Science.gov

Sample records for remote surface mapping

  1. Remote compositional mapping of lunar titanium and surface maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Larson, S. M.; Singer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) is a potential resource capable of providing oxygen for life support and spacecraft propellant for future lunar bases. Estimates of TiO2 content in mature mare soils can be made using an empirical relation between the 400/500 nm reflectance ratio and TiO2 wt percent. A TiO2 abundance map was constructed for the entire near-side lunar maria accurate to + or - 2 wt percent TiO2 using CCD images obtained at the Tumamoc Hill 0.5 m telescope in Tucson, employing bandpass filters centered at 400 and 560 nm. Highest TiO2 regions in the maria are located in western Mare Tranquillitatis. Greater contrast differences between regions on the lunar surface can be obtained using 400/730 nm ratio images. The relation might well be refined to accommodate this possibly more sensitive indicator of TiO2 content. Another potential lunar resource is solar wind-implanted He-3 which may be used as a fuel for fusion reactors. Relative soil maturity, as determined by agglutinate content, can be estimated from 950/560 nm ration images. Immature soils appear darker in this ratio since such soils contain abundant pyroxene grains which cause strong absorption centered near 950 nm due Fe(2+) crystal field transitions. A positive correlation exists between the amount of He-3 and TiO2 content in lunar soils, suggesting that regions high in TiO2 should also be high in He-3. Reflectance spectrophotometry in the region 320 to 870 nm was also obtained for several regions. Below about 340 nm, these spectra show variations in relative reflectance that are caused by as yet unassigned near-UV absorptions due to compositional differences.

  2. A simple thermal model of the earth's surface for geologic mapping by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal inertia of the earth's surface can be used in geologic mapping as a complement to surface reflectance data as provided by Landsat. Thermal inertia cannot be determined directly but must be inferred from radiation temperature measurements (by thermal IR sensors) made at various times in the diurnal cycle, combined with a model of the surface heating processes. A model is developed which differs from those created previously for this purpose, because it includes sensible and latent heating. Tests of this model using field data indicate that it accurately determines the surface heating. When the model is used with field measurements of meteorological variables and is combined with remotely sensed temperature data, a thermal inertia image can be produced.

  3. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  4. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  5. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  6. Airborne mapping of earth-atmosphere exchange processes and remote sensing of surface characteristics over heterogeneous areas

    SciTech Connect

    Schuepp, P.H.; Ogunjemiyo, S.; Mitic, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Given the spatial heterogeneity of much of the biosphere, and the difficulty in establishing representative observation points at the surface, airborne flux observations coupled with airborne and satellite-based remote sensing plays an increasing role in the description of surface-atmosphere exchange processes. Our paper summarizes flux mapping procedures based on low level airborne sampling by the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft, over three ecosystems with different degrees of spatial heterogeneity (grassland, mixed agricultural land and boreal forest). Observations show that the degree to which flux maps for heat, moisture and trace gases are correlated, among themselves and with maps of radiometrically observable surface features, cannot be generalized. This means that, wherever possible, algorithms for the prediction of surface-atmosphere exchange processes based on remote sensing observations should be developed for - and tested in - each structurally different ecosystem. The flexibility of deployment of aircraft serves well, both for the gathering of data to develop such algorithms, as well as for their testing at scales that integrate over an adequate sample of the various components that constitute a spatially heterogeneous ecosystem. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Remote sensing aids geologic mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Marrs, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques were applied to general geologic mapping along the Rio Grande rift zone in central Colorado. A geologic map of about 1,100 square miles was prepared utilizing (1) prior published and unpublished maps, (2) detailed and reconnaissance field maps made for this study, and (3) remote sensor data interpretations. The map is used for interpretation of the complex Cenozoic tectonic and geomorphic histories of the area.

  8. Advances in soil mapping: Mapping quartz content of soil surface using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weksler, Shahar; Notesco, Gila; Ben-Dor, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave-infrared (LWIR) spectral region has proven to be a new and efficient tool for mineral mapping (Adar et al. 2013). Minerals which are featureless in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared regions, e.g., quartz, have a unique fingerprint in the LWIR region (8-12 μm). This spectral region adds to the optical region in which several important minerals can be characterized with significant features (e.g., clay). Accordingly, using airborne hyperspectral remote-sensing data in the LWIR region is an important and practical means of classifying and quantifying minerals. Day and night airborne data, acquired by the AisaOWL sensor over Nitzana National Park in Israel, were used to demonstrate how LWIR region data can be used to map quartz content on the soil surface in a pixel-by-pixel process. The LWIR radiance image is composed of the surface emissivity (and hence the surface's chemical and physical properties), the radiant temperature (according to the Plank equation) and the atmospheric attenuation (which is different during the day and at night). In this work, we show that it is possible to separate surface emissivity, temperature and atmospheric attenuation by using the radiance measured from a vicarious calibration site which was found to be distinctive for the atmospheric contribution. Applying the spectrum of this area as a gain factor to each pixel in the image reduced the atmospheric effects while emphasizing the mineralogical features. Based on this finding and using the same vicarious calibration site used by Notesco et al. (2015), we further studied the possibility of mapping quartz in an area outside the vicarious calibration site. The resulting emissivity image of Nitzana soils (100 km away from the vicarious calibration site) enabled quantifying the quartz in each pixel and mapping its abundance. The day and night images showed a similar quartz distribution, thereby validating the methodology and

  9. Evaluation of Surface Energy Balance models for mapping evapotranspiration using very high resolution airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, George

    Agriculture is the largest (90%) consumer of all fresh water in the world. The consumptive use of water by vegetation represented by the process evapotranspiration (ET) has a vital role in the dynamics of water, carbon and energy fluxes of the biosphere. Consequently, mapping ET is essential for making water a sustainable resource and also for monitoring ecosystem response to water stress and changing climate. Over the past three decades, numerous thermal remote sensing based ET mapping algorithms were developed and these have brought a significant theoretical and technical advancement in the spatial modeling of ET. Though these algorithms provided a robust, economical, and efficient tool for ET estimations at field and regional scales, yet the uncertainties in flux estimations were large, making evaluation a difficult task. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and improve the performance of widely used remote sensing based energy balance models, namely: the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Data used in this study was collected as part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional field campaign BEAREX (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) that was conducted during 2007 and 2008 summer cropping seasons at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas. Seventeen high resolution remote sensing images taken from multispectral sensors onboard aircraft and field measurements of the agro-meteorological variables from the campaign were used for model evaluation and improvement. Overall relative error measured in terms of mean absolute percent difference (MAPD) for instantaneous ET (mm h -1) were 22.7%, 23.2%, and 12.6% for SEBAL, METRIC, and SEBS, respectively. SEBAL and METRIC performances for irrigated fields representing higher ET

  10. Mapping Surface Cover Parameters Using Aggregation Rules and Remotely Sensed Cover Classes. Version 1.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arain, Altaf M.; Shuttleworth, W. James; Yang, Z-Liang; Michaud, Jene; Dolman, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    A coupled model, which combines the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) with an advanced atmospheric boundary-layer model, was used to validate hypothetical aggregation rules for BATS-specific surface cover parameters. The model was initialized and tested with observations from the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observational Study and used to simulate surface fluxes for rain forest and pasture mixes at a site near Manaus in Brazil. The aggregation rules are shown to estimate parameters which give area-average surface fluxes similar to those calculated with explicit representation of forest and pasture patches for a range of meteorological and surface conditions relevant to this site, but the agreement deteriorates somewhat when there are large patch-to-patch differences in soil moisture. The aggregation rules, validated as above, were then applied to remotely sensed 1 km land cover data set to obtain grid-average values of BATS vegetation parameters for 2.8 deg x 2.8 deg and 1 deg x 1 deg grids within the conterminous United States. There are significant differences in key vegetation parameters (aerodynamic roughness length, albedo, leaf area index, and stomatal resistance) when aggregate parameters are compared to parameters for the single, dominant cover within the grid. However, the surface energy fluxes calculated by stand-alone BATS with the 2-year forcing, data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) CDROM were reasonably similar using aggregate-vegetation parameters and dominant-cover parameters, but there were some significant differences, particularly in the western USA.

  11. A Thermal-Based remote sensing technique for routine mapping of land-surface carbon, water and energy fluxes from field to regional scales.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robust remote sensing methodologies for mapping instantaneous land-surface CO2 fluxes over a range of spatial scales are required to reconcile “top-down” (e.g., atmospheric) and “bottom-up” (e.g., scaled leaf) models of land-atmosphere carbon exchange. This study investigates the implementation of ...

  12. Remote sensing. [land use mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jinich, A.

    1979-01-01

    Various imaging techniques are outlined for use in mapping, land use, and land management in Mexico. Among the techniques discussed are pattern recognition and photographic processing. The utilization of information from remote sensing devices on satellites are studied. Multispectral band scanners are examined and software, hardware, and other program requirements are surveyed.

  13. Remote surface inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Balaram, J.; Seraji, H.; Kim, W. S.; Tso, K.; Prasad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going research and development effort in remote surface inspection of space platforms such as the Space Station Freedom (SSF). It describes the space environment and identifies the types of damage for which to search. This paper provides an overview of the Remote Surface Inspection System that was developed to conduct proof-of-concept demonstrations and to perform experiments in a laboratory environment. Specifically, the paper describes three technology areas: (1) manipulator control for sensor placement; (2) automated non-contact inspection to detect and classify flaws; and (3) an operator interface to command the system interactively and receive raw or processed sensor data. Initial findings for the automated and human visual inspection tests are reported.

  14. Regional mapping of carbon, water, and energy land-surface fluxes using remotely sensed indicators of canopy light use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely sensed data allow for indirect estimates of key biophysical and biochemical parameters needed for accurate and reliable assessments of land-surface carbon, energy and water fluxes. Biophysical parameters such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), which provides information useful for determining vari...

  15. Mapping carbon, water, and energy land-surface fluxes using remotely indicators of canopy light use efficiency from hyperspectral data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely sensed data allow for indirect estimates of key biophysical and biochemical parameters needed for accurate and reliable assessments of land-surface carbon, energy and water fluxes. Biophysical parameters such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), which provides information useful for determining varia...

  16. Improved Mapping of Carbon, Water and Energy Land-Surface Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Indicators of Canopy Light Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schull, M. A.; Anderson, M. C.; Kustas, W.; Cammalleri, C.; Houborg, R.

    2012-12-01

    A light-use-efficiency (LUE) based model of canopy resistance has been embedded into a thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model to facilitate coupled simulations of transpiration and carbon assimilation. The model assumes that deviations of the observed canopy LUE from a nominal stand-level value (LUEn - typically indexed by vegetation class) are due to varying conditions of light, humidity, CO2 concentration and leaf temperature. The deviations are accommodated by adjusting an effective LUE that responds to the varying conditions. The challenge to monitoring fluxes on a larger scale is to capture the physiological responses due to changing conditions. This challenge can be met using remotely sensed leaf chlorophyll (Cab). Since Cab is a vital pigment for absorbing light for use in photosynthesis, it has been recognized as a key parameter for quantifying photosynthetic functioning that are sensitive to these conditions. Recent studies have shown that it is sensitive to changes in LUE, which defines how efficiently a plant can assimilate carbon dioxide (CO2) given the absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) and is therefore useful for monitoring carbon fluxes. We investigate the feasibility of leaf chlorophyll to capture these variations in LUEn using remotely sensed data. To retrieve Cab from remotely sensed data we use REGFLEC, a physically based tool that translates at-sensor radiances in the green, red and NIR spectral regions from multiple satellite sensors into realistic maps of LAI and Cab. Initial results show that Cab is exponentially correlated to light use efficiency. Incorporating nominal light use efficiency estimated from Cab is shown to improve fluxes of carbon, water and energy most notably in times of stressed vegetation. The result illustrates that Cab is sensitive to changes in plant physiology and can capture plant stress needed for improved estimation of fluxes. The observed relationship and initial results demonstrate the

  17. Mapping products of Titan's surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Karkoschka, Erich; Barnes, Jason W.; Tomasko, Martin G.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Le Corre, Lucille; Langhans, Mirjam; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Lorenz, Ralf D.; Perry, Jason; Brown, Robert H.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing instruments aboard the Cassini spacecraft have been observed the surface of Titan globally in the infrared and radar wavelength ranges as well as locally by the Huygens instruments revealing a wealth of new morphological features indicating a geologically active surface. We present a summary of mapping products of Titan's surface derived from data of the remote sensing instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (ISS, VIMS, RADAR) as well as the Huygens probe (DISR) that were achieved during the nominal Cassini mission including an overview of Titan's recent nomenclature.

  18. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Carini, Gabriella A.; Wei, Chen; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kramer, Georgiana; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Zheng, Li; Ramsey, Brian D.; Rehak, Pavel; Siddons, D. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (<150 eV at 5.9 keV) and an order of magnitude lower power requirement, making much higher sensitivities possible. Furthermore, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  19. Sensitivity of thermal inertia calculations to variations in environmental factors. [in mapping of Earth's surface by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of thermal inertia (TI) calculations to errors in the measurement or parameterization of a number of environmental factors is considered here. The factors include effects of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, surface albedo and emissivity, variations in surface turbulent heat flux density, cloud cover, vegetative cover, and topography. The error analysis is based upon data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite for July 1978 at three separate test sites in the deserts of the western United States. Results show that typical errors in atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud cover, and vegetative cover can individually cause root-mean-square (RMS) errors of about 10 percent (with atmospheric effects sometimes as large as 30-40 percent) in HCMM-derived thermal inertia images of 20,000-200,000 pixels.

  20. Bone Surface Mapping Method

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Zhang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bone shape is an important factor to determine the bone's structural function. For the asymmetrically shaped and anisotropically distributed bone in vivo, a surface mapping method is proposed on the bases of its geometric transformation invariance and its uniqueness of the principal axes of inertia. Using spiral CT scanning, we can make precise measurements to bone in vivo. The coordinate transformations lead to the principal axes of inertia, with which the prime meridian and the contour can be set. Methods such as tomographic reconstruction and boundary development are employed so that the surface of bone in vivo can be mapped. Experimental results show that the surface mapping method can reflect the shape features and help study the surface changes of bone in vivo. This method can be applied to research into the surface characteristics and changes of organ, tissue or cell whenever its digitalized surface is obtained. PMID:22412952

  1. A satellite remote sensing technique for geological structure horizon mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, A.; Huggins, P.; Rees, J.

    1996-08-01

    A Satellite Remote Sensing Technique is demonstrated for generating near surface geological structure data. This technique enables the screening of large areas and targeting of seismic acquisition during hydrocarbon exploration. This is of particular advantage in terrains where surveying is logistically difficult. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data and a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM), are used to identify and map outcropping horizons. These are used to reconstruct the near surface structure. The technique is applied in Central Yemen which is characterised by a {open_quote}layer-cake{close_quote} geological and low dipping terrain. The results are validated using 2D seismic data. The near surface map images faults and structure not apparent in the raw data. Comparison with the structure map generated from a 2D seismic data indicates very good structural and fault correlation. The near surface map successfully highlights areas of potential closure at reservoir depths.

  2. Geographic Object-based Image Analysis for Developing Cryospheric Surface Mapping Application using Remotely Sensed High-Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Luis, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel semi-automated method was devised by coupling spectral index ratios (SIRs) and geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) to extract cryospheric geoinformation from very high resolution WorldView 2 (WV-2) satellite imagery. The present study addresses development of multiple rule sets for GEOBIA-based classification of WV-2 imagery to accurately extract land cover features in the Larsemann Hills, Antarctica. Multi-level segmentation process was applied to WV-2 image to generate different sizes of geographic image objects corresponding to various land cover features w.r.t scale parameter. Several SIRs were applied to geographic objects at different segmentation levels to classify landmass, man-made features, snow/ice, and water bodies. A specific attention was paid to water body class to identify water areas at the image level, considering their uneven appearance on landmass and ice. The results illustrated that synergetic usage of SIRs and GEOBIA can provide accurate means to identify land cover classes with an overall classification accuracy of ≈97%. In conclusion, the results suggest that GEOBIA is a powerful tool for carrying out automatic and semiautomatic analysis for most cryospheric remote-sensing applications, and the synergetic coupling with pixel-based SIRs is found to be a superior method for mining geoinformation.

  3. Paleovalleys mapping using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibatsha, A. B.

    2014-06-01

    For work materials used multispectral satellite imagery Landsat (7 channels), medium spatial resolution (14,25-90 m) and a digital elevation model (data SRTM). For interpretation of satellite images and especially their infrared and thermal channels allocated buried paleovalleys pre-paleogene age. Their total length is 228 km. By manifestation of the content of remote sensing paleovalleys distinctly divided into two types, long ribbon-like read in materials and space survey highlights a network of small lakes. By the nature of the relationship established that the second type of river paleovalleys flogs first. On this basis, proposed to allocate two uneven river paleosystem. The most ancient paleovalleys first type can presumably be attributed to karst erosion, blurry chalk and carbon deposits foundation. Paleovalleys may include significant groundwater resources as drinking and industrial purposes. Also we can control the position paleovalleys zinc and bauxite mineralization area and alluvial deposits include uranium mineralization valleys infiltration type and placer gold. Direction paleovalleys choppy, but in general they have a north-east orientation, which is controlled by tectonic zones of the foundation. These zones are defined as the burial place themselves paleovalleys and position of karst cavities in areas interfacing with other structures orientation. The association of mineralization to the caverns in the beds paleovalleys could generally present conditions of formation of mineralization and carry it to the "Niagara" type. The term is obviously best reflects the mechanism of formation of these ores.

  4. Application of remote sensing-based two-source energy balance model for mapping field surface fluxes with composite and component surface temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operational application of a remote sensing-based two source energy balance model (TSEB) to estimate evaportranspiration (ET) and the components evaporation (E), transpiration (T) at a range of space and time scales is very useful for managing water resources in arid and semiarid watersheds. The TSE...

  5. Mapping products of Titan's surface: Chapter 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Karkoschka, Erich; Kirk, Randolph L.; Barnes, Jason W.; Tomasko, Martin G.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Le Corre, Lucille; Langhans, Mirjam; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Perry, Jason; Brown, Robert; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Waite, J. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing instruments aboard the Cassini spacecraft have been observed the surface of Titan globally in the infrared and radar wavelength ranges as well as locally by the Huygens instruments revealing a wealth of new morphological features indicating a geologically active surface. We present a summary of mapping products of Titan's surface derived from data of the remote sensing instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (ISS, VIMS, RADAR) as well as the Huygens probe (DISR) that were achieved during the nominal Cassini mission including an overview of Titan's recent nomenclature.

  6. Remote Sensing Sensors and Applications in Environmental Resources Mapping and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; S.Thenkabail, Prasad; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  7. Remote sensing sensors and applications in environmental resources mapping and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  8. Time series analysis of optical remote sensing data for the mapping of temporary surface water bodies in sub-Saharan western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, E. M.; Bartholomé, E.; Combal, B.

    2009-05-01

    SummaryA map of temporary small water bodies (TSWB) at 1 km resolution was derived for the arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid regions of sub-Saharan western Africa where the spatio-temporal distribution of actual surface water occurrence exhibits high inter- and intra-annual variability. Water bodies and humid areas have been mapped and characterized by the analysis of 10 daily small water bodies (SWB) maps based on SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) data spanning the period January 1999-September 2007. Further analysis of the SWB time series provided additional information about the seasonal recurrence of water bodies as well as their hydrological function. A map derived from a continuous time series assures the inclusion of temporary features, a clear advantage compared to other datasets, which are based on several single date observations. The method described in this paper targets at a rapid creation of TSWB maps based on the SWB time series for different time intervals and regions. An accuracy assessment has been carried out with a stratified random sampling approach and a one-stage cluster analysis that relies on high-resolution satellite data to verify the detected water bodies. The overall accuracy, considering only the commission error, is 95.4% for the whole study region, with best results in the arid and semi-arid climate zone. The method to map water bodies delivers satisfactory results, particularly for sparsely vegetated areas as well as flat areas of the study region. In more humid, more vegetated areas and in mountainous areas, the possibility of false detections increases due to surface characteristics.

  9. Potential of the upcoming German EnMAP hyperspectral mission for the assimilation of agricultural remote sensing products into biophysical land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hank, T.; Richter, K.; Frank, T.; Friese, M.; Bach, H.; Locherer, M.; Mauser, W.

    2010-12-01

    The German hyperspectral satellite mission ‘Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program’ (EnMAP) is expected to be launched in 2014. The first high-quality imaging spectrometer in space will deliver data for a wide range of applications. The agricultural sector will particularly benefit from the hyperspectral observation capability, since information about state and dynamics of the (non-)vegetated land surface, expressed by biophysical variables, is required for instance in irrigation water determination, stress detection or in crop production modeling. Advanced canopy reflectance models, such as the widely applied coupled PROSPECT+SAIL model, have successfully been used for the retrieval of land surface variables mostly using multispectral EO-data. However, only imaging spectrometers provide the spectral resolution that is necessary to release the full potential of these retrieval strategies. With EnMAP, a new instrument will be available, covering the spectral range from 420 to 2450nm with 240 spectral bands. With 30km swath and 4 days revisit cycle, EnMAP will allow for a multiseasonal hyperspectral variable retrieval on a larger scale. However, EO recordings only provide single observations of the land surface, while the investigated processes, like for instance plant growth, are dynamically and non-linearly evolving. Physically-based land surface models may bridge the gaps between the single acquisitions. Being regularly updated through assimilated EO information, the models provide detailed growth parameters, such as biomass, phenology or evapotranspiration. The work presented here applies a neural network approach for the inversion of the PROSPECT+SAIL model to derive biophysical land surface variables. From those, LAI and fAPAR are assimilated into the PROMET (Process of Radiation Mass and Energy Transfer) model in order to model spatially heterogeneous crop growth for a test site in Southern Germany. The results indicate on one hand that the use of

  10. Spectroscopic remote sensing for material identification, vegetation characterization, and mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Lewis, Paul E.; Shen, Sylvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying materials by measuring and analyzing their reflectance spectra has been an important procedure in analytical chemistry for decades. Airborne and space-based imaging spectrometers allow materials to be mapped across the landscape. With many existing airborne sensors and new satellite-borne sensors planned for the future, robust methods are needed to fully exploit the information content of hyperspectral remote sensing data. A method of identifying and mapping materials using spectral feature analyses of reflectance data in an expert-system framework called MICA (Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm) is described. MICA is a module of the PRISM (Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements) software, available to the public from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2011/1155/. The core concepts of MICA include continuum removal and linear regression to compare key diagnostic absorption features in reference laboratory/field spectra and the spectra being analyzed. The reference spectra, diagnostic features, and threshold constraints are defined within a user-developed MICA command file (MCF). Building on several decades of experience in mineral mapping, a broadly-applicable MCF was developed to detect a set of minerals frequently occurring on the Earth's surface and applied to map minerals in the country-wide coverage of the 2007 Afghanistan HyMap data set. MICA has also been applied to detect sub-pixel oil contamination in marshes impacted by the Deepwater Horizon incident by discriminating the C-H absorption features in oil residues from background vegetation. These two recent examples demonstrate the utility of a spectroscopic approach to remote sensing for identifying and mapping the distributions of materials in imaging spectrometer data.

  11. Mapping of submerged vegetation using remote sensing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savastano, K. J.; Faller, K. H.; Mcfadin, L. W.; Holley, H.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques for mapping submerged sea grasses using aircraft supported remote sensors are described. The 21 channel solid state array spectroradiometer was successfully used as a remote sensor in the experiment in that the system operated without problem and obtained data. The environmental conditions of clear water, bright sandy bottom and monospecific vegetation (Thalassia) were ideal.

  12. Remote sensing of land surface phenology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, G.A.; Brown, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of land-surface phenology is an important method for studying the patterns of plant and animal growth cycles. Phenological events are sensitive to climate variation; therefore phenology data provide important baseline information documenting trends in ecology and detecting the impacts of climate change on multiple scales. The USGS Remote sensing of land surface phenology program produces annually, nine phenology indicator variables at 250 m and 1,000 m resolution for the contiguous U.S. The 12 year archive is available at http://phenology.cr.usgs.gov/index.php.

  13. HI Surface brightness mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Peterson, Jeff; Bandura, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    We propose to scan the 2dF survey field with Parkes multibeam in driftscan mode to make a map to cross correlate with galaxy redshifts. This allows a statistical detection of HI large scale structure out to z=0.15. In this cross correlation, the HI in ALL galaxies contributes, not only the bright ones, which significantly boosts the sensitivity. The proposed 40 hours on the fields result in a forecasted 20 sigma detection. The survey volume is 10 million cubic megaparsec, which contain 10^15 solar masses of hydrogen.

  14. Surface Energy Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.; Vukovich, Fred M.; Pontikes, Elizabeth G.

    1997-01-01

    Realistic estimates of surface energy heat fluxes are needed for the study of water and energy interactions between the land and atmosphere. The primary objective of this work is to study the estimation of surface heat energy fluxes using remote sensing derived parameters under different spatial and temporal conditions. Surface energy fluxes and remote sensing derived data from two sources were analyzed. First, we used surface heat flux, remote sensing, and ancillary data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), mapped at a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid. Second, we used NOAA AVHRR (1 km), weather station, and ancillary data to derive estimates of surface latent and sensible heat energy fluxes over a 100 sq kilometers area for three test sites: 1) First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) grassland site, Konza Prairie, Kansas; 2) Howland, Maine Forest Ecosystem Dynamics Site; and 3) Walnut Gulch, scrubland site, surrounding Tombstone, Arizona. Satellite derived estimates of land surface temperature, surface albedo, and spectral vegetation index are used in selected models to provide estimates of surface heat fluxes. Analysis of results from the 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid for North America indicated there were similar, overall correlations between sensible and latent heat energy fluxes versus remotely sensed vegetation index and ground temperature during dry and wet year conditions. However, there were significant differences in correlations between years when stratified by land cover class. Analysis of 100 km x 100 km data (1 km resolution) indicated partitioning the areas in to primary versus secondary cover, with the secondary cover comprising less than 5% of the area, significantly improved surface heat energy flux estimates.

  15. Integrating passive and active remote sensing methods to assess and map soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Chudnovsky Chudnovsky, Alexandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated lands in Israel are subjected to salinization processes, mostly as a result of using low-quality irrigation water. The Jezre'el Valley in northern Israel is an example of this phenomenon and thus it was selected to carry out this study. This area is characterized by increasing soil salinity over the years, followed by an increase in soil SAR (Sodium Adsorption Ration), which leads to a significant deterioration of the soil structure and a reduced infiltration rate. The traditional methods of mapping, by soil sampling (sampling, laboratory checks, and mapping) are time-consuming and do not provide near real-time information. An alternative method is suggested herein using active and passive remote sensing methods: (1) an hyperspectral data from the ground ASD field spectrometer and from the air, by AISA air-born sensor (2) EFDM- Frequency Domain Electro-Magnetic, and (3) GPR- ground penetration radar. The constructed PLS model was applied on the hyperspectral images, producing an EC thematic map of the surface. In addition, a sub-surface salinity map was generated by applying the surface - sub-surface correlation on the surface EC thematic map. The generated maps were found to be in good agreement with maps based on chemical data. The results indicated that traditional methods are correlated with the remote sensing ones and that merging the three remote sensing methodologies may yield a better picture than each of them alone. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of applied in this study methods. It can be concluded that it is possible to account for soil salinity based on active and passive remote sensing means.

  16. MULTI-SCALE REMOTE SENSING MAPPING OF ANTHROPOGENIC IMPERVIOUS SURFACES: SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL SCALING ISSUES RELATED TO ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL LANDSCAPE ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic impervious surfaces are leading contributors to non-point-source water pollution in urban watersheds. These human-created surfaces include such features as roads, parking lots, rooftops, sideways, and driveways. Aerial photography provides a historical vehicle for...

  17. Map-guided interpretation of remotely-sensed imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenenbaum, J. M.; Barrow, H. G.; Bolles, R. C.; Fischler, M. A.; Wolf, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    A map-guided approach to interpretation of remotely sensed imagery is described, with emphasis on applications involving continuous monitoring of predetermined ground sites. Geometric correspondence between a sensed image and a symbolic reference map is established in an initial stage of processing by adjusting parameters of a sensor model so that image features predicted from the map optimally match corresponding features extracted from the sensed image. Information in the map is then used to constrain where to look in an image and what to look for. With such constraints, previously intractable remote sensing tasks can become feasible, even easy, to automate. Four illustrative examples are given, involving the monitoring of reservoirs, roads, railroad yards, and harbors.

  18. CONFIRMING THE RESULTS: AN ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF REMOTE PRODUCTS, AN EXAMPLE COMPARING MULTIPLE MID-ATLANTIC SUB-PIXEL IMPERVIOUS SURFACE MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic impervious surfaces have an important relationship with non-point source pollution (NPS) in urban watersheds. The amount of impervious surface area in a watershed is a key indicator of landscape change. As a single variable, it serves to intcgrate a number of concur...

  19. Verification of vegetation maps made from remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botkin, Daniel B.; Estes, John E.; Star, Jeffrey L.; Woods, Kerry

    1985-01-01

    Verification of vegetation maps is discussed, including a map of the vegetation of the Mt. Washington area of New Hampshire. This area was chosen to determine the accuracy of mapping by remote sensing at the boundary between two major forest biomass. Verification was carried out by ground observation and through the use of low altitude 70 mm infrared photographs. Two verification sampling schemes were used: a point method and a transect method. Resulting confidence limits gave an area weighted sampling accuracy of 89 pct. Spatial patterns in terrestrial vegetation must be understood in order to choose appropriate spatial resolutions required for remote sensing instruments, and to relate vegetation dynamics to climate dynamics and biogeochemical cycles.

  20. Remotely Sensed Mapping of Agricultural Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiros, E.; Domenikiotis, C.; Dalezios, N. R.; Danalatos, N. G.

    2009-04-01

    Identifying vulnerable agricultural production areas is essential for any sustainable development/farming plan. Climate is among the most important factors that determine the agricultural potential of a region and the suitability of an area for a specific crop or land management, followed by soil characteristics and geomorphology. Temperature and rainfall in terms of quantity and spatiotemporal variability are the two climatic variables that determine the agricultural potential of an area and the risk involved in any new agronomical use. Also, extreme weather events, such as droughts, have to be taken into account. In this paper, two satellite derived indices are combined in GIS environment with soil maps and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in order to identify the agricultural potential of areas. Namely, these indices are the Vegetation Health Index (VHI) and the Degree Days (DD) (also known as Heat Units). VHI represents overall vegetation health and is used for agricultural drought monitoring and mapping. DD units (oC d) are often used in agriculture in order to estimate or predict the lengths of the different phases of the development in crop plants, since temperature has a primary role in the growth of many organisms (plants and insects). The two indices are computed for 20 hydrological years, from October 1981 to September 2001, from NOAA/AVHRR ten -day composite images with 8x8 Km spatial resolution. DD is examined for crops of great commercial importance. The soil maps are digitized according to fertility (appropriate or not for agricultural use) and desertification vulnerability, whereas altitude based limitations are provided by the DEM. The study area is the water district of Thessaly, the largest lowland formation of Greece and the country's largest agricultural centre, located in Central Greece. The superposition of the two indices along with the soil and elevation data had led to the identification of vulnerable agricultural production areas. The

  1. Corrected body surface potential mapping.

    PubMed

    Krenzke, Gerhard; Kindt, Carsten; Hetzer, Roland

    2007-02-01

    In the method for body surface potential mapping described here, the influence of thorax shape on measured ECG values is corrected. The distances of the ECG electrodes from the electrical heart midpoint are determined using a special device for ECG recording. These distances are used to correct the ECG values as if they had been measured on the surface of a sphere with a radius of 10 cm with its midpoint localized at the electrical heart midpoint. The equipotential lines of the electrical heart field are represented on the virtual surface of such a sphere. It is demonstrated that the character of a dipole field is better represented if the influence of the thorax shape is reduced. The site of the virtual reference electrode is also important for the dipole character of the representation of the electrical heart field.

  2. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  3. Vesta surface thermal properties map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capria, Maria Teresa; Tosi, F.; De Santis, Maria Cristina; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Frigeri, A.; Zambon, F; Fonte, S.; Palomba, E.; Turrini, D.; Titus, T.N.; Schroder, S.E.; Toplis, M.J.; Liu, J.Y.; Combe, J.-P.; Raymond, C.A.; Russell, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    The first ever regional thermal properties map of Vesta has been derived from the temperatures retrieved by infrared data by the mission Dawn. The low average value of thermal inertia, 30 ± 10 J m−2 s−0.5 K−1, indicates a surface covered by a fine regolith. A range of thermal inertia values suggesting terrains with different physical properties has been determined. The lower thermal inertia of the regions north of the equator suggests that they are covered by an older, more processed surface. A few specific areas have higher than average thermal inertia values, indicative of a more compact material. The highest thermal inertia value has been determined on the Marcia crater, known for its pitted terrain and the presence of hydroxyl in the ejecta. Our results suggest that this type of terrain can be the result of soil compaction following the degassing of a local subsurface reservoir of volatiles.

  4. Environmental mapping and monitoring of Iceland by remote sensing (EMMIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Vilmundardóttir, Olga K.; Falco, Nicola; Sigurmundsson, Friðþór S.; Rustowicz, Rose; Belart, Joaquin M.-C.; Gísladóttir, Gudrun; Benediktsson, Jón A.

    2016-04-01

    Iceland is exposed to rapid and dynamic landscape changes caused by natural processes and man-made activities, which impact and challenge the country. Fast and reliable mapping and monitoring techniques are needed on a big spatial scale. However, currently there is lack of operational advanced information processing techniques, which are needed for end-users to incorporate remote sensing (RS) data from multiple data sources. Hence, the full potential of the recent RS data explosion is not being fully exploited. The project Environmental Mapping and Monitoring of Iceland by Remote Sensing (EMMIRS) bridges the gap between advanced information processing capabilities and end-user mapping of the Icelandic environment. This is done by a multidisciplinary assessment of two selected remote sensing super sites, Hekla and Öræfajökull, which encompass many of the rapid natural and man-made landscape changes that Iceland is exposed to. An open-access benchmark repository of the two remote sensing supersites is under construction, providing high-resolution LIDAR topography and hyperspectral data for land-cover and landform classification. Furthermore, a multi-temporal and multi-source archive stretching back to 1945 allows a decadal evaluation of landscape and ecological changes for the two remote sensing super sites by the development of automated change detection techniques. The development of innovative pattern recognition and machine learning-based approaches to image classification and change detection is one of the main tasks of the EMMIRS project, aiming to extract and compute earth observation variables as automatically as possible. Ground reference data collected through a field campaign will be used to validate the implemented methods, which outputs are then inferred with geological and vegetation models. Here, preliminary results of an automatic land-cover classification based on hyperspectral image analysis are reported. Furthermore, the EMMIRS project

  5. Remote Sensing of Surface Visibility from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, A. L.; Wang, J.; Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid growth in the use of satellite-derived Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements for estimating surface particulate matter (PM) concentrations for air quality and health studies. Although the two properties may be correlated, physically connecting the two quantities requires prior knowledge of aerosol type and relative humidity. AOD is an ambient, column-integrated optical property, and PM is a dry mass quantity measured at the surface. Surface visibility, however, is an ambient optical property, and may have closer physical ties to AOD. Since ambient visibility is so important for the safety of both aviation and ground transportation, there are near-continuous measurements at airports and other sites of commercial interest. Yet, like ground PM monitors, measurements of visibility have limited spatial coverage. In this study, we evaluate whether remote sensing techniques can help to determine surface visibility. AOD measurements from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are compared with one-minute extinction coefficient data (visibility = 3.0/σext) from the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS). However, since ASOS data lack quality control regulations, we first develop methods for quality control, including steps to limit unrealistic variability, poor calibration, and inconsistent formatting. Then we test different protocols for temporal averaging of the ASOS data (±10, 30, and 60 minutes) and spatial averaging of the MODIS data (1x1, 3x3, and 5x5 pixels) to collocate and compare the two data sets. Preliminary results for the U.S. mid-Atlantic show overall moderate correlation between MODIS AOD and ASOS extinction coefficient with higher correlations during summer months and lower correlations during winter months.

  6. Conformal Surface Parameterization for Texture Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-25

    Conformal Surface Parameterization for Texture Mapping Steven Haker Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Minnesota...also like to thank Professor Victoria Interrante for some very helpful conversations on texture mappings. References [1] S. Angenent, S. Haker , A

  7. Application of remote sensors in mapping rice area and forecasting its production: a review.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Mostafa K; Hassan, Quazi K; Chowdhury, Ehsan H

    2015-01-05

    Rice is one of the staple foods for more than three billion people worldwide. Rice paddies accounted for approximately 11.5% of the World's arable land area during 2012. Rice provided ~19% of the global dietary energy in recent times and its annual average consumption per capita was ~65 kg during 2010-2011. Therefore, rice area mapping and forecasting its production is important for food security, where demands often exceed production due to an ever increasing population. Timely and accurate estimation of rice areas and forecasting its production can provide invaluable information for governments, planners, and decision makers in formulating policies in regard to import/export in the event of shortfall and/or surplus. The aim of this paper was to review the applicability of the remote sensing-based imagery for rice area mapping and forecasting its production. Recent advances on the resolutions (i.e., spectral, spatial, radiometric, and temporal) and availability of remote sensing imagery have allowed us timely collection of information on the growth and development stages of the rice crop. For elaborative understanding of the application of remote sensing sensors, following issues were described: the rice area mapping and forecasting its production using optical and microwave imagery, synergy between remote sensing-based methods and other developments, and their implications as an operational one. The overview of the studies to date indicated that remote sensing-based methods using optical and microwave imagery found to be encouraging. However, there were having some limitations, such as: (i) optical remote sensing imagery had relatively low spatial resolution led to inaccurate estimation of rice areas; and (ii) radar imagery would suffer from speckles, which potentially would degrade the quality of the images; and also the brightness of the backscatters were sensitive to the interacting surface. In addition, most of the methods used in forecasting rice yield were

  8. Methods of Determining Playa Surface Conditions Using Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-08

    NO. 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) METHODS OF DETERMINING PLAYA SURFACE CONDITIONS USING REMOTE SENSING 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) J. PONDER...PLAYA SURFACE CONDITIONS USING REMOTE SENSING J. Ponder Henley U. S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060-5546 "ABSTRACT...geochemistry, hydrology and remote sensing but all of these are important to the understanding of these unique geomorphic features. There is a large body

  9. Integrable mappings via rational elliptic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Teruhisa

    2004-02-01

    We present a geometric description of the QRT map (which is an integrable mapping introduced by Quispel, Roberts and Thompson) in terms of the addition formula of a rational elliptic surface. By this formulation, we classify all the cases when the QRT map is periodic; and show that its period is 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6. A generalization of the QRT map which acts birationally on a pencil of K3 surfaces, or Calabi-Yau manifolds, is also presented.

  10. A remote sensing research agenda for mapping and monitoring biodiversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoms, D. M.; Estes, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    A remote sensing research agenda designed to expand the knowledge of the spatial distribution of species richness and its ecological determinants and to predict its response to global change is proposed. Emphasis is placed on current methods of mapping species richness of both plants and animals, hypotheses concerning the biophysical factors believed to determine patterns of species richness, and anthropogenic processes causing the accelerating rate of extinctions. It is concluded that biodiversity should be incorporated more prominently into the global change and earth system science paradigms.

  11. Impact of Remotely Sensed Land Surface States on Variability in Atmospheric Forcing and Fluxes Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer Schemes used for operational land surface flux mapping from remotely sensed data typically use high resolution remote sensed data, but coarser atmospheric inputs, either specified by a model or taken from a nearby weather station. While the role of spatially varia...

  12. A Multivariate Model for Coastal Water Quality Mapping Using Satellite Remote Sensing Images

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan-Fong; Liou, Jun-Jih; Hou, Ju-Chen; Hung, Wei-Chun; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Lien, Yi-Ting; Su, Ming-Daw; Cheng, Ke-Sheng; Wang, Yeng-Fung

    2008-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of coastal water quality mapping using satellite remote sensing images. Water quality sampling campaigns were conducted over a coastal area in northern Taiwan for measurements of three water quality variables including Secchi disk depth, turbidity, and total suspended solids. SPOT satellite images nearly concurrent with the water quality sampling campaigns were also acquired. A spectral reflectance estimation scheme proposed in this study was applied to SPOT multispectral images for estimation of the sea surface reflectance. Two models, univariate and multivariate, for water quality estimation using the sea surface reflectance derived from SPOT images were established. The multivariate model takes into consideration the wavelength-dependent combined effect of individual seawater constituents on the sea surface reflectance and is superior over the univariate model. Finally, quantitative coastal water quality mapping was accomplished by substituting the pixel-specific spectral reflectance into the multivariate water quality estimation model. PMID:27873872

  13. A Multivariate Model for Coastal Water Quality Mapping Using Satellite Remote Sensing Images.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuan-Fong; Liou, Jun-Jih; Hou, Ju-Chen; Hung, Wei-Chun; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Lien, Yi-Ting; Su, Ming-Daw; Cheng, Ke-Sheng; Wang, Yeng-Fung

    2008-10-10

    his study demonstrates the feasibility of coastal water quality mapping using satellite remote sensing images. Water quality sampling campaigns were conducted over a coastal area in northern Taiwan for measurements of three water quality variables including Secchi disk depth, turbidity, and total suspended solids. SPOT satellite images nearly concurrent with the water quality sampling campaigns were also acquired. A spectral reflectance estimation scheme proposed in this study was applied to SPOT multispectral images for estimation of the sea surface reflectance. Two models, univariate and multivariate, for water quality estimation using the sea surface reflectance derived from SPOT images were established. The multivariate model takes into consideration the wavelength-dependent combined effect of individual seawater constituents on the sea surface reflectance and is superior over the univariate model. Finally, quantitative coastal water quality mapping was accomplished by substituting the pixel-specific spectral reflectance into the multivariate water quality estimation model.

  14. Using Remotely Sensed Data to Map Urban Vulnerability to Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation defines remote sensing, and presents examples of remote sensing and astronaut photography, which has been a part of many space missions. The presentation then reviews the project aimed at analyzing urban vulnerability to climate change, which is to test the hypotheses that Exposure to excessively warm weather threatens human health in all types of climate regimes; Heat kills and sickens multitudes of people around the globe every year -- directly and indirectly, and Climate change, coupled with urban development, will impact human health. Using Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixing Analysis (MESMA), and the Phoenix urban area as the example, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated, a change detection analysis is shown, and surface temperature is shown.

  15. Assessing map accuracy in a remotely sensed, ecoregion-scale cover map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, T.C.; Moisen, G.G.; Cutler, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Landscape- and ecoregion-based conservation efforts increasingly use a spatial component to organize data for analysis and interpretation. A challenge particular to remotely sensed cover maps generated from these efforts is how best to assess the accuracy of the cover maps, especially when they can exceed 1000 s/km2 in size. Here we develop and describe a methodological approach for assessing the accuracy of large-area cover maps, using as a test case the 21.9 million ha cover map developed for Utah Gap Analysis. As part of our design process, we first reviewed the effect of intracluster correlation and a simple cost function on the relative efficiency of cluster sample designs to simple random designs. Our design ultimately combined clustered and subsampled field data stratified by ecological modeling unit and accessibility (hereafter a mixed design). We next outline estimation formulas for simple map accuracy measures under our mixed design and report results for eight major cover types and the three ecoregions mapped as part of the Utah Gap Analysis. Overall accuracy of the map was 83.2% (SE=1.4). Within ecoregions, accuracy ranged from 78.9% to 85.0%. Accuracy by cover type varied, ranging from a low of 50.4% for barren to a high of 90.6% for man modified. In addition, we examined gains in efficiency of our mixed design compared with a simple random sample approach. In regard to precision, our mixed design was more precise than a simple random design, given fixed sample costs. We close with a discussion of the logistical constraints facing attempts to assess the accuracy of large-area, remotely sensed cover maps.

  16. Sea Surface Salinity: The Next Remote Sensing Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Swift, Calvin T.; LeVine, David M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of salinity remote sensing is presented. The role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the far north Atlantic and the influence of salinity variations on upper ocean dynamics in the tropics are described. An assessment of the present state of the technology of the SSS satellite remote sensing is given.

  17. Surface mineral maps of Afghanistan derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data, version 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a new version of surface mineral maps derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data collected over Afghanistan in the fall of 2007. This report also describes the processing steps applied to the imaging spectrometer data. The 218 individual flight lines composing the Afghanistan dataset, covering more than 438,000 square kilometers, were georeferenced to a mosaic of orthorectified Landsat images. The HyMap data were converted from radiance to reflectance using a radiative transfer program in combination with ground-calibration sites and a network of cross-cutting calibration flight lines. The U.S. Geological Survey Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm (MICA) was used to generate two thematic maps of surface minerals: a map of iron-bearing minerals and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the shorter wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range, and a map of carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the longer wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range. In contrast to the original version, version 2 of these maps is provided at full resolution of 23-meter pixel size. The thematic maps, MICA summary images, and the material fit and depth images are distributed in digital files linked to this report, in a format readable by remote sensing software and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The digital files can be downloaded from http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/787/downloads/.

  18. A New Computational Framework for Atmospheric and Surface Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timucin, Dogan A.

    2004-01-01

    A Bayesian data-analysis framework is described for atmospheric and surface retrievals from remotely-sensed hyper-spectral data. Some computational techniques are high- lighted for improved accuracy in the forward physics model.

  19. Mapping surface fluxes and moisture conditions from field to global scales using ALEXI/DisALEXI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land-surface temperature (LST) maps derived from thermal infrared (TIR) satellite data convey valuable information for detecting moisture stress conditions and for constraining diagnostic surface flux estimates based on remote sensing. Soil surface and vegetation canopy temperatures rise as availab...

  20. Applications of remote sensing techniques to county land use and flood hazard mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. B.; Conn, J. S.; Miller, D. A.; Mouat, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing in Arizona is discussed. Land use and flood hazard mapping completed by the Applied Remote Sensing Program is described. Areas subject to periodic flood inundation are delineated and land use maps monitoring the growth within specific counties are provided.

  1. A New Approach to Liquefaction Potential Mapping Using Remote Sensing and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oommen, T.; Baise, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    In order to help communities better plan and mitigate the effects of seismic hazards, it is important to use innovations in science and technology to improve our techniques for mapping the spatial extents of seismic hazards. Earthquake induced ground shaking in areas with saturated sandy soils pose a major threat to communities as a result of the soil liquefaction. Liquefaction is the process of changing a saturated cohesionless soil from a solid to liquid state due to increased pore pressure. Many major earthquakes, especially those in coastal regions, result in liquefaction related ground failures that can lead to infrastructure damage or slope stability issues. Currently liquefaction potential is assessed on two scales: regionally based on surficial geologic unit or locally based on geotechnical sample data. Regional liquefaction potential maps fail to capture the variability of liquefaction potential on the local scale. On the other hand, collection of geotechnical data on the local scale is costly and only done for specific engineering projects and therefore not generally available for regional mapping. Today, the advent of advanced remote sensing products from air and space borne sensors allow us to explore the land surface parameters (geology, moisture content, temperature) at different spatial scales (remote sensor footprint). In this study, we explore the use of satellite based remote sensing data (Landsat 7 ETM+), together with digital elevation model, ground water table, land cover classification, geology, water index and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to characterize the liquefaction potential of northern Monterey and southern Santa Cruz counties in California. A supervised classification of the data into seven classes based on the liquefaction potential map developed by Dupre and Tinsley 1980 was done using Support Vector Machine (SVM). SVM is a machine learning/artificial intelligence algorithm that has the ability to simulate the

  2. A satellite remote-sensing technique for geological horizon structure mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, A.J.; Huggins, P.; Cleverley, P.H.; Rees, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    A Satellite Remote Sensing technique is demonstrated which provides accurate and cost effective near-surface geological structure data. In the exploration phase the technique enables the rapid and inexpensive screening of open licences and the targeting of seismic acquisition, particularly important in terrains of difficult data acquisition. This paper describes the satellite data used, the technique of horizon surface data extraction and the analysis of a case study from Yemen. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data and a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM), generated from stereo SPOT panchromatic images, are used in conjunction to identify a number of outcropping horizons and map their spatial position and height. Geological contacts are identified and digitised from the Landsat TM data and the elevations of these points taken from the digital elevation data. The extracted x,y,z co-ordinates are then gridded to construct a horizon structure map. The technique is applied to an area of central Yemen which is characterised by a near-surface {open_quote}layer cake{close_quote} geological structure in an extremely low dipping terrain (Less than 1{degrees}). The remote sensing interpretation is validated by comparison with 2D seismic across the area. Regional flexural structures with bed dips of as little as 0.25{degrees} can be mapped. Trend analysis and residual calculations on the horizon structure map show the techniques ability to identify and quantify horizon deformation related to faulting. Surface geological structure was successfully interpolated into the subsurface indicating potential fault closure at reservoir target depths.

  3. The remote sensing image segmentation mean shift algorithm parallel processing based on MapReduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Zhou, Liqing

    2015-12-01

    With the development of satellite remote sensing technology and the remote sensing image data, traditional remote sensing image segmentation technology cannot meet the massive remote sensing image processing and storage requirements. This article put cloud computing and parallel computing technology in remote sensing image segmentation process, and build a cheap and efficient computer cluster system that uses parallel processing to achieve MeanShift algorithm of remote sensing image segmentation based on the MapReduce model, not only to ensure the quality of remote sensing image segmentation, improved split speed, and better meet the real-time requirements. The remote sensing image segmentation MeanShift algorithm parallel processing algorithm based on MapReduce shows certain significance and a realization of value.

  4. A methodology for mapping forest latent heat flux densities using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Lars L.; Congalton, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    Surface temperatures and reflectances of an upper elevation Sierran mixed conifer forest were monitored using the Thematic Mapper Simulator sensor during the summer of 1985 in order to explore the possibility of using remote sensing to determine the distribution of solar energy on forested watersheds. The results show that the method is capable of quantifying the relative energy allocation relationships between the two cover types defined in the study. It is noted that the method also has the potential to map forest latent heat flux densities.

  5. Remote Sensing Based Flood Mapping for Disaster Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Policelli, F.; Brakenridge, R.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Sun, J.; Slayback, D. A.; Fatoyinbo, L.

    2010-12-01

    Flooding is among the most destructive and costly natural disasters faced by modern society. The disaster management community requires flood extent information with very little latency and frequent updating. With the advent of near real time satellite data acquisition and rapid processing and distribution techniques, there is every reason to develop and deploy an automated system for near real time flood map production. Funded by a NASA Applied Sciences grant to conduct a “feasibility study”, the authors have developed the algorithms and methodology necessary to automate the production of global near real time flood maps based on remote sensing data from the MODIS instruments on the NASA AQUA and TERRA satellites. A number of challenges to developing a useful product have been addressed by this applied research, including minimizing product latency, identifying water in the data scenes and distinguishing flood water from “normal” water levels, minimizing the impact of data loss due to cloud and cloud shadow, and providing context. We provide an overview of the data sources used, the algorithms employed, the processing techniques, the initial results, and the validation approach.

  6. Multibeam Mapping of Remote Fjords in Southeast-Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrebe, W.; Kjaer, K. H.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Bjork, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The fjords of Southeast-Greenland are among the most remote areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Access to this area is hampered by a broad belt of sea ice floating along the East-Greenland coast from North to South. Consequently, the majority of those fjords have never been surveyed in detail until now. During an expedition by the Center of GeoGenetics of the University of Copenhagen in summer of 2014 we were able to map the Skjoldungen Fjord system with multibeam bathymetry. The topsail schooner ACTIV, built 1951 as a cargo ship to supply remote settlements in Greenland was chosen for the expedition. Though a vintage vessel, the ACTIV was well suited to cross the belt of sea ice and to cruise the ice covered fjords. A portable ELAC-Seabeam 1050 multibeam system was temporarily installed on the vessel. The two transducer of the system were mounted at the lower end of a 6 m long pole attached outboard at port side to the hull of the vessel. Though the installation was quite demanding without any winches or cranes, the construction was sufficiently stable and easy to manage throughout the entire cruise. Nearly the entire fjord system, leaving only a small gap of 5 km at the innermost part and small stripes close to the shorelines could be surveyed during the cruise. For the first time, a comprehensive map of Skjoldungen Fjord is now available. The map displays water depths from close to zero up to 800 m, the deepest part along a stretch of about 10 km in the Southwest. The bathymetry of the northern fjord is remarkably different from the southern fjord: the southern fjord features an outer deep part showing water depths between 500 m and 800 m and a shallow inner part with depths less than 300 m and a prominent sill in between. The northern fjord shows a more gradual increase of water depths from 200 m in the inner part to 600 m at the entrance.

  7. Application of Remote Sensors in Mapping Rice Area and Forecasting Its Production: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh, Mostafa K.; Hassan, Quazi K.; Chowdhury, Ehsan H.

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the staple foods for more than three billion people worldwide. Rice paddies accounted for approximately 11.5% of the World's arable land area during 2012. Rice provided ∼19% of the global dietary energy in recent times and its annual average consumption per capita was ∼65 kg during 2010–2011. Therefore, rice area mapping and forecasting its production is important for food security, where demands often exceed production due to an ever increasing population. Timely and accurate estimation of rice areas and forecasting its production can provide invaluable information for governments, planners, and decision makers in formulating policies in regard to import/export in the event of shortfall and/or surplus. The aim of this paper was to review the applicability of the remote sensing-based imagery for rice area mapping and forecasting its production. Recent advances on the resolutions (i.e., spectral, spatial, radiometric, and temporal) and availability of remote sensing imagery have allowed us timely collection of information on the growth and development stages of the rice crop. For elaborative understanding of the application of remote sensing sensors, following issues were described: the rice area mapping and forecasting its production using optical and microwave imagery, synergy between remote sensing-based methods and other developments, and their implications as an operational one. The overview of the studies to date indicated that remote sensing-based methods using optical and microwave imagery found to be encouraging. However, there were having some limitations, such as: (i) optical remote sensing imagery had relatively low spatial resolution led to inaccurate estimation of rice areas; and (ii) radar imagery would suffer from speckles, which potentially would degrade the quality of the images; and also the brightness of the backscatters were sensitive to the interacting surface. In addition, most of the methods used in forecasting rice yield

  8. From Surface Data to 3D Geologic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, D.; Luxey, P.; Longuesserre, V.; Monod, B.; Guillaume, B.

    2008-12-01

    New trends in earth sciences are mostly related to technologies allowing graphical representations of the geology in 3D. However, the concept of 3D geologic map is commonly misused. For instance, displays of geologic maps draped onto DEM in rotating perspective views have been misleadingly called 3D geologic maps, but this still cannot provide any volumetric underground information as a true 3D geologic map should. Here, we present a way to produce mathematically and geometrically correct 3D geologic maps constituted by the volume and shape of all geologic features of a given area. The originality of the method is that it is based on the integration of surface data only consisting of (1) geologic maps, (2) satellite images, (3) DEM and (4) bedding dips and strikes. To generate 3D geologic maps, we used a 3D geologic modeler that combines and extrapolates the surface information into a coherent 3D data set. The significance of geometrically correct 3D geologic maps is demonstrated for various geologic settings and applications. 3D models are of primarily importance for educational purposes because they reveal features that standard 2D geologic maps by themselves could not show. The 3D visualization helps in the understanding of the geometrical relationship between the different geologic features and, in turn, for the quantification of the geology at the regional scale. Furthermore, given the logistical challenges associated with modern oil and mineral exploration in remote and rugged terrain, these volume-based models can provide geological and commercial insight prior to seismic evaluation.

  9. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  10. Remote sensing for detecting and mapping whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) infestations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing technology has long been used for detecting insect infestations on agricultural crops. With recent advances in remote sensing sensors and other spatial information technologies such as Global Position Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing is finding mo...

  11. Determining suitability of Large Aperture Scintillometer for validating remote sensing based evapotranspiration maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, G.; Gowda, P. H.; Howell, T. A.; Basu, S.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Marek, T.

    2013-12-01

    Scintillation method is a relatively new technique for measuring the sensible heat and water fluxes over land surfaces. Path integrating capabilities of scintillometer over heterogeneous landscapes make it a potential tool for comparing the energy fluxes derived from remote sensing based energy balance algorithms. For this reason, scintillometer-derived evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes are being used to evaluate remote sensing based energy balance algorithms for their ability to estimate ET fluxes. However, LAS' (Large Aperture Scintillometer) ability to derive ET fluxes is not thoroughly tested. The objective of this study was to evaluate LAS- and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS)-derived fluxes against lysimetric data to determine LAS' suitability for validating remote sensing based evapotranspiration (ET) maps. The study was conducted during the Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment - 2008 (BEAREX-08) at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL), Bushland, Texas. SEBS was coded in a GIS environment to retrieve ET fluxes from the high resolution imageries acquired using airborne multispectral sensors. The CPRL has four large weighing lysimeters (3 m long x 3 m wide x 2.4 m deep), each located in the middle of approximately 5 ha fields, arranged in a block pattern. The two lysimeter fields located on the east (NE and SE) were managed under irrigated conditions, and the other two lysimeters on the west (NW and SW) were under dryland management. Each lysimeter field was equipped with an automated weather station that provided measurements for net radiation (Rn), Ts, soil heat flux (Go), Ta, relative humidity, and wind speed. During BEAREX08, the NE and SE fields were planted to cotton on May 21, and the NW and SW dryland lysimeters fields were planted to cotton on June 5. One LAS each was deployed across two large dryland lysimeter fields (NW and SW) and two large irrigated lysimeter fields (NE and SE). The

  12. Mineral mapping in the Maherabad area, eastern Iran, using the HyMap remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molan, Yusuf Eshqi; Refahi, Davood; Tarashti, Ali Hoseinmardi

    2014-04-01

    This study applies matched filtering on the HyMap airborne hyperspectral data to obtain the distribution map of alteration minerals in the Maherabad area and uses virtual verification to verify the results. This paper also introduces "moving threshold" which tries to find an appropriate threshold value to convert gray scale images, produced by mapping methods, to target and background pixels. The Maherabad area, located in the eastern part of the Lut block, is a Cu-Au porphyry system in which quartz-sericite-pyrite, argillic and propylitic alteration are most common. Minimum noise fraction transform coupled with a pixel purity index was applied on the HyMap images to extract the endmembers of the alteration minerals, including kaolinite, montmorillonite, sericite (muscovite/illite), calcite, chlorite, epidote, and goethite. Since there was no access to any portable spectrometer and/or lab spectral measurements for the verification of the remote sensing imagery results, virtual verification achieved using the USGS spectral library and showed an agreement of 83.19%. The comparison between the results of the matched filtering and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses also showed an agreement of 56.13%.

  13. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Meliker, J.R.; Goovaerts, P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps.

  14. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    MAXWELL, SUSAN K.; MELIKER, JAYMIE R.; GOOVAERTS, PIERRE

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps. PMID:19240763

  15. Using remotely-sensed multispectral imagery to build age models for alluvial fan surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Mason, Philippa J.; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Lewis, James

    2016-04-01

    Accurate exposure age models are essential for much geomorphological field research, and generally depend on laboratory analyses such as radiocarbon, cosmogenic nuclide, or luminescence techniques. These approaches continue to revolutionise geomorphology, however they cannot be deployed remotely or in situ in the field. Therefore other methods are still needed for producing preliminary age models, performing relative dating of surfaces, or selecting sampling sites for the laboratory analyses above. With the widespread availability of detailed multispectral imagery, a promising approach is to use remotely-sensed data to discriminate surfaces with different ages. Here, we use new Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) multispectral imagery to characterise the reflectance of 35 alluvial fan surfaces in the semi-arid Owens Valley, California. Alluvial fans are useful landforms to date, as they are widely used to study the effects of tectonics, climate and sediment transport processes on source-to-sink sedimentation. Our target fan surfaces have all been mapped in detail in the field, and have well-constrained exposure ages ranging from modern to ~ 125 ka measured using a high density of 10Be cosmogenic nuclide samples. Despite all having similar granitic compositions, the spectral properties of these surfaces vary systematically with their exposure ages. Older surfaces demonstrate a predictable shift in reflectance across the visible and short-wave infrared spectrum. Simple calculations, such as the brightness ratios of different wavelengths, generate sensitive power law relationships with exposure age that depend on post-depositional alteration processes affecting these surfaces. We investigate what these processes might be in this dryland location, and evaluate the potential for using remotely-sensed multispectral imagery for developing surface age models. The ability to remotely sense relative exposure ages has useful implications for preliminary mapping, selecting

  16. Remote sensing data assimilation in land surface process modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Heike; Mauser, Wolfram

    2002-01-01

    Land surface process models describe the energy-, water-, carbon- and nutrient-fluxes at the land surface on a regional scale by combining a given set of environmental parameters and variables (e.g. water balance model, plant physiology model, atmospheric boundary layer model, erosion model). They need spatially distributed input parameters, which can be delivered from remote sensing analyses using both optical and microwave sensors. Thus, land surface process models are the main drivers for four dimensional data assimilation (4DDA) which is based on the synergistic data utilization of remote sensing and ancillary data both in space and time. To ensure the constant flow of the necessary input parameters and variables, the development of adequate data-assimilation and data-fusion techniques is mandatory. Parameter models operate at the centre of this data fusion process to convert remote sensing measurements into a set of model input parameters and variables. Different strategies to use remote sensing derived parameters in models are demonstrated. They span from the simple delivery of static input-parameters, over the provision of dynamic model parameters, model forcing and recalibration of internal model variables, to inversion and validation of land surface process models. Examples will illustrate these different data assimilation strategies using SAR and optical data sources. The integration of land surface parameters derived from remote sensing (e.g. land use, digital terrain model, surface soil moisture) in flood forecast is a rather straight forward task. For water balance modelling, soil moisture and snow cover assessment will be illustrated. This task is already more complex, since a continuous process must be simulated and the data assimilation must avoid inconsistencies in model performance. The application of remote sensing data assimilation methods for crop growth and agricultural production models further requires complex feedback mechanisms. Examples

  17. Mapping Palm Swamp Wetland Ecosystems in the Peruvian Amazon: a Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K. C.; Schroeder, R.; Pinto, N.; Zimmerman, R.; Horna, V.

    2012-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems are prevalent in the Amazon basin, especially in northern Peru. Of specific interest are palm swamp wetlands because they are characterized by constant surface inundation and moderate seasonal water level variation. This combination of constantly saturated soils and warm temperatures year-round can lead to considerable methane release to the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence and expected sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate change, it is critical to develop methods to quantify their spatial extent and inundation state in order to assess their carbon dynamics. Spatio-temporal information on palm swamps is difficult to gather because of their remoteness and difficult accessibility. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing is an effective tool for characterizing these ecosystems since it is sensitive to surface water and vegetation structure and allows monitoring large inaccessible areas on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination. We developed a remote sensing methodology using multi-sensor remote sensing data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM, and Landsat to derive maps at 100 meter resolution of palm swamp extent and inundation based on ground data collections; and combined active and passive microwave data from AMSR-E and QuikSCAT to derive inundation extent at 25 kilometer resolution on a weekly basis. We then compared information content and accuracy of the coarse resolution products relative to the high-resolution datasets. The synergistic combination of high and low resolution datasets allowed for characterization of palm swamps and assessment of their flooding status. This work has been undertaken partly within the framework of the JAXA ALOS Kyoto & Carbon Initiative. PALSAR data have been provided by JAXA. Portions of this work were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  18. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  19. A remote characterization system for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Mapping of buried objects and regions of chemical and radiological contamination is required at US Department of Energy (DOE) buried waste sites. The DOE Office of Technology Development Robotics Integrated Program has initiated a project to develop and demonstrate a remotely controlled subsurface sensing system, called the Remote Characterization System (RCS). This project, a collaborative effort by five of the National Laboratories, involves the development of a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for non-invasive inspection of the surface and subsurface. To minimize interference with on-board sensors, the survey vehicle has been constructed predominatantly of non-metallic materials. The vehicle is self-propelled and will be guided by an operator located at a remote base station. The RCS sensors will be environmentally sealed and internally cooled to preclude contamination during use. Ground-penetrating radar, magnetometers, and conductivity devices are planned for geophysical surveys. Chemical and radiological sensors will be provided to locate hot spots and to provide isotopic concentration data.

  20. Mapping wildland fuels for fire management across multiple scales: integrating remote sensing, GIS, and biophysical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keane, Robert E.; Burgan, Robert E.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel maps are essential for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. However, fuel mapping is an extremely difficult and complex process requiring expertise in remotely sensed image classification, fire behavior, fuels modeling, ecology, and geographical information systems (GIS). This paper first presents the challenges of mapping fuels: canopy concealment, fuelbed complexity, fuel type diversity, fuel variability, and fuel model generalization. Then, four approaches to mapping fuels are discussed with examples provided from the literature: (1) field reconnaissance; (2) direct mapping methods; (3) indirect mapping methods; and (4) gradient modeling. A fuel mapping method is proposed that uses current remote sensing and image processing technology. Future fuel mapping needs are also discussed which include better field data and fuel models, accurate GIS reference layers, improved satellite imagery, and comprehensive ecosystem models.

  1. Remote sensing of surface water for environmental flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Kingsford, R.; Lucas, R.; Keith, D.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental flows represent water management activities that release flushes of water stored in dams on regulated rivers during dry periods. These flows aim to mimic natural flow and inundation regimes to maintain ecological health and function of rivers and wetlands. Assessment and understanding of the effectiveness of environmental flows requires quantification of temporal and spatial pattern of surface water and inundation dynamic in a synoptic yet detailed way and understanding dynamics of vegetation response to flooding. Here we focused on the on the entire Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia as a case study. The MDB is a large semi-arid region with scarce water resources, high hydroclimatic variability and competing water demands, impacted by climate change, altered flow regimes and land use changes. The basin covers 14% of the Australian continent and contains the nation's largest river system, important groundwater systems, and represents the most important agricultural area in the country. We used Landsat TM and ETM+ data time series to synoptically map the dynamic of surface water extent with an internally consistent algorithm over decades. Within the basin-wide study area we carried out a detailed investigation of the largest river red gum forest in the world, a key site for environmental flow and conservation management. Here we tracked the response of vegetation community condition to flooding across space and time. Results show high interannual variability in number and size of flooded areas. Vegetation community response to flooding varied in space and time and with vegetation types, densities and location relative to areas frequently inundated by environmental water release. Knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamic of flooding and the response of vegetation communities to flooding is important for management of floodplain wetlands and vegetation communities and for investigating effectiveness of environmental flows and flow regimes in the

  2. Remotely and Conclusively Mapping One Finite Set of Qudit States onto Another Assisted by Qubit Entanglements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Bing; Lu, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Alice and Bob are two remote parties. We propose a probabilistic method which allows Alice to map remotely and conclusively Bob's set of nonorthogonal symmetric d-level quantum states onto another. The procedure we use is a remote positive operator valued measurement (POVM) in Bob's (2 d-1)-level direct sum space. We construct a quantum network for implementing this (2 d-1)-level remote nonunitary POVM with ( d-1) two-level remote unitary rotations. The fact that the two-level remote rotation, which is hired to rotate remotely a basis vector, can been implementing rapidly using only one ebit (a two-level Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pair) and one cbit (classical communication) is notable. This scheme is simpler but with less resource, which will make it more feasible and suitable for large-scale quantum network.

  3. Hyperbolic Harmonic Mapping for Surface Registration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Su, Zhengyu; Jiang, Jian; Damasio, Hanna; Lu, Zhonglin; Wang, Yalin; Yau, Shing-Tung; Gu, Xianfeng

    2016-05-12

    Automatic computation of surface correspondence via harmonic map is an active research field in computer vision, computer graphics and computational geometry. It may help document and understand physical and biological phenomena and also has broad applications in biometrics, medical imaging and motion capture inducstries. Although numerous studies have been devoted to harmonic map research, limited progress has been made to compute a diffeomorphic harmonic map on general topology surfaces with landmark constraints. This work conquers this problem by changing the Riemannian metric on the target surface to a hyperbolic metric so that the harmonic mapping is guaranteed to be a diffeomorphism under landmark constraints. The computational algorithms are based on Ricci flow and nonlinear heat diffusion methods. The approach is general and robust. We employ our algorithm to study the constrained surface registration problem which applies to both computer vision and medical imaging applications. Experimental results demonstrate that, by changing the Riemannian metric, the registrations are always diffeomorphic and achieve relatively high performance when evaluated with some popular surface registration evaluation standards.

  4. Hyperspectral remote sensing data maps minerals in Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Trude V. V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2012-08-01

    Although Afghanistan has abundant mineral resources, including gold, silver, copper, rare earth elements, uranium, tin, iron ore, mercury, lead-zinc, bauxite, and industrial minerals, most have not been successfully developed or explored using modern methods. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with cooperation from the Afghan Geological Survey (AGS) and support from the Department of Defense's Task Force for Business and Stability Operations (TFBSO) has used new imaging spectroscopy surface material maps to help refine the geologic signatures of known but poorly understood mineral deposits and identify previously unrecognized mineral occurrences. To help assess the potential mineral deposit types, the high-resolution hyperspectral data were analyzed to detect the presence of selected minerals that may be indicative of past mineralization processes. This legacy data set is providing tangible support for economic decisions by both the government of Afghanistan and other public and private sector parties interested in the development of the nation's natural resources.

  5. Impervious surface mapping with Quickbird imagery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dengsheng; Hetrick, Scott; Moran, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    This research selects two study areas with different urban developments, sizes, and spatial patterns to explore the suitable methods for mapping impervious surface distribution using Quickbird imagery. The selected methods include per-pixel based supervised classification, segmentation-based classification, and a hybrid method. A comparative analysis of the results indicates that per-pixel based supervised classification produces a large number of “salt-and-pepper” pixels, and segmentation based methods can significantly reduce this problem. However, neither method can effectively solve the spectral confusion of impervious surfaces with water/wetland and bare soils and the impacts of shadows. In order to accurately map impervious surface distribution from Quickbird images, manual editing is necessary and may be the only way to extract impervious surfaces from the confused land covers and the shadow problem. This research indicates that the hybrid method consisting of thresholding techniques, unsupervised classification and limited manual editing provides the best performance. PMID:21643434

  6. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  7. Comparative mineral mapping in the Colorado Mineral Belt using AVIRIS and ASTER remote sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents results of interpretation of spectral remote sensing data covering the eastern Colorado Mineral Belt in central Colorado, USA, acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensors. This study was part of a multidisciplinary mapping and data integration project at the U.S. Geological Survey that focused on long-term resource planning by land-managing entities in Colorado. The map products were designed primarily for the regional mapping and characterization of exposed surface mineralogy, including that related to hydrothermal alteration and supergene weathering of pyritic rocks. Alteration type was modeled from identified minerals based on standard definitions of alteration mineral assemblages. Vegetation was identified using the ASTER data and subdivided based on per-pixel chlorophyll content (depth of 0.68 micrometer absorption band) and dryness (fit and depth of leaf biochemical absorptions in the shortwave infrared spectral region). The vegetation results can be used to estimate the abundance of fire fuels at the time of data acquisition (2002 and 2003). The AVIRIS- and ASTER-derived mineral mapping results can be readily compared using the toggleable layers in the GeoPDF file, and by using the provided GIS-ready raster datasets. The results relating to mineral occurrence and distribution were an important source of data for studies documenting the effects of mining and un-mined, altered rocks on aquatic ecosystems at the watershed level. These studies demonstrated a high correlation between metal concentrations in streams and the presence of hydrothermal alteration and (or) pyritic mine waste as determined by analysis of the map products presented herein. The mineral mapping results were also used to delineate permissive areas for various mineral deposit types.

  8. Remote Sensing: Environmental Effects of Surface Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-15

    Spangle Program and other related activities of the Program Office. The Principal Investigator, William D. Garrett, was also involved in an ONR...developing new film measurement technologies. Consequently, he was requested by the Spangle Program Manager to present information on sea surface film...al. [1970], Gas transport reduction ... Jarvis et al. [1962]’ Brockmann et al. 119801" PetrmannI 1976 ]’ I Oleophilic pollutant accumula- l irtung and

  9. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  10. Mapping forest parameters using geostatistics and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Sian Patricia

    This work presents a new method for characterising forests with remote sensing data using numerical scene simulations and spatial statistics. The principal study area is Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam. This site has undergone both recent changes in vegetation composition associated with population pressures, as well as historical changes due to military activities during the 1960s and 70s and provides an appropriate location for spatio-temporal monitoring of forest structure. The principal remote sensing data used comprises a set of panchromatic declassified air-photos (1965--1966). The lack of flight details for these makes established techniques for exterior orientation impractical. An alternative means to geo-rectifying these data is therefore presented. This focuses on a new application of a stereomatching algorithm, where a disparity model, related to topographic features, is first built and then co-registered to a geo-referenced elevation model to provide the transformation required to correct the air-photos. These geo-rectified data are then processed for forest parameter extraction. Scene modelling is used to produce simulations of varying ground structure. A geo-optical model is used to capture the shape and size distribution of objects in the scene, and to allow for crown shading on the trees. The scene variogram is considered as a combination of spatial interactions between scene elements (crown and ground), which are described by 'component variograms'. These are examined under differing scene specifications, and used to explore and explain the mechanisms responsible for variations in scene variogram 'range' across multi-spectral data. The scene simulations provide a set of candidate model variograms, derived from physical realisations of scene structure, for use in inverting the experimental scene variogram, where forest structural parameters are derived from the realisation associated with the best fit. Results are presented for the high resolution

  11. Validating surface energy balance fluxes derived from airborne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Eguez, Jose Luis

    Remote sensing-derived energy balance components were compared against measured eddy covariance energy balance terms using heat flux source area models to validate the airborne multispectral remote sensing procedure in the estimation of instantaneous and daily evapotranspiration rates. A procedure was developed to generate raster layers of the footprint weights for weighting/integrating the different components of the energy balance model and obtain meaningful comparisons to similar energy balance terms measured at eddy covariance and/or Bowen ratio stations. Soil heat flux and surface aerodynamic temperature models were studied in an effort to improve the remote sensing estimation of distributed evapotranspiration rates. Aerial and ground data were acquired over a riparian corridor (Salt Cedar, Tamarix grove), soybean and cornfields (rainfed crops) in different ecosystems. The results confirmed that net radiation is well estimated with the remote sensing technique showing an estimation error of only -4.8 +/- 20.7 W m-2, (-0.5 +/- 3.6%). Linear and exponential soil heat flux models were found to correlate strongly to leaf area index and net radiation. The surface aerodynamic temperature term in the sensible heat flux equation was parameterized using surface radiometric temperature, air temperature, wind speed, and leaf area index. It is suggested that the surface aerodynamic temperature model be tested for a wide range of vegetation types, atmospheric stability conditions, surface heterogeneity, and ecosystems to assess the model limitations. The flux source area footprint model "FSAM" integrated heat flux pixels that compared better to measured values and it is recommended as a standard procedure to compare airborne remote sensing-derived heat fluxes against measured fluxes by eddy covariance systems; when compared to the "FASOWG" footprint model and simple arithmetic averages. Finally, the method that uses alfalfa reference daily evapotranspiration in

  12. Implementation of remote-sensed surface water condition into a land surfaces model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ui-Yong; Sung, Hyun Min; Hong, Je-Woo; Hong, Jinkyu; Kunstmann, Harald; Arnault, Joel

    2016-04-01

    We will present our current efforts to incorporate remote-sensed surface water conditions into a land surface model in the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) for better representation of cropland in East Asia. In this presentation, we introduce the model development and discuss its regional impacts on hydrological cycle in perspectives of the PBL-surface interactions and surface evapotranspiration tagging.

  13. Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO) Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    The NEMO hyperspectral remote sensing program will provide unclassified, space-based hyperspectral passive imagery at moderate resolution that offers substantial potential for direct use by Naval forces and the Civil Sector.

  14. Remote Sensing and Geochemistry of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    We have been examining the resources required to support potential life on Mars, as a way of understanding the possible abundance and distribution of life. Based on our understanding of the Earth, the necessary requirements for the environment to allow it to support life are (i) presence of liquid water, (ii) access to the biogenic elements (C, H, O, N, S, P, Ca, Fe, etc.), and (iii) a source of energy to drive chemical disequilibrium, such that the reactions back toward equilibrium can release energy to support metabolism. While even demonstrating that all of these requirements have been met would not mean that life would necessarily exist on Mars, they provide the context in which a search for life or analysis of geochemical characteristics that might be indicative of life might be carried out. Our previous work has focused on the first and third of these characteristics determine where and when liquid water might have been present, and understanding the availability of chemical energy from weathering reactions that might ID support life. In the analysis supported by this grant (covering the time period 2/15/01-2/14/02), we have been examining the second requirement--the abundance of the necessary biogenic elements, their geographical distribution on Mars and the information on the possible vertical distribution within the crust, and their geochemical accessibility and mobility within the crust and at the surface. In particular, our work during the performance period has emphasized phosphorous.

  15. Regolith landform mapping based on remote sensing data and airborne geophysics in Western Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelka, Vaclav; Baratoux, Lenka; Jessell, Mark; Naba, Seta

    2010-05-01

    The Precambrian granite-greenstone belts of West Africa are currently of great interest both to scientific community as well as the exploration industry. Studying and observing the geology of these ancient terrains is not an easy task mainly due to complex, deep weathering, which effectively masks the underlying bedrock. It is the weathered regolith material and its landforms that can be directly accessed by surface mapping. Knowing the distribution of these regolith landform units and understanding the processes which led to their formation is crucial for any kind of successful geological mapping or geochemical exploration project. In our research we have focused on regolith units in the Houndé and Boromo greenstone belts in Western Burkina Faso. We examined three approaches to map regolith material and subsequently regolith landform units: subpixel classification, based on spectral characteristics of indicative materials, a polarimetric segmentation of radar data, and a classification of an integrated dataset of remote sensing data and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. In situ spectral measurements were used to calibrate ASTER and LANDSAT scenes and served as endmember identifiers. A spectral library has been created containing over three hundred unique spectral measurements. ASTER and Landsat data were classified using the Mixture tuned matched filtering method. Wishart supervised classifier was used on ALOS PALSAR data. Classifications based on supervised maximum likelihood method and neural networks have been applied to an integrated dataset which included SRTM elevation data and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry. Feruginous duricrusts rich in hematite and goethite, clay rich mottled zones relics and fluvial sediments were mapped successfully in the region. The results were compared with existing regolith landform maps and field observations.

  16. The Remote Sensing of Surface Radiative Temperature over Barbados.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    remote sensing of surface radiative temperature over Barbados was undertaken using a PRT-5 attached to a light aircraft. Traverses across the centre of the island, over the rugged east coast area, and the urban area of Bridgetown were undertaken at different times of day and night in the last week of June and the first week of December, 1969. These traverses show that surface variations in long-wave radiation emission lie within plus or minus 5% of the observations over grass at a representative site. The quick response of the surface to sunset and sunrise was

  17. Mapping surface mineralogy using imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Fred A.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging spectrometry, simultaneous measurement of spectra and images in up to hundreds of spectral channels or bands, is a proven technology for identifying and mapping minerals based on their reflectance or emissivity signatures. Also known as hyperspectral imaging or "HSI", extraction of key spectral signatures from these data allows direct identification of iron minerals such as hematite, goethite, and jarosite in the visible/near infrared (VNIR); clays, carbonates, micas, sulfates, and other minerals in the short wave infrared (SWIR); and silicates and carbonates in the long wave infrared (LWIR). The unique capability of imaging spectrometry to produce detailed maps of the spatial distribution of specific minerals, mineral assemblages, and mineral variability on the surface of Earth makes it an ideal tool for enhanced geomorphic mapping. Case histories illustrate the use of HSI for characterizing and mapping active and relict geothermal/hydrothermal systems and determining relations between mineralogy and derived landforms. Imaging spectrometry, used in conjunction with complimentary datasets such as InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar), Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), or stereo (photogrammetric-derived) digital elevation models (DEMs), provides a unique means of visualizing the spatial distribution and association of mineralogy with topography, thus contributing to the understanding of the relations between geology and landscape and to improved interpretation of surface geologic processes.

  18. Electromagnetic Land Surface Classification by Integration of Optical and Radar Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jin; Gu, Wei; Kim, Jeong Woo; Wang, Xin C.; Lim, Gye Jae; Lee, Dong Cheon

    2010-05-01

    Remotely sensed images, such as optical and radar (Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)) images have been playing important roles to retrieve crucial physical and chemical information on the land surface. With noticeable improvements of spatial, temporal, spectral, and radiometric resolutions of these satellite observations as well as with recent remarkable technical advances, it has been possible to observe and classify the land surface more accurately. By integration of satellite multi-spectral high-resolution optical and polarized radar images of central Alberta near Saskatchewan border, we present a non-hierarchical electromagnetic land surface classification method. We first adapt a conventional supervised land surface classification method using a commercial software ER-Mapper and also implement a Principal Component Analysis method (PCA) to the optical image to extract artificial facilities, such as access road and borehole site that are too small not to be recognized in the classification by any commercial software. The 11 electromagnetic (EM) properties suggested by Döttling and Wiesbeck (1999) on the basis of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Level I and II land use classes are then assigned to the classified surfaces to produce hierarchical EM (e.g., dielectric constant, permittivity, etc) land classification maps. To further classify the hierarchical EM surface map, especially for dielectric constant, we calculate surface roughness with SRTM-3 Digital Elevation Model and at-sensor temperature from thermal band of Landsat-5. We also calculate backscattering coefficients and depolarization ratio from the polarimetric properties of the ALOS PALSAR images. Using these estimated values, we compute intrinsic weighting factors by Dubois (1995) model for less vegetated (NDVI <0.55) land area and Ulaby (1986) model for open water area. By multiplying these weight factors to the hierarchical EM surface, we generate a non-hierarchical higher-resolution EM surface map

  19. Remote Detection of Oil Slicks at the Ocean Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    particulates have signals at these wavelengths. Additionally, floating vegetation (i.e.,Sargassum spp.) and thick and emulsified oil can be observed at NIR...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 01-23-2015 Conference Proceedings 1 REMOTE DETECTION OF OIL SLICKS AT THE OCEAN SURFACE...H, Bldg. 17, Rm. N111 Greenbelt, MD NASA Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil slick caused by

  20. Mapping the Educational Work of Governesses on Australia's Remote Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sally

    2014-01-01

    This article is about the educational work of governesses on Australia's remote cattle and sheep stations. These stations occupy vast tracts of land in the outback, and form part of global food supply chains exporting meat to countries around the world. The article explores the nature of governesses' work, the boundaries they negotiate to perform…

  1. Assessment Of Accuracies Of Remote-Sensing Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Don H.; Strong, Laurence L.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of accuracies of classifications of picture elements in map derived by digital processing of Landsat-multispectral-scanner imagery of coastal plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Accuracies of portions of map analyzed with help of statistical sampling procedure called "stratified plurality sampling", in which all picture elements in given cluster classified in stratum to which plurality of them belong.

  2. Mapping carbon dioxide flux in semiarid grasslands using optical remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holifield Collins, Chandra Deberta

    Increasing atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and the potential impact on climate change has caused an increased effort to more accurately quantify terrestrial sources and sinks. Semiarid grasslands cover a significant portion of the Earth's land surface and may be an important sink for atmospheric CO2. This study was conducted to examine the role semiarid grasslands play in the carbon cycle. The relation between surface reflectance and temperature obtained from satellite imagery was used to determine a Water Deficit Index (WDI) to estimate distributed plant transpiration rates for a point in time. Due to the relationship between transpiration and plant CO2 uptake, WDI was directly related to CO2 flux. Satellite images were acquired for a five-year period (1996-2000) during which transpiration and net CO2 flux were measured for a semiarid grassland site in southeastern Arizona. Manual and automatic chamber data were also collected in 2005 and 2006 and used to assess the spatial variability of nighttime soil respiration. Spatial analysis showed the most influential factor affecting nighttime respiration was aspect, where flux from North-facing slopes was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than on South-facing slopes. A strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.97) existed between WDI-derived instantaneous net CO2 flux and daytime net CO2 flux estimates, and was used to generate maps of distributed daytime net CO2 flux. A linear relationship (R2 = 0.88) was also found between daytime and nighttime net CO2 flux, and used in combination with maps of daytime net CO2 flux to create maps of daily net CO2 flux. This study indicated that remote sensing offers an operational, physically-based means of obtaining daily net CO2 flux in semiarid grasslands.

  3. Lunar Prospector: a Preliminary Surface Remote Sensing Resource Assessment for the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardon, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential existence of lunar volatiles is a scientific discovery that could distinctly change the direction of pathways of inner solar system human expansion. With a dedicated germanium gamma ray spectrometer launched in the early 1990's, surface water concentrations of 0.7 percent could be detected immediately upon full lunar polar orbit operations. The expense of lunar base construction and operation would be dramatically reduced over a scenario with no lunar volatile resources. Global surface mineral distribution could be mapped out and integrated into a GIS database for lunar base site selection. Extensive surface lunar mapping would also result in the utilization of archived Apollo images. A variety of remote sensing systems and their parameters have been proposed for use in the detection of these lunar ice masses. The detection or nondetection of subsurface and surface ice masses in lunar polar crater floors could dramatically direct the development pathways that the human race might follow in its radiation from the Earth to habitable locales in the inner terran solar system. Potential sources of lunar volatiles are described. The use of remote sensing to detect lunar volatiles is addressed.

  4. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  5. Remote gate capacitance-voltage studies for noninvasive surface characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, R. R.; Lile, D. L.; Gann, R.

    1987-01-01

    A measurement technique has been developed which allows noncontact capacitance-voltage measurements to be made using a gate electrode located remote from the semiconductor surface under study. With gate electrodes about 0.5 mm in diameter and gate to semiconductor separations of about 1500 A, it was possible to generate data entirely comparable to that obtained with integrated MIS structures but with the advantage that there was access directly to the free-semiconductor surface. This technique was applied to bulk single-crystal Si and InP samples.

  6. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  7. Quantitative mapping of chlorophyll a distributions in coastal zones by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results of experiments conducted in the James River, Virginia and the New York Bight indicate that concurrently collected sea-truth measurements may be used to calibrate remotely sensed multispectral scanner data collected over each of these environmentally different scenes. Statistical stepwise regression analysis was used in both experiments to incorporate significant bands of MSS data into regression equations that quantitatively relate remotely sensed data to water quality parameters, such as chlorophyll a and suspended sediment. These regression equations are used to map synoptic distributions of chlorophyll a in the remotely sensed scenes.

  8. Theoretical Foundations of Remote Sensing for Glacier Assessment and Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Michael P.; Bush, Andrew B. G.; Furfaro, Roberto; Gillespie, Alan R.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Haritashya, Umesh K.; Shroder, John F., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The international scientific community is actively engaged in assessing ice sheet and alpine glacier fluctuations at a variety of scales. The availability of stereoscopic, multitemporal, and multispectral satellite imagery from the optical wavelength regions of the electromagnetic spectrum has greatly increased our ability to assess glaciological conditions and map the cryosphere. There are, however, important issues and limitations associated with accurate satellite information extraction and mapping, as well as new opportunities for assessment and mapping that are all rooted in understanding the fundamentals of the radiation transfer cascade. We address the primary radiation transfer components, relate them to glacier dynamics and mapping, and summarize the analytical approaches that permit transformation of spectral variation into thematic and quantitative parameters. We also discuss the integration of satellite-derived information into numerical modeling approaches to facilitate understandings of glacier dynamics and causal mechanisms.

  9. Challenges for mapping cyanotoxin patterns from remote sensing of cyanobacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, Rick P; Davis, Timothy W.; Wynne, Timothy T.; Graham, Jennifer; Loftin, Keith A.; Johengen, T.H.; Gossiaux, D.; Palladino, D.; Burtner, A.

    2016-01-01

    Using satellite imagery to quantify the spatial patterns of cyanobacterial toxins has several challenges. These challenges include the need for surrogate pigments – since cyanotoxins cannot be directly detected by remote sensing, the variability in the relationship between the pigments and cyanotoxins – especially microcystins (MC), and the lack of standardization of the various measurement methods. A dual-model strategy can provide an approach to address these challenges. One model uses either chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) or phycocyanin (PC) collected in situ as a surrogate to estimate the MC concentration. The other uses a remote sensing algorithm to estimate the concentration of the surrogate pigment. Where blooms are mixtures of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae, PC should be the preferred surrogate to Chl-a. Where cyanobacteria dominate, Chl-a is a better surrogate than PC for remote sensing. Phycocyanin is less sensitive to detection by optical remote sensing, it is less frequently measured, PC laboratory methods are still not standardized, and PC has greater intracellular variability. Either pigment should not be presumed to have a fixed relationship with MC for any water body. The MC-pigment relationship can be valid over weeks, but have considerable intra- and inter-annual variability due to changes in the amount of MC produced relative to cyanobacterial biomass. To detect pigments by satellite, three classes of algorithms (analytic, semi-analytic, and derivative) have been used. Analytical and semi-analytical algorithms are more sensitive but less robust than derivatives because they depend on accurate atmospheric correction; as a result derivatives are more commonly used. Derivatives can estimate Chl-a concentration, and research suggests they can detect and possibly quantify PC. Derivative algorithms, however, need to be standardized in order to evaluate the reproducibility of parameterizations between lakes. A strategy for producing useful estimates

  10. Challenges for mapping cyanotoxin patterns from remote sensing of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Richard P; Davis, Timothy W; Wynne, Timothy T; Graham, Jennifer L; Loftin, Keith A; Johengen, Thomas H; Gossiaux, Duane; Palladino, Danna; Burtner, Ashley

    2016-04-01

    Using satellite imagery to quantify the spatial patterns of cyanobacterial toxins has several challenges. These challenges include the need for surrogate pigments - since cyanotoxins cannot be directly detected by remote sensing, the variability in the relationship between the pigments and cyanotoxins - especially microcystins (MC), and the lack of standardization of the various measurement methods. A dual-model strategy can provide an approach to address these challenges. One model uses either chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) or phycocyanin (PC) collected in situ as a surrogate to estimate the MC concentration. The other uses a remote sensing algorithm to estimate the concentration of the surrogate pigment. Where blooms are mixtures of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae, PC should be the preferred surrogate to Chl-a. Where cyanobacteria dominate, Chl-a is a better surrogate than PC for remote sensing. Phycocyanin is less sensitive to detection by optical remote sensing, it is less frequently measured, PC laboratory methods are still not standardized, and PC has greater intracellular variability. Either pigment should not be presumed to have a fixed relationship with MC for any water body. The MC-pigment relationship can be valid over weeks, but have considerable intra- and inter-annual variability due to changes in the amount of MC produced relative to cyanobacterial biomass. To detect pigments by satellite, three classes of algorithms (analytic, semi-analytic, and derivative) have been used. Analytical and semi-analytical algorithms are more sensitive but less robust than derivatives because they depend on accurate atmospheric correction; as a result derivatives are more commonly used. Derivatives can estimate Chl-a concentration, and research suggests they can detect and possibly quantify PC. Derivative algorithms, however, need to be standardized in order to evaluate the reproducibility of parameterizations between lakes. A strategy for producing useful estimates of

  11. Dawn Maps the Surface Composition of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prettyman, T.; Palmer, E.; Reedy, R.; Sykes, M.; Yingst, R.; McSween, H.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Capaccinoni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Filacchione, G.; Magni, G.; Ammannito, E.; Carraro, F.; Coradini, A.; Fonte, S.; Noschese, R.; Tosi, F.; Blewett, D.; Denevi, B.; Lawrence, D.; Buratti, B.; Raymond, C. A.; Combe, J. P.; McCord, T.; Forni, O.

    2011-01-01

    By 7-October-2011, the Dawn mission will have completed Survey orbit and commenced high altitude mapping of 4-Vesta. We present a preliminary analysis of data acquired by Dawn's Framing Camera (FC) and the Visual and InfraRed Spectrometer (VIR) to map mineralogy and surface temperature, and to detect and quantify surficial OH. The radiometric calibration of VIR and FC is described. Background counting data acquired by GRaND are used to determine elemental detection limits from measurements at low altitude, which will commence in November. Geochemical models used in the interpretation of the data are described. Thermal properties, mineral-, and geochemical-data are combined to provide constraints on Vesta s formation and thermal evolution, the delivery of exogenic materials, space weathering processes, and the origin of the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites.

  12. The Characterization of Surface Variegation Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    Improvements in remote sensing capabilities hinge very directly upon attaining an understanding of the physical processes contributing to the measurements. In order to devise new measurement strategies and to learn better techniques for processing remotely gathered data, it is necessary to understand and to characterize the complex radiative interactions of the atmosphere-surface system. In particular, it is important to understand the role of atmospheric structure, ground reflectance inhomogeneity and ground bidirectional reflectance type. The goals, then, are to model, analyze, and parameterize the observable effects of three dimensional atmospheric structure and composition and two dimensional variations in ground albedo and bidirectional reflectance. To achieve these goals, a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code is employed to model and analyze the effects of many of the complications which are present in nature.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman fiberoptic sensors for remote monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, D.L.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-09-01

    A new sensor design for remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements has been developed for environmental applications. The design features the modification of an optical fiber using layers of alumina microparticles and silver coatings for inducing the SERS effect at the sensing probe. A single fiber carries both the laser excitation and the SERS signal radiation, keeping optical parameters at the remote tip simple and consistent. The small tip size achievable with this configuration also demonstrates potential of this new design as a microsensor for in-situ measurement in microenvironments. Details of sensor tip fabrication and optical system design are described. SERS spectra of aqueous environmental samples acquired in-situ using the SERS sensor are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the SERS sensor.

  14. Regional Geolgical Mapping in Tropical Environments Using Landsat TM and Srtm Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand Pour, A.; Hashim, M.

    2015-10-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data were used to produce geological maps in tropical environments. Lineament, lithology and landform maps were produced for all states in peninsular Malaysia in this study. Kedah, Perak and Terengganu states have been selected as case studies to demonstrate the results of the data and techniques used. Directional filtering technique was applied to Landsat TM bands 4, 5 and 3 for lineament mapping. The lithology map was produced using Landsat TM bands combination consist of bands 4, 3 and 2. Digital elevation model and landform map were produced using SRTM data in 3 Dimension (3D) and 2 Dimension (2D) perspective views, respectively. The produced geological maps and the remote sensing data and methods applied in this study are mostly appropriate for hazard risk mapping applications and mineral exploration projects in the peninsular Malaysia and tropical environments.

  15. Hydrologic Remote Sensing and Land Surface Data Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Hamid

    2008-05-06

    Accurate, reliable and skillful forecasting of key environmental variables such as soil moisture and snow are of paramount importance due to their strong influence on many water resources applications including flood control, agricultural production and effective water resources management which collectively control the behavior of the climate system. Soil moisture is a key state variable in land surface-atmosphere interactions affecting surface energy fluxes, runoff and the radiation balance. Snow processes also have a large influence on land-atmosphere energy exchanges due to snow high albedo, low thermal conductivity and considerable spatial and temporal variability resulting in the dramatic change on surface and ground temperature. Measurement of these two variables is possible through variety of methods using ground-based and remote sensing procedures. Remote sensing, however, holds great promise for soil moisture and snow measurements which have considerable spatial and temporal variability. Merging these measurements with hydrologic model outputs in a systematic and effective way results in an improvement of land surface model prediction. Data Assimilation provides a mechanism to combine these two sources of estimation. Much success has been attained in recent years in using data from passive microwave sensors and assimilating them into the models. This paper provides an overview of the remote sensing measurement techniques for soil moisture and snow data and describes the advances in data assimilation techniques through the ensemble filtering, mainly Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and Particle filter (PF), for improving the model prediction and reducing the uncertainties involved in prediction process. It is believed that PF provides a complete representation of the probability distribution of state variables of interests (according to sequential Bayes law) and could be a strong alternative to EnKF which is subject to some limitations including the linear

  16. Solid surface mapping by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M C; Osuna, S; Baráibar, I

    2005-09-16

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution, is a technique for characterising solid surfaces. Current practice is the injection of n-alkane homologous series to obtain the free energy of adsorption of the CH2 group, from which the London component of the solid surface free energy, gamma(d)s, is calculated. A value around 40 mJ/m2 is obtained for poly(ethylene), and 30 mJ/m2 for a clean glass fibre, while the potential surface interactivity of a glass fibre is far greater than that of poly(ethylene). A specific component of the surface, in mJ/m2, should be calculated in order to obtain significant parameters. As applied up to date, when calculating the specific component of the surface energy, the fact that W(sp)a energy values are in a totally different scale than AN or DN values is a major drawback. Consequently, Ka and Kb values obtained are in arbitrary energy units, different from those of the London component measured by injecting the n-alkane series. This paper proposes a method to obtain Ka and Kb values of the surface in the same energetic scale than the London component. The method enables us to correct the traditional London component of a solid, obtaining a new value, where the amount of WaCH2 accounting for Debye interactions with polar sites, is excluded. As a result, an approach to surface mapping is performed in several different substrate materials. We show results obtained on different solid surfaces: poly(ethylene), clean glass fibre, glass beads, chemically modified glass beads and carbon fibre.

  17. The Application of Aperture Synthesis to the Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Sea surface salinity is measured optimally at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum in order to maximize radiometric sensitivity to changes in salinity. Long wavelengths (e.g. L-band) mean large antennas in space, and because of the technological challenge associated with putting large scanning antennas in orbit, no system currently exists to measure salinity. Aperture synthesis is an interferometric technique to make deployment of large antenna apertures in space feasible. It uses pairs of small antennas and signal processing to achieve the resolution of a single large aperture. Aperture synthesis has been demonstrated successfully for remote sensing by the aircraft prototype radiometer, ESTAR. ESTAR is an L-band instrument which employs aperture synthesis in the cross track dimension. Recent measurements with ESTAR of the fresh water outflow from the Delaware River are in good agreement (about 1 psu) with shipboard thermosalinograph measurements. Synthetic aperture radiometers are currently being developed for remote sensing from space. HYDROSTAR is an instrument for remote sensing from space based on the design of ESTAR. It employs aperture synthesis in one dimension and is being proposed as a pathfinder instrument to make global maps of soil moisture and sea surface salinity and to demonstrate the feasibility of aperture synthesis for remote sensing from space. Instruments which use remote sensing in two dimensions are currently being developed by the European Space Agency. These instruments include additional channels (frequencies and polarizations) and may be able to achieve radiometric sensitivity and spatial resolution to meet the diverse needs of the coastal zone and open ocean oceanographic communities.

  18. Hydrologic Remote Sensing and Land Surface Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and skillful forecasting of key environmental variables such as soil moisture and snow are of paramount importance due to their strong influence on many water resources applications including flood control, agricultural production and effective water resources management which collectively control the behavior of the climate system. Soil moisture is a key state variable in land surface–atmosphere interactions affecting surface energy fluxes, runoff and the radiation balance. Snow processes also have a large influence on land-atmosphere energy exchanges due to snow high albedo, low thermal conductivity and considerable spatial and temporal variability resulting in the dramatic change on surface and ground temperature. Measurement of these two variables is possible through variety of methods using ground-based and remote sensing procedures. Remote sensing, however, holds great promise for soil moisture and snow measurements which have considerable spatial and temporal variability. Merging these measurements with hydrologic model outputs in a systematic and effective way results in an improvement of land surface model prediction. Data Assimilation provides a mechanism to combine these two sources of estimation. Much success has been attained in recent years in using data from passive microwave sensors and assimilating them into the models. This paper provides an overview of the remote sensing measurement techniques for soil moisture and snow data and describes the advances in data assimilation techniques through the ensemble filtering, mainly Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and Particle filter (PF), for improving the model prediction and reducing the uncertainties involved in prediction process. It is believed that PF provides a complete representation of the probability distribution of state variables of interests (according to sequential Bayes law) and could be a strong alternative to EnKF which is subject to some limitations including the linear

  19. Remote sensing soil salinity map for the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil salinization is a major natural hazard to worldwide agriculture. We present a remote imagery approach that maps salinity within a range (i.e., salinities less than 20 dS m-1, when measured as the electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract), accuracy, and resolution most relevant to ...

  20. PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION MAPPING USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery for automated mapping of submersed aquatic vegetation in the tidal Potomac River was investigated for near to real-time resource assessment and monitoring. Airborne hyperspectral imagery, together with in-situ spectral refl...

  1. Mapping three-dimensional geological features from remotely-sensed images and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin Peter

    Accurate mapping of geological structures is important in numerous applications, ranging from mineral exploration through to hydrogeological modelling. Remotely sensed data can provide synoptic views of study areas enabling mapping of geological units within the area. Structural information may be derived from such data using standard manual photo-geologic interpretation techniques, although these are often inaccurate and incomplete. The aim of this thesis is, therefore, to compile a suite of automated and interactive computer-based analysis routines, designed to help a the user map geological structure. These are examined and integrated in the context of an expert system. The data used in this study include Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and Airborne Thematic Mapper images, both with a spatial resolution of 5m, for a 5 x 5 km area surrounding Llyn Cow lyd, Snowdonia, North Wales. The geology of this area comprises folded and faulted Ordo vician sediments intruded throughout by dolerite sills, providing a stringent test for the automated and semi-automated procedures. The DEM is used to highlight geomorphological features which may represent surface expressions of the sub-surface geology. The DEM is created from digitized contours, for which kriging is found to provide the best interpolation routine, based on a number of quantitative measures. Lambertian shading and the creation of slope and change of slope datasets are shown to provide the most successful enhancement of DEMs, in terms of highlighting a range of key geomorphological features. The digital image data are used to identify rock outcrops as well as lithologically controlled features in the land cover. To this end, a series of standard spectral enhancements of the images is examined. In this respect, the least correlated 3 band composite and a principal component composite are shown to give the best visual discrimination of geological and vegetation cover types. Automatic edge detection (followed by line

  2. Soil surface roughness characterization for microwave remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzahn, P.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-04-01

    With this poster we present a simple and efficient method to measure soil surface roughness in an agricultural environment. Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. In recent studies it is strongly recognized that soil surface roughness significantly influences the backscatter of agricultural surface, especially on bare fields. Indeed, while different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscattering. In this study, we introduce a photogrammetric system which consists of a customized consumer grade Canon EOS 5d camera and a reference frame providing ground control points. With the system one can generate digital surface models (DSM) with a minimum size of 1 x 2.5 m2, extendable to any desired size, with a ground x,y- resolution of 2 mm. Using this approach, we generated a set of DSM with sizes ranging from 2.5 m2 to 22 m2, acquired over different roughness conditions representing ploughed, harrowed as well as crusted fields on different test sites. For roughness characterization we calculated in microwave remote sensing common roughness indices such as the RMS- height s and the autocorrelation length l. In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behavior of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes of the proposed method. Results indicate, compared to results from profiles generated out of the dataset, that using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust in their estimation. In addition, a strong directional dependency of the proposed roughness indices was observed which could be related to the orientation of the seedbed rows to the acqusition direction. In a geostatistical analysis, we decomposed the acquired roughness indices into different scales, yielding a roughness quantity

  3. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    PubMed

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R(2), RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  4. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R2, RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  5. Remote sensing of Arctic boundary layer clouds above snow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    In the Arctic remote sensing of clouds using reflected solar radiation is mostly related to high uncertainties as the contrast between the bright sea ice and snow surface and the clouds is low. Additionally, uncertainties result from variation of the snow grain size which changes the absorption of solar radiation similarly to the size of cloud particles. This is a major issue for understanding the response of Arctic clouds to climate warming as the quantification of cloud properties in this remote region mostly relies on satellite observations. We used spectral radiation measurements of the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer) to improve common used cloud remote sensing algorithms in case of snow surfaces. The measurements were collected during the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) above the Canadian Beaufort where both sea ice covered and ice free ocean areas were present during the observation period. Based on the spectral absorption characteristics of snow and clouds (assuming to be dominated by the liquid fraction) a combination of wavelengths was found which allows to separate the impact of clouds and snow surface on the reflected radiation measured above the clouds. While snow grain size dominates the absorption at a wavelength of 1.0 μm, information on cloud optical thickness and cloud particle effective radius can be extracted at wavelengths of 1.7 μm and 2.1 μm, respectively. Based on radiative transfer simulations lookup tables for the retrieval algorithm were calculated and used to estimate the theoretical uncertainties of the retrieval. It was found that using ratios instead of absolute radiances reduces the uncertainties significantly. The new algorithm was applied to a specific case observed during the VERDI campaign where a stratocumulus clouds was located above an ice edge. It could be shown that the method works also over water

  6. Synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Yang, Kun; Deng, Ming; Liu, Cun

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces, is significant to urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning and resource management.Impervious surface area (ISA) is considered a key indicator of environmental quality and can be used to address complex urban environmental issues, particularly those related to the health of urban watersheds. ISA is also an indicator of non-point source pollution or polluted runoff. Remote sensing offers a consistent framework for representing spatial patterns and rates of urbanization over time through accurate observations of impervious surface area. Most of the existing methods of extracting impervious surface based on remote sensing concentrate on an urban scale, but the rapid and accurate methods of extracting impervious surfaces in a basin scale are nearly nonexistent in China and abroad. In recent years,with the rapid urbanization especially surrounding the Dianchi water body, the impervious surface coverage rate also grows rapidly and results in severe degradation of basin water environment within Dianchi watershed. In this study, we developed an approach to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin by synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at Thematic Mapper (TM) images were mapped using the classification and regression tree(CART) algorithm. Sub-pixel impervious surfaces at 30m resolution were mapped in this study area through regression tree models. The estimated ISA results were evaluated through independent ISA reference data derived from high resolution QuickBird. The results prove the suitability of the approach for a widely automated and mapping of impervious surfaces in a basin scale.

  7. Remote object recognition by analysis of surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, J.; Stark, H.; Olsen, E. T.; Kogler, K.

    1995-06-01

    We present a new algorithm for the discrimination of remote objects by their surface structure. Starting from a range-azimuth profile function, we formulate a range-azimuth matrix whose largest eigenvalues are used as discriminating features to separate object classes. A simpler, competing algorithm uses the number of sign changes in the range-azimuth profile function to discriminate among classes. Whereas both algorithms work well on noiseless data, an experiment involving real data shows that the eigenvalue method is far more robust with respect to noise than is the sign-change method. Two well-known methods based on surface structure, variance, and fractal dimension were also tested on real data. Neither method furnished the aspect invariance and the discriminability of the eigenvalue method.

  8. Application of Remote Sensing for Generation of Groundwater Prospect Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayathulla, Masool

    2016-07-01

    In developing accurate hydrogeomorphological analysis, monitoring, ability to generate information in spatial and temporal domain and delineation of land features are crucial for successful analysis and prediction of groundwater resources. However, the use of RS and GIS in handling large amount of spatial data provides to gain accurate information for delineating the geological and geomorphological characteristics and allied significance, which are considered as a controlling factor for the occurrence and movement of groundwater used IRS LISS II data on 1: 50000 scale along with topographic maps in various parts of India to develop integrated groundwater potential zones. The present work is an attempt to integrate RS and GIS based analysis and methodology in groundwater potential zone identification in the Arkavathi Basin, Bangalore, study area. The information on geology, geomorphology, soil, slope, rainfall, water level and land use/land cover was gathered, in addition, GIS platform was used for the integration of various themes. The composite map generated was further classified according to the spatial variation of the groundwater potential. Five categories of groundwater potential zones namely poor, moderate to poor, moderate, good and very good were identified and delineated. The hydrogeomorphological units like valley fills and alluvial plain and are potential zones for groundwater exploration and development and valley fills associated with lineaments is highly promising area for ground water recharging. The spatial variation of the potential indicates that groundwater occurrence is controlled by geology, land use / land cover, slope and landforms.

  9. Spatial Distribution and Pattern Persistence of Surface Soil Moisture and Temperature Over Prairie from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Daoyi; Engman, Edwin T.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Images remotely sensed aboard aircraft during FIFE, namely, PBMR (microwave) soil moisture and NS001 thermal infrared surface temperature, were mapped on the same coordinate system covering the 20 km x 20 km experimental site. For both kinds of image data, the frequency distributions were close to symmetric, and the area average compared reasonably well with the ground based measurements. For any image on any given day, the correlation between the remotely sensed values and collocated ground based measurements over the area was usually high in the case of NS001 surface temperature but low in the case of PBMR soil moisture. On the other hand, at any given flux station the correlation between the PBMR and gravimetric soil moisture over all available days was usually high. The correlation pixel by pixel between images of PBMR on different days was generally high. The preservation of the spatial patterns of soil moisture was also evaluated by considering the correlation station by station between ground-based soil moisture measurements on different days; no persistence of spatial pattern was apparent during wet periods, but a definite pattern gradually established itself toward the end of each drying episode. The spatial patterns of surface temperature revealed by NS001 were not preserved even within a single day. The cross-correlations among the two kinds of images and the vegetation index NDVI were normally poor. This suggests that different processes of vegetation growth, and of the near-surface soil water and energy budgets.

  10. Rapid Mapping of Surface Rupture from the South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trexler, C. C.; Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid documentation (<1 day) of co-seismic surface rupture location and slip is essential for scientific and emergency response. We demonstrate how social media (text messaging and Twitter) and the emerging 3D data collection technique known as Structure from Motion (SfM), used in conjunction with traditional field reconnaissance, enabled us to rapidly locate and document surface ruptures from the Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. On the morning of the event, our field team used information available on social media to identify locations with potential surface rupture. Preliminary observations of surface rupture (measurements and geo-tagged photographs) were texted to the office-based team member who created digital maps of the rupture trace and shared them online via Twitter in near-real time. We documented many ephemeral features (such as offset roads, curbs, and driveways) along the rupture trace within 12 hours of the event, before these features were destroyed by road and infrastructure repair. We were able to return to most sites again within several days, allowing us to document continuing slip and create time-series datasets of offset features. After the collection and re-collection of data at selected sites, we made detailed measurements remotely using 3D models constructed with SfM. The ability to quantitatively project features into the fault plane using these models allows for accurate measurements of small features often difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Traditionally, even preliminary maps of rupture extent and offset magnitudes are not available for several days after an event because office-based processing and compilation is required. Because we were able to compile our data in real time, we distributed our results while they were still valuable for ongoing scientific response. Our work helped other science teams efficiently target fieldwork and instrument deployment; for example, one geodetic survey team used our surface rupture map to

  11. Remote sensing of the lunar surface using low energy ions from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Nishino, Masaki N.; Uemura, Kota; Kawamura, Mariko; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and a solar system object varies largely according to the object's properties, such as the existence of a global intrinsic magnetic field and/or thick atmosphere. It is well known that the Moon has neither global intrinsic magnetic field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth's case where the intrinsic global magnetic field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. In the Earth's magnetosphere, where the Moon stays for 3 ~ 4 days every month, hot plasma-sheet plasmas in the Earth's magnetosphere (instead of the solar wind) can impact the lunar surface. On the other hand, the ions generated or reflected / scattered at the lunar surface are accelerated by the solar wind / magnetotail convection electric field and are detected by ion detectors on the spacecraft orbiting around the Moon. Since these ions have information about the lunar surface structure / composition, they can be used for remote sensing of the lunar surface. Solar wind protons reflected / backscattered at the lunar surface is one of the ion populations observed on the dayside of the Moon. The solar wind protons that impact the lunar surface are mostly scattered backward inside a scattering cone with ± 40deg. whose center axis is opposite to the incidence direction of the solar wind. It is also found that the energy decrease of the backscattered solar wind is most significant along the axis of the scattering cone. In order to investigate the global distribution of the backscattered solar wind protons, we have made a backscattered proton intensity map. Since the magnetic anomalies magnetically reflect the incident solar wind ions, we have made the backscattered proton intensity map by masking the major magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface. The backscattered proton intensity map shows that the relatively intense backscattering was observed on the lunar maria regions. It indicates that the

  12. a Framework for Capacity Building in Mapping Coastal Resources Using Remote Sensing in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamondong, A.; Cruz, C.; Ticman, T.; Peralta, R.; Go, G. A.; Vergara, M.; Estabillo, M. S.; Cadalzo, I. E.; Jalbuena, R.; Blanco, A.

    2016-06-01

    Remote sensing has been an effective technology in mapping natural resources by reducing the costs and field data gathering time and bringing in timely information. With the launch of several earth observation satellites, an increase in the availability of satellite imageries provides an immense selection of data for the users. The Philippines has recently embarked in a program which will enable the gathering of LiDAR data in the whole country. The capacity of the Philippines to take advantage of these advancements and opportunities is lacking. There is a need to transfer the knowledge of remote sensing technology to other institutions to better utilize the available data. Being an archipelagic country with approximately 36,000 kilometers of coastline, and most of its people depending on its coastal resources, remote sensing is an optimal choice in mapping such resources. A project involving fifteen (15) state universities and colleges and higher education institutions all over the country headed by the University of the Philippines Training Center for Applied Geodesy and Photogrammetry and funded by the Department of Science and Technology was formed to carry out the task of capacity building in mapping the country's coastal resources using LiDAR and other remotely sensed datasets. This paper discusses the accomplishments and the future activities of the project.

  13. Added value products for imaging remote sensing by processing actual GNSS reflectometry delay doppler maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavulli, Domenico; Frappart, Frédéric; Ramilien, Guillaume; Darrozes, José; Nunziata, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) is an innovative and promising tool for remote sensing. It is based on the exploitation of GNSS signals reflected off Earth's surface as signals of opportunity to infer geophysical information of the reflecting surface. The main advantages of GNSS-R with respect dedicated sensors are: the unprecedented spatial-temporal coverage due to the availability of a great amount of transmitting satellite, e.g. GPS, Galileo, Glonass, etc…, long term GNSS mission life and cost effectiveness. In fact only a simple receiver is needed. In the last years several works demonstrated the meaningful of this technique in several Earth Observation applications. All these applications presented results obtained by using a receiver mounted on an aircraft or on a fixed platform. Moreover, space borne missions have been launched or are planned: UK-DMC, TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1), NASA CYGNSS, Geros ISS. Practically, GNSS-R can be seen as a bistatic radar system where the GNSS satellites continuously transmit the L-band all-weather night-and-day signals that are reflected off a surface, called Glistening Zone (GZ), and a receiver measures the scattered microwave signals in terms of Delay-Doppler maps (DDMs) or delay waveforms. These two products have been widely studied in the literature to extract compact parameters for different remote sensing applications. However, products measured in the Delay Doppler (DD) domain are not able to provide any spatial information of the scattering scene. This could represent a drawback for applications related to imaging remote sensing, e.g. target detection, sea/land and sea/ice transition, oil spill detection, etc…. To overcome these limitations some deconvolution techniques have been proposed in the state of the art aiming at the reconstruction of a radar image of the observed scene by processing the measured DDMs. These techniques have been tested on DDMs related to simulated marine scenario

  14. Development of a Remote-Sensing Based Framework for Mapping Drought over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.; Zhan, X.; Gao, F.; Svoboda, M.; Wardlow, B.; Mladenova, I. E.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will address the development of a multi-scale drought monitoring tool for North America based on remotely sensed estimates of evapotranspiration. The North American continent represents a broad range in vegetation and climate conditions, from the boreal forests in Canada to the arid deserts in Mexico. This domain also encompasses a range in constraints limiting vegetation growth, with a gradient from radiation/energy limitation in the north to moisture limits in the south. This feasibility study over NA will provide a valuable test bed for future implementation world-wide in support of proposed global drought monitoring and early warning efforts. The Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) represents anomalies in the ratio of actual-to-potential ET (fPET), generated with the thermal remote sensing based Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) surface energy balance model and associated disaggregation algorithm, DisALEXI demonstrated that ESI maps over the continental US (CONUS) show good correspondence with standard drought metrics and with patterns of antecedent precipitation, but can be generated at significantly higher spatial resolution due to a limited reliance on ground observations. Unique behavior is observed in the ESI in regions where the evaporative flux is enhanced by moisture sources decoupled from local rainfall, for example in areas where drought impacts are being mitigated by intense irrigation or shallow water tables. As such, the ESI is a measure of actual stress rather than potential for stress, and has physical relevance to projected crop development. Because precipitation is not used in construction of the ESI, this index provides an independent assessment of drought conditions and will have particular utility for real-time monitoring in regions with sparse rainfall data or significant delays in meteorological reporting. The North American ESI product will be quantitatively compared with spatiotemporal patterns in the NADM, and with

  15. A Remote Characterization System for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W.; Martinson, L.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a development project that will provide new technology for characterizing hazardous waste burial sites. The project is a collaborative effort by five of the national laboratories, involving the development and demonstration of a remotely controlled site characterization system. The Remote Characterization System (RCS) includes a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for non-invasive inspection of the surface and subsurface.

  16. Correcting for Atmospheric Spatial Variability When Estimating Surface Fluxes from Remotely Sensed Land Surface Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to monitor the terrestrial water cycle require accurate estimates of evapotranspiration over the global land area. Flux towers provide valuable site-level data, but their collective footprints cover only a very small fraction of the land surface. Satellite remote sensing instruments, on th...

  17. Use of remotely sensed evapotranspiration maps for monitoring drought impacts at field to continental scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) describes temporal anomalies in evapotranspiration (ET), highlighting areas with anomalously high or low rates of water use across the land surface. ET is retrieved via energy balance using remotely sensed land-surface temperature (LST) time-change signals. LST ...

  18. Development and Evaluation of Global Wetlands Mappings from Coarse-Resolution Satellite Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, R.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; Willacy, K.; Jones, L. A.; Kimball, J. S.; Zimmermann, R.

    2010-12-01

    Wetlands exert major impacts on global biogeochemistry, hydrology, and biological diversity. The extent and seasonal, interannual, and decadal variation of inundated wetland area play key roles in ecosystem dynamics. Wetlands contribute approximately one fourth of the total methane annually emitted to the atmosphere and are identified as the primary contributor to interannual variations in the growth rate of atmospheric methane concentrations. Despite the importance of these environments in the global cycling of carbon and water and to current and future climate, the extent and dynamics of global wetlands remain poorly characterized and modeled, primarily because of the scarcity of suitable regional-to-global remote-sensing data for characterizing their distribution and dynamics. We present a satellite-based approach for mapping wetlands globally at coarse-resolution (25km). The approach employs a mixture model applied to ~8 years (2002-2009) of daily 18.7 GHz, V and H polarization brightness temperature (Tb) data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E) and daily Ku-band (13.4 GHz) radar backscatter data from SeaWinds-on-QuikSCAT. The combined passive-active microwave mixture model approach utilizes site-specific MODIS IGBP land cover information to account for the effect of vegetation structure on the microwave remote sensing-based retrieval of surface inundation dynamics. A comparison with coarse-resolution global maps of fractional open water cover (Fw) derived from radiometric inversion of daily AMSR-E 18.7 GHz, V and H polarized Tb observations demonstrates agreement in terms of both spatial distribution and temporal variability of the major global wetland complexes, but differences in the magnitudes of the Fw retrievals. Wetlands products obtained from both satellite-based methods are compared with the high-resolution (250m) land water mask developed from MODIS and SRTM L3 (MOD44W) as well as the global lake and wetland database (GLWD

  19. ROLES OF REMOTE SENSING AND CARTOGRAPHY IN THE USGS NATIONAL MAPPING DIVISION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southard, Rupert B.; Salisbury, John W.

    1983-01-01

    The inseparable roles of remote sensing and photogrammetry have been recognized to be consistent with the aims and interests of the American Society of Photogrammetry. In particular, spatial data storage, data merging and manipulation methods and other techniques originally developed for remote sensing applications also have applications for digital cartography. Also, with the introduction of much improved digital processing techniques, even relatively low resolution (80 m) traditional Landsat images can now be digitally mosaicked into excellent quality 1:250,000-scale image maps.

  20. Integration of remote sensing and morphological data for an optimal mapping of badland areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, T.; Liberti, M.; Carone, M. T.; Coppola, R.; D'Emilio, M.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-04-01

    Badlands are complex and peculiar types of erosional formations deriving from the action of geological, geomorphological and denudation processes. For soil erosion assessment such as temporal monitoring of badland areas, digital soil mapping from remote sensing images can be a valuable tool. It can allow for exploring both the role of climate effects on landform development and changes of erosion rate due to human influence. However, in order to effectively use multispectral satellite data, which are still a main source of information for multitemporal analyses, many attempts are required to solve the problems linked to low spectral separability of land features. In particular, data from the Landsat TM/ETM series, recognized particularly appropriate for supporting both research and land conservation planning, showed their limit in accurately detecting eroded materials influenced by run-off processes. These surface processes, indeed, are responsible for the increase in spectral confusion by spreading materials from badlands to the surrounding areas. To overcome this problem, we proposed the integration of spectral data with morphological information deriving from a Digital Elevation Model. We used slope and hillslope aspect as key parameters in identifying eroded formations. Therefore, our protocol was developed by testing all possible combinations of classification algorithm (Maximum likelihood Classifier and Parallelepiped) and input layers (spectral and morphological). Results obtained in a badlands sites located in Basilicata region (Southern Italy) showed a progressive reduction of misclassified badlands-pixels in the surrounding deposition areas by adding the terrain predictors. Our methodology allowed the improvement of badlands mapping: the best performance was obtained by applying MLC on all TM seven bands together with slope and aspect maps. Here, we show results from validation tests carried out on an other badland areas with similar heterogeneity which

  1. Mapping evapotranspiration based on remote sensing: An application to Canada's landmass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, J. M.; Cihlar, J.

    2003-07-01

    The evapotranspiration (ET) from all Canadian landmass in 1996 is estimated at daily steps and 1 km resolution using a process model named boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS). The model is driven by remotely sensed leaf area index and land cover maps as well as soil water holding capacity and daily meteorological data. All the major ET components are considered: transpiration from vegetation, evaporation of canopy-intercepted rainfall, evaporation from soil, sublimation of snow in winter and in permafrost and glacier areas, and sublimation of canopy-intercepted snow. In forested areas the transpiration from both the overstory and understory vegetation is modeled separately. The Penman-Monteith method was applied to sunlit and shaded leaf groups individually in modeling the canopy-level transpiration, a methodological improvement necessary for forest canopies with considerable foliage clumping. The modeled ET map displays pronounced east-west and north-south gradients as well as detailed variations with cover types and vegetation density. It is estimated that for a relative wet year of 1996, the total ET from all Canada's landmass (excluding inland waters) was 2037 km3. If compared with the total precipitation of 5351 km3 based on the data from a medium range meteorological forecast model, the ratio of ET to precipitation was 38%. The ET averaged over Canadian land surface was 228 mm/yr in 1996, partitioned into transpiration of 102 mm yr-1 and evaporation and sublimation of 126 mm yr-1. Forested areas contributed the largest fraction of the total national ET at 59%. Averaged for all cover types, transpiration accounted for 45% of the total ET, while in forested areas, transpiration contributed 51% of ET. Modeled results of daily ET are compared with eddy covariance measurements at three forested sites with a r2 value of 0.61 and a root mean square error of 0.7 mm/day.

  2. Mapping radiation transfer through sea ice using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Katlein, C.

    2013-05-01

    Transmission of sunlight into and through sea ice is of critical importance for sea-ice associated organisms and photosynthesis because light is their primary energy source. The amount of visible light transferred through sea ice contributes to the energy budget of the sea ice and the uppermost ocean. However, our current knowledge on the amount and distribution of light under sea ice is still restricted to a few local observations, and our understanding of light-driven processes and interdisciplinary interactions is still sparse. The main reasons are that the under-ice environment is difficult to access and that measurements require large logistical and instrumental efforts. Hence, it has not been possible to map light conditions under sea ice over larger areas and to quantify spatial variability on different scales. Here we present a detailed methodological description for operating spectral radiometers on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) under sea ice. Recent advances in ROV and radiation-sensor technology have allowed us to map under-ice spectral radiance and irradiance on floe scales within a few hours of station time. The ROV was operated directly from the sea ice, allowing for direct relations of optical properties to other sea-ice and surface features. The ROV was flown close to the sea ice in order to capture small-scale variability. Results from the presented data set and similar future studies will allow for better quantification of light conditions under sea ice. The presented experiences will support further developments in order to gather large data sets of under-ice radiation for different ice conditions and during different seasons.

  3. The Surface Contour Radar, a unique remote sensing instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, J. E.; Uliana, E. A.; Walsh, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A 36 GHz computer controlled airborne Surface Contour Radar (SCR) is described, which was developed by the Naval Research Laboratory and NASA. The system uses pulse-compression techniques and dual frequency carriers spaced far enough apart to be decorrelated on the sea surface. The continuous wave transmitter is biphase modulated, the return signal is autocorrelated, and the code length and clock rate are variable, providing selectable range resolutions of 0.15, 0.30, 0.61 and 1.52 m. The SCR generates a false-color coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time, and can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with off-line data processing.

  4. Tropospheric aerosols remote sensing over the water surface of Penang Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S. A.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Lim, H. S.; Wong, C. J.; Salleh, N. Mohd.

    2006-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols play an important role in climate change. Aerosols are typically studied over deep clear water, due to the relatively constant reflectance of water and the ability to easily separate surface and atmospheric contributions on the satellite signal. A methodology based on multi-spectral approach was employed to map tropospheric aerosols concentrations over the water areas surrounding Penang Island. The aim of this study was to estimate the pollutants concentrations using remote sensing techniques. In this study, we attempted to derive AOT (Aerosol Optical Thickness) values from the sky transmittance measurements in the visible spectrum. The transmittance values were measured at the sea surface using a handheld spectroradiometer. The correspond PM10 readings were taken simultaneously during the transmittance measurements acquisition of the imageries using a Dust Trak meter. The PCI Geomatica version 9.1 digital image processing software was used in all image-processing analyses. The results produced a linear relationship between PM10 and AOT values over the water surface of Penang Island. Finally, The PM10 concentration map over the water surface of Penang Island was generated using Kriging interpolation technique. This study has indicated the potential use of a handheld spectroradiometer for air quality study.

  5. Investigation of remote sensing to detect near-surface groundwater on irrigated lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryland, D. W.; Schmer, F. A.; Moore, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques was studied for detecting areas with high water tables in irrigated agricultural lands. Aerial data were collected by the LANDSAT-1 satellite and aircraft over the Kansas/Bostwick Irrigation District in Republic and Jewell Counties, Kansas. LANDSAT-1 data for May 12 and August 10, 1973, and aircraft flights (midday and predawn) on August 10 and 11, 1973, and June 25 and 26, 1974, were obtained. Surface and water table contour maps and active observation well hydrographs were obtained from the Bureau of Reclamation for use in the analysis. Results of the study reveal that LANDSAT-1 data (May MSS band 6 and August MSS band 7) correlate significantly (0.01 level) with water table depth for 144 active observation wells located throughout the Kansas/Bostwick Irrigation District. However, a map of water table depths of less than 1.83 meters prepared from the LANDSAT-1 data did not compare favorably with a map of seeped lands of less than 1.22 m (4 feet) to the water table. Field evaluation of the map is necessary for a complete analysis. Analysis of three fields on a within or single-field basis for the 1973 LANDSAT-1 data also showed significant correlation results.

  6. Mapping of Coral Reef Environment in the Arabian Gulf Using Multispectral Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Romdhane, H.; Marpu, P. R.; Ghedira, H.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2016-06-01

    Coral reefs of the Arabian Gulf are subject to several pressures, thus requiring conservation actions. Well-designed conservation plans involve efficient mapping and monitoring systems. Satellite remote sensing is a cost-effective tool for seafloor mapping at large scales. Multispectral remote sensing of coastal habitats, like those of the Arabian Gulf, presents a special challenge due to their complexity and heterogeneity. The present study evaluates the potential of multispectral sensor DubaiSat-2 in mapping benthic communities of United Arab Emirates. We propose to use a spectral-spatial method that includes multilevel segmentation, nonlinear feature analysis and ensemble learning methods. Support Vector Machine (SVM) is used for comparison of classification performances. Comparative data were derived from the habitat maps published by the Environment Agency-Abu Dhabi. The spectral-spatial method produced 96.41% mapping accuracy. SVM classification is assessed to be 94.17% accurate. The adaptation of these methods can help achieving well-designed coastal management plans in the region.

  7. A method of spatial mapping and reclassification for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing image classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhou; Liu, Jianbo; He, Guojin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine). Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy.

  8. Flood mapping by combining the strengths of optical and Sentinel active radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, H. C.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Westerhoff, R.; Huizinga, J.; Villars, N.; Bishop, C.

    2012-04-01

    Flood mapping with remote sensing plays an important role in large scale disaster management procedures. For this purpose, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) gained experience since 1993 with the production of flood maps from optical satellite imagery and has currently established, together with NASA collaborators, a fully automated, global, near real-time service. Another consortium is also presently working on an automated, near real-time, global flood mapping procedure called the 'Global Flood Observatory' (GFO), which will make use of high resolution Sentinel data. The procedure is currently tested on Envisat active radar (ASAR) imagery. Both the DFO and GFO projects provide open data output of their data and maps. The optical and radar approaches to flood mapping each have advantages and suffer from shortcomings. Optical remote sensing via the U.S. MODIS and VIIRS sensors is constrained by cloud cover but can attain a high revisit frequency (>2 /day), whereas the Envisat ASAR is not affected by cloud cover, but uses a lower revisit frequency (generally once/3 days, depending on the location). In this contribution, we demonstrate the combination of both approaches into one flood mapping result. This results in improved flood mapping in a case study over the Chao Phraya basin (Bangkok surroundings) during the recent October-November 2011 extreme flooding. The combined map shows that during overpass, ASAR reveals flooded regions over cloud-obscured areas, which clearly follow elevated features in the landscape such as roads, embankments and railways. Meanwhile, the high frequency of delivery of the optical information ensures timely information. Also, the quite different water classification methods used for the optical and ASAR data sources show good agreement and have been successfully merged into one GIS data product. This can also be automatically generated and disseminated on a global basis.

  9. Mapping irrigated areas of Ghana using fusion of 30 m and 250 m resolution remote-sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gumma, M.K.; Thenkabail, P.S.; Hideto, F.; Nelson, A.; Dheeravath, V.; Busia, D.; Rala, A.

    2011-01-01

    Maps of irrigated areas are essential for Ghana's agricultural development. The goal of this research was to map irrigated agricultural areas and explain methods and protocols using remote sensing. Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data and time-series Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data were used to map irrigated agricultural areas as well as other land use/land cover (LULC) classes, for Ghana. Temporal variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) pattern obtained in the LULC class were used to identify irrigated and non-irrigated areas. First, the temporal variations in NDVI pattern were found to be more consistent in long-duration irrigated crops than with short-duration rainfed crops due to more assured water supply for irrigated areas. Second, surface water availability for irrigated areas is dependent on shallow dug-wells (on river banks) and dug-outs (in river bottoms) that affect the timing of crop sowing and growth stages, which was in turn reflected in the seasonal NDVI pattern. A decision tree approach using Landsat 30 m one time data fusion with MODIS 250 m time-series data was adopted to classify, group, and label classes. Finally, classes were tested and verified using ground truth data and national statistics. Fuzzy classification accuracy assessment for the irrigated classes varied between 67 and 93%. An irrigated area derived from remote sensing (32,421 ha) was 20-57% higher than irrigated areas reported by Ghana's Irrigation Development Authority (GIDA). This was because of the uncertainties involved in factors such as: (a) absence of shallow irrigated area statistics in GIDA statistics, (b) non-clarity in the irrigated areas in its use, under-development, and potential for development in GIDA statistics, (c) errors of omissions and commissions in the remote sensing approach, and (d) comparison involving widely varying data types, methods, and approaches used in determining irrigated area statistics

  10. Image Mining in Remote Sensing for Coastal Wetlands Mapping: from Pixel Based to Object Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farda, N. M.; Danoedoro, P.; Hartono; Harjoko, A.

    2016-11-01

    The availably of remote sensing image data is numerous now, and with a large amount of data it makes “knowledge gap” in extraction of selected information, especially coastal wetlands. Coastal wetlands provide ecosystem services essential to people and the environment. The aim of this research is to extract coastal wetlands information from satellite data using pixel based and object based image mining approach. Landsat MSS, Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, and Landsat 8 OLI images located in Segara Anakan lagoon are selected to represent data at various multi temporal images. The input for image mining are visible and near infrared bands, PCA band, invers PCA bands, mean shift segmentation bands, bare soil index, vegetation index, wetness index, elevation from SRTM and ASTER GDEM, and GLCM (Harralick) or variability texture. There is three methods were applied to extract coastal wetlands using image mining: pixel based - Decision Tree C4.5, pixel based - Back Propagation Neural Network, and object based - Mean Shift segmentation and Decision Tree C4.5. The results show that remote sensing image mining can be used to map coastal wetlands ecosystem. Decision Tree C4.5 can be mapped with highest accuracy (0.75 overall kappa). The availability of remote sensing image mining for mapping coastal wetlands is very important to provide better understanding about their spatiotemporal coastal wetlands dynamics distribution.

  11. Use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data in the Mapping of Global Landslide Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing data has significant potential use in analysis of natural hazards such as landslides. Relying on the recent advances in satellite remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques, this paper aims to map landslide susceptibility over most of the globe using a GIs-based weighted linear combination method. First , six relevant landslide-controlling factors are derived from geospatial remote sensing data and coded into a GIS system. Next, continuous susceptibility values from low to high are assigned to each of the six factors. Second, a continuous scale of a global landslide susceptibility index is derived using GIS weighted linear combination based on each factor's relative significance to the process of landslide occurrence (e.g., slope is the most important factor, soil types and soil texture are also primary-level parameters, while elevation, land cover types, and drainage density are secondary in importance). Finally, the continuous index map is further classified into six susceptibility categories. Results show the hot spots of landslide-prone regions include the Pacific Rim, the Himalayas and South Asia, Rocky Mountains, Appalachian Mountains, Alps, and parts of the Middle East and Africa. India, China, Nepal, Japan, the USA, and Peru are shown to have landslide-prone areas. This first-cut global landslide susceptibility map forms a starting point to provide a global view of landslide risks and may be used in conjunction with satellite-based precipitation information to potentially detect areas with significant landslide potential due to heavy rainfall. 1

  12. Photoelectric scanner makes detailed work function maps of metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    Photoelectric scanning device maps the work function of a metal surface by scanning it with a light spot and measuring the resulting photocurrent. The device is capable of use over a range of surface temperatures.

  13. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these

  14. Remote sensing of directional wave spectra using the surface contour radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Kenney, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A unique radio-oceanographic remote sensing instrument was developed. The 36 GHz airborne Surface Contour Radar (SCR) remotely produces a real-time topographical map of the sea surface beneath the aircraft. It can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with off-line data processing. The transmitter is a coherent dual-frequency device that uses pulse compression to compensate for the limited available power at Ka band. The radar has selectable pulse widths of 1, 2, 4, and 10 nanoseconds. The transmitting antenna is a 58 lambda horn fed dielectric lens whose axis is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. It illuminates an elliptical mirror which is oriented 45 deg to the lens' longitudinal axis to deflect the beam towards the region beneath the aircraft. The mirror is oscillated in a sinusoidal fashion through mechanical linkages driven to a variable speed motor to scan the transmitter beam (1.2 deg X 1.2 deg) with + or - 16 deg of the perpendicular to the aircraft wings in the plane perpendicular to the aircraft flight direction.

  15. Remote sensing of impervious surface growth: A framework for quantifying urban expansion and re-densification mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahtahmassebi, Amir Reza; Song, Jie; Zheng, Qing; Blackburn, George Alan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Ling Yan; Pan, Yi; Moore, Nathan; Shahtahmassebi, Golnaz; Sadrabadi Haghighi, Reza; Deng, Jing Song

    2016-04-01

    A substantial body of literature has accumulated on the topic of using remotely sensed data to map impervious surfaces which are widely recognized as an important indicator of urbanization. However, the remote sensing of impervious surface growth has not been successfully addressed. This study proposes a new framework for deriving and summarizing urban expansion and re-densification using time series of impervious surface fractions (ISFs) derived from remotely sensed imagery. This approach integrates multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA), analysis of regression residuals, spatial statistics (Getis_Ord) and urban growth theories; hence, the framework is abbreviated as MRGU. The performance of MRGU was compared with commonly used change detection techniques in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. The results suggested that the ISF regression residuals were optimal for detecting impervious surface changes while Getis_Ord was effective for mapping hotspot regions in the regression residuals image. Moreover, the MRGU outputs agreed with the mechanisms proposed in several existing urban growth theories, but importantly the outputs enable the refinement of such models by explicitly accounting for the spatial distribution of both expansion and re-densification mechanisms. Based on Landsat data, the MRGU is somewhat restricted in its ability to measure re-densification in the urban core but this may be improved through the use of higher spatial resolution satellite imagery. The paper ends with an assessment of the present gaps in remote sensing of impervious surface growth and suggests some solutions. The application of impervious surface fractions in urban change detection is a stimulating new research idea which is driving future research with new models and algorithms.

  16. Reproducibility of crop surface maps extracted from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) derived digital surface maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Stephen D.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Al-Mashhawari, Samir K.; Rosas, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Crop height measured from UAVs fitted with commercially available RGB cameras provide an affordable alternative to retrieve field scale high resolution estimates. The study presents an assessment of between flight reproducibility of Crop Surface Maps (CSM) extracted from Digital Surface Maps (DSM) generated by Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms. Flights were conducted over a centre pivot irrigation system covered with an alfalfa crop. An important step in calculating the absolute crop height from the UAV derived DSM is determining the height of the underlying terrain. Here we use automatic thresholding techniques applied to RGB vegetation index maps to classify vegetated and soil pixels. From interpolation of classified soil pixels, a terrain map is calculated and subtracted from the DSM. The influence of three different thresholding techniques on CSMs are investigated. Median Alfalfa crop heights determined with the different thresholding methods varied from 18cm for K means thresholding to 13cm for Otsu thresholding methods. Otsu thresholding also gave the smallest range of crop heights and K means thresholding the largest. Reproducibility of median crop heights between flight surveys was 4-6cm for all thresholding techniques. For the flight conducted later in the afternoon shadowing caused soil pixels to be classified as vegetation in key locations around the domain, leading to lower crop height estimates. The range of crop heights was similar for both flights using K means thresholding (35-36cm), local minimum thresholding depended on whether raw or normalised RGB intensities were used to calculate vegetation indices (30-35cm), while Otsu thresholding had a smaller range of heights and varied most between flights (26-30cm). This study showed that crop heights from multiple survey flights are comparable, however, they were dependent on the thresholding method applied to classify soil pixels and the time of day the flight was conducted.

  17. Mapping Early Speech: Prescriptive Developmental Profiles for Very Remote Aboriginal Students in the First Two Years of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the issues surrounding the mapping of the oral language development of Standard Australian English (SAE) in the early school years of remote and very remote Aboriginal education in the Northern Territory (NT). Currently, teachers in this context have 2 mandated documents as guides that chart the development of SAE oracy.…

  18. Mapping Weathering and Alteration Minerals in the Comstock and Geiger Grade Areas using Visible to Thermal Infrared Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Greg R.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    To support research into both precious metal exploration and environmental site characterization a combination of high spatial/spectral resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data were acquired to remotely map hydrothermal alteration minerals around the Geiger Grade and Comstock alteration regions, and map the mineral by-products of weathered mine dumps in Virginia City. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopy. The resulting mineral maps show the spatial distribution of several important alteration minerals around each study area including alunite, quartz, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. In the Comstock region the mineral maps show acid-sulfate alteration, widespread propylitic alteration and extensive faulting that offsets the acid-sulfate areas, in contrast to the larger, dominantly acid-sulfate alteration exposed along Geiger Grade. Also, different mineral zones within the intense acid-sulfate areas were mapped. In the Virginia City historic mining district the important weathering minerals mapped include hematite, goethite, jarosite and hydrous sulfate minerals (hexahydrite, alunogen and gypsum) located on mine dumps. Sulfate minerals indicate acidic water forming in the mine dump environment. While there is not an immediate threat to the community, there are clearly sources of

  19. Automated methodology for selecting hot and cold pixel for remote sensing based evapotranspiration mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface energy fluxes, especially the latent heat flux from evapotranspiration (ET), determine exchanges of energy and mass between the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. There are numerous remote sensing-based energy balance approaches such as METRIC and SEBAL that use hot and cold pixels from...

  20. Preliminary investigation of submerged aquatic vegetation mapping using hyperspectral remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.J.; Rybicki, N.B.; Lombana, A.V.; O'Brien, T. M.; Gomez, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The use of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery for automated mapping of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the tidal Potomac River was investigated for near to realtime resource assessment and monitoring. Airborne hyperspectral imagery and field spectrometer measurements were obtained in October of 2000. A spectral library database containing selected ground-based and airborne sensor spectra was developed for use in image processing. The spectral library is used to automate the processing of hyperspectral imagery for potential real-time material identification and mapping. Field based spectra were compared to the airborne imagery using the database to identify and map two species of SAV (Myriophyllum spicatum and Vallisneria americana). Overall accuracy of the vegetation maps derived from hyperspectral imagery was determined by comparison to a product that combined aerial photography and field based sampling at the end of the SAV growing season. The algorithms and databases developed in this study will be useful with the current and forthcoming space-based hyperspectral remote sensing systems.

  1. Surface-sediment dynamics in a dust source from thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katra, I.; Lancaster, N.

    2007-12-01

    Characteristics of surface sediments are significant factors in modeling dust entrainment and wind erosion, and it is of interest to monitor them using remote sensing in source areas at high spatial and temporal resolution. A time-series of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data were acquired for Soda Playa (CA), a modern depositional environment associated with dust emission. Analysis of the multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images indicates that the type and distribution of the surface sediments can be mapped by linear spectral unmixing techniques. Image-based spectral endmembers extracted from the ASTER five-band surface emissivity data were used to drive fraction images. The spectral-mixture analysis reveals that the mosaic-like pattern of the main sediment types - silica-rich, clay-rich, and salt-rich, changes in time as a consequence of interactions between hydrologic and geomorphic processes in the playa environment. The results highlight the dynamic response of the playa-surface to wind erosion, and suggest that this technique is useful for continuously detecting dust emission potential in sources characterized by a small extension and a complex surface.

  2. Modeling spatial surface energy fluxes of agricultural and riparian vegetation using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, Hatim Mohammed Eisa

    Modeling of surface energy fluxes and evapotranspiration (ET ) requires the understanding of the interaction between land and atmosphere as well as the appropriate representation of the associated spatial and temporal variability and heterogeneity. This dissertation provides new methodology showing how to rationally and properly incorporate surface features characteristics/properties, including the leaf area index, fraction of cover, vegetation height, and temperature, using different representations as well as identify the related effects on energy balance flux estimates including ET. The main research objectives were addressed in Chapters 2 through 4 with each presented in a separate paper format with Chapter 1 presenting an introduction and Chapter 5 providing summary and recommendations. Chapter 2 discusses a new approach of incorporating temporal and spatial variability of surface features. We coupled a remote sensing-based energy balance model with a traditional water balance method to provide improved estimates of ET. This approach was tested over rainfed agricultural fields ˜ 10 km by 30 km in Ames, Iowa. Before coupling, we modified the water balance method by incorporating a remote sensing-based estimate for one of its parameters to ameliorate its performance on a spatial basis. Promising results were obtained with indications of improved estimates of ET and soil moisture in the root zone. The effects of surface features heterogeneity on measurements of turbulence were investigated in Chapter 3. Scintillometer-based measurements/estimates of sensible heat flux (H) were obtained over the riparian zone of the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), California. Surface roughness including canopy height (hc), roughness length, and zero-plane displacement height were incorporated in different ways, to improve estimates of H. High resolution, 1-m maps of ground surface digital elevation model and canopy height, hc, were derived from airborne LiDAR sensor data

  3. Quantitative mapping by remote sensing of an ocean acid-waste dump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results from quantitative analysis show that airplane remotely sensed spectral data can be used to quantify and map an acid-waste dump in terms of its particulate iron concentration. These same data, however, could not be used to map the dump in terms of total suspended solids, organic suspended solids, or inorganic suspended solids concentrations. A single-variable equation using the ratio of band 2 (440 to 490 nm) radiance to band 4 (540 to 580 nm) radiance was used to quantify the iron concentration in the acid-waste dump. The acid waste that was mapped varied in age from freshly dumped to 31/2 hr. Particulate iron concentrations in the acid waste were estimated to range up to 1.1 mg/l at a depth of 0.46 m. A classification technique was developed to identify pixels in the data set affected by sun glitter.

  4. Remote sensing-based neural network mapping of tsunami damage in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Matthew J; Lumsdon, Parivash; Miller, David R

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the loss of human life, the tsunami event of 26 December 2004 caused extensive damage to coastal areas. The scale of the disaster was such that remote sensing may be the only way to determine its effects on the landscape. This paper presents the results of a neural network-based mapping of part of the region of Aceh, Sumatra. Before-and-after satellite imagery, combined with a novel neural network methodology, enabled a characterisation of landscape change. The neural network technique used a threshold of acceptance for identification, in combination with a bootstrapped identification method for identifying problem pixels. Map analysis allowed identification of urban areas that were inaccessible by road, and which aid agencies could therefore only reach by air or sea. The methods used provide a rapid and effective mapping ability and would be a useful tool for aid agencies, insurance underwriters and environmental monitoring.

  5. Remote sensing for mapping natural habitats and their conservation status - New opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbane, Christina; Lang, Stefan; Pipkins, Kyle; Alleaume, Samuel; Deshayes, Michel; García Millán, Virginia Elena; Strasser, Thomas; Vanden Borre, Jeroen; Toon, Spanhove; Michael, Förster

    2015-05-01

    Safeguarding the diversity of natural and semi-natural habitats in Europe is one of the aims set out by the Habitats Directive (Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora) and one of the targets of the European 2020 Biodiversity Strategy, and is to be accomplished by maintaining a favourable conservation status. To reach this aim a high-level understanding of the distribution and conditions of these habitats is needed. Remote sensing can considerably contribute to habitat mapping and their observation over time. Several European projects and a large number of scientific studies have addressed the issue of mapping and monitoring natural habitats via remote sensing and the deriving of indicators on their conservation status. The multitude of utilized remote sensing sensors and applied methods used in these studies, however, impede a common understanding of what is achievable with current state-of-the-art technologies. The aim of this paper is to provide a synthesis on what is currently feasible in terms of detection and monitoring of natural and semi-natural habitats with remote sensing. To focus this endeavour, we concentrate on those studies aimed at direct mapping of individual habitat types or discriminating between different types of habitats occurring in relatively large, spatially contiguous units. By this we uncover the potential of remote sensing to better understand the distribution of habitats and the assessment of their conservation status in Europe. Natural habitats are "terrestrial or aquatic areas distinguished by geographic, abiotic and biotic features, whether entirely natural or semi-natural" (HabDir). Biotopes are "the smallest geographical unit of the biosphere or of a habitat that can be delimited by convenient boundaries and is characterized by its biota" (Lincoln, 1998). The term 'remote sensing' as used in this context comprises advanced, computer-assisted analytical tools for information

  6. MORFEO project: use of remote sensing technology for mapping, monitoring and forecasting landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, F.; Candela, L.; Carlà, R.; Fornaro, G.; Lanari, R.; Mondini, A.; Ober, G.; Fiorucci, F.; Zeni, G.

    2009-04-01

    MORFEO, an Italian acronym for Monitoring Landslide Risk exploiting Earth Observation Technology, is a 3-year research and development project of the Italian Space Agency, carried out in the framework of the Italian national earth observation programme. The project primary contract is Carlo Gavazzi Space, a leading enterprise in space technology and remote sensing applications in Italy. The project research team is composed by seven research institutes of the Italian National Research Council, and six university departments. The team has consolidated experience in landslide detection and mapping, landslide hazard assessment and risk evaluation, remote sensing technology (e.g., laser, optical, radar, GPS) for landslide detection, mapping and monitoring. MORFEO aims at the design, development and demonstration of a prototype system that exploits multiple satellite technologies to support the Italian national civil protection offices to manage landslide risk in Italy. Research activities conducted within the MORFEO project consist chiefly in testing, evaluating and improving EO technologies to increase the current capabilities to detect, map, monitor and forecast landslides in Italy. More precisely, the activities include: (i) detection and mapping landslides exploiting medium-resolution to very-high resolution satellite optical images, (ii) landslide monitoring, through the integration of ground based and satellite technologies, including GPS and DInSAR, (iii) landslide susceptibility, hazard and risk modelling using information obtained processing optical and radar data, (iv) vulnerability and damage assessment, exploiting optical and radar sensors, and (v) landslides forecasting, using thresholds, models and remote sensing data. We provide examples of some of the preliminary results obtained in the MOFEO project.

  7. Use of a remote computer terminal during field checking of Landsat digital maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.; Hutchinson, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    Field checking of small-scale land classification maps made digitally from Landsat data is facilitated by use of a remote portable teletypewriter terminal linked by teleplume to the IDIMS (Interactive Digital Image Manipulation System) at the EDC (EROS Data Center), Sioux Falls, S. Dak. When field checking of maps 20 miles northeast of Baker, Calif., during the day showed that changes in classification were needed, the terminal was used at night to combine image statistical files, remap portions of images, and produce new alphanumeric maps for field checking during the next day. The alphanumeric maps can be used without serious difficulty in location in the field even though the scale is distorted, and statistical files created during the field check can be used for full image classification and map output at the EDC. This process makes field checking faster than normal, provides interaction with the statistical data while in the field, and reduces to a minimum the number of trips needed to work interactively with the IDIMS at the EDC, thus saving significant amounts of time and money. The only significant problem is using telephone lines which at times create spurious characters in the printout or prevent the line feed (paper advance) signal from reaching the terminal, thus overprinting lines which should be sequential. We recommend that maps for field checking be made with more spectral classes than are expected because in the field it is much easier to group classes than to reclassify or separate classes when only the remote terminal is available for display.

  8. Higher resolution satellite remote sensing and the impact on image mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Allen H.; Thormodsgard, June M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of civil land remote sensing satellite data are presenting new opportunities for image mapping applications. The U.S. Geological Survey's experimental satellite image mapping program is evolving toward larger scale image map products with increased information content as a result of improved image processing techniques and increased resolution. Thematic mapper data are being used to produce experimental image maps at 1:100,000 scale that meet established U.S. and European map accuracy standards. Availability of high quality, cloud-free, 30-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper sensor, along with 10-meter ground resolution panchromatic and 20-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the recently launched French SPOT satellite, present new cartographic and image processing challenges. The need to fully exploit these higher resolution data increases the complexity of processing the images into large-scale image maps. The removal of radiometric artifacts and noise prior to geometric correction can be accomplished by using a variety of image processing filters and transforms. Sensor modeling and image restoration techniques allow maximum retention of spatial and radiometric information. An optimum combination of spectral information and spatial resolution can be obtained by merging different sensor types. These processing techniques are discussed and examples are presented. 

  9. Non-Lambertian effects on remote sensing of surface reflectance and vegetation index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of non-Lambertian reflection from a homogeneous surface on remote sensing of the surface reflectance and vegetation index from a satellite. Remote measurement of the surface characteristics is perturbed by atmospheric scattering of sun light. This scattering tends to smooth the angular dependence of non-Lambertian surface reflectances, an effect that is not present in the case of Lambertian surfaces. This effect is calculated to test the validity of a Lambertian assumption used in remote sensing. For the three types of vegetations considered in this study, the assumption of Lambertian surface can be used satisfactorily in the derivation of surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance for a view angle outside the backscattering region. Within the backscattering region, however, the use of the assumption can result in a considerable error in the derived surface reflectance. Accuracy also deteriorates with increasing solar zenith angle. The angular distribution of the surface reflectance derived from remote measurements is smoother than that at the surface. The effect of surface non-Lambertianity on remote sensing of vegetation index is very weak. Since the effect is similiar in the visible and near infrared part of the solar spectrum for the vegetations treated in this study, it is canceled in deriving the vegetation index. The effect of the diffuse skylight on surface reflectance measurements at ground level is also discussed.

  10. Ground Surface Visualization Using Red Relief Image Map for a Variety of Map Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, T.; Hasi, B.

    2016-06-01

    There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008) to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  11. Advances in Electrostatic Dust Detection on Remote Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Voinier, C; Skinner, C H; Roquemore, A L

    2005-02-09

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Two grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125 mu m to 25 mu m are biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the result current pulse is recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 mu m grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 mu m grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5 30 mu m) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125 250 mu m) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 mu g/cm^2.

  12. Hydrological Application of Remote Sensing: Surface States -- Snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Kelly, Richard E. J.; Foster, James L.; Chang, Alfred T. C.

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing research of snow cover has been accomplished for nearly 40 years. The use of visible, near-infrared, active and passive-microwave remote sensing for the analysis of snow cover is reviewed with an emphasis on the work on the last decade.

  13. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data.

  14. Waste-surface mapping of the Fernald K-65 silos using a structured light measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Dinkins, M.A.; Rowe, J.C.; Selleck, C.B.; Jacoboski, D.L.

    1992-10-01

    A remotely operated surface-mapping measurement system was developed by the Robotics & Process Systems Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the K-65 waste-storage silos at Fernald, Ohio. The mapping system used three infrared line-generating laser diodes as illumination sources and three high-resolution, low-lux, calibrated, black-and-white, charge-coupled-device video cameras as receivers. These components were combined to form structured light source range and direction sensors with six different possible emitter-receiver pairs. A technology demonstration and predeployment tests were performed at Fernald using the empty Silo 4 into which was placed rectangular objects of known dimensions. These objects were scanned by the structured light sources to demonstrate functionality and verify that the system was giving sufficiently accurate range data in three dimensions. The structured light sources were deployed in Silos 1 and 2 to scan the waste surfaces. The resulting data were merged to create three-dimensional maps of those surfaces. A bentonite clay cap was placed over the waste surfaces and surface maps were obtained. The change in surface height before and after bentonite addition was utilized as a measure of clay cap thickness.

  15. Waste-surface mapping of the Fernald K-65 silos using a structured light measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Dinkins, M.A.; Rowe, J.C. ); Selleck, C.B. ); Jacoboski, D.L. )

    1992-10-01

    A remotely operated surface-mapping measurement system was developed by the Robotics Process Systems Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the K-65 waste-storage silos at Fernald, Ohio. The mapping system used three infrared line-generating laser diodes as illumination sources and three high-resolution, low-lux, calibrated, black-and-white, charge-coupled-device video cameras as receivers. These components were combined to form structured light source range and direction sensors with six different possible emitter-receiver pairs. A technology demonstration and predeployment tests were performed at Fernald using the empty Silo 4 into which was placed rectangular objects of known dimensions. These objects were scanned by the structured light sources to demonstrate functionality and verify that the system was giving sufficiently accurate range data in three dimensions. The structured light sources were deployed in Silos 1 and 2 to scan the waste surfaces. The resulting data were merged to create three-dimensional maps of those surfaces. A bentonite clay cap was placed over the waste surfaces and surface maps were obtained. The change in surface height before and after bentonite addition was utilized as a measure of clay cap thickness.

  16. Remotely mapping river water quality using multivariate regression with prediction validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, Chris L.; Autrey, Bradley C.

    2005-09-01

    Remote spectral sensing offers an attractive means of mapping river water quality over wide spatial regions. While previous research has focused on development of spectral indices and models to predict river water quality based on remote images, little attention has been paid to subsequent validation of these predictions. To address this oversight, we describe a retrospective analysis of remote, multispectral Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) images of the Ohio River and its Licking River and Little Miami River tributaries. In conjunction with the CASI acquisitions, ground truth measurements of chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity were made for a small set of locations in the Ohio River. Partial least squares regression models relating the remote river images to ground truth measurements of chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity for the Ohio River were developed. Employing these multivariate models, chlorophyll-a concentrations and turbidity levels were predicted in river pixels lacking ground truth measurements, generating detailed estimated water quality maps. An important but often neglected step in the regression process is to validate prediction results using a spectral residual statistic. For both the chlorophyll-a and turbidity regression models, a spectral residual value was calculated for each river pixel and compared to the associated statistical confidence limit for the model. These spectral residual statistic results revealed that while the chlorophyll-a and turbidity models could validly be applied to a vast majority of Ohio River and Licking River pixels, application of these models to Little Miami River pixels was inappropriate due to an unmodeled source of spectral variation.

  17. Remotely mapping river water quality using multivariate regression with prediction validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, Christopher Lyle; Autry, Bradley C.

    2005-07-01

    Remote spectral sensing offers an attractive means of mapping river water quality over wide spatial regions. While previous research has focused on development of spectral indices and models to predict river water quality based on remote images, little attention has been paid to subsequent validation of these predictions. To address this oversight, we describe a retrospective analysis of remote, multispectral Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) images of the Ohio River and its Licking River and Little Miami River tributaries. In conjunction with the CASI acquisitions, ground truth measurements of chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity were made for a small set of locations in the Ohio River. Partial least squares regression models relating the remote river images to ground truth measurements of chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity for the Ohio River were developed. Employing these multivariate models, chlorophyll-a concentrations and turbidity levels were predicted in river pixels lacking ground truth measurements, generating detailed estimated water quality maps. An important but often neglected step in the regression process is to validate prediction results using a spectral residual statistic. For both the chlorophyll-a and turbidity regression models, a spectral residual value was calculated for each river pixel and compared to the associated statistical confidence limit for the model. These spectral residual statistic results revealed that while the chlorophyll-a and turbidity models could validly be applied to a vast majority of Ohio River and Licking River pixels, application of these models to Little Miami River pixels was inappropriate due to an unmodeled source of spectral variation.

  18. Using Remote Sensing Platforms to Estimate Near-Surface Soil Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Rickman, D.; Mask, P. L.; Wersinger, J. M.; Luvall, J.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of near-surface soil properties via remote sensing (RS) could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction, fertilization regimes, and allocation of agrochemicals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and near surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil water content, soil organic carbon (SOC), particle size distribution (PSD), and citrate dithionite extractable iron (Fed) content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured at sampling. Results showed RS data acquired from lands with less than 4 % surface soil water content best approximated near-surface soil properties at the Coastal Plain site where loamy sand textured surfaces were predominant. Utilizing a combination of band ratios in stepwise regression, Fed (r2 = 0.61), SOC (r2 = 0.36), sand (r2 = 0.52), and clay (r2 = 0.76) were related to RS data at the Coastal Plain site. In contrast, the more clayey Ridge and Valley soils had r-squares of 0.50, 0.36, 0.17, and 0.57. for Fed, SOC, sand and clay, respectively. Use of estimated eEmissivity did not generally improve estimates of near-surface soil attributes.

  19. New map of seafloor mirrors surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Over the past few years, a Kiwi fisherman has made a bountiful living casting his nets in an area the experts said did not exist. The New Zealander has long asserted that there are shallows amid the remote and abyssal seas of the South Pacific—shallows that teem with marine life. His echo location instruments, as well as readings taken by a research ship in 1964, had charted depths as shallow as 160 m. But those readings were consistently discounted by ocean floor researchers as improbable.

  20. Daily sea surface salinity variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean derived from satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Portabella, Marcos; Martinez, Justino; Hoareau, Nina

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a multifractal data fusion algorithm is used to obtain daily sea surface salinity (SSS) maps from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Level 2 (L2) data. The L2 SSS retrievals are obtained from the brightness temperature reconstructions at different polarizations and incidence angles along the satellite swath. SMOS L2 data have a spatial resolution of about 43 km and accuracy between 0.6 to 1.7 (in the practical salinity scale). The main goal of the data fusion algorithm is to use the reliable information of the OSTIA sea surface temperature (SST) daily fields to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of the SMOS L2 SSS data. Our SMOS dataset consists of the European Space Agency (ESA) L2 v620 reprocessed data from January 2010 to May 2015, and of the latest L2 operational data (near real-time) version after May 2015. Salinity anomalies are constructed by removing the five-year average of the L2 salinity data as a function of the geographical position, the overpass orientation (ascending or descending), and the across-track distance to the center of the swath. The SMOS-based climatologies evidence the existence of strong systematic artifacts, especially near the coast and, as such, they allow retrieving some of the systematic errors present in the original L2 data. The 0.05-degree, daily SST product from OSTIA is used as a template in our scalar fusion algorithm to generate 0.05 degree, daily SSS maps. The resulting SSS maps are less noisy and better define the main geophysical structures as compared to the standard high-level SSS products. Differences against near-surface Argo salinity measurements are reduced by 40% with respect to the standard products. In order to assess the significance of the extrapolation to the time domain, data from the Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array are used. The results indicate that the small time-scale variability present in the mooring data are not completely reproduced by remote sensing, although data

  1. Remote sensing approach to map riparian vegetation of the Colorado River Ecosystem, Grand Canyon area, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, U.; Glenn, E.; Nagler, P. L.; Sankey, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones in the southwestern U.S. are usually a mosaic of vegetation types at varying states of succession in response to past floods or droughts. Human impacts also affect riparian vegetation patterns. Human- induced changes include introduction of exotic species, diversion of water for human use, channelization of the river to protect property, and other land use changes that can lead to deterioration of the riparian ecosystem. This study explored the use of remote sensing to map an iconic stretch of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The pre-dam riparian zone in the Grand Canyon was affected by annual floods from spring run-off from the watersheds of Green River, the Colorado River and the San Juan River. A pixel-based vegetation map of the riparian zone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, was produced from high-resolution aerial imagery. The map was calibrated and validated with ground survey data. A seven-step image processing and classification procedure was developed based on a suite of vegetation indices and classification subroutines available in ENVI Image Processing and Analysis software. The result was a quantitative species level vegetation map that could be more accurate than the qualitative, polygon-based maps presently used on the Lower Colorado River. The dominant woody species in the Grand Canyon are now saltcedar, arrowweed and mesquite, reflecting stress-tolerant forms adapted to alternated flow regimes associated with the river regulation.

  2. Mapping Glauconite Unites with Using Remote Sensing Techniques in North East of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadirouhani, R.; Samiee, S.

    2014-10-01

    Glauconite is a greenish ferric-iron silicate mineral with micaceous structure, characteristically formed in shallow marine environments. Glauconite has been used as a pigmentation agent for oil paint, contaminants remover in environmental studies and a source of potassium in plant fertilizers, and other industries. Koppeh-dagh basin is extended in Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan countries and Glauconite units exist in this basin. In this research for enhancing and mapping glauconitic units in Koppeh-dagh structural zone in north east of Iran, remote sensing techniques such as Spectral Angle Mapper classification (SAM), band ratio and band composition methods on SPOT, ASTER and Landsat data in 3 steps were applied.

  3. A New Perspective on Surface Weather Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Steve

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional weather map is actually a physical representation of three-dimensional atmospheric conditions at a specific point in time. Abstract thinking is required to visualize this two-dimensional image in three-dimensional form. But once that visualization is accomplished, many of the meteorological concepts and processes conveyed by the…

  4. Observations of Brine Pool Surface Characteristics and Internal Structure Through Remote Acoustic and Structured Light Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Michel, A.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the surface characteristics and internal structure of deep-sea brine pools are currently limited to discrete in-situ observations. Complementary acoustic and structured light imaging sensors mounted on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) have demonstrated the ability systematically detect variations in surface characteristics of a brine pool, reveal internal stratification and detect areas of active hydrocarbon activity. The presented visual and acoustic sensors combined with a stereo camera pair are mounted on the 4000m rated ROV Hercules (Ocean Exploration Trust). These three independent sensors operate simultaneously from a typical 3m altitude resulting in visual and bathymetric maps with sub-centimeter resolution. Applying this imaging technology to 2014 and 2015 brine pool surveys in the Gulf of Mexico revealed acoustic and visual anomalies due to the density changes inherent in the brine. Such distinct changes in acoustic impedance allowed the high frequency 1350KHz multibeam sonar to detect multiple interfaces. For instance, distinct acoustic reflections were observed at 3m and 5.5m below the vehicle. Subsequent verification using a CDT and lead line indicated the acoustic return from the brine surface was the signal at 3m, while a thicker muddy and more saline interface occurred at 5.5m, the bottom of the brine pool was not located but is assumed to be deeper than 15m. The multibeam is also capable of remotely detecting emitted gas bubbles within the brine pool, indicative of active hydrocarbon seeps. Bubbles associated with these seeps were not consistently visible above the brine while using the HD camera on the ROV. Additionally, while imaging the surface of brine pool the structured light sheet laser became diffuse, refracting across the main interface. Analysis of this refraction combined with varying acoustic returns allow for systematic and remote detection of the density, stratification and activity levels within and

  5. Some examples of the utility of HCMM data in geologic remote sensing. [Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Abrams, M. J.; Alley, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of HCMM (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission) data in geologic remote sensing are presented, and the data set is composed of HCMM and aircraft digital scanner data and ground truth data from four western U.S. test sites. Data are used in the thermal model to test thermal data effectiveness, and changes in temperature with depth and time for dry soils are described by the model. It is found that the HCMM thermal inertia image is useful in the separability of bedrock and alluvium in Death Valley, and aa and pahoehoe flows in the Pisgah basalt flow. In a color composite of HCMM day temperature, night temperature, and day visible images of the Pisgah Crater test site, it is possible to distinguish alluvium, playa, aa and pahoehoe basalt flow, rhyolite intrusives, and other elements. Ground checking of units at a few points will extend capabilities to large areas and assist in creating telegeologic maps.

  6. Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at Microwave Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    This report summarizes research activities and results obtained under grant N000l4-99-1-0627 "Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at...Measurements were completed during April 1999 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts.

  7. Hyperspectral remote sensing for mineral mapping of structural related mineralizations around Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Sandra; Salati, Sanaz; Gloaguen, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Alone or combined with other remote sensing data, hyperspectral mineral mapping can be used to investigate mineralizations and deposits via alteration minerals. Their kind, abundance and spatial distribution can deliver important statements about the occurrence and formation of mineralizations and their relation to structural features. The high spectral and spatial resolution of HyMap data exceeds multispectral data distinctly and makes the recognition of even smaller geological structures possible. The spectral unmixing of single endmembers can be used for the accurate mapping of specific materials or minerals. The support of hyperspectral imaging by spectral data gathered in the field and the analysis of the composition of rock samples can help to determine endmembers and to identify absorption features. This study demonstrates the possibilities and limitations of remote sensing, especially hyperspectral data, for mineral mapping purposes, using the example of the Mount Isa Inlier. This geological area is situated in Northern Queensland, Australia, and is known for its considerable ore deposits and consequent mining of predominantly copper, zinc, lead, silver and gold. Beside hyperspectral HyMap data, multispectral Landsat 8 and SRTM digital elevation data were analyzed. A three-week field study in 2014 supported the investigations. After preprocessing and vegetation masking the data were analyzed using Spectral Feature Fitting (SFF) and Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF) for alteration mineral mapping. The outcomes were combined with results from decorrelation stretch, band ratioing, topographic indices and automated lineament analysis. Additional information was provided by field spectrometer measurements and the XRF and XRD analysis of rock samples. Throughout the study, mineral mapping using remote sensing data, especially hyperspectral data, turned out to deliver high qualitative results when it is supported by additional information. In situ

  8. Mapping and monitoring conifer mortality using remote sensing in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Macomber, S.A.; Woodcock, C.E. )

    1994-12-01

    A prolonged drought in the western US has resulted in alarming levels of mortality in conifer forests. Satellite remote sensing holds the potential for mapping and monitoring the effects of such environmental changes over large geographic areas in a timely manner. Results from the application of a forest canopy reflectance model using multitemporal Landsat TM imagery and field measurements, indicate conifer mortality can be effectively mapped and inventoried. The test area for this project is the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit in the Sierra Nevada of California. The Landsat TM images are from the summers of 1988 and 1991. The Li-Strahler canopy model estimates several forest stand parameters, including tree size and canopy cover for each conifer stand, from reflectance values in satellite imagery. The difference in cover estimates between the dates forms the basis for stratifying stands into mortality classes, which are used as both themes in a map and the basis of the field sampling design. Field measurements from 61 stands collected in the summer of 1992 indicate 15% of the original timber volume in the true fir zone died between 1988 and 1992. The resulting low standard error of 11% for this estimate indicates the utility of these mortality classes for detecting areas of high mortality. Also, the patterns in the estimated mean timber volume loss for each class follow the expected trends. The results of this project are immediately useful for fire hazard management, by providing both estimates of the degree of overall mortality and maps showing its location. They also indicate current remote sensing technology may be useful for monitoring the changes in vegetation that are expected to result from climate change.

  9. Bush Encroachment Mapping for Africa - Multi-Scale Analysis with Remote Sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, V. A. M.; Oldenburg, C.; Dubovyk, O.

    2015-12-01

    Bush encroachment describes a global problem which is especially facing the savanna ecosystem in Africa. Livestock is directly affected by decreasing grasslands and inedible invasive species which defines the process of bush encroachment. For many small scale farmers in developing countries livestock represents a type of insurance in times of crop failure or drought. Among that bush encroachment is also a problem for crop production. Studies on the mapping of bush encroachment so far focus on small scales using high-resolution data and rarely provide information beyond the national level. Therefore a process chain was developed using a multi-scale approach to detect bush encroachment for whole Africa. The bush encroachment map is calibrated with ground truth data provided by experts in Southern, Eastern and Western Africa. By up-scaling location specific information on different levels of remote sensing imagery - 30m with Landsat images and 250m with MODIS data - a map is created showing potential and actual areas of bush encroachment on the African continent and thereby provides an innovative approach to map bush encroachment on the regional scale. A classification approach links location data based on GPS information from experts to the respective pixel in the remote sensing imagery. Supervised classification is used while actual bush encroachment information represents the training samples for the up-scaling. The classification technique is based on Random Forests and regression trees, a machine learning classification approach. Working on multiple scales and with the help of field data an innovative approach can be presented showing areas affected by bush encroachment on the African continent. This information can help to prevent further grassland decrease and identify those regions where land management strategies are of high importance to sustain livestock keeping and thereby also secure livelihoods in rural areas.

  10. Seasonal variation of land surface fluxes in regional scale by using a remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroizumi, T.; Nakamichi, T.; Miura, T.

    2012-12-01

    Land surface fluxes influence the coupling between the surface and the lower atmosphere, and are also important factors for forming a regional climate.In recent years, it became possible to observe the land surface states in the regional area by the development of the remote sensing technology, and some studies for estimating the land surface energy fluxes at regional scale using the remote sensing data have been carried out. In this study, the surface energy fluxes in the Kanto Plain in Japan where various land uses were mixed were estimated using a remote sensing data (Landsat 7 ETM+), and tried the analysis of the seasonal changes in the land surface energy fluxes. The energy balance and the bulk equations were used in order to estimate the land surface energy fluxes. The parameters in those models were identified using the micro-meteorological data observed above the land surface.

  11. Vesta Mineralogy: VIR maps Vesta's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coradina, A.; DeSanctis, M.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, T.; Carraro, F.; Cartacci, M.; Filacchione, G.; Fonte, S.; Magni, G.; Noschese, R.; Tosi, F.; Barucci, A.; Federico, C.; Frigeri, A.; Fulchigoni, M.; Langevin, Y.; Marchi, S.; Palomba, E.; Turrini, D.; McCord, T.; McFadden, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    The Dawn mission will have completed Survey orbit around 4 Vesta by the end of August 2011. We present a preliminary analysis of data acquired by the Visual and InfraRed Spectrometer (VIR) to map Vesta mineralogy. Thermal properties and mineralogical data are combined to provide constraints on Vesta's formation and thermal evolution. delivery of exogenic materials, space weathering processes, and origin of the howardite. eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites.

  12. Interactive remote data processing using Pixelize Wavelet Filtration (PWF-method) and PeriodMap analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert; Nakariakov, Valery; Anfinogentov, Sergey

    Wavelet analysis is suitable for investigating waves and oscillating in solar atmosphere, which are limited in both time and frequency. We have developed an algorithms to detect this waves by use the Pixelize Wavelet Filtration (PWF-method). This method allows to obtain information about the presence of propagating and non-propagating waves in the data observation (cube images), and localize them precisely in time as well in space. We tested the algorithm and found that the results of coronal waves detection are consistent with those obtained by visual inspection. For fast exploration of the data cube, in addition, we applied early-developed Period- Map analysis. This method based on the Fast Fourier Transform and allows on initial stage quickly to look for "hot" regions with the peak harmonic oscillations and determine spatial distribution at the significant harmonics. We propose the detection procedure of coronal waves separate on two parts: at the first part, we apply the PeriodMap analysis (fast preparation) and than, at the second part, use information about spatial distribution of oscillation sources to apply the PWF-method (slow preparation). There are two possible algorithms working with the data: in automatic and hands-on operation mode. Firstly we use multiply PWF analysis as a preparation narrowband maps at frequency subbands multiply two and/or harmonic PWF analysis for separate harmonics in a spectrum. Secondly we manually select necessary spectral subband and temporal interval and than construct narrowband maps. For practical implementation of the proposed methods, we have developed the remote data processing system at Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk. The system based on the data processing server - http://pwf.iszf.irk.ru. The main aim of this resource is calculation in remote access through the local and/or global network (Internet) narrowband maps of wave's sources both in whole spectral band and at significant harmonics. In addition

  13. Protein-surface interaction maps for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-04-05

    In this paper, protein-surface interaction maps were generated by performing coarse-grained protein-surface calculations. This approach allowed for the rapid determination of the protein-surface interaction energies at a range of orientations and distances. Interaction maps of lysozyme indicated that there was a contiguous series of orientations corresponding to several adjacent preferred binding regions on the protein surface. Examination of these orientations provided insight into the residues involved in surface interactions, which qualitatively agreed with the retention data for single-site mutants. Interaction maps of lysozyme single-site mutants were also generated and provided significant insight into why these variants exhibited significant differences in their chromatographic behavior. This approach was also employed to study the binding behavior of CspB and related mutants. The results indicated that, in addition to describing general trends in the data, these maps provided significant insight into retention data of the single-site mutants. In particular, subtle retention trends observed with the K12 and K13 mutants were well-described using this interaction map approach. Finally, the number of interaction points with energies stronger than -2 kcal/mol was shown to be able to semi-quantitatively predict the behavior of most of the mutants. This rapid approach for calculating protein-surface interaction maps is expected to facilitate future method development for separating closely related protein variants in ion-exchange systems.

  14. A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, H. G.; de Pater, I.; Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.; Young, E. F.; Brown, M. E.; Bouchez, A. H.

    2004-06-01

    We present a new map of Titan's surface obtained in the spectral `window' at ~1.6 μm between strong methane absorption. This pre-Cassini view of Titan's surface was created from images obtained using adaptive optics on the W.M. Keck II telescope and is the highest resolution map yet made of Titan's surface. Numerous surface features down to the limits of the spatial resolution (~200-300 km) are apparent. No features are easily identifiable in terms of their geologic origin, although several are likely craters.

  15. The detection and mapping of oil on a marshy area by a remote luminescent sensor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarlane, C.; Watson, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing can be a cost-effective method for monitoring pollutants in large areas such as occur in oil spills. An opportunity to test a particular method arose when a well ruptured and for 23 days spewed a 90-meter fountain of oil into the air, dispersing the oil over a wide area. The method tested was an airborne luminescence detector with a Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) which was flown over the affected area 41 days after the well was capped to obtain a map or the deposition pattern. To calibrate the system, samples of Spartina (wire grass) and Phragmites (common reed) were collected from the contaminated area and the oil residues were eluted in cyclohexane and quantitatively analyzed in a fluorescence photometer. Good correlation was observed between the remote sensor (FLD) and the laboratory analysis. Isopleths defining the deposition pattern of oil were drawn from the remote sensing information. A discussion will be presented on the feasibility of using this instrument for similar contamination incidents for cleanup and damage assessment.

  16. A Map-Reduce-enabled SOLAP cube for large-scale remotely sensed data aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiyuan; Meng, Lingkui; Wang, Frank Z.; Zhang, Wen; Cai, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Spatial On-Line Analytical Processing (SOLAP) is a powerful decision support systems tool for exploring the multidimensional perspective of spatial data. In recent years, remotely sensed data have been integrated into SOLAP cubes, and this improvement has advantages in spatio-temporal analysis for environment monitoring. However, the performance of aggregations in SOLAP still faces a considerable challenge from the large-scale dataset generated by Earth observation. From the perspective of data parallelism, a tile-based SOLAP cube model, the so-called Tile Cube, is presented in this paper. The novel model implements Roll-Up/Drill-Across operations in the SOLAP environment based on Map-Reduce, a popular data-intensive computing paradigm, and improves the throughput and scalability of raster aggregation. Therefore, the long time-series, wide-range and multi-view analysis of remotely sensed data can be processed in a short time. The Tile Cube prototype was built on Hadoop/Hbase, and drought monitoring is used as an example to illustrate the aggregations in the model. The performance testing indicated the model can be scaled along with both the data growth and node growth. It is applicable and natural to integrate the SOLAP cube with Map-Reduce. Factors that influence the performance are also discussed, and the balance of them will be considered in future works to make full use of data locality for model optimisation.

  17. The use of remote sensing imagery for environmental land use and flood hazard mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouat, D. A.; Miller, D. A.; Foster, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    Flood hazard maps have been constructed for Graham, Yuma, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona using remote sensing techniques. Watershed maps of priority areas were selected on the basis of their interest to the county planning staff and represented areas of imminent or ongoing development and those known to be subject to inundation by storm runoff. Landsat color infrared imagery at scales of 1:1,000,000, 1:500,000, and 1:250,000 was used together with high-altitude aerial photography at scales of 1:120,000 and 1:60,000 to determine drainage patterns and erosional features, soil type, and the extent and type of ground cover. The satellite imagery was used in the form of 70 mm chips for enhancement in a color additive viewer and in all available enlargement modes. Field checking served as the main backup to the interpretations. Areas with high susceptibility to flooding were determined with a high level of confidence from the remotely sensed imagery.

  18. Mapping of Muslim Bagh ophiolite complex (Pakistan) using new remote sensing, and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Mahmood, Khalid; Casey, John F.

    2007-04-01

    TETHYS is a relational GIS database that combines geophysical, remote sensing, geochemical, and geochronological data, developed as a flexible resource for studying magmatic and geodynamic responses to continental collisions. In this paper, we demonstrate utility of our database by integrating field, remote sensing, and structural data, for detailed mapping and tectonic emplacement of Muslim Bagh ophiolite of western Pakistan. This ophiolite forms the uppermost part of a nappe pile which accreted onto the Indian continental margin during the closure of the Neo-Tethys during a pre-terminal collision that predated the final closure of Tethys during the major collision between India and Eurasia. Utilizing the TETHYS, Landsat, ASTER imagery, and a digital elevation model developed from the ASTER data are used to characterize the lithology and structure of the area. Use of image processing techniques improved the geologic map of the area, for a better understanding of the tectonic emplacement of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite. For the first time we report that the dikes in the Muslim Bagh ophiolite are cutting the metamorphic sole. Our preliminary geochemical data for sheeted dike complex suggest chemical affinities with arc-related rocks. This observation suggests that dikes were intruded in an island arc environment soon after the ophiolite was formed.

  19. Mapping Surface Features Produced by an Active Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Mario; Gueguen, Erwan; Vennari, Carmela

    2016-10-01

    A large landslide reactivated on December 2013, at Montescaglioso, southern Italy, after 56 hours of rainfall. The landslide disrupted over 500 m of a freeway, involved a few warehouses, a supermarket, and private homes. After the event, it has been performed field surveys, aided by visual analysis of terrestrial and helicopter photographs, to compile a map of the surface deformations. The geomorphological features mapped included single fractures, sets of fractures, tension cracks, trenches, and pressure ridges. In this paper we present the methodology used, the map obtained through the intensive field work, and discuss the main surface features produced by the landslide.

  20. Beyond Flood Hazard Maps: Detailed Flood Characterization with Remote Sensing, GIS and 2d Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, J. R.; Marqueso, J. T.; Makinano-Santillan, M.; Serviano, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Flooding is considered to be one of the most destructive among many natural disasters such that understanding floods and assessing the risks associated to it are becoming more important nowadays. In the Philippines, Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) are two main technologies used in the nationwide modelling and mapping of flood hazards. Although the currently available high resolution flood hazard maps have become very valuable, their use for flood preparedness and mitigation can be maximized by enhancing the layers of information these maps portrays. In this paper, we present an approach based on RS, GIS and two-dimensional (2D) flood modelling to generate new flood layers (in addition to the usual flood depths and hazard layers) that are also very useful in flood disaster management such as flood arrival times, flood velocities, flood duration, flood recession times, and the percentage within a given flood event period a particular location is inundated. The availability of these new layers of flood information are crucial for better decision making before, during, and after occurrence of a flood disaster. The generation of these new flood characteristic layers is illustrated using the Cabadbaran River Basin in Mindanao, Philippines as case study area. It is envisioned that these detailed maps can be considered as additional inputs in flood disaster risk reduction and management in the Philippines.

  1. The Low-Cost UAV-Based Remote Sensing System Capabilities for Large Scale Cadaster Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aries Rokhmana, Catur; Utomo, Susilo

    2016-11-01

    There is at least 190 million hectare of Indonesia's land part area that should be mapped in large scale cadaster maps. The completion of cadaster maps up to scale 1/2500 are still an open problems. The very high resolution images with spatial resolution less than 10cm can be a good choice to be able to see a parcel boundary. The use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle- based remote sensing system can produce aerial photograph with spatial resolution less than 10cm. For keeping UAV-based system low-cost, the system architecture consists of (1) aerial platform from hobby aeromodelling; (2) consumers grade camera sensor; (3) a low-cost GPS logger for ground control survey; (4) an open source structure from motion processing; and (5) an open source GIS software. This system was tested for producing a cadaster base map in a paddy field area at Trimulyo village at Bantul Region. The high resolution image with Ground Sampling Distance up to 7 cm can easily to see a parcel boundary and some of boundary markers. Some of the parcel areas were used for geometric evaluation. The bundle adjustment with 9 Ground Control Points (GCP) shows the error less than 12 cm in all coordinates component. Meanwhile, the percentage of area differences from some parcel samples show less than 5% of differences. In future, the potential use of a GPS kinematic assisted photo flight should be explored in accordance to reduce the need for GCP survey.

  2. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (+/-5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  3. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (plus or minus 5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  4. Minimizing Gaps of Daily Ndvi Map with Geostationary Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Ryu, Y.; Jiang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite based remote sensing has been used to monitor plant phenology. Numerous studies have generally utilized normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to quantify phenological patterns and changes in regional to the global scales. Obtaining the NDVI values during summer in East Asian Monsoon regions is important because most plants grow vigorously in this season. However, satellite derived NDVI data are error prone to clouds during most of the period. Various methods have attempted to reduce the effect of cloud in temporal and spatial NDVI monitoring; the fundamental solution is to have a large data pool that includes multiple images in short period and supplements NDVI values in same period. Multiple images of geostationary satellite in a day can be a method to expand the pool. In this study, we suggest an approach that minimizes data gaps in NDVI of the day through geostationary satellite derived NDVI composition. We acquired data from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) which is a satellite that was launched to monitor ocean around the Korean peninsula, China, Japan and Russia. The satellite observes eight times per day (09:00 - 16:00, every hour) at 500 x 500 m resolution from 2011 to 2015. GOCI red- and near infrared radiance was converted into surface reflectance by using 6S Radiative Transfer Model (6S). We calculated NDVI tiles for each of observed eight tiles per day and made one day NDVI through maximum-value composite method. We evaluated the composite GOCI derived NDVI by comparing with daily MODIS-derived NDVI (composited from MOD09GA and MYD09GA), 16-day Landsat 8-derived NDVI, and in-situ light emitting diode (LED) NDVI measurements at a homogeneous deciduous forest and rice paddy sites. We found that GOCI-derived NDVI maps revealed little data gaps compared to MODIS and Landsat, and GOCI derived NDVI time series were smoother than MODIS derived NDVI time series in summer. GOCI-derived NDVI agreed well with in-situ observations of NDVI

  5. Surface Emissivity Maps for Use in Satellite Retrievals of Longwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate accounting of surface emissivity is essential for the retrievals of surface temperature from remote sensing measurements, and for the computations of longwave (LW) radiation budget of the Earth?s surface. Past studies of the above topics assumed that emissivity for all surface types, and across the entire LW spectrum is equal to unity. There is strong evidence, however, that emissivity of many surface materials is significantly lower than unity, and varies considerably across the LW spectrum. We have developed global maps of surface emissivity for the broadband LW region, the thermal infrared window region (8-12 micron), and 12 narrow LW spectral bands. The 17 surface types defined by the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP) were adopted as such, and an additional (18th) surface type was introduced to represent tundra-like surfaces. Laboratory measurements of spectral reflectances of 10 different surface materials were converted to corresponding emissivities. The 10 surface materials were then associated with 18 surface types. Emissivities for the 18 surface types were first computed for each of the 12 narrow spectral bands. Emissivities for the broadband and the window region were then constituted from the spectral band values by weighting them with Planck function energy distribution.

  6. Mapping surface disturbance from wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2013-04-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing segments of the electricity market and this trend will likely continue as countries strive to reduce CO2 production while meeting growing energy demands. One impact of wind facilities is surface disturbance, including roads, that lead to habitat loss and fragmentation. Numerous studies of wind power utilize estimates of surface disturbance for GIS-based modeling or basic calculations of the land area required to generate energy using wind. However published estimates of the land use required for a MW of electricity from wind facilities vary by more than 10 times (0.83 to 250 MW/Km2). We report results from a geospatial analysis of 39 wind facilities in the United States that we fully digitized using high resolution photo-imagery. The selected sites and analyses were designed to elucidate the effects of turbine size, topography, and land use on the area requirements of wind facilities. The results indicate point estimates of average surface disturbance/MW have wide levels of variation, explained primarily by Landcover and Topography. Wind facilities in agricultural landscapes had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities in forests and shrublands, and facilities in relatively flat topography had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities on hills, ridges, or mesas. Land use, topography, and turbine size all influenced turbine spacing. The statistical models suggest we can predict geographic locations where new wind facilities could be placed with minimized surface disturbance.

  7. Remote estimation of surface pCO2 on the West Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuangling; Hu, Chuanmin; Byrne, Robert H.; Robbins, Lisa L.; Yang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Surface pCO2 data from the West Florida Shelf (WFS) have been collected during 25 cruise surveys between 2003 and 2012. The data were scaled up using remote sensing measurements of surface water properties in order to provide a more nearly synoptic map of pCO2 spatial distributions and describe their temporal variations. This investigation involved extensive tests of various model forms through parsimony and Principal Component Analysis, which led to the development of a multi-variable empirical surface pCO2 model based on concurrent MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) estimates of surface chlorophyll a concentrations (CHL, mg m-3), diffuse light attenuation at 490 nm (Kd_Lee, m-1), and sea surface temperature (SST, °C). Validation using an independent dataset showed a pCO2 Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of <12 μatm and a 0.88 coefficient of determination (R2) for measured and model-predicted pCO2 ranging from 300 to 550 μatm. The model was more sensitive to SST than to CHL and Kd_Lee, with a 1 °C change in SST leading to a 16 μatm change in the predicted pCO2. Application of the model to the entire WFS MODIS time series between 2002 and 2014 showed clear seasonality, with maxima ( 450 μatm) in summer and minima ( 350 μatm) in winter. The seasonality was positively correlated to SST (high in summer and low in winter) and negatively correlated to CHL and Kd_Lee (high in winter and low in summer). Inter-annual variations of pCO2 were consistent with inter-annual variations of SST, CHL, and Kd_Lee. These results suggest that surface water pCO2 of the WFS can be estimated, with known uncertainties, from remote sensing. However, while the general approach of empirical regression may work for waters from other areas of the Gulf of Mexico, model coefficients need to be empirically determined in a similar fashion.

  8. Mapping Invasive Plant Species with a Combination of Field and Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowronek, S.; Feilhauer, H.; Van De Kerchove, R.; Ewald, M.; Aerts, R.; Somers, B.; Warrie, J.; Kempeneers, P.; Lenoir, J.; Honnay, O.; Asner, G. P.; Schmidtlein, S.; Hattab, T.; Rocchini, D.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced hyperspectral and LIDAR data offer a great potential to map and monitor invasive plant species and their impact on ecosystems. These species are often difficult to detect over large areas with traditional mapping approaches. One challenge is the combination of the remote sensing data with the field data for calibration and validation. Therefore, our goals were to (1) develop an approach that allows to efficiently map species invasions based on presence-only data of the target species and remote sensing data; and (2) use this approach to create distribution maps for invasive plant species in two study areas in western Europe, which offer the basis for further analysis of the impact of invasions and to infer possible management options. For this purpose, on the island of Sylt in Northern Germany, we collected vegetation data on 120 plots with a size of 3 m x 3 m with different cover fractions of two invasive plant species; the moss Campylopus introflexus and the shrub Rosa rugosa. In the forest of Compiègne in Northern France, we sampled a total of 50 plots with a size of 25 x 25 m, targeting the invasive tree Prunus serotina. In both study areas, independent validation datasets containing presence and absence points of the target species were collected. Airborne hyperspectral data (APEX), which were simultaneously acquired for both study areas in summer 2014, provided 285 spectral bands covering the visible, near infrared and short-wave infrared region with a pixel size of 1.8 and 3 m. First results showed that mapping using one-class classifiers is possible: For C. introflexus, AUC value was 0.89 and OAC 0.72, for R. rugosa., AUC was 0.93 and OAC 0.92. However, for both species, a few areas were mapped incorrectly. Possible explanations are the different appearances of the target species in different biotope types underrepresented in the calibration data, and a high cover of species with similar reflectance properties.

  9. Biomass Mapping of US forests using synergy of Synthetic Aperture Radar and optical Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Baccini, A.; Bishop, J.; Cartus, O.; Cormier, T.; Walker, W. S.; Santoro, M.

    2011-12-01

    The availability of several national remote sensing datasets with 30 m resolution for ca. year 2000, i.e. the SRTM DEM, the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED), the National Land Cover Dataset 2001 (NLCD 2001) as well as Landsat ETM+ data compiled by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium (MRLC), represented a unique opportunity to produce a baseline canopy height and aboveground biomass map for the US, the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset, NBCD 2000. Differentiation of the SRTM Elevations and NED allowed the estimation of the SRTM phase scattering center height within the forest canopies, which was found to be a key predictor for the actual canopy height as well as for the aboveground biomass of live woody vegetation. Together with topographic information derived from the DEM, the NLCD maps and the Landsat data, the phase scattering center heights were used as spatial predictor layers in RandomForest for predicting canopy height and biomass. Forest survey data provided by the USDA Forest Service FIA program were available under a national Memorandum of Understanding and served as response variables for model development and validation. The production of the canopy height and biomass maps was done on a mapping zone basis in which the conterminous US was split into 66 ecoregionally distinct mapping zones. A bootstrap validation at different spatial scales resulted in biomass retrieval accuracies in terms of the root mean square error, RMSE, of 55 t/ha (at plot level), 19 t/ha (at hexagon level) and 14 t/ha (at county level). In case of canopy height, the RMSE was 3.8 m at plot level. In a follow-on project, we aim at generating regional datasets of changes in carbon stocks between the years 2000 and 2007 for the Northeastern US. In order to update the NBCD biomass map, ALOS PALSAR FBD data for the years 2007/08 were ordered from ASF. For the biomass retrieval with ALOS PALSAR data, we adopted a fully automated retrieval algorithm, presented in

  10. A ground temperature map of the North Atlantic permafrost region based on remote sensing and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, S.; Østby, T.; Gisnås, K.; Schuler, T. V.; Etzelmüller, B.

    2015-02-01

    Permafrost is a key element of the terrestrial cryosphere which makes mapping and monitoring of its state variables an imperative task. We present a modeling scheme based on remotely sensed land surface temperatures and reanalysis products from which mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT) can be derived at a spatial resolution of 1 km on continental scale. The approach explicitly accounts for the uncertainty due to unknown input parameters and their spatial variability at subgrid scale by delivering a range of MAGTs for each grid cell. This is achieved by a simple equilibrium model with only few input parameters which for each grid cell allows scanning the range of possible results by running many realizations with different parameters. The approach is applied to the unglacierized land areas in the North Atlantic region, an area of more than 5 million km2 ranging from the Ural mountains in the East to the Canadian Archipelago in the West. A comparison to in-situ temperature measurements in 143 boreholes suggests a model accuracy better than 2.5 °C, with 139 considered boreholes within this margin. The statistical approach with a large number of realizations facilitates estimating the probability of permafrost occurrence within a grid cell so that each grid cell can be classified as continuous, discontinuous and sporadic permafrost. At its southern margin in Scandinavia and Russia, the transition zone between permafrost and permafrost-free areas extends over several hundred km width with gradually decreasing permafrost probabilities. The study exemplifies the unexploited potential of remotely sensed data sets in permafrost mapping if they are employed in multi-sensor multi-source data fusion approaches.

  11. A ground temperature map of the North Atlantic permafrost region based on remote sensing and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, S.; Østby, T. I.; Gisnås, K.; Schuler, T. V.; Etzelmüller, B.

    2015-06-01

    Permafrost is a key element of the terrestrial cryosphere which makes mapping and monitoring of its state variables an imperative task. We present a modeling scheme based on remotely sensed land surface temperatures and reanalysis products from which mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT) can be derived at a spatial resolution of 1 km at continental scales. The approach explicitly accounts for the uncertainty due to unknown input parameters and their spatial variability at subgrid scale by delivering a range of MAGTs for each grid cell. This is achieved by a simple equilibrium model with only few input parameters which for each grid cell allows scanning the range of possible results by running many realizations with different parameters. The approach is applied to the unglacierized land areas in the North Atlantic region, an area of more than 5 million km2 ranging from the Ural Mountains in the east to the Canadian Archipelago in the west. A comparison to in situ temperature measurements in 143 boreholes suggests a model accuracy better than 2.5 °C, with 139 considered boreholes within this margin. The statistical approach with a large number of realizations facilitates estimating the probability of permafrost occurrence within a grid cell so that each grid cell can be classified as continuous, discontinuous and sporadic permafrost. At its southern margin in Scandinavia and Russia, the transition zone between permafrost and permafrost-free areas extends over several hundred km width with gradually decreasing permafrost probabilities. The study exemplifies the unexploited potential of remotely sensed data sets in permafrost mapping if they are employed in multi-sensor multi-source data fusion approaches.

  12. Mapping Neogene and Quaternary sedimentary deposits in northeastern Brazil by integrating geophysics, remote sensing and geological field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrades-Filho, Clódis de Oliveira; Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Bezerra, Francisco Hilario Rego; Medeiros, Walter Eugênio; Valeriano, Márcio de Morisson; Cremon, Édipo Henrique; Oliveira, Roberto Gusmão de

    2014-12-01

    Neogene and late Quaternary sedimentary deposits corresponding respectively to the Barreiras Formation and Post-Barreiras Sediments are abundant along the Brazilian coast. Such deposits are valuable for reconstructing sea level fluctuations and recording tectonic reactivation along the passive margin of South America. Despite this relevance, much effort remains to be invested in discriminating these units in their various areas of occurrence. The main objective of this work is to develop and test a new methodology for semi-automated mapping of Neogene and late Quaternary sedimentary deposits in northeastern Brazil integrating geophysical and remote sensing data. The central onshore Paraíba Basin was selected due to the recent availability of a detailed map based on the integration of surface and subsurface geological data. We used airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (i.e., potassium-K and thorium-Th concentration) and morphometric data (i.e., relief-dissection, slope and elevation) extracted from the digital elevation model (DEM) generated by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The procedures included: (a) data integration using geographic information systems (GIS); (b) exploratory statistical analyses, including the definition of parameters and thresholds for class discrimination for a set of sample plots; and (c) development and application of a decision-tree classification. Data validation was based on: (i) statistical analysis of geochemical and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data consisting of K and Th concentrations; and (ii) map validation with the support of a confusion matrix, overall accuracy, as well as quantity disagreement and allocation disagreement for accuracy assessment based on field points. The concentration of K successfully separated the sedimentary units of the basin from Precambrian basement rocks. The relief-dissection morphometric variable allowed the discrimination between the Barreiras Formation and the Post-Barreiras Sediments. In

  13. Mapping aboveground woody biomass using forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bechu K V; Nandy, S

    2015-05-01

    Mapping forest biomass is fundamental for estimating CO₂ emissions, and planning and monitoring of forests and ecosystem productivity. The present study attempted to map aboveground woody biomass (AGWB) integrating forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques, viz., direct radiometric relationships (DRR), k-nearest neighbours (k-NN) and cokriging (CoK) and to evaluate their accuracy. A part of the Timli Forest Range of Kalsi Soil and Water Conservation Division, Uttarakhand, India was selected for the present study. Stratified random sampling was used to collect biophysical data from 36 sample plots of 0.1 ha (31.62 m × 31.62 m) size. Species-specific volumetric equations were used for calculating volume and multiplied by specific gravity to get biomass. Three forest-type density classes, viz. 10-40, 40-70 and >70% of Shorea robusta forest and four non-forest classes were delineated using on-screen visual interpretation of IRS P6 LISS-III data of December 2012. The volume in different strata of forest-type density ranged from 189.84 to 484.36 m(3) ha(-1). The total growing stock of the forest was found to be 2,024,652.88 m(3). The AGWB ranged from 143 to 421 Mgha(-1). Spectral bands and vegetation indices were used as independent variables and biomass as dependent variable for DRR, k-NN and CoK. After validation and comparison, k-NN method of Mahalanobis distance (root mean square error (RMSE) = 42.25 Mgha(-1)) was found to be the best method followed by fuzzy distance and Euclidean distance with RMSE of 44.23 and 45.13 Mgha(-1) respectively. DRR was found to be the least accurate method with RMSE of 67.17 Mgha(-1). The study highlighted the potential of integrating of forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques for forest biomass mapping.

  14. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Surface Soil Properties in Alabama Ultisols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dana G.; Shaw, Joey N.; Rickman, Doug; Mask, Paul L.; Luvall, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of surface soil properties via remote sensing could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction and allocation of agrochemicals for precision management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High-resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil organic carbon, particle size distribution, and citrate dithionite extractable iron content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured during sampling. Two methods of analysis were evaluated: 1) multiple linear regression using common spectral band ratios, and 2) partial least squares regression. Our data show that thermal infrared spectra are highly, linearly related to soil organic carbon, sand and clay content. Soil organic carbon content was the most difficult to quantify in these highly weathered systems, where soil organic carbon was generally less than 1.2%. Estimates of sand and clay content were best using partial least squares regression at the Valley site, explaining 42-59% of the variability. In the Coastal Plain, sandy surfaces prone to crusting limited estimates of sand and clay content via partial least squares and regression with common band ratios. Estimates of iron oxide content were a function of mineralogy and best accomplished using specific band ratios, with regression explaining 36-65% of the variability at the Valley and Coastal Plain sites, respectively.

  15. Application of a simple cerebellar model to geologic surface mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagens, A.; Doveton, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Neurophysiological research into the structure and function of the cerebellum has inspired computational models that simulate information processing associated with coordination and motor movement. The cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC) has a design structure which makes it readily applicable as an automated mapping device that "senses" a surface, based on a sample of discrete observations of surface elevation. The model operates as an iterative learning process, where cell weights are continuously modified by feedback to improve surface representation. The storage requirements are substantially less than those of a conventional memory allocation, and the model is extended easily to mapping in multidimensional space, where the memory savings are even greater. ?? 1991.

  16. Compositional Mapping of Europa's Surface with SUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Hand, K. P.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Altobelli, N.; Gruen, E.; Gudipati, M. S.; Schmidt, J.; Zolotov, M. Y.; Tucker, S.; Hoxie, V. C.; Kohnert, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Surface Mass Analyzer (SUDA) measures the composition of ballistic dust particles populating the thin exospheres that were detected around each of the Galilean moons. Since these grains are direct samples from the moons' icy surfaces, unique composition data will be obtained that will help to define and constrain the geological activities on and below the moons' surface. SUDA will make a vital contribution to NASA's mission to Europa and provide key answers to its main scientific questions about the surface composition, habitability, the icy crust, and exchange processes with the deeper interior of the Jovian icy moon Europa. SUDA is a time-of- flight, reflectron-type impact mass spectrometer, optimised for a high mass resolution which only weakly depends on the impact location. The small size, low mass and large sensitive area meet the challenging demands of mission to Europa. A full-size prototype SUDA instrument was built in order to demonstrate its performance through calibration experiments at the dust accelerator at NASA's IMPACT institute at Boulder, CO, with a variety of cosmo-chemically relevant dust analogues. The effective mass resolution of m/Δm of 150-300 is achieved for mass range of interest m = 1-150.

  17. Combined Use of Active and Passive Remote Sensing for Mapping Distribution and Biomass of Coastal Mangroves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, A.; Rahman, A. F.; Warren, M.; Robeson, S. M.; Darusman, T.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing provides a potentially fast, cost-effective, and efficient tool for mapping and monitoring mangroves located in relatively inaccessible areas where field measurements are often difficult and expensive. In this study, we examined the utility of combining Landsat-8 (LDCM), ALOS-PALSAR, and SRTM satellite imagery for mapping mangrove species composition, its canopy height and biomass distribution in the Mimika District of Papua, Indonesia. Image segmentation of ALOS-PALSAR radar data were used to delineate mangrove areas, while flexible statistical expert-based classification of spectral signatures from Landsat-8 (LDCM) images were used to classify mangrove associations. The overall accuracy of mangrove mapping for the entire area was 94.38% with kappa coefficient of 0.94 when validated with field data and QuickBird image data with 2.44 m spatial resolution. Mangrove height and biomass were mapped using the SRTM-based elevation, which were calibrated with field-measured canopy height via regression models. There was a strong linear relationship between the SRTM data and field-measured vegetation height (r = 0.87 and adjusted R2 = 0.76). A bootstrap simulation of 10,000 runs with replacement resulted in an error of 3.03 m (RMSE) and 2.33 m (MAE) for mean tree height over 30 m pixels. SRTM-derived canopy height and plot-level biomass from the 22 mangrove plots showed a strong non-linear relationship with an R2=0.75. Our results showed that mangrove standing biomass in the Mimika District varies from 70.32 Mg/ha to 511.80 Mg/ha with mean biomass error of 65.23 Mg/ha (RMSE) and 58.10 Mg/ha (MAE) over a pixel of 90 m. This study explored a set of reliable methodologies which can be applied for mapping and monitoring mangrove dynamics of large areas in Indonesia.

  18. Integration of remote sensing and radiometric data set to improve geologic map : application to namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, C.; Ledru, P.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Wackerle, R.

    2003-04-01

    Remote sensing and radiometric data sets have been processed and interpreted in order to improve the existing geologic map, on the Southern margin of the Damara orogen (Namibia, northern margin of the Nama marine sedimentary sequence). The data set is composed by ASTER images (multi spectral imaging system), Digital Elevation Model (DEM, 50-m gridding), and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data (K, eTh and eU, 50-m gridding). Apparent reflectance images have been first calculated from raw ASTER data. Terrain illumination effects have been then removed using slope and aspect data calculated from the DEM, by applying a first order reflectance law. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been realized on the ASTER data in order to reduce the redundancy in highly correlated bands. Results of PCA and supervised classification, combining radioelement contents enable a revision of the geologic map. A precise mapping of the internal structure of the Nama quartzite, limestone and dolomite is performed while several types of surficial formations are characterized. The Omkyk Member Massif, hosting the oldest Proterozoic biomineralized metazoan on Earth, is well contrasted in reflectance and display a complete depletion in radioelements, that is unique in the studied zone.

  19. Urban Mapping and Growth Prediction using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques, Pune, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, V.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to map the urban area in and around Pune region between the year 1991 and 2010, and predict its probable future growth using remote sensing and GIS techniques. The Landsat TM and ETM+ satellite images of 1991, 2001 and 2010 were used for analyzing urban land use class. Urban class was extracted / mapped using supervised classification technique with maximum likelihood classifier. The accuracy assessment was carried out for classified maps. The achieved overall accuracy and Kappa statistics were 86.33 % & 0.76 respectively. Transition probability matrix and area change were obtained using different classified images. A plug-in was developed in QGIS software (open source) based on Markov Chain model algorithm for predicting probable urban growth for the future year 2021. Based on available data set, the result shows that urban area is expected to grow much higher in the year 2021 when compared to 2010. This study provides an insight into understanding of urban growth and aids in subsequent infrastructure planning, management and decision-making.

  20. Landslide susceptibility mapping using GIS-based statistical models and Remote sensing data in tropical environment

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Mazlan

    2015-01-01

    This research presents the results of the GIS-based statistical models for generation of landslide susceptibility mapping using geographic information system (GIS) and remote-sensing data for Cameron Highlands area in Malaysia. Ten factors including slope, aspect, soil, lithology, NDVI, land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from SAR data, SPOT 5 and WorldView-1 images. The relationships between the detected landslide locations and these ten related factors were identified by using GIS-based statistical models including analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) models. The landslide inventory map which has a total of 92 landslide locations was created based on numerous resources such as digital aerial photographs, AIRSAR data, WorldView-1 images, and field surveys. Then, 80% of the landslide inventory was used for training the statistical models and the remaining 20% was used for validation purpose. The validation results using the Relative landslide density index (R-index) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) demonstrated that the SMCE model (accuracy is 96%) is better in prediction than AHP (accuracy is 91%) and WLC (accuracy is 89%) models. These landslide susceptibility maps would be useful for hazard mitigation purpose and regional planning. PMID:25898919

  1. Landslide susceptibility mapping using GIS-based statistical models and Remote sensing data in tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Himan; Hashim, Mazlan

    2015-04-22

    This research presents the results of the GIS-based statistical models for generation of landslide susceptibility mapping using geographic information system (GIS) and remote-sensing data for Cameron Highlands area in Malaysia. Ten factors including slope, aspect, soil, lithology, NDVI, land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from SAR data, SPOT 5 and WorldView-1 images. The relationships between the detected landslide locations and these ten related factors were identified by using GIS-based statistical models including analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) models. The landslide inventory map which has a total of 92 landslide locations was created based on numerous resources such as digital aerial photographs, AIRSAR data, WorldView-1 images, and field surveys. Then, 80% of the landslide inventory was used for training the statistical models and the remaining 20% was used for validation purpose. The validation results using the Relative landslide density index (R-index) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) demonstrated that the SMCE model (accuracy is 96%) is better in prediction than AHP (accuracy is 91%) and WLC (accuracy is 89%) models. These landslide susceptibility maps would be useful for hazard mitigation purpose and regional planning.

  2. Extracting temporal and spatial information from remotely sensed data for mapping wildlife habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Cynthia S. A.

    The research accomplished in this dissertation used both mathematical and statistical techniques to extract and evaluate measures of landscape temporal dynamics and spatial structure from remotely sensed data for the purpose of mapping wildlife habitat. By coupling the landscape measures gleaned from the remotely sensed data with various sets of animal sightings and population data, effective models of habitat preference were created. Measures of temporal dynamics of vegetation greenness as measured by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite were used to effectively characterize and map season specific habitat of the Sonoran pronghorn antelope, as well as produce preliminary models of potential yellow-billed cuckoo habitat in Arizona. Various measures that capture different aspects of the temporal dynamics of the landscape were derived from AVHRR Normalized Difference Vegetation Index composite data using three main classes of calculations: basic statistics, standardized principal components analysis, and Fourier analysis. Pronghorn habitat models based on the AVHRR measures correspond visually and statistically to GIS-based models produced using data that represent detailed knowledge of ground-condition. Measures of temporal dynamics also revealed statistically significant correlations with annual estimates of elk population in selected Arizona Game Management Units, suggesting elk respond to regional environmental changes that can be measured using satellite data. Such relationships, once verified and established, can be used to help indirectly monitor the population. Measures of landscape spatial structure derived from IKONOS high spatial resolution (1-m) satellite data using geostatistics effectively map details of Sonoran pronghorn antelope habitat. Local estimates of the nugget, sill, and range variogram parameters calculated within 25 x 25-meter image windows describe the spatial

  3. Extracting temporal and spatial information from remotely sensed data for mapping wildlife habitat: Tucson

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Advised by Marsh, Stuart E.

    2002-01-01

    The research accomplished in this dissertation used both mathematical and statistical techniques to extract and evaluate measures of landscape temporal dynamics and spatial structure from remotely sensed data for the purpose of mapping wildlife habitat. By coupling the landscape measures gleaned from the remotely sensed data with various sets of animal sightings and population data, effective models of habitat preference were created.Measures of temporal dynamics of vegetation greenness as measured by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite were used to effectively characterize and map season specific habitat of the Sonoran pronghorn antelope, as well as produce preliminary models of potential yellow-billed cuckoo habitat in Arizona. Various measures that capture different aspects of the temporal dynamics of the landscape were derived from AVHRR Normalized Difference Vegetation Index composite data using three main classes of calculations: basic statistics, standardized principal components analysis, and Fourier analysis. Pronghorn habitat models based on the AVHRR measures correspond visually and statistically to GIS-based models produced using data that represent detailed knowledge of ground-condition.Measures of temporal dynamics also revealed statistically significant correlations with annual estimates of elk population in selected Arizona Game Management Units, suggesting elk respond to regional environmental changes that can be measured using satellite data. Such relationships, once verified and established, can be used to help indirectly monitor the population.Measures of landscape spatial structure derived from IKONOS high spatial resolution (1-m) satellite data using geostatistics effectively map details of Sonoran pronghorn antelope habitat. Local estimates of the nugget, sill, and range variogram parameters calculated within 25 x 25-meter image windows describe the spatial

  4. Expading fluvial remote sensing to the riverscape: Mapping depth and grain size on the Merced River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Ryan T.

    This study builds upon recent research in the field of fluvial remote sensing by applying techniques for mapping physical attributes of rivers. Depth, velocity, and grain size are primary controls on the types of habitat present in fluvial ecosystems. This thesis focuses on expanding fluvial remote sensing to larger spatial extents and sub-meter resolutions, which will increase our ability to capture the spatial heterogeneity of habitat at a resolution relevant to individual salmonids and an extent relevant to species. This thesis consists of two chapters, one focusing on expanding the spatial extent over which depth can be mapped using Optimal Band Ratio Analysis (OBRA) and the other developing general relations for mapping grain size from three-dimensional topographic point clouds. The two chapters are independent but connected by the overarching goal of providing scientists and managers more useful tools for quantifying the amount and quality of salmonid habitat via remote sensing. The OBRA chapter highlights the true power of remote sensing to map depths from hyperspectral images as a central component of watershed scale analysis, while also acknowledging the great challenges involved with increasing spatial extent. The grain size mapping chapter establishes the first general relations for mapping grain size from roughness using point clouds. These relations will significantly reduce the time needed in the field by eliminating the need for independent measurements of grain size for calibrating the roughness-grain size relationship and thus making grain size mapping with SFM more cost effective for river restoration and monitoring. More data from future studies are needed to refine these relations and establish their validity and generality. In conclusion, this study adds to the rapidly growing field of fluvial remote sensing and could facilitate river research and restoration.

  5. AVIRIS Land-Surface Mapping in Support of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Gamon, John; Keightley, Keir; Prentiss, Dylan; Reith, Ernest; Green, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A key scientific objective of the original Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) field campaign (1993-1996) was to obtain the baseline data required for modeling and predicting fluxes of energy, mass, and trace gases in the boreal forest biome. These data sets are necessary to determine the sensitivity of the boreal forest biome to potential climatic changes and potential biophysical feedbacks on climate. A considerable volume of remotely-sensed and supporting field data were acquired by numerous researchers to meet this objective. By design, remote sensing and modeling were considered critical components for scaling efforts, extending point measurements from flux towers and field sites over larger spatial and longer temporal scales. A major focus of the BOREAS follow-on program is concerned with integrating the diverse remotely sensed and ground-based data sets to address specific questions such as carbon dynamics at local to regional scales. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has the potential of contributing to BOREAS through: (1) accurate retrieved apparent surface reflectance; (2) improved landcover classification; and (3) direct assessment of biochemical/biophysical information such as canopy liquid water and chlorophyll concentration through pigment fits. In this paper, we present initial products for major flux tower sites including: (1) surface reflectance of dominant cover types; (2) a land-cover classification developed using spectral mixture analysis (SMA) and Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA); and (3) liquid water maps. Our goal is to compare these land-cover maps to existing maps and to incorporate AVIRIS image products into models of photosynthetic flux.

  6. Exploiting Surface Albedos Products to Bridge the Gap Between Remote Sensing Information and Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, Bernard; Andredakis, Ioannis; Clerici, Marco; Kaminski, Thomas; Taberner, Malcolm; Stephen, Plummer

    2011-01-01

    We present results from the application of an inversion method conducted using MODIS derived broadband visible and near-infrared surface albedo products. This contribution is an extension of earlier efforts to optimally retrieve land surface fluxes and associated two- stream model parameters based on the Joint Research Centre Two-stream Inversion Package (JRC-TIP). The discussion focuses on products (based on the mean and one-sigma values of the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs)) obtained during the summer and winter and highlight specific issues related to snowy conditions. This paper discusses the retrieved model parameters including the effective Leaf Area Index (LAI), the background brightness and the scattering efficiency of the vegetation elements. The spatial and seasonal changes exhibited by these parameters agree with common knowledge and underscore the richness of the high quality surface albedo data sets. At the same time, the opportunity to generate global maps of new products, such as the background albedo, underscores the advantages of using state of the art algorithmic approaches capable of fully exploiting accurate satellite remote sensing datasets. The detailed analyses of the retrieval uncertainties highlight the central role and contribution of the LAI, the main process parameter to interpret radiation transfer observations over vegetated surfaces. The posterior covariance matrix of the uncertainties is further exploited to quantify the knowledge gain from the ingestion of MODIS surface albedo products. The estimation of the radiation fluxes that are absorbed, transmitted and scattered by the vegetation layer and its background is achieved on the basis of the retrieved PDFs of the model parameters. The propagation of uncertainties from the observations to the model parameters is achieved via the Hessian of the cost function and yields a covariance matrix of posterior parameter uncertainties. This matrix is propagated to the radiation

  7. Mapping agricultural phenology using repetitive optical remote sensing over a peri-urban region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, Nicolas; Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Dragoi, Mihaela; Maignan, Fabienne; Ottlé, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the potential of multi-temporal optical remote sensing, with high revisit frequency, to derive missing information on agricultural practices necessary to model soil organic carbon content, over the agricultural lands in the Versailles plain in the western Paris suburbs. This study comes besides past and ongoing studies on the use of radar and high spatial resolution optical remote sensing to monitor agricultural practices in this study area (e.g. Vaudour et al. 2014). Agricultural statistics, such as the Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS) for France, permit to know the nature of annual crops for each digitized declared field of this land parcel registry. However, within each declared field, several cropped plots and a diversity of practices may exist, being marked by agricultural rotations which vary both spatially and temporally within it and differ from one year to the other. Very high spatial resolution Pléiades satellite data has allowed delineating crops plots, and identifying crops within declared fields, revealing this fine spatial crop pattern. Here we evaluate the potential of high observation frequency remote sensing to differentiate seasonal crops (e.g. winter barley from spring barley) and to evaluate key phenological moments. In particular, in addition to a dataset of field observations, we use three datasets at three complementary spatial resolutions: the CNES SPOT4-TAKE5 at ten meters in the 2013 winter and spring, the Landsat data at 30m, and the large-swath PROBA-V central camera data at 100m available since May 2013. The analysis of each dataset is done first on a pixel-based approach and second on a within-plot approach on the basis of the above described crop map. This work is carried out in the framework of the CNES TOSCA-PLEIADES-CO of the French Space Agency.

  8. Road pavement condition mapping and assessment using remote sensing data based on MESMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Zhang, X.; Jin, X.; Yu, H.; Rao, J.; Tian, S.; Luo, L.; Li, C.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing can be used to monitor changes of asphalt pavement condition because of the spectral change of aged asphalt material. However, owing to coarse spatial resolution of images and the limited width of roads ambient land cover types (e.g. vegetation, buildings, and soil) affect the spectral signal and add significant variability and uncertainty to analysis of road conditions. To overcome this problem, Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) was tested to map asphalt pavement condition using WorldView-2 satellite imagery with eight bands spanning from visible to near infrared. Results indicated that MESMA run in a three-endmember model models mixed-pavement pixels well with a low average RMSE (0.01).

  9. Mapping radioactivity in groundwater to identify elevated exposure in remote and rural communities.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Ross; Black, Jeffrey; Akber, Riaz

    2011-03-01

    A survey of radioactivity in groundwater (110 sites) was conducted as a precursor to providing a baseline of radiation exposure in rural and remote communities in Queensland, Australia, that may be impacted upon by exposure pathways associated with the supply, treatment, use and wastewater treatment of the resource. Radionuclides in groundwater, including ²³⁸U, ²²⁶Ra, ²²²Rn, ²²⁸Ra, ²²⁴Ra and ⁴⁰K were measured and found to contain activity concentration levels of up to 0.71 BqL⁻¹, 0.96 BqL⁻¹, 108 BqL⁻¹, 2.8 BqL⁻¹, 0.11 BqL⁻¹ and 0.19 BqL⁻¹ respectively. Activity concentration results were classified by aquifer lithology, showing correlation between increased radium isotope concentration and basic volcanic host rock. The groundwater survey and mapping results were further assessed using an investigation assessment tool to identify seven remote or rural communities that may require additional radiation dose assessment beyond that attributed to ingestion of potable water.

  10. Mapping dustfall distribution in urban areas using remote sensing and ground spectral data.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Zhao, Wenji; Luo, Nana

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this study was to utilize remote sensing and ground-based spectral data to assess dustfall distribution in urban areas. The ground-based spectral data denoted that dust has a significant impact on spectral features. Dusty leaves have an obviously lower reflectance than clean leaves in the near-infrared bands (780-1,300 nm). The correlation analysis between dustfall weight and spectral reflectance showed that spectroscopy in the 350-2,500-nm region produced useful dust information and could assist in dust weight estimation. A back propagation (BP) neutral network model was generated using spectral response functions and integrated remote sensing data to assess dustfall weight in the city of Beijing. Compared with actual dustfall weight, validation of the results showed a satisfactory accuracy with a lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 3.6g/m(2). The derived dustfall distribution in Beijing indicated that dustfall was easily accumulated and increased in the south of the city. In addition, our results showed that construction sites and low-rise buildings with inappropriate land use were two main sources of dust pollution. This study offers a low-cost and effective method for investigating detailed dustfall in an urban environment. Environmental authorities may use this method for deriving dustfall distribution maps and pinpointing the sources of pollutants in urban areas.

  11. Integration of diverse remote sensing data sets for geologic mapping and resource exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Dietz, John B.

    1991-01-01

    The use of high-quality multispectral images in the visible, near-infrared, shortwave infrared, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of the spectrum for producing thematic maps showing details of the surface geology is reported. The airborne data sets used in the study include the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner, and the airborne SAR. Ancillary data include a digital elevation model, National High Altitude Photography, Landsat Multispectral Scanner data, Landsat Thematic Mapper data, laboratory and field spectral measurements, and traditional geologic mapping. The integrated, multispectral images are shown to provide new geologic information that can be used in mineral deposit models to provide exploration targets.

  12. Investigations in vegetation map rectification, and the remotely sensed detection and measurement of natural vegetation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard Eugene

    2000-10-01

    As projected climate changes loom, the monitoring of the response of natural vegetation becomes important for both science and management. Successful monitoring requires good baseline information and vegetation change detection techniques. The research reported here involved three main tasks: (1) digital geometric rectification of a detailed historic vegetation map; (2) an analysis of high spatial resolution airborne remote sensing data for tree mortality; and (3) the development of a Landsat Thematic Mapper-based vegetation change detection procedure. These studies focused on the Sierra Nevada of California, and in particular Yosemite National Park. The Vegetation Type Maps (VTMs) (Wieslander 1935) represent some of the finest maps of their kind in the world, and cover more than 40% of California. Yosemite National Park was mapped using these techniques in the late 1930s. Geometric inaccuracies in the 19th century USGS basemaps were mitigated using newly available GIS and remote sensing tools, enabling the rectified VTMs, to be integrated into the National Park's vegetation monitoring work. In 1992, several transects of a four-band high spatial resolution airborne scanner (ADAR) were taken of mid-elevation forests in the southern Sierra Nevada, to evaluate their use for tree mortality monitoring. This analysis highlighted the difficulty of using single-date imagery for monitoring vegetation changes, but showed (1) the best measure of tree mortality (when compared with field data) was found using solely the red wavelength band; and (2) the metric most highly correlated with the field data was relative canopy mortality (%), not absolute area (ha). Lastly, based upon Principal Components Analysis, I developed an algorithm for separating spectral changes resulting from vegetation changes on the ground from other changes present but not of concern to monitoring. Three vectors were derived using 6 of 7 Thematic Mapper bands. Although few published change detection

  13. LAnd surface remote sensing Products VAlidation System (LAPVAS) and its preliminary application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xingwen; Wen, Jianguang; Tang, Yong; Ma, Mingguo; Dou, Baocheng; Wu, Xiaodan; Meng, Lumin

    2014-11-01

    The long term record of remote sensing product shows the land surface parameters with spatial and temporal change to support regional and global scientific research widely. Remote sensing product with different sensors and different algorithms is necessary to be validated to ensure the high quality remote sensing product. Investigation about the remote sensing product validation shows that it is a complex processing both the quality of in-situ data requirement and method of precision assessment. A comprehensive validation should be needed with long time series and multiple land surface types. So a system named as land surface remote sensing product is designed in this paper to assess the uncertainty information of the remote sensing products based on a amount of in situ data and the validation techniques. The designed validation system platform consists of three parts: Validation databases Precision analysis subsystem, Inter-external interface of system. These three parts are built by some essential service modules, such as Data-Read service modules, Data-Insert service modules, Data-Associated service modules, Precision-Analysis service modules, Scale-Change service modules and so on. To run the validation system platform, users could order these service modules and choreograph them by the user interactive and then compete the validation tasks of remote sensing products (such as LAI ,ALBEDO ,VI etc.) . Taking SOA-based architecture as the framework of this system. The benefit of this architecture is the good service modules which could be independent of any development environment by standards such as the Web-Service Description Language(WSDL). The standard language: C++ and java will used as the primary programming language to create service modules. One of the key land surface parameter, albedo, is selected as an example of the system application. It is illustrated that the LAPVAS has a good performance to implement the land surface remote sensing product

  14. Mapping Glacial Weathering Processes with Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing: A Case Study at Robertson Glacier, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Christensen, P. R.; Shock, E.; Canovas, P. A., III

    2014-12-01

    Geologic weathering processes in cold environments, especially subglacial chemical processes acting on rock and sediment, are not well characterized due to the difficulty of accessing these environments. Glacial weathering of geologic materials contributes to the solute flux in meltwater and provides a potential source of energy to chemotrophic microbes, and is thus an important component to understand. In this study, we use Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data to map the extent of glacial weathering in the front range of the Canadian Rockies using remotely detected infrared spectra. We ground-truth our observations using laboratory infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and geochemical analyses of field samples. The major goals of the project are to quantify weathering inputs to the glacial energy budget, and to link in situ sampling with remote sensing capabilities. Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada is an excellent field site for this technique as it is easily accessible and its retreating stage allows sampling of fresh subglacial and englacial sediments. Infrared imagery of the region was collected with the ASTER satellite instrument. At that same time, samples of glacially altered rock and sediments were collected on a downstream transect of the glacier and outwash plain. Infrared laboratory spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to determine the composition and abundance of minerals present. Geochemical data were also collected at each location, and ice and water samples were analyzed for major and minor elements. Our initial conclusion is that the majority of the weathering seems to be occurring at the glacier-rock interface rather than in the outwash stream. Results from both laboratory and ASTER data indicate the presence of leached weathering rinds. A general trend of decreasing carbonate abundances with elevation (i.e. residence time in ice) is observed, which is consistent with increasing calcium ion

  15. Remote mapping of river bathymetry from publicly available multispectral image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Remote sensing could facilitate efficient characterization of river systems for research and management purposes, provided that suitable image data are available and that the information derived therefrom is reliable. This study evaluated the utility of public domain multispectral images for estimating flow depths in a small stream and a larger gravel-bed river, using data acquired through a task-oriented consortium and the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). Field measurements were used to calibrate image-derived quantities to observed depths and to assess depth retrieval accuracy. A band ratio-based algorithm yielded coherent, hydraulically reasonable bathymetric maps for both field sites and three different types of image data. Applying a spatial filter reduced image noise and improved depth retrieval performance, with a strong calibration relationship (R2 = 0.68) and an observed (field-surveyed) vs. predicted (image-derived) R2 of 0.6 for tasked images of the smaller stream. The NAIP data were less useful in this environment due to geo-referencing errors and a coarser spatial resolution. On the larger river, NAIP-derived bathymetry was more accurate, with an observed vs. predicted R2 value of 0.64 for a compressed county mosaic easily accessible via the internet. Comparison of remotely sensed bathymetric maps with field surveys indicated that although the locations of pools were determined accurately, their full depth could not be detected due to limited sensor radiometric resolution. Although a number of other constraints also must be considered, such as the need for local calibration data, depth retrieval from publicly available image data is feasible under appropriate conditions.

  16. Mapping of groundwater potential zones across Ghana using remote sensing, geographic information systems, and spatial modeling.

    PubMed

    Gumma, Murali Krishna; Pavelic, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater development across much of sub-Saharan Africa is constrained by a lack of knowledge on the suitability of aquifers for borehole construction. The main objective of this study was to map groundwater potential at the country-scale for Ghana to identify locations for developing new supplies that could be used for a range of purposes. Groundwater potential zones were delineated using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) techniques drawing from a database that includes climate, geology, and satellite data. Subjective scores and weights were assigned to each of seven key spatial data layers and integrated to identify groundwater potential according to five categories ranging from very good to very poor derived from the total percentage score. From this analysis, areas of very good groundwater potential are estimated to cover 689,680 ha (2.9 % of the country), good potential 5,158,955 ha (21.6 %), moderate potential 10,898,140 ha (45.6 %), and poor/very poor potential 7,167,713 ha (30 %). The results were independently tested against borehole yield data (2,650 measurements) which conformed to the anticipated trend between groundwater potential and borehole yield. The satisfactory delineation of groundwater potential zones through spatial modeling suggests that groundwater development should first focus on areas of the highest potential. This study demonstrates the importance of remote sensing and GIS techniques in mapping groundwater potential at the country-scale and suggests that similar methods could be applied across other African countries and regions.

  17. Mapping and Quantifying Surface Charges on Clay Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Gaikwad, Ravi; Hande, Aharnish; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas

    2015-09-29

    Understanding the electrical properties of clay nanoparticles is very important since they play a crucial role in every aspect of oil sands processing, from bitumen extraction to sedimentation in mature fine tailings (MFT). Here, we report the direct mapping and quantification of surface charges on clay nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The morphology of clean kaolinite clay nanoparticles shows a layered structure, while the corresponding surface potential map shows a layer-dependent charge distribution. More importantly, a surface charge density of 25 nC/cm(2) was estimated for clean kaolinite layers by using EFM measurements. On the other hand, the EFM measurements show that the clay particles obtained from the tailings demonstrate a reduced surface charge density of 7 nC/cm(2), which may be possibly attributed to the presence of various bituminous compounds residing on the clay surfaces.

  18. Rice Area Inter Annual Variation through a Remote Sensing Based Mapping Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshorbagy, A. M.; Imam, E. H.; Nour, M. H.

    2013-10-01

    Rice is the main water-consuming crop planted in Egypt Delta. Constrained with the limited water resources, mapping rice is essential for any better water resources management. Xiao (2005) developed an algorithm for rice mapping by studying the dynamics of three vegetation indices the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and the Land surface water index (LSWI). Rice main differentiating feature is being planted in flooded land. Thus moisture sensitive index like LSWI will temporally exceed the EVI or the NDVI signalling rice transplanting. Xiao (2005) utilized MODIS free satellite imagery (500 m spatial resolution). However its coarse resolution combined with the Egyptian complex landscape raised the need for the algorithm modification. In this piece of work a low - cost rice mapping algorithm was developed. The multi resolution (MODIS 250 m red and near infrared bands) and (MODIS 500 m - shortwave infrared and blue bands) were utilized. The arable land was mapped through the utilization of the NDVI and applying it on MODIS 250 m (fine spatial resolution) scenes. The MODIS fine temporal resolution (MOD09A1 product) was utilized to study the LSWI, NDVI and EVI dynamics throughout the rice planting season. The non-arable land from MODIS 250 m was then used to refine the rice area calculated from the MODIS 500 m imagery. The algorithm was applied on the Egypt delta region in years 2008, 2009, and 2010. The mapped rice areas were enhanced from the MODIS 250 m arable mapping module and the results of the algorithm were validated against annual areas reports. There was good agreement between the estimated areas from the algorithm and the reports. Inter annual variation in rice areas was successfully mapped. In addition, the rice area and probable transplanting dates conforms to local planting practices. The findings of this study indicate that the algorithm can be used for rice mapping on a timely and frequent manner.

  19. Mapping Near-Surface Salinization Using Long-wavelength AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffery G.

    2003-01-01

    In May 1999, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory acquired airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) data over the Hatchel and Montague Test Sites in Texas. We analyzed P- and L-band polarimetric radar data from these AIRSAR missions to assess whether AIRSAR could be used as a rapid and remote platform for screening large areas at risk for near-surface soil and water salinization. Ongoing geological, geophysical, and hydrological studies at the Hatchel Test Site in Runnels County and the Montague Test Site in Montague County have demonstrated the utility of high-resolution airborne electromagnetic (EM) induction in mapping electrical conductivity changes that accompany shallow natural and oil-field related salinization at these sites in the Colorado and Red River basins. We compared AIRSAR and airborne EM data quantitatively by (1) selecting representative flight lines from airborne EM surveys of the Hatchel and Montague sites, (2) extracting measurement locations and apparent conductivities at the highest available EM frequency, (3) identifying and extracting all P- and L-band backscatter intensities for all locations within 5 m of an airborne EM measurement, and (4) examining the spatial and magnitude relationships between apparent conductivity and all radar polarization and polarization-ratio combinations. For both test sites, backscatter intensity in all individual P- and L-band polarizations was slightly negatively correlated with apparent conductivity. In most modes this was manifested as a decrease in the range and magnitude of backscatter intensity as apparent conductivity increased. Select single-band and cross-band polarization ratios exhibited somewhat higher correlation with apparent conductivity by partly diminishing the dominance of the vegetation contribution to V backscatter intensity. The highest correlation with conductivity was obtained using the L-band vertical- to cross-polarization ratio, the P-band vertical- to L-band cross-polarization ratio

  20. 43 CFR 3931.60 - Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maps of underground and surface mine... § 3931.60 Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations. Maps of.... All maps must be appropriately marked with reference to government land marks or lines and...

  1. 43 CFR 3931.60 - Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maps of underground and surface mine... § 3931.60 Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations. Maps of.... All maps must be appropriately marked with reference to government land marks or lines and...

  2. 43 CFR 3931.60 - Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maps of underground and surface mine... § 3931.60 Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations. Maps of.... All maps must be appropriately marked with reference to government land marks or lines and...

  3. Demonstration of centimeter-level precision, swath mapping, full-waveform laser altimetry from high altitude on the Global Hawk UAV for future application to cryospheric remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Wake, S.; Rabine, D.; Hofton, M. A.; Mitchell, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Land Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) is a high-altitude, wide-swath laser altimeter that has, for over 15 years, demonstrated state-of-the-art performance in surface altimetry, including many aspects of remote sensing of the cryosphere such as precise topography of ice sheets and sea ice. NASA Goddard, in cooperation with NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO), has developed a new, more capable sensor that can operate autonomously from a high-altitude UAV aircraft to further enhance the LVIS capability and extend its reach and coverage. In June 2012, this latest sensor, known as LVIS-GH, was integrated onto NASA's Global Hawk aircraft and completed a successful high-altitude demonstration flight over Death Valley, Owens Valley, and the Sierra Nevada region of California. Data were collected over a wide variety of terrain types from 58,000' (> 17 km) altitude during the 6 hour long test flight. The full-waveform laser altimetry technique employed by LVIS and LVIS-GH provides precise surface topography measurements for solid earth and cryospheric applications and captures the vertical structure of forests in support of territorial ecology studies. LVIS-GH fully illuminates and maps a 4 km swath and provides cm-level range precision, as demonstrated in laboratory and horizontal range testing, as well as during this test flight. The cm range precision is notable as it applies to accurate measurements of sea ice freeboard and change detection of subtle surface deformation such as heaving in permafrost areas. In recent years, LVIS has primarily supported Operation IceBridge activities, including deployments to the Arctic and Antarctic on manned aircraft such as the NASA DC-8 and P-3. The LVIS-GH sensor provides an major upgrade of coverage capability and remote access; LVIS-GH operating on the long-duration Global Hawk aircraft can map up to 50,000 km^2 in a single flight and can provide access to remote regions such as the entirety of Antarctica. Future

  4. Mapping Alteration Caused by Hydrocarbon Microseepages in Patrick Draw area Southwest Wyoming Using Image Spectroscopy and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Shuhab D. Khan

    2008-06-21

    Detection of underlying reservoir accumulations using remote sensing techniques had its inception with the identification of macroseeps. However, today we find ourselves relying on the detection of more subtle characteristics associated with petroleum reservoirs, such as microseeps. Microseepages are the result of vertical movement of light hydrocarbons from the reservoir to the surface through networks of fractures, faults, and bedding planes that provide permeable routes within the overlying rock. Microseepages express themselves at the surface in an array of alterations and anomalies, such as chemical or mineralogical changes in overlying soils and sediments. Using NASA's Hyperion hyperspectral imaging sensors, this project has developed spectral and geochemical ground truthing techniques to identify and map alterations caused by hydrocarbon microseepages and to determine their relationships to the underlying geology in the Patrick Draw area of Southwest Wyoming. Training the classification of satellite imagery with spectral inputs of samples collected over previously defined areas of hydrocarbon microseepage resulted in the successful identification of an anomalous zone. Geochemical characteristics of samples that defined this anomalous zone were then compared to the remaining non-anomalous samples using XRD, ICP, spectroscopy and carbon isotope techniques.

  5. Mapping Tamarix: New techniques for field measurements, spatial modeling and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelista, Paul H.

    Native riparian ecosystems throughout the southwestern United States are being altered by the rapid invasion of Tamarix species, commonly known as tamarisk. The effects that tamarisk has on ecosystem processes have been poorly quantified largely due to inadequate survey methods. I tested new approaches for field measurements, spatial models and remote sensing to improve our ability measure and to map tamarisk occurrence, and provide new methods that will assist in management and control efforts. Examining allometric relationships between basal cover and height measurements collected in the field, I was able to produce several models to accurately estimate aboveground biomass. The best two models were explained 97% of the variance (R 2 = 0.97). Next, I tested five commonly used predictive spatial models to identify which methods performed best for tamarisk using different types of data collected in the field. Most spatial models performed well for tamarisk, with logistic regression performing best with an Area Under the receiver-operating characteristic Curve (AUC) of 0.89 and overall accuracy of 85%. The results of this study also suggested that models may not perform equally with different invasive species, and that results may be influenced by species traits and their interaction with environmental factors. Lastly, I tested several approaches to improve the ability to remotely sense tamarisk occurrence. Using Landsat7 ETM+ satellite scenes and derived vegetation indices for six different months of the growing season, I examined their ability to detect tamarisk individually (single-scene analyses) and collectively (time-series). My results showed that time-series analyses were best suited to distinguish tamarisk from other vegetation and landscape features (AUC = 0.96, overall accuracy = 90%). June, August and September were the best months to detect unique phenological attributes that are likely related to the species' extended growing season and green-up during

  6. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  7. Hyper-temporal remote sensing for digital soil mapping: Characterizing soil-vegetation response to climatic variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indices derived from remotely-sensed imagery are commonly used to predict soil properties with digital soil mapping (DSM) techniques. The use of images from single dates or a small number of dates is most common for DSM; however, selection of the appropriate images is complicated by temporal variabi...

  8. Mapping Irrigated Areas Using Remote Sensing over the Past Decade in Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, M.; Budde, M. E.; Rowland, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agricultural production capacity and food security in Afghanistan largely depend on irrigated farming, mostly utilizing surface water fed by snowmelt. Over 80 percent of Afghanistan's food supply comes from irrigated crops. Knowing the spatial distribution and year-to-year variation in irrigated areas is imperative to monitoring food security for the country. We used 16-day composites of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to create a set of 12-year time series. Time series were used in a threshold dependent decision tree algorithm to map irrigated areas in Afghanistan from 2000 through 2011. In an effort to evaluate these maps of irrigated lands, we created higher resolution maps of irrigated areas from growing-season visible, near infrared, and thermal infrared bands of Landsat data over six predefined, highly irrigated sites across Afghanistan for 2000 and 2010. We were able to effectively separate irrigated areas from non-irrigated areas using Landsat imagery by selecting as irrigated those areas with Landsat-derived NDVI greater than 0.45 and surface temperature less than or equal to 310 Kelvin. The MODIS-derived maps agreed well with the Landsat irrigated area maps for all six sites for both years, providing confidence in the MODIS-derived maps for other years. The maps portrayed a highly dynamic irrigated agriculture practice in Afghanistan, where irrigated areas can vary by as much as 40% depending on the availability of water for irrigation. During the past decade, 2001, 2004 and 2008 had among the lowest levels of irrigated areas, attesting to the severe drought conditions in those years. Irrigation was at its peak in 2009 when snowpack and snowmelt were well above the 10-year average. However, it has declined in subsequent years, with below average snowmelt in much of the country. This model not only provides the capability to map irrigated areas for past years, but also to map

  9. Multichannel analysis of surface waves to map bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Richard D.; Xia, Jianghai; Park, Choon B.; Ivanov, Julian M.

    1999-01-01

    High velocity gradients within the shear wave velocity field consistent with drill confirmed bedrock are considered diagnostic of the bedrock surface and were used to map the top of bedrock on all four lines connected at this site. Calculating the shear wave velocity field from surface wave arrivals was accomplished with a high degree of accuracy regardless of cultural noise. Improved resolution on the surface of the bedrock provides insight into the texture of bedrock and permits identification and appraisal of short wavelength variations in the bedrock surface.

  10. Integration of remote sensing and surface geophysics in the detection of faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, P. L.; Shuchman, R. A.; Wagner, H.; Ruskey, F.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensing was included in a comprehensive investigation of the use of geophysical techniques to aid in underground mine placement. The primary objective was to detect faults and slumping, features which, due to structural weakness and excess water, cause construction difficulties and safety hazards in mine construction. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance was performed on a potential site for an underground oil shale mine in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. LANDSAT data, black and white aerial photography and 3 cm radar imagery were obtained. LANDSAT data were primarily used in optical imagery and digital tape forms, both of which were analyzed and enhanced by computer techniques. The aerial photography and radar data offered supplemental information. Surface linears in the test area were located and mapped principally from LANDSAT data. A specific, relatively wide, linear pointed directly toward the test site, but did not extend into it. Density slicing, ratioing, and edge enhancement of the LANDSAT data all indicated the existence of this linear. Radar imagery marginally confirmed the linear, while aerial photography did not confirm it.

  11. Mapping paddy biomass with multiple vegetation indexes by using multispectral remotely sensed image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaohe; Wang, Yancang; Song, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xingang

    2016-10-01

    Monitoring dry biomass of crop timely and accurately by remote sensing is crucial to assess crop growth, manage field water-fertilizer and predict yield. The Huaihe River Basin in China was chose as study area to map the spatial distribution of paddy biomass. The study derived 12 vegetation indexes from HJ-CCD image, which were closely related to crop growth. After screening sensitive vegetation index with in-situ samples by correlation analysis, the study developed the inversion model by single variable and multiple variables. The determination coefficient (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE) was used to evaluate the accuracy of models. Results showed that the accuracies of multivariable models were better than these of single-variable models, of which the average R2 reached 0.647 and the average RMSE was 0.059. It indicated that the multi-variable models were input in more information than those of single-variable models, which improved the accuracies of estimating paddy biomass in to a certain degree. The average overall accuracies of multi-variable models were 92.7%, while that of singe-variable models were 87.8%. The model with multiple linear regressions could be used to map the paddy biomass in the study area by using HJ-CCD image.

  12. Cross-Product Comparison of Multiple Resolution Microwave Remote Sensing Data Sets Supporting Global Mapping of Inundated Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; Schroeder, R.; McDonald, K. C.; Pinto, N.; Willacy, K.; Whitcomb, J.; Moghaddam, M.; Hess, L. L.; Zimmermann, R.

    2010-12-01

    Inundated vegetation and open water bodies are common features across the landscape and exert major impacts on hydrologic processes and surface-atmosphere carbon exchange. Their carbon dioxide and methane emissions can have a large impact on global climate. It is therefore of great importance to assess their spatial extent and temporal variations in order to improve upon carbon balance estimates. Despite their importance in the global cycling of carbon and water and climate forecasting, they remain poorly characterized and modeled, primarily because of the scarcity of suitable regional-to-global remote sensing data for characterizing wetlands distribution and dynamics. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers an effective tool for characterizing these ecosystems since it is particularly sensitive to surface water and to vegetation structure, and it allows monitoring large inaccessible areas on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination. We are assembling a multi-year Earth System Data Record (ESDR) of global inundated wetlands to facilitate investigations on their role in climate, biogeochemistry, hydrology, and biodiversity. The ESDR is comprised of (1) fine-resolution (100m) maps of wetland extent, vegetation type, and seasonal inundation extent, derived from L-band SAR data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-Band SAR (PALSAR) and the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) SAR, for continental-scale areas covering crucial wetland regions, and (2) global multi-temporal mappings of inundation extent at 25 km resolution derived from data sets from combined passive and active microwave remote sensing instruments (AMSR-E, QuikSCAT). We present a comparative analysis of the high-resolution SAR-based data sets and the coarse resolution inundation data sets for wetland ecosystems in the Amazonian tropics and the northern high latitudes of Alaska, Canada, and Eurasia. We compare information content

  13. Remotely sensed high resolution irrigated area mapping in India for 2000 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ambika, Anukesh Krishnankutty; Wardlow, Brian; Mishra, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    India is among the countries that uses a significant fraction of available water for irrigation. Irrigated area in India has increased substantially after the Green revolution and both surface and groundwater have been extensively used. Under warming climate projections, irrigation frequency may increase leading to increased irrigation water demands. Water resources planning and management in agriculture need spatially-explicit irrigated area information for different crops and different crop growing seasons. However, annual, high-resolution irrigated area maps for India for an extended historical record that can be used for water resources planning and management are unavailable. Using 250 m normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and 56 m land use/land cover data, high-resolution irrigated area maps are developed for all the agroecological zones in India for the period of 2000–2015. The irrigated area maps were evaluated using the agricultural statistics data from ground surveys and were compared with the previously developed irrigation maps. High resolution (250 m) irrigated area maps showed satisfactory accuracy (R2=0.95) and can be used to understand interannual variability in irrigated area at various spatial scales. PMID:27996974

  14. Remotely sensed high resolution irrigated area mapping in India for 2000 to 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambika, Anukesh Krishnankutty; Wardlow, Brian; Mishra, Vimal

    2016-12-01

    India is among the countries that uses a significant fraction of available water for irrigation. Irrigated area in India has increased substantially after the Green revolution and both surface and groundwater have been extensively used. Under warming climate projections, irrigation frequency may increase leading to increased irrigation water demands. Water resources planning and management in agriculture need spatially-explicit irrigated area information for different crops and different crop growing seasons. However, annual, high-resolution irrigated area maps for India for an extended historical record that can be used for water resources planning and management are unavailable. Using 250 m normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and 56 m land use/land cover data, high-resolution irrigated area maps are developed for all the agroecological zones in India for the period of 2000-2015. The irrigated area maps were evaluated using the agricultural statistics data from ground surveys and were compared with the previously developed irrigation maps. High resolution (250 m) irrigated area maps showed satisfactory accuracy (R2=0.95) and can be used to understand interannual variability in irrigated area at various spatial scales.

  15. Mapping Methane in Titan's Atmosphere near Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Soderblom, Jason; Barnes, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Titan's atmospheric methane may be coupled to sources and sinks on its surface. In order to map methane concentrations in layers just above Titan's surface, we use data sets in which locations on Titan are imaged from a variety of viewing angles (and within a short time span). We also use a radiative transfer code based on the Markov Chain method of Esposito and House (1978, AJ 219, 1058) to accommodate spherical atmospheric geometries. We report on (a) selected Cassini/VIMS flybys that image terrain on Titan from different angles, (b) the expected vertical resolution of methane maps near the surface from these flybys and (c) preliminary results: 3D methane and haze distributions and surface albedos.

  16. New algorithms to map asymmetries of 3D surfaces.

    PubMed

    Combès, Benoît; Prima, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a set of new generic automated processing tools to characterise the local asymmetries of anatomical structures (represented by surfaces) at an individual level, and within/between populations. The building bricks of this toolbox are: (1) a new algorithm for robust, accurate, and fast estimation of the symmetry plane of grossly symmetrical surfaces, and (2) a new algorithm for the fast, dense, nonlinear matching of surfaces. This last algorithm is used both to compute dense individual asymmetry maps on surfaces, and to register these maps to a common template for population studies. We show these two algorithms to be mathematically well-grounded, and provide some validation experiments. Then we propose a pipeline for the statistical evaluation of local asymmetries within and between populations. Finally we present some results on real data.

  17. Monitoring land-use change by combining participatory land-use maps with standard remote sensing techniques: Showcase from a remote forest catchment on Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialhe, François; Gunnell, Yanni; Ignacio, J. Andres F.; Delbart, Nicolas; Ogania, Jenifer L.; Henry, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    This paper combines participatory activities (PA) with remote sensing analysis into an integrated methodology to describe and explain land-cover changes. A remote watershed on Mindanao (Philippines) is used to showcase the approach, which hypothesizes that the accuracy of expert knowledge gained from remote sensing techniques can be further enhanced by inputs from vernacular knowledge when attempting to understand complex land mosaics and past land-use changes. Six participatory sessions based on focus-group discussions were conducted. These were enhanced by community-based land-use mapping, resulting in a final total of 21 participatory land-use maps (PLUMs) co-produced by a sample of stakeholders with different sociocultural and ecological perspectives. In parallel, seven satellite images (Landsat MSS, Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+, and SPOT4) were classified following standard techniques and provided snapshots for the years 1976, 1996, and 2010. Local knowledge and collective memory contributed to define and qualify relevant land-use classes. This also provided information about what had caused the land-use changes in the past. Results show that combining PA with remote-sensing analysis provides a unique understanding of land-cover change because the two methods complement and validate one another. Substantive qualitative information regarding the chronology of land-cover change was obtained in a short amount of time across an area poorly covered by scientific literature. The remote sensing techniques contributed to test and to quantify verbal reports of land-use and land-cover change by stakeholders. We conclude that the method is particularly relevant to data-poor areas or conflict zones where rapid reconnaissance work is the only available option. It provides a preliminary but accurate baseline for capturing land changes and for reporting their causes and consequences. A discussion of the main challenges encountered (i.e. how to combine different systems of

  18. Description and evaluation of a surface runoff susceptibility mapping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagadec, Lilly-Rose; Patrice, Pierre; Braud, Isabelle; Chazelle, Blandine; Moulin, Loïc; Dehotin, Judicaël; Hauchard, Emmanuel; Breil, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Surface runoff is the hydrological process at the origin of phenomena such as soil erosion, floods out of rivers, mudflows, debris flows and can generate major damage. This paper presents a method to create maps of surface runoff susceptibility. The method, called IRIP (Indicator of Intense Pluvial Runoff, French acronym), uses a combination of landscape factors to create three maps representing the susceptibility (1) to generate, (2) to transfer, and (3) to accumulate surface runoff. The method input data are the topography, the land use and the soil type. The method aims to be simple to implement and robust for any type of study area, with no requirement for calibration or specific input format. In a second part, the paper focuses on the evaluation of the surface runoff susceptibility maps. The method is applied in the Lézarde catchment (210 km2, northern France) and the susceptibility maps are evaluated by comparison with two risk regulatory zonings of surface runoff and soil erosion, and two databases of surface runoff impacts on roads and railways. Comparison tests are performed using a standard verification method for dichotomous forecasting along with five verification indicators: accuracy, bias, success ratio, probability of detection, and false alarm ratio. The evaluation shows that the susceptibility map of surface runoff accumulation is able to identify the concentrated surface runoff flows and that the susceptibility map of transfer is able to identify areas that are susceptible to soil erosion. Concerning the ability of the IRIP method to detect sections of the transportation network susceptible to be impacted by surface runoff, the evaluation tests show promising probabilities of detection (73-90%) but also high false alarm ratios (77-92%). However, a qualitative analysis of the local configuration of the infrastructure shows that taking into account the transportation network vulnerability can explain numerous false alarms. This paper shows that the

  19. Remote Sensing supports EULAKES project for mapping submerged macrophytes in Lake Garda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Erica; Bresciani, Mariano; Giardino, Claudia; Bolpagni, Rossano; Pellegrini, Giovanna; Braga, Federica

    2013-04-01

    Lake bottoms have an important role in the aquatic ecosystem: bathymetry and morphology may affect the hydrodynamic processes in coastal waters, while the presence of aquatic macrophytes helps to preserve the ecology. Within the context of macrophyte monitoring programs, technical advances in remote sensing with higher spatial and spectral resolutions provide opportunities for big scale ecological studies, with the possibility to assess a multitemporal analysis. One of the objectives of the EULAKES project has been to map aquatic vegetation cover inside the Garda Lake from hyperspectral MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) aerial images thanks to the application of a bio-optical model inversion technique (BOMBER: Bio-Optical Model Based tool for Estimating water quality and bottom properties from Remote sensing images). MIVIS images, with a spectral resolution of 102 bands, working between 430 and 1270 nm, were previously corrected for atmospheric, adjacency and glint effects before being processed with the BOMBER tool. One complete MIVIS overflight (12 runs) acquired on June 27th 2011, allowed the retrieval of a macrophyte presence map all around the first 7m deep coastal belt, with a validation error of about 10%, resulting from 89 in situ measures performed during images acquisition. A relevant spatial distribution could be observed, with higher aquatic plants concentration in the Southern part of the lake. A further local cover distribution map localized on the Sirmione Peninsula was integrated with previous results to perform a temporal analysis of macrophyte colonization patterns along this reduced littoral zone for the last 14 years (acquisitions on September 1997, July 2005 and July 2010). Considerable modifications in terms of macrophyte structural complexity and colonized areas were detectable: a drastic reduction of well-established dense communities (more than 70% of cover) and increasing of un-colonized areas were followed by

  20. Introduction and testing of a monitoring and colony-mapping method for waterbird populations that uses high-speed and ultra-detailed aerial remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Bakó, Gábor; Tolnai, Márton; Takács, Ádám

    2014-07-18

    Remote sensing is a method that collects data of the Earth's surface without causing disturbances. Thus, it is worthwhile to use remote sensing methods to survey endangered ecosystems, as the studied species will behave naturally while undisturbed. The latest passive optical remote sensing solutions permit surveys from long distances. State-of-the-art highly sensitive sensor systems allow high spatial resolution image acquisition at high altitudes and at high flying speeds, even in low-visibility conditions. As the aerial imagery captured by an airplane covers the entire study area, all the animals present in that area can be recorded. A population assessment is conducted by visual interpretations of an ortho image map. The basic objective of this study is to determine whether small- and medium-sized bird species are recognizable in the ortho images by using high spatial resolution aerial cameras. The spatial resolution needed for identifying the bird species in the ortho image map was studied. The survey was adjusted to determine the number of birds in a colony at a given time.

  1. Introduction and Testing of a Monitoring and Colony-Mapping Method for Waterbird Populations That Uses High-Speed and Ultra-Detailed Aerial Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Bakó, Gábor; Tolnai, Márton; Takács, Ádám

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing is a method that collects data of the Earth's surface without causing disturbances. Thus, it is worthwhile to use remote sensing methods to survey endangered ecosystems, as the studied species will behave naturally while undisturbed. The latest passive optical remote sensing solutions permit surveys from long distances. State-of-the-art highly sensitive sensor systems allow high spatial resolution image acquisition at high altitudes and at high flying speeds, even in low-visibility conditions. As the aerial imagery captured by an airplane covers the entire study area, all the animals present in that area can be recorded. A population assessment is conducted by visual interpretations of an ortho image map. The basic objective of this study is to determine whether small- and medium-sized bird species are recognizable in the ortho images by using high spatial resolution aerial cameras. The spatial resolution needed for identifying the bird species in the ortho image map was studied. The survey was adjusted to determine the number of birds in a colony at a given time. PMID:25046012

  2. [The progress in retrieving land surface temperature based on thermal infrared and microwave remote sensing technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; Li, Xin; Yao, Feng-Mei; Li, Xian-Hua

    2009-08-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important parameter in the study on the exchange of substance and energy between land surface and air for the land surface physics process at regional and global scales. Many applications of satellites remotely sensed data must provide exact and quantificational LST, such as drought, high temperature, forest fire, earthquake, hydrology and the vegetation monitor, and the models of global circulation and regional climate also need LST as input parameter. Therefore, the retrieval of LST using remote sensing technology becomes one of the key tasks in quantificational remote sensing study. Normally, in the spectrum bands, the thermal infrared (TIR, 3-15 microm) and microwave bands (1 mm-1 m) are important for retrieval of the LST. In the present paper, firstly, several methods for estimating the LST on the basis of thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing were synthetically reviewed, i. e., the LST measured with an ground-base infrared thermometer, the LST retrieval from mono-window algorithm (MWA), single-channel algorithm (SCA), split-window techniques (SWT) and multi-channels algorithm(MCA), single-channel & multi-angle algorithm and multi-channels algorithm & multi-angle algorithm, and retrieval method of land surface component temperature using thermal infrared remotely sensed satellite observation. Secondly, the study status of land surface emissivity (epsilon) was presented. Thirdly, in order to retrieve LST for all weather conditions, microwave remotely sensed data, instead of thermal infrared data, have been developed recently, and the LST retrieval method from passive microwave remotely sensed data was also introduced. Finally, the main merits and shortcomings of different kinds of LST retrieval methods were discussed, respectively.

  3. Use of remote sensing techniques for geological hazard surveys in vegetated urban regions. [multispectral imagery for lithological mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stow, S. H.; Price, R. C.; Hoehner, F.; Wielchowsky, C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using aerial photography for lithologic differentiation in a heavily vegetated region is investigated using multispectral imagery obtained from LANDSAT satellite and aircraft-borne photography. Delineating and mapping of localized vegetal zones can be accomplished by the use of remote sensing because a difference in morphology and physiology results in different natural reflectances or signatures. An investigation was made to show that these local plant zones are affected by altitude, topography, weathering, and gullying; but are controlled by lithology. Therefore, maps outlining local plant zones were used as a basis for lithologic map construction.

  4. Efficient crop type mapping based on remote sensing in the Central Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Liheng

    Most agricultural systems in California's Central Valley are purposely flexible and intentionally designed to meet the demands of dynamic markets. Agricultural land use is also impacted by climate change and urban development. As a result, crops change annually and semiannually, which makes estimating agricultural water use difficult, especially given the existing method by which agricultural land use is identified and mapped. A minor portion of agricultural land is surveyed annually for land-use type, and every 5 to 8 years the entire valley is completely evaluated. So far no effort has been made to effectively and efficiently identify specific crop types on an annual basis in this area. The potential of satellite imagery to map agricultural land cover and estimate water usage in the Central Valley is explored. Efforts are made to minimize the cost and reduce the time of production during the mapping process. The land use change analysis shows that a remote sensing based mapping method is the only means to map the frequent change of major crop types. The traditional maximum likelihood classification approach is first utilized to map crop types to test the classification capacity of existing algorithms. High accuracy is achieved with sufficient ground truth data for training, and crop maps of moderate quality can be timely produced to facilitate a near-real-time water use estimate. However, the large set of ground truth data required by this method results in high costs in data collection. It is difficult to reduce the cost because a trained classification algorithm is not transferable between different years or different regions. A phenology based classification (PBC) approach is developed which extracts phenological metrics from annual vegetation index profiles and identifies crop types based on these metrics using decision trees. According to the comparison with traditional maximum likelihood classification, this phenology-based approach shows great advantages

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Uav Based Mapping System for Remote Sensing and Surveying Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eling, C.; Wieland, M.; Hess, C.; Klingbeil, L.; Kuhlmann, H.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have increasingly been used in various application areas, such as in the remote sensing or surveying. For these applications the UAV has to be equipped with a mapping sensor, which is mostly a camera. Furthermore, a georeferencing of the UAV platform and/or the acquired mapping data is required. The most efficient way to realize this georeferencing is the direct georeferencing, which is based on an onboard multi-sensor system. In recent decades, direct georeferencing systems have been researched and used extensively in airborne, ship and land vehicle applications. However, these systems cannot easily be adapted to UAV platforms, which is mainly due to weight and size limitations. In this paper a direct georeferencing system for micro- and mini-sized UAVs is presented, which consists of a dual-frequency geodetic grade OEM GPS board, a low-cost single-frequency GPS chip, a tactical grade IMU and a magnetometer. To allow for cm-level position and sub-degree attitude accuracies, RTK GPS (real-time kinematic) and GPS attitude (GPS compass) determination algorithms are running on this system, as well as a GPS/IMU integration. Beside the direct georeferencing, also the precise time synchronization of the camera, which acts as the main sensor for mobile mapping applications, and the calibration of the lever arm between the camera reference point and the direct georeferencing reference point are explained in this paper. Especially the high accurate time synchronization of the camera is very important, to still allow for high surveying accuracies, when the images are taken during the motion of the UAV. Results of flight tests demonstrate that the developed system, the camera synchronization and the lever arm calibration make directly georeferenced UAV based single point measurements possible, which have cm-level accuracies on the ground.

  6. Remote Sensing Soil Salinity Map for the San Joaquin Vally, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudiero, E.; Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Soil salinization is a major natural hazard to worldwide agriculture. We present a remote imagery approach that maps salinity within a range (i.e., salinities less than 20 dS m-1, when measured as the electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract), accuracy, and resolution most relevant to agriculture. A case study is presented for the western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV), California, USA (~870,000 ha of farmland) using multi-year Landsat 7 ETM+ canopy reflectance and the Canopy Response Salinity Index (CRSI). Highly detailed salinity maps for 22 fields (542 ha) established from apparent soil electrical conductivity directed sampling were used as ground-truth (sampled in 2013), totaling over 5000 pixels (30×30 m) with salinity values in the range of 0 to 35.2 dS m-1. Multi-year maximum values of CRSI were used to model soil salinity. In addition, soil type, elevation, meteorological data, and crop type were evaluated as covariates. The fitted model (R2=0.73) was validated: i) with a spatial k-folds (i.e., leave-one-field-out) cross-validation (R2=0.61), ii) versus salinity data from three independent fields (sampled in 2013 and 2014), and iii) by determining the accuracy of the qualitative classification of white crusted land as extremely-saline soils. The effect of land use change is evaluated over 2396 ha in the Broadview Water District from a comparison of salinity mapped in 1991 with salinity predicted in 2013 from the fitted model. From 1991 to 2013 salinity increased significantly over the selected study site, bringing attention to potential negative effects on soil quality of shifting from irrigated agriculture to fallow-land. This is cause for concern since over the 3 years of California's drought (2010-2013) the fallow land in the WSJV increased from 12.7% to 21.6%, due to drastic reduction in water allocations to farmers.

  7. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  8. Surface-Constrained Volumetric Brain Registration Using Harmonic Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anand A.; Shattuck, David W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to compare anatomical and functional brain imaging data across subjects, the images must first be registered to a common coordinate system in which anatomical features are aligned. Intensity-based volume registration methods can align subcortical structures well, but the variability in sulcal folding patterns typically results in misalignment of the cortical surface. Conversely, surface-based registration using sulcal features can produce excellent cortical alignment but the mapping between brains is restricted to the cortical surface. Here we describe a method for volumetric registration that also produces an accurate one-to-one point correspondence between cortical surfaces. This is achieved by first parameterizing and aligning the cortical surfaces using sulcal landmarks. We then use a constrained harmonic mapping to extend this surface correspondence to the entire cortical volume. Finally, this mapping is refined using an intensity-based warp. We demonstrate the utility of the method by applying it to T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI). We evaluate the performance of our proposed method relative to existing methods that use only intensity information; for this comparison we compute the inter-subject alignment of expert-labeled sub-cortical structures after registration. PMID:18092736

  9. Aboveground biomass mapping in French Guiana by combining remote sensing, forest inventories and environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayad, Ibrahim; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Guitet, Stéphane; Bailly, Jean-Stéphane; Hérault, Bruno; Gond, Valéry; El Hajj, Mahmoud; Tong Minh, Dinh Ho

    2016-10-01

    Mapping forest aboveground biomass (AGB) has become an important task, particularly for the reporting of carbon stocks and changes. AGB can be mapped using synthetic aperture radar data (SAR) or passive optical data. However, these data are insensitive to high AGB levels (>150 Mg/ha, and >300 Mg/ha for P-band), which are commonly found in tropical forests. Studies have mapped the rough variations in AGB by combining optical and environmental data at regional and global scales. Nevertheless, these maps cannot represent local variations in AGB in tropical forests. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of misrepresenting local variations in AGB and AGB estimation with good precision occurs because of both methodological limits (signal saturation or dilution bias) and a lack of adequate calibration data in this range of AGB values. We test this hypothesis by developing a calibrated regression model to predict variations in high AGB values (mean >300 Mg/ha) in French Guiana by a methodological approach for spatial extrapolation with data from the optical geoscience laser altimeter system (GLAS), forest inventories, radar, optics, and environmental variables for spatial inter- and extrapolation. Given their higher point count, GLAS data allow a wider coverage of AGB values. We find that the metrics from GLAS footprints are correlated with field AGB estimations (R2 = 0.54, RMSE = 48.3 Mg/ha) with no bias for high values. First, predictive models, including remote-sensing, environmental variables and spatial correlation functions, allow us to obtain "wall-to-wall" AGB maps over French Guiana with an RMSE for the in situ AGB estimates of ∼50 Mg/ha and R2 = 0.66 at a 1-km grid size. We conclude that a calibrated regression model based on GLAS with dependent environmental data can produce good AGB predictions even for high AGB values if the calibration data fit the AGB range. We also demonstrate that small temporal and spatial mismatches between field data and GLAS

  10. 43 CFR 3931.60 - Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maps of underground and surface mine....60 Maps of underground and surface mine workings and in situ surface operations. Maps of underground workings and surface operations must be to a scale of 1:24,000 or larger if the BLM requests it. All...

  11. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  12. Science aspects of a remotely controlled Mars surface roving vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, R.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    Particular attention is given to aspects pertinent to teleoperation, remote control, onboard control, and man-machine relationships in carrying out scientific operations with such a vehicle. It is assumed that landed operations would comprise one Martian year and that the traverse would extend across an area approximately 500 km wide. The mission is assumed to be planned for the early 1980s. Its objective is to obtain data which will aid in answering a number of questions regarding the history of the solar system, the formation of Mars, and the evolution of life on Mars. A series of candidate rover payloads is proposed to meet the requirements. The smallest payload includes a TV camera, a general-purpose manipulator arm, a crusher and siever, an X-ray diffractometer-spectrometer, a gravimeter, a magnetometer, meteorological instruments, and a radio transponder.

  13. California nearshore surface currents. [monitoring by remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Murphy, M. J.; Edmisten, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    During the oceanic period from July to November, the southward flowing California current dominates the nearshore current patterns. Commencing about the middle of November and extending to mid-February, the Davidson current, a northward moving countercurrent, is the dominant inshore transporter of water and suspensates. The phenomenon of upwelling is prevalent during the period from the middle of February to the end of July. Thus, every year along the coast of California, there are three successive current seasons: the oceanic, the Davidson, and the upwelling. This paper is a discussion of the nature of these nearshore currents. In addition, the capabilities of various remote sensing platforms and systems for providing methods of monitoring the coastal processes associated with the current seasons of California are demonstrated herein.

  14. Sub-pixel flood inundation mapping from multispectral remotely sensed images based on discrete particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linyi; Chen, Yun; Yu, Xin; Liu, Rui; Huang, Chang

    2015-03-01

    The study of flood inundation is significant to human life and social economy. Remote sensing technology has provided an effective way to study the spatial and temporal characteristics of inundation. Remotely sensed images with high temporal resolutions are widely used in mapping inundation. However, mixed pixels do exist due to their relatively low spatial resolutions. One of the most popular approaches to resolve this issue is sub-pixel mapping. In this paper, a novel discrete particle swarm optimization (DPSO) based sub-pixel flood inundation mapping (DPSO-SFIM) method is proposed to achieve an improved accuracy in mapping inundation at a sub-pixel scale. The evaluation criterion for sub-pixel inundation mapping is formulated. The DPSO-SFIM algorithm is developed, including particle discrete encoding, fitness function designing and swarm search strategy. The accuracy of DPSO-SFIM in mapping inundation at a sub-pixel scale was evaluated using Landsat ETM + images from study areas in Australia and China. The results show that DPSO-SFIM consistently outperformed the four traditional SFIM methods in these study areas. A sensitivity analysis of DPSO-SFIM was also carried out to evaluate its performances. It is hoped that the results of this study will enhance the application of medium-low spatial resolution images in inundation detection and mapping, and thereby support the ecological and environmental studies of river basins.

  15. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values.

  16. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane–protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values. PMID:27561322

  17. Sampling strategies on Mars: Remote and not-so-remote observations from a surface rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.

    1988-01-01

    The mobility and speed of a semi-autonomous Mars rover are of necessity limited by the need to think and stay out of trouble. This consideration makes it essential that the rover's travels be carefully directed to likely targets of interest for sampling and in situ study. Short range remote sensing conducted from the rover, based on existing technology, can provide significant information about the chemistry and mineralogy of surrounding rocks and soils in support of sampling efforts. These observations are of course of direct scientific importance as well. Because of the small number of samples actually to be returned to Earth, it is also important that candidate samples be analyzed aboard the rover so that diversity can be maximized. It is essential to perform certain types of analyses, such as those involving volatiles, prior to the thermal and physical shocks of the return trip to Earth. In addition, whatever measurements can be made of nonreturned samples will be important to enlarge the context of the detailed analyses to be performed later on the few returned samples. Some considerations related to these objectives are discussed.

  18. [Improvement of PVC bio-carrier surface property by remote plasma].

    PubMed

    Li, Ru; Chen, Jie-Rong; Chen, Jun; Yao, Xin

    2006-01-01

    The effects of various remote plasma, such as Ar, He, O2 and N2 on PVC bio-carrier surface modification were studied. The surface properties were characterized by the contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The role of all kinds of active species such as electrons, ions and free radicals involved in plasma surface modification were evaluated. Results show that the remote plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in both wettability and composition, the (O + N)/C of PVC surface increases from 7% to 22%, and the water contact angle decreases from 97 degrees to 15 degrees. The optimal results was achieved when plasma treatment parameters were set, that is treatment time 3 min, Ar flux at 20 cm3/s, power at 60W, sample position of 40 cm. The results show that the modified PVC Bio-carrier adhesion rate and capacity on the modified surface are greatly increased.

  19. Mapping of government land encroachment in Cameron Highlands using multiple remote sensing datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, M. H. M.; Ahmad, B.

    2014-02-01

    The cold and refreshing highland weather is one of the factors that give impact to socio-economic growth in Cameron Highlands. This unique weather of the highland surrounded by tropical rain forest can only be found in a few places in Malaysia. It makes this place a famous tourism attraction and also provides a very suitable temperature for agriculture activities. Thus it makes agriculture such as tea plantation, vegetable, fruits and flowers one of the biggest economic activities in Cameron Highlands. However unauthorized agriculture activities are rampant. The government land, mostly forest area have been encroached by farmers, in many cases indiscriminately cutting down trees and hill slopes. This study is meant to detect and assess this encroachment using multiple remote sensing datasets. The datasets were used together with cadastral parcel data where survey lines describe property boundary, pieces of land are subdivided into lots of government and private. The general maximum likelihood classification method was used on remote sensing image to classify the land-cover in the study area. Ground truth data from field observation were used to assess the accuracy of the classification. Cadastral parcel data was overlaid on the classification map in order to detect the encroachment area. The result of this study shows that there is a land cover change of 93.535 ha in the government land of the study area between years 2001 to 2010, nevertheless almost no encroachment took place in the studied forest reserve area. The result of this study will be useful for the authority in monitoring and managing the forest.

  20. Coupling ocean colour remote sensing data into physical-ecosystem models: mapping uncertainty distributions from space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Twardowski, Mike; Trees, Chuck; Sanjuan-Calzado, Violeta

    2013-04-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing (OCRS) has transformed our understanding of complex feedback processes linking physical forcing events to biogeochemical responses. With continuous daily global coverage extending beyond the last decade, OCRS has become established as an essential global climate variable with potential use as a sensitive indicator of regional and global response to changing climate. There is increasing focus on use of OCRS data for validation and assimilation into coupled physical-ecosystem models for both environmental and operational applications. It is therefore essential that OCRS data products are not only optimised for maximum accuracy, but are also provided to end users with appropriate uncertainties. A simple spectral deconvolution model will be presented along with a new bootstrap approach for estimating product uncertainties. This approach can be adapted for both remote sensing and in situ data, opening up the possibility of mapping uncertainty distributions in 3-D for the first time, and can be applied to other established OCRS data products, including the existent historic data set. Ecosystem models seek to reproduce and predict ocean biogeochemical processes, where the models are constrained by physical parameters such as: wind, currents, density and light. The hydrographic aspects of marine ecosystems can generally be defined through ocean circulation models, which are largely independent of the ecosystem itself. The physical optics determining the light environment, on the other hand, are two-way coupled with ecosystem models since light interacts with seawater and suspended constituents. The Optical Physical and Ecosystem Regional Assessment (OPERA) model proposes a more comprehensive and challenging approach, where all optical interactions occurring within the volume of water are taken into account, thus providing a more accurate definition of light dependent processes.

  1. Coupling ocean colour remote sensing data into physical-ecosystem models: mapping uncertainty distributions from space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Twardowski, Mike; Trees, Chuck; Sanjuan Calzado, Violeta

    2014-05-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing (OCRS) has transformed our understanding of complex feedback processes linking physical forcing events to biogeochemical responses. With continuous daily global coverage extending beyond the last decade, OCRS has become established as an essential global climate variable with potential use as a sensitive indicator of regional and global response to changing climate. There is increasing focus on use of OCRS data for validation and assimilation into coupled physical-ecosystem models for both environmental and operational applications. It is therefore essential that OCRS data products are not only optimised for maximum accuracy, but are also provided to end users with appropriate uncertainties. A simple spectral deconvolution model will be presented along with a new bootstrap approach for estimating product uncertainties. This approach can be adapted for both remote sensing and in situ data, opening up the possibility of mapping uncertainty distributions in 3-D for the first time, and can be applied to other established OCRS data products, including the existent historic data set. Ecosystem models seek to reproduce and predict ocean biogeochemical processes, where the models are constrained by physical parameters such as: wind, currents, density and light. The hydrographic aspects of marine ecosystems can generally be defined through ocean circulation models, which are largely independent of the ecosystem itself. The physical optics determining the light environment, on the other hand, are two-way coupled with ecosystem models since light interacts with seawater and suspended constituents. The Optical Physical and Ecosystem Regional Assessment (OPERA) model proposes a more comprehensive and challenging approach, where all optical interactions occurring within the volume of water are taken into account, thus providing a more accurate definition of light dependent processes.

  2. [Dobutamine stress body surface mapping in Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Seki, T; Zhang, J; Ogawa, S; Hirayama, T

    1994-11-01

    The dobutamine (DOB) stress body surface mapping tests were carried out to detect myocardial ischemia in 23 patients who had Kawasaki disease previously. Eight of 23 patients (group A) had coronary stenosis of 75% or more diameter reduction in major coronary arteries without sufficient collateral flow, as shown by the coronary angiography, but without myocardial infarction. Nine patients (group B) showed no ischemic change exercised 201Tl myocardial scintigram. Six patients (group C) had myocardial infarction due to Kawasaki disease. ST segment potential mapping (0.04 sec after the J point in QRS) and ST-T Isointegral mapping were performed using CVM-3000 system (87 leads), and the following calculations were made: number of leads with horizontal or down-sloping ST depression of 0.10 mV or more, lasting 0.08 sec (nST); row number of the minimum lead in the Isointegral map (Imin); number of positive leads on the seventh row in Isointegral mapping (I-7); number of positive leads on the first row in Isointegral mapping (I-1) and I-7/I-1 ratio. Based on these calculations the criteria for detecting myocardial ischemia (nST < or = 2, Imin < or = 2, I-7/I-1 > or = 1) were created and their usefulness was tested using findings of coronary angiography and exercised 201Tl myocardial scintigram as the golden standard. For the diagnosis of ischemic lesion, the DOB stress body surface mapping test in group A had higher specificity (nST: 100%, Imin: 89%, I-7/I-1: 100% vs. 78%) and higher sensitivity (75%, 50%, 63% vs. 38%), than those by the Treadmill test, while ischemic changes were not detected in group C by this test. From these results it is concluded that it is useful in evaluating ischemic heart disease in children who can not perform Treadmill exercised test adequately.

  3. Remote Sensing Based Analysis of the Role of Land Use/Land Cover on Surface Temperature and Temporal Changes in Temperature; a Case Study of Ajmer District, Rajasthan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, A.; Bhalla, P.; Palria, S.

    2014-12-01

    An attempt has been made in this research to analyze temporal variations in surface temperature in Ajmer District Rajasthan. The research is carried out to assess the relationship between the land surface temperatures (LST) and land cover (LC) changes both in quantitative and qualitative ways in Ajmer District area using Landsat TM/ETM+ data over the period 1989 to 2013.in this period we used three temporal TM/ETM data 1989, 2001 and 2013. Remote sensing of Land surface temperature (LST) has traditionally used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as the indicator of vegetation abundance to estimate the land surface temperature (LST)-vegetation relationship. Unsupervised classification methods have been taken to prepare the LC map. LST is derived from the thermal band of Landsat TM/ETM+ using the calibration of spectral radiance and emissivity correction of remote sensing. NDVI is derived from the NIR & RED Band using image enhancement technique (Indices). Arc-GIS have been utilized for data visualization. This procedure allowed analyzing whether LULC classes match LST classes. However, the results of such overlaying are hard to interpret. LST and LULC maps of these areas give the understanding on how the classes and corresponding LST have changed from one date to the other. Another option is to collect statistical data. it was impossible to calculate linear regression between LULC map and LST map. A solution to that matter is to use Normalized Vegetation Index (NDVI) instead of LULC classification result.

  4. Operational evapotranspiration mapping using remote sensing and weather datasets: a new parameterization for the SSEB approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Bohms, Stefanie; Singh, Ramesh K.; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Alemu, Henok; Verdin, James P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of multi-scale remotely sensed data and global weather datasets is allowing the estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) at multiple scales. We present a simple but robust method that uses remotely sensed thermal data and model-assimilated weather fields to produce ET for the contiguous United States (CONUS) at monthly and seasonal time scales. The method is based on the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model, which is now parameterized for operational applications, renamed as SSEBop. The innovative aspect of the SSEBop is that it uses predefined boundary conditions that are unique to each pixel for the "hot" and "cold" reference conditions. The SSEBop model was used for computing ET for 12 years (2000-2011) using the MODIS and Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) data streams. SSEBop ET results compared reasonably well with monthly eddy covariance ET data explaining 64% of the observed variability across diverse ecosystems in the CONUS during 2005. Twelve annual ET anomalies (2000-2011) depicted the spatial extent and severity of the commonly known drought years in the CONUS. More research is required to improve the representation of the predefined boundary conditions in complex terrain at small spatial scales. SSEBop model was found to be a promising approach to conduct water use studies in the CONUS, with a similar opportunity in other parts of the world. The approach can also be applied with other thermal sensors such as Landsat.

  5. Why surface-truth field study is needed in remote-sensing instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Especially designed field studies are needed in remote sensing technology transfer courses regardless of the field work provided by the students'/trainees' major disciplines because the remote sensing discipline has unique emphases and needs. Modification of existng schedules to include field work provides the equivalent of extending the duration of the program with the added benefit of enhancing learning achievements per actual program day. The process of surface truth field instruction, levels of student capabilities and stages in the development of surface truth field studies are discussed.

  6. The use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) for geological monitoring and mapping in mountain area: test and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, Glenda; Piras, Marco; Forno, Gabriella M.; Gattiglio, Marco; Lingua, Andrea; Lo Russo, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Geological mapping is an interpretive process involving multiple types of information, from analytical data to subjective observations, collected and synthesized by a researcher. With field experience, geologists generally develop effective personal styles of relatively efficient mapping. Each geologic map, regardless of scale, requires a certain level of field mapping, where data are recorded on a topographic map and on aerial images, with notes in a field book. Traditionally, geological elements are hand-transferred to a cartography, on which the final map is prepared for publication using known cartographic techniques. Cartography and topographic support are traditionally produced with aerial photogrammetry method, but nowadays, the coming of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) or so called UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) can help the geologist to produce similar support, but reducing cost, increasing the productivity , to have a more flexible system and more. In this case, the commercial fixed-wing system EBEE has been tested by producing a dense digital surface model (DDSM) of the bedrock, Quaternary sediments and landforms in a sector of the alpine Rodoretto Valley, a tributary of the Germanasca Valley (northwestern Italy). The Germanasca Valley is located along the north-south tectonic thrust between the Dora Maira Massif, which outcrops on the valley's right side and the Greenstone and Schist Complex visible on the left side. These nappe systems include the Penninic Domain (Lower, Medium and Upper Penninic units) and the Piedmont Zone. The landforms and surficial sediments in this valley have resulted from the combinate effects of the Quaternary alpine glacial phases and deep-seated gravitative slope deformations. In the area of investigation only monotonous calcshists of the Greenstone and Schist Complex (GS) occur, with a regional foliation dipping 20-30° to N30E and the examined area is located between 2500 m and 1760 m. The area appears elongated

  7. Hyperspectral remote sensing technology (HRST) program and the Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO) satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Davis, Curtiss O.

    1998-11-01

    The Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) are currently in the design phase of a program called the Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technology (HRST) program. HRST will demonstrate the utility of a hyperspectral earth-imaging system to support Naval needs for characterization of the littoral regions of the world. One key component of the HRST program is the development of the Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO) satellite system to provide a large hyperspectral data base. NEMO will carry the Coastal Ocean Imaging Spectrometer (COIS) which will provide images of littoral regions with 210 spectral channels over a bandpass of 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer. Since ocean environments have reflectances typically less than 5%, this system requires a very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). COIS will sample over a 30 km swath width with a 60 m Ground Sample Distance (GSD) with the ability to go to a 30 m GSD by utilizing the systems attitude control system to 'nod' (i.e., use ground motion compensation to slow down the ground track of the field of view). Also included in the payload is a co-registered 5m Panchromatic Imager (PIC) to provide simultaneous high spatial resolution imagery. A sun-synchronous circular orbit of 605 km allows continuous repeat coverage of the whole earth. One unique aspect of NEMO is an on board processing system, a feature extraction and data compression software package developed by NRL called the Optical Real-Time Spectral Identification System (ORASIS). ORASIS employs a parallel, adaptive hyperspectral method for real time scene characterization, data reduction, background suppression, and target recognition. The use of ORASIS is essential for management of the massive amounts of data expected from the NEMO HSI system, and for developing Naval products under HRST. The combined HSI and panchromatic images will provide critical phenomenology to aid in the operation of Naval systems in the littoral environment. The imagery can also

  8. 43 CFR 3592.2 - Maps of underground workings and surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maps of underground workings and surface... THAN COAL) EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS Plans and Maps § 3592.2 Maps of underground workings and surface operations. Maps of underground workings and surface operations shall be drawn to a...

  9. 43 CFR 3592.2 - Maps of underground workings and surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maps of underground workings and surface... THAN COAL) EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS Plans and Maps § 3592.2 Maps of underground workings and surface operations. Maps of underground workings and surface operations shall be drawn to a...

  10. 43 CFR 3592.2 - Maps of underground workings and surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maps of underground workings and surface... THAN COAL) EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS Plans and Maps § 3592.2 Maps of underground workings and surface operations. Maps of underground workings and surface operations shall be drawn to a...

  11. 43 CFR 3592.2 - Maps of underground workings and surface operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maps of underground workings and surface... THAN COAL) EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS Plans and Maps § 3592.2 Maps of underground workings and surface operations. Maps of underground workings and surface operations shall be drawn to a...

  12. Anopheles fauna of coastal Cayenne, French Guiana: modelling and mapping of species presence using remotely sensed land cover data

    PubMed Central

    Adde, Antoine; Dusfour, Isabelle; Roux, Emmanuel; Girod, Romain; Briolant, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the Anopheles species of the coastal areas of French Guiana, or their spatiotemporal distribution or environmental determinants. The present study aimed to (1) document the distribution of Anopheles fauna in the coastal area around Cayenne, and (2) investigate the use of remotely sensed land cover data as proxies of Anopheles presence. To characterise the Anopheles fauna, we combined the findings of two entomological surveys that were conducted during the period 2007-2009 and in 2014 at 37 sites. Satellite imagery data were processed to extract land cover variables potentially related to Anopheles ecology. Based on these data, a methodology was formed to estimate a statistical predictive model of the spatial-seasonal variations in the presence of Anopheles in the Cayenne region. Two Anopheles species, known as main malaria vectors in South America, were identified, including the more dominant An. aquasalis near town and rural sites, and An. darlingi only found in inland sites. Furthermore, a cross-validated model of An. aquasalis presence that integrated marsh and forest surface area was extrapolated to generate predictive maps. The present study supports the use of satellite imagery by health authorities for the surveillance of malaria vectors and planning of control strategies. PMID:27982304

  13. Anopheles fauna of coastal Cayenne, French Guiana: modelling and mapping of species presence using remotely sensed land cover data.

    PubMed

    Adde, Antoine; Dusfour, Isabelle; Roux, Emmanuel; Girod, Romain; Briolant, Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the Anopheles species of the coastal areas of French Guiana, or their spatiotemporal distribution or environmental determinants. The present study aimed to (1) document the distribution of Anopheles fauna in the coastal area around Cayenne, and (2) investigate the use of remotely sensed land cover data as proxies of Anopheles presence. To characterise the Anopheles fauna, we combined the findings of two entomological surveys that were conducted during the period 2007-2009 and in 2014 at 37 sites. Satellite imagery data were processed to extract land cover variables potentially related to Anopheles ecology. Based on these data, a methodology was formed to estimate a statistical predictive model of the spatial-seasonal variations in the presence of Anopheles in the Cayenne region. Two Anopheles species, known as main malaria vectors in South America, were identified, including the more dominant An. aquasalis near town and rural sites, and An. darlingi only found in inland sites. Furthermore, a cross-validated model of An. aquasalis presence that integrated marsh and forest surface area was extrapolated to generate predictive maps. The present study supports the use of satellite imagery by health authorities for the surveillance of malaria vectors and planning of control strategies.

  14. Mapping vibrational surface and bulk modes in a single nanocube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Maureen J.; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Batson, Philip E.

    2017-03-01

    Imaging of vibrational excitations in and near nanostructures is essential for developing low-loss infrared nanophotonics, controlling heat transport in thermal nanodevices, inventing new thermoelectric materials and understanding nanoscale energy transport. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy has previously been used to image plasmonic behaviour in nanostructures in an electron microscope, but hitherto it has not been possible to map vibrational modes directly in a single nanostructure, limiting our understanding of phonon coupling with photons and plasmons. Here we present spatial mapping of optical and acoustic, bulk and surface vibrational modes in magnesium oxide nanocubes using an atom-wide electron beam. We find that the energy and the symmetry of the surface polariton phonon modes depend on the size of the nanocubes, and that they are localized to the surfaces of the nanocube. We also observe a limiting of bulk phonon scattering in the presence of surface phonon modes. Most phonon spectroscopies are selectively sensitive to either surface or bulk excitations; therefore, by demonstrating the excitation of both bulk and surface vibrational modes using a single probe, our work represents advances in the detection and visualization of spatially confined surface and bulk phonons in nanostructures.

  15. Mapping vibrational surface and bulk modes in a single nanocube.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Maureen J; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Batson, Philip E

    2017-03-22

    Imaging of vibrational excitations in and near nanostructures is essential for developing low-loss infrared nanophotonics, controlling heat transport in thermal nanodevices, inventing new thermoelectric materials and understanding nanoscale energy transport. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy has previously been used to image plasmonic behaviour in nanostructures in an electron microscope, but hitherto it has not been possible to map vibrational modes directly in a single nanostructure, limiting our understanding of phonon coupling with photons and plasmons. Here we present spatial mapping of optical and acoustic, bulk and surface vibrational modes in magnesium oxide nanocubes using an atom-wide electron beam. We find that the energy and the symmetry of the surface polariton phonon modes depend on the size of the nanocubes, and that they are localized to the surfaces of the nanocube. We also observe a limiting of bulk phonon scattering in the presence of surface phonon modes. Most phonon spectroscopies are selectively sensitive to either surface or bulk excitations; therefore, by demonstrating the excitation of both bulk and surface vibrational modes using a single probe, our work represents advances in the detection and visualization of spatially confined surface and bulk phonons in nanostructures.

  16. Characterization of Surface Reflectance Variation Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes to simulate the effects on remote sensing in visible and infrared wavelengths of variables which affect classification is examined. These variables include detector viewing angle, atmospheric aerosol size distribution, aerosol vertical and horizontal distribution (e.g., finite clouds), the form of the bidirectional ground reflectance function, and horizontal variability of reflectance type and reflectivity (albedo). These simulations are used to characterize the sensitivity of observables (intensity and polarization) to variations in the underlying physical parameters both to improve algorithms for the removal of atmospheric effects and to identify techniques which can improve classification accuracy. It was necessary to revise and validate the simulation codes (CTRANS, ARTRAN, and the Mie scattering code) to improve efficiency and accommodate a new operational environment, and to build the basic software tools for acquisition and off-line manipulation of simulation results. Initial calculations compare cases in which increasing amounts of aerosol are shifted into the stratosphere, maintaining a constant optical depth. In the case of moderate aerosol optical depth, the effect on the spread function is to scale it linearly as would be expected from a single scattering model. Varying the viewing angle appears to provide the same qualitative effect as modifying the vertical optical depth (for Lambertian ground reflectance).

  17. Removal of surface-reflected light for the measurement of remote-sensing reflectance from an above-surface platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhongping; Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Mobley, Curtis; Arnone, Robert

    2010-12-06

    Using hyperspectral measurements made in the field, we show that the effective sea-surface reflectance ρ (defined as the ratio of the surface-reflected radiance at the specular direction corresponding to the downwelling sky radiance from one direction) varies not only for different measurement scans, but also can differ by a factor of 8 between 400 nm and 800 nm for the same scan. This means that the derived water-leaving radiance (or remote-sensing reflectance) can be highly inaccurate if a spectrally constant ρ value is applied (although errors can be reduced by carefully filtering measured raw data). To remove surface-reflected light in field measurements of remote sensing reflectance, a spectral optimization approach was applied, with results compared with those from remote-sensing models and from direct measurements. The agreement from different determinations suggests that reasonable results for remote sensing reflectance of clear blue water to turbid brown water are obtainable from above-surface measurements, even under conditions of high waves.

  18. Two-pulse rapid remote surface contamination measurement.

    SciTech Connect

    Headrick, Jeffrey M.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2010-11-01

    This project demonstrated the feasibility of a 'pump-probe' optical detection method for standoff sensing of chemicals on surfaces. Such a measurement uses two optical pulses - one to remove the analyte (or a fragment of it) from the surface and the second to sense the removed material. As a particular example, this project targeted photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) to detect of surface deposits of low-volatility chemical warfare agents (LVAs). Feasibility was demonstrated for four agent surrogates on eight realistic surfaces. Its sensitivity was established for measurements on concrete and aluminum. Extrapolations were made to demonstrate relevance to the needs of outside users. Several aspects of the surface PF-LIF physical mechanism were investigated and compared to that of vapor-phase measurements. The use of PF-LIF as a rapid screening tool to 'cue' more specific sensors was recommended. Its sensitivity was compared to that of Raman spectroscopy, which is both a potential 'confirmer' of PF-LIF 'hits' and is also a competing screening technology.

  19. Mapping ephemeral stream networks in desert environments using very-high-spatial-resolution multispectral remote sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Hamada, Yuki; O'Connor, Ben L.; Orr, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-03-26

    In this paper, understanding the spatial patterns of ephemeral streams is crucial for understanding how hydrologic processes influence the abundance and distribution of wildlife habitats in desert regions. Available methods for mapping ephemeral streams at the watershed scale typically underestimate the size of channel networks. Although remote sensing is an effective means of collecting data and obtaining information on large, inaccessible areas, conventional techniques for extracting channel features are not sufficient in regions that have small topographic gradients and subtle target-background spectral contrast. By using very high resolution multispectral imagery, we developed a new algorithm that applies landscape information tomore » map ephemeral channels in desert regions of the Southwestern United States where utility-scale solar energy development is occurring. Knowledge about landscape features and structures was integrated into the algorithm using a series of spectral transformation and spatial statistical operations to integrate information about landscape features and structures. The algorithm extracted ephemeral stream channels at a local scale, with the result that approximately 900% more ephemeral streams was identified than what were identified by using the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Hydrography Dataset. The accuracy of the algorithm in detecting channel areas was as high as 92%, and its accuracy in delineating channel center lines was 91% when compared to a subset of channel networks that were digitized by using the very high resolution imagery. Although the algorithm captured stream channels in desert landscapes across various channel sizes and forms, it often underestimated stream headwaters and channels obscured by bright soils and sparse vegetation. While further improvement is warranted, the algorithm provides an effective means of obtaining detailed information about ephemeral streams, and it could make a significant contribution

  20. Mapping ephemeral stream networks in desert environments using very-high-spatial-resolution multispectral remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; O'Connor, Ben L.; Orr, Andrew B.; Wuthrich, Kelsey K.

    2016-03-26

    In this paper, understanding the spatial patterns of ephemeral streams is crucial for understanding how hydrologic processes influence the abundance and distribution of wildlife habitats in desert regions. Available methods for mapping ephemeral streams at the watershed scale typically underestimate the size of channel networks. Although remote sensing is an effective means of collecting data and obtaining information on large, inaccessible areas, conventional techniques for extracting channel features are not sufficient in regions that have small topographic gradients and subtle target-background spectral contrast. By using very high resolution multispectral imagery, we developed a new algorithm that applies landscape information to map ephemeral channels in desert regions of the Southwestern United States where utility-scale solar energy development is occurring. Knowledge about landscape features and structures was integrated into the algorithm using a series of spectral transformation and spatial statistical operations to integrate information about landscape features and structures. The algorithm extracted ephemeral stream channels at a local scale, with the result that approximately 900% more ephemeral streams was identified than what were identified by using the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Hydrography Dataset. The accuracy of the algorithm in detecting channel areas was as high as 92%, and its accuracy in delineating channel center lines was 91% when compared to a subset of channel networks that were digitized by using the very high resolution imagery. Although the algorithm captured stream channels in desert landscapes across various channel sizes and forms, it often underestimated stream headwaters and channels obscured by bright soils and sparse vegetation. While further improvement is warranted, the algorithm provides an effective means of obtaining detailed information about ephemeral streams, and it could make a significant contribution toward

  1. Efficient epitope mapping by bacteriophage {lambda} surface display

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, I.; Maruyama, H.; Zuberi, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage {lambda} surface expression system, {lambda}foo, was used for epitope mapping of human galectin-3. We constructed random epitope and peptide libraries and compared their efficiencies in the mapping. The galectin-3 cDNA was randomly digested by DNase I to make random epitope libraries. The libraries were screened by affinity selection using a microtiter plate coated with monoclonal antibodies. Direct DNA sequencing of the selected clones defined two distinct epitope sites consisting of nine and 11 amino-acid residues. Affinity selection of random peptide libraries recovered a number of sequences that were similar to each other but distinct from the galectin-3 sequence. These results demonstrate that a single affinity selection of epitope libraries with antibodies is able to define an epitope determinant as small as nine residues long and is more efficient in epitope mapping than random peptide libraries. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  3. Surface water dynamics in Amazon, Congo, and Lake Chad Wetlands from remote sensing and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Getirana, A.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2013-05-01

    The capability of satellites to understand and monitor surface water dynamics in tropical wetlands is presented by analysis various remote sensing technologies over the Amazon, Congo, and Lake Chad regions. Although different in size and location, all these basins are tropical, representing riparian tropical, swamp tropical and inland Saharan wetlands, respectively. First, yearly flooding in the Logone floodplain is investigated using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Flooding has a direct impact on agricultural, pastoral and fishery systems in the Lake Chad Basin. Since the flooding extent, depth, and duration are highly variable, flood inundation mapping facilitates efficient use of water resources and have more knowledge of the coupled human-natural system in the Logone floodplain. Flood maps are generated from 33 multi-temporal ETM+ images acquired during the period 2006 to 2008. The maximum flooding extent in the study area increases up to ~5.8K km2 in late October 2008. A strong correlation is observed between the flooding extents and water height variations in both the floodplain and the river. Second, interferometric processing of JERS-1 SAR data from the central portions of both Amazon and Congo Wetlands provides centimeter-scale measurements of water level change. The Amazon is marked by a myriad of floodplain channels, but the Congo has comparatively few. Amazon floodplain channels, lakes and pans are well interconnected, whereas the Congo wetlands are expanses with few boundaries or flow routes. The hydraulic processes that build the Amazon floodplain are not similarly apparent in the Congo. Third, we evaluate the potential of large altimetry datasets as a complementary gauging network capable of providing water discharge in ungauged regions. A rating-curve-based methodology is adopted to derive water discharge from altimetric data provided by the Envisat satellite within the Amazon basin. From a global-scale perspective, the stage

  4. Cooperative studies between the United States of America and the People's Republic of China on applications of remote sensing to surveying and mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauer, Donald T.; Chu, Liangcai

    1992-01-01

    A Protocol established between the National Bureau of Surveying and Mapping, People's Republic of China (PRC) and the U.S. Geological Survey, United States of America (US), resulted in the exchange of scientific personnel, technical training, and exploration of the processing of remotely sensed data. These activities were directed toward the application of remotely sensed data to surveying and mapping. Data were processed and various products were generated for the Black Hills area in the US and the Ningxiang area of the PRC. The results of these investigations defined applicable processes in the creation of satellite image maps, land use maps, and the use of ancillary data for further map enhancements.

  5. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  6. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  7. Mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants using remote sensing data

    DOE PAGES

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-05-14

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on amore » Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. Furthermore, we present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.« less

  8. Remote detection and mapping of organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere using ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Nixon, Conor A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Palmer, Maureen; Mumma, Michael J.; Molter, Edward; Teanby, Nicholas; Irwin, Patrick GJ; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Serigano, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Titan is the largest moon of Saturn, with a thick (1.45 bar) atmosphere composed primarily of molecular nitrogen and methane. Atmospheric photochemistry results in the production of a wide range of complex organic molecules, including hydrocarbons, nitriles, aromatics and species of possible pre-biotic relevance. Studies of Titan's atmospheric chemistry thus provide a unique opportunity to explore the origin and evolution of complex organic matter in a primitive (terrestrial) planetary atmosphere. Underpinned by laboratory measurements, remote and in-situ observations of hydrocarbons, nitriles and oxygen-bearing species provide important new insights in this regard. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new facility, well suited to the study of molecular emission from Titan's upper and middle-atmosphere. This presentation will focus on results from our ongoing studies of Titan using ALMA during the period 2012-2014, including detection and mapping of rotational emission lines from molecules including HNC, CO, HC3N, CH3CN, C2H3CN and C2H5CN, as well minor isotopologues. Possible chemical formation pathways for these species will be discussed, and the the scope for improved understanding of non-aqueous organic chemistry through laboratory experiments and atmospheric/liquid-phase simulations under Titan-like conditions will be examined.

  9. Lineament mapping of vertical fractures of rock outcrops by remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matarrese, Raffaella; Masciopinto, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of hydrological processes within the vadose zone is usually difficult, especially in the presence of compact rock subsoil. The possibility of recognizing the trend of the structural lineaments in fractured systems has important fallout in the understanding water infiltration processes, especially when the groundwater flow is strongly affected by the presence of faults and fractures that constitute the preferred ways of water fluxes. This study aims to detect fracture lineaments on fractured rock formations from CASI hyperspectral airborne VNIR images, with a size of 60 cm of the spatial resolution, and collected during November 2014. Lineaments detected with such high resolution have been compared with the fracture lineaments detected by a Landsat 8 image acquired at the same time of the CASI acquisition. The method has processed several remote sensed images at different spatial resolution, and it has produced the visualization of numerous lineament maps, as result of the vertical and sub-vertical fractures of the investigated area. The study has been applied to the fractured limestone outcrop of the Murgia region (Southern Italy). Here the rock formation hosts a deep groundwater, which supplies freshwater for drinking and irrigation purposes. The number of the fractures allowed a rough estimation of the vertical average hydraulic conductivity of the rock outcrop. This value was compared with field saturated rock hydraulic conductivity measurements derived from large ring infiltrometer tests carried out on the same rock outcrop.

  10. Soil salinity mapping and hydrological drought indices assessment in arid environments based on remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhag, Mohamed; Bahrawi, Jarbou A.

    2017-03-01

    Vegetation indices are mostly described as crop water derivatives. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is one of the oldest remote sensing applications that is widely used to evaluate crop vigor directly and crop water relationships indirectly. Recently, several NDVI derivatives were exclusively used to assess crop water relationships. Four hydrological drought indices are examined in the current research study. The water supply vegetation index (WSVI), the soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), the moisture stress index (MSI) and the normalized difference infrared index (NDII) are implemented in the current study as an indirect tool to map the effect of different soil salinity levels on crop water stress in arid environments. In arid environments, such as Saudi Arabia, water resources are under pressure, especially groundwater levels. Groundwater wells are rapidly depleted due to the heavy abstraction of the reserved water. Heavy abstractions of groundwater, which exceed crop water requirements in most of the cases, are powered by high evaporation rates in the designated study area because of the long days of extremely hot summer. Landsat 8 OLI data were extensively used in the current research to obtain several vegetation indices in response to soil salinity in Wadi ad-Dawasir. Principal component analyses (PCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analyses are complementary tools used to understand the regression pattern of the hydrological drought indices in the designated study area.

  11. Mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants using remote sensing data

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-05-14

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. Furthermore, we present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.

  12. Remote sensing of the Dead Sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehorai, R.; Lensky, I. M.; Lensky, N. G.; Shiff, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique terminal lake located at the lowest place on Earth's surface. It has the highest surface temperature, salinity, and density among Earth's large water bodies, and its level is currently dropping at a rate of ˜1 m/a. Knowledge of the Dead Sea thermal and saline structure is based on meteorological and hydrological measurements from a single site at a time. In this study, we used satellite and in situ data to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of the Dead Sea sea surface temperature (SST) and to explore the causes for these variations. Sequences of almost continuous individual satellite images were transformed into a time series of parameters representing the spatial distribution of SST. Also used were in situ measured bulk SST, wind speed, solar radiation, and water temperature profiles with depth. Analysis of this data set shows strong diurnal and seasonal variations of the surface and vertical temperature field and the meteorological forcing. The temperature field is heterogeneous after noon, when radiation is high and wind speed is low and thermal layering develops. The temperature field is homogeneous during the nighttime, when solar radiation is absent and the high wind speed vertically mixes the upper layer.

  13. Sea surface conditions remotely sensed by upward-looking ADCPs

    SciTech Connect

    Visbeck, M.; Fischer, J.

    1995-02-01

    Surface data obtained from 153-kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) deployed in the Greenland Sea at about 350-m depth during the winter of 1988/89 were investigated under several aspects. First a method is described to improve the instrument depth measurements using the binned backscattered energy profile near the surface. The accuracy of the depth estimates is found to be significantly better than 0.5 m. Further, improvements of wind speed estimates were found by using the ambient noise in the 150-kHz band in favor of the surface backscattered energy as suggested by Schott. Limitations of the ambient sound method at low wind speeds are presented when thermal noise overwhelms the wind-induced noise. Finally, a method to detect the presence of sea ice above ADCP is presented by cross correlating the surface backscatter strength and the magnitudes of all Doppler velocity components. The resulting time series of ice concentration are in overall good agreement with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) estimates but allow for higher temporal resolution. Further, in the vicinity of the ice edge, enhanced high-frequency ambient noise in the 150-kHz band was observed.

  14. Remote control and navigation tests for application to long-range lunar surface exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, W. C.; White, P. R.; Vinz, F. L.

    1971-01-01

    Tests conducted with a vehicle system built at the Marshall Space Flight Center to investigate some of the unknown factors associated with remote controlled teleoperated vehicles on the lunar surface are described. Test data are summarized and conclusions are drawn from these data which indicate that futher testing will be required.

  15. Evaluating Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture Estimates Using Triple Collocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of enhancing remotely-sensed surface soil moisture validation activities through the application of triple collocation techniques which compare time series of three mutually independent geophysical variable estimates in order to acquire the root-mean-square...

  16. Comparison/Validation of Remote Sensing-Based Surface Energy Balance Models Over the Agricultural Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate characterization of surface energy fluxes over a range of spatial and temporal scales is critical for many applications in agriculture, hydrology, meteorology, and climatology. Over the past several years, there has been a major effort devoted to the development and refinement of remote sen...

  17. [An operational remote sensing algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration based on NOAA PAL dataset].

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying-Yu; He, Yan-Bo; Wang, Jian-Lin; Tian, Guo-Liang

    2009-10-01

    Based on the time series 10-day composite NOAA Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) dataset (8 km x 8 km), and by using land surface energy balance equation and "VI-Ts" (vegetation index-land surface temperature) method, a new algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) was constructed. This new algorithm did not need the support from meteorological observation data, and all of its parameters and variables were directly inversed or derived from remote sensing data. A widely accepted ET model of remote sensing, i. e., SEBS model, was chosen to validate the new algorithm. The validation test showed that both the ET and its seasonal variation trend estimated by SEBS model and our new algorithm accorded well, suggesting that the ET estimated from the new algorithm was reliable, being able to reflect the actual land surface ET. The new ET algorithm of remote sensing was practical and operational, which offered a new approach to study the spatiotemporal variation of ET in continental scale and global scale based on the long-term time series satellite remote sensing images.

  18. Remote sensing of the sea surface by millimeterwave SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Pagels, A.

    2006-09-01

    On several occasions the sea surface has been measured with the mmW radar MEMPHIS in SAR geometry. This research was mainly aimed to investigate the ability of SAR for imaging of disturbances of the water surface at mm-wave radar bands and to gather data on the statistical properties of sea clutter. It can be suspected, that the probability density functions for the reflectivity of sea clutter is as well dependent on the radar wavelength as on resolution, as different scattering processes may significantly contribute. While most of the available millimeterwave data have been collected with a resolution of 75 cm, improvements of the MEMPHIS radar now allow a resolution of about 20 cm. The paper describes the measurement set-up, the evaluation methods and discusses the influence of resolution and radar frequency on sea clutter characteristics as found during the experiments.

  19. Investigating a Quadrant Surface Coil Array for NQR Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    UNCLASSIFIED 1  Abstract—this paper is on the design and fabrication of a surface coil array in a quadrant layout for NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole...coupling and SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio) at standoff distances perpendicular from each coil. Index Terms— Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance, NQR ...Coil Array, probe, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, tuning, decoupling, RLC, mutual coupling, RLC I. INTRODUCTION N Nuclear quadrupole resonance ( NQR

  20. Extending airborne electromagnetic surveys for regional active layer and permafrost mapping with remote sensing and ancillary data, Yukon Flats ecoregion, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Minsley, Burke J.; Ji, Lei; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Rose, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning regression tree models were used to extrapolate airborne electromagnetic resistivity data collected along flight lines in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, central Alaska, for regional mapping of permafrost. This method of extrapolation (r = 0.86) used subsurface resistivity, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) at-sensor reflectance, thermal, TM-derived spectral indices, digital elevation models and other relevant spatial data to estimate near-surface (0–2.6-m depth) resistivity at 30-m resolution. A piecewise regression model (r = 0.82) and a presence/absence decision tree classification (accuracy of 87%) were used to estimate active-layer thickness (ALT) (< 101 cm) and the probability of near-surface (up to 123-cm depth) permafrost occurrence from field data, modelled near-surface (0–2.6 m) resistivity, and other relevant remote sensing and map data. At site scale, the predicted ALTs were similar to those previously observed for different vegetation types. At the landscape scale, the predicted ALTs tended to be thinner on higher-elevation loess deposits than on low-lying alluvial and sand sheet deposits of the Yukon Flats. The ALT and permafrost maps provide a baseline for future permafrost monitoring, serve as inputs for modelling hydrological and carbon cycles at local to regional scales, and offer insight into the ALT response to fire and thaw processes.

  1. Role of remote sensing in Bay measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mugler, J. P., Jr.; Godfrey, J. P.; Hickman, G. D.; Hovis, W. G.; Pearson, A. O.; Weaver, K. N.

    1978-01-01

    Remote measurements of a number of surface or near surface parameters for baseline definition and specialized studies, remote measurements of episodic events, and remote measurements of the Bay lithosphere are considered in terms of characterizing and understanding the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay. Geologic processes and features best suited for information enhancement by remote sensing methods are identified. These include: (1) rates of sedimentation in the Bay; (2) rates of erosion of Bay shorelines; (3) spatial distribution and geometry of aquifers; (4) mapping of Karst terrain (sinkholes); and (5) mapping of fracture patterns. Recommendations for studying problem areas identified are given.

  2. Mapping of an approximate neutral density surface with Ungridded data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yuzhu

    2008-02-01

    A neutral density surface is a logical study frame for water-mass mixing since water parcels spread along such a surface without doing work against buoyancy restoring force. Mesoscale eddies are believed to stir and subsequently mix predominantly along such surfaces. Because of the nonlinear nature of the equation of state of seawater, the process of accurately mapping a neutral density surface necessarily involves lateral computation from one conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) cast to the next in a logical sequence. By contrast, the depth of a potential density surface on any CTD cast is found solely from the data on this cast. The lateral calculation procedure causes a significant inconvenience. In a previous paper by present author published in this journal (You, 2006), the mapping of neutral density surfaces with regularly gridded data such as Levitus data has been introduced. In this note, I present a new method to find the depth of a neutral density surface from a cast without having to specify an integration path in space. An appropriate reference point is required that is on the neutral density surface and thereafter the neutral density surface can be determined by using the CTD casts in any order. This method is only approximate and the likely errors can be estimated by plotting a scatter diagram of all the pressures and potential temperatures on the neutral density surfaces. The method assumes that the variations of potential temperature and pressure (with respect to the values at the reference point) on the neutral density surface are proportional. It is important to select the most appropriate reference point in order to approximately satisfy this assumption, and in practice this is found by inspecting the θ-p plot of data on the surface. This may require that the algorithm be used twice. When the straight lines on the θ-p plot, drawn from the reference point to other points on the neutral density surface, enclose an area that is external to

  3. Combining surface reanalysis and remote sensing data for monitoring evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, Pat; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Marie, B.; Cappelaere, B.; Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Noubellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled actual evapotranspiration (AET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a model driven by dynamic canopy AET was combined with the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the NOAH Land Surface Model (GNOAH) wet canopy and soil AET for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against AET from the GNOAH model and dynamic model using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance are at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites is poor, but better than individual models. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a dynamic vegetation component with land surface model estimates, improved model parameterization, and reduction of multiplicative effects of uncertain data.

  4. Dynamic Corneal Surface Mapping with Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, S.; Gualini, M. M. S.

    2013-06-01

    In view of the fast advancement in ophthalmic technology and corneal surgery, there is a strong need for the comprehensive mapping and characterization techniques for corneal surface. Optical methods with precision non-contact approaches have been found to be very useful for such bio measurements. Along with the normal mapping approaches, elasticity of corneal surface has an important role in its characterization and needs to be appropriately measured or estimated for broader diagnostics and better prospective surgical results, as it has important role in the post-op corneal surface reconstruction process. Use of normal corneal topographic devices is insufficient for any intricate analysis since these devices operate at relatively moderate resolution. In the given experiment, Pulsed Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry has been utilized along with an excitation mechanism to measure the dynamic response of the sample cornea. A Pulsed ESPI device has been chosen for the study because of its micron-level resolution and other advantages in real-time deformation analysis. A bovine cornea has been used as a sample in the subject experiment. The dynamic response has been taken on a chart recorder and it is observed that it does show a marked deformation at a specific excitation frequency, which may be taken as a characteristic elasticity parameter for the surface of that corneal sample. It was seen that outside resonance conditions the bovine cornea was not that much deformed. Through this study, the resonance frequency and the corresponding corneal deformations are mapped and plotted in real time. In these experiments, data was acquired and processed by FRAMES plus computer analysis system. With some analysis of the results, this technique can help us to refine a more detailed corneal surface mathematical model and some preliminary work was done on this. Such modelling enhancements may be useful for finer ablative surgery planning. After further experimentation

  5. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Atmosphere and Surface Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Yang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) are all hyper-spectral satellite sensors with thousands of spectral channels. Top of atmospheric radiance spectra measured by these sensors contain high information content on atmospheric, cloud, and surface properties. Exploring high information content contained in these high spectral resolution spectra is a challenging task due to computation e ort involved in modeling thousands of spectral channels. Usually, only very small fractions (4{10 percent) of the available channels are included in physical retrieval systems or numerical weather forecast (NWP) satellite data assimilations. We will describe a method of simultaneously retrieving atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface properties using all available spectral channels without sacrificing computational speed. The essence of the method is to convert channel radiance spectra into super-channels by an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) transformation. Because the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, about 100 super-channels are adequate to capture the information content of the radiance spectra. A Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is used to calculate both the super-channel magnitudes and derivatives with respect to atmospheric profiles and other properties. There is no need to perform EOF transformations to convert super channels back to spectral space at each iteration step for a one-dimensional variational retrieval or a NWP data assimilation system. The PCRTM forward model is also capable of calculating radiative contributions due to multiple-layer clouds. The multiple scattering effects of the clouds are efficiently parameterized. A physical retrieval algorithm then performs an inversion of atmospheric, cloud, and surface properties in super channel domain directly therefore both reducing the

  6. Probing and mapping electrode surfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blinn, Kevin S; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-20

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen (1-7). The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion(2). Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation(8-12). It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition(8, 10, 13, 14) ("coking") and sulfur poisoning(11, 15) and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation(16). The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM

  7. Intercomparison of Land Surface Remote Sensing Products From Various Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Mélin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M.; Widlowski, J.

    2003-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces are documented from spectral measurements made in space. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products able to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the preliminary results of an inter-comparison exercise conducted with SeaWiFS, MERIS(ENVISAT), MISR(Terra) and MODIS(Terra) products will be presented.

  8. NASA lunar surface habitat and remote exploration demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clearwater, Yvonne A.

    1992-07-01

    The Human Exploration Demonstration Project (HEDP) conducted by the NASA Ames Research Center to develop technological integration and demonstration capabilities for lunar and Mars space missions is described. The development of safe, effective, and reliable systems requires that independently engineered subsystems be fully integrated and tested under realistic conditions. The primary objective of the HEDP is demonstration of various aspects of human exploration and habitation on extraterrestrial surfaces. Some of the technologies to be demonstrated are also applicable to unmanned precursor mission functions. It is concluded that the HEDP will provide a unique opportunity to address a broad spectrum of advanced mission operations by bridging between the early requirements for robotic systems with control at earth-based workstations.

  9. Integration of remote sensing based surface information into a three-dimensional microclimate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldens, Wieke; Heiden, Uta; Esch, Thomas; Mueller, Andreas; Dech, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Climate change urges cities to consider the urban climate as part of sustainable planning. Urban microclimate models can provide knowledge on the climate at building block level. However, very detailed information on the area of interest is required. Most microclimate studies therefore make use of assumptions and generalizations to describe the model area. Remote sensing data with area wide coverage provides a means to derive many parameters at the detailed spatial and thematic scale required by urban climate models. This study shows how microclimate simulations for a series of real world urban areas can be supported by using remote sensing data. In an automated process, surface materials, albedo, LAI/LAD and object height have been derived and integrated into the urban microclimate model ENVI-met. Multiple microclimate simulations have been carried out both with the dynamic remote sensing based input data as well as with manual and static input data to analyze the impact of the RS-based surface information and the suitability of the applied data and techniques. A valuable support of the integration of the remote sensing based input data for ENVI-met is the use of an automated processing chain. This saves tedious manual editing and allows for fast and area wide generation of simulation areas. The analysis of the different modes shows the importance of high quality height data, detailed surface material information and albedo.

  10. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, T.; Smith, L.; Moosdorf, N.; Hartmann, J.; Durr, H.H.; Manning, A.H.; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of ???5 ?? 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Smith, Leslie; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Durr, Hans H.; Manning, Andrew H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of -5 x 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change.

  12. Mapping charge-mosaic surfaces in electrolyte solutions using surface charge microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drelich, Jaroslaw; Yin, Xihui

    2010-06-01

    A significant limitation of electrokinetic measurements is that only an average value of the zeta potential/streaming potential is measured—regardless of whether the surface charge distribution is homogeneous or otherwise. However, in real-world situations, nearly all solids (and liquids) of technological significance exhibit surface heterogeneities. To detect heterogeneities in surface charge, analytical tools which provide accurate and spatially resolved information about material surface potential—particularly at microscopic and sub-microscopic resolutions—are needed. A novel AFM-based technique for mapping surface charge domains on heterogeneous surfaces, which we call Surface Charge Microscopy ( SCM), was recently introduced by our research team. It relies on recording colloidal force curves over multiple locations on the substrate surface using small probes. The surface charge characteristics of the heterogeneous substrate are determined from the recorded colloidal force curves, allowing for the surface charge variation to be mapped. In this communication, we briefly review the SCM technique. Examples of results of measurements of the surface interaction forces that were recorded between a silicon nitride AFM cantilever and a multi-phase volcanic rock and heterogeneous surface of bitumen are also given.

  13. Subpixel mapping on remote sensing imagery using a prediction model combining wavelet transform and radial basis function neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Guo, Zhongyang; Zhang, Liquan; Xu, Wencheng

    2009-12-01

    Soft classification methods can be used for mixed-pixel classification on remote sensing imagery by estimating different land cover class fractions of every pixel. However, the spatial distribution and location of these class components within the pixel remain unknown. To map land cover at subpixel scale and increase the spatial resolution of land cover classification maps, in this paper, a prediction model combining wavelet transform and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) neural network, abbreviated as Wavelet-RBFNN, is constructed by predicting high-frequency wavelet coefficients from low-frequency coefficients at the same resolution with RBF network and taking wavelet coefficients at coarser resolution as training samples. According to different land cover class fraction images obtained from mixed-pixel classification, based on the assumption of neighborhood dependence of wavelet coefficients, subpixel mapping on remote sensing imagery can be accomplished through two steps, i.e., prediction of land cover class compositions within subpixels and hard classification. The experimental results obtained with artificial images, QuickBird image and Landsat 7 ETM+ image indicate that the subpixel mapping method proposed in this paper can successfully produce super-resolution land cover classification maps from remote sensing imagery, outperforming cubic B-spline and Kriging interpolation method in visual effect and prediction accuracy. The Wavelet-RBFNN model can also be applied to simulate higher spatial resolution image, and automatically identify and locate land cover targets at the subpixel scales, when the cost and availability of high resolution imagery prohibit its use in many areas of work.

  14. Agriculture pest and disease risk maps considering MSG satellite data and land surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques da Silva, J. R.; Damásio, C. V.; Sousa, A. M. O.; Bugalho, L.; Pessanha, L.; Quaresma, P.

    2015-06-01

    Pest risk maps for agricultural use are usually constructed from data obtained from in-situ meteorological weather stations, which are relatively sparsely distributed and are often quite expensive to install and difficult to maintain. This leads to the creation of maps with relatively low spatial resolution, which are very much dependent on interpolation methodologies. Considering that agricultural applications typically require a more detailed scale analysis than has traditionally been available, remote sensing technology can offer better monitoring at increasing spatial and temporal resolutions, thereby, improving pest management results and reducing costs. This article uses ground temperature, or land surface temperature (LST), data distributed by EUMETSAT/LSASAF (with a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 km (nadir resolution) and a revisiting time of 15 min) to generate one of the most commonly used parameters in pest modeling and monitoring: "thermal integral over air temperature (accumulated degree-days)". The results show a clear association between the accumulated LST values over a threshold and the accumulated values computed from meteorological stations over the same threshold (specific to a particular tomato pest). The results are very promising and enable the production of risk maps for agricultural pests with a degree of spatial and temporal detail that is difficult to achieve using in-situ meteorological stations.

  15. Use of various remote sensing land cover products for plant functional type mapping over Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottlé, C.; Lescure, J.; Maignan, F.; Poulter, B.; Wang, T.; Delbart, N.

    2013-11-01

    High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in regulating the climate system and are presently undergoing rapid environmental change. Accurate land cover data sets are required to both document these changes as well as to provide land-surface information for benchmarking and initializing Earth system models. Earth system models also require specific land cover classification systems based on plant functional types (PFTs), rather than species or ecosystems, and so post-processing of existing land cover data is often required. This study compares over Siberia, multiple land cover data sets against one another and with auxiliary data to identify key uncertainties that contribute to variability in PFT classifications that would introduce errors in Earth system modeling. Land cover classification systems from GLC 2000, GlobCover 2005 and 2009, and MODIS collections 5 and 5.1 are first aggregated to a common legend, and then compared to high-resolution land cover classification systems, vegetation continuous fields (MODIS VCFs) and satellite-derived tree heights (to discriminate against sparse, shrub, and forest vegetation). The GlobCover data set, with a lower threshold for tree cover and taller tree heights and a better spatial resolution, tends to have better distributions of tree cover compared to high-resolution data. It has therefore been chosen to build new PFT maps for the ORCHIDEE land surface model at 1 km scale. Compared to the original PFT data set, the new PFT maps based on GlobCover 2005 and an updated cross-walking approach mainly differ in the characterization of forests and degree of tree cover. The partition of grasslands and bare soils now appears more realistic compared with ground truth data. This new vegetation map provides a framework for further development of new PFTs in the ORCHIDEE model like shrubs, lichens and mosses, to represent the water and carbon cycles in northern latitudes better. Updated land cover

  16. Use of various remote sensing land cover products for PFT mapping over Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottlé, C.; Lescure, J.; Maignan, F.; Poulter, B.; Wang, T.; Delbart, N.

    2013-06-01

    High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in regulating the climate system and are presently undergoing rapid environmental change. Accurate land cover datasets are required to both document these changes as well as to provide land-surface information for benchmarking and initializing earth system models. Earth system models also require specific land cover classification systems based on plant functional types, rather than species or ecosystems, and so post-processing of existing land cover data is often required. This study compares over Siberia, multiple land cover datasets against one another and with auxiliary data to identify key uncertainties that contribute to variability in Plant Functional Type (PFT) classifications that would introduce errors in earth system modeling. Land cover classification systems from GLC 2000, GlobCover 2005 and 2009, and MODIS collections 5 and 5.1 are first aggregated to a common legend, and then compared to high-resolution land cover classification systems, continuous vegetation fields (MODIS-VCF) and satellite-derived tree heights (to discriminate against sparse, shrub, and forest vegetation). The GlobCover dataset, with a lower threshold for tree cover and taller tree heights and a better spatial resolution, tends to have better distributions of tree cover compared to high-resolution data. It has therefore been chosen to build new PFTs maps for the ORCHIDEE land surface model at 1 km scale. Compared to the original PFT dataset, the new PFT maps based on GlobCover 2005 and an updated cross-walking approach mainly differ in the characterization of forests and degree of tree cover. The partition of grasslands and bare soils now appears more realistic compared with ground-truth data. This new vegetation map provides a framework for further development of new PFTs in the ORCHIDEE model like shrubs, lichens and mosses, to better represent the water and carbon cycles in northern latitudes. Updated

  17. Mapping Woody Plant Encroachment in Grassland Using Multiple Source Remote Sensing images: Case Study in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xiao, X.; Qin, Y.; Dong, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.; Zou, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Wu, X.; Bajgain, R.

    2015-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment (mainly Juniperus virginiana, a coniferous evergreen tree) in the native grassland has been rapidly increasing in the U.S. Southern Great Plains, largely triggered by overgrazing domestic livestock, fire suppression, and changing rainfall regimes. Increasing dense woody plants have significant implications for local grassland ecosystem dynamics, such as carbon storage, soil nutrient availability, herbaceous forage production, livestock, watershed hydrology and wildlife habitats. However, very limited data are available about the spatio-temporal dynamics of woody plant encroachment to the native grassland at regional scale. Data from remotes sensing could potentially provide relevant information and improve the conversion of native grassland to woody plant encroachment. Previous studies on woody detection in grassland mainly conducted at rangeland scale using airborne or high resolution images, which is sufficient to monitor the dynamics of woody plant encroachment in local grassland. This study examined the potential of medium resolution images to detect the woody encroachment in tallgrass prairie. We selected Cleveland county, Oklahoma, US. as case study area, where eastern area has higher woody coverage than does the western area. A 25-m Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR, N36W98) image was used to map the trees distributed in the grassland. Then, maximum enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in the winter calculated from time-series Landsat images was used to identify the invaded woody species (Juniperus virginiana) through phenology-based algorithm. The resulting woody plant encroachment map was compared with the results extracted from the high resolution images provided by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP). Field photos were also used to validate the accuracy. These results showed that integrating PALSAR and Landsat had good performance to identify the

  18. Rapidmap - rapid mapping and information dissemination for disasters using remote sensing and geoinformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltsavias, E.; Cho, K.; Remondino, F.; Soergel, U.; Wakabayashi, H.

    2013-10-01

    FP7 INCO project frame for enhancing research cooperation between European countries and Japan on two topics, one of which is Resilience Against Disasters. The project started in June 2013 and has a duration of 2 years. In the paper, we will outline the aims of the project, methodologies and techniques to be developed and some test data. Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) are powerful technologies for collecting useful information on the damages of disasters in short time. However, since many different types of RS data are available (satellite, aerial, UAV, terrestrial), data co-registration, information integration and feature extraction need reliable and advanced methodologies. In the RAPIDMAP project, we will develop practical ways to integrate RS data processing tools in near-real-time and allow users to use this data soon after the disasters by means of WebGIS tools. This will help not only decision makers but also end-users in the disaster area. The key components of this project are: (1) Near-real-time monitoring: the procedure of near-real-time monitoring with satellites as well as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV) will be set up and demonstrated. (2) Data co-registration: in disasters, various images as well as maps come from different sources. The co-registration of multiple images is a key technology for information integration. In this project, a system to co-register multiple images in near-real-time will be developed. (3) Data fusion and change detection: one of the advantages of RS is to collect information with multiple sensors. Various methods for fusing optical with active microwave (SAR) sensor data for information extraction and change detection will be developed. (4) Decision Support System (DSS) based on WebGIS technologies: the collected and integrated information has to be easily accessible and visible by decision makers and end-users in near-real-time and worldwide. By using WebGIS technologies, wireless networks and

  19. Automated mapping of linear dunefield morphometric parameters from remotely-sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfer, M. W.; Fyfe, R. M.; Lewin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Linear dunes are among the world's most common desert dune types, and typically occur in dunefields arranged in remarkably organized patterns extending over hundreds of kilometers. The causes of the patterns, formed by dunes merging, bifurcating and terminating, are still poorly understood, although it is widely accepted that they are emergent properties of the complex system of interactions between the boundary layer and an often-vegetated erodible substrate. Where such dunefields are vegetated, they are typically used as extensive rangeland, yet it is evident that many currently stabilized dunefields have been reactivated repeatedly during the late Quaternary. It has been suggested that dunefield patterning and the temporal evolution of dunefields are related, and thus there is considerable interest in better understanding the boundary conditions controlling dune patterning, especially given the possibility of reactivation of currently-stabilized dunefields under 21st century climate change. However, the time-consuming process of manual dune mapping has hampered attempts at quantitative description of dunefield patterning. This study aims to develop and test methods for delineating linear dune trendlines automatically from freely-available remotely sensed datasets. The highest resolution free global topographic data presently available (Aster GDEM v2) proved to be of marginal use, as the topographic expression of the dunes is of the same order as the vertical precision of the dataset (∼10 m), but in regions with relatively simple patterning it defined dune trends adequately. Analysis of spectral data (panchromatic Landsat 8 data) proved more promising in five of the six test sites, and despite poor panchromatic signal/noise ratios for the sixth site, the reflectance in the deep blue/violet (Landsat 8 Band 1) offers an alternative method of delineating dune pattern. A new edge detection algorithm (LInear Dune Optimized edge detection; LIDO) is proposed, based on

  20. Solution of the equation of radiative transfer for remote sensing over nonuniform surface reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere is a necessity for the remote sensing of surface reflectivity from satellites and aircraft. The range of the adjacency effect, which represents the effect of bright areas on the radiance above dark areas, is the main parameter that distinguishes atmospheric radiative transfer over a nonuniform surface from that over a uniform one. A radiative transfer model which expresses this range correctly is, therefore, critical for developing remote sensing methods for the case of an atmosphere over a nonuniform surface. The present investigation is concerned with the development of a new approximate solution of the radiative transfer (RT) equation. The solution is not limited to nonabsorbing atmospheres, but it will still be limited to nadir observations. The results compare favorably with Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Mapping crop distribution in administrative districts of southwest Germany using multi-sensor remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Christopher; Goessl, Achim; Lex, Sylvia; Metz, Annekatrin; Esch, Thomas; Konrad, Christoph; Goettlicher, Gerold; Dech, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    In the face of global change, concepts for sustainable land management are increasingly requested, among others to cope with the rapidly increasing energy demand. High resolution land use classifications can contribute spatially explicit information suitable for land use planning. In this study, the coverage of cereal crops was derived for two regions in Baden-Wuerttemberg and Rhineland-Palatinate - Germany, as well as in the Alsace - France, by classifying multitemporal and multi-scale remote sensing data. The presented methodology shall be used as basic input for high resolution bio-energy potential calculations. Segmentation of pan-merged 15 m Landsat 7 ETM+ data and pre-classification with CORINE data was applied to derive homogenous objects assumed to approximate the field boundaries of agricultural areas. Seven acquisitions of moderate resolution IRS-P6 AWiFS data (60 m) recorded during the vegetation period of 2007 were used for the subsequent classification of the objects. Multiple classification and regression trees (random forest) were selected as classification algorithm due to their ability to consider non-linear distributions of class values in the feature space. Training and validation was based on a subset of 1724 samplings of the official European land use survey LUCAS (Land Use/ Cover Area Frame Statistical Survey). Altogether, the object based approach resulted in an overall accuracy of 74 %. The use of 15 m Landsat for mapping field objects were identified to be one major obstacle caused by the characteristically small agricultural units in Southwest Germany. Improvements were also achieved by correcting the LUCAS samples for location errors.

  2. Artificial Groundwater Recharge Zones Mapping Using Remote Sensing and GIS: A Case Study in Indian Punjab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amanpreet; Panda, S. N.; Kumar, K. S.; Sharma, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-07-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge plays a vital role in sustainable management of groundwater resources. The present study was carried out to identify the artificial groundwater recharge zones in Bist Doab basin of Indian Punjab using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) for augmenting groundwater resources. The study area has been facing severe water scarcity due to intensive agriculture for the past few years. The thematic layers considered in the present study are: geomorphology (2004), geology (2004), land use/land cover (2008), drainage density, slope, soil texture (2000), aquifer transmissivity, and specific yield. Different themes and related features were assigned proper weights based on their relative contribution to groundwater recharge. Normalized weights were computed using the Saaty's analytic hierarchy process. Thematic layers were integrated in ArcGIS for delineation of artificial groundwater recharge zones. The recharge map thus obtained was divided into four zones (poor, moderate, good, and very good) based on their influence to groundwater recharge. Results indicate that 15, 18, 37, and 30 % of the study area falls under "poor," "moderate," "good," and "very good" groundwater recharge zones, respectively. The highest recharge potential area is located towards western and parts of middle region because of high infiltration rates caused due to the distribution of flood plains, alluvial plain, and agricultural land. The least effective recharge potential is in the eastern and middle parts of the study area due to low infiltration rate. The results of the study can be used to formulate an efficient groundwater management plan for sustainable utilization of limited groundwater resources.

  3. Putting Us on the Map: Remote Sensing Investigation of the Ancient Maya Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Thomas L.; Saturno, William

    2004-01-01

    A common problem for archaeologists studying ancient settlement in the Maya Lowlands is overcoming the dense vegetation in order to obtain an accurate regional perspective of the presence of archaeological sites, their exact locations and their overall extents. Most often this is done by extensive ground surveys in which many individuals chop parallel paths through the vegetation in search of sites. Once a site is found an effort is made to mark its location on a regional map and to explore its perimeter. Obtaining locational information has been made dramatically easier in recent years with the advent of improved Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however the process of initial identification of sites and the determination of their borders is exceedingly labor intensive and has remained relatively unchanged since the beginning of settlement surveys in the region in the 1950 s. Currently, we are revolutionizing settlement survey in the Maya Lowlands by using remotely sensed data from IKONOS, Quickbird, and Eo 1, satellites as well as airborne AIRSAR radar data. The Ancient Maya built their cities, towns and even their smallest hamlets using excavated limestone and lime plasters. We propose that the decay of these structures provides a unique microenvironment for the growth of vegetation as the levels of moisture and nutrition within the ruins vary substantially from those in the surrounding forest. These microenvironmental differences on the ground are likewise represented by compositional differences in the forest canopy both in the species present and in leaf color (representing moisture/nutritional stress) visible through the analysis of high-resolution satellite data. In this way the detailed analysis of forest composition can reveal a detailed picture of the ancient settlements that lie beneath it. Preliminary examinations using this technique have been very successful and we are refining these techniques in order to efficiently comprehend the details of

  4. Putting us on the Map: Remote Sensing Investigation of the Ancient Maya Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Thomas L.; Saturno, William; Irwin, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    A common problem for archaeologists studying ancient settlement in the Maya Lowlands is overcoming the dense vegetation in order to obtain an accurate regional perspective of the presence of archaeological sites, their exact locations and their overall extents. Most often this is done by extensive ground surveys in which many individuals chop parallel paths through the vegetation in search of sites. Once a site is found an effort is made to mark its location on a regional map and to explore its perimeter. Obtaining locational information has been made dramatically easier in recent years with the advent of improved Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however the process of initial identification of sites and the determination of their borders is exceedingly labor intensive and has remained relatively unchanged since the beginning of settlement surveys in the region in the 1950's. Currently, we are revolutionizing settlement survey in the Maya Lowlands by using remotely sensed data from IKONOS, Quickbird, and Eol, satellites. The Ancient Maya built their cities, towns and even their smallest hamlets using excavated limestone and lime plasters. We propose that the decay of these structures provides a unique microenvironment for the growth of vegetation as the levels of moisture and nutrition within the ruins vary substantially from those in the surrounding forest. These microenvironmental differences on the ground are likewise represented by compositional differences in the forest canopy both in the species present and in leaf color (representing moisture/nutritional stress) visible through the analysis of high- resolution satellite data. In this way the detailed analysis of forest composition can reveal a detailed picture of the ancient settlements that lie beneath it. Preliminary examinations using this technique have been very successful and we are refining these techniques in order to efficiently comprehend the details of Ancient Maya settlement in the Lowlands.

  5. Landslide Mapping and Modeling Using Remote Sensing, GIS and Statistical Analysis of District Muzaffarabad, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Nimrah; Mushtaq, Saman

    2016-07-01

    Occurrence factors of Landslide hazard can be natural such as high slopes, geological conditions and lineaments, faults, rain, and river cutting. Man-made factors such as road cuttings, deforestation or development can also contribute to the landsliding. The focus of this study was to model those landslides susceptible prone to hazard areas which in turn can help for the development, urbanization and for setting up rules or regulations to save nature and environment of the area. The focal of the current research work was the Earthquake of October, 2005 also known as Kashmir Earthquake, the epicenter location of the earthquake 34°29'35″N 73°37'44″E at height of ~2000 from mean sea level and ~20 Km North-East from Muzaffarabad city, Azad Jammu & Kashmir, at the scale of 1:50000 Geological map of 43-F/11, tehsil Nauseri area. The techniques used in this research is based on theorem of Bayes's bivariat statistic (weight of evidence) which predicts the events geographically and on input layers and the relationship of event. A relationship between event of landslide and factors was studied and analyzed using this method. Subsequently a prediction of the occurrence of the spatial location of the landslide event was established successfully. The relationship of distribution of landslide and factors layers was calculated using the statistical methods which enabled to predict the landslides zones in different areas. The methodology applied proved that the success rate was 80% landslide occurred in 18% area and prediction rate was 70% of landslides occurred in 70% of area. The use satellite remote sensing data, and GIS with the integration of statistical method are definitely an effective tool for predicting the future landslide prone areas.

  6. Artificial groundwater recharge zones mapping using remote sensing and GIS: a case study in Indian Punjab.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanpreet; Panda, S N; Kumar, K S; Sharma, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-07-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge plays a vital role in sustainable management of groundwater resources. The present study was carried out to identify the artificial groundwater recharge zones in Bist Doab basin of Indian Punjab using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) for augmenting groundwater resources. The study area has been facing severe water scarcity due to intensive agriculture for the past few years. The thematic layers considered in the present study are: geomorphology (2004), geology (2004), land use/land cover (2008), drainage density, slope, soil texture (2000), aquifer transmissivity, and specific yield. Different themes and related features were assigned proper weights based on their relative contribution to groundwater recharge. Normalized weights were computed using the Saaty's analytic hierarchy process. Thematic layers were integrated in ArcGIS for delineation of artificial groundwater recharge zones. The recharge map thus obtained was divided into four zones (poor, moderate, good, and very good) based on their influence to groundwater recharge. Results indicate that 15, 18, 37, and 30 % of the study area falls under "poor," "moderate," "good," and "very good" groundwater recharge zones, respectively. The highest recharge potential area is located towards western and parts of middle region because of high infiltration rates caused due to the distribution of flood plains, alluvial plain, and agricultural land. The least effective recharge potential is in the eastern and middle parts of the study area due to low infiltration rate. The results of the study can be used to formulate an efficient groundwater management plan for sustainable utilization of limited groundwater resources.

  7. Color Shaded-Relief and Surface-Classification Maps of the Fish Creek Area, Harrison Bay Quadrangle, Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, John L.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Houseknecht, David W.; Amoroso, Lee; Meares, Donald C.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The northeastern part of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) has become an area of active petroleum exploration during the past five years. Recent leasing and exploration drilling in the NPRA requires the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to manage and monitor a variety of surface activities that include seismic surveying, exploration drilling, oil-field development drilling, construction of oil-production facilities, and construction of pipelines and access roads. BLM evaluates a variety of permit applications, environmental impact studies, and other documents that require rapid compilation and analysis of data pertaining to surface and subsurface geology, hydrology, and biology. In addition, BLM must monitor these activities and assess their impacts on the natural environment. Timely and accurate completion of these land-management tasks requires elevation, hydrologic, geologic, petroleum-activity, and cadastral data, all integrated in digital formats at a higher resolution than is currently available in nondigital (paper) formats. To support these land-management tasks, a series of maps was generated from remotely sensed data in an area of high petroleum-industry activity (fig. 1). The maps cover an area from approximately latitude 70?00' N. to 70?30' N. and from longitude 151?00' W. to 153?10' W. The area includes the Alpine oil field in the east, the Husky Inigok exploration well (site of a landing strip) in the west, many of the exploration wells drilled in NPRA since 2000, and the route of a proposed pipeline to carry oil from discovery wells in NPRA to the Alpine oil field. This map area is referred to as the 'Fish Creek area' after a creek that flows through the region. The map series includes (1) a color shaded-relief map based on 5-m-resolution data (sheet 1), (2) a surface-classification map based on 30-m-resolution data (sheet 2), and (3) a 5-m-resolution shaded relief-surface classification map that combines the shaded

  8. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  9. Mapping flood prone areas in southern Brazil: a combination of frequency analysis, HAND algorithm and remote sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris Goerl, Roberto; Borges Chaffe, Pedro Luiz; Marcel Pellerin, Joel Robert; Altamirano Flores, Juan Antonio; Josina Abreu, Janete; Speckhann, Gustavo Andrei; Mattos Sanchez, Gerly

    2015-04-01

    Floods disaster damages several people around the world. There is a worldwide increasing trend of natural disasters frequency and their negative impacts related to the population growth and high urbanization in natural hazards zones. In Santa Catarina state, such as almost all southern Brazilian territory, floods are a frequent hydrological disaster. In this context, flood prone areas map is a important tool to avoid the construction of new settlements in non-urbanizations areas. The present work aimed to map flood prone areas in Palhoça City, Southern Brazil combining high resolution digital elevations data, remote sensing information, frequency analysis and High Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) algorithm. We used 17 years of daily discharge and stage data to calculate flood probability and return period. Remote Sensing (RS) with CBERS HRC image with 2,7m resolution was used. This image was taken one day after one flood occurrence and a band difference was used to extract the flood extent. HAND using DEM to calculate the altimetric difference between channel pixel and adjacent terrain values. All morphometric attributes used in HAND were extracted directly from the high resolution DEM (1m). Through CBERS image areas where flood level was higher than 0.5m were mapped. There is some kind of uncertain in establish HAND classes, since only distance to the channel was take in account. Thus, using other hydrological or spatial information can reduce this uncertain. To elaborate the final flood prone map, all this methods were combined. This map was classified in three main classes based on return period. It was notices that there is a strong spatial correlation between high susceptibility flood areas and geomorphological features like floodplains and Holocene beach ridges, places where water table emerges frequently. The final map was classified using three different colors (red, yellow and green) related to high, medium an law susceptibility flood areas. This mapping

  10. Applications of remote sensing and GIS in surface hydrology: Snow cover, soil moisture and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei

    Studies on surface hydrology can generally be classified into two categories, observation for different components of surface water, and modeling their dynamic movements. This study only focuses on observation part of surface water components: snow cover, soil moisture, and precipitation. Moreover, instead of discussion on the detailed algorithm and instrument technique behind each component, this dissertation pours efforts on analysis of the standard remotely sensed products and their applications under different settings. First in Chapter 2, validation of MODIS Terra 8-day maximum snow cover composite (MOD10A2) in the Northern Xinjiang, China, from 2000-2006, shows that the 8-day MODIS/Terra product has high agreements with in situ measurements as the in situ snow depth is larger or equal to 4 cm, while the agreement is low for the patchy snow as the in situ snow depth less than 4 cm. According to the in situ observation, this chapter develops an empirical algorithm to separate the cloud-covered pixels into snow and no snow. Continued long-term production of MODIS-type snow cover product is critical to assess water resources of the study area, as well as other larger scale global environment monitoring. Terra and Aqua satellites carry the same MODIS instrument and provide two parallel MODIS daily snow cover products at different time (local time 10:30 am and 1:30 pm, respectively). Chapter 3 develops an algorithm and automated scripts to combine the daily MODIS Terra (MOD10A1) and Aqua (MYD10A1) snow cover products, and to automatically generate multi-day Terra-Aqua snow cover image composites, with flexible starting and ending dates and a user-defined cloud cover threshold. Chapter 4 systematically compares the difference between MODIS Terra and Aqua snow cover products within a hydrologic year of 2003-2004, validates the MODIS Terra and Aqua snow cover products using in situ measurements in Northern Xinjiang, and compares the accuracy among the standard MODIS

  11. Identifying and Mapping Seasonal Surface Water Frost with MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wood, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured surface broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. However, few studies have investigated seasonal surface water frost and its role in the global water cycle. We examine zonally-averaged TES daytime albedo, temperature, and water vapor abundance data [after Smith, 2004] to map the presence of surface water frost on Mars. Surface water frost occurs in the polar and mid latitudes, in regions with surface temperatures less than 220 K and above 150 K, and can significantly increase albedo relative to the bare surface. In the northern hemisphere water frost is most apparent in late fall/early winter, before the onset of carbon dioxide frost. Dust storms occurring near northern winter solstice affect albedo data and prevent us from putting a latitudinal lower limit on the water frost in the northern hemisphere. Regardless, seasonal water frost occurs at least as low as 48°N in Utopia Planitia, beginning at Ls=~230°, as observed by Viking Lander 2 [Svitek and Murray, 1990]. Daytime surface water frost was also observed at the Phoenix Lander site (68°N) beginning at Ls=~160° [Cull et al., 2010]. The timing of albedo variations observed by TES agree relatively well with lander observations of seasonal frost. Seasonal water frost is not detected during fall in the southern hemisphere. A potential explanation for this discrepancy, compared with frost detections in the north, is the disparity in atmospheric water vapor abundance between the two hemispheres. The frost point temperatures for water vapor

  12. Surface Photometry of Reverberation-Mapped Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    I present a statistical analysis of the surface photometry obtained for a sample of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival images of the host galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose time-delay between continuum and broad emission line variations have been analyzed (i.e., reverberation mapping). For quiescent galaxies, strong correlations exist between central black hole mass and host galaxy structure. If there are similar correlations for AGN between central black hole masses derived from reverberation mapping and the host galaxy structure that I have derived from archival HST images, this would imply some validation of the assumptions underlying reverberation mapping concerning the structure, kinematics, and orientation of the broad line regions in AGN.The correlations for quiescent galaxies bewteen central black hole mass and host galaxy structure imply that there might be a strong causal connection between the formation and evolution of the black hole and the galaxy bulge. A current hypothesis is that bulges, black holes, and quasars formed, grew, or turned on as parts of the same process, in part because the collapse or merger of bulges might provide a rich fuel supply to a central black hole. One way of testing this hypothesis would be to plot AGN as a function of redshift on these correlations. However, two severe obstacles limit the ability to measure black hole masses in AGN using HST to analyze the central stellar and/or gas dynamics: (1) since spatial resolution becomes more limited at larger distances, only two reverberation-mapped AGN are close enough to Earth to render the analysis feasible, and (2) it isdifficult to obtain useful spectra of the stars and/or gas in the presence of the bright nonstellar nucleus. The most useful alternative is to exploit reverberation mapping, which uses the time delay in a given AGN between variations in the continuum emission and broad emission lines.

  13. Surface characteristics of debris-covered glacier tongues in the Khumbu Himalaya derived from remote sensing texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racoviteanu, Adina; Arnaud, Yves; Nicholson, Lindsay

    2013-04-01

    The delineation of debris-covered glaciers remains a challenge in optical remote sensing, due to the similarity of the spectral signature of debris-covered ice to surrounding lateral moraines, making it difficult to apply standard semi-automated algorithms commonly used for clean ice delineation. Furthermore, supraglacial debris exhibits considerable spatial variability in its characteristics such as debris cover thickness, particle size, thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. These properties are needed in order to map the extent of debris cover and to estimate ice melt under the debris cover or at the surface. In this study we evaluate the potential of texture analysis for detecting surface characteristics of debris-cover glacier tongues in the Khumbu Himalaya, using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and high-resolution Ikonos data. We focus on mapping supra-glacier lakes and exposed ice walls using texture analysis algorithms such as grey-level co-occurrence measures (GLCM), filtering, image segmentation, and particle boundaries. We compare the performance of various existing commercial software suitable for texture analysis such as ERDAS Objective, Aphelion, as well as public domain image display and analysis software used originally for medical analysis, notably Image SXM and ImageJ. Preliminary results based on geostatistics and GLCM measures show differences in surface roughness of debris cover when compared to surrounding ice-free moraines. We expand on these results and aim at developing a quasi-automated algorithm for extracting surface features, which will be used as input in an energy balance model for estimating melting under debris cover as well as surface ice melt.

  14. VEM on VERITAS - Retrieval of global infrared surface emissivity maps of Venus and expectable retrieval uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappel, David; Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne; Hensley, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Even though Venus is in many respects the most Earth-like planet we know today, its surface composition and geology are not well understood yet. The major obstacle is the extremely dense, hot, and opaque atmosphere that complicates both in situ measurements and infrared remote sensing, the wavelength range of the latter often being the range of choice due to its coverage of many spectral properties diagnostic to the surface material's composition and texture. Thermal emissions of the hot surface depend on surface temperature and on spectral surface emissivity. As this emitted radiation wells upward, it is strongly attenuated through absorption and multiple scattering by the gaseous and particulate components of the dense atmosphere, and it is superimposed by thermal atmospheric emissions. While surface information this way carried to space is completely lost in the scattered sunlight on the dayside, a few narrow atmospheric transparency windows around 1 μm allow the sounding of the surface with nightside measurements. The successfully completed VEX ('Venus Express') mission, although not dedicated to surface science, enabled a first glimpse at much of the southern hemisphere's surface through the nightside spectral transparency windows covered by VIRTIS-M-IR ('Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer, Mapping channel in the IR', 1.0-5.1 μm). Two complementary approaches, a fast semi-empiric technique on the one hand, and a more fundamental but resource-intensive method based on a fully regularized Bayesian multi-spectrum retrieval algorithm in combination with a detailed radiative transfer simulation program on the other hand, were both successfully applied to derive surface emissivity data maps. Both methods suffered from lack of spatial coverage and a small SNR as well as from surface topography maps not sufficiently accurate for the definition of suitable boundary conditions for surface emissivity retrieval. The recently proposed VERITAS mission

  15. Quantitative surface parameter maps using Intermodulation Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Platz, Daniel; Tholén, Erik; Hutter, Carsten; Haviland, David

    2011-03-01

    It is well known that the phase image in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) is sensitive to material properties of the surface. However that information is not enough to fully quantify the tip-surface interaction. We have developed Intermodulation AFM, based on a spectral analysis of the cantilever's nonlinear dynamics, which increases the amount of information obtained without increasing scan time. We show how it is possible to extract quantitative material properties of the surface from this additional information. The method works under the assumption of a tip-surface force model, such as the DMT model, fitting the model parameters to the measured spectral data. The parameters are obtained at each pixel of the AFM image and form surface property maps which can be displayed together with topography. We demonstrate this on different surfaces such as polymer blends, extracting stiffness and adhesive properties. D. Platz, E. A. Tholen, D. Pesen, and D. B. Haviland, Appl. Phys. Lett., 92, 153106 (2008)

  16. Hyperscale Analysis of River Morphology Though Optical Remote Mapping of Water Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The science of in-channel river processes and forms has profited enormously from the introduction of specialized remote sensing tools such as LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging during the past decade. However, the cost and lack of historical data make them a less than ideal choice for many geomorphic questions. As an alternative to high-performance technology, a new analytical technique applied to older color aerial imagery allows extraction of the three-dimensional river environment over enormous distances. In clearwater rivers, some light often reaches the riverbed and returns to the surface, providing optical information about different components of the physical habitat structure. The HAB-2 transform combines the Beer-Lambert law of light absorption with hydrodynamic rules to allow the estimation of river depth at each image pixel, and it allows separation of the depth effect from the remaining image information. The widespread availability of CIR digital orthophotoquads across much of the United States allows the use of HAB approaches to extract three dimensional data for large area riverscapes at scales from about a meter to that of the entire watershed. The rapid and widespread utility of image-based river DTMs allows hitherto unparalleled investigation of geomorphic structures. As one example of this utility, HAB- calibrated high-resolution imagery of the Nueces River watershed, Texas, shows systematic deviations from the classic theory of the downstream hydraulic geometry as well as an unprecedented level of randomness at most scales.

  17. Disaggregating census data for population mapping using random forests with remotely-sensed and ancillary data.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Forrest R; Gaughan, Andrea E; Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are vital for measuring impacts of population growth, monitoring human-environment interactions and for planning and policy development. Many methods are used to disaggregate census data and predict population densities for finer scale, gridded population data sets. We present a new semi-automated dasymetric modeling approach that incorporates detailed census and ancillary data in a flexible, "Random Forest" estimation technique. We outline the combination of widely available, remotely-sensed and geospatial data that contribute to the modeled dasymetric weights and then use the Random Forest model to generate a gridded prediction of population density at ~100 m spatial resolution. This prediction layer is then used as the weighting surface to perform dasymetric redistribution of the census counts at a country level. As a case study we compare the new algorithm and its products for three countries (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya) with other common gridded population data production methodologies. We discuss the advantages of the new method and increases over the accuracy and flexibility of those previous approaches. Finally, we outline how this algorithm will be extended to provide freely-available gridded population data sets for Africa, Asia and Latin America.

  18. Disaggregating Census Data for Population Mapping Using Random Forests with Remotely-Sensed and Ancillary Data

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Forrest R.; Gaughan, Andrea E.; Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are vital for measuring impacts of population growth, monitoring human-environment interactions and for planning and policy development. Many methods are used to disaggregate census data and predict population densities for finer scale, gridded population data sets. We present a new semi-automated dasymetric modeling approach that incorporates detailed census and ancillary data in a flexible, “Random Forest” estimation technique. We outline the combination of widely available, remotely-sensed and geospatial data that contribute to the modeled dasymetric weights and then use the Random Forest model to generate a gridded prediction of population density at ~100 m spatial resolution. This prediction layer is then used as the weighting surface to perform dasymetric redistribution of the census counts at a country level. As a case study we compare the new algorithm and its products for three countries (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya) with other common gridded population data production methodologies. We discuss the advantages of the new method and increases over the accuracy and flexibility of those previous approaches. Finally, we outline how this algorithm will be extended to provide freely-available gridded population data sets for Africa, Asia and Latin America. PMID:25689585

  19. Remote sensing for precision agriculture: Within-field spatial variability analysis and mapping with aerial digital multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalapillai, Sreekala

    2000-10-01

    Advances in remote sensing technology and biological sensors provided the motivation for this study on the applications of aerial multispectral remote sensing in precision agriculture. The feasibility of using high-resolution multispectral remote sensing for precision farming applications such as soil type delineation, identification of crop nitrogen levels, and modeling and mapping of weed density distribution and yield potential within a crop field was explored in this study. Some of the issues such as image calibration for variable lighting conditions and soil background influence were also addressed. Intensity normalization and band ratio methods were found to be adequate image calibration methods to compensate for variable illumination and soil background influence. Several within-field variability factors such as growth stage, field conditions, nutrient availability, crop cultivar, and plant population were found to be dominant in different periods. Unsupervised clustering of color infrared (CIR) image of a field soil was able to identify soil mapping units with an average accuracy of 76%. Spectral reflectance from a crop field was highly correlated to the chlorophyll reading. A regression model developed to predict nitrogen stress in corn identified nitrogen-stressed areas from nitrogen-sufficient areas with a high accuracy (R2 = 0.93). Weed density was highly correlated to the spectral reflectance from a field. One month after planting was found to be a good time to map spatial weed density. The optimum range of resolution for weed mapping was 4 m to 4.5 m for the remote sensing system and the experimental field used in this study. Analysis of spatial yield with respect to spectral reflectance showed that the visible and NIR reflectance were negatively correlated to yield and crop population in heavily weed-infested areas. The yield potential was highly correlated to image indices, especially to normalized brightness. The ANN model developed for one of the

  20. Mapping of plume deposits and surface composition on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Scipioni, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Clark, R. N.,; Hand, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    A major result of the Cassini mission was the discovery that the small mid-sized moon Enceladus is presently geological active[Dougherty et al., 2006; Porco et al., 2006; Spencer et al., 2006; Hansen et al., 2008]. This activity results in plumes of water vapor and ice emanating from a series of fractures ("Tiger Stripes") at the moon's South Pole. Some fraction of plume material escapes the moon's gravity and populates the E-ring as well as ultimately providing a source of fresh plasma in the Saturnian magnetosphere [Pontius and Hill, 2006; Kempf et al., 2010]. However, a significant portion of plume material is redeposited on Enceladus and thus provides a source of surface contaminants. By studying the near-infrared spectral signatures of these contaminants we may put new constraints on the composition of the plumes and, ultimately, their source, which is currently believed to be Enceladus's global sub-surface ocean [Iess et al., 2014]. Here we present preliminary results from our analysis of observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [Brown et al., 2005] onboard Cassini and mapping of plume deposits across the surface of Enceladus. We have investigated the global variation of the water ice Fresnel peak at 3.1 μm, which may be used as an indicator of ice crystallinity [Hansen & McCord, 2004; Jaumann et al., 2008; Newman et al., 2008]. We have also investigated the slope of the 1.11-2.25 μm spectral region, which serves as an indicator of water ice grain size for small grains (< 100 μm) as well as the presence of contaminants [e.g. Filacchione et al., 2010]. Finally, we have identified and mapped an absorption feature centered at 3.25 μm that may be related to organic contaminants, represented by the band depth of the fundamental C-H stretch [e.g. Cruikshank et al., 2014; Scipioni et al., 2014].

  1. Mapping the global land surface using 1 km AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauer, D.T.; Eidenshink, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The scientific requirements for mapping the global land surface using 1 km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data have been set forth by the U.S. Global Change Research Program; the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP); The United Nations; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the Committee on Earth Observations Satellites; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission to planet Earth (MTPE) program. Mapping the global land surface using 1 km AVHRR data is an international effort to acquire, archive, process, and distribute 1 km AVHRR data to meet the needs of the international science community. A network of AVHRR receiving stations, along with data recorded by NOAA, has been acquiring daily global land coverage since April 1, 1992. A data set of over 70,000 AVHRR images is archived and distributed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Data Center, and the European Space Agency. Under the guidance of the IGBP, processing standards have been developed for calibration, atmospheric correction, geometric registration, and the production of global 10-day maximum normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) composites. The major uses of the composites are for the study of surface vegetation condition, mapping land cover, and deriving biophysical characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems. A time-series of 54 10-day global vegetation index composites for the period of April 1, 1992 through September 1993 has been produced. The production of a time-series of 33 10-day global vegetation index composites using NOAA-14 data for the period of February 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995 is underway. The data products are available from the USGS, in cooperation with NASA's MTPE program and other international organizations.

  2. Regional adaptation of a dynamic global vegetation model using a remote sensing data derived land cover map of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostikov, S.; Venevsky, S.; Bartalev, S.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) SEVER has been regionally adapted using a remote sensing data-derived land cover map in order to improve the reconstruction conformity of the distribution of vegetation functional types over Russia. The SEVER model was modified to address noticeable divergences between modelling results and the land cover map. The model modification included a light competition method elaboration and the introduction of a tundra class into the model. The rigorous optimisation of key model parameters was performed using a two-step procedure. First, an approximate global optimum was found using the efficient global optimisation (EGO) algorithm, and afterwards a local search in the vicinity of the approximate optimum was performed using the quasi-Newton algorithm BFGS. The regionally adapted model shows a significant improvement of the vegetation distribution reconstruction over Russia with better matching with the satellite-derived land cover map, which was confirmed by both a visual comparison and a formal conformity criterion.

  3. Urban land-cover change detection through sub-pixel imperviousness mapping using remotely sensed data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Limin; Xian, George Z.; Klaver, Jacqueline M.; Deal, Brian

    2003-01-01

    We developed a Sub-pixel Imperviousness Change Detection (SICD) approach to detect urban land-cover changes using Landsat and high-resolution imagery. The sub-pixel percent imperviousness was mapped for two dates (09 March 1993 and 11 March 2001) over western Georgia using a regression tree algorithm. The accuracy of the predicted imperviousness was reasonable based on a comparison using independent reference data. The average absolute error between predicted and reference data was 16.4 percent for 1993 and 15.3 percent for 2001. The correlation coefficient (r) was 0.73 for 1993 and 0.78 for 2001, respectively. Areas with a significant increase (greater than 20 percent) in impervious surface from 1993 to 2001 were mostly related to known land-cover/land-use changes that occurred in this area, suggesting that the spatial change of an impervious surface is a useful indicator for identifying spatial extent, intensity, and, potentially, type of urban land-cover/land-use changes. Compared to other pixel-based change-detection methods (band differencing, rationing, change vector, post-classification), information on changes in sub-pixel percent imperviousness allow users to quantify and interpret urban land-cover/land-use changes based on their own definition. Such information is considered complementary to products generated using other change-detection methods. In addition, the procedure for mapping imperviousness is objective and repeatable, hence, can be used for monitoring urban land-cover/land-use change over a large geographic area. Potential applications and limitations of the products developed through this study in urban environmental studies are also discussed.

  4. Mapping erodibility in dust source regions based on geomorphology, meteorology, and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Yang, Zong-Liang; Kocurek, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Mineral dust in the atmosphere has implications for Earth's radiation budget, biogeochemical cycles, hydrological cycles, human health, and visibility. Currently, the simulated vertical mass flux of dust differs greatly among the existing dust models. While most of the models utilize an erodibility factor to characterize dust sources, this factor is assumed to be static, without sufficient characterization of the highly heterogeneous and dynamic nature of dust source regions. We present a high-resolution land cover map of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in which the terrain is classified by visually examining satellite images obtained from Google Earth Professional and Environmental Systems Research Institute Basemap. We show that the correlation between surface wind speed and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer deep blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be used as a proxy for erodibility, which satisfactorily represents the spatiotemporal distribution of soil-derived dust sources. This method also identifies agricultural dust sources and eliminates the satellite-observed dust component that arises from long-range transport, pollution, and biomass burning. The erodible land cover of the MENA region is grouped into nine categories: (1) bedrock: with sediment, (2) sand deposit, (3) sand deposit: on bedrock, (4) sand deposit: stabilized, (5) agricultural and urban area, (6) fluvial system, (7) stony surface, (8) playa/sabkha, and (9) savanna/grassland. Our results indicate that erodibility is linked to the land cover type and has regional variation. An improved land cover map, which explicitly accounts for sediment supply, availability, and transport capacity, may be necessary to represent the highly dynamic nature of dust sources in climate models.

  5. Evaluating the potential for remote bathymetric mapping of a turbid, sand-bed river: 1. Field spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2011-09-01

    Remote sensing offers an efficient means of mapping bathymetry in river systems, but this approach has been applied primarily to clear-flowing, gravel bed streams. This study used field spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling to assess the feasibility of spectrally based depth retrieval in a sand-bed river with a higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and greater water turbidity. Attenuation of light within the water column was characterized by measuring the amount of downwelling radiant energy at different depths and calculating a diffuse attenuation coefficient, Kd. Attenuation was strongest in blue and near-infrared bands due to scattering by suspended sediment and absorption by water, respectively. Even for red wavelengths with the lowest values of Kd, only a small fraction of the incident light propagated to the bed, restricting the range of depths amenable to remote sensing. Spectra recorded above the water surface were used to establish a strong, linear relationship (R2 = 0.949) between flow depth and a simple band ratio; even under moderately turbid conditions, depth remained the primary control on reflectance. Constraints on depth retrieval were examined via numerical modeling of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and water column. SSC and sensor radiometric resolution limited both the maximum detectable depth and the precision of image-derived depth estimates. Thus, although field spectra indicated that the bathymetry of turbid channels could be remotely mapped, model results implied that depth retrieval in sediment-laden rivers would be limited to shallow depths (on the order of 0.5 m) and subject to a significant degree of uncertainty.

  6. Evaluating the potential for remote bathymetric mapping of a turbid, sand-bed river: 1. Field spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Legleiter, C.J.; Kinzel, P.J.; Overstreet, B.T.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing offers an efficient means of mapping bathymetry in river systems, but this approach has been applied primarily to clear-flowing, gravel bed streams. This study used field spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling to assess the feasibility of spectrally based depth retrieval in a sand-bed river with a higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and greater water turbidity. Attenuation of light within the water column was characterized by measuring the amount of downwelling radiant energy at different depths and calculating a diffuse attenuation coefficient, Kd. Attenuation was strongest in blue and near-infrared bands due to scattering by suspended sediment and absorption by water, respectively. Even for red wavelengths with the lowest values of Kd, only a small fraction of the incident light propagated to the bed, restricting the range of depths amenable to remote sensing. Spectra recorded above the water surface were used to establish a strong, linear relationship (R2 = 0.949) between flow depth and a simple band ratio; even under moderately turbid conditions, depth remained the primary control on reflectance. Constraints on depth retrieval were examined via numerical modeling of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and water column. SSC and sensor radiometric resolution limited both the maximum detectable depth and the precision of image-derived depth estimates. Thus, although field spectra indicated that the bathymetry of turbid channels could be remotely mapped, model results implied that depth retrieval in sediment-laden rivers would be limited to shallow depths (on the order of 0.5 m) and subject to a significant degree of uncertainty. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Evaluating the potential for remote bathymetric mapping of a turbid, sand-bed river: 1. field spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing offers an efficient means of mapping bathymetry in river systems, but this approach has been applied primarily to clear-flowing, gravel bed streams. This study used field spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling to assess the feasibility of spectrally based depth retrieval in a sand-bed river with a higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and greater water turbidity. Attenuation of light within the water column was characterized by measuring the amount of downwelling radiant energy at different depths and calculating a diffuse attenuation coefficient, Kd. Attenuation was strongest in blue and near-infrared bands due to scattering by suspended sediment and absorption by water, respectively. Even for red wavelengths with the lowest values of Kd, only a small fraction of the incident light propagated to the bed, restricting the range of depths amenable to remote sensing. Spectra recorded above the water surface were used to establish a strong, linear relationship (R2 = 0.949) between flow depth and a simple band ratio; even under moderately turbid conditions, depth remained the primary control on reflectance. Constraints on depth retrieval were examined via numerical modeling of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and water column. SSC and sensor radiometric resolution limited both the maximum detectable depth and the precision of image-derived depth estimates. Thus, although field spectra indicated that the bathymetry of turbid channels could be remotely mapped, model results implied that depth retrieval in sediment-laden rivers would be limited to shallow depths (on the order of 0.5 m) and subject to a significant degree of uncertainty.

  8. Integrating remote sensing with species distribution models; Mapping tamarisk invasions using the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    West, Amanda M.; Evangelista, Paul H.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Talbert, Colin; Talbert, Marian K.; Morisette, Jeffrey; Anderson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of invasive plant species is vital for the management of natural resources and protection of ecosystem processes. The use of satellite remote sensing for mapping the distribution of invasive plants is becoming more common, however conventional imaging software and classification methods have been shown to be unreliable. In this study, we test and evaluate the use of five species distribution model techniques fit with satellite remote sensing data to map invasive tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) along the Arkansas River in Southeastern Colorado. The models tested included boosted regression trees (BRT), Random Forest (RF), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), generalized linear model (GLM), and Maxent. These analyses were conducted using a newly developed software package called the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM). All models were trained with 499 presence points, 10,000 pseudo-absence points, and predictor variables acquired from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor over an eight-month period to distinguish tamarisk from native riparian vegetation using detection of phenological differences. From the Landsat scenes, we used individual bands and calculated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and tasseled capped transformations. All five models identified current tamarisk distribution on the landscape successfully based on threshold independent and threshold dependent evaluation metrics with independent location data. To account for model specific differences, we produced an ensemble of all five models with map output highlighting areas of agreement and areas of uncertainty. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of species distribution models in analyzing remotely sensed data and the utility of ensemble mapping, and showcase the capability of SAHM in pre-processing and executing multiple complex models.

  9. Integrating Remote Sensing with Species Distribution Models; Mapping Tamarisk Invasions Using the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM).

    PubMed

    West, Amanda M; Evangelista, Paul H; Jarnevich, Catherine S; Young, Nicholas E; Stohlgren, Thomas J; Talbert, Colin; Talbert, Marian; Morisette, Jeffrey; Anderson, Ryan

    2016-10-11

    Early detection of invasive plant species is vital for the management of natural resources and protection of ecosystem processes. The use of satellite remote sensing for mapping the distribution of invasive plants is becoming more common, however conventional imaging software and classification methods have been shown to be unreliable. In this study, we test and evaluate the use of five species distribution model techniques fit with satellite remote sensing data to map invasive tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) along the Arkansas River in Southeastern Colorado. The models tested included boosted regression trees (BRT), Random Forest (RF), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), generalized linear model (GLM), and Maxent. These analyses were conducted using a newly developed software package called the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM). All models were trained with 499 presence points, 10,000 pseudo-absence points, and predictor variables acquired from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor over an eight-month period to distinguish tamarisk from native riparian vegetation using detection of phenological differences. From the Landsat scenes, we used individual bands and calculated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and tasseled capped transformations. All five models identified current tamarisk distribution on the landscape successfully based on threshold independent and threshold dependent evaluation metrics with independent location data. To account for model specific differences, we produced an ensemble of all five models with map output highlighting areas of agreement and areas of uncertainty. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of species distribution models in analyzing remotely sensed data and the utility of ensemble mapping, and showcase the capability of SAHM in pre-processing and executing multiple complex models.

  10. Integrating Remote Sensing with Species Distribution Models; Mapping Tamarisk Invasions Using the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM)

    PubMed Central

    West, Amanda M.; Evangelista, Paul H.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Talbert, Colin; Talbert, Marian; Morisette, Jeffrey; Anderson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of invasive plant species is vital for the management of natural resources and protection of ecosystem processes. The use of satellite remote sensing for mapping the distribution of invasive plants is becoming more common, however conventional imaging software and classification methods have been shown to be unreliable. In this study, we test and evaluate the use of five species distribution model techniques fit with satellite remote sensing data to map invasive tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) along the Arkansas River in Southeastern Colorado. The models tested included boosted regression trees (BRT), Random Forest (RF), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), generalized linear model (GLM), and Maxent. These analyses were conducted using a newly developed software package called the Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM). All models were trained with 499 presence points, 10,000 pseudo-absence points, and predictor variables acquired from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor over an eight-month period to distinguish tamarisk from native riparian vegetation using detection of phenological differences. From the Landsat scenes, we used individual bands and calculated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and tasseled capped transformations. All five models identified current tamarisk distribution on the landscape successfully based on threshold independent and threshold dependent evaluation metrics with independent location data. To account for model specific differences, we produced an ensemble of all five models with map output highlighting areas of agreement and areas of uncertainty. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of species distribution models in analyzing remotely sensed data and the utility of ensemble mapping, and showcase the capability of SAHM in pre-processing and executing multiple complex models. PMID:27768080

  11. Use of radar remote sensing (RADARSAT) to map winter wetland habitat for shorebirds in an agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taft, O.W.; Haig, S.M.; Kiilsgaard, C.

    2003-01-01

    Many of today's agricultural landscapes once held vast amounts of wetland habitat for waterbirds and other wildlife. Successful restoration of these landscapes relies on access to accurate maps of the wetlands that remain. We used C-band (5.6-cm-wavelength), HH-polarized radar remote sensing (RADARSAT) at a 38?? incidence angle (8-m resolution) to map the distribution of winter shorebird (Charadriiformes) habitat on agricultural lands in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. We acquired imagery on three dates (10 December 1999, 27 January 2000, and 15 March 2000) and simultaneously collected ground reference data to classify radar signatures and evaluate map accuracy of four habitat classes: (1) wet with ??? 50% vegetation (considered optimal shorebird habitat), (2) wet with > 50% vegetation, (3) dry with ??? 50% vegetation, and (4) dry with > 50% vegetation. Overall accuracy varied from 45 to 60% among the three images, but the accuracy of focal class 1 was greater, ranging from 72 to 80%. Class 4 coverage was stable and dominated maps (40% of mapped study area) for all three dates, while class 3 coverage decreased slightly throughout the study period. Among wet classes, class 1 was most abundant (30% coverage) in December and January, decreasing in March by 15%. Conversely, class 2 increased dramatically from January to March, likely due to transition from class 1 as vegetation grew. This approach was successful in detecting optimal habitat for shorebirds on agricultural lands. For modest classification schemes, radar remote sensing is a valuable option for wetland mapping in areas where cloud cover is persistent. ?? 2003 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  12. Use of radar remote sensing (RADARSAT) to map winter wetland habitat for shorebirds in an agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taft, Oriane W.; Haig, Susan M.

    2004-01-01

    Many of todays agricultural landscapes once held vast amounts of wetland habitat for waterbirds and other wildlife. Successful restoration of these landscapes relies on access to accurate maps of the wetlands that remain. We used C-band (5.6-cm-wavelength), HH-polarized radar remote sensing (RADARSAT) at a 38A? incidence angle (8-m resolution) to map the distribution of winter shorebird (Charadriiformes) habitat on agricultural lands in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. We acquired imagery on three dates (10 December 1999, 27 January 2000, and 15 March 2000) and simultaneously collected ground reference data to classify radar signatures and evaluate map accuracy of four habitat classes: (1) wet with 50% vegetation (considered optimal shorebird habitat), (2) wet with > 50% vegetation, (3) dry with 50% vegetation, and (4) dry with > 50% vegetation. Overall accuracy varied from 45 to 60% among the three images, but the accuracy of focal class 1 was greater, ranging from 72 to 80%. Class 4 coverage was stable and dominated maps (40% of mapped study area) for all three dates, while coverage of class 3 decreased slightly throughout the study period. Among wet classes, class 1 was most abundant (about 30% coverage) in December and January, decreasing in March to approximately 15%. Conversely, class 2 increased dramatically from January to March, likely due to transition from class 1 as vegetation grew. This approach was successful in detecting optimal habitat for shorebirds on agricultural lands. For modest classification schemes, radar remote sensing is a valuable option for wetland mapping in areas where cloud cover is persistent.

  13. Mapping surface soil moisture using an aircraft-based passive microwave instrument: algorithm and example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Le Vine, David E.

    1996-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing at L-band (21 cm wavelength) can provide a direct measurement of the surface soil moisture for a range of cover conditions and within reasonable error bounds. Surface soil moisture observations are rare and, therefore, the use of these data in hydrology and other disciplines has not been fully explored or developed. Without satellite-based observing systems, the only way to collect these data in large-scale studies is with an aircraft platform. Recently, aircraft systems such as the push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) and the electronically scanned thinned array radiometer (ESTAR) have been developed to facilitate such investigations. In addition, field experiments have attempted to collect the passive microwave data as part of an integrated set of hydrologic data. One of the most ambitious of these investigations was the Washita'92 experiment. Preliminary analysis of these data has shown that the microwave observations are indicative of deterministic spatial and temporal variations in the surface soil moisture. Users of these data should be aware of a number of issues related to using aircraft-based systems and practical approaches to applying soil moisture estimation algorithms to large data sets. This paper outlines the process of mapping surface soil moisture from an aircraft-based passive microwave radiometer system for the Washita'92 experiment.

  14. Use of ground-based remotely sensed data for surface energy balance calculations during Monsoon '90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. S.; Kustas, William P.; Vidal, Alain; Stannard, David I.; Blanford, James

    1991-01-01

    Surface energy balance was evaluated at a semiarid watershed using direct and indirect measurements of the turbulent fluxes, a remote technique based on measurements of surface reflectance and temperature, and conventional meteorological information. Comparison of remote estimates of net radiant flux and soil heat flux densities with measured values showed errors on the order of +/-40 W/sq m. To account for the effects of sparse vegetation, semi-empirical adjustments to aerodynamic resistance were required for evaluation of sensible heat flux density (H). However, a significant scatter in estimated versus measured latent heat flux density (LE) was still observed, +/-75 W/sq m over a range from 100-400 W/sq m. The errors of H and LE estimates were reduced to +/-50 W/sq m when observations were restricted to clear sky conditions.

  15. Study of vegetation impact on the ground surface temperature using remote sensing data with different spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Yury; Heim, Birgit; Leibman, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost mapping and modeling is based on the understanding of the main controls affecting permafrost parameters: ground temperature, active-layer thickness, cryogenic processes. In the Tundra zone, remote sensing can provide necessary information on spatial distribution of surficial parameters represented by vegetation type and coverage. In this work we will consider shrub complexes, as far as they serve as an entrapment for snow and consequently affect the active layer depth. A case study was undertaken at central Yamal at the research station Vaskiny Dachi. In summer 2011 a 1.5 km long transect crossing main geomorphologic units of central Yamal was established and subject to multipurpose field study. Detailed description of vegetation and numeric parameters characterizing tundra complexes was followed by active-layer measurements. The main optical satellite data base is a high-spatial resolution GeoEye-1 acquisition with 0.5 m ground sampling distance acquired at the 15th August in 2009 (NGA license, University Alaska Fairbanks, NASA LCLUC Yamal). Spectral analyses were performed to extract surface class - shrub-dominant communities. Spectral discrimination of surface waters was done using a threshold value in the near infrared band 4. Various spectral analyses were tested to separate shrubs-dominated areas. Processed were 4 Principal Component (PC) (Schowengerdt, 2007) bands, including masking of surface waters. The lower PC bands contain the subordinate information that can often not be extracted using standard classification methods. PC bands 2 and 3 were interpreted to contain information on 'greenness' and 'moisture and structure', respectively. At this stage, the shrubs were manually digitized guided by the structure information in PC band 3. The communities sorted out in vector format were used for the following analysis. For the analysis of the shrub impact on permafrost, interpretation results were compared with a map of the surface temperature and

  16. Surface plasmon resonance imaging by holographic enhanced mapping.

    PubMed

    Mandracchia, B; Pagliarulo, V; Paturzo, M; Ferraro, P

    2015-04-21

    We designed, constructed and tested a holographic surface plasmon resonance (HoloSPR) objective-based microscope for simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). SPRi is a widely spread tool for label-free detection of changes in refractive index and concentration, as well as mapping of thin films. Currently, most of the SPR sensors rely on the detection of amplitude or phase changes of light. Despite the high sensitivities achieved so far, each technique alone has a limited detection range with optimal sensitivity. Here we use a high numerical aperture objective that avoids all the limitations due to the use of a prism-based configuration, yielding highly magnified and distortion-free images. Holographic reconstructions of SPR images and real-time kinetic measurements are presented to show the capability of HoloSPR to provide a versatile imaging method for high-throughput SPR detection complementary to conventional SPR techniques.

  17. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  18. Characterization of Aerosols and Atmospheric Parameters From Space-Borne and Surface-Based Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Ocean color and temperature exhibit strong gradients. White capping and sun glint (which are highly wind speed dependent) cause further ocean color...aircraft altitude causing spectral brightness shift due to changes in aerosol and molecular scattering, and repeat the sequence. The method for remote...sensing of smoke or sulfates over vegetated (dark) regions by Kaufman et al. (1997) is extended to include dust over the desert ( bright surface). Now

  19. Automated mapping of impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas: Linear spectral unmixing of high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; He, Yuhong

    2017-02-01

    Quantifying impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas is a key step toward a sustainable urban planning and management strategy. With the availability of fine-scale remote sensing imagery, automated mapping of impervious surfaces has attracted growing attention. However, the vast majority of existing studies have selected pixel-based and object-based methods for impervious surface mapping, with few adopting sub-pixel analysis of high spatial resolution imagery. This research makes use of a vegetation-bright impervious-dark impervious linear spectral mixture model to characterize urban and suburban surface components. A WorldView-3 image acquired on May 9th, 2015 is analyzed for its potential in automated unmixing of meaningful surface materials for two urban subsets and one suburban subset in Toronto, ON, Canada. Given the wide distribution of shadows in urban areas, the linear spectral unmixing is implemented in non-shadowed and shadowed areas separately for the two urban subsets. The results indicate that the accuracy of impervious surface mapping in suburban areas reaches up to 86.99%, much higher than the accuracies in urban areas (80.03% and 79.67%). Despite its merits in mapping accuracy and automation, the application of our proposed vegetation-bright impervious-dark impervious model to map impervious surfaces is limited due to the absence of soil component. To further extend the operational transferability of our proposed method, especially for the areas where plenty of bare soils exist during urbanization or reclamation, it is still of great necessity to mask out bare soils by automated classification prior to the implementation of linear spectral unmixing.

  20. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  1. CosmoQuest: A software platform for surface feature mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    While many tools exist for allowing individuals to mark features in images, it has previously been unwieldy to get entire teams collaboratively mapping out surface features, and to statistically compare each team members contributions. Our CSB software was initially developed to facilitate crowd-sourcing projects, including CosmoQuest's "Moon Mappers" project. Statistically study of its results (Robbins et al 2014) has shown that professionals using this software get results that are as good as those they get using other commonly used software packages. This has lead to an expansion of the software to facilitate professional science use of the software. In order to allow the greatest use of CSB, and to facilitate better science collaboration, CosmoQuest now allows teams to create private projects. Basic features include: using their own data sets, allowing multiple team members to annotate the images, performing basic statistics on the resulting data, downloading all results in either .sql or .csv formats. In this presentation, we will overview how best to use CSB to improve your own science collaboration. Current applications include surface science and transient object identification, and published results include both crater maps and the discovery of KBOs.

  2. Surface Towed CSEM Systems for Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J.; Constable, S.; Kannberg, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a low-power, surface towed electric dipole-dipole system suitable for mapping seafloor geology in shallow water and deployable from small boats. The transmitter is capable of up to 50 amps output using 12 VDC from a 110/240 VAC power supply, and can generate an arbitrary GPS stabilized ternary waveform. Transmitter antennas are typically 50 to 100 m long. Receivers are built around the standard Scripps seafloor electrode, amplifier, and logging systems but housed in floating PVC cases and equipped with GPS timing and positioning, pitch/roll/heading sensors, and accelerometers. Receiver dipoles are 1.5 m long rigid booms held 1 m below the surface. As with the Scripps deep-towed Vulcan system, rigid antennas are used to avoid noise associated with flexible antennas moving across Earth's magnetic field. The tow cable is a simple floating rope up to 1000 m long. Water depth and conductivity are sampled continuously in order to provide constraints for apparent resistivity calculations and inversion, and moored seafloor recorders can be used to extend transmitter/receiver offsets. The entire system can be air freighted and transported in one utility vehicle. We will present results from a study to map permafrost in shallow water off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

  3. Potentiometric-surface map, 1993, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Tucci, P.; Burkhardt, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The revised potentiometric surface map here, using mainly 1993 average water levels, updates earlier maps of this area. Water levels are contoured with 20-m intervals, with additional 0.5-m contours in the small-gradient area SE of Yucca Mountain. Water levels range from 728 m above sea level SE of Yucca to 1,034 m above sea level north of Yucca. Potentiometric levels in the deeper parts of the volcanic rock aquifer range from 730 to 785 m above sea level. The potentiometric surface can be divided into 3 regions: A small gradient area E and SE of Yucca, a moderate-gradient area on the west side of Yucca, and a large-gradient area to the N-NE of Yucca. Water levels from wells at Yucca were examined for yearly trends (1986-93) using linear least-squares regression. Of the 22 wells, three had significant positive trends. The trend in well UE-25 WT-3 may be influenced by monitoring equipment problems. Tends in USW WT-7 and USW WTS-10 are similar; both are located near a fault west of Yucca; however another well near that fault exhibited no significant trend.

  4. Heliospheric current sheet inclinations predicted from source surface maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shodhan, S.; Crooker, N. U.; Hughes, W. J.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The inclinations of the neutral line at the ecliptic plane derived from source surface model maps of coronal fields are measured for the interval from June 1976 to March 1992. The mean and median values of 53 deg and 57 deg are close to the average inclinations determined earlier from minimum variance analyses of solar wind measurements at sector boundaries, but the mode falls in the 80 deg - 90 deg bin. This result, which is based on the model assumptions implicit in deriving the source surface maps, predicts that the heliospheric current sheet typically intersects the ecliptic plane nearly at right angles, even without steepening by stream interaction regions. High inclinations dominate the solar cycle for about 7 years around solar maximum. Dips to lower inclination occur near solar minimum, but high variance admits a wide range of inclinations throughout the cycle. Compared to the smooth solar cycle variation of the maximum latitudinal excursion of the neutral line, often treated as the tilt angle of a flat heliospheric current sheet, the noisy variation of the inclinations reflects the degree to which the neutral line deviates from a sine wave, implying warps and corrugations in the current sheet. About a third of the time the neutral line so deviates that it doubles back in longitude.

  5. Compositional Mapping of the Surfaces of Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Eberhard; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Trieloff, M.

    2010-10-01

    The determination of the global surface compositions of Europa and Ganymede is a prime objective of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). Classical methods to analyze surfaces of airless planetary objects are IR and gamma ray spectroscopy, and neutron backscatter measurements. Here we present a complementary method to analyze dust particles as samples of planetary objects from which they were released. All airless moons and planets are exposed to the ambient meteoroid bombardment that erodes the surface and generates ejecta particles. The Galileo dust detector (Krueger et al., Icarus, 164, 170, 2003) discovered tenuous ejecta clouds around all Galilean satellites. In-situ mass spectroscopic analysis of these dust particles impacting onto a detector of an orbiting spacecraft reveals their composition. Depending on the altitude from which the dust measurements are taken, the position of origin on the surface can be determined with at least corresponding resolution. Since the detection rates are on the order of thousands per day, spatially resolved maps of the surface composition can be obtained. This `dust spectrometer’ approach provides key chemical and isotopic constraints for varying provinces on the surfaces, leading to better understanding of the body's geological evolution. Traces of mineral or organic components in an ice matrix can be identified and quantified even at low impact speeds >1 km/s. Compositional measurements by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer of ice grains emitted from Enceladus probed the deep interior of this satellite (Postberg et al., Nature, 459, 1098, 2009). New instrumentation has been developed that meet or exceeded the capabilities in sensitivity and mass resolution of all previous dust analyzers. The deployment of such dust analyzers on the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) missions will provide unprecedented information on the surface compositions of these satellites and their potential activity.

  6. The Measurement of Unsteady Surface Pressure Using a Remote Microphone Probe.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yaoyi; Berntsen, Carl R; Bilka, Michael J; Morris, Scott C

    2016-12-03

    Microphones are widely applied to measure pressure fluctuations at the walls of solid bodies immersed in turbulent flows. Turbulent motions with various characteristic length scales can result in pressure fluctuations over a wide frequency range. This property of turbulence requires sensing devices to have sufficient sensitivity over a wide range of frequencies. Furthermore, the small characteristic length scales of turbulent structures require small sensing areas and the ability to place the sensors in very close proximity to each other. The complex geometries of the solid bodies, often including large surface curvatures or discontinuities, require the probe to have the ability to be set up in very limited spaces. The development of a remote microphone probe, which is inexpensive, consistent, and repeatable, is described in the present communication. It allows for the measurement of pressure fluctuations with high spatial resolution and dynamic response over a wide range of frequencies. The probe is small enough to be placed within the interior of typical wind tunnel models. The remote microphone probe includes a small, rigid, and hollow tube that penetrates the model surface to form the sensing area. This tube is connected to a standard microphone, at some distance away from the surface, using a "T" junction. An experimental method is introduced to determine the dynamic response of the remote microphone probe. In addition, an analytical method for determining the dynamic response is described. The analytical method can be applied in the design stage to determine the dimensions and properties of the RMP components.

  7. Application of hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing: data taken in the Baixianishan region of Gansu Province as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sun; Zhao, Yingjun; Zhang, Donghui; Qin, Kai; Tian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing, featured by integrated images and spectra, is now a frontier of the remote sensing. Using meticulous spectra, hyperspectral remote sensing technology can depict spectral features of objects in detail and are capable of identifying objects rather than simply discriminating them. This study took the Baixianishan region in Gansu Province as an example, and CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data were utilized to extract and map alteration minerals by MTMF mapping method. Six hydrothermal alteration minerals were mapped, which contained limonite, sericite and epidote. In addition, we analyzed the types, combinations and distribution of the alteration minerals and divided three stages of hydrothermal activity. It is considered that the favorable ore-forming elements for gold deposits are middle Hercynian porphyraceous granite, fracture and veined distribution of sericite and limonite. The application of CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data in the Baixianishan area has achieved ideal results, indicative of their wide application potential in the geological research.

  8. A novel approach to land-cover maps updating in complex scenarios based on multitemporal remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahirat, K.; Bovolo, F.; Bruzzone, L.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays, an ever increasing number of multi-temporal images is available, giving the possibility of having with high temporal frequency information about the land-cover evolution on the ground. In general, the production of accurate land-cover maps requires the availability of reliable ground truth information on the considered area for each image to be classified. Unfortunately the rate of ground truth information collection will never equal the remote sensing image acquisition rate, making supervised classification unfeasible for land-cover maps updating. This problem has been faced according to domain adaptation methods that update land-cover maps under the assumption that: i) training data are available for one of the considered multi-temporal acquisitions while they are not for the others and ii) set of land-cover classes is same for all considered acquisitions. In real applications, the latter assumption represents a constraint which is often not satisfied due to possible changes occurred on the ground and associated with the presence of new classes or the absence of old classes in the new images. In this work, we propose an approach that removes this constraint by automatically identifying whether there exist differences between classes in multi-temporal images and properly handling these differences in the updating process. Experimental results on a real multi-temporal remote sensing data set confirm the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach.

  9. Frost grain size metamorphism - Implications for remote sensing of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Fanale, F. P.; Zent, A. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effective grain size of a material on a planetary surface affects the strength of absorption features observed in the reflectance of a particulate surface. In the case of a planetary surface containing volatile ices, the absorption characteristics can change in connection with processes leading to a change in the grain size of the material. The present investigation is concerned with an evaluation regarding the occurrence of such processes and the implications for remote sensing applications. It is found that quantitative modeling of the kinetics of grain growth and destruction by thermal and nonthermal processes can provide a means to reconcile apparent optical paths in the volatile portions of planetary surfaces with the physical history of those surfaces. Attention is also given to conditions in the case of the Pluto/Triton system, Uranus and Saturnian satellites, and the Galilean system.

  10. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2015-05-01

    Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  11. LANDSAT Remote Sensing: Observations of an Appalachian mountaintop surface coal mining and reclamation operation. [kentucky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The potential benefits of using LANDSAT remote sensing data by state agencies as an aide in monitoring surface coal mining operations are reviewed. A mountaintop surface mine in eastern Kentucky was surveyed over a 5 year period using satellite multispectral scanner data that were classified by computer analyses. The analyses were guided by aerial photography and by ground surveys of the surface mines procured in 1976. The application of the LANDSAT data indicates that: (1) computer classification of the various landcover categories provides information for monitoring the progress of surface mining and reclamation operations; (2) successive yearly changes in barren and revegetated areas can be qualitatively assessed for surface mines of 100 acres or more of disrupted area; (3) barren areas consisting of limestone and shale mixtures may be recognized, and revegetated areas in various stages of growth may be identified against the hilly forest background.

  12. Global permittivity mapping of the Martian surface from SHARAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Luigi; Mège, Daniel; Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Orosei, Roberto; Alberti, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    SHARAD is a subsurface sounding radar aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, capable of detecting dielectric discontinuities in the subsurface caused by compositional and/or structural changes. Echoes coming from the surface contain information on geometric properties at metre scale and on the permittivity of the upper layers of the Martian crust. A model has been developed to estimate the effect of surface roughness on echo power, depending on statistical parameters such as RMS height and topothesy. Such model is based on the assumption that topography can be characterized as a self-affine fractal, and its use allows the estimation of the dielectric properties of the first few metres of the Martian soil. A permittivity map of the surface of Mars is obtained, covering several large regions across the planet surface. The most significant correspondence with geology is observed at the dichotomy boundary, with high dielectric constant on the highlands side (7 to over 10) and lower on the lowlands side (3 to 7). Other geological correlations are discussed.

  13. Adhesive force mapping of friction-transferred PTFE film surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Mashiko, S.

    The adhesive force of a friction-transferred polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film was mapped by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) system driven by custom software. The friction-transferred PTFE film, which was made by sliding a PTFE polymer rod on a heated glass, consisted of many PTFE ridges running parallel to the sliding direction on the glass surface. The adhesive force on the sample was derived from force curve measurement. A triangular wave amplified with a custom high-voltage amplifier was fed into the Z piezo of the AFM head through an AFM controller unit to obtain force curves while the AFM cantilever scanned a single line of the sample. The force curves both of the PTFE ridges and of the bare glass surface could be obtained by scanning the region perpendicular to the sliding direction. The deflection signal of the cantilever was sampled and stored in a computer through an AD converter. The adhesive force on the PTFE region was about half that on the glass surface. This difference was explained by the difference in capillary force of the surface water.

  14. Mapping of the ocean surface wind by ocean acoustic interferometers.

    PubMed

    Voronovich, Alexander G; Penland, Cécile

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of marine surface winds are crucial to understanding mechanical and thermodynamic forces on the ocean. Satellite measurements of surface winds provide global coverage but are problematic at high wind speeds. Acoustic techniques of wind speed retrieval, and even for tracking hurricanes, have been suggested as an alternative since wind is a strong source of ambient noise in the ocean. Such approaches involve near-local measurements with bottom-mounted hydrophones located close to the area of interest. This paper suggests a complementary approach: measuring directivity of low-frequency ambient noise in the horizontal plane. These measurements would employ long vertical line arrays (VLAs) spanning a significant portion of the ocean waveguide. Two VLAs separated by a distance of some tens of kilometers and coherently measuring acoustic pressure form a single ocean interferometer. By sampling the area of interest from different perspectives with at least two interferometers, marine surface winds might be mapped over horizontal scales of the order of 1000 km with about 10 km resolution (more specifically, the 10 km resolution here means that contribution from the basis functions representing surface wind field with the scale of spatial variations of the order of 10 km can be resolved; independent retrieval of the wind within 10(4) cells of a corresponding grid is hardly possible). An averaging time required to overcome statistical variability in the noise field is estimated to be about 3 h. Numerical simulations of propagation conditions typical for the North Atlantic Ocean are presented.

  15. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laughner, Jacob I.; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation. PMID:22796539

  16. Adaptive Multi-Objective Sub-Pixel Mapping Framework Based on Memetic Algorithm for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2012-07-01

    Sub-pixel mapping technique can specify the location of each class within the pixels based on the assumption of spatial dependence. Traditional sub-pixel mapping algorithms only consider the spatial dependence at the pixel level. The spatial dependence of each sub-pixel is ignored and sub-pixel spatial relation is lost. In this paper, a novel multi-objective sub-pixel mapping framework based on memetic algorithm, namely MSMF, is proposed. In MSMF, the sub-pixel mapping is transformed to a multi-objective optimization problem, which maximizing the spatial dependence index (SDI) and Moran's I, synchronously. Memetic algorithm is utilized to solve the multi-objective problem, which combines global search strategies with local search heuristics. In this framework, the sub-pixel mapping problem can be solved using different evolutionary algorithms and local algorithms. In this paper, memetic algorithm based on clonal selection algorithm (CSA) and random swapping as an example is designed and applied simultaneously in the proposed MSMF. In MSMF, CSA inherits the biologic properties of human immune systems, i.e. clone, mutation, memory, to search the possible sub-pixel mapping solution in the global space. After the exploration based on CSA, the local search based on random swapping is employed to dynamically decide which neighbourhood should be selected to stress exploitation in each generation. In addition, a solution set is used in MSMF to hold and update the obtained non-dominated solutions for multi-objective problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach outperform traditional sub-pixel mapping algorithms, and hence provide an effective option for sub-pixel mapping of hyperspectral remote sensing imagery.

  17. Use of a 35mm camera for remote surface cleanliness verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Non-contact or remote monitoring of surfaces for both particle and molecular contaminants is required for verification of surface cleanliness on many program subsystems. The capability of a 35mm camera to satisfy this need is presented. The many limitations imposed by standard available lens systems are compared to actual required sensitivities. Methods of optimizing camera systems for specific applications and descriptions of support systems for extending the range of usefulness of the recorded data are also provided. Although this general concept is not new, significant improvements in the technique involving the use of polarized light and diffraction effects have resulted in a more efficient utilization of information recorded on the film.

  18. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  19. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-25

    The sun is a sufficiently strong source of radiation at L-band to be an important source of interference for radiometers on future satellite missions such as SMOS, Aquarius, and Hydros designed to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes and radiation that is reflected from the surface to the radiometer. Examples are presented in the case

  20. Development of a Land Use Mapping and Monitoring Protocol for the High Plains Region: A Multitemporal Remote Sensing Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kevin P.; Nellis, M. Duane

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a practical protocol that employs multitemporal remotely sensed imagery, integrated with environmental parameters to model and monitor agricultural and natural resources in the High Plains Region of the United States. The value of this project would be extended throughout the region via workshops targeted at carefully selected audiences and designed to transfer remote sensing technology and the methods and applications developed. Implementation of such a protocol using remotely sensed satellite imagery is critical for addressing many issues of regional importance, including: (1) Prediction of rural land use/land cover (LULC) categories within a region; (2) Use of rural LULC maps for successive years to monitor change; (3) Crop types derived from LULC maps as important inputs to water consumption models; (4) Early prediction of crop yields; (5) Multi-date maps of crop types to monitor patterns related to crop change; (6) Knowledge of crop types to monitor condition and improve prediction of crop yield; (7) More precise models of crop types and conditions to improve agricultural economic forecasts; (8;) Prediction of biomass for estimating vegetation production, soil protection from erosion forces, nonpoint source pollution, wildlife habitat quality and other related factors; (9) Crop type and condition information to more accurately predict production of biogeochemicals such as CO2, CH4, and other greenhouse gases that are inputs to global climate models; (10) Provide information regarding limiting factors (i.e., economic constraints of pumping, fertilizing, etc.) used in conjunction with other factors, such as changes in climate for predicting changes in rural LULC; (11) Accurate prediction of rural LULC used to assess the effectiveness of government programs such as the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS) Conservation Reserve Program; and (12) Prediction of water demand based on rural LULC that can be related to rates of

  1. Mapping water surface roughness in a shallow, gravel-bed river using hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid advances in remote sensing are narrowing the gap between the data available for characterizing physical and biological processes in rivers and the information needed to guide river management decisions. The availability and quality of hyperspectral imagery have increased drastically over the past 20 years and hyperspectral data is now used in a number of different capacities that range from classifying riverine environments to measuring river bathymetry. A fundamental challenge in relating the spectral data from images to biophysical processes is the difficulty of isolating individual contributions to the at-sensor radiance, each associated with a different component of the fluvial environment. In this presentation we describe a method for isolating the contribution of light reflected from the water surface, or sun glint, from a hyperspectral image of a shallow gravel-bed river. We show that isolation and removal of sun glint can improve the accuracy of spectrally-based depth retrieval in cases where sun glint dominates the at-sensor radiance. Observed-vs.-predicted R2 values for depth retrieval improved from 0.56 to 0.68 following sun glint removal. In addition to clarifying the signal associated with the water column and bed, isolating sun glint could unlock important hydraulic information contained within the topography of the water surface. We present data from flume and field experiments suggesting that the intensity of sun glint is a function of water surface roughness. In rivers, water surface roughness depends on local flow hydraulics: depth, velocity, and bed material grain size. To explore this relationship, we coupled maps of image-derived sun glint with hydraulic measurements collected with a kayak-borne acoustic Doppler current profiler along 2 km of the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park. Spatial patterns of sun glint are spatially correlated with field observations of near-surface velocity and depth, suggesting that reach scale hydraulics

  2. Crack-mouth displacements for semielliptical surface cracks subjected to remote tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Atluri, Satya N.

    1992-01-01

    The exact analytical solution for an embedded elliptical crack in an infinite body subjected to arbitrary loading was used in conjunction with the finite element alternating method to obtain crack-mouth-opening displacements (CMOD) for surface cracks in finite plates subjected to remote tension. Identical surface-crack configurations were also analyzed with the finite element method using 20-noded element for plates subjected to both remote tension and bending. The CMODs from these two methods generally agreed within a few percent of each other. Comparisons made with experimental results obtained from surface cracks in welded aluminum alloy specimens subjected to tension also showed good agreement. Empirical equations were developed for CMOD for a wide range of surface-crack shapes and sizes subjected to tension and bending loads. These equations were obtained by modifying the Green-Sneddon exact solution for an elliptical crack in an infinite body to account for finite boundary effects. These equations should be useful in monitoring surface-crack growth in tests and in developing complete crack-face-displacement equations for use in three-dimensional weight-function methods.

  3. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ray G.; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of consumptive use of surface water by agriculture are vital for assessing food security, managing water rights, and evaluating anthropogenic impacts on regional hydrology. However, reliable, current, and public data on consumptive use can be difficult to obtain, particularly in international and less developed basins. We combine remotely-sensed precipitation and satellite observations of evapotranspiration and groundwater depletion to estimate surface water consumption by irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley for the 2004-09 water years. We validated our technique against measured consumption data determined from streamflow observations and water export data in the Central Valley. Mean satellite-derived surface water consumption was 291.0 ± 32.4 mm/year while measured surface water consumption was 308.1 ± 6.5 mm/year. The results show the potential for remotely-sensed hydrologic data to independently observe irrigated agriculture's surface water consumption in contested or unmonitored basins. Improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of satellite precipitation, evapotranspiration and gravimetric groundwater observations are needed to reduce the uncertainty in this method and to allow its use on smaller basins and at shorter time scales.

  4. Validation of Spaceborne Radar Surface Water Mapping with Optical sUAS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Chee-Ming, J.; Murnaghan, K.; Sherman, D.; Poncos, V.; Brisco, B.; Armenakis, C.

    2015-08-01

    The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) has over 40 years of experience with airborne and spaceborne sensors and is now starting to use small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) to validate products from large coverage area sensors and create new methodologies for very high resolution products. Wetlands have several functions including water storage and retention which can reduce flooding and provide continuous flow for hydroelectric generation and irrigation for agriculture. Synthetic Aperture Radar is well suited as a tool for monitoring surface water by supplying acquisitions irrespective of cloud cover or time of day. Wetlands can be subdivided into three classes: open water, flooded vegetation and upland which can vary seasonally with time and water level changes. RADARSAT-2 data from the Wide-Ultra Fine, Spotlight and Fine Quad-Pol modes has been used to map the open water in the Peace-Athabasca Delta, Alberta using intensity thresholding. We also use spotlight modes for higher resolution and the fully polarimetric mode (FQ) for polarimetric decomposition. Validation of these products will be done using a low altitude flying sUAS to generate optical georeferenced images. This project provides methodologies which could be used for flood mapping as well as ecological monitoring.

  5. A study of surface and surface-volume scattering for discrete random medium in microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahali, Syabeela Bt

    In the study of microwave remote sensing and wave propagation in a medium, it is interesting and important to model and calculate the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the medium, as the backscattering returns from the medium will be recorded and processed to produce satellite radar images and the wave attenuation while propagating in the medium will affect the microwave and mobile communications. Traditionally, theoretical modelling of this problem assumes that the scatterers are interacting with the wave independently. However, in real nature, the coherence effect of these interactions due to the close-spacing of the scatterers cannot be ignored, especially in the case of an electrically dense medium. Traditional theoretical modelling also assumes that wave-interface effects are only due to single scattering on the surface. This is also less accurate since multiple scattering can also contribute to the effect, especially for rough surfaces. It is also assumed that the surface-volume interaction is only due to first order surface-volume scattering. However, second order surface-volume scattering is also important and should not be ignored. Therefore, a good and reliable theoretical model for wave scattering in the natural earth terrain should be developed for the use in microwave remote sensing, communications and satellite-based natural resource monitoring. In this research, the backscattering model for an electrically dense medium is developed. This model incorporates the coherent effects due to the close-spacing of the scatterers. Improvement is done by considering the multiple surface scattering effect, together with the single surface scattering effect on the surface scattering formulation based on the existing integral equation model (IEM) for both the top and the bottom surfaces of the layer of the model. The backscattering model is also improved by considering up to second order surface-volume scattering. Its effect on surface, surface

  6. Wavelet and Fractal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Surface Temperature with Applications to Estimation of Surface Sensible Heat Flux Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schieldge, John

    2000-01-01

    Wavelet and fractal analyses have been used successfully to analyze one-dimensional data sets such as time series of financial, physical, and biological parameters. These techniques have been applied to two-dimensional problems in some instances, including the analysis of remote sensing imagery. In this respect, these techniques have not been widely used by the remote sensing community, and their overall capabilities as analytical tools for use on satellite and aircraft data sets is not well known. Wavelet and fractal analyses have the potential to provide fresh insight into the characterization of surface properties such as temperature and emissivity distributions, and surface processes such as the heat and water vapor exchange between the surface and the lower atmosphere. In particular, the variation of sensible heat flux density as a function of the change In scale of surface properties Is difficult to estimate, but - in general - wavelets and fractals have proved useful in determining the way a parameter varies with changes in scale. We present the results of a limited study on the relationship between spatial variations in surface temperature distribution and sensible heat flux distribution as determined by separate wavelet and fractal analyses. We analyzed aircraft imagery obtained in the thermal infrared (IR) bands from the multispectral TIMS and hyperspectral MASTER airborne sensors. The thermal IR data allows us to estimate the surface kinetic temperature distribution for a number of sites in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States (viz., San Pedro River Basin, Arizona; El Reno, Oklahoma; Jornada, New Mexico). The ground spatial resolution of the aircraft data varied from 5 to 15 meters. All sites were instrumented with meteorological and hydrological equipment including surface layer flux measuring stations such as Bowen Ratio systems and sonic anemometers. The ground and aircraft data sets provided the inputs for the wavelet and fractal analyses

  7. An investigation of satellite sounding products for the remote sensing of the surface energy balance and soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George R.

    1989-01-01

    Improved techniques for the remote sensing of the land surface energy balance (SEB) and soil moisture would greatly improve prediction of climate and weather as well as be of benefit to agriculture, hydrology and many associated fields. Most of the satellite remote sensing methods which were researched to date rely upon satellite-measured infrared surface temperatures or their time changes as a remote sensing signal. Optimistically, only four or five levels of information (wet to dry) in surface heating/evaporation are discernable by surface temperature methods and a good understanding of atmospheric conditions is necessary to bring them to this accuracy level. Skin temperature methods were researched as well as begun work on several new methods for the remote sensing of the SEB, some elements of which are applicable to current and retrospective data sources and some which will rely on instrumentation from the Earth Observing System (EOS) program in the 1990s.

  8. Use of models to map potential capture of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, Stanley A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of ground-water withdrawals on surface-water resources and riparian vegetation have become important considerations in water-availability studies. Ground water withdrawn by a well initially comes from storage around the well, but with time can eventually increase inflow to the aquifer and (or) decrease natural outflow from the aquifer. This increased inflow and decreased outflow is referred to as “capture.” For a given time, capture can be expressed as a fraction of withdrawal rate that is accounted for as increased rates of inflow and decreased rates of outflow. The time frames over which capture might occur at different locations commonly are not well understood by resource managers. A ground-water model, however, can be used to map potential capture for areas and times of interest. The maps can help managers visualize the possible timing of capture over large regions. The first step in the procedure to map potential capture is to run a ground-water model in steady-state mode without withdrawals to establish baseline total flow rates at all sources and sinks. The next step is to select a time frame and appropriate withdrawal rate for computing capture. For regional aquifers, time frames of decades to centuries may be appropriate. The model is then run repeatedly in transient mode, each run with one well in a different model cell in an area of interest. Differences in inflow and outflow rates from the baseline conditions for each model run are computed and saved. The differences in individual components are summed and divided by the withdrawal rate to obtain a single capture fraction for each cell. Values are contoured to depict capture fractions for the time of interest. Considerations in carrying out the analysis include use of realistic physical boundaries in the model, understanding the degree of linearity of the model, selection of an appropriate time frame and withdrawal rate, and minimizing error in the global mass balance of the model.

  9. Change detection based on deep feature representation and mapping transformation for multi-spatial-resolution remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Puzhao; Gong, Maoguo; Su, Linzhi; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhizhou

    2016-06-01

    Multi-spatial-resolution change detection is a newly proposed issue and it is of great significance in remote sensing, environmental and land use monitoring, etc. Though multi-spatial-resolution image-pair are two kinds of representations of the same reality, they are often incommensurable superficially due to their different modalities and properties. In this paper, we present a novel multi-spatial-resolution change detection framework, which incorporates deep-architecture-based unsupervised feature learning and mapping-based feature change analysis. Firstly, we transform multi-resolution image-pair into the same pixel-resolution through co-registration, followed by details recovery, which is designed to remedy the spatial details lost in the registration. Secondly, the denoising autoencoder is stacked to learn local and high-level representation/feature from the local neighborhood of the given pixel, in an unsupervised fashion. Thirdly, motivated by the fact that multi-resolution image-pair share the same reality in the unchanged regions, we try to explore the inner relationships between them by building a mapping neural network. And it can be used to learn a mapping function based on the most-unlikely-changed feature-pairs, which are selected from all the feature-pairs via a coarse initial change map generated in advance. The learned mapping function can bridge the different representations and highlight changes. Finally, we can build a robust and contractive change map through feature similarity analysis, and the change detection result is obtained through the segmentation of the final change map. Experiments are carried out on four real datasets, and the results confirmed the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  10. Microwave backscattering theory and active remote sensing of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.; Miller, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    The status is reviewed of electromagnetic scattering theory relative to the interpretation of microwave remote sensing data acquired from spaceborne platforms over the ocean surface. Particular emphasis is given to the assumptions which are either implicit or explicit in the theory. The multiple scale scattering theory developed during this investigation is extended to non-Gaussian surface statistics. It is shown that the important statistic for the case is the probability density function of the small scale heights conditioned on the large scale slopes; this dependence may explain the anisotropic scattering measurements recently obtained with the AAFE Radscat. It is noted that present surface measurements are inadequate to verify or reject the existing scattering theories. Surface measurements are recommended for qualifying sensor data from radar altimeters and scatterometers. Additional scattering investigations are suggested for imaging type radars employing synthetically generated apertures.

  11. Remote sensing for oil products on water surface via fluorescence induced by UV filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ionin, A. A.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Geints, Yu. E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Remote monitoring of water pollution, namely thin films of oil or oil products on water surface, can be carried out by laser fluorimetry. The pollutants fluorescence during its interaction with ultrashort UV laser pulses was experimentally studied in this paper. The laser pulses power was considered in a wide range of values including the filamentation regime. We compared fluorescence stimulated by femtosecond UV laser pulses with two central wavelengths (248 and 372 nm) for detection of crude oil and the following oil products: oil VM-5, oil 5W-40 and solvent WhiteSpirit. It was shown that shorter UV wavelengths are more suitable for fluorescence excitation. The spatial resolution of the fluorescence localization was no worse than 30 cm. We discuss techniques of high intensity emission delivery to the remote target as post-filamentation channels and multifilamentation beam propagation regime as well experimentally and numerically.

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy - Quantitative analysis techniques for remote sensing applications. [in planetary surface geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Roush, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    The empirical methods and scattering theories that are important for solving remote sensing problems are among the methods for remotely sensed reflectance data analysis presently compared. In the case of the photon mean optical path length concept's implications for reflectance spectra modeling, it is shown that the mean optical path length in a particulate surface is in roughly inverse proportion to the square root of the absorption coefficient. Absorption bands, which are Gaussian in shape when plotted as true absorptance vs photon energy, are also Gaussians in apparent absorptance, although they have a smaller intensity. An apparent continuum in a reflectance spectrum is modeled as a mathematical function that is used to isolate a particular absorption feature for analysis, and it is noted that this continuum should be removed by dividing it into the reflectance spectrum.

  13. Photoinduced surface voltage mapping study for large perovskite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liu, Yucheng; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-05-01

    Using a series of illumination sources, including white light (tungsten-halogen lamp), 445-nm, 532-nm, 635-nm, and 730-nm lasers, the surface photovoltage (SPV) images were mapped for centimeter-sized CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite single crystals using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The significant SPV signals were observed to be wavelength-dependent. We attribute the appreciable SPV to the built-in electric field in the space charge region. This study shines light into the understanding of photoinduced charge generation and separation processes at nanoscale to help advance the development of perovskite solar cells, optoelectronics, laser, photodetector, and light-emitting diode (LED).

  14. Surface towed electromagnetic system for mapping of subsea Arctic permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Dallas; Kannberg, Peter; Constable, Steven

    2017-02-01

    Sea level has risen globally since the late Pleistocene, resulting in permafrost-bearing coastal zones in the Arctic being submerged and subjected to temperature induced degradation. Knowing the extent of permafrost and how it changes over time is important for climate change predictions and for planning engineering activities in the Arctic environment. We developed a controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method to obtain information on the depth, thickness, and lateral extent of marine permafrost. To operate in shallow water we used a surface towed electric dipole-dipole CSEM system suitable for deployment from small boats. This system was used to map permafrost on the Arctic shelf offshore Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Our results show significant lateral variability in the presence of permafrost, with the thickest layers associated with a large river outflow where freshwater influx seems to have a preserving effect on relict subsea permafrost.

  15. Surface mapping of selected regions in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, P. M.; Turnrose, B. E.; Harvel, C. A.; Thompson, R. W.; Mallama, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    Low dispersion, large aperture, ultraviolet spectra of selected regions in the Orion Nebula were obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) scientific instrument. Spectra obtained at 35 contiguous locations defining a mosaic within the nebula were used to generate monochromatic images of high spatial resolution at the wavelengths of the ultraviolet emission lines. Image processing techniques were utilized to generate and analyze these ultraviolet surface maps. The imagery at the three wavelengths studied shows definite differences in the spatial distribution of emission from the CII CIII and OII ions. Ways of using the imagery to determine ionization structure and C/O abundance ratios throughout the regions observed are developed, in addition to means of analyzing the extensive continuum measurements in terms of dust scattering characteristics.

  16. Application of NASA's modern era retrospective-analysis in Global Wetlands Mappings Derived from Coarse-Resolution Satellite Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, R.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; Jones, L. A.; Kimball, J. S.; Pinto, N.; Zimmermann, R.; Küppers, M.

    2011-12-01

    The sensitivity of Earth's wetlands to observed shifts in global precipitation and temperature patterns and their ability to produce large quantities of methane gas are key global change questions. Global methane emissions are typically estimated via process-based models calibrated to individual wetland sites. Regardless of the complexity of these process-based models, accurate geographical distribution and seasonality of recent global wetland extent are typically not accounted for in such an approach, which may explain the large variations in estimated global methane emissions as well as the significant interannual variations in the observed atmospheric growth rate of methane. Spatially comprehensive ground observation networks of large-scale inundation patterns are very sparse because they require large fiscal, technological and human resources. Satellite remote sensing of global inundation dynamics thus can support the ability for a complete synoptic view of past and current inundation dynamics over large areas that otherwise could not be assessed. Coarse-resolution (~25km) satellite data from passive and active microwave instruments are well suited for the global observation of large-scale inundation patterns because they are primarily sensitive to the associated dielectric properties of the landscape and cover large areas within a relatively short amount of time (up to daily repeat in high latitudes). This study summarizes a new remote sensing technique for quantifying global daily surface water fractions based on combined passive-active microwave remote sensing data sets from the AMSR-E and QuikSCAT instruments over a 7 year period (July 2002 - July 2009). We apply these data with ancillary land cover maps from MODIS to: 1) define the potential global domain of surface water impacted land; 2) establish land cover driven predictive equations for implementing a dynamic mixture model adjusted to total column water vapor obtained from NASA's modern era

  17. SYNOPTIC GLOBAL REMOTE SENSING OF LAND SURFACE VEGETATION: OVERVIEW OF DAILY DATA QUALITY, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto-Munoz, A.; Didan, K.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous acquisition of global satellite imagery over the years has contributed to the creation of a long data record from AVHRR, MODIS, TM, SPOT VGT, and other sensors. These records account now for 30+ years, and as the archive grows, it becomes an invaluable source of data for many environmental related studies dealing with trends and changes from local to global scale. Synoptic global remote sensing provides a multitude of land surface state variables and serves as a major foundation for global change research. However, these records are inhibited with problems that need to be accounted for in order to understand the limits and improve the science results derived from these records. The presence of clouds, aerosols, spatial gaps, variable viewing geometry, inconsistent atmosphere corrections, multiple reprocessing, and different sensors characteristics, makes it difficult to obtain frequently high quality data everywhere and every time. Moreover, these issues are location and season dependent making it even more difficult to construct the consistent time series required to study change over time. To evaluate these records, we analyzed 30+ years (1981 to 1999 and 2000 to 2009) of daily global land surface measurements (CMG resolution) from AVHRR (N07, N09, N11 and N14) and MODIS (AQUA and TERRA, Collection 5, C5). We stratified the data based on land cover, latitudinal zone, and season and we examined the daily data quality, including cloud persistence, aerosol loads, data gaps, and an index of reliability that measures how likely an observation is acceptable for research. The aim was to generate aggregate maps of cloud distribution, aerosol levels distribution, and data reliability distribution in both time and space. This information was then converted into an uncertainty measure at the pixel level that indicates how suspect or significant a result could potentially be, depending on its location and season and consequently what geographic locations and times

  18. The Evaluation of an Integrated Land Surface - Groundwater Model Through Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, R.; Liu, Y.; Ajami, H.; Evans, J. P.; McCabe, M. F.; Sharma, A.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated land surface-groundwater models simulate the variability of water dynamics and land surface fluxes in both time and space while explicitly incorporating the role of groundwater dynamics in soil moisture distribution. The ParFlow.CLM modelling platform is an integrated hydrologic model and was used here for simulating land surface and groundwater dynamics over the Baldry sub-catchment in Australia at hourly time intervals. Baldry is located in the central west of New South Wales, has an ephemeral creek and is located in a temperate climate class with hot summers. Here, a multi-criteria evaluation strategy was employed using a range of observed catchment responses, including surface energy fluxes and states of land surface temperature, soil moisture and groundwater level for the period from 2005-2010. Particularly, the use of remotely sensed soil moisture and land surface temperature products obtained from downscaled microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) were explored to test the feasibility of these products for model evaluation at the catchment scale. Results suggest high agreement between the temporal dynamics of the model simulations and remotely sensed surface soil moisture and land surface temperature products, with correlation coefficient values of 0.79 and 0.92 respectively. Model comparisons with observed daily groundwater levels show satisfactory model performance (correlation coefficient > 0.5) considering the simple conceptual geological model developed for the study site. Our analyses indicate that the depth to the water table (DTWT) has an important role in controlling evaporation rates and top layer soil moisture distributions in the catchment. The relationship between evaporation rates and DTWT distribution for the six years of simulations shows increased sensitivity during dryer periods. Our results highlight that soil moisture distributions obtained from a physically

  19. Quantitative suspended sediment mapping using aircraft remotely sensed multispectral data. [in Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Suspended sediment is an important environmental parameter for monitoring water quality, water movement, and land use. Quantitative suspended sediment determinations were made from analysis of aircraft remotely sensed multispectral digital data. A statistical analysis and derived regression equation were used to determine and plot quantitative suspended sediment concentration contours in the tidal James River, Virginia, on May 28, 1974. From the analysis, a single band, Band 8 (0.70-0.74 microns), was adequate for determining suspended sediment concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.89 was obtained with a mean inaccuracy of 23.5 percent for suspended sediment concentrations up to about 50 mg/l. Other water quality parameters - secchi disc depth and chlorophyll - also had high correlations with the remotely sensed data. Particle size distribution had only a fair correlation with the remotely sensed data.

  20. Revised potentiometric-surface map, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ervin, E.M.; Luckey, R.R.; Burkhardt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The revised potentiometric-surface map presented in this report updates earlier maps of the Yucca Mountain area using mainly 1988 average water levels. Because of refinements in the corrections to the water-level measurements, these water levels have increased accuracy and precision over older values. The small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain is contoured with a 0.25-meter interval and ranges in water-level altitude from 728.5 to 731.0 meters. Other areas with different water levels, to the north and west of Yucca Mountain, are illustrated with shaded patterns. The potentiometric surface can be divided into three regions: 1) A small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain, which may be explained by flow through high-transmissivity rocks or low ground-water flux through the area; 2) A moderate-gradient area, on the western side of Yucca Mountain, where the water-level altitude ranges from 775 to 780 meters, and appears to be impeded by the Solitario Canyon Fault and a splay of that fault; and 3) A large-gradient area, to the north-northeast of Yucca Mountain, where water level altitude ranges from 738 to 1,035 meters, possibly as a result of a semi-perched groundwater system. Water levels from wells at Yucca Mountain were examined for yearly trends (1986-89) using linear least-squares regression. Data from five wells exhibited trends which were statistically significant, but some of those may be a result of slow equilibration of the water level from drilling in less permeable rocks. Adjustments for temperature and density changes in the deep wells with long fluid columns were attempted, but some of the adjusted data did not fit the surrounding data and, thus, were not used.

  1. Comparison of two different surfaces for 3d model abstraction in support of remote sensing simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Paul A; Ranken, Doug M

    2010-01-01

    A method for abstracting a 3D model by shrinking a triangular mesh, defined upon a best fitting ellipsoid surrounding the model, onto the model's surface has been previously described. This ''shrinkwrap'' process enables a semi-regular mesh to be defined upon an object's surface. This creates a useful data structure for conducting remote sensing simulations and image processing. However, using a best fitting ellipsoid having a graticule-based tessellation to seed the shrinkwrap process suffers from a mesh which is too dense at the poles. To achieve a more regular mesh, the use of a best fitting, subdivided icosahedron was tested. By subdividing each of the twenty facets of the icosahedron into regular triangles of a predetermined size, arbitrarily dense, highly-regular starting meshes can be created. Comparisons of the meshes resulting from these two seed surfaces are described. Use of a best fitting icosahedron-based mesh as the seed surface in the shrinkwrap process is preferable to using a best fitting ellipsoid. The impacts to remote sensing simulations, specifically generation of synthetic imagery, is illustrated.

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  3. Retrieval of surface temperature by remote sensing. [of earth surface using brightness temperature of air pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    A simple procedure and computer program were developed for retrieving the surface temperature from the measurement of upwelling infrared radiance in a single spectral region in the atmosphere. The program evaluates the total upwelling radiance at any altitude in the region of the CO fundamental band (2070-2220 1/cm) for several values of surface temperature. Actual surface temperature is inferred by interpolation of the measured upwelling radiance between the computed values of radiance for the same altitude. Sensitivity calculations were made to determine the effect of uncertainty in various surface, atmospheric and experimental parameters on the inferred value of surface temperature. It is found that the uncertainties in water vapor concentration and surface emittance are the most important factors affecting the accuracy of the inferred value of surface temperature.

  4. Deformable structure registration of bladder through surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiong; Viswanathan, Akila; Stewart, Alexandra J.; Haker, Steven; Tempany, Clare M.; Chin, Lee M.; Cormack, Robert A.

    2006-06-15

    Cumulative dose distributions in fractionated radiation therapy depict the dose to normal tissues and therefore may permit an estimation of the risk of normal tissue complications. However, calculation of these distributions is highly challenging because of interfractional changes in the geometry of patient anatomy. This work presents an algorithm for deformable structure registration of the bladder and the verification of the accuracy of the algorithm using phantom and patient data. In this algorithm, the registration process involves conformal mapping of genus zero surfaces using finite element analysis, and guided by three control landmarks. The registration produces a correspondence between fractions of the triangular meshes used to describe the bladder surface. For validation of the algorithm, two types of balloons were inflated gradually to three times their original size, and several computerized tomography (CT) scans were taken during the process. The registration algorithm yielded a local accuracy of 4 mm along the balloon surface. The algorithm was then applied to CT data of patients receiving fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy to the vaginal cuff, with the vaginal cylinder in situ. The patients' bladder filling status was intentionally different for each fraction. The three required control landmark points were identified for the bladder based on anatomy. Out of an Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved study of 20 patients, 3 had radiographically identifiable points near the bladder surface that were used for verification of the accuracy of the registration. The verification point as seen in each fraction was compared with its predicted location based on affine as well as deformable registration. Despite the variation in bladder shape and volume, the deformable registration was accurate to 5 mm, consistently outperforming the affine registration. We conclude that the structure registration algorithm presented works with reasonable accuracy and

  5. Deformable structure registration of bladder through surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Viswanathan, Akila; Stewart, Alexandra J; Haker, Steven; Tempany, Clare M; Chin, Lee M; Cormack, Robert A

    2006-06-01

    Cumulative dose distributions in fractionated radiation therapy depict the dose to normal tissues and therefore may permit an estimation of the risk of normal tissue complications. However, calculation of these distributions is highly challenging because of interfractional changes in the geometry of patient anatomy. This work presents an algorithm for deformable structure registration of the bladder and the verification of the accuracy of the algorithm using phantom and patient data. In this algorithm, the registration process involves conformal mapping of genus zero surfaces using finite element analysis, and guided by three control landmarks. The registration produces a correspondence between fractions of the triangular meshes used to describe the bladder surface. For validation of the algorithm, two types of balloons were inflated gradually to three times their original size, and several computerized tomography (CT) scans were taken during the process. The registration algorithm yielded a local accuracy of 4 mm along the balloon surface. The algorithm was then applied to CT data of patients receiving fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy to the vaginal cuff, with the vaginal cylinder in situ. The patients' bladder filling status was intentionally different for each fraction. The three required control landmark points were identified for the bladder based on anatomy. Out of an Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved study of 20 patients, 3 had radiographically identifiable points near the bladder surface that were used for verification of the accuracy of the registration. The verification point as seen in each fraction was compared with its predicted location based on affine as well as deformable registration. Despite the variation in bladder shape and volume, the deformable registration was accurate to 5 mm, consistently outperforming the affine registration. We conclude that the structure registration algorithm presented works with reasonable accuracy and

  6. Detection of terrain indices related to soil salinity and mapping salt-affected soils using remote sensing and geostatistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Triki Fourati, Hela; Bouaziz, Moncef; Benzina, Mourad; Bouaziz, Samir

    2017-04-01

    Traditional surveying methods of soil properties over landscapes are dramatically cost and time-consuming. Thus, remote sensing is a proper choice for monitoring environmental problem. This research aims to study the effect of environmental factors on soil salinity and to map the spatial distribution of this salinity over the southern east part of Tunisia by means of remote sensing and geostatistical techniques. For this purpose, we used Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer data to depict geomorphological parameters: elevation, slope, plan curvature (PLC), profile curvature (PRC), and aspect. Pearson correlation between these parameters and soil electrical conductivity (ECsoil) showed that mainly slope and elevation affect the concentration of salt in soil. Moreover, spectral analysis illustrated the high potential of short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands to identify saline soils. To map soil salinity in southern Tunisia, ordinary kriging (OK), minimum distance (MD) classification, and simple regression (SR) were used. The findings showed that ordinary kriging technique provides the most reliable performances to identify and classify saline soils over the study area with a root mean square error of 1.83 and mean error of 0.018.

  7. SETTLEMENT AREA MAPPING USING OPTICAL AND SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (SAR) REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY TO SUPPORT TSUNAMI RISK ASSESSMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomarudin, R.; Strunz, G.; Ludwig, R.; Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; Esch, T.; Indrajit, A.; Khomarudin, R.

    2009-12-01

    In Indonesia more than 60% of the population and more than 80% of the industrial areas are located in the coastal regions. Many of the development activities take place in the coastal areas such as fisheries, agriculture, industry, transportation, tourism, urban development, that are particularly vulnerable to natural disasters. Indonesia is one of the most vulnerable countries on the world with respect to the tsunami threat. In the framework of the GITEWS (German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) project a comprehensive risk assessment is being performed. To mitigate and decrease the loss of lives caused by tsunami, the information on people activities and settlement area is important. Remote sensing techniques can be applied to map settlement areas, which are used as input for tsunami risk assessment. This paper presents the results of the development and application of classification techniques for settlement extraction using Landsat TM and TerraSAR-X imagery. Several methods, like region growing, Index based built up index (IBI) and speckle divergence methods, have been investigated to extract settlement areas in the districts of Cilacap and Padang. The decision tree and neighborhood algorithm has also been used for performing the classification steps. The results of this research are promising, especially the SAR techniques based on TerraSAR-X gave highly accurate results with more than 85% overall accuracy and low omission and commission errors. Keyword: Remote Sensing, Settlement Mapping, Region Growing, Index Based Built-up Index, SAR Speckle Divergence

  8. Application of remote sensing and geographical information system in mapping forest fire risk zone at Bhadra wildlife sanctuary, India.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, S V; Somashekar, R K

    2010-11-01

    Fire is the most spectacular natural disturbance that affects the forest ecosystem composition and diversity. Fire has a devastating effect on the landscape and its impact is felt at every level of the ecosystem and it is possible to map forest fire risk zone and thereby minimize the frequency of fire. There is a need for supranational approaches that analyze wide scenarios of factors involved and global fire effects. Fires can be monitored and analyzed over large areas in a timely and cost effective manner by using satellite imagery. Also Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used effectively to demarcate the fire risk zone map. Bhadra wildlife Sanctuary located in Kamataka, India was selected for this study. Vegetation, slope, distance from roads, settlements parameters were derived for a study area using topographic maps and field information. The Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographical Information System (GIS)-based forest fire risk model of the study area appeared to be highly compatible with the actual fire-affected sites. The temporal satellite data from 1989 to2006 have been analyzed to map the burnt areas. These classes were weighted according to their influence on forest fire. Four categories of fire risk regions such as Low, Moderate, High and Very high fire intensity zones were identified. It is predicted that around 10.31% of the area falls undermoderate risk zone.

  9. Digital mapping of corrosion risk in coastal urban areas using remote sensing and structural condition assessment: case study in cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neocleous, Kyriacos; Christofe, Andreas; Agapiou, Athos; Evagorou, Evagoras; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is one of the main factors leading to performance deterioration of reinforced concrete buildings; and, hence, periodic structural condition monitoring is required to assess and repair the adverse effects of corrosion. However, this can become a cumbersome and expensive task to undertake for large populations of buildings, scattered in large urban areas. To optimize the use of available resources, appropriate tools are required for the assessment of corrosion risk of reinforced concrete construction. This paper proposes a framework for the production of digital corrosion risk maps for urban areas; Cyprus was used as a case study. This framework explored multi-temporal satellite remote sensing data from the Landsat sensors as well as corrosion risk factors derived from the results of a recently completed research project, entitled "STEELCOR". This framework was used to develop two corrosion risk scenarios within Geographical Information Systems, and to produce corrosion risk maps for three coastal cities of Cyprus. The thematic maps indicated that, for slight corrosion damage, the distance of reinforced concrete buildings from the coast was more influential than the building age. While, for significant corrosion damage, the maps indicated that the age of RC buildings was more influential than the distance from the coast.

  10. Remote sensing algorithm for surface evapotranspiration considering landscape and statistical effects on mixed pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing Peng, Zhi; Xin, Xiaozhou; Jiao, Jin Jun; Zhou, Ti; Liu, Qinhuo

    2016-11-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays an important role in surface-atmosphere interactions and can be monitored using remote sensing data. However, surface heterogeneity, including the inhomogeneity of landscapes and surface variables, significantly affects the accuracy of ET estimated from satellite data. The objective of this study is to assess and reduce the uncertainties resulting from surface heterogeneity in remotely sensed ET using Chinese HJ-1B satellite data, which is of 30 m spatial resolution in VIS/NIR bands and 300 m spatial resolution in the thermal-infrared (TIR) band. A temperature-sharpening and flux aggregation scheme (TSFA) was developed to obtain accurate heat fluxes from the HJ-1B satellite data. The IPUS (input parameter upscaling) and TRFA (temperature resampling and flux aggregation) methods were used to compare with the TSFA in this study. The three methods represent three typical schemes used to handle mixed pixels from the simplest to the most complex. IPUS handles all surface variables at coarse resolution of 300 m in this study, TSFA handles them at 30 m resolution, and TRFA handles them at 30 and 300 m resolution, which depends on the actual spatial resolution. Analyzing and comparing the three methods can help us to get a better understanding of spatial-scale errors in remote sensing of surface heat fluxes. In situ data collected during HiWATER-MUSOEXE (Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration over heterogeneous land surfaces of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research) were used to validate and analyze the methods. ET estimated by TSFA exhibited the best agreement with in situ observations, and the footprint validation results showed that the R2, MBE, and RMSE values of the sensible heat flux (H) were 0.61, 0.90, and 50.99 W m-2, respectively, and those for the latent heat flux (LE) were 0.82, -20.54, and 71.24 W m-2, respectively. IPUS yielded the largest errors in ET estimation. The RMSE of LE between the

  11. Laboratory insights into the detection of surface biosignatures by remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Roditi, I.; Frey, J.; Thomas, N.

    2014-03-01

    With the progress of direct imaging techniques, it will be possible in the short or long-term future to retrieve more efficiently the information on the physical properties of the light reflected by rocky exoplanets (Traub et al., 2010). The search for visible-infrared absorption bands of peculiar gases (O2, CH4 etc.) in this light could give clues for the presence of life (Kaltenegger and Selsis, 2007). Even more uplifting would be the direct detection of life itself, on the surface of an exoplanet. Considering this latter possibility, what is the potential of optical remote-sensing methods to detect surface biosignatures? Reflected light from the surface of the Earth exhibits a strong surface biosignature in the form of an abrupt change of reflectance between the visible and infrared range of the spectrum (Seager et al., 2005). This spectral feature called "vegetation red-edge" is possibly the consequence of biological evolution selecting the right chemical structures enabling the plants to absorb the visible energy, while preventing them from overheating by reflecting more efficiently the infrared. Such red-edge is also found in primitive photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, that colonized the surface of the Earth ocean and continents billions of years before multicellular plants (Knacke, 2003). If life ever arose on an Earth-like exoplanet, one could hypothesize that some form of its surface-life evolves into similar photo-active organisms, also exhibiting a red-edge. In this paper, we will present our plan and preliminary results of a laboratory study aiming at precising the potentiality of remote sensing techniques in detecting such surface biosignatures. Using equipment that has been developed in our team for surface photometry studies (Pommerol 2011, Jost 2013, Pommerol 2013), we will investigate the reflectance spectra and bidirectional reflectance function of soils containing bacteria such as cyanobacteria, in various environmental conditions. We will

  12. Principles and case studies of earthquake-triggered landslide inventory mapping using remote sensing and GIS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-05-01

    Inventory maps of earthquake-triggered landslides can be constructed using several methods, which are often subject to obvious differences due to lack of commonly accepted criteria or principles. To solve this problem, the author describes the principles for preparing inventory maps of earthquake-triggered landslides, focusing on varied methods and their criteria. The principles include the following key points: all landslides should be mapped as long as they can be recognized from images; both the boundary and source area position of landslides should be mapped; spatial distribution pattern of earthquake-triggered landslides should be continuous; complex landslides should be divided into distinct groups; three types of errors such as precision of the location and boundary of landslides, false positive errors, and false negative errors of earthquake-triggered landslide inventories should be controlled and reduced; and inventories of co-seismic landslides should be constructed by the visual interpretation method rather than automatic extraction of satellite images or/and aerial photographs. In addition, selection of remote sensing images and creation of landslides attribute database are also discussed in this paper. Then the author applies these principles to produce inventory maps of four events: the 12 May 2008 Wenchuan, China Mw 7.9, 14 April 2010 Yushu, China Mw 6.9, 12 January 2010 Haiti Mw 7.0, and 2007 Aysén Fjord, Chile Mw 6.2. The results show obvious differences in comparison with previous studies by other researchers, which again attests to the necessity of establishment of unified principles for preparation of inventory maps of earthquake-triggered landslides. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation of China (41202235).

  13. A POD Mapping Approach to Emulate Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Liu, Y.; Riley, W. J.; Shen, C.

    2014-12-01

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Since simulating LSMs at a spatial scale to explicitly resolve the finest resolution processes is computationally expensive, upscaling techniques are used in LSMs to capture effect of subgrid heterogeneity. However, routinely employed linear upscaling techniques that allow LSMs to be simulated at coarse spatial resolution can result in large prediction error. To efficiently predict fine-resolution solutions to LSMs, we studied the application of a reduce order model (ROM) technique known as the "Proper Orthogonal Decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally-resolved fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions for two case studies. In the first case study, we applied POD approach on surface-subsurface isothermal simulations for four study sites (104 [m2]) in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (>103) with very small relative approximation error (<0.1%) for two validation years not used in training the ROM. In the second case study, we illustrate the applicability of our ROM approach at watershed scale (1837 km2) model that is substantially more heterogeneous and demonstrate a hierarchical approach to emulating models at spatial scales consistent with mechanistic physical process representation.

  14. Mapping currents at the corroding surface/solution interface

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Ryan, M.P.; Oblonsky, L.J.

    1997-04-01

    Corrosion is electrochemical in nature. The kinetics of the processes taking place are controlled by the potential of the metal in its environment. The potentials of corroding metals can be measured against a reference electrode in virtually all cases. However, the currents and corrosion rates are generally difficult to determine directly. The flow of current in solution depends on the corrosion processes taking place. When the corrosion is uniform, then conceptually there need not be currents flowing in solution as the anodic and cathodic reactions take place at the same sites on the surface. This may be the case for both very high or low corrosion rates. In acidic solution, where rapid corrosion takes place, models which envision migration of separate anodic and cathodic sites have been proposed. With passive surfaces, the anodic and cathodic sites are considered to be separated by the thickness of the passive layer which acts as a mixed electrolyte, conducting both ions and electrons. This is similar to the processes taking place during high temperature oxidation. Direct measurement of these currents have not been made. It is generally necessary to produce changes in the system, by applying external voltages, to ascertain the behavior of the currents through measurement of changes in the net current. This can only be done on small areas of metal. Corrosion rates can then be determined by extrapolation back to the open circuit potential. This paper describes studies in current density mapping for the understanding of corrosion.

  15. Elemental mapping of planetary surfaces using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The {gamma} rays are made by the nuclear excitations induced by these cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially capture or inelastic-scattering reactions induced by neutrons) and decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements. After a short history of planetary {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and its applications, the {gamma}-ray spectrometer planned for the Mars Observer mission is presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces or measure cross sections for the production of {gamma} rays and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and {gamma} rays will be reviewed. The emphasis here is on studies of Mars and on new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometer. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Euro-Maps 3D- A Transnational, High-Resolution Digital Surface Model For Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, A.; Barner, F.; Hass, T.; Makiola, J.; d'Angelo, P.; Reinartz, P.; Carl, S.; Steiner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Euro-Maps 3D is a homogeneous 5 m spaced digital surface model (DSM) semi-automatically derived by Euromap from 2.5 m in-flight stereo data provided by the Indian IRS-P5 Cartosat-1 satellite. This new and innovative product has been developed in close co- operation with the Remote Sensing Technology Institute (IMF) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and is being jointly exploited. The very detailed and accurate representation of the surface is achieved by using a sophisticated and well adapted algorithm implemented on the basis of the Semi-Global Matching approach. In addition, the final product includes detailed flanking information consisting of several pixel-based quality and traceability layers also including an ortho layer. The product is believed to provide maximum accuracy and transparency. The DSM product meets and exceeds HRE80 qualification standards. The DSM product will be made available transnational in a homogeneous quality for most parts of Europe, North Africa and Turkey by Euromap step-by-step. Other areas around the world are processed on demand.

  17. Vegetation Cover Mapping Based on Remote Sensing and Digital Elevation Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korets, M. A.; Ryzhkova, V. A.; Danilova, I. V.; Prokushkin, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An algorithm of forest cover mapping based on combined GIS-based analysis of multi-band satellite imagery, digital elevation model, and ground truth data was developed. Using the classification principles and an approach of Russian forest scientist Kolesnikov, maps of forest types and forest growing conditions (FGC) were build. The first map is based on RS-composite classification, while the second map is constructed on the basis of DEM-composite classification. The spatial combination of this two layers were also used for extrapolation and mapping of ecosystem carbon stock values (kgC/m2). The proposed approach was applied for the test site area (~3600 km2), located in the Northern Siberia boreal forests of Evenkia near Tura settlement.

  18. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M; Abraham, Saji; Wentz, F; Lagerloef, G S

    2005-01-01

    The sun is a sufficiently strong source of radiation at L-band to be an important source of interference for radiometers on future satellite missions such as SMOS, Aquarius, and Hydros designed to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes and radiation that is reflected from the surface to the radiometer. Examples are presented in the case of Aquarius, a pushbroom radiometer with three beams designed to monitor sea surface salinity. Near solar minimum, solar contamination is not a problem unless the sun enters near the main beam. But near solar maximum, contamination from the sun equivalent to a change of salinity on the order of 0.1 psu can occur even when the signal enters in sidelobes far from the main beam.

  19. Remote measurement of ice thickness on the shuttle external tank surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1990-01-01

    A passive technique is proposed for remote measurement of thickness of the ice layer formed on the external tank surface of the Shuttle during the T-2 hours period before launch. It is based on the comparison of the ratios of the intensities of three preselected near-IR wavelength bands scattered from the (test spot) and a neighboring (reference spot) on the tank surface. The Shuttle is uniformly illuminated by a battery of strategically located solar simulator lamps and banks of incadescent lamps during prelaunch period. Thus, there should be adequate radiation in the three selected bands incident on the external tank surface during the test period. It is planned to conduct a feasibility study of the proposed technique before recommending it to the KSC/SSC teams for adoption.

  20. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  1. Reclaimed surface mine terrestrial pools: Integrating remote sensing, spatial data and field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazar, Sheila A.

    This study investigated the remote sensing of aboveground biomass in reclaimed surface mine reclamation sites and the carbon (C) storage potential of these sites. The research is structured in three sections. In the first study, the potential for utilizing the tasseled cap (TC) spectral transformation to characterize multi-temporal changes of vegetation growth was investigated within nine reclaimed coal surface mines in Monongalia and Preston Counties, West Virginia. The spectral patterns of TC greenness, brightness and wetness values associated with the minesites were investigated for a multi-temporal series of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from 1992 to 2007. In general, most of the minesites at the time of mining showed increased brightness, and decreased greenness and wetness, with a reverse of this pattern during reclamation. However, rainfall appears to be a confounding variable, at least for relatively recently reclaimed sites. Spectral change vector analysis (CVA) was found to be effective for summarizing the patterns of change in TC values before and after reclamation. In the second study, field samples were collected from reclaimed grassland minesites and used to estimate biomass and C accumulation. In general, biomass and C increased in the six years following reclamation, and then slowly declined. Three Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from April, May and September of 2007, were used to assess four vegetation indices (VIs), TC, and red and near infrared radiance for potential for mapping biomass. For the April 3 Landsat image, the vegetation indices were not statistically correlated with field-measured biomass, and nor were the regression models significant. For the May 13 image, TC greenness and EVI were most strongly correlated with biomass, with TC wetness, NDVI, TVI and SAVI all significant at the 0.05 level. A number of regression models that included age since reclamation and spectral indices for May 13 were statistically significant

  2. Novel applications of multiple-point geostatistics in remote sensing, geophysics, climate science and surface hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariethoz, G.; Jha, S. K.; McCabe, M. F.; Evans, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) offer new possibilities in remote sensing, surface hydrology and climate modeling. MPS is an ensemble of tools for the characterization of spatial phenomena. Its most prominent characteristic is the use of training images for defining what type of spatial patterns are deemed to result from the processes under study. In the last decade, MPS have been increasingly used to characterize 3D subsurface structures consisting of geological facies, with application primarily to reservoir engineering, hydrogeology and mining. Although the methods show good results, a consistent difficulty relates to finding appropriate training images to describe largely unknown geological formations. Despite this issue, the growing interest in MPS triggered a series of different methodological advances, leading to improved computational performance and increased flexibility. With these recent improvements, the scientific community now has unprecedented numerical tools that allow dealing with a wide range of problems outside the realm of subsurface applications. These include the simulation of continuous variables as well as complex non-linear ensembles of multivariate properties. It is found that these new tools are ideal to address a number of issues in scientific fields related to surface modeling of environmental systems and geophysical data. Shifting focus and investigating the application of MPS to surface hydrology results in a wealth of training images that are readily available, thanks to global networks of remote sensing measurements. This presentation will delineate recent results in this direction, including MPS applications to the stochastic downscaling of climate models, the completion of partially informed remote sensing images and the processing of geophysical data. A major advantage is the use of satellite images taken at regular intervals, which can be used to inform both the spatial and temporal variability of

  3. Toward autonomous surface-based infrared remote sensing of polar clouds: cloud-height retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Penny M.; Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.

    2016-08-01

    Polar regions are characterized by their remoteness, making measurements challenging, but an improved knowledge of clouds and radiation is necessary to understand polar climate change. Infrared radiance spectrometers can operate continuously from the surface and have low power requirements relative to active sensors. Here we explore the feasibility of retrieving cloud height with an infrared spectrometer that would be designed for use in remote polar locations. Using a wide variety of simulated spectra of mixed-phase polar clouds at varying instrument resolutions, retrieval accuracy is explored using the CO2 slicing/sorting and the minimum local emissivity variance (MLEV) methods. In the absence of imposed errors and for clouds with optical depths greater than ˜ 0.3, cloud-height retrievals from simulated spectra using CO2 slicing/sorting and MLEV are found to have roughly equivalent high accuracies: at an instrument resolution of 0.5 cm-1, mean biases are found to be ˜ 0.2 km for clouds with bases below 2 and -0.2 km for higher clouds. Accuracy is found to decrease with coarsening resolution and become worse overall for MLEV than for CO2 slicing/sorting; however, the two methods have differing sensitivity to different sources of error, suggesting an approach that combines them. For expected errors in the atmospheric state as well as both instrument noise and bias of 0.2 mW/(m2 sr cm-1), at a resolution of 4 cm-1, average retrieval errors are found to be less than ˜ 0.5 km for cloud bases within 1 km of the surface, increasing to ˜ 1.5 km at 4 km. This sensitivity indicates that a portable, surface-based infrared radiance spectrometer could provide an important complement in remote locations to satellite-based measurements, for which retrievals of low-level cloud are challenging.

  4. Aerosol Optical Retrieval and Surface Reflectance from Airborne Remote Sensing Data over Land

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550nm (τ550) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ550 with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ550 and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ550 retrieved by Module A (r2 = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r2 ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  5. Aerosol optical retrieval and surface reflectance from airborne remote sensing data over land.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm (τ(550)) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ(550) with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ(550) and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ(550) retrieved by Module A (r(2) = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r(2) ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness.

  6. Modeling urban growth effects on surface runoff with the integration of remote sensing and GIS.

    PubMed

    Weng, Q

    2001-12-01

    A methodology is developed to relate urban growth studies to distributed hydrological modeling using an integrated approach of remote sensing and GIS. This linkage is possible because both studies share land-use and land-cover data. Landsat Thematic Mapper data are utilized to detect urban land-cover changes. GIS analyses are then conducted to examine the changing spatial patterns of urban growth. The integration of remote sensing and GIS is applied to automate the estimation of surface runoff based on the Soil Conservation Service model. Impacts of urban growth on surface runoff and the rainfall-runoff relationship are examined by linking the two modeling results with spatial analysis techniques. This methodology is applied to the Zhujiang Delta of southern China, where dramatic urban growth has occurred over the past two decades, and the rampant urban growth has created severe problems in water resources management. The results revealed a notably uneven spatial pattern of urban growth and an increase of 8.10 mm in annual runoff depth during the 1989-1997 period. An area that experienced more urban growth had a greater potential for increasing annual surface runoff. Highly urbanized areas were more prone to flooding. Urbanization lowered potential maximum storage, and thus increased runoff coefficient values.

  7. Downscaling of Land Surface Temperature Maps in the Texas High Plains with TsHARP Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High spatial resolution daily evapotranspiration (ET) maps would significantly improve assessing crop water requirements in arid and semi-arid regions of the world such as Texas High Plains (THP) where water demand exceeds supply for irrigation. Remote sensing-based models that use energy balance eq...

  8. Multiscale controls on water surface roughness and implications for remote sensing of rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.; Harrison, L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Ryan, J.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing has emerged as a viable and efficient tool for studying river systems and facilitating their rehabilitation. While many remote sensing applications utilize spectral information from the substrate and water column, light reflected from the water surface is often a significant component of the total at-sensor radiance. As water surface roughness (WSR) increases, a greater proportion of surface facets become oriented so as to reflect, rather than transmit, light. As a result, WSR exerts a primary control on the amount of surface reflected light measured by a remote sensor. WSR in rivers is a function of flow hydraulics, channel form, slope, bed roughness, and wind. While the relative influence of each of these components on WSR changes with scale, understanding these relationships could lead to methods for obtaining hydraulic information from image-derived metrics of WSR (i.e., surface reflectance). We collected field data on flow depth and velocity using an acoustic Doppler current profiler and simultaneously measured WSR using a custom built ultrasonic distance sensor on a diverse set of rivers ranging from a 15 m wide supraglacial river on the Greenland Ice Sheet to 100 m wide gravel-bed rivers in Wyoming and Oregon. Simultaneous multi- and hyperspectral image data sets indicate that image-derived surface reflectance is strongly correlated with WSR. Temporally distributed point measurements of flow depth, velocity, and WSR on the supraglacial river capture a threefold range in discharge (6 m3/s to 17 m3/s) and indicate that flow velocity is a primary control on WSR in smaller channels, even in the absence of sediment-induced bed roughness. Spatially distributed field measurements from large gravel-bed rivers suggests that spatial variability of WSR in the thalweg corresponds with geomorphic facies while WSR along the channel margins is more significantly influenced by grain size, relative submergence, and bank geometry. These findings suggest that

  9. Earth-based remote sensing of planetary surfaces and atmospheres at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two reasons for remote sensing from the Earth are given: (1) space exploration, particularly below the surfaces or underneath cloud layers, is limited to only a very few planets; and (2) a program of regular monitoring, currently impractical with a limited number of space probes, is required. Reflected solar and nonthermal radiation are discussed. Relativistic electrons, trapped in large magnetospheres on Saturn and Jupiter, are discussed. These electrons produce synchrotron radiation and also interact with the ionosphere to produce bursts of low frequency emission. Because most objects are black-bodies, continuum radiometry is emphasized. Spectroscopic techniques and the measurement of nonthermal emission are also discussed.

  10. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  11. Laser Remote Measurements of atmospheric pollutants (Las-R-Map): UV-Visible Laser system description and data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, V.; Wyk, H. V.

    Laser radar more popularly known as LIDAR LIght Detection And Ranging is becoming one of the most powerful techniques for active remote sensing of the earth s atmosphere Around the globe several new lidar systems have been developed based on the scientific interest Particularly the DIfferential Absorption Lidar DIAL technique is only one which can provide the better accuracy of measuring atmospheric pollutants Using modern advanced techniques and instrumentation a mobile DIAL system called laser remote measurements of atmospheric pollutants hear after referred as Las-R-Map is designed at National Laser Centre NLC --Pretoria 25 r 45 prime S 28 r 17 prime E Las-R-Map is basically used for measuring atmospheric pollutants applying the principle of absorption by constituents The system designed primarily to focus on the following pollutant measurements such as SO 2 CH 4 CO 2 NO 2 and O 3 In future the system could be used to measure few particulate matter between 2 5 mu m and 10 mu m Benzene Hg 1 3-butadiene H 2 S HF and Volatile Organic Compounds VOC Las-R-map comprises of two different laser sources Alexandrite and CO 2 optical receiver data acquisition and signal processor It uses alexandrite laser in the UV-Visible region from 200 nm to 800 nm and CO 2 laser in the Far-IR region from 9 2 mu m to 10 8 mu m Such two different laser sources make feasibility for studying the wide range of atmospheric pollutants The present paper is focused on technical details

  12. Field-scale land surface modeling over continental extents: Applications in satellite remote sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, N.; Wood, E. F.; Cai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Existing land surface models (LSM) struggle to accurately represent the observed field-scale (~100 meters) spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture due to the over-simplistic parameterizations of sub-grid heterogeneity and the coarseness of the model input data. This is especially relevant in the context of satellite remote sensing of soil moisture since land surface models are seen as important tools with which to validate high-resolution soil moisture retrievals. To address this challenge, we have developed HydroBloks, a semi-distributed land surface model that uses hydrologic response units (HRUs) to represent the observed field-scale spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture while maintaining the computational efficiency of existing LSMs. To accomplish this goal, HydroBloks couples the Noah-MP land surface model to the Dynamic TOPMODEL hydrologic model. The HRUs are defined by clustering proxies of the drivers of spatial heterogeneity using field-scale land data (e.g., NLCD). This allows for each HRU's results to be readily mapped out in space, enabling model application and validation at sub-100 meter scales. In this study, HydroBloks is implemented at three USDA watersheds over the contiguous United States (Little Washita, Little River, and Walnut Gulch). HydroBloks is run at each watershed between 2004 and 2014 using a 100 Latin Hypercube Sample to account for model parameter uncertainty. Each catchment's model ensemble is constrained and validated using available in-situ top-layer soil moisture observations. The results from this study provide insight into the strengths and weaknesses of existing soil moisture networks and the model's potential applications for improved design of in-situ soil moisture networks.

  13. Development and Validation of Remote Sensing-Based Surface Inundation Products for Vector-Borne Disease Risk in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; McDonald, K. C.; Ceccato, P.; Schroeder, R.; Podest, E.

    2014-12-01

    The potential impact of climate variability and change on the spread of infectious disease is of increasingly critical concern to public health. Newly-available remote sensing datasets may be combined with predictive modeling to develop new capabilities to mitigate risks of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and rift valley fever. We have developed improved remote sensing-based products for monitoring water bodies and inundation dynamics that have potential utility for improving risk forecasts of vector-borne disease epidemics. These products include daily and seasonal surface inundation based on the global mappings of inundated area fraction derived at the 25-km scale from active and passive microwave instruments ERS, QuikSCAT, ASCAT, and SSM/I data - the Satellite Water Microwave Product Series (SWAMPS). Focusing on the East African region, we present validation of this product using multi-temporal classification of inundated areas in this region derived from high resolution PALSAR (100m) and Landsat (30m) observations. We assess historical occurrence of malaria in the east African country of Eritrea with respect to the time series SWAMPS datasets, and we aim to construct a framework for use of these new datasets to improve prediction of future malaria risk in this region. This work is supported through funding from the NASA Applied Sciences Program, the NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program, and the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program. This study is also supported and monitored by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under Grant - CREST Grant # NA11SEC4810004. The statements contained within the manuscript/research article are not the opinions of the funding agency or the U.S. government, but reflect the authors' opinions. This work was conducted in part under the framework of the ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative. ALOS PALSAR data were provided by JAXA EORC.

  14. A Remote Characterization System and a fault-tolerant tracking system for subsurface mapping of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Bennett, D.W. ); Martinson, L. ); Bingham, D.N.; Anderson, A.A. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper describes two closely related projects that will provide new technology for characterizing hazardous waste burial sites. The first project, a collaborative effort by five of the national laboratories, involves the development and demonstration of a remotely controlled site characterization system. The Remote Characterization System (RCS) includes a unique low-signature survey vehicle, a base station, radio telemetry data links, satellite-based vehicle tracking, stereo vision, and sensors for noninvasive inspection of the surface and subsurface. The second project, conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), involves the development of a position sensing system that can track a survey vehicle or instrument in the field. This system can coordinate updates at a rate of 200/s with an accuracy better than 0.1% of the distance separating the target and the sensor. It can employ acoustic or electromagnetic signals in a wide range of frequencies and can be operated as a passive or active device.

  15. Determination of Land Surface Temperature and Soil Moisture From Trmm/tmi Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.

    An analytical algorithm for determination of land surface temperature and soil mois- ture from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI) re- mote sensing data is developed in this study. Error analyses illustrate that uncer- tainty of the involved parameters will not give serious errors in determination of land surface temperature and soil Fresnel reflectivity. With the proposed algorithm and TRMM/TMI remote sensing data collected during Global Energy and Water Experi- ment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment in Tibet (GAME/Tibet) Intensive Obser- vation Period (IOP'98) field campaign in 1998, the regional and temporal distributions of the land surface temperature and volumetric soil moisture are estimated over the central Tibetan plateau area. To validate the proposed method, the ground measured surface temperature and soil volumetric moisture are compared to TRMM/TMI de- rived land surface temperature and soil Fresnel reflectivity respectively. The result shows that estimated surface temperature is in good agreement with ground mea- surements, their difference and correlation coefficient are 0.52+-2.41 K and 0.81. A quasi-linear relationship exists between the estimated Fresnel reflectivity and ground measured volumetric soil moisture with a correlation coefficient 0.82. The land sur- face characteristics can also be clearly identified from the regional distribution of the estima