and treatment are very lengthy and difficult. Critical Issues: In severe and irreversible injuries, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment. Several surgical procedures, such as debridement, skin grafting, and local and free-vascularized flaps, are widely used. Recent Advances: In specific cases of major morbidity or in high-risk patients, a newly developed therapy using a patient's own stem cells is safe and effective. Adipose tissue, normally a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which are similar to those from the bone marrow, can be harvested, since the procedure is easy, and abundant tissue can be obtained with minimal invasiveness. Future Directions: Based on the molecular basis of radiation injuries, several prospective treatments are under development. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms focus on an individual's sensitivity to radiation in radiogenomics, and the pathology of radiation fibrosis or the effect of radiation on wound healing is being studied and will lead to new insight into the treatment of radiation injuries. Protectors and mitigators are being actively investigated in terms of the timing of administration or dose. PMID:24761339

  16. Proceedings of the eighth thematic conference on geologic remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the Eighth Thematic Conference on Geologic Remote Sensing. This meeting was held April 29-May 2, 1991, in Denver, Colorado, USA. The conference was organized by the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan, in Cooperation with an international program committee composed primarily of geologic remote sensing specialists. The meeting was convened to discuss state-of-the-art exploration, engineering, and environmental applications of geologic remote sensing as well as research and development activities aimed at increasing the future capabilities of this technology. The presentations in these volumes address the following topics: Spectral Geology; U.S. and International Hydrocarbon Exploration; Radar and Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing; Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology; Minerals Exploration; Remote Sensing for Marine and Environmental Applications; Image Processing and Analysis; Geobotanical Remote Sensing; Data Integration and Geographic Information Systems.

  17. Remote Liver Ischemic Preconditioning Protects against Sudden Cardiac Death via an ERK/GSK-3β-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaoyang; Hu, Sheng; Yang, Shuai; Chen, Mou; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Jin; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preconditioning stimuli conducted in remote organs can protect the heart against subsequent ischemic injury, but effects on arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of remote liver ischemia preconditioning (RLIPC) on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD) in vivo, and determined the potential role of ERK/GSK-3βsignaling. Methods/Results Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to sham-operated, control, or RLIPC groups. RLIPC was induced by alternating four 5-minute cycles of liver ischemia with 5-minute intermittent reperfusions. To investigate I/R-induced arrhythmogenesis, hearts in each group were subsequently subjected to 5-minute left main coronary artery ligation followed by 20-minute reperfusion. RLIPC reduced post-I/R ventricular arrhythmias, and decreased the incidence of SCD >threefold. RLIPC increased phosphorylation of cardiac ERK1/2, and GSK-3β Ser9 but not Tyr216 post-I/R injury. Inhibition of either GSK-3β (with SB216763) or ERK1/2 (with U0126) abolished RLIPC-induced antiarrhythmic activity and GSK-3β Ser9 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, leaving GSK-3β Tyr216 phosphorylation unchanged. Conclusions RLIPC exerts a powerful antiarrhythmic effect and reduces predisposition to post-IR SCD. The underlying mechanism of RLIPC cardioprotection against I/R-induced early arrhythmogenesis may involve ERK1/2/GSK-3β Ser9-dependent pathways. PMID:27768739

  18. Remote ischemic preconditioning for kidney protection: GSK3β-centric insights into the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhangsuo; Gong, Rujun

    2015-11-01

    Preventing acute kidney injury (AKI) in high-risk patients following medical interventions is a paramount challenge for clinical practice. Recent data from animal experiments and clinical trials indicate that remote ischemic preconditioning, represented by limb ischemic preconditioning, confers a protective action on the kidney. Ischemic preconditioning is effective in reducing the risk for AKI following cardiovascular interventions and the use of iodinated radiocontrast media. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms for this protective effect are elusive. A protective signal is conveyed from the remote site undergoing ischemic preconditioning, such as the limb, to target organs, such as the kidney, by multiple potential communication pathways, which may involve humoral, neuronal, and systemic mechanisms. Diverse transmitting pathways trigger a variety of signaling cascades, including the reperfusion injury salvage kinase and survivor activating factor enhancement pathways, all of which converge on glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Inhibition of GSK3β subsequent to ischemic preconditioning reinforces the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense, diminishes the nuclear factor-κB-dependent proinflammatory response, and exerts prosurvival effects ensuing from the desensitized mitochondria permeability transition. Thus, therapeutic targeting of GSK3β by ischemic preconditioning or by pharmacologic preconditioning with existing US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs having GSK3β-inhibitory activities might represent a pragmatic and cost-effective adjuvant strategy for kidney protection and prophylaxis against AKI.

  19. [Diagnosis and treatment of thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Guguli, M; Gasi, M

    1979-01-01

    Injuries of the chest isolated or joined with injuries of other organs are distinctly increasing. There are almost no polytraumatic people without thorax injuries. Traffic traumas have a dominant role in causing these injuries. We had most injuries in sammer months. The isolated chest injurie we had 60% and the accompanying injurie 40%. Of the accompanying injuries, the head injurie have the most autstanding place, which especially make difficult the diagnostics, and curing. In heavy injuries of the thorax with paradoxical breathing and on both sides of the leasions, establishing the internal pneumatic stabilisation at the beginning by pulmomatic and then ostheosyntesis of ribs are the most effective therapy. In order to prevent the infections, atracheobronchial dressing with antibiotics is performed as well as the regular X-ray check. As a general rule than 200 ml. per 3 hour requires operative control of the hemorrhage. We had 5,6% thoracothomy after continuous drainage by persstend hemorrhage. The obstructive pneumonia, particularly the eldery are to avoid obstructis, aspiration by catheter with bronchoscopy.

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  2. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  3. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, ... millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can ...

  4. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  5. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  6. Remote Control of Intestinal Stem Cell Activity by Haemocytes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sveta; Li, Xiaoxue; Collas, Esther Jeanne; Boquete, Jean-Phillipe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is a key signaling pathway in the regulation of development and immunity in metazoans. In contrast to the multiple combinatorial JAK/STAT pathways in mammals, only one canonical JAK/STAT pathway exists in Drosophila. It is activated by three secreted proteins of the Unpaired family (Upd): Upd1, Upd2 and Upd3. Although many studies have established a link between JAK/STAT activation and tissue damage, the mode of activation and the precise function of this pathway in the Drosophila systemic immune response remain unclear. In this study, we used mutations in upd2 and upd3 to investigate the role of the JAK/STAT pathway in the systemic immune response. Our study shows that haemocytes express the three upd genes and that injury markedly induces the expression of upd3 by the JNK pathway in haemocytes, which in turn activates the JAK/STAT pathway in the fat body and the gut. Surprisingly, release of Upd3 from haemocytes upon injury can remotely stimulate stem cell proliferation and the expression of Drosomycin-like genes in the intestine. Our results also suggest that a certain level of intestinal epithelium renewal is required for optimal survival to septic injury. While haemocyte-derived Upd promotes intestinal stem cell activation and survival upon septic injury, haemocytes are dispensable for epithelium renewal upon oral bacterial infection. Our study also indicates that intestinal epithelium renewal is sensitive to insults from both the lumen and the haemocoel. It also reveals that release of Upds by haemocytes coordinates the wound-healing program in multiple tissues, including the gut, an organ whose integrity is critical to fly survival. PMID:27231872

  7. Remote hydrogen sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Cortes L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate remote hydrogen sensing methodologies utilizing metal oxide semi-conductor field effect transistors (MOS-FET) and mass spectrometric (MS) technologies and combinations thereof.

  8. Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    Remotely sensed data allows archeologists and historic preservationists the ability to non-destructively detect phenomena previously unobservable to them. Archeologists have successfully used aerial photography since the turn of the century and it continues to be an important research tool today. Multispectral scanners and computer-implemented analysis techniques extend the range of human vision and provides the investigator with innovative research designs at scales previously unimaginable. Pioneering efforts in the use of remote sensing technology have demonstrated its potential, but it is the recent technological developments in remote sensing instrumentation and computer capability that provide for unlimited, cost-effective applications in the future. The combination of remote sensing, Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are radically altering survey, inventory, and modelling approaches.

  9. Remote Sensing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The applications are reported of new remote sensing techniques for earth resources surveys and environmental monitoring. Applications discussed include: vegetation systems, environmental monitoring, and plant protection. Data processing systems are described.

  10. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  11. Remote Sensing Information Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the classification of Remote Sensing data in relation to epidemiology. Classification is a way to reduce the dimensionality and precision to something a human can understand. Classification changes SCALAR data into NOMINAL data.

  12. Remote Access Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Erin

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Remote Access Astronomy Project, a computerized optical telescope and dial-in data distribution system that places high-quality images and image processing techniques into computer workstations in junior and high school classrooms. (PR)

  13. The epidemiology of single season musculoskeletal injuries in professional baseball.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Zhou, Hanbing; Williams, Phillip; Steele, John J; Nguyen, Joseph; Jäger, Marcus; Coleman, Struan

    2013-02-22

    The aim of this descriptive epidemiology study was to evaluate the injury incidence, pattern and type as a function of position in one professional baseball organization for one complete season. The study was carried out in a major academic center. Participants were all major/minor league baseball players playing for one professional organization. The disabled/injury list of one single professional baseball organization (major and minor league players) was reviewed for all of the injuries and the number of total days missed secondary to each injury. All injuries were categorized into major anatomic zones that included: shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, back, abdomen/groin, hip, knee, and ankle/foot. The data was further stratified based on the injury type and the number of days missed due to that particular injury and a statistical analysis was performed. In pitchers, elbow injuries (n=12) resulted in 466 days missed. In catchers, wrist injuries (n=4) resulted in 89 days missed. In position players, abdominal/groin injuries (n=16) resulted in 318 days missed and shoulder injuries (n=9) resulted in 527 days missed. Overall, 134 players were injured and a total of 3209 days were missed. Pitchers had 27 times and 34 times the rate of days missed due to elbow injuries compared to position players and all players, respectively. Abdominal and groin injuries caused the pitchers to have 5.6 times and 6.4 times the rate of days missed than the position and all players, respectively. Both elbow and abdominal/groin injuries are the most disabling injury pattern seen in pitchers. Among the position players, shoulder injuries resulted in the most days missed and knee injuries resulted in the highest rate of days missed in both pitchers and catchers.

  14. Child and adolescent traumatic brain injury: correlates of injury severity.

    PubMed

    Max, J E; Lindgren, S D; Knutson, C; Pearson, C S; Ihrig, D; Welborn, A

    1998-01-01

    A record review focused on children and adolescents, with a history of traumatic brain injury, who were consecutively admitted to a brain injury clinic in which all new patients are psychiatrically evaluated. Significant correlates of severity of injury in the cognitive, education and communication domains of functioning included Performance IQ but not Verbal IQ nor standardized ratings of language or learning disability. Current organic personality syndrome (OPS) but not attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder diagnostic status was significantly related to severity. In conclusion, the findings in this referred sample are similar to prospective studies indicating that Performance IQ appears sensitive in reflecting brain damage. The finding linking OPS to severity of injury is not surprising. This is because OPS is a diagnosis which is dependent on the clinician's judgment of the likelihood that the organic factor is etiologically related to a defined behavioural syndrome. The diagnosis therefore requires a clinical judgment that the threshold of severity of a presumed organic etiological factor has been reached.

  15. Use of remote sensing for land use policy formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boylan, M.; Vlasin, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Uses of remote sensing imagery were investigated based on exploring and evaluating the capability and reliability of all kinds of imagery for improving decision making on issues of land use at all scales of governmental administration. Emphasis was placed on applications to solving immediate problems confronting public agencies and private organizations. Resulting applications of remote sensing use by public agencies, public organizations, and related private corporations are described.

  16. Energy and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. A.; Smith, W. L.; Short, N. M.

    1977-01-01

    Effective implementation of the President's National Energy Plan and the Nuclear Power Policy Statement require application of the best remote sensing tools available. The potential contributions of remote sensing, particularly LANDSAT data, have yet to be clearly identified and exploited. These contributions investigated fall into the following categories: (1) exploration; (2) exploitation; (3) power plant siting; (4) environmental assessment and monitoring; and (5) transportation infrastructure.

  17. Thermal Remote Anemometer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Miller, William E.; Welch, Christopher S.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal Remote Anemometer Device developed for remote, noncontacting, passive measurement of thermal properties of sample. Model heated locally by scanning laser beam and cooled by wind in tunnel. Thermal image of model analyzed to deduce pattern of airflow around model. For materials applications, system used for evaluation of thin films and determination of thermal diffusivity and adhesive-layer contact. For medical applications, measures perfusion through skin to characterize blood flow and used to determine viabilities of grafts and to characterize tissues.

  18. Online Remote Sensing Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawhead, Joel

    2007-01-01

    BasinTools Module 1 processes remotely sensed raster data, including multi- and hyper-spectral data products, via a Web site with no downloads and no plug-ins required. The interface provides standardized algorithms designed so that a user with little or no remote-sensing experience can use the site. This Web-based approach reduces the amount of software, hardware, and computing power necessary to perform the specified analyses. Access to imagery and derived products is enterprise-level and controlled. Because the user never takes possession of the imagery, the licensing of the data is greatly simplified. BasinTools takes the "just-in-time" inventory control model from commercial manufacturing and applies it to remotely-sensed data. Products are created and delivered on-the-fly with no human intervention, even for casual users. Well-defined procedures can be combined in different ways to extend verified and validated methods in order to derive new remote-sensing products, which improves efficiency in any well-defined geospatial domain. Remote-sensing products produced in BasinTools are self-documenting, allowing procedures to be independently verified or peer-reviewed. The software can be used enterprise-wide to conduct low-level remote sensing, viewing, sharing, and manipulating of image data without the need for desktop applications.

  19. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  20. Baseball and softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  1. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    White, Laura E; Santora, Rachel J; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A; Hassoun, Heitham T

    2012-09-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1-/- mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets.

  2. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  3. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  4. Reconstruction in Warfare Injuries.

    PubMed

    Langer, V

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic injuries, especially in the combat setting, stress the surgical team that may be sited in a remote forward area, battling against paucity of time, resources and infrastructure. The lone surgeon may be faced with the arduous challenge of saving life. There is seldom thought given to reconstruction in this high-pressure situation. If the patient survives, morbidity for want of reconstruction can be severe and quality of life can suffer significantly. Reconstruction after 3 to 5 days is fraught with complications and usually does compromise outcome in the post-operative phase. The reconstructive surgeon should be involved early in the management as he can provide coverage for large soft tissue defects after aggressive debridement with panache. If the patient is haemodynamically stable, he should be transferred urgently, preferrably by air, to a higher centre with multi-specialty care, especially being equipped with an orthopaedic and trauma reconstructive surgeon. It has been proved beyond doubt that the healing improves significantly and there is marked decrease in morbidity if coverage of wounds is provided early, before colonized wounds get infected. PMID:27365741

  5. Low power reactor for remote applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, K. L.; Palmer, R. G.; Kirchner, W. L.

    1985-05-01

    A compact, low power reactor is being designed to provide electric power for remote, unattended applications. Because of the high fuel and maintenance costs for conventional power sources such as diesel generators, a reactor power supply appears especially attractive for remote and inaccessible locations. Operating at a thermal power level of 135 kWt, the power supply achieves a gross electrical output of 25 kWe from an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine. By intentional selection of design features stressing inherent safety, operation in an unattended mode is possible with minimal risk to the environment. Reliability is achieved through the use of components representing existing, proven technology. Low enrichment uranium particle fuel, in graphite core blocks, cooled by heat pipes coupled to an ORC converter insures long term, virtually maintenance free, operation of this reactor for remote applications.

  6. Low power reactor for remote applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.L.; Palmer, R.G.; Kirchner, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    A compact, low power reactor is being designed to provide electric power for remote, unattended applications. Because of the high fuel and maintenance costs for conventional power sources such as diesel generators, a reactor power supply appears especially attractive for remote and inaccessible locations. Operating at a thermal power level of 135 kWt, the power supply achieves a gross electrical output of 25 kWe from an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine. By intentional selection of design features stressing inherent safety, operation in an unattended mode is possible with minimal risk to the environment. Reliability is achieved through the use of components representing existing, proven technology. Low enrichment uranium particle fuel, in graphite core blocks, cooled by heat pipes coupled to an ORC converter insures long-term, virtually maintenance free, operation of this reactor for remote applications. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Reorganization of Functional Connectivity as a Correlate of Cognitive Recovery in Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Paul, Nuria; Ordonez, Victoria E.; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomas; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on…

  8. Eye injuries in Canadian amateur hockey.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies, one retrospective (1972 to 1973) and one prospective (1974 to 1975), CONcerning eye injuries incurred by hockey players were conducted by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society with questionnaires to its members. Responses to the questionnaires were analyzed by age, type of injury, cause (i.e., hockey stick, puck, or other means), and results to visual acuity. The results were also designated by organized or unorganized participation. Almost 300 eye injuries were reported in each study. In the first study, 13.7% of the injured players became legally blind as a result of the injury; in the second study, 16% became legally blind. Organized hockey produced more injuries than unorganized hockey. The majority of the injuries were caused by the hockey stick. The injuries were both intraocular and extraocular. The group of 11- to 15-year olds received the highest number of injuries, and the older age group had the higher incidence of blindness. Studies have led to setting more rigid standards, altering rules of the game, and selecting face protectors for hockey players. Older players who care for their equipment prefer the plastic shield face protectors, and the younger players (who complain of fogging and scratching of the plastic) prefer mesh protectors through which neither the stick nor the puck can penetrate. New high sticking (above the shoulder level) rules were included in the 1976 official rule book for Canadian amateur hockey. PMID:474867

  9. Eye injuries in Canadian amateur hockey.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies, one retrospective (1972 to 1973) and one prospective (1974 to 1975), CONcerning eye injuries incurred by hockey players were conducted by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society with questionnaires to its members. Responses to the questionnaires were analyzed by age, type of injury, cause (i.e., hockey stick, puck, or other means), and results to visual acuity. The results were also designated by organized or unorganized participation. Almost 300 eye injuries were reported in each study. In the first study, 13.7% of the injured players became legally blind as a result of the injury; in the second study, 16% became legally blind. Organized hockey produced more injuries than unorganized hockey. The majority of the injuries were caused by the hockey stick. The injuries were both intraocular and extraocular. The group of 11- to 15-year olds received the highest number of injuries, and the older age group had the higher incidence of blindness. Studies have led to setting more rigid standards, altering rules of the game, and selecting face protectors for hockey players. Older players who care for their equipment prefer the plastic shield face protectors, and the younger players (who complain of fogging and scratching of the plastic) prefer mesh protectors through which neither the stick nor the puck can penetrate. New high sticking (above the shoulder level) rules were included in the 1976 official rule book for Canadian amateur hockey.

  10. The hazard of sharp force injuries: Factors influencing outcome.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Stine; Normann, Stig-André; Morild, Inge; Lilleng, Peer Kåre; Heltne, Jon-Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The risk of dying from sharp force injury is difficult to ascertain. To the best of our knowledge, no study has been performed in Norway regarding mortality due to sharp force injury or factors that impact survival. Thus, the objective of the present study was to investigate and assess mortality in subjects with sharp force injury. This retrospective study comprises data on 136 subjects (34 female, 102 male) with suspected severe sharp force injury (self-inflicted or inflicted by others) admitted to Haukeland University Hospital between 2001 and 2010. The majority of subjects were intoxicated, and the injury was most often inflicted by a knife. The incidence of sharp force injury in Western Norway is similar to the incidence in other European countries. Almost half of the subjects with self-inflicted injury died. In cases with injury inflicted by another individual, one in five died. Mortality rates were higher in those with penetrating chest injuries than those with penetrating abdominal injuries and higher in cases with cardiac injury compared to pleural or lung injury. Sharp force injury can be fatal, but the overall mortality rate in this study was 29%. Factors influencing mortality rate were the number of injuries, the topographic regions of the body injured, the anatomical organs/structures inflicted, and emergency measures performed.

  11. Testicular Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones and muscles like other parts of your reproductive system and most of your other organs. Also, the ... examine the testicle itself. Because infections of the reproductive system or urinary tract can sometimes cause similar pain, ...

  12. Remote Sensing of Ocean Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierssen, Heidi M.; Randolph, Kaylan

    The oceans cover over 70% of the earth's surface and the life inhabiting the oceans play an important role in shaping the earth's climate. Phytoplankton, the microscopic organisms in the surface ocean, are responsible for half of the photosynthesis on the planet. These organisms at the base of the food web take up light and carbon dioxide and fix carbon into biological structures releasing oxygen. Estimating the amount of microscopic phytoplankton and their associated primary productivity over the vast expanses of the ocean is extremely challenging from ships. However, as phytoplankton take up light for photosynthesis, they change the color of the surface ocean from blue to green. Such shifts in ocean color can be measured from sensors placed high above the sea on satellites or aircraft and is called "ocean color remote sensing." In open ocean waters, the ocean color is predominantly driven by the phytoplankton concentration and ocean color remote sensing has been used to estimate the amount of chlorophyll a, the primary light-absorbing pigment in all phytoplankton. For the last few decades, satellite data have been used to estimate large-scale patterns of chlorophyll and to model primary productivity across the global ocean from daily to interannual timescales. Such global estimates of chlorophyll and primary productivity have been integrated into climate models and illustrate the important feedbacks between ocean life and global climate processes. In coastal and estuarine systems, ocean color is significantly influenced by other light-absorbing and light-scattering components besides phytoplankton. New approaches have been developed to evaluate the ocean color in relationship to colored dissolved organic matter, suspended sediments, and even to characterize the bathymetry and composition of the seafloor in optically shallow waters. Ocean color measurements are increasingly being used for environmental monitoring of harmful algal blooms, critical coastal habitats

  13. Management of injuries to the porta hepatis.

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, G F; Lim, R C; Yee, E S; Petersen, S R

    1985-01-01

    The management of injuries to the porta hepatis is challenging and controversial. Although definitive, anatomic reconstruction of injured ductal or vascular structures is optimal, porta hepatis injuries are universally accompanied by injuries to other organs (3.6 in this series), which often precludes initial repair. Moreover, frequent injury to the inferior vena cava, aorta, or other major blood vessels in addition to the structures of the porta hepatis results in these injuries being treated in conjunction with exsanguinating hemorrhage. For that reason, control of hemorrhage is the initial management priority, with the initial operation requiring expeditious, if less than anatomically exact, operations. Eighteen of 31 patients survived porta hepatis injury. Hepatic artery injuries were treated by ligation. Complex injuries to bile ducts frequently required enteric-ductal anastomoses as secondary procedures. Of 29 patients with portal vein injuries, six were treated by ligation, 22 by lateral repair, and one with splenic vein interposition graft. As in earlier reports, the structure of the porta hepatis associated with the highest morbidity and mortality rates when injured was the portal vein. Images FIG. 2. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. FIG. 8. PMID:4051602

  14. Remote monitoring: A global partnership for safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J.

    1996-08-01

    With increased awareness of the significant changes of the past several years and their effect on the expectations to international safeguards, it is necessary to reflect on the direction for development of nuclear safeguards in a new era and the resulting implications. The time proven monitoring techniques, based on quantitative factors and demonstrated universal application, have shown their merit. However, the new expectations suggest a possibility that a future IAEA safeguards system could rely more heavily on the value of a comprehensive, transparent, and open implementation regime. With the establishment of such a regime, it is highly likely that remote monitoring will play a significant role. Several states have seen value in cooperating with each other to address the many problems associated with the remote interrogation of integrated monitoring systems. As a consequence the International Remote Monitoring Project was organized to examine the future of remote monitoring in International Safeguards. This paper provides an update on the technical issues, the future plans, and the safeguards implications of cooperative programs relating to remote monitoring. Without providing answers to the policy questions involved, it suggests that it is timely to begin addressing these issues.

  15. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang; Hegland, Joel E.; Jones, Scott C.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

  16. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  17. Injury surveillance in construction: eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Welch, L S; Hunting, K L; Mawudeku, A

    2001-07-01

    Occupational eye injuries are both common and preventable. About 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. To investigate the nature of eye injuries among construction workers, we analyzed a large data set of construction worker injuries. In addition, we interviewed 62 workers with eye injuries to further explore circumstances of eye injury and workers' attitudes and behavior toward the use of eye protection. Eleven percent (363 cases) of the 3,390 construction workers in our data set were treated for eye injuries. Welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glaziers, supervisors, and electricians had a higher proportion of all injuries due to eye injuries than other trades. Nearly half of the diagnoses were abrasions (46%) followed by foreign objects or splash in the eye (29%), conjunctivitis (10%), and burns (5%). In the interviews with 62 workers, we found that employers very frequently required eye protection for all tasks or for high-risk tasks, and workers report wearing eye protection regularly. However, most did not wear eye protection with top and side shields; if we believe the injuries occurred because a particle or liquid passed between the glasses and the workers' faces, increased use of goggles or full shields would have prevented two-thirds of this group of injuries.

  18. Post-conditioning through lower limb ischemia-reperfusion can alleviate lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shi-Qiu; Gan, Hui-Li; Zhang, Jian-Qun; Feng, Lei; Sun, Jian-Chao; Wang, Sheng-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Operation on the infrarenal aorta could cause ischemic-reperfusion (IR) injury in local tissues and remote organs (e.g. the lung). We aim to explore the method of reducing lung ischemia-reperfusion damage after lower limb IR with post conditioning (LIPC). Methods: Bilateral lower limb ischemia was performed in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and then animals were divided into 4 groups: IR-Sham-operated, IR, post conditioned-IR (LIPC) and bilateral lower limb ischemia (LIR). The serum free radical, histological changes, Wet/Dry (W/D) ratio, levels of TNF-α, IL-6, cytokines and chemokines were tested and compared. Results: Post-conditioning could ameliorate histological injuries in the lung when compared to IR group. The serum free radical is significantly lower in LIPC group than IR groups. W/D ratio in LIPC groups is significantly lower. LIPC also could reduce the expression of cytokines and chemokines. Conclusion: post conditioning could reduce long-term damages of the lung after lower limb ischemic-reperfusion injury. PMID:26628977

  19. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  20. Sports-specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  1. Remote water monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Haynes, D. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A remote water monitoring system is described that integrates the functions of sampling, sample preservation, sample analysis, data transmission and remote operation. The system employs a floating buoy carrying an antenna connected by lines to one or more sampling units containing several sample chambers. Receipt of a command signal actuates a solenoid to open an intake valve outward from the sampling unit and communicates the water sample to an identifiable sample chamber. Such response to each signal receipt is repeated until all sample chambers are filled in a sample unit. Each sample taken is analyzed by an electrochemical sensor for a specific property and the data obtained is transmitted to a remote sending and receiving station. Thereafter, the samples remain isolated in the sample chambers until the sampling unit is recovered and the samples removed for further laboratory analysis.

  2. Remote connector development study

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    Plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) connectors, the most common connectors used at the Hanford site, offer a certain level of flexibility in pipe routing, process system configuration, and remote equipment/instrument replacement. However, these desirable features have inherent shortcomings like leakage, high pressure drop through the right angle bends, and a limited range of available pipe diameters that can be connect by them. Costs for construction, maintenance, and operation of PUREX connectors seem to be very high. The PUREX connector designs include a 90{degree} bend in each connector. This increases the pressure drop and erosion effects. Thus, each jumper requires at least two 90{degree} bends. PUREX connectors have not been practically used beyond 100 (4 in.) inner diameter. This study represents the results of a survey on the use of remote pipe-connection systems in US and foreign plants. This study also describes the interdependence between connectors, remote handling equipment, and the necessary skills of the operators.

  3. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  4. Impairment of remote memory after closed head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, H S; High, W M; Meyers, C A; Von Laufen, A; Hayden, M E; Eisenberg, H M

    1985-01-01

    Evidence of partial retrograde amnesia for episodic memories of no personal salience was found in head injured patients (n = 10) tested during posttraumatic amnesia or shortly after its resolution (n = 10), but there was no selective preservation of the earliest memories. In contrast, head injured patients tested during posttraumatic amnesia exhibited relatively preserved retention of early autobiographical memories which they recalled as accurately as oriented head injured patients. It is suggested that reminiscence of salient, early events increases their resistance to partial retrograde amnesia and contributes to the observed temporal gradient. PMID:4009192

  5. Anterior chamber gas bubbles in open globe injury.

    PubMed

    Barnard, E B G; Baxter, D; Blanch, R

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old soldier who was in close proximity to the detonation of an improvised explosive device (IED). Bubbles of gas were visible within the anterior chamber of his left eye. The authors propose that intraocular gas, present acutely after trauma, is diagnostic of open globe injury and is of particular importance in remote military environments.

  6. Eye injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Grin, T R; Nelson, L B; Jeffers, J B

    1987-07-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted of all children with eye injuries admitted to Wills Eye Hospital to determine demographic, etiologic, and prophylactic factors. There were 278 cases, representing 22% of all ocular injuries in children requiring admission. The frequency of childhood ocular injuries is high, often resulting in serious visual impairment. Many of these injuries are preventable. The causes of pediatric eye injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  7. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  8. Remote air pollution measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion and comparison of the Raman method, the resonance and fluorescence backscatter method, long path absorption methods and the differential absorption method for remote air pollution measurement. A comparison of the above remote detection methods shows that the absorption methods offer the most sensitivity at the least required transmitted energy. Topographical absorption provides the advantage of a single ended measurement, and differential absorption offers the additional advantage of a fully depth resolved absorption measurement. Recent experimental results confirming the range and sensitivity of the methods are presented.

  9. Aerosol Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, Jacqueline (Editor); Remer, Lorraine (Editor); Tanre, Didier (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    This book gives a much needed explanation of the basic physical principles of radia5tive transfer and remote sensing, and presents all the instruments and retrieval algorithms in a homogenous manner. For the first time, an easy path from theory to practical algorithms is available in one easily accessible volume, making the connection between theoretical radiative transfer and individual practical solutions to retrieve aerosol information from remote sensing. In addition, the specifics and intercomparison of all current and historical methods are explained and clarified.

  10. Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  11. The past and present of blast injury research in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing incidence of blast injury, the research on its mechanisms and protective measures draws more and more attention. Blast injury has many characteristics different from general war injuries or trauma. For example, soldiers often have various degrees of visceral injury without significant surface damage, combined injuries and arterial air embolism. Researchers in China began to investigate blast injury later than the United States and Sweden, but the development is so fast that lots of achievements have been gained, including the development of biological shock tube, the mechanisms and characteristics of blast injury in various organs, as well as protective measures under special environments. This article reviews the past and current situation of blast injury research in China.

  12. Apoptosis and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Havasi, Andrea; Borkan, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Improved mechanistic understanding of renal cell death in acute kidney injury (AKI) has generated new therapeutic targets. Clearly, the classic lesion of acute tubular necrosis is not adequate to describe the consequences of renal ischemia, nephrotoxin exposure, or sepsis on glomerular filtration rate. Experimental evidence supports a pathogenic role for apoptosis in AKI. Interestingly, proximal tubule epithelial cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis, and injury at this site contributes to organ failure. During apoptosis, well-orchestrated events converge at the mitochondrion, the organelle that integrates life and death signals generated by the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein family. Death requires the ‘perfect storm’ for outer mitochondrial membrane injury to release its cellular ‘executioners’. The complexity of this process affords new targets for effective interventions, both before and after renal insults. Inhibiting apoptosis appears to be critical, because circulating factors released by the injured kidney induce apoptosis and inflammation in distant organs including the heart, lung, liver, and brain, potentially contributing to the high morbidity and mortality associated with AKI. Manipulation of known stress kinases upstream of mitochondrial injury, induction of endogenous, anti-apoptotic proteins, and improved understanding of the timing and consequences of renal cell apoptosis will inevitably improve the outcome of human AKI. PMID:21562469

  13. Remote ischemic preconditioning for prevention of high-altitude diseases: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Berger, Marc Moritz; Macholz, Franziska; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Bärtsch, Peter

    2015-11-15

    Preconditioning refers to exposure to brief episodes of potentially adverse stimuli and protects against injury during subsequent exposures. This was first described in the heart, where episodes of ischemia/reperfusion render the myocardium resistant to subsequent ischemic injury, which is likely caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory processes. Protection of the heart was also found when preconditioning was performed in an organ different from the target, which is called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). The mechanisms causing protection seem to include stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, increase in antioxidant enzymes, and downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. These pathways are also thought to play a role in high-altitude diseases: high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is associated with decreased bioavailability of NO and increased generation of ROS, whereas mechanisms causing acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) seem to involve cytotoxic effects by ROS and inflammation. Based on these apparent similarities between ischemic damage and AMS, HACE, and HAPE, it is reasonable to assume that RIPC might be protective and improve altitude tolerance. In studies addressing high-altitude/hypoxia tolerance, RIPC has been shown to decrease pulmonary arterial systolic pressure in normobaric hypoxia (13% O2) and at high altitude (4,342 m). Our own results indicate that RIPC transiently decreases the severity of AMS at 12% O2. Thus preliminary studies show some benefit, but clearly, further experiments to establish the efficacy and potential mechanism of RIPC are needed.

  14. A “clean case” of systemic injury: Mesenteric lymph after hemorrhagic shock elicits a sterile inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jeniann; Slaughter, Anne; Kotter, Cassandra V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Hauser, Carl J.; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Wohlauer, Max; Frank, Daniel N.; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Peltz, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Post-injury multiple organ failure results from an inappropriate, overwhelming immune response to injury. During trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS), mesenteric ischemia causes gut mucosal breakdown with disruption of the intestinal barrier. It has been proposed that this releases the gut microbiota systemically via post-shock mesenteric lymph, engendering infectious complications. Despite extensive investigation, no clear evidence has been presented for gut bacterial translocation after resuscitation from T/HS. However, such previous studies were limited by available technologies. More sensitive methods, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), have since emerged for detection of bacterial presence and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Quantitative PCR was applied to post-shock mesenteric lymph (PSML) derived from a rat model of T/HS. No bacterial presence was detected in a series of 12 samples, whereas multiple lymph samples showed presence of DAMPs after T/HS. Thus, we confirmed that bacterial translocation does not exist in PSML following resuscitation from T/HS-associated mesenteric ischemia. However, T/HS does increase the presence of mitochondrial DAMPs in PSML. These results support our current position that PSML elaborates remote organ injury by multiple inflammatory mechanisms, including lipid-mediated pro-inflammatory stimuli, and by contribution from gut-derived DAMPS. PMID:26196840

  15. NDVI to Detect Sugarcane Aphid Injury to Grain Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Elliott, N C; Backoulou, G F; Brewer, M J; Giles, K L

    2015-06-01

    Multispectral remote sensing has potential to provide quick and inexpensive information on sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), pest status in sorghum fields. We describe a study conducted to determine if injury caused by sugarcane aphid to sorghum plants in fields of grain sorghum could be detected using multispectral remote sensing from a fixed wing aircraft. A study was conducted in commercial grain sorghum fields in the Texas Gulf Coast region in June 2014. Twenty-six commercial grain sorghum fields were selected and rated for the level of injury to sorghum plants in the field caused by sugarcane aphid. Plant growth stage ranged from 5.0 (watery ripe) to 7.0 (hard dough) among fields; and plant injury rating from sugarcane aphid ranged from 1.0 (little or no injury) to 4.0 (>40% of plants displaying injury) among fields. The normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) is calculated from light reflectance in the red and near-infrared wavelength bands in multispectral imagery and is a common index of plant stress. High NDVI indicates low levels of stress and low NDVI indicates high stress. NDVI ranged from -0.07 to 0.26 among fields. The correlation between NDVI and plant injury rating was negative and significant, as was the correlation between NDVI and plant growth stage. The negative correlation of NDVI with injury rating indicated that plant stress increased with increasing plant injury. Reduced NDVI with increasing plant growth probably resulted from reduced photosynthetic activity in more mature plants. The correlation between plant injury rating and plant growth stage was positive and significant indicating that plant injury from sugarcane aphid increased as plants matured. The partial correlation of NDVI with plant injury rating was negative and significant indicating that NDVI decreased with increasing plant injury after adjusting for its association with plant growth stage. We demonstrated that remotely sensed imagery acquired from grain

  16. Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in a Murine Model of the H-ARS: Multiple-Organ Injury Consequent to <10 Gy Total Body Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Unthank, Joseph L; Miller, Steven J; Quickery, Ariel K; Ferguson, Ethan L; Wang, Meijing; Sampson, Carol H; Chua, Hui Lin; DiStasi, Matthew R; Feng, Hailin; Fisher, Alexa; Katz, Barry P; Plett, P Artur; Sandusky, George E; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Vemula, Sasidhar; Cohen, Eric P; MacVittie, Thomas J; Orschell, Christie M

    2015-11-01

    The threat of radiation exposure from warfare or radiation accidents raises the need for appropriate animal models to study the acute and chronic effects of high dose rate radiation exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the late development of fibrosis in multiple organs (kidney, heart, and lung) in survivors of the C57BL/6 mouse model of the hematopoietic-acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Separate groups of mice for histological and functional studies were exposed to a single uniform total body dose between 8.53 and 8.72 Gy of gamma radiation from a Cs radiation source and studied 1-21 mo later. Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated significantly in the irradiated mice at 9 and 21 mo (from ∼22 to 34 ± 3.8 and 69 ± 6.0 mg dL, p < 0.01 vs. non-irradiated controls) and correlated with glomerosclerosis (29 ± 1.8% vs. 64 ± 9.7% of total glomeruli, p < 0.01 vs. non-irradiated controls). Glomerular tubularization and hypertrophy and tubular atrophy were also observed at 21 mo post-total body irradiation (TBI). An increase in interstitial, perivascular, pericardial and peribronchial fibrosis/collagen deposition was observed from ∼9-21 mo post-TBI in kidney, heart, and lung of irradiated mice relative to age-matched controls. Echocardiography suggested decreased ventricular volumes with a compensatory increase in the left ventricular ejection fraction. The results indicate that significant delayed effects of acute radiation exposure occur in kidney, heart, and lung in survivors of the murine H-ARS TBI model, which mirrors pathology detected in larger species and humans at higher radiation doses focused on specific organs.

  17. An INR-based definition of acute traumatic coagulopathy is associated with mortality, venous thromboembolism, and multiple organ failure after injury

    PubMed Central

    Peltan, Ithan D.; Vande Vusse, Lisa K.; Maier, Ronald V.; Watkins, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is associated with adverse outcomes including death. Previous studies examining ATC's relationship with mortality are limited by inconsistent criteria for syndrome diagnosis, inadequate control of confounding and single-center designs. In this study, we validated the admission international normalized ratio (INR) as an independent risk factor for death and other adverse outcomes after trauma and compared two common INR-based definitions for ATC. Design Multicenter prospective observational study. Setting Nine level I trauma centers in the United States. Patients 1,031 blunt trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results INR exhibited a positive adjusted association with all-cause in-hospital mortality, hemorrhagic shock-associated in-hospital mortality, venous thromboembolism, and multiple organ failure. ATC affected 50% of subjects if defined as an INR >1.2 and 21% of subjects if defined by INR >1.5. After adjustment for potential confounders, ATC defined as an INR >1.5 was significantly associated with all-cause death (OR 1.88, p<0.001), hemorrhagic shock-associated death (OR 2.44, p=0.001), venous thromboembolism (1.73, p<0.001), and multiple organ failure (OR 1.38, p=0.02). ATC defined as an INR >1.2 was not associated with an increased risk for the studied outcomes. Conclusions Elevated INR on hospital admission is a risk factor for mortality and morbidity after severe trauma. Our results confirm this association in a prospectively-assembled multicenter cohort of severely injured patients. Defining ATC using an INR >1.5 but not an INR >1.2 identified a clinically-meaningful subset of trauma patients who, adjusting for confounding factors, suffered more adverse outcomes. Targeting future therapies for ATC to patients with an INR >1.5 may yield greater returns than using a lower INR threshold. PMID:25816119

  18. Incidence of injury in Texas girls' high school basketball.

    PubMed

    Gomez, E; DeLee, J C; Farney, W C

    1996-01-01

    We studied the incidence of injury in girl's varsity basketball to characterize injury demographics in high school athletics. We defined a reportable injury as one that occurred during organized practice or competition, resulted in either missed practice or game time, required physician consultation, or involved the head or face. We prospectively evaluated the athletes on team rosters during the 1993 to 1994 season from 100 randomly selected Class 4A and 5A Texas public high schools that employed full-time certified athletic trainers. The 890 student athletes from 80 schools ranged in age from 14 to 18 years. Four hundred thirty-six injuries were reported for a rate of 0.49 per athlete per season. Injury risk, calculated on the basis of exposure time, was 0.4% per hour per athlete. Although game time accounted for only 12.5% of exposure time, it represented one half of the total injuries. Sprains and strains (56%) were the most common injuries, followed by contusions (15%) and dental injuries (14%). Injuries to the ankle (31%) and knee (19%) were by far the most common. There were 34 severe injuries defined as requiring surgery or hospitalization, for a rate of 0.038 per athlete per season. Knee injuries were by far the most likely to require surgeries, and ACL injuries accounted for 69% of the severe knee injuries.

  19. Autonomic neural control and implications for remote medical monitoring in space.

    PubMed

    Cooke, William H

    2007-07-01

    Long-duration space travel or extended stays on the moon or Mars will pose new challenges for maintaining and monitoring the health status of astronauts. Remote medical monitoring systems will need to be developed for a number of applications, including providing decision support for care-givers in the event of traumatic injury in space. The focus of this brief review is to introduce potential methods of monitoring astronaut status remotely from simple ECG recordings.

  20. EPA REMOTE SENSING RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2006 transgenic corn imaging research campaign has been greatly assisted through a cooperative effort with several Illinois growers who provided planting area and crop composition. This research effort was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of remote sensed imagery of var...

  1. Remote Access Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, Richard; Bowdley, David; Newsam, Andrew; Roche, Paul

    2003-01-01

    There is still nothing to beat the excitement and fulfilment that you can get from observing celestial bodies on a clear dark night, in a remote location away from the seemingly ever increasing light pollution from cities. However, it is also the specific requirements for good observing that can sometimes prevent teachers from offering this…

  2. Remote systems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R.; Schaefer, O.; Hussey, J.

    1992-01-01

    Potential space missions of the nineties and the next century require that we look at the broad category of remote systems as an important means to achieve cost-effective operations, exploration and colonization objectives. This paper addresses such missions, which can use remote systems technology as the basis for identifying required capabilities which must be provided. The relationship of the space-based tasks to similar tasks required for terrestrial applications is discussed. The development status of the required technology is assessed and major issues which must be addressed to meet future requirements are identified. This includes the proper mix of humans and machines, from pure teleoperation to full autonomy; the degree of worksite compatibility for a robotic system; and the required design parameters, such as degrees-of-freedom. Methods for resolution are discussed including analysis, graphical simulation and the use of laboratory test beds. Grumman experience in the application of these techniques to a variety of design issues are presented utilizing the Telerobotics Development Laboratory which includes a 17-DOF robot system, a variety of sensing elements, Deneb/IRIS graphics workstations and control stations. The use of task/worksite mockups, remote system development test beds and graphical analysis are discussed with examples of typical results such as estimates of task times, task feasibility and resulting recommendations for design changes. The relationship of this experience and lessons-learned to future development of remote systems is also discussed.

  3. Remotely controlled spray gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  4. Solar System Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the symposium on Solar System Remote Sensing, September 20-21, 2002, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Administration and publications support for this meeting were provided by the staff of the Publications and Program Services Departments at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  5. Remote Inspection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to remotely inspect equipment of an aging infrastructure is becoming of major interest to many industries. Often the ability to just get a look at a piece of critical equipment can yield very important information. With millions of miles of piping installed throughout the United States, this vast network is critical to oil, natural…

  6. Remote Agent Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benard, Doug; Dorais, Gregory A.; Gamble, Ed; Kanefsky, Bob; Kurien, James; Millar, William; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, Pandu; Rouquette, Nicolas; Rajan, Kanna; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Remote Agent (RA) is a model-based, reusable artificial intelligence (At) software system that enables goal-based spacecraft commanding and robust fault recovery. RA was flight validated during an experiment on board of DS1 between May 17th and May 21th, 1999.

  7. Application of remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, W. J. (Compiler)

    1973-01-01

    Remote sensing and aerial photographic interpretation are discussed along with the specific imagery techniques used for this research. The method used to select sites, the results of data analyses for the Houston metropolitan area, and the location of dredging sites along the Houston Ship Channel are presented. The work proposed for the second year of the project is described.

  8. Remote Services, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    The Remote Services, Inc. (RSI) case is designed as an extensible, database design and implementation project. The case is designed in two primary components: design and implementation. The design component of the case allows students to evaluate a scenario that is similar to a real-world business situation and create an appropriate design…

  9. Remote Sensing and the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, C. A.; Gervin, J. C.; Ragusa, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A text book on remote sensing, as part of the earth resources Skylab programs, is presented. The fundamentals of remote sensing and its application to agriculture, land use, geology, water and marine resources, and environmental monitoring are summarized.

  10. The biology of burn injury.

    PubMed

    Evers, Lars H; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Mailänder, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Burn injury is a complex traumatic event with various local and systemic effects, affecting several organ systems beyond the skin. The pathophysiology of the burn patient shows the full spectrum of the complexity of inflammatory response reactions. In the acute phase, inflammation mechanism may have negative effects because of capillary leak, the propagation of inhalation injury and the development of multiple organ failure. Attempts to mediate these processes remain a central subject of burn care research. Conversely, inflammation is a necessary prologue and component in the later-stage processes of wound healing. In this review, we are attempting to present the current science of burn wound pathophysiology and wound healing. We also describe the evolution of innovative strategies for burn management.

  11. Cross-border firing and injury patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nital; Hackla, Shafiq; Bhagat, Virendar; Singh, Satvir; Hussain, Farid; Gupta, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cross-border firing are increasingly being common in the modern era. The injuries resulting from these low intensity conflicts are a source of anxiety among treating physicians and their respective governments. The provisions are required to minimise the suffering of the victims viz. Mode of injuries, mortality patterns, adequacy of treatment at pre-hospital and tertiary care hospital and provisions to decrease morbidity and mortality for the people living in these areas. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in GMCH, Jammu who suffered injuries due to cross border firing in the month of October, 2014. 68 patients were reported in the causality wing. All the patients were referred from level 2 trauma centre. There were 51 males and 17 females out of which 5 were children. The cause of injury, involvement of organ system, cause of mortality and morbidity and loopholes in prehospital management were identified. Results: Sharpnel were the most common cause of injury followed by indirect trauma. The common cause of mortality was abdominal and thoracic injuries. There were 4 deaths at hospital 2 of which were brought dead and 2 died during the course of treatment. There were twenty patients with extremity injuries, fourteen with chest trauma, eleven with abdomen including parineal injuries, three with head injuries, eight with ENT injuries, three with eye injuries and nine with splinters in the back out of which two were in the spinal canal. Conclusion: Prehospital stabilisation, early transport, in-transit resuscitation, immediate surgery if required and implementation of triage model and ATLS protocol has been the key to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26957821

  12. Smoke Inhalation Lung Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Demling, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to present a multifaceted, definitive review of the past and current status of smoke inhalation injury. History along with current understanding of anatomical, physiology, and biologic components will be discussed. Methods: The literature has been reviewed from the early onset of the concept of smoke inhalation in the 1920s to our current understanding as of 2007. Results: The results indicate that the current pathophysiologic concept is of a disease process that leads to immediate and delayed pulmonary injury best managed by aggressive physiologic support. Management approaches for the biochemical changes have not kept up with current knowledge. The lung injury process is activated by toxins in the smoke's gas and particle components and perpetuated by a resulting lung inflammation. This inflammatory process becomes self-perpetuating through the activation of a large number of inflammatory cascades. In addition, smoke injury leads to significant systemic abnormalities injuring other organs and accentuating the burn injury process and subsequently leading to mediator-induced cellular injury leading potentially to multisystem organ failure. Conclusions: Smoke inhalation injury results in the anatomic finding of denuded and sometimes sloughed airways mucosa. Physiologic findings include small airways containing fibrin casts of mucosa and neutrophils. Airway hyper-reactivity results as well, leading to further decreased collapse, causing obstruction. PMID:18552974

  13. Preventing injuries and illnesses in the wilderness.

    PubMed

    Angert, David; Schaff, Eric A

    2010-06-01

    Wilderness trips have become increasingly popular, especially in the adolescent population. The wilderness can be a source of rejuvenation while being mentally and physically challenging; however, it is also fraught with the potential for injury, illness, and even death. Epidemiologic studies of injuries and illnesses from hikers are not extensive, but there are sufficient data to identify the most common risk factors to offer some strategies for prevention. Many youth will have a medical visit or preparticipation physical assessment before an organized wilderness experience. This article highlights commonly seen wilderness injuries and illnesses and provides guidance for proper planning and problem solving.

  14. Comparison of injury-tracking programs.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Geof; Wadsworth, L Tyler

    2008-01-01

    Injury-tracking software is becoming a necessity in the athletic training room to organize care and meet requirements for record-keeping. A variety of competing products is available, including workstation, local network, and Internet-based programs. Most of these systems are commercially available, while the NCAA Internet-based system is available for member institutions at no cost. A few of the injury-tracking systems have gained wider use and are reviewed here.

  15. Assessment and treatment of common persistent sequelae following blast induced mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Billie A; Cifu, David X; McNamee, Shane; Nichols, Michelle; Carne, William

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and terrorist activity worldwide have been associated with an increased incidence of blast injuries. While blast injuries share similarities with blunt or penetrating traumatic injuries, there are unique mechanistic elements of blast injury that create increased vulnerability to damage of specific organs. This review highlights the mechanism of blast-related injury, describes the common sequelae of blast exposure that may impact rehabilitation care, and summarizes the intervention strategies for these blast-related sequelae.

  16. Remote Sensing and the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosius, Craig A.; And Others

    This document is designed to help senior high school students study remote sensing technology and techniques in relation to the environmental sciences. It discusses the acquisition, analysis, and use of ecological remote data. Material is divided into three sections and an appendix. Section One is an overview of the basics of remote sensing.…

  17. Remote Sensing: A Film Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, David J.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the content of 19 films on remote sensing published between 1973 and 1980. Concludes that they are overly simplistic, notably outdated, and generally too optimistic about the potential of remote sensing from space for resource exploration and environmental problem-solving. Provides names and addresses of more current remote sensing…

  18. Remote sensing and image interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillesand, T. M.; Kiefer, R. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A textbook prepared primarily for use in introductory courses in remote sensing is presented. Topics covered include concepts and foundations of remote sensing; elements of photographic systems; introduction to airphoto interpretation; airphoto interpretation for terrain evaluation; photogrammetry; radiometric characteristics of aerial photographs; aerial thermography; multispectral scanning and spectral pattern recognition; microwave sensing; and remote sensing from space.

  19. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  20. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  1. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  2. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  3. Hamstring strain injuries: factors that lead to injury and re-injury.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are common in a number of sports and incidence rates have not declined in recent times. Additionally, the high rate of recurrent injuries suggests that our current understanding of HSI and re-injury risk is incomplete. Whilst the multifactoral nature of HSIs is agreed upon by many, often individual risk factors and/or causes of injury are examined in isolation. This review aims to bring together the causes, risk factors and interventions associated with HSIs to better understand why HSIs are so prevalent. Running is often identified as the primary activity type for HSIs and given the high eccentric forces and moderate muscle strain placed on the hamstrings during running these factors are considered to be part of the aetiology of HSIs. However, the exact causes of HSIs remain unknown and whilst eccentric contraction and muscle strain purportedly play a role, accumulated muscle damage and/or a single injurious event may also contribute. Potentially, all of these factors interact to varying degrees depending on the injurious activity type (i.e. running, kicking). Furthermore, anatomical factors, such as the biarticular organization, the dual innervations of biceps femoris (BF), fibre type distribution, muscle architecture and the degree of anterior pelvic tilt, have all been implicated. Each of these variables impact upon HSI risk via a number of different mechanisms that include increasing hamstring muscle strain and altering the susceptibility of the hamstrings to muscle damage. Reported risk factors for HSIs include age, previous injury, ethnicity, strength imbalances, flexibility and fatigue. Of these, little is known, definitively, about why previous injury increases the risk of future HSIs. Nevertheless, interventions put in place to reduce the incidence of HSIs by addressing modifiable risk factors have focused primarily on increasing eccentric strength, correcting strength imbalances and improving flexibility. The response to

  4. Hamstring strain injuries: factors that lead to injury and re-injury.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are common in a number of sports and incidence rates have not declined in recent times. Additionally, the high rate of recurrent injuries suggests that our current understanding of HSI and re-injury risk is incomplete. Whilst the multifactoral nature of HSIs is agreed upon by many, often individual risk factors and/or causes of injury are examined in isolation. This review aims to bring together the causes, risk factors and interventions associated with HSIs to better understand why HSIs are so prevalent. Running is often identified as the primary activity type for HSIs and given the high eccentric forces and moderate muscle strain placed on the hamstrings during running these factors are considered to be part of the aetiology of HSIs. However, the exact causes of HSIs remain unknown and whilst eccentric contraction and muscle strain purportedly play a role, accumulated muscle damage and/or a single injurious event may also contribute. Potentially, all of these factors interact to varying degrees depending on the injurious activity type (i.e. running, kicking). Furthermore, anatomical factors, such as the biarticular organization, the dual innervations of biceps femoris (BF), fibre type distribution, muscle architecture and the degree of anterior pelvic tilt, have all been implicated. Each of these variables impact upon HSI risk via a number of different mechanisms that include increasing hamstring muscle strain and altering the susceptibility of the hamstrings to muscle damage. Reported risk factors for HSIs include age, previous injury, ethnicity, strength imbalances, flexibility and fatigue. Of these, little is known, definitively, about why previous injury increases the risk of future HSIs. Nevertheless, interventions put in place to reduce the incidence of HSIs by addressing modifiable risk factors have focused primarily on increasing eccentric strength, correcting strength imbalances and improving flexibility. The response to

  5. Acute paraquat exposure determines dose-dependent oxidative injury of multiple organs and metabolic dysfunction in rats: impact on exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo D; Gonçalves, Reggiani V; Cupertino, Marli C; Santos, Eliziária C; Bigonha, Solange M; Fernandes, Geraldo J M; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Natali, Antônio J

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the pathological morphofunctional adaptations related to the imbalance of exercise tolerance triggered by paraquat (PQ) exposure in rats. The rats were randomized into four groups with eight animals each: (a) SAL (control): 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl solution; (b) PQ10: PQ 10 mg/kg; (c) PQ20: PQ 20 mg/kg; and (d) PQ30: PQ 30 mg/kg. Each group received a single injection of PQ. After 72 hours, the animals were subjected to an incremental aerobic running test until fatigue in order to determine exercise tolerance, blood glucose and lactate levels. After the next 24 h, lung, liver and skeletal muscle were collected for biometric, biochemical and morphological analyses. The animals exposed to PQ exhibited a significant anticipation of anaerobic metabolism during the incremental aerobic running test, a reduction in exercise tolerance and blood glucose levels as well as increased blood lactate levels during exercise compared to control animals. PQ exposure increased serum transaminase levels and reduced the glycogen contents in liver tissue and skeletal muscles. In the lung, the liver and the skeletal muscle, PQ exposure also increased the contents of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, superoxide dismutase and catalase, as well as a structural remodelling compared to the control group. All these changes were dose-dependent. Reduced exercise tolerance after PQ exposure was potentially influenced by pathological remodelling of multiple organs, in which glycogen depletion in the liver and skeletal muscle and the imbalance of glucose metabolism coexist with the induction of lipid, protein and DNA oxidation, a destructive process not counteracted by the upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27277193

  6. Quantitative interpretation of Great Lakes remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Salzman, J.; Svehla, R. A.; Gedney, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the quantitative interpretation of Great Lakes remote sensing water quality data. Remote sensing using color information must take into account (1) the existence of many different organic and inorganic species throughout the Great Lakes, (2) the occurrence of a mixture of species in most locations, and (3) spatial variations in types and concentration of species. The radiative transfer model provides a potential method for an orderly analysis of remote sensing data and a physical basis for developing quantitative algorithms. Predictions and field measurements of volume reflectances are presented which show the advantage of using a radiative transfer model. Spectral absorptance and backscattering coefficients for two inorganic sediments are reported.

  7. Remote ischaemic conditioning on recipients of deceased renal transplants, effect on immediate and extended kidney graft function: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial protocol (CONTEXT)

    PubMed Central

    Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Bibby, Bo M; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Dor, Frank J M F; Birn, Henrik; Jespersen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function due to ischaemia-reperfusion injury is a frequent complication in deceased donor renal transplantation. Experimental evidence indicates that remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) provides systemic protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in various tissues. Methods and analysis ‘Remote ischaemic conditioning in renal transplantation—effect on immediate and extended kidney graft function’ (the CONTEXT study) is an investigator initiated, multicentre, randomised controlled trial investigating whether RIC of the leg of the recipient improves short and long-term graft function following deceased donor kidney transplantation. The study will include 200 kidney transplant recipients of organ donation after brain death and 20 kidney transplant recipients of organ donation after circulatory death. Participants are randomised in a 1:1 design to RIC or sham-RIC (control). RIC consists of four cycles of 5 min occlusion of the thigh by a tourniquet inflated to 250 mm Hg, separated by 5 min of deflation. Primary end point is the time to a 50% reduction from the baseline plasma creatinine, estimated from the changes of plasma creatinine values 30 days post-transplant or 30 days after the last performed dialysis post-transplant. Secondary end points are: need of dialysis post-transplant, measured and estimated-glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 3 and 12 months after transplantation, patient and renal graft survival, number of rejection episodes in the first year, and changes in biomarkers of acute kidney injury and inflammation in plasma, urine and graft tissue. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local ethical committees and national data security agencies. Results are expected to be published in 2016. Trial registration number NCT01395719. PMID:26297360

  8. Catastrophic Head Injuries in High School and Collegiate Sports.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Frederick O.

    2001-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence of catastrophic head injuries in a variety of high school and college sports. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data on catastrophic head injuries were compiled in a national surveillance system maintained by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research. The data were compiled with the assistance of coaches, athletic trainers, athletic directors, executive officers of state and national athletic organizations, a national newspaper clipping service, professional associates of the researchers, and national sport organizations. SUBJECTS: Data included all high school and college athletic programs in the United States. MEASUREMENTS: Background information on the athlete (age, height, weight, experience, previous injury, etc), accident information, immediate and postaccident medical care, type of injury, and equipment involved. Autopsy reports were used when available. RESULTS: A football-related fatality has occurred every year from 1945 through 1999, except for 1990. Head-related deaths accounted for 69% of football fatalities, cervical spinal injuries for 16.3%, and other injuries for 14.7%. High school football produced the greatest number of football head-related deaths. From 1984 through 1999, 69 football head-related injuries resulted in permanent disability. Sixty-three of the injuries were associated with high school football and 6 with college football. Although football has received the most attention, other sports have also been associated with head-related deaths and permanent disability injuries. From 1982 through 1999, 20 deaths and 19 permanent disability injuries occurred in a variety of sports. Track and field, baseball, and cheerleading had the highest incidence of these catastrophic injuries. Three deaths and 3 injuries resulting in permanent disability have occurred in female participants. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Reliable data collection systems and continual analysis of the data can help us to reduce the

  9. Remote ischaemic conditioning in the context of type 2 diabetes and neuropathy: the case for repeat application as a novel therapy for lower extremity ulceration.

    PubMed

    Epps, J A; Smart, N A

    2016-01-01

    An emerging treatment modality for reducing damage caused by ischaemia-reperfusion injury is ischaemic conditioning. This technique induces short periods of ischaemia that have been found to protect against a more significant ischaemic insult. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) can be administered more conveniently and safely, by inflation of a pneumatic blood pressure cuff to a suprasystolic pressure on a limb. Protection is then transferred to a remote organ via humoral and neural pathways. The diabetic state is particularly vulnerable to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and ischaemia is a significant cause of many diabetic complications, including the diabetic foot. Despite this, studies utilising ischaemic conditioning and RIC in type 2 diabetes have often been disappointing. A newer strategy, repeat RIC, involves the repeated application of short periods of limb ischaemia over days or weeks. It has been demonstrated that this improves endothelial function, skin microcirculation, and modulates the systemic inflammatory response. Repeat RIC was recently shown to be beneficial for healing in lower extremity diabetic ulcers. This article summarises the mechanisms of RIC, and the impact that type 2 diabetes may have upon these, with the role of neural mechanisms in the context of diabetic neuropathy a focus. Repeat RIC may show more promise than RIC in type 2 diabetes, and its potential mechanisms and applications will also be explored. Considering the high costs, rates of chronicity and serious complications resulting from diabetic lower extremity ulceration, repeat RIC has the potential to be an effective novel advanced therapy for this condition. PMID:27613524

  10. Remote ischaemic conditioning in the context of type 2 diabetes and neuropathy: the case for repeat application as a novel therapy for lower extremity ulceration.

    PubMed

    Epps, J A; Smart, N A

    2016-01-01

    An emerging treatment modality for reducing damage caused by ischaemia-reperfusion injury is ischaemic conditioning. This technique induces short periods of ischaemia that have been found to protect against a more significant ischaemic insult. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) can be administered more conveniently and safely, by inflation of a pneumatic blood pressure cuff to a suprasystolic pressure on a limb. Protection is then transferred to a remote organ via humoral and neural pathways. The diabetic state is particularly vulnerable to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and ischaemia is a significant cause of many diabetic complications, including the diabetic foot. Despite this, studies utilising ischaemic conditioning and RIC in type 2 diabetes have often been disappointing. A newer strategy, repeat RIC, involves the repeated application of short periods of limb ischaemia over days or weeks. It has been demonstrated that this improves endothelial function, skin microcirculation, and modulates the systemic inflammatory response. Repeat RIC was recently shown to be beneficial for healing in lower extremity diabetic ulcers. This article summarises the mechanisms of RIC, and the impact that type 2 diabetes may have upon these, with the role of neural mechanisms in the context of diabetic neuropathy a focus. Repeat RIC may show more promise than RIC in type 2 diabetes, and its potential mechanisms and applications will also be explored. Considering the high costs, rates of chronicity and serious complications resulting from diabetic lower extremity ulceration, repeat RIC has the potential to be an effective novel advanced therapy for this condition.

  11. Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

  12. Teeth Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Teeth Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Teeth Injuries ... or young child injures the gums or baby teeth: Apply pressure to the area (if it's bleeding) ...

  13. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  14. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  15. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries.

  16. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  17. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  18. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  19. Hand Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations ... deformity Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  20. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  1. Recreational softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Shesser, R; Smith, M; Ellis, P; Brett, S; Ott, J E

    1985-05-01

    Every patient who presented to an urban teaching hospital's emergency department during one season complaining of an injury sustained while playing softball was interviewed to determine the parameters of play associated with the injury. Trends were noticed toward increased frequency of injury to experienced players late in the season. A fall was the most common mechanism of injury, and player location at the time of injury was equally divided between the basepath and defense. Very few players were injured at bat. No conclusion could be drawn about the protection afforded a player from the use of a mitt or cleats. The relative rate of injury was estimated to be 2.26 injuries per 1,000 players per day, making the risk of injury for softball participants about 50% of that for recreational skiers.

  2. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  3. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  4. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-06

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  5. Remote surface inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Balaram, J.; Seraji, H.; Kim, W. S.; Tso, K.; Prasad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going research and development effort in remote surface inspection of space platforms such as the Space Station Freedom (SSF). It describes the space environment and identifies the types of damage for which to search. This paper provides an overview of the Remote Surface Inspection System that was developed to conduct proof-of-concept demonstrations and to perform experiments in a laboratory environment. Specifically, the paper describes three technology areas: (1) manipulator control for sensor placement; (2) automated non-contact inspection to detect and classify flaws; and (3) an operator interface to command the system interactively and receive raw or processed sensor data. Initial findings for the automated and human visual inspection tests are reported.

  6. Evapotranspiration and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Gurney, R.

    1982-01-01

    There are three things required for evapotranspiration to occur: (1) energy (580 cal/gm) for the change of phase of the water; (2) a source of the water, i.e., adequate soil moisture in the surface layer or in the root zone of the plant; and (3) a sink for the water, i.e., a moisture deficit in the air above the ground. Remote sensing can contribute information to the first two of these conditions by providing estimates of solar insolation, surface albedo, surface temperature, vegetation cover, and soil moisture content. In addition there have been attempts to estimate precipitation and shelter air temperature from remotely sensed data. The problem remains to develop methods for effectively using these sources of information to make large area estimates of evapotranspiration.

  7. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  8. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Progress report on remote sensing of Earth terrain covering the period from Jan. to June 1993 is presented. Areas of research include: radiative transfer model for active and passive remote sensing of vegetation canopy; polarimetric thermal emission from rough ocean surfaces; polarimetric passive remote sensing of ocean wind vectors; polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces; layer model with tandom spheriodal scatterers for remote sensing of vegetation canopy; application of theoretical models to active and passive remote sensing of saline ice; radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest; scattering of electromagnetic waves from a dense medium consisting of correlated mie scatterers with size distributions and applications to dry snow; variance of phase fluctuations of waves propagating through a random medium; polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory; branching model for vegetation; polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces; composite volume and surface scattering model; and radar image classification.

  9. REMOTELY RECHARGEABLE EPD

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; Athneal Marzolf, A; Scott Bowser, S

    2007-11-13

    Radiation measurements inside the Contact Decon Maintenance Cell (CDMC) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are required to determine stay times for personnel. A system to remotely recharge the transmitter of an Electronic Personnel Dosimeter (EPD) and bail assembly to transport the EPD within the CDMC was developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to address this need.

  10. Remote Maintenance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Richard C.; Simkins, Lorenz; Rochette, Donn

    1990-01-01

    Automated system gives new life to aging network of computers. Remote maintenance monitoring system developed to diagnose problems in large distributed computer network. Consists of data links, displays, controls, software, and more than 200 computers. Uses sensors to collect data on failures and expert system to examine data, diagnose causes of failures, and recommend cures. Designed to be retrofitted into launch processing system at Kennedy Space Center. Reduces downtime, lowers workload and expense of maintenance, and makes network less dependent on human expertise.

  11. Remote terminal system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. L.; Grams, H. L.; Lindenlaub, J. C.; Schwingendorf, S. K.; Swain, P. H.; Simmons, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Earth Resources Data Processing System was developed to evaluate the system for training, technology transfer, and data processing. In addition to the five sites included in this project two other sites were connected to the system under separate agreements. The experience of these two sites is discussed. The results of the remote terminal project are documented in seven reports: one from each of the five project sites, Purdue University, and an overview report summarizing the other six reports.

  12. Remote sensing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, T.

    1973-01-01

    Research projects concerning the development and application of remote sensors are discussed. Some of the research projects conducted are as follows: (1) aerial photographic inventory of natural resources, (2) detection of buried river channels, (3) delineation of interconnected waterways, (4) plant indicators of atmospheric pollution, and (5) techniques for data transfer from photographs to base maps. On-going projects involving earth resources analyses are described.

  13. Internet Based Remote Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, James

    1999-01-01

    This is the Final Report for the Internet Based Remote Operations Contract, has performed payload operations research support tasks March 1999 through September 1999. These tasks support the GSD goal of developing a secure, inexpensive data, voice, and video mission communications capability between remote payload investigators and the NASA payload operations team in the International Space Station (ISS) era. AZTek has provided feedback from the NASA payload community by utilizing its extensive payload development and operations experience to test and evaluate remote payload operations systems. AZTek has focused on use of the "public Internet" and inexpensive, Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Internet-based tools that would most benefit "small" (e.g., $2 Million or less) payloads and small developers without permanent remote operations facilities. Such projects have limited budgets to support installation and development of high-speed dedicated communications links and high-end, custom ground support equipment and software. The primary conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) The trend of using Internet technology for "live" collaborative applications such as telescience will continue. The GSD-developed data and voice capabilities continued to work well over the "public" Internet during this period. 2. Transmitting multiple voice streams from a voice-conferencing server to a client PC to be mixed and played on the PC is feasible. 3. There are two classes of voice vendors in the market: - Large traditional phone equipment vendors pursuing integration of PSTN with Internet, and Small Internet startups.The key to selecting a vendor will be to find a company sufficiently large and established to provide a base voice-conferencing software product line for the next several years.

  14. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries.

  15. Baseball/lacrosse injuries.

    PubMed

    Casazza, B A; Rossner, K

    1999-02-01

    With the expansion of baseball into all age groups, the game is becoming as much a recreational sport as a youth sport. Throwing arm injuries eventually limit the participation of most players. Analysis is made of these injuries with the goal of complete rehabilitation for the baseball player. Lacrosse has also seen an increase in popularity as a recreational sport. Analysis of lacrosse injuries and rehabilitation of the most common injuries is reviewed.

  16. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries. PMID:27618243

  17. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  18. The cardioprotective potential of valsartan in myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Najah R.; Al-Amran, Fhadil G.; Hussien, Yasmeem A.; Al-Turfy, Mahamed

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischaemia/reperfusion injury describes the experimentally and clinically prevalent finding that tissue ischaemia with inadequate oxygen followed by successful reperfusion initiates a wide and complex array of inflammatory responses that may aggravate local injury as well as induce impairment of remote organ function by mechanisms that involve oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Objective This study was undertaken to investigate the potential role of valsartan angiotensin receptor blocker-1 (ARB-1) in the amelioration of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury induced by ligation of coronary artery in a rat model. Material and methods Adult male Albino rats were randomised into four equal groups (seven rats in each group). In group 1 (sham group) the rats underwent the same anaesthetic and surgical procedure as the control group except for ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery; group 2 (control group) rats were subjected to regional ischaemia for 25 minutes by ligation of LAD coronary artery and reperfusion for 2 hours; group 3 (control vehicle group) rats received (normal saline) vehicle of valsartan via IP injection and were subjected to regional ischaemia for 25 minutes by ligation of LAD coronary artery and reperfusion for two hours; group 4 (valsartan treated group) rats were pretreated with valsartan 10 mg/kg IP 30 minutes before ligation of LAD coronary artery. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were taken by direct cardiac puncture for the measurement of plasma levels of troponin T (cTnT) and serum levels for both malondialdehyde MDA and glutathione GSH. After blood sampling, the heart was removed and divided into two parts; the apex was used for histopathological examination, and the remaining part was used for the measurement of cardiac tissue levels of tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), cysteine aspartic acid-protease 3 (caspase-3), and BCL2-associated X

  19. Advanced laser remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  20. Remote repair appliance

    DOEpatents

    Heumann, Frederick K.; Wilkinson, Jay C.; Wooding, David R.

    1997-01-01

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a worksite on a substantially circular bore of a workpiece and for providing video signals of the worksite to a remote monitor comprising: a baseplate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the baseplate and positioned to roll against the bore of the workpiece when the baseplate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the baseplate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the baseplate; a camera for providing video signals of the worksite to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the baseplate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris.

  1. Remote repair appliance

    DOEpatents

    Heumann, F.K.; Wilkinson, J.C.; Wooding, D.R.

    1997-12-16

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a work site on a substantially circular bore of a work piece and for providing video signals of the work site to a remote monitor comprises: a base plate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the base plate and positioned to roll against the bore of the work piece when the base plate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the base plate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the base plate; a camera for providing video signals of the work site to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the base plate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris. 5 figs.

  2. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  3. The THOSE remote interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawon, Kevin; Gold, Josh; Bachman, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    The DIA, in conjunction with the Army Research Lab (ARL), wants to create an Unmanned Ground Sensor (UGS) controller that is (a) interoperable across all controller platforms, (b) capable of easily adding new sensors, radios, and processes and (c) backward compatible with existing UGS systems. To achieve this, a Terra Harvest controller was created that used Java JRE 1.6 and an Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi) platform, named Terra Harvest Open Software Environment (THOSE). OSGi is an extensible framework that provides a modularized environment for deploying functionality in "bundles". These bundles can publish, discover, and share services available from other external bundles or bundles provided by the controller core. With the addition of a web GUI used for interacting with THOSE, a natural step was then to create a common remote interface that allows 3rd party real-time interaction with the controller. This paper provides an overview of the THOSE system and its components as well as a description of the architectural structure of the remote interface, highlighting the interactions occurring between the controller and the remote interface and its role in providing a positive user experience for managing UGSS functions.

  4. Remote instrument telemaintenance.

    PubMed

    Laugier, A; Allahwerdi, N; Baudin, J; Gaffney, P; Grimson, W; Groth, T; Schilders, L

    1996-07-01

    In the past decade, great technological progress has been made in telemaintenance of mainframe and mini computers. As hardware technology is now available at an acceptable cost, computer aided trouble-shooting can be adapted to laboratory instrumentation in order to significantly improve repair time, avoid instrument downtime by taking advantage of predictive methods, and provide general diagnostic assistance. Depending on the size of the instrument, the telemaintenance facility can be dedicated to a single instrument or alternatively a telemaintenance server can manage multiple distributed small instruments through a Local Area Network. As complex failures can occur, the local diagnosis capabilities may be exceeded and automatic dialing for connection to computerized Remote Maintenance Centers is needed. The main advantages of such a centre, as compared to local diagnosis systems, are the increased access to more information and experience of failures from instrument installations, and consequently the provision of training data updates for Artificial Neural Networks and Knowledge Based Systems in general. When an abnormal situation is detected or anticipated by a diagnosis module, an automatic alert is given to the user, local diagnosis is activated, and for simple solutions, instructions are given to the operator. In the last resort, a human expert can be alerted who, with remote control tools, can attend to the failures. For both local and remote trouble-shooting, the data provided by the instrument and connected workstation is of paramount importance for the efficiency and accuracy of the diagnosis. Equally, the importance of standardization of telemaintenance communication protocols is addressed.

  5. Clinical trials in head injury.

    PubMed

    Reinert, M M; Bullock, R

    1999-06-01

    Secondary brain damage, following severe head injury is considered to be a major cause for bad outcome. Impressive reductions of the extent of brain damage in experimental studies have raised high expectations for cerebral neuroprotective treatment, in the clinic. Therefore multiple compounds were and are being evaluated in trials. In this review we discuss the pathomechanisms of traumatic brain damage, based upon their clinical importance. The role of hypothermia, mannitol, barbiturates, steroids, free radical scavengers, arachidonic acid inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, and potassium channel blockers, will be discussed. The importance of a uniform strategic approach for evaluation of potentially interesting new compounds in clinical trials, to ameliorate outcome in patients with severe head injury, is proposed. To achieve this goal, two nonprofit organizations were founded: the European Brain Injury Consortium (EBIC) and the American Brain Injury Consortium (ABIC). Their aim lies in conducting better clinical trials, which incorporate lessons learned from previous trials, such that the succession of negative, or incomplete studies, as performed in previous years, will cease.

  6. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  7. Prevention of Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, Donald T; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “clinical trial” or “randomized controlled trial” which had been conducted on children and adults whose goal was preventing common football injuries. Our objective was to find studies with an exercise-based training program, thus projects that used mechanical interventions were excluded. Results A structured, generalized warm-up has been shown to be effective at preventing common injuries in football, reducing injuries by about one-third. Conclusion The huge participation numbers in the worldwide family of football would suggest that any reduction in injury should have a public health impact. Professionals in sports medicine need to promote injury prevention programs that have been shown to be effective. PMID:22375195

  8. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  9. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  10. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  11. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study.

  12. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Lance, Rachel M.; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  13. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  14. A 20-Year Comparison of Football-Related Injuries in American and Canadian Youth Aged 6 to 17 Years: A Replication Study.

    PubMed

    Keays, Glenn; Friedman, Debbie; Gagnon, Isabelle

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Little is known about Canadian youth football injuries. The objectives of this study were (a) to contrast the injuries in Canadian and American football players aged 6 to 17 years and (b) compare the injuries sustained during organized football with those in nonorganized football. Methods Using a retrospective cohort design based on data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System a comparison of injuries was made. Results Trends in injuries were comparable. Proportions and odds of injuries were similar, except for a few exceptions. In Canada, more girls were injured and fractures were more prevalent. Compared with nonorganized football, organized football players were older, involved more males, and suffered more traumatic brain injuries and injuries to their lower extremities. Conclusion Canadian and American youth football injuries were similar. The type of football, be it organized or nonorganized, has an impact on injuries. PMID:26316542

  15. Urogenital disorders after pelvic ring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ter–Grigorian, Atom A.; Pushkar, Dmitry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The close anatomical relationship between the skeletal and connective systems of the pelvis, neurological, and vascular structures and pelvic organs are predisposing factors for structural and functional damages of the urogenital system. Materials and methods We performed PUBMED and MEDLINE search using terms “pelvic ring trauma/disruption, bladder injury, urethral injury, sexual dysfunction”. Results The probability of damage of the pelvic organs increases along with the degree of disturbance of integrity of the pelvic ring. The most important risk factor of urogenital injuries is the rupture of the symphyseal joint. Patients with lesions of the urogenital system have a higher risk of mortality compared with patients without lesions of the urogenital system. Sexual dysfunctions along with urinary incontinence are a common consequence of the pelvic fracture in men and women. Conclusions Injuries of the urogenital organs during pelvic ring fractures have an important negative prognostic value in terms of morbidity and quality of life. A prerequisite for a successful therapeutic outcome in case of pelvic fractures with disturbance of pelvic ring integrity is cooperation of orthopedists and urologists, with possible early diagnosis and treatment of injuries of the urogenital organs. PMID:24707384

  16. Hemostatic methods for the management of spleen and liver injuries.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Mischinger, H J; Pfeifer, J; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Werkgartner, G; Steindorfer, P; Kraft-Kirz, J

    1996-10-01

    The spleen and liver are the most frequently injured organs during blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma. Emergency laparotomy is crucial for early control of bleeding and to prevent "secondary" injury as a result of physiologic splanchnic vasoconstriction and free oxygen radicals. Altogether 98 patients with spleen and liver injuries were treated over an 8-year period. Primary orthotopic spleen preservation could be achieved in 46 of 63 patients. In 58 patients with hepatic trauma, hemostatic treatment was chosen based on the severity of the injury. Nonoperative management was used for four splenic and seven hepatic trauma patients. The most commonly used techniques were fibrin sealing, suturing, and débridement for hepatic injury and mesh splenorrhaphy, fibrin glue, and partial resection with a TA stapler for splenic injury. The death of patients with complex injuries was mainly due to preclinical massive blood loss and multiple organ failure. PMID:8798373

  17. Overuse and throwing injuries in the skeletally immature athlete.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Mark R; Ireland, Mary Lloyd

    2003-01-01

    Over 25 million children participate in school-sponsored sports, and an additional 20 million participate in extracurricular organized sports. Over the past decade, increased intensity of training, more pressure for success, new opportunities for structured play, and more organized advanced leagues and traveling teams have led to a corresponding increase in overuse injuries in the skeletally immature athlete. Perhaps the classic sports model for overuse injuries of the upper extremity is baseball. Throwing sports contribute to an increased incidence of elbow and shoulder injuries that might be related to intensity of training, throwing mechanics, and poor conditioning, including core strength. Specific areas of concern regarding overuse injuries in young athletes include such diagnoses as little leaguer's shoulder, little leaguer's elbow, osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow, tennis elbow, and distal radial epiphysitis. Ultimately, overuse injuries, and particularly physeal injuries, should be suspected in any young athlete who has pain in the upper extremity. Comparative bilateral radiographs are the rule in workup.

  18. Hemostatic methods for the management of spleen and liver injuries.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Mischinger, H J; Pfeifer, J; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Werkgartner, G; Steindorfer, P; Kraft-Kirz, J

    1996-10-01

    The spleen and liver are the most frequently injured organs during blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma. Emergency laparotomy is crucial for early control of bleeding and to prevent "secondary" injury as a result of physiologic splanchnic vasoconstriction and free oxygen radicals. Altogether 98 patients with spleen and liver injuries were treated over an 8-year period. Primary orthotopic spleen preservation could be achieved in 46 of 63 patients. In 58 patients with hepatic trauma, hemostatic treatment was chosen based on the severity of the injury. Nonoperative management was used for four splenic and seven hepatic trauma patients. The most commonly used techniques were fibrin sealing, suturing, and débridement for hepatic injury and mesh splenorrhaphy, fibrin glue, and partial resection with a TA stapler for splenic injury. The death of patients with complex injuries was mainly due to preclinical massive blood loss and multiple organ failure.

  19. Review of Remote Sensing Needs and Applications in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.

    2007-01-01

    Remote sensing data has had an important role in identifying and responding to inter-annual variations in the African environment during the past three decades. As a largely agricultural region with diverse but generally limited government capacity to acquire and distribute ground observations of rainfall, temperature and other parameters, remote sensing is sometimes the only reliable measure of crop growing conditions in Africa. Thus, developing and maintaining the technical and scientific capacity to analyze and utilize satellite remote sensing data in Africa is critical to augmenting the continent's local weather/climate observation networks as well as its agricultural and natural resource development and management. The report Review of Remote Sensing Needs and Applications in Africa' has as its central goal to recommend to the US Agency for International Development an appropriate approach to support sustainable remote sensing applications at African regional remote sensing centers. The report focuses on "RS applications" to refer to the acquisition, maintenance and archiving, dissemination, distribution, analysis, and interpretation of remote sensing data, as well as the integration of interpreted data with other spatial data products. The report focuses on three primary remote sensing centers: (1) The AGRHYMET Regional Center in Niamey, Niger, created in 1974, is a specialized institute of the Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel (CILSS), with particular specialization in science and techniques applied to agricultural development, rural development, and natural resource management. (2) The Regional Centre for Maiming of Resources for Development (RCMRD) in Nairobi, Kenya, established in 1975 under the auspices of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the Organization of African Unity (now the African Union), is an intergovernmental organization, with 15 member states from eastern and southern Africa. (3) The

  20. Shoulder injuries in the skeletally immature baseball pitcher and recommendations for the prevention of injury.

    PubMed

    Zaremski, Jason L; Krabak, Brian J

    2012-07-01

    Since 1996, when the first article on pitch restriction recommendations was published, the number of research articles involving skeletally immature pitchers has increased. Potential shoulder injuries in this age group are proximal humeral epiphysiolysis, glenohumeral instability, rotator cuff dysfunction, and superior labrum anteroposterior lesions. Fatigue, improper biomechanics, and overuse are the most common reasons for these injuries. In the hopes of preventing injury to young pitchers, numerous organizations, including the USA Baseball Medical & Safety Advisory Committee, The American Sports Medicine Institute, Little League Baseball & Softball, and the Long Term Athlete Development Program for Baseball Canada, have developed recommendations on pitching restrictions that include limits on pitch count, pitches per week, pitches per season, and rest between pitching. Awareness by sports medicine providers, coaches, and parents/guardians of the most up-to-date recommendations on injury prevention and return to play guidelines should reduce the incidence of acute and chronic injuries in adolescent baseball pitchers.

  1. [Trampoline injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Antila, Eeva; Korhonen, Jussi; Rättyä, Johanna; Serlo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Trampolines for home use have become common in Finland during the past ten years, being especially favored by children. Trampoline jumping is beneficial and constructive physical exercise, but poses a significant risk for injuries. The most common injuries include sprains and strains. During summertime, trampoline injuries account for as many as 13% of children's accidents requiring hospital care. Fractures are by far the most common trampoline injuries requiring hospital care. Injuries can be prevented by using safety nets. Only one child at a time is allowed to jump on the trampoline.

  2. Indoor racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Silko, G J; Cullen, P T

    1994-08-01

    Family physicians can care for most patients injured while participating in indoor racquet sports. However, patients with injuries to the eye usually require ophthalmologic referral. The most common injuries that occur in persons participating in indoor racquet sports include contusions, sprains and strains, lacerations, eye injuries, bursitis and tendinitis. Musculoskeletal injuries that merit special consideration include lateral epicondylitis, DeQuervain's tenosynovitis, wrist intersection syndrome, patellar pain syndrome, meniscal injuries, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The family physician plays a critical role in providing patients with information about preventive measures.

  3. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  4. Injuries in Swedish skydiving

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Objective To create a basis for prevention of modern skydiving injuries. Design Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting National total material. Patients Data on all reported injury events (n = 257) in Swedish skydiving 1999–2003 (total 539 885 jumps) were retrieved from the Swedish Parachute Association. Non‐fatally injured skydivers were sent a questionnaire asking for event and injury details (response rate 89%), and supplementary hospital records were retrieved for the most serious injuries (n = 85). Human, equipment and environmental factors were assessed for risk. Main Outcome Measurements Frequency and severity of injuries. Results Incidence of non‐fatal injury events was 48 per 100 000 jumps. The lower extremities, spine and shoulders were important regions of injury. The most serious injuries were experienced by licensed skydivers, but students in training had a higher injury rate and more often left the sport because of the injury. Of two student‐training systems, one had an incidence less than half that of the other. Conclusions A basis for prevention was created, showing a potential for reduction of frequency and severity of injuries with training and technical interventions. PMID:17224436

  5. Spinal injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Babcock, J L

    1975-05-01

    Spinal injuries with neurologic sequelae are a rare but catastrophic injury. Many of these injuries might be preventable through proper parent and child education, particularly in water sports and vehicles accidents. A significant number of neurologic injuries are incomplete at the time of injury and proper rescue and initial care may make the difference between life as a quadriplegic and life as a normal individual. Because of the complexity of the management of the child with spinal injuries and their relative rarity, the definitive care is best undertaken at hospitals which specialize in the care of spinal injuries. Progressive deformity of the spine, a problem unique to childhood and adolescent paralysis, is often preventable with prolonged immobilization and protection of the spine. Progressive deformities which interfere with function or result in neurologic deterioration require an aggressive surgical approach. PMID:1124228

  6. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect. PMID:20659880

  7. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  8. [Advances in the research of blast lung injury].

    PubMed

    Peng, L H; Guo, G H

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a variety of explosive weapons become increasingly common used in regional military conflicts and terrorist bomb attacks. Meanwhile, the incidence of accidental explosion also showed an increase in the industries and daily life. The lung is the most labile organ and it is used to be severely injured organ in blast injury although even no signs of external injury could be observed on chest. Blast injury can present the symptoms such as lung rupture, bleeding, edema and emphysema. Respiratory dysfunction can affect oxygen supply to organs and systemic tissue, resulting in rapid and sustained hypoxemia and high mortality rate. Blast lung injury is characterized by respiratory disturbance and hypoxia. This article summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiological changes, diagnosis, and treatment of blast lung injury, with a hope to provide some useful clinical information.

  9. [Advances in the research of blast lung injury].

    PubMed

    Peng, L H; Guo, G H

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a variety of explosive weapons become increasingly common used in regional military conflicts and terrorist bomb attacks. Meanwhile, the incidence of accidental explosion also showed an increase in the industries and daily life. The lung is the most labile organ and it is used to be severely injured organ in blast injury although even no signs of external injury could be observed on chest. Blast injury can present the symptoms such as lung rupture, bleeding, edema and emphysema. Respiratory dysfunction can affect oxygen supply to organs and systemic tissue, resulting in rapid and sustained hypoxemia and high mortality rate. Blast lung injury is characterized by respiratory disturbance and hypoxia. This article summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiological changes, diagnosis, and treatment of blast lung injury, with a hope to provide some useful clinical information. PMID:27030652

  10. Adolescent shoulder injuries: consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dean C; Krasinski, Kevin L

    2009-01-01

    Adolescent participation in sports is at an all-time high. Younger patients also are competing with a greater intensity level, frequently playing organized sports throughout the year. Players are putting greater demands on their shoulders, making them more prone to injuries. Because these players are in the process of skeletal development, certain considerations are needed for this patient population. There is controversy regarding the appropriate treatment of these adolescent athletes- including debate on injury prevention; nonsurgical treatment versus surgical treatment; overuse injuries; and return to play after shoulder fractures, dislocations, and instability. It is valuable to review evidence in the current literature regarding recommendations for the treatment of shoulder injuries in adolescent athletes.

  11. Penetrating ocular injury from contaminated eating utensils.

    PubMed

    Feist, R M; Lim, J I; Joondeph, B C; Pflugfelder, S C; Mieler, W F; Ticho, B H; Resnick, K

    1991-01-01

    Although the rate of infectious endophthalmitis following penetrating ocular injury is generally less than 10%, certain settings may carry a greater risk of infection. One such setting is penetrating injury resulting from eating utensils contaminated with oral flora. We reviewed six of these injuries. Culture-positive bacterial endophthalmitis developed in four of the six eyes; only one of the eyes retained reading visual acuity (greater than 20/50) and two eyes lost light perception. The potential for infection and limited visual outcome in this series warrants aggressive prophylaxis and treatment. The unexpected isolation of Haemophilus influenzae in two of the four infections suggests that broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should be considered in all such injuries since less common organisms may be encountered.

  12. Remote copulation: male adaptation to female cannibalism.

    PubMed

    Li, Daiqin; Oh, Joelyn; Kralj-Fiser, Simona; Kuntner, Matjaz

    2012-08-23

    Sexual cannibalism by females and associated male behaviours may be driven by sexual conflict. One such male behaviour is the eunuch phenomenon in spiders, caused by total genital emasculation, which is a seemingly maladaptive behaviour. Here, we provide the first empirical testing of an adaptive hypothesis to explain this behaviour, the remote copulation, in a highly sexually cannibalistic orb-web spider Nephilengys malabarensis. We demonstrate that sperm transfer continues from the severed male organ into female genitals after the male has been detached from copula. Remote copulation increases the total amount of sperm transferred, and thus probably enhances paternity. We conclude that the mechanism may have evolved in response to sexual cannibalism and female-controlled short copulation duration.

  13. Early management of head injury.

    PubMed

    Cunitz, G

    1997-01-01

    Patients with head injury need effective help. The restoration of disturbed ventilation and an impaired general circulation is important. Concomitant injuries, which occur in about 40% of cases, should be recognized. Priority must be given to treating large lesions of vital organs. Hypoxia and hypotension should be avoided because they produce secondary brain damage. Unconscious patients are intubated and ventilated. In a few cases a laryngeal mask could be applied. Intravenous hypnotics, narcotics and benzodiazepines are used. Inhalational anesthetics, among them N2O, are harmful and should be avoided in these cases. The patients are given normal volumes of colloid fluids or water electrolyte solutions. A long-lasting muscle relaxation will impede clinical assessment. Cerebral protection and effective drug treatment of the lesions is still under debate: Nimodepine in traumatic SAH and glucosteroids in local lesions with BBB rupture, however, seem to be effective.

  14. NASA Remote Sensing Research as Applied to Archaeology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giardino, Marco J.; Thomas, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of remotely sensed images is not new to archaeology. Ever since balloons and airplanes first flew cameras over archaeological sites, researchers have taken advantage of the elevated observation platforms to understand sites better. When viewed from above, crop marks, soil anomalies and buried features revealed new information that was not readily visible from ground level. Since 1974 and initially under the leadership of Dr. Tom Sever, NASA's Stennis Space Center, located on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, pioneered and expanded the application of remote sensing to archaeological topics, including cultural resource management. Building on remote sensing activities initiated by the National Park Service, archaeologists increasingly used this technology to study the past in greater depth. By the early 1980s, there were sufficient accomplishments in the application of remote sensing to anthropology and archaeology that a chapter on the subject was included in fundamental remote sensing references. Remote sensing technology and image analysis are currently undergoing a profound shift in emphasis from broad classification to detection, identification and condition of specific materials, both organic and inorganic. In the last few years, remote sensing platforms have grown increasingly capable and sophisticated. Sensors currently in use, or nearing deployment, offer significantly finer spatial and spectral resolutions than were previously available. Paired with new techniques of image analysis, this technology may make the direct detection of archaeological sites a realistic goal.

  15. Remote robotic countermine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Peter

    2010-04-01

    QinetiQ North America (QNA) has approximately 27 years experience in the mine/countermine mission area. Our expertise covers mine development, detection, and neutralization and has always been intertwined with deployment of remote robotic systems. Our countermine payload systems have been used to detect limpet mines on ship hulls, antiassault mines in shallow water and littoral zones and currently for clearance and render safe of land-based routes. In our talk, we will address the challenges encountered in addressing the ongoing countermine mission over a diverse range of operational scenarios, environmental conditions and strategic priorities.

  16. Remote sensing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, R. A., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A syllabus and training materials prepared and used in a series of one-day workshops to introduce modern remote sensing technology to selected groups of professional personnel in Vermont are described. Success in using computer compatible tapes, LANDSAT imagery and aerial photographs is reported for the following applications: (1) mapping defoliation of hardwood forests by tent caterpillar and gypsy moth; (2) differentiating conifer species; (3) mapping ground cover of major lake and pond watersheds; (4) inventorying and locating artificially regenerated conifer forest stands; (5) mapping water quality; (6) ascertaining the boat population to quantify recreational activity on lakes and waterways; and (7) identifying potential aquaculture sites.

  17. Accelerating Commercial Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Visiting Investigator Program (VIP) at Stennis Space Center, Community Coffee was able to use satellites to forecast coffee crops in Guatemala. Using satellite imagery, the company can produce detailed maps that separate coffee cropland from wild vegetation and show information on the health of specific crops. The data can control coffee prices and eventually may be used to optimize application of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation. This would result in maximal crop yields, minimal pollution and lower production costs. VIP is a mechanism involving NASA funding designed to accelerate the growth of commercial remote sensing by promoting general awareness and basic training in the technology.

  18. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  19. Occupational injuries identified by an emergency department based injury surveillance system in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Noe, R; Rocha, J; Clavel-Arcas, C; Aleman, C; Gonzales, M; Mock, C

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and describe the work related injuries in both the formal and informal work sectors captured in an emergency department based injury surveillance system in Managua, Nicaragua. Setting: Urban emergency department in Managua, Nicaragua serving 200–300 patients per day. Methods: Secondary analysis from the surveillance system data. All cases indicating an injury while working and seen for treatment at the emergency department between 1 August 2001 and 31 July 2002 were included. There was no exclusion based on place of occurrence (home, work, school), age, or gender. Results: There were 3801 work related injuries identified which accounted for 18.6% of the total 20 425 injures captured by the surveillance system. Twenty seven work related fatalities were recorded, compared with the 1998 International Labor Organization statistic of 25 occupational fatalities for all of Nicaragua. Injuries occurring outside of a formal work location accounted for more than 60% of the work related injuries. Almost half of these occurred at home, while 19% occurred on the street. The leading mechanisms for work related injuries were falls (30%), blunt objects (28%), and stabs/cuts (23%). Falls were by far the most severe mechanism in the study, causing 37% of the work related deaths and more than half of the fractures. Conclusions: Occupational injuries are grossly underreported in Nicaragua. This study demonstrated that an emergency department can be a data source for work related injuries in developing countries because it captures both the formal and informal workforce injuries. Fall prevention initiatives could significantly reduce the magnitude and severity of occupational injuries in Managua, Nicaragua. PMID:15314050

  20. [Are the injuries caused by the "water bombs" dropped by the Canadair airplane blast injuries?].

    PubMed

    Savić, J

    1991-01-01

    During the forest fire extinguishing in summer using the fire-fighting amphibia (the Canadair) seven soldiers were injured by the "water bomb" dropped from the amphibia and two soldiers died. The way of injury occurrence as well as type and nature of injuries, imposed the question to the author: could it be a case of blast injuries, especially of primary blast injuries? Except for pure scientific reasons, a positive answer could have a practical importance both in regulation of work of persons engaged in fire combat on the ground during extinguishing of fire by the amphibia as well as for physician's work with those exposed to water impact from the plane and who could be eventually injured. Defining any mechanical injuries as transmission of the corresponding kinetic energy, the author considers that the mechanism of injury occurrence of the internal organs caused by the impact of the "water bomb" from the amphibia is the transmission of the energy impact wave into the body. The author has concluded that the impact of the "water bomb" dropped from the fire fighting amphibia can cause changes in the internal organs which are characteristic of primary blast injury. It is proposed that persons exposed to impact even in the absence of visible changes should be subjected to otorhinolaryngologic, and, in special cases, to pulmonary examinations.