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Sample records for renal 3d-magnetic resonance

  1. Unsupervised fuzzy segmentation of 3D magnetic resonance brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velthuizen, Robert P.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Bensaid, Amine M.; Arrington, J. A.; Silbiger, Martin L.

    1993-07-01

    Unsupervised fuzzy methods are proposed for segmentation of 3D Magnetic Resonance images of the brain. Fuzzy c-means (FCM) has shown promising results for segmentation of single slices. FCM has been investigated for volume segmentations, both by combining results of single slices and by segmenting the full volume. Different strategies and initializations have been tried. In particular, two approaches have been used: (1) a method by which, iteratively, the furthest sample is split off to form a new cluster center, and (2) the traditional FCM in which the membership grade matrix is initialized in some way. Results have been compared with volume segmentations by k-means and with two supervised methods, k-nearest neighbors and region growing. Results of individual segmentations are presented as well as comparisons on the application of the different methods to a number of tumor patient data sets.

  2. Focused shape models for hip joint segmentation in 3D magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Shekhar S; Xia, Ying; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart; Schwarz, Raphael; Fripp, Jurgen

    2014-04-01

    Deformable models incorporating shape priors have proved to be a successful approach in segmenting anatomical regions and specific structures in medical images. This paper introduces weighted shape priors for deformable models in the context of 3D magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation of the bony elements of the human hip joint. The fully automated approach allows the focusing of the shape model energy to a priori selected anatomical structures or regions of clinical interest by preferentially ordering the shape representation (or eigen-modes) within this type of model to the highly weighted areas. This focused shape model improves accuracy of the shape constraints in those regions compared to standard approaches. The proposed method achieved femoral head and acetabular bone segmentation mean absolute surface distance errors of 0.55±0.18mm and 0.75±0.20mm respectively in 35 3D unilateral MR datasets from 25 subjects acquired at 3T with different limited field of views for individual bony components of the hip joint.

  3. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health.

  4. Quantitative 3D magnetic resonance elastography: Comparison with dynamic mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Phillip J.; Arani, Arvin; Lake, David S.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Manduca, Armando; McGee, Kiaran P.; Ehman, Richard L.; Araoz, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a rapidly growing noninvasive imaging technique for measuring tissue mechanical properties in vivo. Previous studies have compared two‐dimensional MRE measurements with material properties from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) devices that were limited in frequency range. Advanced DMA technology now allows broad frequency range testing, and three‐dimensional (3D) MRE is increasingly common. The purpose of this study was to compare 3D MRE stiffness measurements with those of DMA over a wide range of frequencies and shear stiffnesses. Methods 3D MRE and DMA were performed on eight different polyvinyl chloride samples over 20–205 Hz with stiffness between 3 and 23 kPa. Driving frequencies were chosen to create 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 5.5, and 6.6 effective wavelengths across the diameter of the cylindrical phantoms. Wave images were analyzed using direct inversion and local frequency estimation algorithm with the curl operator and compared with DMA measurements at each corresponding frequency. Samples with sufficient spatial resolution and with an octahedral shear strain signal‐to‐noise ratio > 3 were compared. Results Consistency between the two techniques was measured with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and was excellent with an overall ICC of 0.99. Conclusions 3D MRE and DMA showed excellent consistency over a wide range of frequencies and stiffnesses. Magn Reson Med 77:1184–1192, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:27016276

  5. Anatomical delineation of congenital heart disease using 3D magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams Bornemeier, Renee; Fellows, Kenneth E.; Fogel, Mark A.; Weinberg, Paul M.

    1994-05-01

    Anatomic delineation of the heart and great vessels is a necessity when managing children with congenital heart disease. Spatial orientation of the vessels and chambers in the heart and the heart itself may be quite abnormal. Though magnetic resonance imaging provides a noninvasive means for determining the anatomy, the intricate interrelationships between many structures are difficult to conceptualize from a 2-D format. Taking the 2-D images and using a volumetric analysis package allows for a 3-D replica of the heart to be created. This model can then be used to view the anatomy and spatial arrangement of the cardiac structures. This information may be utilized by the physicians to assist in the clinical management of these children.

  6. Denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images by using higher-order singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Xu, Zhongbiao; Jia, Nan; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Yanqiu

    2015-01-01

    The denoising of magnetic resonance (MR) images is important to improve the inspection quality and reliability of quantitative image analysis. Nonlocal filters by exploiting similarity and/or sparseness among patches or cubes achieve excellent performance in denoising MR images. Recently, higher-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) has been demonstrated to be a simple and effective method for exploiting redundancy in the 3D stack of similar patches during denoising 2D natural image. This work aims to investigate the application and improvement of HOSVD to denoising MR volume data. The wiener-augmented HOSVD method achieves comparable performance to that of BM4D. For further improvement, we propose to augment the standard HOSVD stage by a second recursive stage, which is a repeated HOSVD filtering of the weighted summation of the residual and denoised image in the first stage. The appropriate weights have been investigated by experiments with different image types and noise levels. Experimental results over synthetic and real 3D MR data demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art denoising methods.

  7. Relevance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging sequences in diagnosing basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Mezo, Roger; Lara García, Javier; Arroyo, Mariana; Fleury, Agnès

    2015-12-01

    Imagenological diagnosis of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis is usually difficult when classical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of 3D MRI sequences (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition (FIESTA) and Spoiled Gradient Recalled Echo (SPGR)) with respect to classical sequences (Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and T1) in visualizing Taenia solium cyst in these locations. Forty-seven T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space were diagnosed in eighteen Mexican patients. A pre-treatment MRI was performed on all patients, and all four sequences (FIESTA, FLAIR, T1 SPGR, and T2) were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. The sensitivity of each sequence to detect the parasite membrane and scolex was evaluated, along with its capacity to detect differences in signal intensity between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cysts. FIESTA sequences allowed the visualization of cyst membrane in 87.2% of the parasites evaluated, FLAIR in 38.3%, SPGR in 23.4%, and T2 in 17.0%. The superiority of FIESTA sequences over the other three imaging methods was statistically significant (P<0.001). Scolices were detected by FIESTA twice as much as the other sequences did, although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Differences in signal intensity between CSF and parasite cysts were significant in FIESTA (P<0.0001), SPGR (P<0.0001), and FLAIR (P=0.005) sequences. For the first time, the usefulness of 3D MRI sequences to diagnose T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space was demonstrated. The routine use of these sequences could favor an earlier diagnosis and greatly improve the prognosis of patients affected by this severe form of the disease.

  8. Automatic human knee cartilage segmentation from 3D magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Dodin, Pierre; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Abram, François

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed at developing a new automatic segmentation algorithm for human knee cartilage volume quantification from magnetic resonance images (MRI). Imaging was performed using a 3T scanner and a knee coil, and the exam consisted of a DESS sequence which contrasts cartilage and soft tissues including the synovial fluid. The algorithm was developed on MRI 3D images in which the bone-cartilage interface for the femur and tibia was segmented by an independent segmentation process, giving a parametric surface of the interface. Firstly, the MR images are resampled in the neighborhood of the bone surface. Secondly, by using texture analysis techniques optimized by filtering, the cartilage is discriminated as a bright and homogeneous tissue. This process of excluding soft tissues enables the detection of the external boundary of the cartilage. Thirdly, a technology based on a Bayesian decision criterion enables the automatic separation of the cartilage and synovial fluid. Finally, the cartilage volume and changes in volume for an individual between visits was assessed using the developed technology. Validation included first, for nine knee osteoarthritis patients, a comparison of the cartilage volume and changes over time between the developed automatic system and a validated semi-automatic cartilage volume system, and second, for five knee osteoarthritis patients, a test-retest procedure. Data revealed excellent Pearson correlations and Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) for the global knee (r=0.96, p<0.0001, median DSC=0.84), for the femur (r=0.95, p<0.0001, median DSC=0.85) and the tibia (r=0.83, p<0.0001, median DSC=0.84). Very good similarity between the automatic and semi-automatic methods in regard to cartilage loss was also found for the global knee (r=0.76, p=0.016) as well as for the femur (r=0.79, p=0.011). The test-retest revealed an excellent measurement error of -0.3?1.6% for the global knee and 0.14?1.7% for the femur. In conclusion, the newly

  9. Cardiovascular morphometry with high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance: First application to left ventricle diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Diego; Vardoulis, Orestis; Monney, Pierre; Piccini, Davide; Antiochos, Panagiotis; Schwitter, Juerg; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2017-09-01

    In this study, an image-based morphometry toolset quantifying geometric descriptors of the left ventricle, aorta and their coupling is applied to investigate whether morphological information can differentiate between subjects affected by diastolic dysfunction (patient group) and their age-matched controls (control group). The ventriculo-aortic region of 20 total participants (10 per group) were segmented from high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance images, from the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Each geometry was divided into segments in correspondence of anatomical landmarks. The orientation of each segment was estimated by least-squares fitting of the respective centerline segment to a plane. Curvature and torsion of vessels' centerlines were automatically extracted, and aortic arch was characterized in terms of height and width. Tilt angle between subsequent best-fit planes in the left ventricle and ascending aorta regions, curvature and cross-sectional area in the descending aorta resulted significantly different between patient and control groups (P-values< 0.05). Aortic volume (P = 0.04) and aortic arch width (P = 0.03) resulted significantly different between the two groups. The observed morphometric differences underlie differences in hemodynamics, by virtue of the influence of geometry on blood flow patterns. The present exploratory analysis does not determine if aortic geometric changes precede diastolic dysfunction, or vice versa. However, this study (1) underlines differences between healthy and diastolic dysfunction subjects, and (2) provides geometric parameters that might help to determine early aortic geometric alterations and potentially prevent evolution toward advanced diastolic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pulmonary vein imaging: comparison of 3D magnetic resonance angiography with 2D cine MRI for characterizing anatomy and size.

    PubMed

    Syed, Mushabbar A; Peters, Dana C; Rashid, Haroon; Arai, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary vein imaging is integral for planning atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. We tested the feasibility of quantifying pulmonary vein ostial diameter using two-dimensional cine cardiac magnetic resonance (2D cine CMR) and three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA). Nine patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and 20 normal volunteers underwent 2D cine CMR and contrast-enhanced 3D MRA of pulmonary veins on a 1.5 T scanner. Pulmonary vein ostial diameters were measured and pulmonary vein vessel border sharpness was graded qualitatively. Both techniques provided excellent pulmonary vein imaging; however, 3D MRA was faster to perform. The average difference between the systolic and diastolic pulmonary vein diameter was 2.5 mm (23.2%, p < 0.0001) in normal volunteers and 2.2 mm (16.9%, p < 0.0001) in atrial fibrillation patients. The ostial diameter measurements by 3D MRA were significantly larger than on 2D cine CMR. Additionally, the pulmonary vein borders appeared sharper with 2D cine CMR compared to 3D MRA. In conclusion, the 2D images can resolve differences in diameter across the cardiac cycle, while the 3D images provide high quality anatomical depiction but blur borders due to pulsatile motion. We suggest a protocol combining 2D cine CMR and 3D MRA for comprehensive evaluation of pulmonary veins.

  11. 3D magnetic resonance imaging as a non-invasive tool for investigating water-filled karst formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, A.; Ezersky, M.; Boucher, M.; Chevalier, A.; Vouillamoz, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) is a geophysical technique developed for groundwater exploration. MRS can be used for reliable identification of karst aquifers because of the relaxation time of the magnetic resonance signal (T1) is longer for bulk water in karst caverns and channels (about 2 s) than for water in porous rock (few tens of ms). MRS is sensitive primary to groundwater volume but electrically conductive layers modify electromagnetic fields in the subsurface and thus may have an effect on MRS performance. Generally, the study of a karst requires a 3D field set-up and we developed a measuring procedure and interpretation software that makes it possible to image heterogeneous water-bearing geological formations down to about 80 m (3D-SNMR method). Numerical modeling results show that limited resolution of the method allows only identification of large karst formations. For example detectable karst should be larger than a few hundred cubic meters when karst is located close to the surface and a few thousand cubic meters when it is located at 60 m. Time Domain Electromagnetic method (TDEM) is known as an efficient tool for investigating electrical conductivity of rocks. TDEM results allow more accurate computing of the EM field in the subsurface and thus contribute for improving accuracy of MRS results. TDEM and 3D-SNMR methods were applied jointly in the Dead Sea coast of Israel (Nahal Hever South). The subsurface in this area is heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers over a salt rock, which is partly karstified. Groundwater is very saline, with a chloride concentration of 100-225 g/l thus rendering the resistivity of geological formations less than 1 ohm-m. We have shown numerically that under Dead Sea coast conditions, 3D-SNMR is able to detect and to locate the target within an error of a few tens of meters. In the investigated area (500×500 m2) our results reveal a very heterogeneous shallow aquifer that could be divided into

  12. Protocol for volumetric segmentation of medial temporal structures using high-resolution 3-D magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Eliane; Cendes, Fernando; Min Li, Li

    2004-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of brain structures in normal subjects and in different neurological conditions can be carried out in vivo through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric studies. The use of high-resolution MRI combined with image post-processing that allows simultaneous multiplanar view may facilitate volumetric segmentation of temporal lobe structures. We define a protocol for volumetric studies of medial temporal lobe structures using high-resolution MR images and we studied 30 healthy subjects (19 women; mean age, 33 years; age range, 21-55 years). Images underwent field non-homogeneity correction and linear stereotaxic transformation into a standard space. Structures of interest comprised temporopolar, entorhinal, perirhinal, parahippocampal cortices, hippocampus, and the amygdala. Segmentation was carried out with multiplanar assessment. There was no statistically significant left/right-sided asymmetry concerning any structure analyzed. Neither gender nor age influenced the volumes obtained. The coefficient of repeatability showed no significant difference of intra- and interobserver measurements. Imaging post-processing and simultaneous multiplanar view of high-resolution MRI facilitates volumetric assessment of the medial portion of the temporal lobe with strict adherence to anatomic landmarks. This protocol shows no significant inter- and intraobserver variations and thus is reliable for longitudinal studies.

  13. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, Shan-an; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach. Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model. Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%, for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans. PMID:15822161

  14. Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, Mikael F.; Norén, Bengt; Kihlberg, Johan; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Kechagias, Stergios; Lundberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable. Materials and methods Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist. Results Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,Elastic’ R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa). Conclusion This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression. PMID:26937438

  15. Multifractal analysis of white matter structural changes on 3D magnetic resonance imaging between normal aging and early Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Huang-Jing; Zhou, Lu-Ping; Zeng, Peng; Huang, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Hong-Xing; Ning, Xin-Bao

    2015-07-01

    Applications of multifractal analysis to white matter structure changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently received increasing attentions. Although some progresses have been made, there is no evident study on applying multifractal analysis to evaluate the white matter structural changes on MRI for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. In this paper, to explore multifractal analysis of white matter structural changes on 3D MRI volumes between normal aging and early AD, we not only extend the traditional box-counting multifractal analysis (BCMA) into the 3D case, but also propose a modified integer ratio based BCMA (IRBCMA) algorithm to compensate for the rigid division rule in BCMA. We verify multifractal characteristics in 3D white matter MRI volumes. In addition to the previously well studied multifractal feature, Δα, we also demonstrated Δf as an alternative and effective multifractal feature to distinguish NC from AD subjects. Both Δα and Δf are found to have strong positive correlation with the clinical MMSE scores with statistical significance. Moreover, the proposed IRBCMA can be an alternative and more accurate algorithm for 3D volume analysis. Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of multifractal analysis, which may contribute to clarify some aspects of the etiology of AD through detection of structural changes in white matter. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61271079), the Vice Chancellor Research Grant in University of Wollongong, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China.

  16. Automatic Segmentation of the Eye in 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Novel Statistical Shape Model for Treatment Planning of Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro I.; Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Pica, Alessia; Sznitman, Raphael; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Munier, Francis L.; Kowal, Jens H.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Proper delineation of ocular anatomy in 3-dimensional (3D) imaging is a big challenge, particularly when developing treatment plans for ocular diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently used in clinical practice for diagnosis confirmation and treatment planning for treatment of retinoblastoma in infants, where it serves as a source of information, complementary to the fundus or ultrasonographic imaging. Here we present a framework to fully automatically segment the eye anatomy for MRI based on 3D active shape models (ASM), and we validate the results and present a proof of concept to automatically segment pathological eyes. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic segmentation were performed in 24 images of healthy children's eyes (3.29 ± 2.15 years of age). Imaging was performed using a 3-T MRI scanner. The ASM consists of the lens, the vitreous humor, the sclera, and the cornea. The model was fitted by first automatically detecting the position of the eye center, the lens, and the optic nerve, and then aligning the model and fitting it to the patient. We validated our segmentation method by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. The segmentation results were evaluated by measuring the overlap, using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean distance error. Results: We obtained a DSC of 94.90 ± 2.12% for the sclera and the cornea, 94.72 ± 1.89% for the vitreous humor, and 85.16 ± 4.91% for the lens. The mean distance error was 0.26 ± 0.09 mm. The entire process took 14 seconds on average per eye. Conclusion: We provide a reliable and accurate tool that enables clinicians to automatically segment the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, and the lens, using MRI. We additionally present a proof of concept for fully automatically segmenting eye pathology. This tool reduces the time needed for eye shape delineation and thus can help clinicians when planning eye treatment and confirming the extent of the tumor.

  17. Automatic Segmentation of the Eye in 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Novel Statistical Shape Model for Treatment Planning of Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro I; Rüegsegger, Michael B; Pica, Alessia; Sznitman, Raphael; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Munier, Francis L; Kowal, Jens H; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach

    2015-07-15

    Proper delineation of ocular anatomy in 3-dimensional (3D) imaging is a big challenge, particularly when developing treatment plans for ocular diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently used in clinical practice for diagnosis confirmation and treatment planning for treatment of retinoblastoma in infants, where it serves as a source of information, complementary to the fundus or ultrasonographic imaging. Here we present a framework to fully automatically segment the eye anatomy for MRI based on 3D active shape models (ASM), and we validate the results and present a proof of concept to automatically segment pathological eyes. Manual and automatic segmentation were performed in 24 images of healthy children's eyes (3.29 ± 2.15 years of age). Imaging was performed using a 3-T MRI scanner. The ASM consists of the lens, the vitreous humor, the sclera, and the cornea. The model was fitted by first automatically detecting the position of the eye center, the lens, and the optic nerve, and then aligning the model and fitting it to the patient. We validated our segmentation method by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. The segmentation results were evaluated by measuring the overlap, using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean distance error. We obtained a DSC of 94.90 ± 2.12% for the sclera and the cornea, 94.72 ± 1.89% for the vitreous humor, and 85.16 ± 4.91% for the lens. The mean distance error was 0.26 ± 0.09 mm. The entire process took 14 seconds on average per eye. We provide a reliable and accurate tool that enables clinicians to automatically segment the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, and the lens, using MRI. We additionally present a proof of concept for fully automatically segmenting eye pathology. This tool reduces the time needed for eye shape delineation and thus can help clinicians when planning eye treatment and confirming the extent of the tumor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Secondary Instability in 3-D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2016-12-01

    3-D magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic-electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out in the force free current sheet for cases with a strong guide field BG as occurring in the solar and laboratory plasmas. It is found that, following the growth of the primary reconnection, a secondary instability is excited in the separatrix region, which leads to the electron heating and acceleration in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. The instability is due to the 3-D physics associated with a finite kz, where kz is the wave number along the guide field direction. Dependences of the growth rate of the secondary instability on the electron-ion resistivity, the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are investigated. It is demonstrated that the secondary instability is of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink type.

  19. GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

    2014-05-29

    The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

  20. Advanced morphological 3D magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring using a new isotropic 3D proton-density, turbo spin echo sequence with variable flip angle distribution (PD-SPACE) compared to an isotropic 3D steady-state free precession sequence (True-FISP) and standard 2D sequences.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Goetz H; Zak, Lukas; Mamisch, Tallal C; Paul, Dominik; Lauer, Lars; Mauerer, Andreas; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate a new isotropic 3D proton-density, turbo-spin-echo sequence with variable flip-angle distribution (PD-SPACE) sequence compared to an isotropic 3D true-fast-imaging with steady-state-precession (True-FISP) sequence and 2D standard MR sequences with regard to the new 3D magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. Sixty consecutive MR scans on 37 patients (age: 32.8 ± 7.9 years) after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee were prospectively included. The 3D MOCART score was assessed using the standard 2D sequences and the multiplanar-reconstruction (MPR) of both isotropic sequences. Statistical, Bonferroni-corrected correlation as well as subjective quality analysis were performed. The correlation of the different sequences was significant for the variables defect fill, cartilage interface, bone interface, surface, subchondral lamina, chondral osteophytes, and effusion (Pearson coefficients 0.514-0.865). Especially between the standard sequences and the 3D True-FISP sequence, the variables structure, signal intensity, subchondral bone, and bone marrow edema revealed lower, not significant, correlation values (0.242-0.383). Subjective quality was good for all sequences (P ≥ 0.05). Artifacts were most often visible on the 3D True-FISP sequence (P < 0.05). Different isotropic sequences can be used for the 3D evaluation of cartilage repair with the benefits of isotropic 3D MRI, MPR, and a significantly reduced scan time, where the 3D PD-SPACE sequence reveals the best results. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as ‘3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries. PMID:26494282

  2. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-10-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as `3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries.

  3. 3D magnetic sources' framework estimation using Genetic Algorithm (GA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte-Neto, C. F.; Barbosa, V. C.

    2008-05-01

    We present a method for inverting total-field anomaly for determining simple 3D magnetic sources' framework such as: batholiths, dikes, sills, geological contacts, kimberlite and lamproite pipes. We use GA to obtain magnetic sources' frameworks and their magnetic features simultaneously. Specifically, we estimate the magnetization direction (inclination and declination) and the total dipole moment intensity, and the horizontal and vertical positions, in Cartesian coordinates , of a finite set of elementary magnetic dipoles. The spatial distribution of these magnetic dipoles composes the skeletal outlines of the geologic sources. We assume that the geologic sources have a homogeneous magnetization distribution and, thus all dipoles have the same magnetization direction and dipole moment intensity. To implement the GA, we use real-valued encoding with crossover, mutation, and elitism. To obtain a unique and stable solution, we set upper and lower bounds on declination and inclination of [0,360°] and [-90°, 90°], respectively. We also set the criterion of minimum scattering of the dipole-position coordinates, to guarantee that spatial distribution of the dipoles (defining the source skeleton) be as close as possible to continuous distribution. To this end, we fix the upper and lower bounds of the dipole moment intensity and we evaluate the dipole-position estimates. If the dipole scattering is greater than a value expected by the interpreter, the upper bound of the dipole moment intensity is reduced by 10 % of the latter. We repeat this procedure until the dipole scattering and the data fitting are acceptable. We apply our method to noise-corrupted magnetic data from simulated 3D magnetic sources with simple geometries and located at different depths. In tests simulating sources such as sphere and cube, all estimates of the dipole coordinates are agreeing with center of mass of these sources. To elongated-prismatic sources in an arbitrary direction, we estimate

  4. Renal relevant radiology: renal functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-02-01

    Because of its noninvasive nature and provision of quantitative measures of a wide variety of physiologic parameters, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows great potential for research and clinical applications. Over the past decade, application of functional MRI extended beyond detection of cerebral activity, and techniques for abdominal functional MRI evolved. Assessment of renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion, and parenchymal oxygenation turned this modality into an essential research and potentially diagnostic tool. Variations in many renal physiologic markers can be detected using functional MRI before morphologic changes become evident in anatomic magnetic resonance images. Moreover, the framework of functional MRI opened a window of opportunity to develop novel pathophysiologic markers. This article reviews applications of some well validated functional MRI techniques, including perfusion, diffusion-weighted imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, as well as some emerging new techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography, which might evolve into clinically useful tools.

  5. Proton acceleration by 3D magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, P. K.; Dalla, S.

    2007-05-01

    High energy charged particles are an important feature of solar activity such as flares, and indeed non thermal particles play a significant role in flare energy balance. Magnetic reconnection is the primary energy release mechanism in flares, and the strong DC electric fields associated with this reconnection may well be the origin of the high energy charged particles. Whilst particle acceleration has been widely studied for 2D configurations, little is known about 3D configurations. We investigate particle acceleration using a test particle approach, in the simplest 3D reconnection configuration, a 3D magnetic null point. Two modes of reconnection are possible: with a strong current filament along the "spine" field line connecting to the null, or with a sheet current at the "fan" plane of field lines emerging from the null. Using simple model fields, incorporating intiially only thee ideal reconnection region outside the current sheet (or filament), particle trajectories are investigated and the energy spectra and spatial distribution of accelerated particles are determined. We consider and compare fan and spine reconnection, and determine how the properties of the accelerated particles depend on the parameters of the reonnecting field. We also present preliminary results using more realistic, self consistent model fields.

  6. Magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of duplicated renal collecting systems.

    PubMed

    Adeb, Melkamu; Darge, Kassa; Dillman, Jonathan R; Carr, Michael; Epelman, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Duplex renal collecting systems are common congenital anomalies of the upper urinary tract. In most cases they are incidental findings and not associated with additional pathologies. They demonstrate, however, higher incidences of hydroureteronephrosis, ureteroceles, and ectopic ureters. The most comprehensive morphologic and functional evaluation of duplex systems can be achieved using magnetic resonance urography. Functional magnetic resonance urography allows better separation of the renal poles, thus more accurate calculation of the differential renal functions compared with renal scintigraphy. Magnetic resonance urography is the study of choice when upper urinary tract anatomy is complex or when functional evaluation is needed.

  7. ELM suppression in helium plasmas with 3D magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.; Loarte, A.; Orlov, D. M.; ...

    2017-06-21

    Experiments in DIII-D, using non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields in high-purity low toroidal rotation, 4He plasmas have resulted in Type-I edge localized mode (ELM) suppression and mitigation. Suppression is obtained in plasmas with zero net input torque near the L–H power threshold using either electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) or balanced co- and counter-I p neutral beam injection (NBI) resulting in conditions equivalent to those expected in ITER's non-active operating phase. In low-power ECRH H-modes, periods with uncontrolled density and impurity radiation excursions are prevented by applying n = 3 non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields. ELM suppression results from a reduction andmore » an outward shift of the electron pressure gradient peak compared to that in the high-power ELMing phase. Here, the change in the electron pressure gradient peak is primarily due to a drop in the pedestal temperature rather than the pedestal density.« less

  8. ELM suppression in helium plasmas with 3D magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Loarte, A.; Orlov, D. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Knölker, M. M.; Lyons, B. C.; Cui, L.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments in DIII-D, using non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields in high-purity low toroidal rotation, 4He plasmas have resulted in Type-I edge localized mode (ELM) suppression and mitigation. Suppression is obtained in plasmas with zero net input torque near the L-H power threshold using either electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) or balanced co- and counter-I p neutral beam injection (NBI) resulting in conditions equivalent to those expected in ITER’s non-active operating phase. In low-power ECRH H-modes, periods with uncontrolled density and impurity radiation excursions are prevented by applying n  =  3 non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation fields. ELM suppression results from a reduction and an outward shift of the electron pressure gradient peak compared to that in the high-power ELMing phase. The change in the electron pressure gradient peak is primarily due to a drop in the pedestal temperature rather than the pedestal density.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of induced renal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    London, D.A.; Davis, P.L.; Williams, R.D.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.; Gooding, C.A.

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images obtained after unilateral ligation of the ureter, renal artery, or renal vein in the rat were analyzed and compared with NMR images of the normal rat kidney. Anatomic and functional correlation of the induced renal lesions was made by concurrent CT and by gross examination of the excised kidneys. Many normal anatomic structures at the level of the renal hilum can be identified by high resolution NMR imaging. Differentiation of urine from renal parenchyma permits detection of gross changes both in renal function and in the mass of the renal parenchyma. NMR imaging is capable of diagnosing hydronephrosis, acute renal ischemia, and acute venous congestion in this rat model. In addition, a trend toward prolongation of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for abnormal renal parenchyma is demonstrated.

  10. Recent Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; An, Changlong; Kang, Lei; Mitch, William E; Wang, Yanlin

    2017-05-01

    CKD is a global public health problem. Renal fibrosis is a final common pathway leading to progressive loss of function in CKD. The degree of renal fibrosis predicts the prognosis of CKD. Recent studies have shown that bone marrow-derived fibroblasts contribute significantly to the development of renal fibrosis, which may yield novel therapeutic strategy for fibrotic kidney disease. Therefore, it is imperative to accurately assess the degree of renal fibrosis noninvasively to identify those patients who can benefit from antifibrotic therapy. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the assessment of renal fibrosis by magnetic resonance imaging. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Ce 5d and Fe 3d magnetic profiles in CeH2/Fe multilayers probed by XRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Raoux, D.; Ortega, L.; Bontempi, E.; Münzenberg, M.; Felsch, W.; Suzuki, M.; Maruyama, H.; Dürr, H. A.; Dudzik, E.; van der Laan, G.

    The element and electronic shell specificities of X-ray resonant magnetic scattering have been used to investigate the magnetization of Ce 5d and Fe 3d states in [CeH2(19.6 Å)/Fe(25.4 Å)]*38 a multilayer. We show that the measurement of the magnetic contribution to the intensities reflected at low angles at the Ce L2 and Fe L2,3 edges allows us to investigate the profile of the Ce 5d and Fe 3d magnetic polarization. The Fe 3d polarization is found to be uniform across the Fe layer and the Ce 5d polarization appears to be restricted close to the interface with Fe.

  12. Vibrating sample magnetometer 2D and 3D magnetization effects associated with different initial magnetization states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukins, Ronald E.

    2017-05-01

    Differences in VSM magnetization vector rotation associated with various initial magnetization states were demonstrated. Procedures and criteria were developed to select sample orientation and initial magnetization states to allow for the combination of two different 2D measurements runs (with the same field profiles) to generate a dataset that can be representative of actual 3D magnetization rotation. Nickel, cast iron, and low moment magnetic tape media were used to demonstrate these effects using hysteresis and remanent magnetization test sequences. These results can be used to generate 2D and 3D magnetic properties to better characterize magnetic phenomena which are inherently three dimensional. Example applications are magnetic tape-head orientation sensitivity, reinterpretation of 3D coercivity and other standard magnetic properties, and multi-dimensional shielding effectiveness.

  13. Laboratory Measurement of 3D Magnetic Reconnection of Arched Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-11-01

    An experiment has been constructed to collide two arched magnetic flux tubes at different angles with fully 3D, non-symmetric geometry. The configuration is designed to mimic sheared solar arcades and evaluate the importance of magnetic reconnection in such systems. Time resolved (1MHz) 3D magnetic measurements are taken with a multi-channel 3D magnetic probe. Preliminary analysis shows good agreement between calculated current density and external current diagnostics. Additional simultaneous diagnostics include voltage probes, fast camera imaging, and a 12-channel spectrometer. The spectrometer measures temperature, density, velocity, while the camera provides a view of global plasma behavior. Fast camera images indicate that the topology of the flux tubes evolves such that two equally sized, overlapping loops reconnect to form a small underlying loop and a large overarching loop.

  14. Contactless steering of a plasma jet with a 3D magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    A 3D, steerable magnetic nozzle (MN) is presented that enables contactless thrust vector control of a plasma jet without any moving parts. The concept represents a substantial simplification over current plasma thruster gimbaled platforms, and requires only a small modification in thrusters that already have a MN. The characteristics of the plasma expansion in the 3D magnetic field and the deflection performance of the device are characterized with a fully magnetized plasma model, suggesting that thrust deflections of 5° -10° are readily achievable.

  15. Combined registration of 3D tibia and femur implant models in 3D magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Siebert, Markus; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Ruediger; Graichen, Heiko

    2008-03-01

    The most frequent reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty are loosening and abnormal axial alignment leading to an unphysiological kinematic of the knee implant. To get an idea about the postoperative kinematic of the implant, it is essential to determine the position and orientation of the tibial and femoral prosthesis. Therefore we developed a registration method for fitting 3D CAD-models of knee joint prostheses into an 3D MR image. This rigid registration is the basis for a quantitative analysis of the kinematics of knee implants. Firstly the surface data of the prostheses models are converted into a voxel representation; a recursive algorithm determines all boundary voxels of the original triangular surface data. Secondly an initial preconfiguration of the implants by the user is still necessary for the following step: The user has to perform a rough preconfiguration of both remaining prostheses models, so that the fine matching process gets a reasonable starting point. After that an automated gradient-based fine matching process determines the best absolute position and orientation: This iterative process changes all 6 parameters (3 rotational- and 3 translational parameters) of a model by a minimal amount until a maximum value of the matching function is reached. To examine the spread of the final solutions of the registration, the interobserver variability was measured in a group of testers. This variability, calculated by the relative standard deviation, improved from about 50% (pure manual registration) to 0.5% (rough manual preconfiguration and subsequent fine registration with the automatic fine matching process).

  16. An optimized blockwise nonlocal means denoising filter for 3-D magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Coupe, P; Yger, P; Prima, S; Hellier, P; Kervrann, C; Barillot, C

    2008-04-01

    A critical issue in image restoration is the problem of noise removal while keeping the integrity of relevant image information. Denoising is a crucial step to increase image quality and to improve the performance of all the tasks needed for quantitative imaging analysis. The method proposed in this paper is based on a 3-D optimized blockwise version of the nonlocal (NL)-means filter (Buades, et al., 2005). The NL-means filter uses the redundancy of information in the image under study to remove the noise. The performance of the NL-means filter has been already demonstrated for 2-D images, but reducing the computational burden is a critical aspect to extend the method to 3-D images. To overcome this problem, we propose improvements to reduce the computational complexity. These different improvements allow to drastically divide the computational time while preserving the performances of the NL-means filter. A fully automated and optimized version of the NL-means filter is then presented. Our contributions to the NL-means filter are: 1) an automatic tuning of the smoothing parameter; 2) a selection of the most relevant voxels; 3) a blockwise implementation; and 4) a parallelized computation. Quantitative validation was carried out on synthetic datasets generated with BrainWeb (Collins, et al., 1998). The results show that our optimized NL-means filter outperforms the classical implementation of the NL-means filter, as well as two other classical denoising methods [anisotropic diffusion (Perona and Malik, 1990)] and total variation minimization process (Rudin, et al., 1992) in terms of accuracy (measured by the peak signal-to-noise ratio) with low computation time. Finally, qualitative results on real data are presented .

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney: renal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Williams, R.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-06-01

    Fifteen patients with a variety of renal masses were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography, ultrasound, and intravenous urography. NMR clearly differentiated between simple renal cysts and other renal masses. On spin echo images, the simple renal cyst appeared as a round or slightly oval, homogeneous low-intensity mass with characteristically long T1 and T2 values. The thickness of the cyst wall was not measurable. The cyst had a smooth outer margin and a distict, sharp interface with normal parenchyma. Hemorrhagic cysts were seen as high-intensity lesions. Renal cell carcinomas displayed a wide range of intensity. The T1 and T2 values of the tumors were always different from those of the surrounding renal parenchyma. Tumor pseudocapsule was identified in four of five patients examined. All carcinomas were accurately staged by NMR and extension of the tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava was demonstrated. The authors predict that if these preliminary results are confirmed by data from a larger number of patients, NMR will play a significant role in renal imaging.

  18. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices. PMID:27182110

  19. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Daniel; Rodriguez, Luis A; Béché, Armand; Javon, Elsa; Serrano, Luis; Magen, Cesar; Gatel, Christophe; Lubk, Axel; Lichte, Hannes; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Fernández-Pacheco, Amalio; De Teresa, José M; Snoeck, Etienne

    2015-10-13

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  1. Ballooning Stability Of Tokamak Pedestals In The Presence Of Applied 3D Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, T. B.; Hegna, C. C.; Willensdorfer, M.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Zohm, H.

    2016-10-01

    Applied 3d magnetic perturbations can destabilize ideal mhd ballooning modes in tokamak pedestals. In this work, we describe techniques for studying infinite-n ballooning stability of 3d equilibria deduced from vmec calculations. Full magnetic profiles from vmec are used to construct local equilibria for flux surfaces in and around the edge pedestal region. These local equilibrium calculations are coupled with ideal ballooning stability analysis to determine stability of the system for given rmp configurations. This theoretical development is motivated by recent asdex-u experiments, where toroidally localized high-n mhd activity is observed in the presence of applied 3d fields. We will attempt to explain these observations. Supported by US DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53218.

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in cystic renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Balyemez, Fikret; Aslan, Ahmet; Inan, Ibrahim; Ayaz, Ercan; Karagöz, Vildan; Özkanli, Sıdıka Şeyma; Acar, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to introduce the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing benign and malignant renal cystic masses. Methods: Abdominal DWI-MRIs of patients with Bosniak categories 2F, 3, and 4 cystic renal masses were evaluated retrospectively. Cystic masses were assigned as benign or malignant according to histopathological or followup MRI findings and compared with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Results: There were 30 patients (18 males and 12 females, mean age was 59.23 ± 12.08 years [range 38–83 years]) with cystic renal masses (eight Bosniak category 2F, 12 Bosniak category 3, 10 Bosniak category 4). Among them, 14 cysts were diagnosed as benign and 16 as malignant by followup imaging or histopathological findings. For the malignant lesions, the mean ADC values were lower than for benign lesions (p=0.001). An ADC value of ≤2.28 ×10−6 mm2/s or less had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 92.86% for detecting malignancy. Conclusions: ADC can improve the diagnostic performance of MRI in the evaluation of complex renal cysts when used together with conventional MRI sequences. PMID:28163806

  3. Single cell detection using 3D magnetic rolled-up structures.

    PubMed

    Ger, Tzong-Rong; Huang, Hao-Ting; Huang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Mei-Feng

    2013-11-07

    A 3D rolled-up structure made of a SiO2 layer and a fishbone-like magnetic thin film was proposed here as a biosensor. The magnetoresistance (MR) measurement results of the sensor suggest that the presence of the stray field, which is induced by the magnetic nanoparticles, significantly increased the switching field. Comparing the performance of the 2D sensor and 3D sensor designed in this study, the response in switching field variation was 12.14% in the 2D sensor and 62.55% in the 3D sensor. The response in MR ratio variation was 4.55% in the 2D sensor and 82.32% in the 3D sensor. In addition, the design of the 3D sensor structure also helped to attract and trap a single magnetic cell due to its stronger stray field compared with the 2D structure. The 3D magnetic biosensor designed here can provide important information for future biochip research and applications.

  4. DIII-D Equilibrium Reconstructions with New 3D Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Lang; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Ferron, J. R.; King, J. D.; Lee, X.; Meneghini, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Huang, Y.; Qian, J. G.; Wingen, A.

    2015-11-01

    DIII-D equilibrium reconstructions with the recently installed new 3D magnetic diagnostic are presented. In addition to providing information to allow more accurate 2D reconstructions, the new 3D probes also provide useful information to guide computation of 3D perturbed equilibria. A new more comprehensive magnetic compensation has been implemented. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria making use of the new 3D probes and plasma responses from 3D MHD codes such as GATO and M3D-C1. To improve the computation efficiency, all inactive probes in one of the toroidal planes in EFIT have been replaced with new probes from other planes. Other 3D efforts include testing of 3D reconstructions using V3FIT and a new 3D variational moment equilibrium code VMOM3D. Other EFIT developments include a GPU EFIT version and new safety factor and MSE-LS constraints. The accuracy and limitation of the new probes for 3D reconstructions will be discussed. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  5. Steady state reconnection at a single 3D magnetic null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Pontin, D. I.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We systematically stress a rotationally symmetric 3D magnetic null point by advecting the opposite footpoints of the spine axis in opposite directions. This stress eventually concentrates in the vicinity of the null point, thereby forming a local current sheet through which magnetic reconnection takes place. The aim is to look for a steady state evolution of the current sheet dynamics, which may provide scaling relations for various characteristic parameters of the system. Methods: The evolution is followed by solving numerically the non-ideal MHD equations in a Cartesian domain. The null point is embedded in an initially constant density and temperature plasma. Results: It is shown that a quasi-steady reconnection process can be set up at a 3D null by continuous shear driving. It appears that a true steady state is unlikely to be realised because the current layer tends to grow until it is restricted by the geometry of the computational domain and the imposed driving profile. However, ratios between characteristic quantities clearly settle after some time to stable values, so that the evolution is quasi-steady. The experiments show a number of scaling relations, but they do not provide a clear consensus for extending to lower magnetic resistivity or faster driving velocities. More investigations are needed to fully clarify the properties of current sheets at magnetic null points.

  6. Extensions of 1d Bgk Electron Solitary Wave Solutions To 3d Magnetized and Unmagnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Jen; Parks, George K.

    This paper will compare the key results for BGK electron solitary waves in 3D mag- netized and unmagnetized plasmas. For 3D magnetized plasmas with highly magnetic field-aligned electrons, our results predict that the parallel widths of the solitary waves can be smaller than one Debye length, the solitary waves can be large scale features of the magnetosphere, and the parallel width-amplitude relation has a dependence on the perpendicular size. We can thus obtain an estimate on the typical perpendicular size of the observed solitary waves assuming a series of consecutive solitary waves are in the same flux tude with a particular perpendicular span. In 3D unmagnetized plasma systems such as the neutral sheet and magnetic reconnection sites, our theory indi- cates that although mathematical solutions can be constructed as the time-stationary solutions for the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equations, there does not exist a param- eter range for the solutions to be physical. We conclude that single-humped solitary potential pulses cannot be self-consistently supported by charged particles in 3D un- magnetized plasmas.

  7. Improved assessment of renal lesions in pregnancy with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Putra, Lydia G Johns; Minor, Thomas X; Bolton, Damien M; Appu, Sreevinas; Dowling, Caroline R; Neerhut, Gregory J

    2009-09-01

    To ascertain the potential utility of magnetic resonance imaging in providing additional clarification of those solid renal mass lesions identified at routine antenatal ultrasonography in early pregnancy and influencing the management of such lesions. We present 7 patients in whom magnetic resonance imaging was used to diagnose, stage, and monitor renal lesions detected during pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging provided for improved imaging of renal mass lesions identified at antenatal ultrasonography, without the use of ionizing radiation, and permitted management determined by optimal radiographic assessment of such lesions without fetal irradiation. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most appropriate method to further investigate renal masses identified at routine antenatal ultrasonography early in pregnancy.

  8. Detection of inflammation following renal ischemia by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sang-Kyung; Hu, Xuzhen; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Lizak, Martin; Miyaji, Takehiko; Koretsky, Alan; Star, Robert A

    2003-07-01

    Determining the disease culprits in human acute renal failure (ARF) has been difficult because of the paucity of renal biopsies and the lack of noninvasive methods to determine the location or cause of renal injury. Recently, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles have been used to detect inflammation in animal models. Therefore, we tested if USPIO enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could detect inflammation in ischemic ARF in rats. Rats were subjected to 40 or 60 minutes of bilateral ischemia or injected with mercuric chloride. MR images were obtained before and 24 hours after USPIO injection, and the signal intensity decrease in the outer medulla was measured. Cells containing iron particles were identified by iron staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Leukocytes were identified by ED-1 and chloracetate esterase staining. Injection of USPIO particles caused a black band to appear in the outer medulla at 48, 72, and 120 hours after ischemia. This band was not detected in normal animals, 24 hours after ischemia, or 48 hours after mercuric chloride injection. The signal intensity change in the outer medulla correlated with serum creatinine and the number of iron particle containing cells. Most infiltrating cells were macrophages, and iron particles were present inside lysosomes of macrophages. USPIO injection did not alter renal function in normal or ischemic animals. USPIO-enhanced MRI could detect inflammation noninvasively from 48 hours after 40 or 60 minutes of renal ischemia in rats. This method might be useful to understand the pathogenesis of human ARF and to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory agents.

  9. Polyethylenimine-interlayered core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres as versatile SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongwen; Li, Ping; Wang, Junfeng; Rong, Zhen; Pang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Jiawen; Dong, Peitao; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2015-11-01

    Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 108 and 6.25 × 106, respectively. In addition, the micro-scale magnetic core endowed the CSSM with a superior magnetic nature, which enabled easy separation and further enhanced Raman signals due to enrichment of targeted analytes and abundant interparticle hotspots created by magnetism-induced aggregation. Our results further demonstrated that the CSSM is expected to be a versatile SERS substrate, which has been verified by the detection of the adsorbed pesticide thiram and the non-adsorbed pesticide paraquat with a detection limit as low as 5 × 10-12 M and 1 × 10-10 M, respectively. The novel CSSM can overcome the long-standing limitations of SERS for the trace characterization of various analytes in different solutions and promises to transform SERS into a practical analytical technique.Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 108 and 6.25 × 106, respectively. In addition, the micro

  10. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-07-17

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (n{theta}) or cos (n{theta}) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B{sub z} of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A{sub n}(z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B{sub r,n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} sin (n{theta}),B{sub {theta},n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} cos (n{theta}), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed.

  11. Biochemical characterization of human renal tumors by in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, M. R.; Tugnoli, V.; Bottura, G.; Lucchi, P.; Battaglia, A.; Giorgianni, P.

    2001-05-01

    This study reports an in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of healthy renal parenchyma, renal cell carcinomas and oncocytomas. In vitro 1H NMR measurements allow in-depth biochemical characterization of human healthy and neoplastic renal tissues. Some metabolites with an osmotic activity are considered markers of physiological renal function. Moreover, the HPLC technique was applied to investigate the amino acidic profile of these tissues: some amino acids appear to have statistic significance.

  12. Waves in 3D Magnetic Nulls: some preliminary results in the PPT device and in situ Measurements in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chijie; Yang, Xiaoyi; Chen, Yangao; Chen, Yihang; Wang, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Plasma waves and the particle dynamics in the magnetic null are very important to understand the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection process. A small plasma device, which named PPT device (abbreviated form of PKU Plasma Test device), has setup recently to study the waves and particle dynamics around a magnetic null. Here we will report the first preliminary results, such as the waves along the spines and the fan surfaces, as well as the particle dynamics around it. Furthermore, some wave modes around 3D nulls detected by Cluster mission in the magnetosphere will also be reported to compare. These preliminary results will give more clues to understanding of the magnetic nulls and 3D magnetic reconnection.

  13. Distinguishing splenosis from renal masses using ferumoxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Berman, Adam J; Zahalsky, Michael P; Okon, Stephen A; Wagner, Joseph R

    2003-10-01

    A 43-year-old man with a history of splenectomy was found to have a solid renal mass on computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging with ferumoxide characterized this mass as ectopic splenic tissue and nephrectomy was avoided.

  14. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  15. Synthesis and Application of Novel 3D Magnetic Chlorogenic Acid Imprinted Polymers Based on a Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Composite.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Yin, Yuli; Lv, Piaopiao; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing; Long, Fang

    2016-04-20

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) magnetic chlorogenic acid (CGA) imprinted polymer (MMIP) was prepared with novel carbon hybrid nanocomposite as the carrier, chlorogenic acid as the template molecule, and methacrylic acid as the functional monomer. The 3D MMIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, vibrating sample magnetometer, and UV spectrometry in detail. The results showed that the imprinted layer was attached successfully on the surface of a 3D magnetic carbon hybrid nanocomposite. The adsorption performance of the 3D MMIPs was investigated, and the results showed that the 3D MMIPs exhibited high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate toward CGA with a maximum adsorption capacity of 10.88 mg g(-1). The extraction conditions involving washing solvent, the pH of eluent solvent, elution volume, and desorption time were also investigated in detail. Combined with high-performance liquid chromatography, the 3D MMIPs have been applied to successfully extract CGA from Eucommia leaf extract samples.

  16. Effect of 3D magnetic perturbations on the plasma rotation in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martitsch, A. F.; Kasilov, S. V.; Kernbichler, W.; Kapper, G.; Albert, C. G.; Heyn, M. F.; Smith, H. M.; Strumberger, E.; Fietz, S.; Suttrop, W.; Landreman, M.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    The toroidal torque due to the non-resonant interaction with external magnetic perturbations (TF ripple and perturbations from ELM mitigation coils) in ASDEX Upgrade is modelled with help of the NEO-2 and SFINCS codes and compared to semi-analytical models. It is shown that almost all non-axisymmetric transport regimes contributing to neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) are realized within a single discharge at different radial positions. The NTV torque is obtained to be roughly a quarter of the NBI torque. This indicates the presence of other important momentum sources. The role of these momentum sources and possible integral torque balance measurements are briefly discussed.

  17. Contributions of nuclear magnetic resonance to renal biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.; Freeman, D.; Chan, L.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR as a descriptive technique is of interest to nephrologists. Particular contributions of /sup 31/P NMR to our understanding of renal function may be enumerated.: Free metabolite levels are different from those classically accepted; in particular, ADP and Pi are low with implications for the control of renal metabolism and Pi transport, and, via the phosphorylation potential, for Na+ transport. Renal pH is heterogeneous; between cortex, outer medulla, and papilla, and between cell and lumen, a large pH gradient exists. Also, quantitation between cytosol and mitochondrion of the pH gradient is now feasible. In acute renal failure of either ischemic or nonischemic origin, both ATP depletion and acidification of the renal cell result in damage, with increasing evidence for the importance of the latter. Measurements of renal metabolic rate in vivo suggest the existence of a prodromal phase of acute renal failure, which could lead to its detection at an earlier and possibly reversible stage. Human renal cancers show a unique /sup 31/P NMR spectrum and a very acidic environment. Cancer chemotherapy may alter this and detection of such changes with NMR offers a method of therapeutic monitoring with significance beyond nephrology. Renal cortex and medulla have a different T1 relaxation time, possibly due to differences in lipid composition. It seems that NMR spectroscopy has much to offer to the future understanding of the relationship between renal biochemistry and function. 56 references.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of urea transporter knockout mice reveals two distinct types of renal pelvic abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Vinitha; Harbaugh, Calista; Dietz, John R.; Fenton, Robert A.; Kim, Soo Mi; Castrop, Hayo; Schnermann, Jurgen; Knepper, Mark A.; Chou, Chung-Lin; Anderson, Stasia A.

    2008-01-01

    Many transgenic and knockout mouse models with increased urine flow have been noted to have structural abnormalities of the renal pelvis and renal inner medulla. Here, we describe an approach for in vivo study of such abnormalities in mice using high resolution contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The studies were carried out in mice in which the UT-A isoform 1 and 3 urea transporters had been deleted (UT-A1/3-/- mice). The experiments revealed three distinct variations in the appearance of the renal pelvis in these mice: 1) normal kidneys with no accumulation of contrast agent in the renal pelvis; 2) frank right-sided unilateral hydronephrosis with marked atrophy of the renal medulla, seen relatively infrequently; and 3) a renal pelvic reflux pattern characterized by the presence of contrast agent in the renal pelvis surrounding the renal inner medulla, with no substantial atrophy of the renal medulla, seen in most UT-A1/3-/- mice with advancing age. The reflux pattern was also found in aquaporin-1 knockout mice. UT-A1/3-/- mice also manifested increased mean arterial pressure. Feeding the UT-A1/3-/- mice a low protein diet did not prevent the demonstrated abnormalities of the renal pelvis. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of real time imaging of renal pelvic structure in genetically manipulated mice, providing a tool for non-destructive, temporal studies of kidney structure. PMID:18854850

  19. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, Nathaniel M.; Grierson, Brian A.; Heidbrink, William W.; Kramer, Gerrit J.; Lasnier, Charles J.; Pace, David C.; Allen, Steve L.; Chen, Xi; Evans, Todd E.; García-Muñoz, Manuel; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Lao, Lang L.; Meyer, William H.; Moyer, Richard A.; Nazikian, Raffi; Orlov, Dmitriy M.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Wingen, Andreas

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $\\rho >0.7$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion ${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed

  20. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, Nathaniel M.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotatingmore » $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $$\\rho >0.7$$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion $${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile

  1. Renal sympathetic denervation increases renal blood volume per cardiac cycle: a serial magnetic resonance imaging study in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Delacroix, Sinny; Chokka, Ramesh G; Nelson, Adam J; Wong, Dennis T; Sidharta, Samuel; Pederson, Stephen M; Rajwani, Adil; Nimmo, Joanne; Teo, Karen S; Worthley, Stephen G

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated improvements in renal blood flow after renal sympathetic denervation (RSDN); however, such effects are yet to be confirmed in patients with resistant hypertension. Herein, we assessed the effects of RSDN on renal artery blood flow and diameter at multiple time points post-RSDN. Patients (n=11) with systolic blood pressures ≥160 mmHg despite taking three or more antihypertensive medications at maximum tolerated dose were recruited into this single-center, prospective, non-blinded study. Magnetic resonance imaging indices included renal blood flow and renal artery diameters at baseline, 1 month and 6 months. In addition to significant decreases in blood pressures (p<0.0001), total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle increased by 20% from 6.9±2 mL at baseline to 8.4±2 mL (p=0.003) at 1 month and to 8.0±2 mL (p=0.04) 6 months post-procedure, with no changes in the renal blood flow. There was a significant decrease in renal artery diameters from 7±2 mm at baseline to 6±1 mm (p=0.03) at 1 month post-procedure. This decrease was associated with increases in maximum velocity of blood flow from 73±20 cm/s at baseline to 78±19 cm/s at 1 month post-procedure. Notably, both parameters reverted to 7±2 mm and 72±18 cm/s, respectively, 6 months after procedure. RSDN improves renal physiology as evidenced by significant improvements in total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle. Additionally, for the first time, we identified a transient decrease in renal artery diameters immediately after procedure potentially caused by edema and inflammation that reverted to baseline values 6 months post-procedure.

  2. Renal sympathetic denervation increases renal blood volume per cardiac cycle: a serial magnetic resonance imaging study in resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Delacroix, Sinny; Chokka, Ramesh G; Nelson, Adam J; Wong, Dennis T; Sidharta, Samuel; Pederson, Stephen M; Rajwani, Adil; Nimmo, Joanne; Teo, Karen S; Worthley, Stephen G

    2017-01-01

    Aim Preclinical studies have demonstrated improvements in renal blood flow after renal sympathetic denervation (RSDN); however, such effects are yet to be confirmed in patients with resistant hypertension. Herein, we assessed the effects of RSDN on renal artery blood flow and diameter at multiple time points post-RSDN. Methods and results Patients (n=11) with systolic blood pressures ≥160 mmHg despite taking three or more antihypertensive medications at maximum tolerated dose were recruited into this single-center, prospective, non-blinded study. Magnetic resonance imaging indices included renal blood flow and renal artery diameters at baseline, 1 month and 6 months. In addition to significant decreases in blood pressures (p<0.0001), total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle increased by 20% from 6.9±2 mL at baseline to 8.4±2 mL (p=0.003) at 1 month and to 8.0±2 mL (p=0.04) 6 months post-procedure, with no changes in the renal blood flow. There was a significant decrease in renal artery diameters from 7±2 mm at baseline to 6±1 mm (p=0.03) at 1 month post-procedure. This decrease was associated with increases in maximum velocity of blood flow from 73±20 cm/s at baseline to 78±19 cm/s at 1 month post-procedure. Notably, both parameters reverted to 7±2 mm and 72±18 cm/s, respectively, 6 months after procedure. Conclusion RSDN improves renal physiology as evidenced by significant improvements in total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle. Additionally, for the first time, we identified a transient decrease in renal artery diameters immediately after procedure potentially caused by edema and inflammation that reverted to baseline values 6 months post-procedure. PMID:28919800

  3. Mitigation of Alfvenic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; ...

    2016-07-05

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n=3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the 1- and 2-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfven continuum at the plasma edge wasmore » found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. Furthermore, the results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfven instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.« less

  4. Mitigation of Alfvenic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Spong, D. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Kubota, S.; Park, J. -K.; Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-07-05

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n=3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the 1- and 2-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfven continuum at the plasma edge was found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. Furthermore, the results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfven instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.

  5. Mitigation of Alfvenic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Spong, D. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Kubota, S.; Park, J. -K.; Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-07-05

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n=3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the 1- and 2-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfven continuum at the plasma edge was found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. Furthermore, the results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfven instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.

  6. Mitigation of Alfvénic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Spong, D. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Kubota, S.; Park, J.-K.; Podestà, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; the NSTX Team

    2016-08-01

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n  =  3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the one- and two-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfvén continuum at the plasma edge was found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. The results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfvén instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.

  7. Novel 3D magnetic resonance elastography for the noninvasive diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit; Cui, Jeffrey; Wolfson, Tanya; Haufe, William; Hooker, Jonathan; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus; Ang, Brandon; Bhatt, Archana; Wang, Kang; Aryafar, Hamed; Behling, Cindy; Valasek, Mark A.; Lin, Grace Y.; Gamst, Anthony; Brenner, David A.; Yin, Meng; Glaser, Kevin J.; Ehman, Richard L.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies show two-dimensional (2D)-MRE is accurate in diagnosing advanced fibrosis (stages 3 and 4) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. 3D-MRE is a more advanced version of the technology that can image shear-wave fields in 3D of the entire liver. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3D-MRE and 2D-MRE for diagnosing advanced fibrosis in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Design This cross-sectional analysis of a prospective study included 100 consecutive patients (56% women) with biopsy-proven NAFLD who also underwent MRE. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) ana3lysis was performed to assess the accuracy of 2D and 3D-MRE in diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Results The mean (±sd) of age and BMI was 50.2 (±13.6) yrs and 32.1 (±5.0) kg/m2, respectively. The AUROC for diagnosing advanced fibrosis was 0.981 for 3D-MRE at 40 Hz, 0.927 for 3D-MRE at 60 Hz (standard shear-wave frequency), and 0.921 for 2D-MRE at 60 Hz (standard shear-wave frequency). At a threshold of 2.43 kPa, 3D-MRE at 40 Hz had sensitivity 1.0, specificity 0.94, positive predictive value 0.72, and negative predictive value 1.0 for diagnosing advanced fibrosis. 3D-MRE at 40 Hz had significantly higher AUROC (p<0.05) than 2D-MRE at 60 Hz for diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Conclusion Utilizing a prospective study design, we demonstrate that 3D MRE at 40 Hz has the highest diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing NAFLD advanced fibrosis. Both 2D and 3D-MRE at 60 Hz, the standard shear-wave frequency, are also highly accurate in diagnosing NAFLD advanced fibrosis. PMID:27002798

  8. Validation of the Model for ELM Suppression with 3D Magnetic Fields Using Low Torque ITER Baseline Scenario Discharges in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Suppression of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) is lost in ITER Baseline Scenario discharges when the torque Tinj and toroidal rotation νϕ are reduced. This is due to a shift in the tearing response deeper into the plasma. ELM suppression is recovered by reducing the normalized plasma pressure βN. In H-mode plasmas, edge turbulence is suppressed in a ``pedestal'' region, leading to large pressure gradients that trigger MHD instabilities (ELMs), causing rapid heat expulsion. 3D magnetic fields are used to drive resonances that limit the pedestal width preventing the ELM. Reducing Tinj changes the νϕ profile such that the drive shifts to a resonance deeper in the plasma, allowing the pedestal to grow again to MHD instability. Reducing βN reduces the edge pressure, which reduces the electron diamagnetic flow and moves the drive to a resonance that is closer to the boundary, recovering suppression. In two-fluid theory, the tearing response occurs at a resonant surface where the electron perpendicular rotation ω (⊥ e) 0 . Linear two-fluid resistive MHD simulations show that the tearing response shifts to a resonance deeper in the plasma when Tinj is reduced. The experimental results confirm that the tearing response occurs for a resonance where ω (⊥ e) 0 , and suggest that the transport which limits the pedestal width is linked to the tearing response, even if any islands are predicted to be small. Although this model describes the differences between ELMing and ELM suppressed H-modes, it doesn't address the transition from ELMs to suppression, because ω (⊥ e) 0 is initially too deep (ψN <= 0.9, q = 3) for the tearing response to limit the pedestal width. Although understanding this transition is important, ITER must apply the RMP in L-mode to avoid the first ELM. These results suggest that manipulation of the edge rotation profile will be important to optimize ELM suppression in future tokamaks. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917 and DE-FG02

  9. Serial quantitative magnetic resonance angiography follow-up of renal artery dimensions following treatment by four different renal denervation systems.

    PubMed

    van Zandvoort, Laurens; van Kranenburg, Matthijs; Karanasos, Antonios; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Ouhlous, Mohammed; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; van Domburg, Ron; Daemen, Joost

    2017-04-07

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) is being studied as a therapeutic option for patients with therapy-resistant hypertension. It remains unclear if the procedure affects the renal arteries in such a way that luminal narrowing might occur at the mid to longer term. The aim of the present study was to assess renal artery integrity accurately at the medium to long term using recently validated quantitative magnetic resonance angiography software in patients treated with four different RDN devices. In a prospective cohort of 27 patients referred for RDN, quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was used to assess 52 vessels at baseline, six, and 12 months post treatment with one of four different devices. No renal artery stenosis was seen at six or 12 months. The average mean lumen area was 26.6±7.3 mm2 at baseline versus 25.0±7.1 mm² and 25.0±6.1 mm² at six and 12 months, respectively, resulting in a late loss of 1.6 mm2 at six months and 1.9 mm2 at 12 months. No differences were observed in the arterial response to RDN with the four different systems used. There was no correlation between post-procedural dissections, oedema or thrombi as detected with invasive imaging, and luminal narrowing at follow-up. Quantitative MRA of patients treated with RDN revealed no significant change in renal artery dimensions up to 12-month follow-up. The lack of a change in renal artery luminal dimensions was irrespective of the arterial response to the individual devices used.

  10. A three-step calibration method for tri-axial field sensors in a 3D magnetic digital compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoning; Zhao, Ta; Cheng, Defu; Zhou, Zhijian

    2017-04-01

    In a 3D magnetic compass, it is important to calibrate the tri-axial magnetometers and accelerometers so the compass will provide accurate heading and attitude information. Previous researchers have used two methods to calibrate these two field sensors separately, i.e. the classic independent ellipsoid fitting method and the independent dot product invariant method, respectively. Both methods are easy to use, and no highly accurate, external equipment is required. However, self-calibration with ellipsoid fitting has the disadvantage that it interfuses an orthogonal matrix, and the dot product invariant method requires the use of pre-calibrated internal field sensors, which may be unavailable in many cases. In this paper, we have introduced and unified an error model of two tri-axial field sensors. Accordingly, the orthogonal matrix caused by ellipsoid fitting was mathematically proved to be the combination of two sources, the mounting misalignment and the rotation misalignment. Moreover, a new method, which we call optimal resultant vector, was proposed to further calibrate multi-sensor systems on the basis of ellipsoid fitting and dot product invariant methods, establishing a new, three-step calibration method. The superiority of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art approaches were demonstrated by simulations and a 3D compass experiment.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Analysis of Ischemia/Reperfusion in Experimental Acute Renal Injury.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Andreas; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between renal oxygen delivery and demand in the first hours after reperfusion is suggested to be decisive in the pathophysiological chain of events leading to ischemia-induced acute kidney injury. Here we describe blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for continuous monitoring of the deoxyhemoglobin-sensitive MR parameter T 2* in the renal cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla of rats throughout renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Changes during I/R are benchmarked against the effects of variations in the fraction of inspired oxygen (hypoxia, hyperoxia). This method may be useful for investigating renal blood oxygenation of rats in vivo under various experimental (patho)physiological conditions.

  12. Integrating a High Resolution Optically Pumped Magnetometer with a Multi-Rotor UAV towards 3-D Magnetic Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Walter, C. A.; Parvar, K.

    2016-12-01

    The current platforms for collecting magnetic data include dense coverage, but low resolution traditional airborne surveys, and high resolution, but low coverage terrestrial surveys. Both platforms leave a critical observation gap between the ground surface and approximately 100m above ground elevation, which can be navigated efficiently by new technologies, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Specifically, multi rotor UAV platforms provide the ability to sense the magnetic field in a full 3-D tensor, which increases the quality of data collected over other current platform types. Payload requirements and target requirements must be balanced to fully exploit the 3-D magnetic tensor. This study outlines the integration of a GEM Systems Cesium Vapour UAV Magnetometer, a Lightware SF-11 Laser Altimeter and a uBlox EVK-7P GPS module with a DJI s900 Multi Rotor UAV. The Cesium Magnetometer is suspended beneath the UAV platform by a cable of varying length. A set of surveys was carried out to optimize the sensor orientation, sensor cable length beneath the UAV and data collection methods of the GEM Systems Cesium Vapour UAV Magnetometer when mounted on the DJI s900. The target for these surveys is a 12 inch steam pipeline located approximately 2 feet below the ground surface. A systematic variation of cable length, sensor orientation and inclination was conducted. The data collected from the UAV magnetometer was compared to a terrestrial survey conducted with the GEM GST-19 Proton Procession Magnetometer at the same elevation, which also served a reference station. This allowed for a cross examination between the UAV system and a proven industry standard for magnetic field data collection. The surveys resulted in optimizing the above parameters based on minimizing instrument error and ensuring reliable data acquisition. The results demonstrate that optimizing the UAV magnetometer survey can yield to industry standard measurements.

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chromatographic methods identify altered lipid composition in human renal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tosi, M R; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Lercker, G; Poerio, A; Trinchero, A; Reggiani, A; Tugnoli, V

    2004-07-01

    We report on the characterization of the lipid obtained from cortical and medullary normal human kidney tissue, benign renal neoplasms (oncocytoma) and 2 different types of malignant renal neoplasms (chromophobic cell carcinoma and clear cell carcinoma). The total lipid fractions were analyzed by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography, whereas the composition of the total fatty acids and the content of total cholesterol were determined by gas chromatography. alpha-Tocopherol was detected and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis revealed significant differences in the renal tissues examined. It was confirmed that cholesteryl esters (mainly oleate) are typical of clear cell renal carcinomas. Their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic factors is discussed, with particular emphasis on its capability to indicate the tumor diffusion in healthy renal parenchyma. alpha-Tocopherol is prevalent in clear cell carcinoma and it is present in nearly the same low amounts in cortex, medulla and chromophobic cell renal carcinoma. Q10 coenzyme and dolichols were detected by thin-layer chromatography and they are present in significant amounts in the cortex and the benign oncocytoma. Great variations were found in the distribution of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, especially in the docosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids and the corresponding omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio.

  14. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow and Oxygenation in CKD Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khatir, Dinah S; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Animal studies suggest that progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is related to renal hypoxia. With renal blood supply determining oxygen delivery and sodium absorption being the main contributor to oxygen consumption, we describe the relationship between renal oxygenation, renal artery blood flow, and sodium absorption in patients with CKD and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study. 62 stable patients with CKD stages 3 to 4 (mean age, 61±13 [SD] years) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. CKD versus control status. Renal artery blood flow, tissue oxygenation (relative changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration of the renal medulla [MR2*] and cortex [CR2*]), and sodium absorption. Renal artery blood flow was determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MR2* and CR2* were determined by blood oxygen level-dependent MRI. Ultrafiltered and reabsorbed sodium were determined from measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) and 24-hour urine collections. mGFR in patients was 37% that of controls (36±15 vs 97±23 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P < 0.001), and reabsorbed sodium was 37% that of controls (6.9 vs 19.1 mol/24 h; P < 0.001). Single-kidney patient renal artery blood flow was 72% that of controls (319 vs 443 mL/min; P < 0.001). Glomerular filtration fraction was 9% in patients and 18% in controls (P < 0.001). Patients and controls had similar CR2* (13.4 vs 13.3 s(-1)) and medullary MR2* (26.4 vs 26.5 s(-1)) values. Linear regression analysis demonstrated no associations between R2* and renal artery blood flow or sodium absorption. Increasing arterial blood oxygen tension by breathing 100% oxygen had very small effects on CR2*, but reduced MR2* in both groups. Only renal artery blood flow was determined and thus regional perfusion could not be related to CR2* or MR2*. In CKD, reductions of mGFR and reabsorbed sodium are more than double that of renal artery blood flow, whereas cortical and medullary oxygenation are within the range of healthy persons

  15. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. -K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. -W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  16. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  17. EDITORIAL: 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, Richard

    2011-08-01

    This annual workshop on MHD Stability Control has been held since 1996 with a focus on understanding and developing control of MHD instabilities for future fusion reactors. The workshop generally covers a wide range of stability topics: from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, ELMs, resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD. It spans many device types, particularly tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches, to pull out commonalities in the physics and improve understanding. In 2010 the workshop was held on 15-17 November at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and was combined with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop. The theme was `3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control', with a focus on multidisciplinary sessions exploring issues of plasma response to 3D fields, the manifestation of such fields in the plasma, and how they influence stability. This has been a topic of renewed interest, with utilisation of 3D fields for ELM control now planned in ITER, and a focus on the application of such fields for error field correction, disruption avoidance, and RWM control. Key issues included the physics of the interaction, types of coils and harmonic spectra needed to control instabilities, and subsidiary effects such as braking (or rotating) the plasma. More generally, a wider range of issues were discussed including RWM physics, tearing mode physics, disruption mitigation, ballooning stability, the snowflake divertor concept, and the line tied pinch! A novel innovation to the meeting was a panel discussion session, this year on Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity, which ran well; more will be tried next year. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2010 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http

  18. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  19. Renal ablation using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology assessment

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Krug, Roland; Do, Loi; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology for noninvasively ablating, quantifying and characterizing ablated renal tissue. METHODS: Six anesthetized/mechanically-ventilated pigs underwent single/double renal sonication (n = 24) using a 3T-MRg-HIFU (1.1 MHz frequency and 3000J-4400J energies). T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2-W), perfusion saturation recovery gradient echo and contrast enhanced (CE) T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences were used for treatment planning, temperature monitoring, lesion visualization, characterization and quantification, respectively. Histopathology was conducted in excised kidneys to quantify and characterize cellular and vascular changes. Paired Student’s t-test was used and a P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Ablated renal parenchyma could not be differentiated from normal parenchyma on T2-W or non-CE T1-W sequences. Ablated renal lesions were visible as hypoenhanced regions on perfusion and CE T1-W MRI sequences, suggesting perfusion deficits and necrosis. Volumes of ablated parenchyma on CE T1-W images in vivo (0.12-0.36 cm3 for single sonication 3000J, 0.50-0.84 cm3, for double 3000J, 0.75-0.78 cm3 for single 4400J and 0.12-2.65 cm3 for double 4400J) and at postmortem (0.23-0.52 cm3, 0.25-0.82 cm3, 0.45-0.68 cm3 and 0.29-1.80 cm3, respectively) were comparable. The ablated volumes on 3000J and 4400J double sonication were significantly larger than single (P < 0.01), thus, the volume and depth of ablated tissue depends on the applied energy and number of sonication. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations confirmed the locations and presence of coagulation necrosis, vascular damage and interstitial hemorrhage, respectively. CONCLUSION: Contrast enhanced MRI provides assessment of MRg-HIFU renal ablation. Histopathology demonstrated coagulation necrosis, vascular damage and confirmed the volume of damage seen on MRI

  20. Efficacy of magnetic resonance urography in detecting renal scars in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Koçyiğit, Ali; Yüksel, Selçuk; Bayram, Recep; Yılmaz, İsmail; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2014-07-01

    The detection of renal scars is of paramount importance for optimal clinical management of patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of unenhanced magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and Tc-99(m) dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-DMSA) scintigraphy to dectect renal scars. Unenhanced MRU and Tc-DMSA scintigraphy were performed in 49 children (10 boys, 39 girls; mean age 7.4 ± 4.2 years, range 1-15 years) with documented VUR. MR imaging scans were obtained within 7 days after voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and Tc-DMSA scintigraphy. The diagnostic performance of MRU in renal scar detection was calculated relative to that of the Tc-DMSA scan. The renal scar detection rate of Tc-DMSA scintigraphy and unenhanced MRU in kidneys with VUR was 32.4 and 25.9%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MRU in the detection of renal scars was 80 and 82.6% in kidneys with VUR, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in lesion detection between MRU and Tc-DMSA scintigraphy (P > 0.05). MRU and Tc-DMSA scintigraphy showed good agreement (κ = 0.60). Unenhanced MRU is a robust technique for the morphologic assessment of the urinary system and detection of renal scars. The lack of radiation and contrast material makes this technique a much safer alternative to scintigraphy in children with VUR, particularly in those who require follow-up scanning and, consequently, considerable radiation exposure.

  1. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of radiation-induced renal damage].

    PubMed

    Haneder, S; Boda-Heggemann, J; Schoenberg, S O; Michaely, H J

    2012-03-01

    The diagnosis of radiation-induced (especially chronic) renal alterations/damage is difficult and currently relies primarily on clinical evaluation. The importance of renal diagnostic evaluation will increase continuously due to the increasing number of long-term survivors after radiotherapy. This article evaluates the potentia diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a focus on functional MRI. The following functional MRI approaches are briefly presented and evaluated: blood oxygenation level-dependent imaging (BOLD), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion measurements and (23)Na imaging. In summary, only DWI and contrast-enhanced MR perfusion currently seem to be suitable approaches for a broader, clinical implementation. However, up to now valid data from larger patient studies are lacking for both techniques in regard to radiation-induced renal alterations. The BOLD and (23)Na imaging procedures have a huge potential but are currently neither sufficiently evaluated with regard to radiation-induced renal alterations nor technically simple and reliable for implementation into the clinical routine.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and staging of renal and perirenal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Demas, B E; Williams, R D; McNamara, M T; Hedgcock, M W; Amparo, E G; Tanagho, E A

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-one adult patients underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after CT scans had demonstrated findings consistent with renal cell carcinoma. MR images were interpreted prospectively and independently of the CT findings. Because the CT scanning was performed at multiple institutions by many examiners, this study was not a direct comparison of CT versus MR. The preoperative diagnoses and staging of the neoplasms, as judged by MR, were compared with those obtained at laparotomy (n = 28), autopsy (n = 1), or biopsy (n = 2). Correct preoperative diagnoses were rendered in 31 patients (100%) on the basis of MR findings. The anatomic staging of 27 renal cell carcinomas was correctly performed by MR in 26 patients (86%). When compared with results of previous studies of the value of CT in the diagnosis and staging of renal neoplasms, MR appears to have several advantages in determination of the origin of the mass; the evaluation of vascular patency; the detection of perihilar lymph node metastases; and the evaluation of direct tumor invasion of adjacent organs. MR is sensitive in determining the extent of tumor thrombus and in evaluating invasion of the inferior vena caval wall. MR should assume an important role in the diagnosis and staging of renal neoplasms.

  3. Role of magnetic resonance urography in diagnosis of duplex renal system: Our initial experience at a tertiary care institute

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Milind P.; Shah, Heemanshi S.; Parelkar, Sandesh V.; Agrawal, Amit A.; Sanghvi, Beejal

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography in cases of duplex renal system. Method: Twenty cases between five month to nine years with suspected or known duplex renal system were evaluated by ultrasound (USG), micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and magnetic resonance urography (MRU). The findings of these diagnostic imaging studies were then compared with each other and against the results of final diagnosis established at surgery. Results: Duplex renal system could be identified in two of these cases on USG, was diagnosed in four in IVU and could be diagnosed in all cases with MRU. Conclusion: MRU is superior and far accurate than IVU, MCU and USG in diagnosing duplex renal system. PMID:19468429

  4. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of maxillofacial lesions in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of maxillofacial lesions in renal osteodystrophy. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging of maxillofacial region in 9 patients (6 females and 3 males with mean age of 31 yr) with renal osteodystrophy. They presented with facial swelling (n = 6), facial disfigurement (n = 2), and oral cavity mass (n = 1). They underwent CT and MR imaging of the maxillofacial region. Brown tumors (n = 6) were seen in the mandible (n = 4) and maxilla (n = 2). They appeared as mixed lytic and sclerotic (n = 4) and sclerotic (n = 2) lesions at CT. The lesions appeared as hypointense at T1-weighted images and of mixed signal intensity at T2-weighted images with intense contrast enhancement (n = 6). Uremic leontiasis ossea (n = 2) appeared at CT as diffuse hyperostosis with protruded maxilla and obliterated sinus. At MR imaging, there was expansion of the maxilla with obliteration of the maxillary sinuses and protrusion of the mandible. The lesion exhibited low signal intensity at T1-weighed images. At T2-weighted images, the lesion showed low signal intensity with small hyperintense lesions. Dystrophic calcification (n = 2) was seen in the parotid and the check. We concluded that CT and MR imaging are helpful for diagnosis and treatment planning of maxillofacial lesions of patients with renal osteodystrophy.

  5. Comparison of computed tomographic angiography and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation of living renal donors

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Abhijit Dnyandeo; Shailage, K.; Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Harigovind, P.; Mohan, R. Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal donor protocol is an established method of preoperative renal vascular pedicle evaluation in prospective renal donors. However, CTA is associated with significant radiation exposure and intravenous contrast administration. The newer noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) techniques, especially arterial spin labeling (ASL) with steady-state free precession (SSFP) hold promise as an effective alternative. We prospectively compared CTA with NCE MRA for accuracy in the evaluation of renal arterial anatomy in prospective renal donors. Methods: A total of 43 subjects underwent CTA followed by NCE MRA in a prospective comparative study. The number of renal arteries and early branching of renal arteries were noted in both kidneys in all subjects. Intermodality agreement was calculated using “K” (Kappa) statistics and 95% confidence interval for both modalities. Results: A total of 63 single, 21 double, and 2 triple arteries were detected in 43 subjects on CTA. CTA showed an early branch in 17 kidneys. NCE MRAshowed 64 single arteries, 20 double arteries, and 2 triple arteries. A total of 14 kidneys showed an early branch. Unweighted Kappa statistic of agreement between CTA and NCE MRA for number of renal arteries and for frequency of early branching was 0.9707 and 0.8822, respectively. Conclusions: The newer NCE MRA techniques such as ASL with SSFP among others are potential alternatives for CTA, in the evaluation of prospective renal donors. PMID:28197027

  6. Hyperpolarized (13) C magnetic resonance evaluation of renal ischemia reperfusion injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Baligand, Celine; Qin, Hecong; True-Yasaki, Aisha; Gordon, Jeremy W; von Morze, Cornelius; Santos, Justin Delos; Wilson, David M; Raffai, Robert; Cowley, Patrick M; Baker, Anthony J; Kurhanewicz, John; Lovett, David H; Wang, Zhen Jane

    2017-07-14

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Persistent oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are implicated across diverse forms of AKI and in the transition to CKD. In this study, we applied hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C dehydroascorbate (DHA) and (13) C pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to investigate the renal redox capacity and mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, respectively, in a murine model of AKI at baseline and 7 days after unilateral ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Compared with the contralateral sham-operated kidneys, the kidneys subjected to IRI showed a significant decrease in the HP (13) C vitamin C/(vitamin C + DHA) ratio, consistent with a decrease in redox capacity. The kidneys subjected to IRI also showed a significant decrease in the HP (13) C bicarbonate/pyruvate ratio, consistent with impaired PDH activity. The IRI kidneys showed a significantly higher HP (13) C lactate/pyruvate ratio at day 7 compared with baseline, although the (13) C lactate/pyruvate ratio was not significantly different between the IRI and contralateral sham-operated kidneys at day 7. Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated significantly reduced perfusion in the IRI kidneys. Renal tissue analysis showed corresponding increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced PDH activity in the IRI kidneys. Our results show the feasibility of HP (13) C MRS for the non-invasive assessment of oxidative stress and mitochondrial PDH activity following renal IRI. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Detailing the relation between renal T2* and renal tissue pO2 using an integrated approach of parametric magnetic resonance imaging and invasive physiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Andreas; Arakelyan, Karen; Hentschel, Jan; Cantow, Kathleen; Flemming, Bert; Ladwig, Mechthild; Waiczies, Sonia; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to detail the relation between renal T2* and renal tissue pO2 using an integrated approach that combines parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative physiological measurements (MR-PHYSIOL). Experiments were performed in 21 male Wistar rats. In vivo modulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was achieved by brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. Renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), local cortical and medullary tissue pO2, and blood flux were simultaneously recorded together with T2*, T2 mapping, and magnetic resonance-based kidney size measurements (MR-PHYSIOL). Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out on a 9.4-T small-animal magnetic resonance system. Relative changes in the invasive quantitative parameters were correlated with relative changes in the parameters derived from MRI using Spearman analysis and Pearson analysis. Changes in T2* qualitatively reflected tissue pO2 changes induced by the interventions. T2* versus pO2 Spearman rank correlations were significant for all interventions, yet quantitative translation of T2*/pO2 correlations obtained for one intervention to another intervention proved not appropriate. The closest T2*/pO2 correlation was found for hypoxia and recovery. The interlayer comparison revealed closest T2*/pO2 correlations for the outer medulla and showed that extrapolation of results obtained for one renal layer to other renal layers must be made with due caution. For T2* to RBF relation, significant Spearman correlations were deduced for all renal layers and for all interventions. T2*/RBF correlations for the cortex and outer medulla were even superior to those between T2* and tissue pO2. The closest T2*/RBF correlation occurred during hypoxia and recovery. Close correlations were observed between T2* and kidney size during hypoxia and recovery and for occlusion and recovery. In both cases, kidney size correlated well with renal vascular conductance

  8. Computed Tomography Perfusion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Histopathological Findings After Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation: An In Vivo Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Graumann, Ole; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Andersen, Gratien; Høyer, Søren; Borre, Michael

    2017-08-01

    The present study investigates how computed tomography perfusion scans and magnetic resonance imaging correlates with the histopathological alterations in renal tissue after cryoablation. A total of 15 pigs were subjected to laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation on both kidneys. After intervention, each animal was randomized to a postoperative follow-up period of 1, 2, or 4 weeks, after which computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed. Immediately after imaging, open bilateral nephrectomy was performed allowing for histopathological examination of the cryolesions. On computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging examinations, rim enhancement was observed in the transition zone of the cryolesion 1week after laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation. This rim enhancement was found to subside after 2 and 4 weeks of follow-up, which was consistent with the microscopic examinations revealing of fibrotic scar tissue formation in the peripheral zone of the cryolesion. On T2 magnetic resonance imaging sequences, a thin hypointense rim surrounded the cryolesion, separating it from the adjacent renal parenchyma. Microscopic examinations revealed hemorrhage and later hemosiderin located in the peripheral zone. No nodular or diffuse contrast enhancement was found in the central zone of the cryolesions at any follow-up stage on neither computed tomography perfusion nor magnetic resonance imaging. On microscopic examinations, the central zone was found to consist of coagulative necrosis 1 week after laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation, which was partially replaced by fibrotic scar tissue 4 weeks following laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation. Both computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging found the renal collecting system to be involved at all 3 stages of follow-up, but on microscopic examination, the urothelium was found to be intact in all cases. In conclusion, cryoablation effectively destroyed renal parenchyma

  9. Conceptual design of the 3D magnetic field configuration relevant to the magnetopause reconnection in the SPERF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Ji, Hantao; Ren, Yang; E, Peng; Wang, Zhibin; Xiao, Qingmei; Xiao, Chijie

    2016-10-01

    A new terrella device, the Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), is designed and under construction in China, with Asymmetric Reconnection EXperiment (AREX) as one component to study the interaction between the magnetosheath and magnetosphere plasmas. AREX will provide a unique platform for studying asymmetric magnetic reconnection relevant to the magnetopause, via a set of coils for simulating ``solar-wind-side'' magnetosheath field and a dipole field on the ``magnetosphere-side''. Thus it could be able to investigate a range of important issues in the magnetosphere geometry, such as the electron and ion-scale dynamics in the current sheet, particle and energy transfer from magnetosheath to magnetosphere, particle energization/heating during magnetic reconnection, 3D and asymmetric effects in fast reconnection, and so on. The plasma is generated by two flux cores at the ``magnetosheath-side'' and one electron cyclotron resonance source at the ``magnetosphere-side''. Different kinds of coils with specific current driven functions, as well as advanced diagnostics are designed. Motivation, overview of the AREX design and reconnection scenarios will be discussed.

  10. Unenhanced respiratory-navigated NATIVE(®) TrueFISP magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of renal arteries: Comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Değirmenci, B; Kara, M; Kıdır, V; İnal, S; Sezer, T; Umul, A; Orhan, H; Çelik, A O; Demirtaş, H; Yilmaz, Ö

    2017-02-01

    To compare unenhanced three-dimensional (3D) NATIVE(®) true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography with the more conventional MR angiography technique obtained after intravenous administration of a gadolinium chelate in the evaluation of renal arteries and their branches in patients with suspected renal artery stenosis. A total of 39 patients (25 men, 14 women) with a mean age of 51.4±17.5years (SD) (range: 10-82years) were included in the study. All patients with suspected renal artery stenosis underwent unenhanced 3D NATIVE(®) TrueFISP MR angiography and contrast-enhanced MR angiography. The two MR angiography methods were compared by two independent readers for image quality using a four-point scale, diagnostic performance and grading of renal artery stenosis on a total of 78 renal arteries. For both readers image quality of unenhanced 3D NATIVE(®) TrueFISP MR angiography (3.12 to 3.63) was greater than that of contrast-enhanced MR angiography (1.94 to 2.71) for renal artery ostium-trunk and the left renal artery segmental branches. The sensitivity of 3D NATIVE(®) TrueFISP MR angiography for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis was 100% for both readers for the right renal artery and 66% and 80% for the left renal artery for reader 1 and reader 2, respectively. Agreement between 3D NATIVE(®) TrueFISP MR angiography and CE-MR angiography was 95% (74/78) for reader 1 and 92% (72/78) for reader 2. Unenhanced NATIVE(®) TrueFISP magnetic resonance angiography can play an additional role in the evaluation of renal arteries in patients with hypertension, especially in subjects at risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Observations of Plasma Waves in the Colliding Jet Region of a 3D Magnetic Flux Rope Flanked by Two Active Reconnection X Lines at the Subsolar Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oieroset, M.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F.; McFadden, J. P.; Angelopoulos, V.; Andersson, L.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed a detailed analysis of plasma and wave observations in a 3D magnetic flux rope encountered by the THEMIS spacecraft at the subsolar magnetopause. The extent of the flux rope was ˜270 ion skin depths in the outflow direction, and it was flanked by two active reconnection X lines producing colliding plasma jets in the flux rope core where ion heating and suprathermal electrons were observed. The colliding jet region was highly dynamic and characterized by the presence of high-frequency waves such as ion acoustic-like waves, electron holes, and whistler mode waves near the flux rope center and low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves over a larger region. We will discuss possible links between these waves and particle heating.

  12. Non-invasive Measurement of Renal Blood Flow by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Romero, Cesar A; Cabral, Glauber; Knight, Robert A; Ding, Guangliang; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2017-10-04

    Renal blood flow (RBF) provides important information regarding renal physiology and nephropathies. Arterial spin labeling-magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) is a non-invasive method of measuring blood flow without exogenous contrast media. However, low signal/noise ratio and respiratory motion artifacts are challenges for RBF measurements in small animals. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of RBF measures by ASL-MRI using respiratory-gating and navigator correction methods to reduce motion artifacts. ASL-MRI images were obtained from the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats on a 7 tesla Varian MRI system with a spin-echo imaging sequence. After 4 days, the study was repeated to evaluate its reproducibility. RBF was also measured in animals under unilateral nephrectomy and in renal artery stenosis (RST) to evaluate the sensitivity in high and low RBF models, respectively. RBF was also evaluated in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). In SD rats the cortical RBFs (cRBF) were 305±59 and 271.8±39 ml/min/100 g tissue in the right and left kidneys, respectively. Re-test analysis revealed no differences (p=0.2). The test-retest reliability coefficient was 92±5%. The cRBFs before and after the nephrectomy were 296.8±30 and 428.2±45 ml/min/100 g (p=0.02), respectively. The kidneys with RST exhibited a cRBF decrease compared with sham animals (86±17.6 vs. 198±33.7 ml/min/100 g tissue; p<0.01). The cRBFs in SD, Dahl-ss and SHR rats were not different (p=0.35). We conclude that ASL-MRI performed with navigator correction and respiratory gating is a feasible and reliable non-invasive method for measuring RBF in rats. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  13. Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance urography in detecting crossing renal vessels in children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pavicevic, Polina K; Saranovic, Djordjije Z; Mandic, Marija J; Vukadinovic, Vojkan M; Djordjevic, Miroslav Lj; Radojicic, Zoran I; Petronic, Ivana; Cirovic, Dragana; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    An aberrant or accessory crossing renal vessel (CV) leading to the lower pole of the kidney is the most common extrinsic cause of uretero pelvic obstruction(UPJ) obstruction in a child and young adolescent.There is still controversy regarding there functional significance in obstruction Preoperative identification of such vessels may influence surgical management. First aim is to determine the value of magnetic resonance (MR) urography in detecting crossing vessels in children with UPJ obstruction,comparing the data with postoperative findings and the second one is to evaluate morphologic and functional parameters in these hydronephrotic kidneys. Between June 2009 and December 2012 we retrospectively reviewed MR urography records of one hundred and nine children with unilateral hydronephrosis at the University Children's Hospital. 68 (62.4%) were male and 41 (37.6%) were female,median age was 6.5 ± 5.7. Of the total number of patients, 30 (27%) underwent pyeloplasty, while 79 (72.5%) did not. The age at surgery ranged from 0.3 to 18 years (median 6.6 years). The indication for surgery was based on standard criteria (obstructed renal transit time with or without altered renal function of vDRF < 40%), and did not depend on the presence or absence of a crossing vessel.Consensus reviewes of the MR urography studies were compared with surgical findings. A crossing vessel (CV) was found upon surgery in 9 (33%) of 30 kidneys.On MRU, there was no crossing vessel in 21 kidneys, confirmed at surgery in 18. A crossing vessel was detected with MRU in 9 kidneys and confirmed at surgery in 6. Thus, the sensitivity of MRU was 66.7%, the specificity was 85.7%, the positive predictive value was 66.7%, the negative predictive value was 85.7% and the accuracy was 80%. There was no statistically significant difference in the detection of crossing vessels between MR urography and surgery (p = 0.004 and p < 0.01 respectively). Overall, MRU and surgery showed good agreement (κ = 0

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Identify Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in cT1a Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Canvasser, Noah E; Kay, Fernando U; Xi, Yin; Pinho, Daniella F; Costa, Daniel; de Leon, Alberto Diaz; Khatri, Gaurav; Leyendecker, John R; Yokoo, Takeshi; Lay, Aaron; Kavoussi, Nicholas; Koseoglu, Ersin; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    The detection of small renal masses is increasing with the use of cross-sectional imaging, although many incidental lesions have negligible metastatic potential. Among malignant masses clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most prevalent and aggressive subtype. A method to identify such histology would aid in risk stratification. Our goal was to evaluate a likelihood scale for multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of clear cell histology. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with cT1a masses who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and partial or radical nephrectomy from December 2011 to July 2015. Seven radiologists with different levels of experience who were blinded to final pathology findings independently reviewed studies based on a predefined algorithm. They applied a clear cell likelihood score, including 1-definitely not, 2-probably not, 3-equivocal, 4-probably and 5-definitely. Binary classification was used to determine the accuracy of clear cell vs all other histologies. Interobserver agreement was calculated with the weighted κ statistic. A total of 110 patients with 121 masses were identified. Mean tumor size was 2.4 cm and 50% of the lesions were clear cell. Defining clear cell as scores of 4 or greater demonstrated 78% sensitivity and 80% specificity while scores of 3 or greater showed 95% sensitivity and 58% specificity. Interobserver agreement was moderate to good with a mean κ of 0.53. A clear cell likelihood score used with magnetic resonance imaging can reasonably identify clear cell histology in small renal masses and may decrease the number of diagnostic renal mass biopsies. Standardization of imaging protocols and reporting criteria is needed to improve interobserver reliability. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography for detection of renal vein thrombosis: comparison with multidetector CT venography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wu, Xinsheng; Yang, Gui Fen; Tang, Chun Xiang; Luo, Song; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Ji, Xue Man; Lu, Guang Ming

    2013-12-01

    Renal vein thrombosis is not uncommon, however, there have been few reports on the diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (3D-CE-MRV) in the detection of renal vein thrombosis (RVT). To evaluate the value of 3D-CE-MRV for detecting RVT with multidetector computed tomography (CT) venography as reference standard. Thirty-two patients with nephrotic syndrome underwent renal CT venography and gradient echo pulse sequence (FLASH 3D) 3D-CE-MRV in a clinical 3-T whole-body MR scanner for suspected RVT with time interval of 0-5 days. RVT was recorded on a per-patient and per-vessel (left renal vein, right renal vein, and inferior vena cava) basis. The diagnostic accuracy of 3D-CE-MRV for detection of RVT was calculated with CT venography as reference standard. Inter-reader agreement for RVT detection was evaluated using Kappa statistics. Of 32 patients, CT venography detected 22 vessels with thrombosis in 17 patients, including five in right renal veins, 14 in left renal veins, and three in inferior vena cava, while 15 patients had no RVT. 3D-CE-MRV detected 21 vessels (21/96, 21.9%) with thrombosis in 16 patients (6/32, 50%), including five in right renal veins, 13 in left renal veins, and three in inferior vena cava, while 16 patients (16/32, 50%) had no RVT. With CT venography as reference standard, the sensitivities and specificities of 3D-CE-MRV for RVT detection were 94.1%, 100%; 95.5%, 100% on a per-patient and a per-vessel basis, respectively. Excellent inter-reader agreement (Kappa value = 0.969, P < 0.001) was observed for RVT detection. 3D-CE-MRV has a high diagnostic accuracy in the detection of RVT, which is optimal alternative imaging modality in the detection of RVT.

  16. Fetal and Postnatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Unilateral Cystic Renal Dysplasia in a Neonate with Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Bornstein, Eran; Schacht, Robert; Lala, Shailee; Milla, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an autosomal dominant condition associated with mutations in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 genes. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic, and they often include lesions in the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and bones. TSC2 gene mutations can be seen concomitantly with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene mutations. We present a case of a fetus with prenatal diagnosis of TS that had unique asymmetrical distribution of renal cystic disease. We describe the extensive work up with both fetal and neonatal magnetic resonance imaging with correlating images of the unilateral polycystic renal disease in addition to typical TS brain findings.

  17. [Quality of 3D magnetic resonance imaging of coronary arteries in patients with D-transposition of the great arteries after the Jatene switch procedure].

    PubMed

    Marín Rodríguez, C; Lancharro Zapata, Á; Rodríguez Ogando, A; Carrasco Muñoz, S; Ruiz Martín, Y; Sánchez Alegre, M L; Maroto Alvaro, E

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of images obtained with 3D balanced fast-field echo whole heart (WH3D) MRI sequences for assessing the coronary anastomosis and coronary stenosis in patients with D-transposition of the great arteries who have undergone the Jatene switch procedure. We retrieved 100 WH3D studies done in 83 patients who had undergone the Jatene switch procedure from our pediatric cardiac MRI database; 84 of these studies fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in the study. We evaluated coronary stenoses on WH3D MR images and their correlation with coronary CT or angiography images. We retrospectively studied the quality of the images of the proximal coronary arteries using a four-point scale and correlating the findings with age, heart rate, and heart size. Of the 84 studies, 4 (4.8%) were of a quality considered «insufficient for diagnosis», 7 (8.3%) were considered «fair», 23 (27.4%) «good», and 50 (59.5%) «excellent». The quality of the image of the coronary arteries was significantly correlated with heart rate. MRI detected stenosis in the origin of the coronary arteries in 9 (10.7%) studies. Images obtained with the WH3D MRI sequence in patients who had undergone the Jatene procedure were of diagnostic quality in most cases and were better in patients with lower heart rates. In 10.7%, stenosis in the origin of the coronary arteries that required new studies was detected. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinations of renal cortical and medullary oxygenation using BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging and selective diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Lizette; Glockner, James F.; Woollard, John; Textor, Stephen C.; Romero, Juan C.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood O2 level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) can detect changes in cortical proximal tubule (PT) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL) oxygenation consequent to successive administration of furosemide and acetazolamide (Az). Assessment of PT and TAL function could be useful to monitor renal disease states in vivo. Therefore, the adjunct use of diuretics that inhibit Na+ reabsorption selectively in PT and TAL, Az and furosemide, respectively, may help discern tubular function by using BOLD MRI to detect changes in tissue oxygenation. Material and Methods BOLD MRI signal R2* (inversely related to oxygenation) and tissue oxygenation with intrarenal O2 probes were measured in pigs that received either furosemide (0.5mg/kg) or Az (15mg/kg) alone, Az sequentially after furosemide (n=6 each, 15-minute intervals), or only saline vehicle (n=3). Results R2* decreased in the cortex of Az-treated and medulla of furosemide-treated kidneys, corresponding to an increase in their tissue O2 assessed with probes. However, BOLD MRI also showed decreased cortical R2* following furosemide that was additive to the Az-induced decrease. Az administration, both alone and after furosemide, also decreased renal blood flow (−26±3.5 and −29.2±3%, respectively, p<0.01). Conclusion These results suggest that an increase in medullary and cortical tissue O2 elicited by selective diuretics is detectable by BOLD MRI, but may be complicated by hemodynamic effects of the drugs. Therefore, the BOLD MRI signal may reflect functional changes additional to oxygenation, and needs to be interpreted cautiously. PMID:20856128

  19. Antiferromagnetic spin chain behavior and a transition to 3D magnetic order in Cu(D,L-alanine)2: Roles of H-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Calvo, Hernán L.; Chagas, Edson F.; Rapp, Raul E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spin chain behavior, a transition to 3D magnetic order and the magnitudes of the exchange interactions for the metal-amino acid complex Cu(D,L-alanine)2•H2O, a model compound to investigate exchange couplings supported by chemical paths characteristic of biomolecules. Thermal and magnetic data were obtained as a function of temperature (T) and magnetic field (B0). The magnetic contribution to the specific heat, measured between 0.48 and 30 K, displays above 1.8 K a 1D spin-chain behavior that can be fitted with an intrachain antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.12±0.08) cm-1 (defined as ℋex(i,i+1) = -2J0SiṡSi+1), between neighbor coppers at 4.49 Å along chains connected by non-covalent and H-bonds. We also observe a narrow specific heat peak at 0.89 K indicating a phase transition to a 3D magnetically ordered phase. Magnetization curves at fixed T = 2, 4 and 7 K with B0 between 0 and 9 T, and at T between 2 and 300 K with several fixed values of B0 were globally fitted by an intrachain AFM exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.27±0.02) cm-1 and g = 2.091±0.005. Interchain interactions J1 between coppers in neighbor chains connected through long chemical paths with total length of 9.51 Å cannot be estimated from magnetization curves. However, observation of the phase transition in the specific heat data allows estimating the range 0.1≤|2J1|≤0.4 cm-1, covering the predictions of various approximations. We analyze the magnitudes of 2J0 and 2J1 in terms of the structure of the corresponding chemical paths. The main contribution in supporting the intrachain interaction is assigned to H-bonds while the interchain interactions are supported by paths containing H-bonds and carboxylate bridges, with the role of the H-bonds being predominant. We compare the obtained intrachain coupling with studies of compounds showing similar behavior and discuss the validity of the approximations allowing to calculate the interchain

  20. [Renal arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in normal adults: a study with a 3.0 T scanner].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xuelin; Yang, Li; Shen, Jie; Gao, Wei

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the renal relative blood flow value (rBFV) and image quality in normal adults using single-shot fast spin echo, flow sensitive invention recovery (SSFSE-FAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence and echo planar imaging, and flow sensitive invention recovery (EPI-FAIR) MR sequence, and assess its value for clinical application in routine renal examination. Forty volunteers (25 male and 15 female adults, aged 30 to 62 years) with normal renal function were included in this prospective study. All the subjects underwent 3.0 Tesla MR scanning using 3 MR scan modes, namely breath-holding EPI-FAIR, breath-holding SSFSE-FAIR and free breathing SSFSE-FAIR. SSFSE-FAIR without breath-holding was capable of differentiating the renal cortex and medulla with the corresponding rBFVs of 111.48∓9.23 and 94.98∓3.38, respectively. Breath-holding SSFSE-FAIR and EPI-FAIR failed to distinguish the borders of the renal cortex and medulla. The EPI-FAIR rBFV of mixed cortex and medulla value was 178.50∓17.17 (95%CI: 167.59, 189.41). Breath-holding SSFSE-FAIR and EPI-FAIR can not distinguish the renal cortex and medulla due to a poor spatial resolution but can be used for rough evaluation of renal blood perfusion. Free breathing SSFSE-FAIR with an improved spatial resolution allows evaluation of the status of renal perfusion of the cortex and medulla.

  1. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the evaluation of unclear solid renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Rübenthaler, J; Paprottka, K; Marcon, J; Hameister, E; Hoffmann, K; Joiko, N; Reiser, M; Clevert, D A

    2016-01-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of unclear renal lesions to the histopathological outcome. A total of 36 patients with a single unclear solid renal lesion with initial imaging studies between 2005 and 2015 were included. CEUS and MRI were used for determining malignancy or benignancy and initial findings were correlated with the histopathological outcome. Out of the 36 renal masses a total of 28 lesions were malignant (77.8%) and 8 were found to be benign (22.2%). Diagnostic accuracy was testes by using the histopathological diagnosis as the gold standard. CEUS showed a sensitivity of 96.4%, a specificity of 100.0%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100.0% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 88,9%. MRI showed a sensitivity of 96.4%, a specificity of 75.0%, a PPV of 93.1% and a NPV of 85.7%. Out of the 28 malignant lesions a total of 18 clear cell renal carcinomas, 6 papillary renal cell carcinomas and 4 other malignant lesions, e.g. metastases, were diagnosed. Out of the 8 benign lesions a total 3 angiomyolipomas, 2 oncocytomas, 1 benign renal cyst and 2 other benign lesions, e.g. renal adenomas were diagnosed. Using CEUS, 1 lesion was falsely identified as benign. Using MRI, 2 lesions were falsely identified as benign and 1 lesion was falsely identified as malignant. CEUS is an useful method which can be additionally used to clinically differentiate between malignant and benign renal lesions. CEUS shows a comparable sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV to MRI. In daily clinical routine, patients with contraindications for other imaging modalities can particularly benefit using this method.

  2. 3D print of polymer bonded rare-earth magnets, and 3D magnetic field scanning with an end-user 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Groenefeld, M.; Muthsam, O.; Schuschnigg, S.; Sirak, K.; Thanhoffer, R.; Teliban, I.; Vogler, C.; Windl, R.; Suess, D.

    2016-10-01

    3D print is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to build previously. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer bonded isotropic hard magnets with a low-cost, end-user 3D printer. Commercially available isotropic NdFeB powder inside a PA11 matrix is characterized, and prepared for the printing process. An example of a printed magnet with a complex shape that was designed to generate a specific stray field is presented, and compared with finite element simulation solving the macroscopic Maxwell equations. For magnetic characterization, and comparing 3D printed structures with injection molded parts, hysteresis measurements are performed. To measure the stray field outside the magnet, the printer is upgraded to a 3D magnetic flux density measurement system. To skip an elaborate adjusting of the sensor, a simulation is used to calibrate the angles, sensitivity, and the offset of the sensor. With this setup, a measurement resolution of 0.05 mm along the z-axes is achievable. The effectiveness of our calibration method is shown. With our setup, we are able to print polymer bonded magnetic systems with the freedom of having a specific complex shape with locally tailored magnetic properties. The 3D scanning setup is easy to mount, and with our calibration method we are able to get accurate measuring results of the stray field.

  3. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C₃₂H₁₆MnN₈).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S

    2016-04-06

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T(C)  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T(C) has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ' and χ″, near the quoted T(C). Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k(B)  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k(B)  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured |D|/  >  J.

  4. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  5. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C32H16MnN8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T C  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T C has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ‧ and χ″, near the quoted T C. Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k B  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k B  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured \\mid D\\mid   >  J.

  6. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  7. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed.

  8. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Masquerading as Jugular Foramen Paraganglioma: A Role for Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Wiggins, Richard H; Gurgel, Richard K

    2017-08-01

    To describe a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) masquerading as a jugular foramen paraganglioma (JP). To compare imaging findings between skull base metastatic RCC and histologically proven paraganglioma. A case of unexpected metastatic skull base RCC is reviewed. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared between 3 confirmed cases of JP and our case of metastatic RCC. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) sequences and computed apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared between these entities. A 55-year-old man presents with what appears clinically and radiographically to be JP. The tumor was resected, then discovered on postoperative pathology to be metastatic RCC. Imaging was retrospectively compared between 3 histologically confirmed cases of JP and our case of skull base RCC. The RCC metastasis was indistinguishable from JP on CT and traditional MRI but distinct by ADC values calculated from DW-MRI. Metastatic RCC at the skull base may mimic the clinical presentation and radiographic appearance of JP. The MRI finding of flow voids is seen in both paraganglioma and metastatic RCC. Diffusion-weighted MRI is able to distinguish these entities, highlighting its potential utility in distinguishing skull base lesions.

  9. Noncontrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Versus Computed Tomography Angiography in Preoperative Evaluation of Potential Living Renal Donors.

    PubMed

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Pedersen, Bodil G; Østrat, Ernst Ø; Andersen, Gratien; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Laustsen, Susse; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    Living renal donors undergo an extensive examination program. These examinations should be as safe, gentle, and patient friendly as possible. To compare computed tomography angiography (CTA) and an extensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol without contrast agents to observations from nephrectomy in living renal donors and to evaluate whether noncontrast-enhanced MRI can replace CTA for vessel assessment in living renal donors. CTA and MRI results were compared to observations from nephrectomy, which served as the reference standard. Fifty-one potential kidney donors underwent imaging, and 31 donated a kidney. Comparisons in sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were made with respect to the number of arteries, early branching, and the number of veins. Agreement was assessed using Cohen's kappa. The exact McNemar's test was used to test for statistically significant differences. In the assessment of more than one renal artery, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and CTA were high and in perfect agreement compared to observations from surgery. The results for both MRI and CTA were as follows: (sensitivity 100%/specificity100%/accuracy 100%/Kappa = 1/P = 1). When comparing the ability to test for early branching we found, MRI: (sensitivity 33%/specificity 100%/accuracy 87%/Kappa = 0.45/P = 1) and CTA: (sensitivity 50%/specificity 100%/accuracy 90%/Kappa = 0.62/P = 1). When used to depict supernumerary veins, we found MRI: (sensitivity60%/specifivity100%/accuracy 93%/Kappa = 0.72/P = 1), whereas CTA showed: (sensitivity 40%/specificity 96%/accuracy 87% Kappa = 0.43/P = 1). In conclusion, an optimized MRI protocol that includes noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography can be substituted for CTA for preoperative assessment of the renal vessels before living donor nephrectomy. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to prenatal differential diagnosis of renal tumors: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Linam, L E; Yu, X; Calvo-Garcia, M A; Rubio, E I; Crombleholme, T M; Bove, K; Kline-Fath, B M

    2010-01-01

    Enlargement of a kidney on prenatal imaging is usually due to hydronephrosis or cystic renal disease, and much less often results from solid tumors such as mesoblastic nephroma, Wilms' tumor, nephroblastomatosis, renal sarcoma, and angiomyolipoma. All can be diagnosed by ultrasound. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful not only in confirming the presence of a renal mass, but also in the evaluation of the contralateral kidney for subtle abnormalities. We present one case each of Wilms' tumor and mesoblastic nephroma, both detected on antenatal ultrasound and further studied with fetal magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Reliability of Total Renal Volume Computation in Polycystic Kidney Disease From Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Turco, Dario; Severi, Stefano; Mignani, Renzo; Aiello, Valeria; Magistroni, Riccardo; Corsi, Cristiana

    2015-11-01

    Total renal volume (TRV) is an important quantitative indicator of the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease proposes a method for TRV computation based on manual tracing and geometric modeling. Alternative approaches for TRV computation are represented by the application of advanced image processing techniques. In this study, we aimed to compare TRV estimates derived from these two different approaches. The nearly automated technique for the analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images was tested on 30 ADPKD patients. TRV was computed from both axial (KVax) and coronal (KVcor) acquisitions and compared to measurements based on geometric modeling (KVap) by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis. In addition, to assess reproducibility, intraobserver and interobserver variabilities were computed. Linear regression analysis between KVax and KVcor resulted in an excellent correlation (KVax = 1KVcor - 0.78; r(2) = 0.997). Bland-Altman analysis showed a negligible bias and narrow limits of agreement (bias: -11.7 mL; SD: 54.3 mL). Similar results were obtained by comparison of volumes obtained applying the nearly automated method and the one based on geometric modeling (y = 0.98x + 75.9; r(2) = 0.99; bias: -53.7 mL; SD: 108.1 mL). Importantly, geometric modeling does not provide reliable TRV estimates in huge kidney affected by regional deformation. Intraobserver and interobserver variability resulted in very small percentage error <2%. The results of this study provide the feasibility of using a nearly automated approach for accurate and fast evaluation of TRV also in markedly enlarged ADPKD kidneys including exophytic cysts. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of Renal Hemodynamics and Oxygenation by Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Quantitative Invasive Physiological Measurements.

    PubMed

    Cantow, Kathleen; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In vivo assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation under (patho)physiological conditions by means of noninvasive diagnostic imaging is conceptually appealing. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative parametric mapping of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times T 2* and T 2 are thought to provide surrogates of renal tissue oxygenation. The validity and efficacy of this technique for quantitative characterization of local tissue oxygenation and its changes under different functional conditions have not been systematically examined yet and remain to be established. For this purpose, the development of an integrative multimodality approaches is essential. Here we describe an integrated hybrid approach (MR-PHYSIOL) that combines established quantitative physiological measurements with T 2* (T 2) mapping and MR-based kidney size measurements. Standardized reversible (patho)physiologically relevant interventions, such as brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia, are used for detailing the relation between the MR-PHYSIOL parameters, in particular between renal T 2* and tissue oxygenation.

  13. Renal dysplasia with single system ectopic ureter: Diagnosis using magnetic resonance urography and management with laparoscopic nephroureterectomy in pediatric age

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Milind; Parelkar, Sandesh; Shah, Heemanshi

    2009-01-01

    Single system ureteral ectopia and associated congenital dysplastic kidney is surgically curable etiology of incontinence with other wise normal pattern of voiding in female child. We share our experience of eight cases in last one year and its management with laparoscopic nephroureterectomy at a tertiary care hospital in India which is one of the largest series in such a short duration of this rare anomaly. Materials and Methods: Patients presented with clinical features of continence with otherwise normal pattern of voiding were clinically examined and investigated by ultrasound (USG), nuclear renal scan, magnetic resonance urography (MRU). Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy was done in all the eight cases and renal dysplasia was confirmed on histological examination. Results: All the patients were females in the age group of five months to five years. USG detected the renal dysplasia in three out of eight cases; however, it could not detect the course of the ectopic ureter in any of the cases. MRU picked up the dysplastic moieties and their location as well as functional status and also depicted the course of the ectopic ureter opening into the vaginal wall in all the eight cases. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy was done in all the cases and patients were cured off their symptoms. Conclusion: Single system ectopic ureter associated with congenital renal dysplasia is exceedingly rare. MRU is definitely the better investigation for the diagnosis of this condition as compared to the conventional radiological investigations. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is a very good procedure for the management of these cases. PMID:19955670

  14. Tumor Vascularity in Renal Masses: Correlation of Arterial Spin-Labeled and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Kapur, Payal; Yuan, Qing; Xi, Yin; Carvo, Ingrid; Signoretti, Sabina; Dimitrov, Ivan; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Margulis, Vitaly; Muradyan, Naira; Brugarolas, James; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin-labeled (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been proposed to quantitatively assess vascularity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there are intrinsic differences between these 2 imaging methods, such as the relative contribution of vascular permeability and blood flow to signal intensity for DCE MRI. We found a correlation between ASL perfusion and the DCE-derived volume transfer constant and rate constant parameters in renal masses > 2 cm in size and these measures correlated with microvessel density in clear cell RCC. The objective of this study was to investigate potential correlations between perfusion using arterial spin-labeled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived quantitative measures of vascularity in renal masses > 2 cm and to correlate these with microvessel density (MVD) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Informed written consent was obtained from all patients before imaging in this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, institutional review board-approved, prospective study. Thirty-six consecutive patients scheduled for surgery of a known renal mass > 2 cm underwent 3T ASL and DCE MRI. ASL perfusion measures (PASL) of mean, peak, and low perfusion areas within the mass were correlated to DCE-derived volume transfer constant (K(trans)), rate constant (Kep), and fractional volume of the extravascular extracellular space (Ve) in the same locations using a region of interest analysis. MRI data were correlated to MVD measures in the same tumor regions in ccRCC. Spearman correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between PASL and DCE-derived measurements, and MVD. P < .05 was considered statistically significant. Histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 36 patients (25 men; mean age 58 ± 12 years). PASL correlated with K(trans) (ρ = 0.48 and P = .0091 for the entire tumor and ρ = 0.43 and P = .03 for the

  15. Single ectopic ureteral orifice with bilateral duplicated renal collecting systems in an adult girl: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Wang, Quanrongzi; Liu, Bianjiang; Li, Jie; Lu, Qiang; Song, Ninghong; Wang, Zengjun; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Renal duplication accompanied by ureteral ectopia is an uncommon urinary congenital abnormality. We report the case of a 21-year-old girl who suffered from lifelong continuous urinary leakage. She was finally diagnosed with bilateral duplicated collecting systems complicated with right ectopic ureteral orifice - an extremely rare case. The patient underwent ureteric re-implantation for the ectopic side, and her urinary incontinence ceased soon thereafter. In this case, traditional imaging failed to show the exact insertion of an ectopic ureter. However, magnetic resonance urography combined with retrograde intubation radiography successfully depicted the point of ureteric insertion, which may make the diagnostic process accurate and efficient.

  16. Augmenting intraoperative ultrasound with preoperative magnetic resonance planning models for percutaneous renal access

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) is a commonly-used intraoperative imaging modality for guiding percutaneous renal access (PRA). However, the anatomy identification and target localization abilities of the US imaging are limited. This paper evaluates the feasibility and efficiency of a proposed image-guided PRA by augmenting the intraoperative US with preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) planning models. Methods First, a preoperative surgical planning approach is presented to define an optimal needle trajectory using MR volume data. Then, a MR to US registration is proposed to transfer the preoperative planning into the intraoperative context. The proposed registration makes use of orthogonal US slices to avoid local minima while reduce processing time. During the registration, a respiratory gating method is used to minimize the impact of kidney deformation. By augmenting the intraoperative US with preoperative MR models and a virtual needle, a visual guidance is provided to guarantee the correct execution of the surgical planning. The accuracy, robustness and processing time of the proposed registration were evaluated by four urologists on human data from four volunteers. Furthermore, the PRA experiments were performed by the same four urologists on a kidney phantom. The puncture accuracy in terms of the needle-target distance was measured, while the perceptual quality in using the proposed image guidance was evaluated according to custom scoring method. Results The mean registration accuracy in terms of the root mean square (RMS) target registration error (TRE) is 3.53 mm. The RMS distance from the registered feature points to their average is 0.81 mm. The mean operating time of the registration is 6'4". In the phantom evaluation, the mean needle-target distance is 2.08 mm for the left lesion and 1.85 mm for the right one. The mean duration for all phantom PRA tests was 4'26". According to the custom scoring method, the mean scores of the Intervention Improvement

  17. Nano-sized Contrast Agents to Non-Invasively Detect Renal Inflammation by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular imaging methods have been developed that employ nano-sized contrast agents to detect markers of inflammation within tissues. Renal inflammation contributes to disease progression in a wide range of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and a biopsy is currently the only method of definitively diagnosing active renal inflammation. However, the development of new molecular imaging methods that employ contrast agents capable of detecting particular immune cells or protein biomarkers will allow clinicians to evaluate inflammation throughout the kidneys, and to assess a patient's response to immunomodulatory drugs. These imaging tools will improve our ability to validate new therapies and to optimize the treatment of individual patients with existing therapies. This review describes the clinical need for new methods of monitoring renal inflammation, and recent advances in the development of nano-sized contrast agents for detection of inflammatory markers of renal disease. PMID:24206601

  18. Stepwise algorithm using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of fat-poor angiomyolipoma in small renal masses: Development and external validation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Saito, Kazutaka; Uehara, Sho; Numao, Noboru; Yuasa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Masuda, Hitoshi; Yonese, Junji; Kihara, Kazunori

    2017-07-01

    To develop a stepwise diagnostic algorithm for fat-poor angiomyolipoma in small renal masses. Two cohorts of small renal masses <4 cm without an apparent fat component that was pathologically diagnosed were included: 153 cases (18 fat-poor angiomyolipomas/135 renal cell carcinomas) for model development and 71 cases (seven fat-poor angiomyolipomas/59 renal cell carcinomas/5 oncocytomas) for validation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings were analyzed. Based on multivariate analysis, we developed two prediction models for fat-poor angiomyolipoma, the computed tomography model and the computed tomography + magnetic resonance imaging model, and a stepwise algorithm that proposes the sequential use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The computed tomography model, which was composed of female aged <50 years, high attenuation on unenhanced computed tomography, less enhancement than the normal renal cortex and homogeneity in the corticomedullary phase, differentiated tumors with none of the factors as the low angiomyolipoma-probability group, and the others were candidates for the computed tomography + magnetic resonance imaging model. The computed tomography + magnetic resonance imaging model, consisting of the first three factors of the computed tomography model, low signal intensity and absence of pseudocapsule on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, re-stratified the tumors into low, intermediate and high angiomyolipoma-probability groups. The incidence of fat-poor angiomyolipoma in each group was 0%, 26% and 93%, respectively (area under the curve 0.981). External validation by two readers showed a high area under the curve (0.912 and 0.924) for each. The interobserver agreement was good (kappa score 0.77). The present algorithm differentiates fat-poor angiomyolipoma in small renal masses with high accuracy by adding magnetic resonance imaging to computed tomography in

  19. Beneficial cardiovascular remodeling following arterio-venous fistula ligation post-renal transplantation: a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Dundon, Benjamin K; Torpey, David K; Nelson, Adam J; Wong, Dennis T L; Duncan, Rae F; Meredith, Ian T; Faull, Randall J; Worthley, Stephen G; Worthley, Matthew I

    2014-08-01

    Despite improvements in survival following renal transplantation, high rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality remain. Persistence of arterio-venous fistulae (AVF) may contribute to maladaptive cardiovascular remodeling and poor health outcomes in this cohort. Utilizing recent advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), we prospectively evaluated alterations in cardiac and vascular structure and function six months after elective ligation of AVF, following stable, successful renal transplantation. Eighteen subjects underwent CMR evaluation of cardiac structure and function, aortic distensibility and endothelial function prior to AVF ligation and at six months. At follow-up, while left ventricular ejection fraction was unchanged, mean cardiac output decreased by 15.6% (9.6 ± 2.9 L/min vs. 8.1 ± 2.3 L/min, p = 0.004) and left ventricular mass had regressed by 10% (166 ± 56 g vs. 149 ± 51 g, p = 0.0001). Significant improvements were also noted in right ventricular and biatrial structure and function. Aortic distensibility was unchanged at follow-up, but endothelial dependent vasodilatation had improved (2.5 ± 6.5% vs. 8.0 ± 5.9%, p = 0.04). Elective AVF ligation following successful renal transplantation is associated with improvements in left ventricular mass, right ventricular, and biatrial structure and function. Further randomized studies are warranted to determine the potential clinical improvement following AVF ligation in this cohort. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Combined magnetic resonance urography and targeted helical CT in patients with renal colic: a new approach to reduce delivered dose.

    PubMed

    Blandino, Alfredo; Minutoli, Fabio; Scribano, Emanuele; Vinci, Sergio; Magno, Carlo; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Settineri, Nicola; Pandolfo, Ignazio; Gaeta, Michele

    2004-08-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance urography (MRU), obtained before helical computed tomography (CT) in patients with acute renal colic, can help delimit the obstructed area to be subsequently examined by a targeted CT scan, thus reducing the dose of radiation. Patients (51) with symptoms of acute renal colic underwent MRU and a total urinary tract helical CT. CT images from the 5 cm below the level of ureteral obstruction as demonstrated by MRU were selected out. Combined interpretation of MRU and selected CT images constituted protocol A. Protocol B consisted of the entire unenhanced helical CT of the urinary tract. The two protocols were compared regarding the following points: 1) sensitivity in diagnosing the presence of obstructing urinary stones, and 2) the delivered radiation dose. Protocol A and protocol B had, respectively, 98% and 100% sensitivity in demonstrating ureteral stone as a cause of renal colic. Estimated average dose calculated from phantom study was 0.52 mSv for protocol A and 2.83 mSv for protocol B. Therefore, the effective radiation dose was 5.4 times lower in protocol A compared to protocol B. Combined MRU and short helical CT has a high sensitivity in detecting ureteral calculi with a reduced radiation dose. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Renal transplant failure due to urologic complications: Comparison of static fluid with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Blondin, D; Koester, A; Andersen, K; Kurz, K D; Moedder, U; Cohnen, M

    2009-02-01

    Postrenal reasons of renal transplant failure can be assessed by magnetic resonance urography. This study was designed to retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of static fluid (T2-)MRU compared to contrast enhanced (CE-)MRU in patients with renal transplant failure. Thirty-five consecutive patients (14 female, 21 men; mean age 48.6 years) with renal transplant failure and sonographically detected hydronephrosis were examined both with T2-MRU as well as CE-MRU resulting in 39 MRU examinations. MRU was performed both using T2-weighted HASTE-sequence (T2-MRU) as well as Gadolinium-enhanced 3D-FLASH-sequence (CE-MRU) on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Medical Solutions). Subjective image quality of resulting maximum intensity projection was assessed in consensus by two readers blinded to the final diagnosis, using a five point scale. MRU findings were correlated to sonography, operative results or clinical follow up. CE-MRU yielded a sensitivity of 85.7% (T2-MRU 76.2%), and a specificity of 83.3% (T2-MRU: 73.7%), however statistical significance was not reached. The subjective image quality was significantly better in CE-MRU. Only concerning subjective image quality CE-MRU proved superior to T2-MRU. Yet, there was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between T2- and CE-MRU. Thinking of incipient nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, T2-MRU can be used as reliable alternative in patients with decreased renal transplant function due to urological complications.

  2. Validation of the model for ELM suppression with 3D magnetic fields using low torque ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Moyer, Richard A.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Nazikian, Raffi; ...

    2017-09-18

    Here, experiments have been executed in the DIII-D tokamak to extend suppression of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) to ITER-relevant levels of beam torque. The results support the hypothesis for RMP ELM suppression based on transition from an ideal screened response to a tearing response at a resonant surface that prevents expansion of the pedestal to an unstable width.

  3. Detection of obstructive uropathy and assessment of differential renal function using two functional magnetic resonance urography tools. A comparison with diuretic renal scintigraphy in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Genseke, Philipp; Rogasch, Julian M M; Steffen, Ingo G; Neumann, Grit; Apostolova, Ivayla; Ruf, Juri; Rißmann, Anke; Wiemann, Dagobert; Liehr, Uwe-Bernd; Schostak, Martin; Amthauer, Holger; Furth, Christian

    2017-02-14

    After detection of obstructive uropathy (OU), the indication for or against surgery is primarily based on the differential renal function (DRF). This is to compare functional magnetic resonance urography (fMRU) with dynamic renal scintigraphy (DRS) to assess OU and DRF in infants and children. Retrospective analysis in 30 patients (female: 16; male: 14; median age: 5.5 years [0.2-16.5]), divided into subgroup A (age: 0-2 years; n = 16) and B (> 2-17 years; n = 14). fMRU was assessed by measuring renal transit time (RTT) and volumetric DRF with CHOP fMRU tool (CT) and ImageJ MRU plug-in (IJ). OU detection by fMRU was compared with DRS (standard of reference) using areas under the curves (AUC) in ROC analyses. Concordant DRF was assumed if absolute deviation between fMRU and DRS was ≤ 5 %. DRS confirmed fixed OU in 4/31 kidneys (12.9 %) in subgroup A. AUC of CT was 0.94 compared with 0.93 by IJ. Subgroup B showed fixed OU in 1/21 kidneys (4.8 %) with AUCs of 0.98 each. RTT measured neither by CT nor by IJ in confirmed fixed OU was < 1200 s - resulting in negative predictive values of 1.0 each. In subgroup A, DRF was concordant in 81.3 % of the kidneys for CT and DRS compared with 75.0 % for IJ and DRS. In subgroup B, CT and DRS were concordant in 91.7 %, and IJ and DRS in 45.8 % of the kidneys. fMRU accurately excluded fixed OU in infants and children, independent from the software used for quantification. However, assessment of DRF with fMRU deviated from DRS especially in infants who may profit most from early intervention. Thus, fMRU cannot fully replace DRS as primary functional examination. If, for clinical reasons, fMRU is performed in first place and it cannot exclude fixed OU, it should be followed by DRS for validation and DRF quantification.

  4. Detection and Evaluation of Renal Injury in Burst Wave Lithotripsy Using Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    May, Philip C; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Cunitz, Bryan W; Blomgren, Philip M; Johnson, Cynthia D; Park, Joshua S H; Bailey, Michael R; Lee, Donghoon; Harper, Jonathan D; Sorensen, Mathew D

    2017-08-01

    Burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) is a transcutaneous technique with potential to safely and effectively fragment renal stones. Preclinical investigations of BWL require the assessment of potential renal injury. This study evaluates the capabilities of real-time ultrasound and MRI to detect and evaluate BWL injury that was induced in porcine kidneys. Ten kidneys from five female farm pigs were treated with either a 170 or 335 kHz BWL transducer using variable treatment parameters and monitored in real-time with ultrasound. Eight kidneys were perfusion fixed and scanned with a 3-Tesla MRI scanner (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and susceptibility-weighted imaging), followed by processing via an established histomorphometric technique for injury quantification. In addition, two kidneys were separately evaluated for histologic characterization of injury quality. Observed B-mode hyperechoes on ultrasound consistent with cavitation predicted the presence of BWL-induced renal injury with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in comparison to the histomorphometric technique. Similarly, MRI detected renal injury with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100% and was able to identify the scale of lesion volumes. The injuries purposefully generated with BWL were histologically similar to those formed by shock wave lithotripsy. BWL-induced renal injury can be detected with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity by real-time ultrasound and post-treatment ex vivo MRI. No injury occurred in this study without cavitation detected on ultrasound. Such capabilities for injury detection and lesion volume quantification on MRI can be used for preclinical testing of BWL.

  5. Imaging Renal Urea Handling in Rats at Millimeter Resolution using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Verkman, Alan S.; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Lustig, Michael; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Bok, Robert A.; Sands, Jeff M.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larsen, Jan Henrik Ardenkjær; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo spin spin relaxation time (T2) heterogeneity of hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea in the rat kidney was investigated. Selective quenching of the vascular hyperpolarized 13C signal with a macromolecular relaxation agent revealed that a long-T2 component of the [13C,15N2]urea signal originated from the renal extravascular space, thus allowing the vascular and renal filtrate contrast agent pools of the [13C,15N2]urea to be distinguished via multi-exponential analysis. The T2 response to induced diuresis and antidiuresis was performed with two imaging agents: hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea and a control agent hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-1-13C-cyclopropane-2H8. Large T2 increases in the inner-medullar and papilla were observed with the former agent and not the latter during antidiuresis. Therefore, [13C,15N2]urea relaxometry is sensitive to two steps of the renal urea handling process: glomerular filtration and the inner-medullary urea transporter (UT)-A1 and UT-A3 mediated urea concentrating process. Simple motion correction and subspace denoising algorithms are presented to aid in the multi exponential data analysis. Furthermore, a T2-edited, ultra long echo time sequence was developed for sub-2 mm3 resolution 3D encoding of urea by exploiting relaxation differences in the vascular and filtrate pools. PMID:27570835

  6. Renal medullary carcinoma: sonographic, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Thomas, N; Costello, B; Jobling, L; deKretser, D; Broadfield, E; O'Shea, S

    2000-07-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma is a recently described, highly aggressive tumour, occurring predominantly in young patients of African descent with sickle cell trait (SCT). All have been metastatic at surgery. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy do not appear to alter the course of the disease. The survival time is very short. Presentation is usually with haematuria, abdominal pain and weight loss. Forty-nine patients have been reported from the USA, of these 47 were African/Americans. The reports have mostly appeared in pathology journals. On review of the imaging findings reported in the radiological journals, it becomes apparent that it is possible for a radiologist to suggest a specific diagnosis in the appropriate demographic and clinical setting. Here the first British patient of Afro-Caribbean decent in whom a pre-operative diagnosis was suggested on the imaging findings of a centrally located renal pelvic tumour, encasing the pelvis on a background of SCT in a 28-year-old is described. It is expected that a high index of suspicion in the appropriate clinical setting may lead to earlier diagnosis, treatment and survival of patients. The patient is alive and reasonably well 9 months after surgery. The full range of imaging findings in renal medullary carcinoma are described.

  7. Tumor Necrosis on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates with Aggressive Histology and Disease Progression in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beddy, Peter; Genega, Elizabeth M; Ngo, Long; Hindman, Nicole; Wei, Jesse; Bullock, Andrea; Bhatt, Rupal S; Atkins, Michael B; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) with the histopathological features and disease progression. Material and Methods IRB approval for this retrospective study was obtained; patient consent was not required. The initial staging MRIs of 75 patients with histologically confirmed ccRCC were retrospectively reviewed. The imaging was assessed by two radiologists for the presence of tumor necrosis, cystic degeneration, intracellular fat, hemorrhage, retroperitoneal collaterals and renal vein thrombosis. Quantitative analysis for the MRI presence of intracellular lipid within tumors was performed. MRI findings were correlated with histopathologic findings of clear cell percentage, alveolar and tubular growth pattern and disease progression. Statistical associations were evaluated with non-parametric univariable analyses and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Correlation between MRI and histopathologic features was performed in 75 patients whereas follow-up data was available for progression analysis in 68 patients. The presence of tumor necrosis, retroperitoneal collaterals and renal vein thrombosis on MRI were significantly associated with low percentage of tumor cells with clear cytoplasm (p<0.01) and with metastatic disease at presentation or disease progression (p<0.01). At multivariable analysis, necrosis remained as the only feature statistically associated with disease progression (p=0.03, adjusted odds ratio=27.7, CI 95%=1.4–554.7 for reader one and p=0.02, adjusted odds ratio=29.3, CI 95%=1.7–520.8 for reader two). Conclusion Necrosis in ccRCC on MRI correlates with the histopathological finding of lower percentage of tumor cells with clear cytoplasm and is a poor prognostic indicator irrespective of tumor size. PMID:24145001

  8. 3D FIESTA pulse sequence for assessing renal artery stenosis: is it a reliable application in unenhanced magnetic resonance angiography?

    PubMed

    Gaudiano, Caterina; Busato, Fiorenza; Ferramosca, Emiliana; Cecchelli, Carlo; Corcioni, Beniamino; De Sanctis, Lucia Barbara; Santoro, Antonio; Golfieri, Rita

    2014-12-01

    To assess the capability of the three-dimensional (3D) Fast Imaging Employing Steady-State Acquisition (FIESTA) sequence in evaluating renal artery stenosis (RAS). We retrospectively analysed 79 patients referred for suspected RAS, examined by 3D FIESTA and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA), using a 1.5T whole-body scanner. Image quality was assessed as well as the presence and grade of RAS. Patients with RAS ≥ 50% were evaluated for possible digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV), and accuracy of 3D FIESTA were calculated with ROC analysis using CE-MRA and DSA as the standard of reference. A total of 186 renal arteries were assessed; 36 had RAS ≥ 50 % demonstrated by CE-MRA. Ten patients underwent DSA, for a total evaluation of 22 arteries. Sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV, and accuracy of 3D FIESTA were 91.7%, 100%, 98%, 100%, and 98%, respectively, as compared to CE-MRA, and 88.2%, 100%, 71.4%, 100%, and 91%, respectively, as compared to DSA. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 3D FIESTA as compared to CE-MRA and DSA was 0.958 and 0.941, respectively. Our study demonstrated the capability of the 3D FIESTA sequence in evaluating RAS, with high-quality images and good diagnostic accuracy. The 3D FIESTA sequence provides a robust evaluation of RAS. The 3D FIESTA sequence allows non-invasive evaluation of the renal arteries. The 3D FIESTA sequence could be a useful tool in evaluating RAS.

  9. Agreement between static magnetic resonance urography and diuretic renal scintigraphy in patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction after pyeloplasty.

    PubMed

    Mazdak, Hamid; Karam, Mehdi; Ghassami, Fatemeh; Malekpour, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the most common cause of hydronephrosis within childhood that usually treat by surgery. According to anatomical variations in different individuals, scheduling similar procedures for all patients is not suitable, and thus the best decision for an appropriate surgical technique should be considered separately for each patient. Regardless of the type of applied technique, creating a funnel-shape UPJ with a suitable size is a successful treatment. In this context, the assessment of a successful surgical treatment in a short-term follow-up means repairing revealed anatomical defects. The present study aimed to compare the diagnostic value of static magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and diuretic-based renalscintigraphy (DRS) in patients with UPJO after pyeloplasty. A total of 30 consecutive patients with UPJO, who underwent unilateral pyeloplasty between 2012 and 2013 were assessed. All subjects underwent DRS and also MRU about 1-month after the former procedure. The Kendall's tau correlation showed a very strong correlation between results of MRU and diuretic renal scintigraphy (r = 0.932, P < 0.001). This strong correlation was also shown by Somers'd test (r = 0.932, P < 0.001) similarly. Our study shows a strong agreement between DRS and MRU to assess UPJO. MRU static fluid has a high accuracy for assessment of renal system anatomy. Due to the lack of dangerous consequences of contrast materials, MRU can be the best option instead of DRS.

  10. Agreement between static magnetic resonance urography and diuretic renal scintigraphy in patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction after pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mazdak, Hamid; Karam, Mehdi; Ghassami, Fatemeh; Malekpour, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the most common cause of hydronephrosis within childhood that usually treat by surgery. According to anatomical variations in different individuals, scheduling similar procedures for all patients is not suitable, and thus the best decision for an appropriate surgical technique should be considered separately for each patient. Regardless of the type of applied technique, creating a funnel-shape UPJ with a suitable size is a successful treatment. In this context, the assessment of a successful surgical treatment in a short-term follow-up means repairing revealed anatomical defects. The present study aimed to compare the diagnostic value of static magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and diuretic-based renalscintigraphy (DRS) in patients with UPJO after pyeloplasty. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 consecutive patients with UPJO, who underwent unilateral pyeloplasty between 2012 and 2013 were assessed. All subjects underwent DRS and also MRU about 1-month after the former procedure. Results: The Kendall's tau correlation showed a very strong correlation between results of MRU and diuretic renal scintigraphy (r = 0.932, P < 0.001). This strong correlation was also shown by Somers’d test (r = 0.932, P < 0.001) similarly. Conclusions: Our study shows a strong agreement between DRS and MRU to assess UPJO. MRU static fluid has a high accuracy for assessment of renal system anatomy. Due to the lack of dangerous consequences of contrast materials, MRU can be the best option instead of DRS. PMID:26605225

  11. Geometry-independent assessment of renal volume in polycystic kidney disease from magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Turco, Dario; Severi, Stefano; Mignani, Renzo; Magistroni, Riccardo; Corsi, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Total renal volume (TRV) is an important quantitative indicator of the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease proposes a method for TRV computation based on manual tracing and geometric modeling. We developed a fast and nearly-automated technique for kidney segmentation and automatically compute TRV. In this study we aim to compare TRV estimates derived from these two different approaches. The highly-automated technique for the analysis of MR images was tested on 30 ADPKD patients. TRV was computed from both axial and coronal acquisitions, and compared to measurements based on geometric modeling by linear regression and Bland Altman analysis. In addition, to assess reproducibility, intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities were computed. The results of this study provide the feasibility of using a nearly-automated approach for accurate and fast evaluation of TRV also in markedly enlarged ADPKD kidneys.

  12. Evolutionary magnetic resonance appearance of renal cell carcinoma after percutaneous cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Jui; Chung, Hsiao-Jen; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Chen, Chun-Ku; Chou, Hsiao-Ping; Chiou, Yi-You

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the evolutionary MRI appearance of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) following cryoablation. Methods: For this institution review board-approved study, we recruited patients with biopsy-proven RCC and treated them with percutaneous cryoablation between November 2009 and October 2014. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the pre-procedural and follow-up MRI. The findings included tumour sizes, signal intensities on T1 weighted imaging (T1WI), T2 weighted imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted imaging, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map and contrast enhancement patterns. The ADC values of the tumours before and after treatment were measured. Results: A total of 26 patients were enrolled. The ablated tumours exhibited predominantly high signals on T1WI at 1–9-month follow-up (47.1% strong hyperintense at 3 months) and subsequently returned to being isointense. In T2WI, the signals of the ablated tumours were highly variable during the first 3 months and became strikingly hypointense after 6 months (58.3% strong hypointense at 6 months). Diffusion restriction was prominent during the first 3 months (lowest ADC: 0.62 ± 0.29 × 10−3 mm2 s−1 at 1 month). Contrast enhancement persisted up to 6 months after the procedure. The residual enhancement gradually increased in the dynamic scan and was most prominent in the delay phase. Conclusion: The MRI of the cryoablated renal tumour follows a typical evolutionary pattern. Advances in knowledge: Familiarity of practitioners with the normal post-cryoablation change of RCC on MRI can enable the early detection and prevention of tumour recurrence. PMID:27401340

  13. Differences in Renal Tumor Size Measurements for Computed Tomography Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Implications for Patients on Active Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Khan, Irtaza; Beksac, Alp Tuna; Paulucci, David J; Abaza, Ronney; Eun, Daniel D; Bhandari, Akshay; Badani, Ketan K

    2017-08-11

    To evaluate and compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting the final pathologic tumor size of partial nephrectomy specimens. We analyzed a multi-institutional database of 807 patients who underwent robotic partial nephrectomy for a cT1a renal mass from 2006 to 2016. Patients who had a solitary tumor with complete data on the baseline imaging modality and the tumor size (baseline and pathologic) (n = 349) were included for analysis. Baseline tumor size evaluated by both imaging modalities, in addition to the difference between the measurements and final pathologic tumor size (cm) measurements, was compared between patients who received a baseline CT (n = 276, 79.1%) and those who received an MRI (n = 73, 20.9%). There were no statistically significant differences between any baseline characteristics and receipt of a CT versus MRI. In multivariable analysis adjusting for confounders, there was no significant difference in the baseline tumor size between patients receiving an MRI and those receiving a CT (2.3 versus 2.6 cm; β = -0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.33 to 0.07; P = .208). Tumor size on imaging was smaller from final pathology by 0.43 cm on average (P = .002). Measurement error for the measured baseline versus actual pathologic tumor size did not significantly differ for patients receiving an MRI versus those receiving a CT (0.38 versus 0.44 cm; β = -0.06; 95% CI = -0.16 to 0.04; P = .232). Baseline renal tumor size measurements were not significantly different for CT scan and MRI. Choice of imaging modality can be based on doctor and patient preference, including cost and exposure to radiation.

  14. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  15. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomic Profiling of Mouse Kidney, Urine and Serum Following Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Justine; Poma, Laurence; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie; de Tullio, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is the most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Its pathophysiology remains unclear. Metabolomics is dedicated to identify metabolites involved in (patho)physiological changes of integrated living systems. Here, we performed 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance metabolomics using urine, serum and kidney samples from a mouse model of renal I/R. Methods Renal 30-min ischemia was induced in 12-week-old C57BL/6J male mice by bilaterally clamping vascular pedicles, and was followed by 6, 24 or 48-hour reperfusion (n = 12/group). Sham-operated mice were used as controls. Statistical discriminant analyses, i.e. principal component analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS-DA), were performed on urine, serum and kidney lysates at each time-point. Multivariate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated from ROC confusion matrix (with averaged class probabilities across 100 cross-validations). Results Urine OPLS-DA analysis showed a net separation between I/R and sham groups, with significant variations in levels of taurine, di- and tri-methylamine, creatine and lactate. Such changes were observed as early as 6 hours post reperfusion. Major metabolome modifications occurred at 24h post reperfusion. At this time-point, correlation coefficients between urine spectra and conventional AKI biomarkers, i.e. serum creatinine and urea levels, reached 0.94 and 0.95, respectively. The area under ROC curve at 6h, 24h and 48h post surgery were 0.73, 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. Similar discriminations were found in kidney samples, with changes in levels of lactate, fatty acids, choline and taurine. By contrast, serum OPLS-DA analysis could not discriminate sham-operated from I/R-exposed animals. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that renal I/R in mouse causes early and sustained metabolomic changes in urine and kidney composition. The most implicated pathways at 6h

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomic Profiling of Mouse Kidney, Urine and Serum Following Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Jouret, François; Leenders, Justine; Poma, Laurence; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie; de Tullio, Pascal

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is the most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Its pathophysiology remains unclear. Metabolomics is dedicated to identify metabolites involved in (patho)physiological changes of integrated living systems. Here, we performed 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance metabolomics using urine, serum and kidney samples from a mouse model of renal I/R. Renal 30-min ischemia was induced in 12-week-old C57BL/6J male mice by bilaterally clamping vascular pedicles, and was followed by 6, 24 or 48-hour reperfusion (n = 12/group). Sham-operated mice were used as controls. Statistical discriminant analyses, i.e. principal component analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS-DA), were performed on urine, serum and kidney lysates at each time-point. Multivariate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated from ROC confusion matrix (with averaged class probabilities across 100 cross-validations). Urine OPLS-DA analysis showed a net separation between I/R and sham groups, with significant variations in levels of taurine, di- and tri-methylamine, creatine and lactate. Such changes were observed as early as 6 hours post reperfusion. Major metabolome modifications occurred at 24h post reperfusion. At this time-point, correlation coefficients between urine spectra and conventional AKI biomarkers, i.e. serum creatinine and urea levels, reached 0.94 and 0.95, respectively. The area under ROC curve at 6h, 24h and 48h post surgery were 0.73, 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. Similar discriminations were found in kidney samples, with changes in levels of lactate, fatty acids, choline and taurine. By contrast, serum OPLS-DA analysis could not discriminate sham-operated from I/R-exposed animals. Our study demonstrates that renal I/R in mouse causes early and sustained metabolomic changes in urine and kidney composition. The most implicated pathways at 6h and 24h post reperfusion include

  18. p38 MAPK inhibitors ameliorate target organ damage in hypertension: Part 2. Improved renal function as assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Stephen C; Nerurkar, Sandhya S; Schaeffer, Thomas R; Mirabile, Rosanna C; Boyce, Rogely W; Adams, David F; Jucker, Beat M; Willette, Robert N

    2003-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of progressive renal disease. Using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we evaluated chronic treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor, trans-1-(4-hydroxycyclohexyl)-4-(4-fluorophenyl-methoxypyridimidin-4-yl)imidazole (SB-239063), on renal function in a hypertension model of progressing renal dysfunction. Spontaneously hypertensive-stroke prone rats were placed on a high salt/fat diet (SFD) or maintained on normal chow diet (ND). SFD animals with albuminuria at 4 to 8 weeks (> or =10 mg/day inclusion criteria), were randomized into p38 MAPK inhibitor treatment (SB-239063, 1200 ppm in diet) or vehicle groups. The progression of blood pressure and albuminuria during the treatment period (approximately 6 weeks) was decreased by 12 and 60%, respectively, in the SFD + SB-239063 versus SFD control group. Renal perfusion and filtration were assessed by in vivo MRI at the end of the study. Relative cortical perfusion was increased in the SFD + SB-239063 group compared with the SFD control group as reflected by a 29% decrease in time to peak of contrast agent in the cortex. Additionally, the regional renal glomerular filtration rate index (Kcl) was increased by 39% in the SFD + SB-239063 versus SFD control group and was normalized to the ND control group. Greater functional heterogeneity was observed in the SFD control versus SFD + SB-239063 or ND control group. All alterations of renal function were supported by histopathological findings. In conclusion, chronic treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB-239063, attenuates functional and structural renal degeneration in a hypertensive model of established renal dysfunction.

  19. Validation of the model for ELM suppression with 3D magnetic fields using low torque ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, R. A.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Knölker, M.; Lyons, B. C.; McKee, G. R.; Osborne, T. H.; Rhodes, T. L.; Meneghini, O.; Smith, S.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groebner, R. J.; Hanson, J. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Luce, T. C.; Mordijck, S.; Solomon, W. M.; Turco, F.; Yan, Z.; Zeng, L.; DIII-D Team

    2017-10-01

    Experiments have been executed in the DIII-D tokamak to extend suppression of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) to ITER-relevant levels of beam torque. The results support the hypothesis for RMP ELM suppression based on transition from an ideal screened response to a tearing response at a resonant surface that prevents expansion of the pedestal to an unstable width [Snyder et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103016 (2011) and Wade et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 023002 (2015)]. In ITER baseline plasmas with I/aB = 1.4 and pedestal ν* ˜ 0.15, ELMs are readily suppressed with co- Ip neutral beam injection. However, reducing the beam torque from 5 Nm to ≤ 3.5 Nm results in loss of ELM suppression and a shift in the zero-crossing of the electron perpendicular rotation ω⊥e ˜ 0 deeper into the plasma. The change in radius of ω⊥e ˜ 0 is due primarily to changes to the electron diamagnetic rotation frequency ωe*. Linear plasma response modeling with the resistive MHD code m3d-c1 indicates that the tearing response location tracks the inward shift in ω⊥e ˜ 0. At pedestal ν*˜ 1, ELM suppression is also lost when the beam torque is reduced, but the ω⊥e change is dominated by collapse of the toroidal rotation vT. The hypothesis predicts that it should be possible to obtain ELM suppression at reduced beam torque by also reducing the height and width of the ωe* profile. This prediction has been confirmed experimentally with RMP ELM suppression at 0 Nm of beam torque and plasma normalized pressure βN ˜ 0.7. This opens the possibility of accessing ELM suppression in low torque ITER baseline plasmas by establishing suppression at low beta and then increasing beta while relying on the strong RMP-island coupling to maintain suppression.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance metabolomics reveals an excretory metabolic signature of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Márcia S; Barros, António S; Pinto, Joana; Carvalho, Márcia; Pires-Luís, Ana S; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Gil, Ana M; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2016-11-18

    RCC usually develops and progresses asymptomatically and, when detected, it is frequently at advanced stages and metastatic, entailing a dismal prognosis. Therefore, there is an obvious demand for new strategies enabling an earlier diagnosis. The importance of metabolic rearrangements for carcinogenesis unlocked a new approach for cancer research, catalyzing the increased use of metabolomics. The present study aimed the NMR metabolic profiling of RCC in urine samples from a cohort of RCC patients (n = 42) and controls (n = 49). The methodology entailed variable selection of the spectra in tandem with multivariate analysis and validation procedures. The retrieval of a disease signature was preceded by a systematic evaluation of the impacts of subject age, gender, BMI, and smoking habits. The impact of confounders on the urine metabolomics profile of this population is residual compared to that of RCC. A 32-metabolite/resonance signature descriptive of RCC was unveiled, successfully distinguishing RCC patients from controls in principal component analysis. This work demonstrates the value of a systematic metabolomics workflow for the identification of robust urinary metabolic biomarkers of RCC. Future studies should entail the validation of the 32-metabolite/resonance signature found for RCC in independent cohorts, as well as biological validation of the putative hypotheses advanced.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance metabolomics reveals an excretory metabolic signature of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Márcia S.; Barros, António S.; Pinto, Joana; Carvalho, Márcia; Pires-Luís, Ana S.; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Gil, Ana M.; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2016-01-01

    RCC usually develops and progresses asymptomatically and, when detected, it is frequently at advanced stages and metastatic, entailing a dismal prognosis. Therefore, there is an obvious demand for new strategies enabling an earlier diagnosis. The importance of metabolic rearrangements for carcinogenesis unlocked a new approach for cancer research, catalyzing the increased use of metabolomics. The present study aimed the NMR metabolic profiling of RCC in urine samples from a cohort of RCC patients (n = 42) and controls (n = 49). The methodology entailed variable selection of the spectra in tandem with multivariate analysis and validation procedures. The retrieval of a disease signature was preceded by a systematic evaluation of the impacts of subject age, gender, BMI, and smoking habits. The impact of confounders on the urine metabolomics profile of this population is residual compared to that of RCC. A 32-metabolite/resonance signature descriptive of RCC was unveiled, successfully distinguishing RCC patients from controls in principal component analysis. This work demonstrates the value of a systematic metabolomics workflow for the identification of robust urinary metabolic biomarkers of RCC. Future studies should entail the validation of the 32-metabolite/resonance signature found for RCC in independent cohorts, as well as biological validation of the putative hypotheses advanced. PMID:27857216

  2. Structure and magnetism of a binuclear Cu(II) pyrophosphate: transition to a 3D magnetic behaviour studied by single crystal EPR.

    PubMed

    Sartoris, Rosana P; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Santana, Ricardo C; Perec, Mireille; Baggio, Ricardo F; Calvo, Rafael

    2015-03-14

    A binuclear Cu(II) compound [Cu2(bpa)2(P2O7)(H2O)2]·2.5H2O, 1, (bpa = 2,2'-bipyridylamine), with pairs of Cu(II) ions bridged by one pyrophosphate tetra-anion, was synthesized and crystallized. Its triclinic structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystal samples of 1 were recorded for a fixed orientation of the magnetic field (B0) as a function of temperature (T) between 4.7 and 293 K, and at T = 4.7, 50 and 293 K, as a function of the orientation of B0. Below ∼8 K, the spectra are assigned to two types of mononuclear crystal defects hyperfine-coupled to one copper and two nitrogen nuclei. The g-matrices and hyperfine couplings at these T provide information about the structures of these defects. Above 10 K, the spectrum is dominated by the response of the bulk binuclear Cu(II) material, showing hyperfine interactions with two copper nuclei, collapsing to a single peak above 18 K when the units are magnetically connected, and the magnetic behaviour becomes 3D. We attribute the results above 10 K to the interplay of an AFM intrabinuclear exchange interaction J0 = -28(3) cm(-1) (defined as Hex = -J0S1·S2), and three orders of magnitude weaker exchange coupling with average magnitude |J1| ≥ 0.022 cm(-1) between Cu(II) ions in neighbouring binuclear units. The interplays between structure, exchange couplings, magnetic dimension and spin dynamics in the binuclear compound are discussed. A previously unreported situation, where the structure of the spectra arising from the anisotropic spin-spin interaction term (D) within the binuclear unit is averaged out, but the forbidden half field transition is not, is observed and explained.

  3. Prediction and diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma using nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolomics and self-organizing maps

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Ji, Jiansong; Zhao, Liangcai; Chen, Minjiang; Shi, An; Pan, Linlin; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Huajie; Dong, Baijun; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at an early stage is challenging, but it provides the best chance for cure. We aimed to develop a predictive diagnostic method for early-stage RCC based on a biomarker cluster using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based serum metabolomics and self-organizing maps (SOMs). We trained and validated the SOM model using serum metabolome data from 104 participants, including healthy individuals and early-stage RCC patients. To assess the predictive capability of the model, we analyzed an independent cohort of 22 subjects. We then used our method to evaluate changes in the metabolic patterns of 23 RCC patients before and after nephrectomy. A biomarker cluster of 7 metabolites (alanine, creatine, choline, isoleucine, lactate, leucine, and valine) was identified for the early diagnosis of RCC. The trained SOM model using a biomarker cluster was able to classify 22 test subjects into the appropriate categories. Following nephrectomy, all RCC patients were classified as healthy, which was indicative of metabolic recovery. But using a diagnostic criterion of 0.80, only 3 of the 23 subjects could not be confidently assessed as metabolically recovered after nephrectomy. We successfully followed-up 17 RCC patients for 8 years post-nephrectomy. Eleven of these patients who diagnosed as metabolic recovery remained healthy after 8 years. Our data suggest that a SOM model using a biomarker cluster from serum metabolome can accurately predict early RCC diagnosis and can be used to evaluate postoperative metabolic recovery. PMID:27463020

  4. Prediction and diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma using nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolomics and self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Ji, Jiansong; Zhao, Liangcai; Chen, Minjiang; Shi, An; Pan, Linlin; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Huajie; Dong, Baijun; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-09-13

    Diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at an early stage is challenging, but it provides the best chance for cure. We aimed to develop a predictive diagnostic method for early-stage RCC based on a biomarker cluster using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based serum metabolomics and self-organizing maps (SOMs). We trained and validated the SOM model using serum metabolome data from 104 participants, including healthy individuals and early-stage RCC patients. To assess the predictive capability of the model, we analyzed an independent cohort of 22 subjects. We then used our method to evaluate changes in the metabolic patterns of 23 RCC patients before and after nephrectomy. A biomarker cluster of 7 metabolites (alanine, creatine, choline, isoleucine, lactate, leucine, and valine) was identified for the early diagnosis of RCC. The trained SOM model using a biomarker cluster was able to classify 22 test subjects into the appropriate categories. Following nephrectomy, all RCC patients were classified as healthy, which was indicative of metabolic recovery. But using a diagnostic criterion of 0.80, only 3 of the 23 subjects could not be confidently assessed as metabolically recovered after nephrectomy. We successfully followed-up 17 RCC patients for 8 years post-nephrectomy. Eleven of these patients who diagnosed as metabolic recovery remained healthy after 8 years. Our data suggest that a SOM model using a biomarker cluster from serum metabolome can accurately predict early RCC diagnosis and can be used to evaluate postoperative metabolic recovery.

  5. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy assessment of subnormal oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle of renal failure patients.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, G E; Bertocci, L A; Painter, P L

    1993-01-01

    In hemodialysis patients, erythropoietin increases hemoglobin, but often the corresponding increase in peak oxygen uptake is low. The disproportionality may be caused by impaired energy metabolism. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study muscle energy metabolism in 11 hemodialysis patients, 11 renal transplant recipients, and 9 controls. Measurements were obtained during rest, static hand-grip, and rhythmic hand-grip; recoveries were followed to baseline. During static hand-grip, there were no between-group differences in phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), or PCr/(PCr + Pi), although intracellular pH was higher in hemodialysis patients than transplant recipients. During rhythmic hand-grip, hemodialysis patients exhibited greater fatigue than transplant recipients or controls, and more reduction in PCr/(PCr + Pi) than transplant recipients. Intracellular pH was higher in controls than either hemodialysis patients or transplant recipients. Recoveries from both exercises were similar in all groups, indicating that subnormal oxidative metabolism was not caused by inability to make ATP. The rhythmic data suggest transplantation normalizes PCr/(PCr + Pi), but not pH. In hemodialysis patients, subnormal oxidative metabolism is apparently caused by limited exchange of metabolites between blood and muscle, rather than intrinsic oxidative defects in skeletal muscle. PMID:8432850

  6. Can diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of clear cell renal carcinoma predict low from high nuclear grade tumors.

    PubMed

    Parada Villavicencio, Carolina; Mc Carthy, Robert J; Miller, Frank H

    2017-04-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in predicting the Fuhrman nuclear grading of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). A total of 129 patients who underwent partial and radical nephrectomies with pathology-proven ccRCC were retrospectively evaluated. Histopathological characteristics and nuclear grades were analyzed. In addition, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features were assessed in consensus by two radiologists to discriminate nuclear grading. ADC values were obtained from a region of interest (ROI) measurement in the ADC maps calculated from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using b values of 50, 500, and 800 s/mm(2). The threshold values for predicting and differentiating low-grade cancers (Fuhrman I-II) from high grade (Fuhrman III-IV) was obtained using binary logistic regression. The ADC cut-off value for differentiating low- and high-grade tumors was determined using classification analysis. Significant associations (P < 0.001) were found between nuclear grading, conventional MR features, and DWI. Hemorrhage, necrosis, perirenal fat invasion, enhancement homogeneity, and cystic component were identified as independent predictors of tumor grade. High-grade ccRCC had significantly lower mean ADC values compared to low-grade tumors. An ADC cut-off value of 1.6 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s had an optimal predictive percentage of 65.5% for low-grade tumors above this threshold and 81% for high-grade ccRCC below this threshold. Overall predictive accuracy was 70.5%. The addition of ADC values to a model based on MRI conventional features demonstrates increased sensitivity and high specificity improving the distinguishing accuracy between both high-grade and low-grade ccRCC.

  7. Defining myocardial tissue abnormalities in end-stage renal failure with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using native T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Elaine; Talle, Mohammed A; Mangion, Kenneth; Bell, Elizabeth; Rauhalammi, Samuli M; Roditi, Giles; McComb, Christie; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Welsh, Paul; Woodward, Rosemary; Struthers, Allan D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Berry, Colin; Mark, Patrick B

    2016-10-01

    Noninvasive quantification of myocardial fibrosis in end-stage renal disease is challenging. Gadolinium contrast agents previously used for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are contraindicated because of an association with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. In other populations, increased myocardial native T1 times on cardiac MRI have been shown to be a surrogate marker of myocardial fibrosis. We applied this method to 33 incident hemodialysis patients and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers who underwent MRI at 3.0T. Native T1 relaxation times and feature tracking-derived global longitudinal strain as potential markers of fibrosis were compared and associated with cardiac biomarkers. Left ventricular mass indices were higher in the hemodialysis than the control group. Global, Septal and midseptal T1 times were all significantly higher in the hemodialysis group (global T1 hemodialysis 1171 ± 27 ms vs. 1154 ± 32 ms; septal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 29 ms vs. 1163 ± 30 ms; and midseptal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 34 ms vs. 1161 ± 29 ms). In the hemodialysis group, T1 times correlated with left ventricular mass indices. Septal T1 times correlated with troponin and electrocardiogram-corrected QT interval. The peak global longitudinal strain was significantly reduced in the hemodialysis group (hemodialysis -17.7±5.3% vs. -21.8±6.2%). For hemodialysis patients, the peak global longitudinal strain significantly correlated with left ventricular mass indices (R = 0.426), and a trend was seen for correlation with galectin-3, a biomarker of cardiac fibrosis. Thus, cardiac tissue properties of hemodialysis patients consistent with myocardial fibrosis can be determined noninvasively and associated with multiple structural and functional abnormalities.

  8. Feasibility of three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography-fluoroscopy image fusion technique in guiding complex endovascular aortic procedures in patients with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Schwein, Adeline; Chinnadurai, Ponraj; Shah, Dipan J; Lumsden, Alan B; Bechara, Carlos F; Bismuth, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional image fusion of preoperative computed tomography (CT) angiography with fluoroscopy using intraoperative noncontrast cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been shown to improve endovascular procedures by reducing procedure length, radiation dose, and contrast media volume. However, patients with a contraindication to CT angiography (renal insufficiency, iodinated contrast allergy) may not benefit from this image fusion technique. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and fluoroscopy image fusion using noncontrast CBCT as a guidance tool during complex endovascular aortic procedures, especially in patients with renal insufficiency. All endovascular aortic procedures done under MRA image fusion guidance at a single-center were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had moderate to severe renal insufficiency and underwent diagnostic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after gadolinium or ferumoxytol injection. Relevant vascular landmarks electronically marked in MRA images were overlaid on real-time two-dimensional fluoroscopy for image guidance, after image fusion with noncontrast intraoperative CBCT. Technical success, time for image registration, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions before stent deployment or vessel catheterization, and renal function before and after the procedure were recorded. The image fusion accuracy was qualitatively evaluated on a binary scale by three physicians after review of image data showing virtual landmarks from MRA on fluoroscopy. Between November 2012 and March 2016, 10 patients underwent endovascular procedures for aortoiliac aneurysmal disease or aortic dissection using MRA image fusion guidance. All procedures were technically successful. A paired t-test analysis showed no difference between preimaging and postoperative renal function (P = .6). The mean time required for MRA-CBCT image

  9. Dissipation mechanism in 3D magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2011-11-15

    Dissipation processes responsible for fast magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas are investigated using 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. The present study revisits the two simulation runs performed in the previous study (Fujimoto, Phys. Plasmas 16, 042103 (2009)); one with small system size in the current density direction, and the other with larger system size. In the case with small system size, the reconnection processes are almost the same as those in 2D reconnection, while in the other case a kink mode evolves along the current density and deforms the current sheet structure drastically. Although fast reconnection is achieved in both the cases, the dissipation mechanism is very different between them. In the case without kink mode, the electrons transit the electron diffusion region without thermalization, so that the magnetic dissipation is supported by the inertia resistivity alone. On the other hand, in the kinked current sheet, the electrons are not only accelerated in bulk, but they are also partly scattered and thermalized by the kink mode, which results in the anomalous resistivity in addition to the inertia resistivity. It is demonstrated that in 3D reconnection the thickness of the electron current sheet becomes larger than the local electron inertia length, consistent with the theoretical prediction in Fujimoto and Sydora (Phys. Plasmas 16, 112309 (2009)).

  10. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  11. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  12. [Feasibility of non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for diagnosis of renal artery stenosis in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; An, Ningyu; Chen, Suihui; Li, Xue; Jiang, Bo; Han, Shaojun; Liu, Xinqiu

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of IFIR-FIESTA technique in detecting renal artery stenosis in elderly patients. Twenty-seven aged patients underwent both IFIR-FIESTA and 3D CE-MRA examinations. The imaging quality and renal artery stenosis grades were evaluated. Kappa test was used to assess the consistency between the two methods. With CE-MRA as the reference, the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV for IFIR-FIESTA were calculated in detecting renal artery stenosis. The images by the two methods were 100% qualified for diagnosis, although the image quality of CE-MRA was significantly better. IFIR-FIESTA and CE-MRA showed excellent consistency in detecting renal artery stenosis. With CE-MRA as the reference, the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV for IFIR-FIESTA were 97.1%, 100%, 98.1%, 100%, and 95% in detecting renal artery stenosis, respectively. IFIR-FIESTA is feasible as a routine examination for detecting renal artery stenosis in elderly patients.

  13. Comparison of magnetic resonance urography to dimercaptosuccinic acid scan for the identification of renal parenchyma defects in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Cerwinka, W H; Grattan-Smith, J D; Jones, R A; Haber, M; Little, S B; Blews, D E; Williams, J P; Kirsch, A J

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan to magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in the identification of renal parenchyma defects (RPD). Twenty-five children with history of acute pyelonephritis and vesicoureteral reflux underwent DMSA scan and MRU to determine the presence of RPD. DMSA scans and MRUs were each evaluated by two radiologists and agreement achieved by consensus. Discordant DMSA-MRU findings were re-evaluated in a side-by-side comparison and an ultimate consensus reached. The ultimate consensus diagnosis was 18 kidneys with RPDs in 15 patients, of which five were classified as mild RPDs, six as moderate RPDs, and seven as severe RPDs. Although DMSA scan and MRU were similar in their ability to diagnose RPDs, MRU was considered to represent the true diagnosis in 11 of the 12 discordant cases in consensus review by four pediatric radiologists. MRU showed a much higher inter-observer agreement with a weighted kappa of 0.96 for both kidneys compared to 0.71 for the right kidney and 0.86 for the left kidney by DMSA scan. Our results suggest that MRU is superior to DMSA scan in the identification of renal parenchyma defects. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Induced renal artery stenosis in rabbits: magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, and radionuclide determination of blood volume and blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.G.; Tobin, M.; LeVeen, R.; Tomaczewski, J.; Alavi, A.; Staum, M.; Kundel, H.

    1988-03-01

    To investigate the ability of MRI to detect alterations due to renal ischemia, a rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS) model was developed. Seven rabbits had RAS induced by surgically encircling the artery with a polyethylene band which had a lumen of 1 mm, 1 to 2 weeks prior to imaging. The stenosis was confirmed by angiography, and the rabbits were then imaged in a 1.4 T research MRI unit. T1 was calculated using four inversion recovery sequences with different inversion times. Renal blood flow, using /sup 113/Sn-microspheres, and regional water content by drying were then measured. The average T1 of the inner medulla was shorter for the ischemia (1574 msec) than for the contralateral kidney (1849 msec), while no change ws noted in the cortex. Ischemic kidneys had less distinct outer medullary zones on IR images with TI = 600 msec than did contralateral or control kidneys. Blood flow to both the cortex and medulla were markedly reduced in ischemic kidneys compared with contralateral kidneys (119.5 vs. 391 ml/min/100 gm for cortex and 19.8 vs. 50.8 ml/min/100 gm for medulla). Renal water and blood content were less affected. Our rabbit model of renal artery stenosis with MRI, radionuclide, and angiographic correlation has the potential to increase our understanding of MR imaging of the rabbit kidney.

  15. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance urography for assessing drainage in dilated pelvicalyceal systems with moderate renal function: preliminary results and comparison with diuresis renography.

    PubMed

    Chu, W C W; Lam, W W M; Chan, K W; Yeung, C K; Lee, K H; Sihoe, J D Y

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the use of dynamic gadolinium diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance urography (Gd-MRU) for assessing kidneys with markedly dilated pelvicalyceal systems and impaired function. Eight children (mean age 30 months, sd 25) were assessed, diagnosed as having gross unilateral hydronephrosis with a mean (sd) anteroposterior renal pelvic diameter of 36 (7) mm and reduced (30-40%) renal function. Dynamic Gd-MRU was performed after the patients were pre-loaded with intravenous fluid and diuretics, and comprised a dynamic T1-weighted sequence after Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg body weight) was administered, with a time-intensity curve of each kidney produced. Drainage was diagnosed by a clearly declining time-intensity curve and direct visualization of contrast medium within the ureter in several frames. High-grade or complete obstruction was diagnosed when drainage of contrast medium could not be detected. Gd-MRU results were compared with diuresis radionuclide (mercapto-acetyltriglycine, MAG3) renography within the same week. Unobstructive units detected by Gd-MRU were treated conservatively with a close follow-up by ultrasonography and radionuclide studies. Diuresis MAG3 renography showed drainage in three dilated units and poor washout in five; in contrast, Gd-MRU showed drainage in seven dilated systems (three showed poor washout by MAG3), and obstruction in the remaining case. The unobstructed units detected by MRU under conservative treatment thus showed no further deterioration of renal function or progressive hydronephrosis in the subsequent follow-up (mean 18 months, range 15-23). These preliminary results suggest that dynamic Gd-MRU is a useful noninvasive imaging method in distinguishing obstructive from unobstructive dilated systems, particularly in patients with hydronephrosis and reduced renal function.

  16. Subcutaneous fatty tissue metastasis from renal cell carcinoma detected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tatoğlu, Mehmet Tarιk; Özülker, Tamer; Değirmenci, Hülya; Sayιlgan, Ayşe Tülay

    2011-01-01

    A patient who had undergone left radical nephrectomy 11 years ago for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was referred to our clinic for restaging. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F18-FDG PET/CT) showed hypometabolic area in left frontal region of the brain and increased FDG uptake in the subcutaneous fatty tissues of the right thigh. Histopathological examination of the biopsy material from the left frontal region and right gluteal region revealed metastasis of clear cell type RCC. Seven months later, a magnetic resonance ımaging (MRI) of right cruris showed a contrast-enhancing lesion with a diameter of 3.5 cm, located at the subcutaneous area of posterior part of right cruris. A concomitant F18-FDG PET/CT detected an increased FDG uptake focus in the proximal third of right cruris adjacent to the muscle planes and this finding was consistent with metastasis of RCC. PMID:21969776

  17. Half Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo magnetic resonance urography for the evaluation of suspected renal colic in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Jeffrey K; Semins, Michelle J; Hyams, Elias S; Bohlman, Mark E; Matlaga, Brian R

    2012-06-01

    To report our experience with magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in pregnant women suspected of having obstructing upper tract calculi. The diagnosis of an upper tract calculus in the pregnant woman can be challenging. Recent evidence suggests that MRU can be used to effectively evaluate renal colic. From 2008-2011, 9 pregnant women were referred for evaluation of suspected renal colic caused by an obstructing upper tract stone. All patients underwent MRU with a half Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) protocol. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed for demographic and clinical data as well as outcome measures. The mean age of the subjects was 25 years (range 20-34); average gestational age of the fetus was 23 weeks (range 9-36). In all cases, a renal ultrasound was the initial imaging study obtained, with nondiagnostic findings. HASTE MRU detected 4 ureteral stones and 4 cases of physiological hydronephrosis of pregnancy. In one case, interpretation of the MRU was limited as a result of patient motion. Of the patients with obstructing stones, 1 required endourologic management during her pregnancy and 3 were followed conservatively. No adverse events related to MRU occurred. HASTE MRU is an informative imaging study for pregnant women with suspected upper tract stone disease. Information gathered from this study augments that gained from alternative modalities, and aids in medical decision-making. The lack of ionizing radiation exposure, coupled with the capture of detailed anatomic imaging, makes HASTE MRU a particularly useful study in this setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fabrication of mAb G250-SPIO Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Nanoprobe for the Specific Detection of Renal Cell Carcinoma In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Yang, Chun; Wang, Jiali; Han, Cuiping; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) has been paid more and more attention for early diagnosis of cancer. A sensitive and specific mMRI probe plays the most important role in this technique. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and mAb G250 were conjugated as mMRI probe for the detection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) using 3.0-Tesla MRI in vitro. mAb G250 could specifically recognize carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) antigen overexpressed in ccRCC and the SPIO nanoparticles as MRI contrast agent presented excellent MRI response and good biocompatibility. The successful assembly of this nanoprobe was confirmed by UV-vis spectrum, FT-IR spectroscopy and DLS analysis. In vitro MRI study on ccRCC cells and control cells indicated that our fabricated mAb G250-SPIO nanoprobe could be used in the specific labeling of clear cell renal carcinoma cells successfully. PMID:24999987

  19. Fabrication of mAb G250-SPIO molecular magnetic resonance imaging nanoprobe for the specific detection of renal cell carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cailuan; Li, Jingjing; Xu, Kai; Yang, Chun; Wang, Jiali; Han, Cuiping; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) has been paid more and more attention for early diagnosis of cancer. A sensitive and specific mMRI probe plays the most important role in this technique. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and mAb G250 were conjugated as mMRI probe for the detection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) using 3.0-Tesla MRI in vitro. mAb G250 could specifically recognize carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) antigen overexpressed in ccRCC and the SPIO nanoparticles as MRI contrast agent presented excellent MRI response and good biocompatibility. The successful assembly of this nanoprobe was confirmed by UV-vis spectrum, FT-IR spectroscopy and DLS analysis. In vitro MRI study on ccRCC cells and control cells indicated that our fabricated mAb G250-SPIO nanoprobe could be used in the specific labeling of clear cell renal carcinoma cells successfully.

  20. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  1. Surgical treatment of renal cell carcinoma: Can morphological features of inferior vena cava tumor thrombus on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging be a prognostic factor?

    PubMed

    Choi, Don Kyoung; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Song, Cheryn; Chung, Jinsoo; Hong, Sung Kyu; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Seo, Seong Il

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of morphological features of inferior vena cava thrombus on the overall survival and cancer-specific survival (cancer-specific survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma). We retrospectively analyzed the records of 156 renal cell carcinoma patients with inferior vena cava thrombus who underwent radical nephrectomy and thrombectomy from 1998 to 2013 at five tertiary centers. Inferior vena cava thrombi were classified as spherical (type I) and spiculated (type II) according to morphological features on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Multivariate cox regression models were used to quantify the impact of prognostic factors on overall survival and cancer-specific survival. Type I was found in 29 patients (18.6%), and type II in 127 patients (81.4%). Median follow up was 38.2 months (interquartile range 12-57). Demographic characteristics were not significantly different, except for the cranial thrombus height (P = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score, clinical tumor size, distant metastasis, histologic subtype, thrombus morphology and remnant venous thrombus significantly affected overall survival in pNany Many patients (all P < 0.05). Among the pNO /X MO patients, clinical tumor size, histologic subtype, thrombus morphology and remnant venous thrombus significantly affected overall survival (all P < 0.05). In terms of cancer-specific survival, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score, clinical tumor size, distant metastasis, histologic subtype and thrombus morphology significantly affected cancer-specific survival in pNany Many patients (all P < 0.05). In patients with pNO /X MO , body mass index, clinical tumor size, histological subtype, thrombus morphology and remnant venous thrombus significantly affected cancer-specific survival (all P < 0.05). Clinical tumor size, histological subtype, and thrombus morphology are independent predictors of overall survival

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography Characteristics of Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated with Xp11.2 Translocation/TFE3 Gene Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Chaofu; Zhou, Liangping; Zhu, Hui; Peng, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Methods This study retrospectively collected the MRI and CT data of twelve patients with Xp11.2 translocation RCC confirmed by pathology. Nine cases underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and 6 cases underwent CT, of which 3 cases underwent MRI and CT simultaneously. The MRI and CT findings were analyzed in regard to tumor position, size, hemorrhagic, cystic or necrotic components, calcification, tumor density, signal intensity and enhancement features. Results The age of the 12 patients ranged from 13 to 46 years (mean age: 23 years). T2WI revealed heterogeneous intensity, hyper-intensity, and slight hypo-intensity in 6 cases, 2 cases, and 1 case, respectively. On DCE-MR images, mild, moderate, and marked rim enhancement of the tumor in the corticomedullary phase (CMP) were observed in 1, 6, and 2 cases, respectively. The tumor parenchyma showed iso-attenuation (n = 4) or slight hyper-attenuation (n = 1) compared to the normal renal cortex on non-contrast CT images. Imaging findings were suggestive of hemorrhage (n = 4) or necrosis (n = 8) in the tumors, and there was evidence of calcification in 8 cases by CT (n = 3) and pathology (n = 8). On dynamic contrast-enhanced CT images, 3 cases and 1 case manifested moderate and strong CMP enhancement, respectively. Nine tumors by MRI and 4 tumors by CT showed prolonged enhancement. Three neoplasms presented at stage I, 2 at stage II, 3 at stage III, and 4 at stage IV according the 2010 AJCC staging criteria. Conclusions XP11.2 translocation RCC should be considered when a child or young adult patient presents with a renal tumor with heterogeneous features such as hemorrhage, necrosis, cystic changes, and calcification on CT and MRI and/or is accompanied by metastatic evidence. PMID:24926688

  3. Longitudinal Assessment of Renal Perfusion and Oxygenation in Transplant Donor-Recipient Pairs Using Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over 2 years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. Arterial spin labeling and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors before transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after transplant. After 3 months, 7 of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25 to 50 mg/d losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fractional excretion of sodium for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 mL/min per 100 g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s-1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 mL/min per 100 g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s-1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney estimated glomerular filtration rate increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 mL/min per 1.73 m (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 mL/min per 1.73 m (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25 to 50 mg/d losartan was 62 ± 24 mL/min per 100 g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. The results suggest an important role for noninvasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially

  4. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society’s most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. PMID:27899435

  5. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-02-28

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society's most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Magnetic resonance microscopy of renal and biliary abnormalities in excised tissues from a mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choong H; O’Connor, Amber K; Yang, Chaozhe; Tate, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trenton R; Flint, Jeremy J; Blackband, Stephen J; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is transmitted as either an autosomal dominant or recessive trait and is a major cause of renal failure and liver fibrosis. The cpk mouse model of autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) has been extensively characterized using standard histopathological techniques after euthanasia. In the current study, we sought to validate magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a robust tool for assessing the ARPKD phenotype. We used MRM to evaluate the liver and kidney of wild-type and cpk animals at resolutions <100 μm and generated three-dimensional (3D) renderings for pathological evaluation. Our study demonstrates that MRM is an excellent method for evaluating the complex, 3D structural defects in this ARPKD mouse model. We found that MRM was equivalent to water displacement in assessing kidney volume. Additionally, using MRM we demonstrated for the first time that the cpk liver exhibits less extensive ductal arborization, that it was reduced in volume, and that the ductal volume was disproportionately smaller. Histopathology indicates that this is a consequence of bile duct malformation. With its reduced processing time, volumetric information, and 3D capabilities, MRM will be a useful tool for future in vivo and longitudinal studies of disease progression in ARPKD. In addition, MRM will provide a unique tool to determine whether the human disease shares the newly appreciated features of the murine biliary phenotype. PMID:26320214

  7. Magnetic resonance microscopy of renal and biliary abnormalities in excised tissues from a mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong H; O'Connor, Amber K; Yang, Chaozhe; Tate, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trenton R; Flint, Jeremy J; Blackband, Stephen J; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is transmitted as either an autosomal dominant or recessive trait and is a major cause of renal failure and liver fibrosis. The cpk mouse model of autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) has been extensively characterized using standard histopathological techniques after euthanasia. In the current study, we sought to validate magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a robust tool for assessing the ARPKD phenotype. We used MRM to evaluate the liver and kidney of wild-type and cpk animals at resolutions <100 μm and generated three-dimensional (3D) renderings for pathological evaluation. Our study demonstrates that MRM is an excellent method for evaluating the complex, 3D structural defects in this ARPKD mouse model. We found that MRM was equivalent to water displacement in assessing kidney volume. Additionally, using MRM we demonstrated for the first time that the cpk liver exhibits less extensive ductal arborization, that it was reduced in volume, and that the ductal volume was disproportionately smaller. Histopathology indicates that this is a consequence of bile duct malformation. With its reduced processing time, volumetric information, and 3D capabilities, MRM will be a useful tool for future in vivo and longitudinal studies of disease progression in ARPKD. In addition, MRM will provide a unique tool to determine whether the human disease shares the newly appreciated features of the murine biliary phenotype.

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the early evaluation of anti-angiogenic therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Iacovelli, Roberto; Barchetti, Flavio; Altavilla, Amelia; Forte, Valerio; Sciarra, Alessandro; Cortesi, Enrico; Catalano, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) in the response to anti-angiogenic-targeted agents in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Twenty-eight consecutive patients with sub-diaphragmatic metastases from mRCC were included in the protocol after signed informed consent. Baseline characteristics were collected and patients were first evaluated with a baseline computed tomography (CT) and DCE-MR, subsequently with a new DCE-MRI after 28 days of therapy and followed-up with CT until progression. Treatments were administered at standard doses. The changes of peak enhancement (ΔPE) and of the sum of longest tumor diameters (ΔLTD) were related to progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The median PFS was 11.4 months [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 7.9-14.7 months) and the parametric two-tailed Pearson's test showed a positive correlation between the median ΔPE and the median PFS (rp=0.809; p=0.015); no significant correlation was found between the median ΔLTD and the median PFS (rp=-0.446; p=0.27). The median OS was 23.3 months (95% CI: 13.6-33.0 months) and no significant correlation was found with the median ΔPE (rp=0.218; p=0.60) or with the median ΔLTD (rp=0.012; p=0.98). The ΔPE but not the ΔLTD was found to be significantly related to PFS; these preliminary results suggest extending the number of patients and investigating the possible relationship with other tumor characteristics and MRI parameters.

  9. Antiferromagnetic resonance in Rb1C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennati, M.; Griffin, R. G.; Knorr, S.; Grupp, A.; Mehring, M.

    1998-08-01

    High-frequency (94 and 140 GHz) ESR was used to investigate the magnetic properties of the low-dimensional conductor Rb1C60. Below 35 K new features of the electron spin resonance are distinguished from the CESR signal of the conducting phase. The analysis of the resonance linewidth and line shift allows a clear identification of a frequency-dependent antiferromagnetic resonance line (AFMR) below 25 K. The characteristic temperature TN for the ordering transition is 25 K. Between 25 K3D magnetic ordering.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of small renal masses in real practice: sensitivity and specificity according to subjective radiologic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Heon; Sun, Hwa Yeon; Hwang, Jiyoung; Hong, Seong Sook; Cho, Yong Jin; Doo, Seung Whan; Yang, Won Jae; Song, Yun Seob

    2016-10-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of small renal masses in real practice. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI were performed between February 2008 and February 2013 on 68 patients who had suspected small (≤4 cm) renal cell carcinoma (RCC) based on ultrasonographic measurements. CT and MRI radiographs were reviewed, and the findings of small renal masses were re-categorized into five dichotomized scales by the same two radiologists who had interpreted the original images. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis was performed, and sensitivity and specificity were determined. Among the 68 patients, 60 (88.2 %) had RCC and eight had benign disease. The diagnostic accuracy rates of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI were 79.41 and 88.23 %, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was greater when using contrast-enhanced MRI because too many masses (67.6 %) were characterized as "4 (probably solid cancer) or 5 (definitely solid cancer)." The sensitivity of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI for predicting RCC were 79.7 and 88.1 %, respectively. The specificities of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI for predicting RCC were 44.4 and 33.3 %, respectively. Fourteen diagnoses (20.5 %) were missed or inconsistent compared with the final pathological diagnoses. One appropriate nephroureterectomy and five unnecessary percutaneous biopsies were performed for RCC. Seven unnecessary partial nephrectomies were performed for benign disease. Although contrast-enhanced CT and MRI showed high sensitivity for detecting small renal masses, specificity remained low.

  11. The Feasibility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Quantification of Liver, Pancreas, Spleen, Vertebral Bone Marrow, and Renal Cortex R2* and Proton Density Fat Fraction in Transfusion-Related Iron Overload.

    PubMed

    İdilman, İlkay S; Gümrük, Fatma; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-03-05

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of quantification of liver, pancreas, spleen, vertebral bone marrow, and renal cortex R2* and magnetic resonance imaging-proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) and to evaluate the correlations among them in patients with transfusion-related iron overload. A total of 9 patients (5 boys, 4 girls) who were referred to our clinic with suspicion of hepatic iron overload were included in this study. All patients underwent T1-independent volumetric multi-echo gradient-echo imaging with T2* correction and spectral fat modeling. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5 T MRI system. All patients had hepatic iron overload. Severe hepatic iron overload was recorded in 5/9 patients (56%), and when we evaluated the PDFF maps of these patients, we observed an extensive patchy artifact in the liver in 4 of 5 patients (R2* greater than 671 Hz). When we performed MRI-PDFF measurements despite these artifacts, we observed artifactual high MRI-PDFF values. There was a close correlation between average pancreas R2* and average pancreas MRI-PDFF (p=0.003, r=0.860). There was a significant correlation between liver R2* and average pancreas R2* (p=0.021, r=0.747), liver R2* and renal cortex R2* (p=0.020, r=0.750), and average pancreas R2* and renal cortex R2* (p=0.003, r=0.858). There was a significant negative correlation between vertebral bone marrow R2* and age (p=0.018, r=-0.759). High iron content of the liver, especially with a T2* value shorter than the first echo time can spoil the efficacy of PDFF calculation. Fat deposition in the pancreas is accompanied by pancreatic iron overload. There is a significant correlation between hepatic siderosis and pancreatic siderosis. Renal cortical and pancreatic siderosis are correlated, too.

  12. MagicFinger: 3D Magnetic Fingerprints for Indoor Location

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Daniel; Moreno, Victoria; Úbeda, Benito; Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2015-01-01

    Given the indispensable role of mobile phones in everyday life, phone-centric sensing systems are ideal candidates for ubiquitous observation purposes. This paper presents a novel approach for mobile phone-centric observation applied to indoor location. The approach involves a location fingerprinting methodology that takes advantage of the presence of magnetic field anomalies inside buildings. Unlike existing work on the subject, which uses the intensity of magnetic field for fingerprinting, our approach uses all three components of the measured magnetic field vectors to improve accuracy. By using adequate soft computing techniques, it is possible to adequately balance the constraints of common solutions. The resulting system does not rely on any infrastructure devices and therefore is easy to manage and deploy. The proposed system consists of two phases: the offline phase and the online phase. In the offline phase, magnetic field measurements are taken throughout the building, and 3D maps are generated. Then, during the online phase, the user's location is estimated through the best estimator for each zone of the building. Experimental evaluations carried out in two different buildings confirm the satisfactory performance of indoor location based on magnetic field vectors. These evaluations provided an error of (11.34 m, 4.78 m) in the (x, y) components of the estimated positions in the first building where the experiments were carried out, with a standard deviation of (3.41 m, 4.68 m); and in the second building, an error of (4 m, 2.98 m) with a deviation of (2.64 m, 2.33 m). PMID:26184230

  13. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  14. Statistical Flux Tube Properties of 3D Magnetic Carpet Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, R. M.; Parnell, C. E.; Mackay, D. H.; Priest, E. R.

    2003-02-01

    The quiet-Sun photosphere consists of numerous magnetic flux fragments of both polarities that evolve with granular and supergranular flow fields. These concentrations give rise to a web of intermingled magnetic flux tubes which characterise the coronal magnetic field. Here, the nature of these flux tubes is studied. The photosphere is taken to be the source plane and each photospheric fragment is represented by a series of point sources. By analysing the potential field produced by these sources, it is found that the distribution of flux tube lengths obtained by (i) integrating forward from positive sources and (ii) tracing back from negative sources is highly dependent on the total flux imbalance within the region of interest. It is established that the relation between the footpoint separation of a flux tube and its height cannot be assumed to be linear. Where there is a significant imbalance of flux within a region, it is found that fragments of the dominant polarity will have noticeably more connections, on average, than the minority polarity fragments. Despite this difference, the flux from a single fragment of either polarity is typically divided such that (i) 60-70% connects to one opposite-polarity fragment, (ii) 25-30% goes to a further 1 to 2 opposite-polarity fragments, and (iii) any remaining flux may connect to as many as another 50 or more other opposite-polarity fragments. This is true regardless of any flux imbalance within the region. It is found that fragments connect preferentially to their nearest neighbours, with, on average, around 60-70% of flux closing down within 10 Mm of a typical fragment. Only 50% of the flux in a quiet region extends higher than 2.5 Mm above the solar surface and 5-10% extends higher than 25 Mm. The fragments that contribute to the field above this height cover a range of sizes, with even the smallest of fragments contributing to the field at heights of over 50 Mm.

  15. Majority logic gate for 3D magnetic computing.

    PubMed

    Eichwald, Irina; Breitkreutz, Stephan; Ziemys, Grazvydas; Csaba, György; Porod, Wolfgang; Becherer, Markus

    2014-08-22

    For decades now, microelectronic circuits have been exclusively built from transistors. An alternative way is to use nano-scaled magnets for the realization of digital circuits. This technology, known as nanomagnetic logic (NML), may offer significant improvements in terms of power consumption and integration densities. Further advantages of NML are: non-volatility, radiation hardness, and operation at room temperature. Recent research focuses on the three-dimensional (3D) integration of nanomagnets. Here we show, for the first time, a 3D programmable magnetic logic gate. Its computing operation is based on physically field-interacting nanometer-scaled magnets arranged in a 3D manner. The magnets possess a bistable magnetization state representing the Boolean logic states '0' and '1.' Magneto-optical and magnetic force microscopy measurements prove the correct operation of the gate over many computing cycles. Furthermore, micromagnetic simulations confirm the correct functionality of the gate even for a size in the nanometer-domain. The presented device demonstrates the potential of NML for three-dimensional digital computing, enabling the highest integration densities.

  16. Observation of a 3D Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Falco, M.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Murabito, M.

    2017-03-01

    We describe high-resolution observations of a GOES B-class flare characterized by a circular ribbon at the chromospheric level, corresponding to the network at the photospheric level. We interpret the flare as a consequence of a magnetic reconnection event that occurred at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point located above the supergranular cell. The potential field extrapolation of the photospheric magnetic field indicates that the circular chromospheric ribbon is cospatial with the fan footpoints, while the ribbons of the inner and outer spines look like compact kernels. We found new interesting observational aspects that need to be explained by models: (1) a loop corresponding to the outer spine became brighter a few minutes before the onset of the flare; (2) the circular ribbon was formed by several adjacent compact kernels characterized by a size of 1″–2″ (3) the kernels with a stronger intensity emission were located at the outer footpoint of the darker filaments, departing radially from the center of the supergranular cell; (4) these kernels started to brighten sequentially in clockwise direction; and (5) the site of the 3D null point and the shape of the outer spine were detected by RHESSI in the low-energy channel between 6.0 and 12.0 keV. Taking into account all these features and the length scales of the magnetic systems involved in the event, we argue that the low intensity of the flare may be ascribed to the low amount of magnetic flux and to its symmetric configuration.

  17. 3D Magnetic inversion and remanence: solving the problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, V.; Morris, W.

    2003-04-01

    3D inversion of surface magnetic data is a common processing technique when used in mineral exploration. The major drawback of most 3D inversion algorithms is that they assume that the surface magnetic anomaly is produced by induced magnetization and that there are no remanent magnetization or demagnetization effects present. This has a significant impact when modeling magnetic data that has remanent magnetization. The magnetic anomaly produced by a dipping subsurface body will be identical for a consistent relationship between the dip of the body and the dip of the magnetic vector, regardless of the actual dip of the magnetic body. For example, in the case where a subsurface body is dipping, such as a dipping dike, the dip estimated by the inversion routine will be correct only if induced magnetization is present. This has serious implications for mineral exploration. A solution to the remanence problem is to model the surface magnetic anomaly using a constrained 2D approach rather than 3D. Using a priori information on dip and strike length of a source body, it is possible to approximate the remanence direction and intensity. The 2D solutions can then be rendered into a 3D imaging package to create a model in 3D. A case study was performed on a mafic-ultramafic layered igneous intrusion located in Big Trout Lake, northwestern Ontario, Canada. Large layered igneous intrusions are known to have significant remanence. Like many other layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld Complex in South Africa, the Big Trout Lake Complex is highly prospective for Platinum Group Elements (PGEs). Intruded during Archean time, the Big Trout Lake Complex has been subsequently folded and faulted to near vertical. As a consequence of limited surface exposures, knowledge of layering within the pluton and the extent of deformation of the pluton is very limited. Newly acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data shows a strongly mineralized horizon within the intrusion that corresponds to an enrichment in magnetite and sulfides. By modeling this mineralized layer, the geometry of the intrusion can be interpreted which will lead to a better understanding of the distribution of PGEs within the intrusion. A series of 2D inversions were run, perpendicular to strike, along the mineralized layer of the intrusion using a dipping dike model. Observations showed that a similar remanence direction was calculated for all inversions. When plotted on a stereonet, the average declination was 358° and inclination of 02°. The results from the 2D inversion provided x, y, and z coordinates of the modeled body which were then be brought into a 3D imaging software package. The results of this case study show that it is possible to develop a preliminary 3D model from a series of 2D inversions. This enables integration with other geoscience data sets to improve and validate the model. The geometry estimated by the inversions can now be compared with known information such as topography, geological maps, and borehole lithology and geophysics. Aspects of the model can be refined with new information. The known distribution of ore can be used to establish a genetic model of the mineral deposit. This study also shows that it is possible to estimate the remanence direction and structure of the mineralized layer of the intrusion. Integrating geoscience data can help develop the 3D model by validating data within the model, increasing the accuracy of the model, and further constraining the inversions. This directly applies to the exploration industry because it reduces the exploration risks and also helps to identify new exploration targets.

  18. Renal aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cura, Marco; Elmerhi, Fadi; Bugnogne, Alejandro; Palacios, Raul; Suri, Rajeev; Dalsaso, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of the vessel lumen. Pseudoaneurysm is a perfused hematoma contained by the adventitia and perivascular tissues that is in communication with the lumen of an adjacent artery or vein. Aneurysm is a dilatation of the vessel lumen involving all three layers of the blood vessel wall. Renal artery aneurysms (RAA) are uncommon but the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging and incidental detection of RAA may result in an increasing number of cases diagnosed. Renal artery pseudoaneurysms are suspected in bleeding patients after penetrating renal trauma. Imaging plays a major role in the detection of renal pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms and diagnoses aneurysm rupture and active bleeding. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography can characterize lesion size, shape, and location and identify other aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms, helping to narrow the differential diagnosis and to understand the vascular anatomy for guiding proper treatment. Endovascular treatments have contributed considerably in the management of renal pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms. The use of coil embolization or covered stent placement prevents the mortality and mobility of surgery. The article describes imaging features and the endovascular therapies to treat these vascular processes and their possible complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spithoven, E M; Meijer, E; Borns, C; Boertien, W E; Gaillard, C A J M; Kappert, P; Greuter, M J W; van der Jagt, E; Vart, P; de Jong, P E; Gansevoort, R T

    2016-03-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBFMRI) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBFMRI measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBFMRI. After validation, we measured RBFMRI in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBFMRI and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBFMRI measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBFMRI compared to RBFHip, whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBFMRI. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. Renal blood flow (RBF) can be accurately measured by phase-contrast MRI in ADPKD patients. RBF measured by phase-contrast is associated with ADPKD disease severity. RBF measurement by phase-contrast MRI may be less feasible in patients with an impaired eGFR.

  20. Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. The micrograph shows calcium oxalate crystals in urine. These small crystals can develop to form renal stones. Principal Investigator: Dr. Peggy Whitson, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  1. Magnetic resonance evaluation of renal artery stenosis in a swine model: performance of low-dose gadobutrol versus gadoterate meglumine in comparison with digital subtraction intra-arterial catheter angiography.

    PubMed

    Morelli, John N; Runge, Val M; Ai, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Schmitt, Peter; McNeal, Gary; Miller, Matthew; Lennox, Mark; Wusten, Oliver; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare low-dose imaging with gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) for evaluation of renal artery stenosis with 3-T magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in a swine model. A total of 12 experimental animals were evaluated using equivalently dosed gadobutrol and Gd-DOTA for time-resolved and static imaging. For time-resolved imaging, the time-resolved imaging with stochastic trajectories (TWIST) technique (temporal footprint, 4.4 seconds) was used; a dose of 1 mL of gadobutrol was injected at 2 mL/s and a dose of 2 mL of Gd-DOTA was injected at both 2 and 4 mL/s. For a separate static acquisition, doses were doubled. The static scans were used for stenosis gradation and the time-resolved scans for comparison of enhancement dynamics, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and qualitative assessments. The average magnitude of difference in the stenosis measurements with static gadobutrol scans relative to digital subtraction intra-arterial catheter angiography (mean [SD], 7.4% [5.6%]) was less than with both the 2 mL/s (10.6% [6.2%]) and 4 mL/s (11.5% [7.8%]) Gd-DOTA MRA protocols. On time-resolved scans, peak signal-to-noise ratio was greatest with the gadobutrol protocol (P < 0.05), and the gadobutrol TWIST scan was preferred to the TWIST Gd-DOTA scan in terms of image quality and stenosis visualization in every case for every reader. Low-dose gadobutrol (~0.05 mmoL/kg) contrast-enhanced MRA results in improved accuracy of renal artery stenosis assessments relative to equivalently dosed Gd-DOTA at 3 T.

  2. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters.

  3. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  4. Renal Scintigraphy

    MedlinePlus

    ... size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Renal Scintigraphy Sponsored by ...

  5. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  6. Comparison of the iron oxide-based blood-pool contrast medium VSOP-C184 with gadopentetate dimeglumine for first-pass magnetic resonance angiography of the aorta and renal arteries in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Abramjuk, Claudia; Wojner, Ines; Schink, Tania; Kroencke, Thomas J; Schellenberger, Eyk; Hamm, Bernd; Pilgrimm, Herbert; Taupitz, Matthias

    2004-09-01

    VSOP-C184 at a dose of 0.045 mmol Fe/kg has been shown to be an efficient blood pool contrast medium for equilibrium magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) that can be administered as a bolus. The present study was performed to determine whether VSOP-C184 is also suitable for first-pass MRA. Fifteen MRA examinations at 1.5 T were performed in minipigs using a fast 3D fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence (repetition time = 4.5 ms, echo time = 1.7 ms, excitation angle = 25 degrees, matrix 256, body phased-array coil). The citrate-stabilized iron oxide preparation VSOP-C184 was investigated (total particle diameter: 7.0 +/- 0.15 nm; core size: 4 nm) and compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA). The following doses were tested: VSOP-C184: 0.015, 0.025, and 0.035 mmol Fe/kg; Gd-DTPA: 0.1 and 0.2 mmol Gd/kg; n = 3 examinations/dose. Data were analyzed quantitatively (signal enhancement (ENH) and vessel edge definition (VED)) and qualitatively. First-pass MRA using the 3 doses of VSOP-C184 yielded the following ENH: aorta: 9.4 +/- 2.6; 12.31 +/- 1.2; 16.53 +/- 1.7; renal arteries: 7.6 +/- 2.2; 9.9 +/- 1.0; 13.2 +/- 0.5. The values for the 2 doses of Gd-DTPA were aorta: 12.9 +/- 1.0; 16.8 +/- 2.2; renal arteries: 11.2 +/- 1.23; 11.3 +/- 1.7. VED for the 3 doses of VSOP-C184 was aorta: 106.3 +/- 31.0; 135.3 +/- 58.8; 141.3 +/- 71.0; renal arteries: 102.2 +/- 24.3; 146.8 +/- 63.0; 126.9 +/- 37.6 and for the 2 doses of Gd-DTPA, aorta: 157.2 +/- 47.8; 164.2 +/- 36.8; renal arteries: 165.9 +/- 30.4; 170.3 +/- 38.2 respectively. The differences between VSOP-C184 and Gd-DTPA are clinically not relevant and statistically not significant (p > or = .05). Qualitative evaluation of image quality, contrast, and delineation of vessels showed the results obtained with VSOP-C184 at doses of 0.025 and 0.035 mmol Fe/kg to be similar to those of Gd-DTPA at 0.1 and 0.2 mmol Gd/kg. VSOP-C184 is suitable for first-pass MRA at doses of 0.025 and 0.035 mmol Fe/kg and thus, in addition to

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging measurements in renal cell carcinoma: effect of region of interest size and positioning on interobserver and intraobserver variability.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, Margarita; Radler, Elisabeth; Ingrisch, Michael; Staehler, Michael; Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Rist, Carsten; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F; Notohamiprodjo, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of region of interest (ROI) size and positioning on perfusion and permeability parameters as well as on interobserver and intraobserver variability of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) of primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and metastases. Thirty-nine DCE-MRI examinations of 34 patients with primary RCC and 20 examinations of 9 patients with RCC metastases obtained at 1.5 T were evaluated. Pretreatment and posttreatment analysis with antiangiogenic therapy was performed in 4 patients with primary RCCs and 5 patients with metastases. The ROIs of the whole tumor (wROI), the circular edge (cROI), a user-defined arbitrary small region (sROI), and a semiautomated segmented ROI were independently defined by 2 readers on 1 slice on arterial phase DCE-MRI images or on parametric plasma-flow maps. Analysis with a 2-compartment exchange model provided 4 parameters: plasma flow (FP), plasma volume (vp), permeability-surface product (PS), and extravascular-extracellular volume (ve). Interobserver and intraobserver parameter correlations were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient, and within-subject variability were considered on the basis of the coefficient of variation. Differences in measurement values of variable ROI size were assessed with paired t test. Mean values of FP and vp with sROIs were significantly higher than those with wROI, cROI, and semiautomated segmented ROI placement in tumor or metastases. Values of ve showed no significant difference between ROI sizes. The highest interobserver and intraobserver correlation with 0.99/0.98 for metastases and 0.97/0.98 for primary RCCs, respectively, was observed for all parameters when defining wROIs on dynamic images. Perfusion parameters of wROI measurements for FP (dynamic, 0.97; parametric maps, 0.96) and vp (0.95/0.89) showed higher interobserver correlation than did permeability parameters ve (0.64/0.6) and PS (0.79/0.5) in primary RCCs. The w

  8. Arterial-phase three-dimensional gadolinium magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries. Strategies for timing and contrast media injection: original investigation.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, S O; Knopp, M V; Prince, M R; Londy, F; Knopp, M A

    1998-09-01

    The authors review different imaging and contrast-media infusion strategies for arterial-phase three-dimensional (3D) gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd-MRA). The influence of physicochemical factors on the infusion of contrast media, including viscosity, flow rate, inline pressure, and cannula size, is assessed. The combination of manual or automated contrast-media administration with timing-dependent or -independent 3D Gd-MRA techniques is reviewed regarding the aspects of effectiveness, robustness, image quality, and costs. For effective bolus delivery with high flow rates, the type and temperature of the contrast media, the size of the cannula, and an immediate saline flush must be considered. Timing-dependent techniques based on a test bolus and using automated contrast-media infusion as well as timing independent techniques such as MR SmartPrep or multiphase 3D Gd-MRA by using a manual injection with a SmartSet tubing set, are all effective procedures for arterial phase 3D Gd-MRA. Manual contrast-media injection with a tubing set can be used for timing-independent MRA techniques. The multiphase 3D Gd-MRA approach seems to be favorable for different MR systems, robustness, and speed.

  9. Imaging of Renal Medullary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, Eliodoro; Santucci, Domiziana; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Nezzo, Marco; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare, highly aggressive tumor recognized as an independent pathological entity. African-descent adolescents and young adults with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy are the most affected groups. This rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma has its own morphogenetic and pathological characteristics. The major clinical manifestations include gross hematuria, abdominal or flank pain, and weight loss. The prognosis is very poor, with 95% of cases diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. In this review, we summarize the morphologic and dynamic characteristics of RMC under various imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance. Differential diagnosis and management strategies are also discussed. PMID:28405543

  10. Evaluation of treatment response and resistance in metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) using integrated (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI); The REMAP study.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Morland, Christian; Rudman, Sarah; Nathan, Paul; Mallett, Susan; Montana, Giovanni; Cook, Gary; Goh, Vicky

    2017-06-02

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the first line standard of care for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Accurate response assessment in the setting of antiangiogenic therapies remains suboptimal as standard size-related response criteria do not necessarily accurately reflect clinical benefit, as they may be less pronounced or occur later in therapy than devascularisation. The challenge for imaging is providing timely assessment of disease status allowing therapies to be tailored to ensure ongoing clinical benefit. We propose that combined assessment of morphological, physiological and metabolic imaging parameters using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging ((18)F-FDG PET/MRI) will better reflect disease behaviour, improving assessment of response/non-response/relapse. The REMAP study is a single-centre prospective observational study. Eligible patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, planned for systemic therapy, with at least 2 lesions will undergo an integrated (18)F-FDG PET and MRI whole body imaging with diffusion weighted and contrast-enhanced multiphasic as well as standard anatomical MRI sequences at baseline, 12 weeks and 24 weeks of systemic therapy allowing (18)F-FDG standardised uptake value (SUV), apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC) and normalised signal intensity (SI) parameters to be obtained. Standard of care contrast-enhanced computed tomography CT scans will be performed at equivalent time-points. CT response categorisation will be performed using RECIST 1.1 and alternative (modified)Choi and MASS criteria. The reference standard for disease status will be by consensus panel taking into account clinical, biochemical and conventional imaging parameters. Intra- and inter-tumoural heterogeneity in vascular, diffusion and metabolic response/non-response will be assessed by image texture analysis. Imaging will also inform the development of computational methods for automated disease

  11. Gadobutrol in Renally Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Michaely, Henrik J.; Aschauer, Manuela; Deutschmann, Hannes; Bongartz, Georg; Gutberlet, Matthias; Woitek, Ramona; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kucharczyk, Walter; Hammerstingl, Renate; De Cobelli, Francesco; Rosenberg, Martin; Balzer, Thomas; Endrikat, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study in 55 centers. Patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for any gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 908 patients were enrolled, including 586 with moderate and 284 with severe renal impairment who are at highest risk for developing NSF. The mean time since renal disease diagnosis was 1.83 and 5.49 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 184 patients (20.3%) underwent further contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based contrast agents within the 2-year follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF. Conclusions No safety concerns with gadobutrol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment were identified. There were no NSF cases. PMID:27529464

  12. Preoperative planning of renal transplantation: a comparison of non-contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance angiography with observations from surgery.

    PubMed

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Pedersen, Bodil G; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Andersen, Gratien; Hørlyck, Arne; Østrat, Ernst Ø; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    Many candidates for kidney transplantation need to undergo vessel examination before the transplantation procedure. To identify the optimal preoperative modality for the examination of vessel status without the use of contrast agents in kidney transplant candidates. Fifty-three consecutive patients were examined and 31 patients were transplanted. Ultrasonography (US), non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (NCCT), and non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCMRA) were compared using inspection during kidney transplantation (TX) as a reference standard. The sensitivity and specificity to severe arteriosclerotic changes and the accuracy were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to assess the agreement between TX and the different examination modalities, and McNemar's test was used to test for significant differences. US had higher sensitivity (1.0) and better agreement with observations from surgery (k = 0.89) than both NCCT (sensitivity = 0.60; k = 0.72) and NCMRA (sensitivity = 0.20; k = 0.30). No significant difference was found between TX and US (P = 0.3173) or TX and NCCT (P = 0.1573), but there was a significant difference between TX and NCMRA (P = 0.0455). US was inconclusive in 20% of cases, and the internal iliac artery could not be visualized in 69% of cases. Either US or NCCT can be used as the preferred preoperative imaging modality to examine vessel status before kidney transplantation, but a combination of the two is preferable. NCMRA should not be used as the sole imaging modality for preoperative imaging before kidney transplantation because of its low sensitivity in detecting severe arteriosclerotic disease without the presence of stenosis. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  13. Renal Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water-like fluid. Renal cysts are fairly common in ... simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water-like fluid inside. They are fairly common in ...

  14. Renal artery dissection following marathon running.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad M; Goparaju, Madhavi; Yemme, Soumya; Lewis, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    A 38-year-old, previously healthy man presented with flank pain after competing in a marathon. Initial laboratory tests and urinalysis were essentially normal. Both contrast enhanced-computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography showed an infarcted region of the left lower kidney without renal artery dissection. Thromboembolism was suspected, but further testing was negative. The diagnosis of renal artery dissection was established by angiogram, showing dissection of the segmental branch. The patient remained normotensive, maintained normal renal function, and had resolution of pain symptoms prior to discharge. On the basis of our experience and review of the literature, renal artery dissection occurs in otherwise healthy men and often goes undiagnosed. The management strategy tends to be conservative unless the patient develops progressive decline in renal function or worsening hypertension, with an excellent prognosis. This case also shows the importance of discussing the pros and cons of extreme physical exertion with all patients.

  15. Preoperative evaluation of renal artery in patients with renal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the feasibility of the noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) to evaluate renal arteries before partial nephrectomy (PN). Retrospective analyzed 479 patients who underwent renal surgery between January 2013 and December 2015 with NCE-MRA or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal artery image reconstruction preoperative in our department. The renal artery reconstruction score (RARS) was based on the level of artery visualization in a 4-class criterion, and the R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (R.E.N.A.L), arterial based complexity (ABC) were also analyzed. Of the 479 patients, the overall-lever RARS was 3.62, and the average in 2 groups was no significant difference (NCE-MRA vs CTA, P = 0.072). The performance of NCE-MRA in PN group was similar with CTA. Further comparison demonstrated that the efficiency of NCE-MRA in moderate- or low-degree tumor according to the R.E.N.A.L and ABC complexity less than 3S was equal to CTA. However, high degree (P < 0.001), 3S (P = 0.027), or 3H (P < 0.001) would affect the imaging of renal artery. Intragroup analysis showed that tumor complexity such as max tumor size (r = −o.351, P < 0.001), R.E.N.A.L (r = −0.439, P < 0.001), and ABC (r = −0.619, P < 0.001) were closely correlated with the NCE-MRA performance. The images of 2 sides of the kidney were compared in single person as well, which was meaningful for NCE-MRA patients only (NCE-MRA, P < 0.001; CTA, P = 0.182). The renal artery reconstruction performed by NCE-MRA is feasible and has a similar achievement in the PN potential recipients, with a lower side effect, and meets the requirements for making surgical decision. It has a broad application prospect in clinical practice; however, it still needs to further improve the ability in more complex tumors. PMID:27759632

  16. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  17. Tumor thrombus in a retroaortic left renal vein and incidental right circumcaval ureter.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, R; Nemcek, A A; Fitzgerald, S W

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of coexistent anomalies of the inferior vena cava and renal venous system. These were particularly relevant due to the presence of a renal neoplasm which invaded an anomalous renal vein.

  18. Renal cyst puncture studies.

    PubMed

    Lang, E K

    1987-02-01

    The edict to contain costs and meet goals imposed by DRG remuneration policies mandates the work-up of asymptomatic renal mass lesions on an outpatient basis. This proved feasible in 98 per cent of patients. The vast majority of such mass lesions (82 to 90 per cent) is diagnosed with acceptable confidence by computed tomography and sonography alone. For a shrinking group of such patients, yet still 16 to 18 per cent, guided percutaneous aspiration biopsy is necessary to affirm the diagnosis. However, this technique has been refined during recent years to incorporate the use of thin needle equipment and can now be performed on an outpatient basis without significant risk of morbidity. For diagnosing hyperdense inflammatory and infected renal cysts, guided percutaneous aspiration is recommended as the most effective method. This procedure should take precedence over surgical exploration because it can diagnose and provide pertinent bacteriologic information that may determine the course of therapy. In many instances inflammatory cysts or even silent renal abscesses are diagnosed by a percutaneous aspiration technique that is then expanded to serve therapeutic purposes such as percutaneous drainage. Even these procedures can be performed safely on an outpatient basis provided the patient is followed closely. Because complications of percutaneous aspiration procedures are extremely rare, the procedure can be used safely on an outpatient basis. The impact of magnetic resonance imaging on the diagnosis of asymptomatic space-occupying lesions of the kidney is as yet not fully determined; however, this method appears promising for diagnosing some of the refractory lesions such as hemorrhagic cysts, aneurysms, or arteriovenous malformations.

  19. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  20. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  1. US and MRI in renal obstruction evaluation.

    PubMed

    Budau, Marina; Onu, Mihaela; Jinga, Viorel; Braticevici, Bogdan; Pop, Tiberiu

    2002-06-01

    To explore the renal obstruction using MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) for anatomical evaluation and Doppler US (Ultra Sound) for functional evaluation. Thirty-two patients with renal obstruction were investigated. The presence of renal obstruction was subsequently established by excretory urography or surgery. US studies were performed using a B&K Medical ultrasound system Panther 2002 equipped with 3 Mhz transducer. MR urography was done with a magnetic resonance imaging system 0.28T, Tomikon R28-Bruker, Germany. All 30 patients presented increased renal vascular resistance as determined by US evaluation (Resistive Index = 0.74 +/- 0.02). The MR urography proved dilated urinary collecting system in only 20 patients of the group. Doppler US has a very good sensitivity in detecting the renal obstruction before the dilatation of the collecting system be installed. Used together these methods (US and MR urography) are important for proving anatomical as well as functional changes in renal obstruction. Both methods could be useful mainly in patients with known intolerance to contrast media.

  2. [Infected solitary renal cyst of the graft in a renal transplant recipient : a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kenichiro; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hiromi; Nakane, Keita; Kato, Taku; Seike, Kensaku; Miwa, Kousei; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Sigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    A 59-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease of diabetic nephropathy who had been on maintenance hemodialisis for 4 years, underwent a living-unrelated renal transplantation 6 years ago. She was admitted to our hospital, because of a low grade fever and edema. Ultrasonography revealed the cyst with heterogeneity structure in the upper pole of the transplanted kidney. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity cystic mass measuring 68×53 mm. As fever and laboratory data did not improve sufficiently by the treatment with antibiotics, echo-guided puncture and drainage were performed for the abnormal structure in the upper pole of the transplanted kidney. In the culture of the purulent aspirate drained from renal cyst, Escherichia coli was isolated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of infected renal cyst of the graft in a renal transplant recipient in the world.

  3. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in the post-CORAL era part 1: the renal penumbra concept and next-generation functional diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan Alper; Inal, Ibrahim; Okcuoglu, John; Rossignol, Patrick; Ortiz, Alberto; Afsar, Baris; Sos, Thomas A; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    After three neutral trials in which renal artery stenting failed to improve renal function or reduce cardiovascular and renal events, the controversy surrounding diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and renovascular hypertension has led to paradigm shifts in the diagnostic algorithm. Noninvasive determination of earlier events (cortex hypoxia and renal artery hemodynamic changes) will supersede late sequelae (calcific stenosis, renal cortical thinning). Therefore, this review proposes the concept of renal penumbra in defining at-risk ischemic renal parenchyma. The complex field of functional renal magnetic resonance imaging will be reviewed succinctly in a clinician-directed fashion. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  5. MRI Phenotype in Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Naomi; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is most commonly diagnosed as an incidental finding on cross-sectional imaging and represents a significant clinical challenge. Although most patients have a surgically curable lesion at the time of diagnosis, the variability in the biologic behavior of the different histologic subtypes and tumor grade of RCC, together with the increasing array of management options, creates uncertainty for the optimal clinical approach to individual patients. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a comprehensive assessment of renal lesions that includes multiple forms of tissue contrast as well as functional parameters, which in turn provides information that helps to address this dilemma. In this article, we review this evolving and increasingly comprehensive role of MRI in the detection, characterization, perioperative evaluation, and assessment of the treatment response of renal neoplasms. We emphasize the ability of the imaging “phenotype” of renal masses on MRI to help predict the histologic subtype, grade, and clinical behavior of RCC. PMID:24690616

  6. Estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter J.; Cebral, Juan R.; Weaver, Ashley; Lutz, Robert J.; Vasbinder, G. Boudewijn C.

    2003-05-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the renal artery can reduce the blood flow leading to renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephopathy. The kidney responds to a decrease in blood flow by activation of the renin-angiotensin system that increases blood pressure and can result in severe hypertension. Percutaneous translumenal angioplasty (PTA) may be indicated for treatment of renovascular hypertension (RVH). However, direct measurement of renal artery caliber and degree of stenosis has only moderate specificity for detection of RVH. A confounding factor in assessment of the proximal renal artery is that diffuse atherosclerotic disease of the distal branches of the renal artery can produce the same effect on blood-flow as atherosclerotic disease of the proximal renal artery. A methodology is proposed for estimation of pressure gradients at renal artery stenoses from magnetic resonance imaging that could improve the evaluation of renal artery disease. In the proposed methodology, pressure gradients are estimated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Realistic CFD models are constructed from images of vessel shape and measurements of blood-flow rates which are available from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively. CFD measurement of renal artery pressure gradients has been validated in a physical flow-through model.

  7. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  8. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-06-21

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products.

  9. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  10. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  11. ACCESSORY RENAL VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Ali Mohammed, Ammar Mohammed; Elseed Abdalrasol, Rami Gusm; Alamin Abdalhai, Khatim; Gommaa Hamad, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the variations of the renal artery has grown in importance with increasing of renal transplants, vascular reconstructions and various surgical and radiologic techniques performing in recent years. We report the presence of unilateral doubled renal vessels, discovered on routine dissection of a male cadaver, on the right side; additional renal artery originated from the abdominal aorta. In addition the right suprarenal gland received arteries from right renal and inferior phrenic arteries only. The right inferior phrenic originated from the right renal artery. PMID:23322980

  12. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  13. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  14. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  15. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  16. THE RELIABILITY OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY USING MULTISLICE 2D SPIN-ECHO ECHO-PLANAR IMAGING (SE-EPI) AND 3D INVERSION RECONSTRUCTION FOR ASSESSING RENAL STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Owen, Nicola E.; Joubert, Ilse; Patterson, Andrew J.; Graves, Martin J.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Alexander, Graeme J.M.; Lomas, David J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the reliability of MRE using a spin-echo echo-planar imaging (SE-EPI) renal MRE technique in healthy volunteers MATERIALS AND METHODS Institutional review board approved prospective study in which all participants provided written informed consent. Sixteen healthy volunteers comprising seven males and nine females with a median age of 35 years (age range: 23 to 59 years) were included. Coronal 90-Hz and 60-Hz MRE acquisitions were performed twice within a 30-minute interval between examinations. Renal MRE reliability was assessed by i) test-retest repeatability, and ii) inter-rater agreement between two independent readers. The MRE-measured averaged renal stiffness values were evaluated using: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman and the within-subject coefficient of variation (COV). RESULTS For test-retest repeatability, Bland-Altman showed a mean stiffness difference between examinations of 0.07 kPa (95% limits of agreement: −1.41, 1.54) at 90-Hz and 0.01 kPa (95% limits of agreement: −0.51, 0.53) at 60-Hz. Coefficient of repeatability was 1.47 kPa and 0.52 kPa at 90-Hz and 60-Hz, respectively. The within-subject COV was 13.6% and 7.7% at 90-Hz and 60-Hz, respectively. ICC values were 0.922 and 0.907 for test-retest repeatability and 0.998 and 0.989 for inter-rater agreement, respectively (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION SE-EPI renal MRE is a reliable technique PMID:25537823

  17. Multiplanar transcranial ultrasound imaging: standards, landmarks and correlation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kern, Rolf; Perren, Fabienne; Kreisel, Stefan; Szabo, Kristina; Hennerici, Michael; Meairs, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to define a standardized multiplanar approach for transcranial ultrasound (US) imaging of brain parenchyma based on matched data from 3-D US and 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The potential and limitations of multiple insonation planes in transverse and coronal orientation were evaluated for the visualization of intracranial landmarks in 60 healthy individuals (18 to 83 years old, mean 41.4 years) with sufficient temporal bone windows. Landmarks regularly visualized even in moderate sonographic conditions with identification rates of >75% were mesencephalon, pons, third ventricle, lateral ventricles, falx, thalamus, basal ganglia, pineal gland and temporal lobe. Identification of medulla oblongata, fourth ventricle, cerebellar structures, hippocampus, insula, frontal, parietal and occipital lobes was more difficult (<75%). We hypothesize that multiplanar transcranial US images, with standardized specification of tilt angles and orientation, not only allow comparison with other neuroimaging modalities, but may also provide a more objective framework for US monitoring of cerebral disease than freehand scanning.

  18. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  19. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  20. Microwave treatment of renal cell carcinoma adjacent to renal sinus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongyan; Liang, Ping; Yu, Xiaoling; Yu, Jie; Cheng, Zhigang; Han, Zhiyu; Duan, Shaobo; Huang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) adjacent to renal sinus. This retrospective study included 41 patients who underwent US-guided percutaneous MWA of 41 RCCs adjacent to the renal sinus from April 2006 to December 2015. Contrast-enhanced images of US and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed at pre-ablation and 1day, 1 month, 3 months, and every 6 months after ablation. Initial ablation success (IAS), disease-free survival (DFS), RCC-related survival (RRS), and overall survival (OS) were recorded at the follow-up visits. IAS was achieved in 92.7% (38/41) of the study subjects. The IAS significantly differed between patients with RCCs ≤4cm (100%, 29/29) and RCCs >4cm (75%, 9/12, p=0.021). During the median follow-up of 37.6 (range, 3.0-97.3) months, the estimated 1-, 3-, and 5-year DFS of patients with an initial tumor of ≤4cm were 100%, 89.7%, and 81.5%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year RRS were 100%, 93.3%, and 93.3%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS were 97.1%, 87.8%, and 83.6%, respectively. The multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazard model revealed no independent predictor of recurrence among all the variables. There were no MWA-related deaths among the study subjects. One patient developed a retroperitoneal abscess after ablation. US-guided percutaneous MWA appears to be a promising method for RCCs adjacent to renal sinus, especially for tumors ≤4cm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed.

  2. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  3. [Renal leiomyoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Guessous, H; Rabii, R; Benjelloun, M; Benlemlih, A; Skali, K; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of renal leiomyoma observed in a 56-year-old man. This cyst presented in the from of loin pain. Computed tomography revealed a homogeneous renal tumor. Treatment consisted of radical nephrectomy. Histological examination of the specimen showed benign renal leiomyoma.

  4. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  5. CT and MRI Findings in a Rare Case of Renal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Zehra; Peker, Elif; Gulpinar, Basak; Karadag, Hale; Erden, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Primary renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor/extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma (PNET/EES) is a very rare renal tumor. Case Report We report a case of primary renal PNET/EES of the kidney in an adult patient and describe its computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings, including diffusion weighted images along with a review of the current medical literature. Conclusions Although very rare, a relatively large renal mass which shows very infiltrative growth pattern on CT and MR imaging and striking diffusion restriction should raise the suspicion of a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor, in a young adult. PMID:27635170

  6. Pediatric magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a powerful clinical tool that fuses anatomic information with functional data in a single test without the use of ionizing radiation. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects, as well as common clinical applications with an emphasis on the evaluation of hydronephrosis. A fluid challenge is an essential part of our MRU protocol and enables the definition of compensated or decompensated kidneys within the spectrum of hydronephrosis. This classification may have prognostic implications when surgery is being considered. In addition, underlying uropathy can be identified on the anatomical scans and renal scarring can be seen on both the anatomical and dynamic scans. MRU can identify and categorize dysmorphic kidneys in vivo and may provide insight into congenital abnormalities seen in conjunction with vesicoureteric reflux. MRU is still in its infancy and as the technique develops and becomes widely available, it seems likely that it will supplant renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of renal tract disorders in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Alimentary Tract Development in Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Ian J.; Goodman, Walter G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive 3D magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to investigate metamorphosis of the alimentary tract of Manduca sexta from the larval to the adult stage. The larval midgut contracts in volume immediately following cessation of feeding and then greatly enlarges during the late pharate pupal period. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the foregut and hindgut of the pharate pupa undergo ecdysis considerably earlier than the external exoskeleton. Expansion of air sacs in the early pupa and development of flight muscles several days later appear to orient the midgut into its adult position in the abdomen. The crop, an adult auxiliary storage organ, begins development as a dorsal outgrowth of the foregut. This coincides with a reported increase in pupal ecdysteroid titers. An outgrowth of the hindgut, the rectal sac, appears several days later and continues to expand until it nearly fills the dorsal half of the abdominal cavity. This development correlates with a second rise in pupal ecdysteroid titers. In the pharate pupa, the presence of paramagnetic species renders the silk glands hyperintense. PMID:27280776

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Alimentary Tract Development in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Ian J; Goodman, Walter G

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive 3D magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to investigate metamorphosis of the alimentary tract of Manduca sexta from the larval to the adult stage. The larval midgut contracts in volume immediately following cessation of feeding and then greatly enlarges during the late pharate pupal period. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the foregut and hindgut of the pharate pupa undergo ecdysis considerably earlier than the external exoskeleton. Expansion of air sacs in the early pupa and development of flight muscles several days later appear to orient the midgut into its adult position in the abdomen. The crop, an adult auxiliary storage organ, begins development as a dorsal outgrowth of the foregut. This coincides with a reported increase in pupal ecdysteroid titers. An outgrowth of the hindgut, the rectal sac, appears several days later and continues to expand until it nearly fills the dorsal half of the abdominal cavity. This development correlates with a second rise in pupal ecdysteroid titers. In the pharate pupa, the presence of paramagnetic species renders the silk glands hyperintense.

  9. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  10. Renal scintiscanning. A review

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E. Rhys

    1970-01-01

    Renal scintiscanning is a simple investigation that does not require special preparation and is well tolerated by patients. Radiopharmaceuticals used in linear scanning are accumulated in the renal cortex. This accumulation is diminished: (a) when the cortex is destroyed, e.g. by pyelonephritis, injury, etc.; and (b) when the amount available to the cortex is reduced, e.g. by ischaemia. The scintigram depicts the kidneys unimpeded by bowel contents, gives a qualitative assessment of renal function and shows the distribution of zones of normal function. Recent technical improvements show great promise in deriving a quantitative measure of renal function in some circumstances. The location of normally functioning cortex is often important in the management of renal diseases and the value of scintiscanning is then considerable. It is occasionally useful in planning surgery. The anatomy of the renal collecting system can be shown only by urography. High dose techniques achieve this even in the face of renal failure, and scintiscanning has few indications in investigating lesions that distort the renal anatomy, e.g. tumours and cysts. Renal scintiscanning is a very valuable additional method to urography, arteriography and renography in investigation of renal disorders. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4905447

  11. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is an autosomal-dominant hereditary syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the FH gene that encodes the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH). HLRCC patients are predisposed to develop cutaneous leiomyomas, multiple, symptomatic uterine fibroids in young women resulting in early hysterectomies, and early onset renal tumors with a type 2 papillary morphology that can progress and metastasize, even when small. Since HLRCC-associated renal tumors can be more aggressive than renal tumors in other hereditary renal cancer syndromes, caution is warranted, and surgical intervention is recommended rather than active surveillance. At-risk members of an HLRCC family who test positive for the familial germline FH mutation should undergo surveillance by annual magnetic resonance imaging from the age of 8 years. Biochemical studies have shown that FH-deficient kidney cancer is characterized by a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis. It is hoped that through ongoing clinical trials evaluating targeted molecular therapies, an effective form of treatment for HLRCC-associated kidney cancer will be developed that will offer an improved prognosis for individuals affected with HLRCC-associated kidney cancer. PMID:25018647

  12. Radiofrequency ablation for renal tumors: our experience.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenji; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Nakamura, Terukazu; Soh, Jintetsu; Mikami, Kazuya; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2009-11-01

    To report our results of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for renal tumors and to assess predictors of therapeutic efficacy. Forty patients (median age 73 years) with renal tumors were treated with RFA under local or epidural anesthesia. All of them had high surgical risk or refused radical surgery. Tumors were punctured percutaneously using the Radionics Cool-tip RF System under computed tomography or ultrasonographic guidance. Median tumor diameter was 24 mm. After RFA, contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was performed within 1 month. Complete response (CR) was defined as no enhancement inside the tumor. Factors related to the outcome and to renal function were assessed. Median follow up was 16 months. CR was observed in 34 cases (85.0%). A significant difference in CR rate was observed between tumors < or =30 mm and those >30 mm. Outcomes tended to be better for tumors in the mid to lower kidney, and those away from the renal hilum. Recurrence was observed in one case (2.9%), but a CR was obtained again by additional RFA. Out of a total of 77 RFA procedures, complications occurred in only three cases (3.9%), and conservative treatment was possible in all cases. Serum creatinine levels 3 months after RFA did not differ from those before RFA. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for small renal tumors in patients with high surgical risk or who refuse radical surgery.

  13. Percutaneous Stent Placement as Treatment of Renal Vein Obstruction Due to Inferior Vena Caval Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stecker, Michael S. Casciani, Thomas; Kwo, Paul Y.

    2006-02-15

    A patient who had undergone his third orthotopic liver transplantation nearly 9 years prior to presentation developed worsening hepatic and renal function, as well as severe bilateral lower extremity edema. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vena caval thrombosis from the suprahepatic venous anastomosis to the infrarenal inferior vena cava, obstructing the renal veins. This was treated by percutaneous placement of metallic stents from the renal veins to the right atrium. At 16 months clinical follow-up, the patient continues to do well.

  14. [Renal carcinoma extending to the inferior vena cava and the right atrium. A case report].

    PubMed

    Zarukiweicz, Magdalena; Pośnik-Kisło, Anna; Borys, Marcin; Dabrowski, Marek; Suwalski, Piotr; Suwalski, Kazimierz; Polański, Jerzy A

    2006-09-01

    A case of a 66-year-old male hospitalised due to heart failure is presented. Echocardiography showed an abnormal structure in the right atrium resembling myxoma or thrombus. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a right renal tumor. Finally, magnetic resonance imaging showed that the abnormal structure in the right atrium was a neoplasmatic plug continuously extending from renal carcinoma. The renal tumor and it's metastatic plug were successfully removed during surgery.

  15. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  16. Bilateral Renal Lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Vaidehi K; Shah, Maulin K; Gandhi, Shruti P; Patel, Himanshu V

    2016-09-01

    Renal Lymphangiectasia (RLM) is very rare benign lymphatic malformation. It can be misdiagnosed for other cystic renal masses, most commonly polycystic kidneys. Though incidentally found in most cases, it may be the cause for hypertension and renal failure in undiagnosed patients. Here, we report a case of an adult asymptomatic male with bilateral RLM which was detected as an incidental finding on ultrasound. Confirmation by CT-scan and laboratory diagnosis of aspirated fluid was done, and patient was managed conservatively.

  17. Isolated Renal Sinus Lymphangiectasia-Close Mimic of Pelviureteric Junction Obstruction and Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Indiran, Venkatraman; Prabhu, P Sathish; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2016-01-01

    Renal lymphangiectasia is a rare disorder which may present as perirenal or peripelvic collection. Isolated renal sinus lymphangiectasia is a close differential diagnosis for pelviureteric junction obstruction on ultrasound, but can be resolved without ambiguity using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Here we describe such a case where imaging helped avoid unnecessary confusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromophobe cell renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Megumi, Y; Nishimura, K

    1998-01-01

    Chromophobe cell renal carcinoma is a recently established subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Herein we report a case of chromophobe cell renal carcinoma in a 67-year-old male patient who occasionally underwent computed tomography. In a microscopic study with hematoxylin and eosin stain, clear eosinophilic cytoplasm, and a moderately atypical nucleus were observed. And it was stained positively by Hale's colloidal iron. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasm was filled with numerous microvesicles. From these results, this tumor was pathologically diagnosed as chromophobe cell renal carcinoma.

  19. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  20. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  1. Snake resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Urrunaga, Nathalie H.; Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Renal dysfunction causes significant morbidity in cirrhotic patients. Diagnosis is challenging because it is based on serum creatinine, which is used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rate, which itself is not an ideal measure of renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Finding the exact cause of renal injury in patients with cirrhosis remains problematic due to the limitations of the current diagnostic tests. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies used to diagnose renal dysfunction in patients with renal dysfunction and review current treatments. Recent findings New diagnostic criteria and classification of renal dysfunction, especially for acute kidney injury (AKI), have been proposed in hopes of optimizing treatment and improving outcomes. New biomarkers that help to differentiate structural from functional AKI in cirrhotic patients have been developed, but require further investigation. Vasoconstrictors are the most commonly recommended treatment of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Given the high mortality in patients with type 1 HRS, all patients with HRS should be evaluated for liver transplantation. When renal dysfunction is considered irreversible, combined liver–kidney transplantation is advised. Summary Development of new biomarkers to differentiate the different types of AKI in cirrhosis holds promise. Early intervention in cirrhotic patients with renal dysfunction offers the best hope of improving outcomes. PMID:25763790

  3. [Hemorrhagic bilateral renal angiomyolipoma].

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Mohamed; Rabii, Redouane; Mezzour, Mohamed Hicham; Joual, Abdenbi; Bennani, Saâd; el Mrini, Mohamed

    2003-09-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumour, often associated with congenital diseases especially de Bourneville's tuberous sclerosis. Bilateral angiomyolipoma is exceptional. The authors report a case of bilateral renal angiomyolipoma in a 33-year-old patient presenting with haemorrhagic shock. In the light of this case and a review of the literature, the authors discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this disease.

  4. Renal osteodystrophy and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Donald J

    2009-11-01

    The bone disease seen in our aging dialysis population is a complex mixture of osteoporosis and renal osteodystrophy. Attention must be paid to both of these issues. Hip fractures are increased with aging and this increase is further aggravated by renal failure. Preventive management with Vitamin D and bisphosphonates is reviewed.

  5. 3D Magnetic Measurements of Kink and Locked Modes in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Shiraki, D.

    2013-10-01

    The DIII-D magnetics diagnostic has been greatly expanded to fully characterize non-axisymmetric ``3D'' fields. Five poloidal locations now recover n <= 3 , while new HFS arrays provide poloidal spectral resolution of 7.4 cm. Initial measurements suggest externally driven kink structures deviate from MARS-F and IPEC models. These variations extend to the ideal regime, where toroidal agreement is observed. The plasma response to an n = 3 RMP increases monotonically as beta increases and q95 decreases, contrary to predictions of a screening to kink valley. Finally, the temporal evolution of the 3D eigenstructure of a slowly rotating (5 Hz) quasi-static, born locked, tearing mode provides the first evidence of an appreciable n = 2 error field, and an estimate of the phase for future correction. This new 3D capability will be used to understand and optimize control of RWMs, NTV torque, ELMs, and error field correction to extend stable tokamak operation. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Analysis of the 3D magnetic field and its errors for undulators with iron poles

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Bahrdt, J.; Gaupp, A.

    1995-12-31

    The attainable field strength and field quality, such as the optical phase error, the electron beam displacement within the undulator and higher order multipoles of the magnetic field, are discussed. These issues are critical to the design and construction of short period undulators for use in short wavelength FEL or for operation in third generation light sources. We discuss two approaches: (i) For superferric undulators the construction of a full length device would rely on the optimum sorting of precision machined undulator segments. Magnetic data on segments with 20 periods (period length 8.80mm) will be presented. (ii) For hybrid undulators the sorting has to be done on individual poles and magnets. For this approach typical error sources such as machining tolerances, magnetization errors of the permanent magnet material and assembly errors are modeled in 3D and compared to induced errors on an existing hybrid undulator segment. In case of undulators having a full length of hundred periods at least five times as many individual parts have to be characterized. This should be done automatically where both the mechanical and magnetic data before and after the assembly of the magnetic structure are recorded in one step. A CNC programmable measuring device suitable for this task will shortly be presented.

  7. Electric current variations and 3D magnetic configuration of coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Harra, Louise K.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Guo, Yang; Demoulin, Pascal; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando, , Prof

    Coronal jets (EUV) were observed by SDO/AIA on September 17, 2010. HMI and THEMIS measured the vector magnetic field from which we derived the magnetic flux, the phostospheric velocity and the vertical electric current. The magnetic configuration was computed with a non linear force-free approach. The phostospheric current pattern of the recurrent jets were associated with the quasi-separatrix layers deduced from the magnetic extrapolation. The large twisted near-by Eiffel-tower-shape jet was also caused by reconnection in current layers containing a null point. This jet cannot be classified precisely within either the quiescent or the blowout jet types. We will show the importance of the existence of bald patches in the low atmosphere

  8. The Donegal Sign Tree: A Local Legend Confirmed with Holographic Radar and 3-D Magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, T.; Cassidy, M.; Inagaki, M.; Windsor, C.; Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Bulleti, A.; Valentini, S.; Borgioli, G.; Ivashov, S.; Zhuravlev, A.; Razewig, V.; Vasiliev, I.; Bechtel, E.

    2009-05-01

    A tree at a crossroad in Historic Donegal, PA (founded 1722) bears unusual burls. Two are similar in size, and lie on opposite sides of the trunk at a height of six feet. Locals say that the tree engulfed an old road sign, and the geometry of the burls gives this appearance. However, the trunk between these two burls bears no welt where it sealed after swallowing the sign. In addition, there are other burls farther up the tree, which are not consistent with engulfed signs. Although the locals all know the legend of the swallowed sign, none ever actually saw the sign; not even an octogenarian who has lived at the crossroad his entire life, and recalls the tree as a child just as it is today. In order to test the veracity of the legend, this study performed subsurface imaging of the tree using holographic subsurface radar (Rascan), and 3-D measurements of the magnetic field about the tree using cesium vapor sensors. The Rascan system used is a continuous wave subsurface radar that operates at 5 discrete frequencies between 1.5 and 2.0 GHz. Reflections from subsurface objects are recorded as the phase difference pattern between an internal reference signal, and the reflected signal. Thus, it is a microwave analogy for optical holography. Rascan records reflections with two receiving antennae - parallel and perpendicular to the transmitter - so a single set of scans provides ten images; five frequencies at two polarizations. This ensures that an object at arbitrary depth will produce a strong phase difference in one of the images. As a consequence, elongate objects that are angled from the plane of scanning (e.g. a dipping sheet) produce "zebra stripes" of contrast values that vary cyclically with depth. The presence of stripes, and their relative positions in the different frequency images (the movement of which has been dubbed the "zebra shift") is useful for determining the relative depth of different portions of a dipping planar, or curved subsurface object. Rascan images of the tree revealed a reflector that produces a zebra shift pattern reminiscent of a curved reflector. However, given the curvature of the tree trunk, the zebra shift is more likely to represent a flat reflector beneath a curved scanning surface - consistent with the presence of the sign. As an independent confirmatory method, the tree was also subjected to a magnetic survey. First, the tree was swept with a magnetic locator - which indicated a magnetic target within the tree. In order to determine the configuration of this target, magnetic total field measurements were collected at the nodes of a 3-D grid surrounding the tree. The geometry of this survey is quite different from traditional archaeological prospection magnetometer surveys and, despite the relatively high latitude of Donegal PA, the vertical orientation of the suspected target mimics the common difficulties with magnetic surveys at low magnetic latitude. Therefore, the analytic signal was calculated to provide an easily interpreted magnetic anomaly that, together with the Rascan images, suggests that the story of the swallowed Donegal road sign may be true.

  9. Protecting ITER walls: fast ion power loads in 3D magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurki-Suonio, T.; Särkimäki, K.; Äkäslompolo, S.; Varje, J.; Liu, Y.; Sipilä, S.; Asunta, O.; Hirvijoki, E.; Snicker, A.; Terävä, J.; Cavinato, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Parail, V.; Saibene, G.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion alpha and beam ion with steady-state power loads in all four main operating scenarios of ITER have been evaluated by the ASCOT code. For this purpose, high-fidelity magnetic backgrounds were reconstructed, taking into account even the internal structure of the ferritic inserts and tritium breeding modules (TBM). The beam ions were found to be almost perfectly confined in all scenarios, and only the so-called hybrid scenario featured alpha loads reaching 0.5 MW due to its more triangular plasma. The TBMs were not found to jeopardize the alpha confinement, nor cause any hot spots. Including plasma response did not bring dramatic changes to the load. The ELM control coils (ECC) were simulated in the baseline scenario and found to seriously deteriorate even the beam confinement. However, the edge perturbation in this case is so large that the sources have to be re-evaluated with plasma profiles that take into account the ECC perturbation.

  10. 3D magnetization currents, magnetization loop, and saturation field in superconducting rectangular prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, E.; Kapolka, M.

    2017-06-01

    Bulk superconductors are used in many applications and material characterization experiments, with the bulk shape of the rectangular prism being the most frequent. However, the magnetization currents are still mostly unknown for this kind of 3D shape, especially below the saturation magnetic field. Knowledge of the magnetization currents in this kind of sample is needed to interpret the measurements and the development of bulk materials for applications. This article presents a systematic analysis of the magnetization currents in square-based prisms of several thicknesses. We make this study by numerical modeling using a variational principle that enables a high number of degrees of freedom. We also compute the magnetization loops and saturation magnetic field, using a definition that is more relevant for thin prisms than previous ones. The article presents a practical analytical fit for any aspect ratio. For applied fields below the saturation field, the current paths are not rectangular, presenting 3D bending. The thickness-average results are consistent with previous modeling and measurements for thin films. The 3D bending of the current lines indicates that there could be flux-cutting effects in rectangular prisms. The component of the critical current density in the applied field direction may play a role, with the magnetization currents being different in a bulk and a stack of tapes.

  11. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. Reconnection spreading is associated with dawn-dusk asymmetries during substorms in the magnetotail and has been observed in two-ribbon flares (such as the Bastille Day flare) and laboratory experiments at the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) and the Magnetic Reconnection eXperiment (MRX). It was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the existence of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006). Previous numerical studies exploring the spreading of localized magnetic reconnection exclusively addressed collisionless (Hall) reconnection. Here, we address the effect of dissipation mechanism has on X-line spreading with and without a guide field. We compare previous results with simulations using three alternate phases of reconnection - Sweet-Parker reconnection, collisional reconnection with secondary islands, and reconnection with anomalous resistivity. We present results from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations to address the nature of X-line spreading. Applications to reconnection in the solar wind and corona will be discussed.

  12. 2-D and 3-D Magnetic Inversion Studies in the South Atlantic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    studies, erupt from a new volcanic vent at very high effusion rates during volcanic and tectonic episodes of activity within the inner floorI ! I I 60...for at least 2.5 my. The highs may be caused by eruption of highly fractionated strongly magnetized basalts at ridge axis discontinuities with both...reduced magma supply near the end points of each segment may result in short-lived transient magma chambers whose eruptive products become highly

  13. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-01

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  14. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Linear Alternator For a Stirling Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing advanced radioisotope Stirling convertors, under contract with Stirling Technology Company (STC), for space applications. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-D finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. Preliminary correlations with open-circuit voltage measurements provide an encouraging level of confidence in the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. These plots identify regions of high H, where at elevated temperature and under electrical load, the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists. This implies the need for further testing and analysis.

  15. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Stirling Convertor Linear Alternator Under Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Regan, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Stirling Technology Company (STC) are developing Stirling convertors for Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (SRPS) to provide electrical power for future NASA deep space missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. The model extends a magnetostatic analysis previously reported at the 35th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) to include the effects of the load current. STC's 55-We linear alternator design was selected to validate the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. The margin for permanent magnet demagnetization is calculated at the expected magnet operating temperature for the near earth environment and for various average magnet temperatures. These thermal conditions were selected to represent a worst-case condition for the planned deep space missions. This paper presents plots that identify regions of high H where the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists.

  16. 3D Magnetization Vector Inversion of Magnetic Data: Improving and Comparing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Hu, Xiangyun; Zhang, Henglei; Geng, Meixia; Zuo, Boxin

    2017-09-01

    Magnetization vector inversion is an useful approach to invert for magnetic anomaly in the presence of significant remanent magnetization and self-demagnetization. However, magnetizations are usually obtained in many different directions under the influences of geophysical non-uniqueness. We propose an iteration algorithm of magnetization vector inversion (M-IDI) that one couple of magnetization direction is iteratively computed after the magnetization intensity is recovered from the magnitude magnetic anomaly. And we compare it with previous methods of (1) three orthogonal components inversion of total magnetization vector at Cartesian framework (MMM), (2) intensity, inclination and declination inversion at spherical framework (MID), (3) directly recovering the magnetization inclination and declination (M-IDCG) and (4) estimating the magnetization direction using correlation method (M-IDC) at the sequential inversion frameworks. The synthetic examples indicate that MMM returns multiply magnetization directions and MID results are strongly dependent on initial model and parameter weights. M-IDI computes faster than M-IDC and achieves a constant magnetization direction compared with M-IDCG. Additional priori information constraints can improve the results of MMM, MID and M-IDCG. Obtaining one magnetization direction, M-IDC and M-IDI are suitable for single and isolated anomaly. Finally, M-IDI and M-IDC are used to invert and interpret the magnetic anomaly of the Galinge iron-ore deposit (NW China) and the results are verified by information from drillholes and physical properties measurements of ore and rock samples. Magnetization vector inversion provides a comprehensive way to evaluate and investigate the remanent magnetization and self-demagnetization.

  17. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features.

  18. Effect of 3D magnetic perturbations on divertor conditions and detachment in tokamak and stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.-W.; Briesemester, A. R.; Kobayashi, M.; Lore, J. D.; Schmitz, O.; Diallo, A.; Gray, T. K.; Lasnier, C. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    Enhanced perpendicular heat and momentum transport induces parallel pressure loss leading to divertor detachment, which can be produced by the increase of density in 2D tokamaks. However, in the 3D configurations such as tokamaks with 3D fields and stellarators, the fraction of perpendicular transport can be higher even in a lower density regime, which could lead to the early transition to detachment without passing through the high-recycling regime. 3D fields applied to the limiter tokamak plasmas produce edge stochastic layers close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS), which can allow for enhanced perpendicular transport and indeed the absence of high recycling regime and early detachment have been observed in TEXTOR and Tore Supra. However, in the X-point divertor tokamaks with the applied 3D fields, the parallel transport is still dominant and the detachment facilitation has not been observed yet. Rather, 3D fields affected detachment adversely under certain conditions, either by preventing detachment onset as seen in DIII-D or by re-attaching the existing detached plasma as shown in NSTX. The possible way for strong 3D effects to induce access to the early detachment in divertor tokamaks appears to be via significant perpendicular loss of parallel momentum by frictional force for the counter-streaming flows between neighboring flow channels in the divertor. In principle, the adjacent lobes in the 3D divertor tokamak may generate the counter-streaming flow channels. However, an EMC3-EIRENE simulation for ITER H-mode plasmas demonstrated that screened RMP leads to significantly reduced counter-flows near the divertor target, therefore the momentum loss effect leading to detachment facilitation is expected to be small. This is consistent with the observation in LHD, which showed screening (amplification) of RMP fields in the attachment (stable detachment) case. Work for optimal parameter window for best divertor operation scenario is needed particularly for the 3D divertor tokamak configuration.

  19. Connecting Global Measures of 3D Magnetic Reconnection to Local Kinetic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William Scott

    2015-07-16

    After giving the motivation for the work, slides present the topic under the following headings: Description of LAPD experiment; Actual simulation setup; Simple kinetic theory of ined-tied tearing; Diagnostics to characterizing 3D reconnection; Example #1 - short-tied system; and Example #2 - long line-tied system. Colorful simulations are shown for quasipotential vs field line exponentiation, field line integrated Ohms Law, and correlation with agyrotopy & energy conversion for example #1; and evolution of current density for largest case, field exponentiation vs quasi-potential, and time evolution of magnetic field lines for example #2. To satisfy line-tied boundary conditions, there is need for superposition of oblique modes--the simple two-mode approximation works surprisingly well. For force-free layers with bg >1, the fastest growing periodic modes are oblique with kxλ ~0.5. This implies a minimum length of Ly > 2πλbg. There are strong correlations between σ → Ξ → A0e (observable with spacecraft). Electron pressure tensor is the dominant non-ideal term.

  20. Particle energization in 3D magnetic reconnection of relativistic pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Yin Lin; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Liang, Edison P.; Li Hui

    2011-05-15

    We present large scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations to examine particle energization in magnetic reconnection of relativistic electron-positron (pair) plasmas. The initial configuration is set up as a relativistic Harris equilibrium without a guide field. These simulations are large enough to accommodate a sufficient number of tearing and kink modes. Contrary to the non-relativistic limit, the linear tearing instability is faster than the linear kink instability, at least in our specific parameters. We find that the magnetic energy dissipation is first facilitated by the tearing instability and followed by the secondary kink instability. Particles are mostly energized inside the magnetic islands during the tearing stage due to the spatially varying electric fields produced by the outflows from reconnection. Secondary kink instability leads to additional particle acceleration. Accelerated particles are, however, observed to be thermalized quickly. The large amplitude of the vertical magnetic field resulting from the tearing modes by the secondary kink modes further help thermalizing the non-thermal particles generated from the secondary kink instability. Implications of these results for astrophysics are briefly discussed.

  1. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Logan, N. C.

    2016-11-01

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ˜10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  2. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data.

    PubMed

    Strait, E J; King, J D; Hanson, J M; Logan, N C

    2016-11-01

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ∼10(-3) to 10(-5) of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  3. 3D magnetic interactions of stars with their close-in planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Brun, Allan Sacha; Matt, Sean; Réville, Victor

    2015-08-01

    Close-in planets generally orbit in a sub-alfv ´enic stellar wind, where the perturbations they excite in the corona are able to travel upwind to the stellar surface and potentially induce observable phenomena. The effective connection between the planet and its host takes the form of two Aflv ´en wings. Depending on the topology of the planetary and stellar magnetic fields, the rotation profile of the corona, and the orbital parameters, it is possible that none, one, or the two Aflv ´en wings connect together the star and the planet.We explore the formation and sustainment of Alfv ´en wings in global three dimensional simulations under the magneto-hydrodynamic formalism with the PLUTO code. We model the stellar wind of a typical cool star in which a close-in orbiting planet is introduced as a boundary condition. By varying the magnetic topologies of the planetary and stellar magnetic fields, we explore the variety of Alfv ´en wings that can develop and quantify the Poynting flux flowing through those wings. We thus provide estimates of the amount of magnetic energy these magnetic interactions can channel to the lower corona. We also quantify the phase and latitude offsets that can be expected between the planetary subpoint on the stellar surface and the actual location where energy is deposited. We summarize the typical situations (in terms of magnetic topology, stellar type, and orbital parameters) where the star-planet magnetic interaction could trigger observable flares. We conclude by extending our results to the cases of more complex, non-axisymmetric topologies of the observed magnetic fields for a few particular stars.

  4. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Logan, N. C.

    2016-08-11

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ~10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Lastly, applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  5. Edge plasma properties with 3D magnetic perturbations in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Scarin, P.; Spizzo, G.; Auriemma, F.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.; RFX-mod Team

    2017-07-01

    The response of the edge plasma to a magnetic perturbation (MP) is studied in the RFX-mod device, in both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak discharges. The use of spatially distributed diagnostics, in particular along the poloidal direction, allows a direct 3D characterization of the plasma. It is shown that there is a difference between the spectrum of the MP and that of different properties of the edge plasma, such as the floating potential, the electron pressure and the flow, for both RFP and tokamak plasmas. In particular, for RFP cases, even if the magnetic perturbation is mainly m  =  1, with the amplitude of the m  =  0 and m  =  2 sidebands negligible, the connection length to the wall of the magnetic field L cw has a more complex structure. The ergodic regions, with L cw larger than the Kolmogorov length, are due to the interaction of both m  =  1 and m  =  0 modes, showing a complex and non-monochromatic behaviour along the poloidal angle. This structure of L cw is responsible for the impure m  =  1 behaviour of the plasma wall interaction, floating potential and electron pressure. Thus the helicity of the edge plasma is quite different from that of the dominant MP.

  6. Development of 3-D magnetic nano-arrays by electrodeposition into mesoporous silica.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.; Manning, J.; Bakker, M.G.; Li, X.; Lee, D.R.; Wang, J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Alabama

    2006-01-01

    The development of periodic nanostructures fabricated by self-assembly of surfactants and block co-polymers has opened up the possibility of generating periodic magnetic nanostructures of types not accessible by self-assembly of nano-particles. The fabrication of mesoporous silica thin films around self-assembled block co-polymers is well established. Common structures for such films are SBA-15 which consists of hexagonal arrays of cylindrical pores and SBA-16 which has face centered arrays of spherical voids. These pores are connected by 1-2 nm thick flaws in the continuous silica phase producing an effectively continuous porous phase. After removal of the block co-polymer template, electrodeposition into the mesoporous silica thin films produces arrays of 5-10 nm diameter nano-wires and nano-particles. We have demonstrated that such materials can be fabricated on a wide range of metal substrates. Characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopies shows that the mesoporous silica is well ordered over micron scale areas. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) studies shows diffraction spots, consistent with the entire film being well ordered. GISAXS also shows that the mesoporous silica films survive removal of the template and electrodeposition of nickel and cobalt into the mesoporous silica films. Such films are of interest for their magnetic properties, as the nanophase and scale can be independently varied. Further, the presence of nanowires inside an insulator suggests that these films might also be of interest as the current confining element for Confined Current Path-Current Perpendicular to Plane GMR sensors.

  7. Simulations of Gyrosynchrotron Microwave Emission from an Oscillating 3D Magnetic Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Reznikova, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Radio observations of solar flares often reveal various periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. Most likely, these oscillations are caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations of flaring loops which modulate the emission. Interpreting the observations requires comparing them with simulations. We simulated the gyrosynchrotron radio emission from a semicircular (toroidal-shaped) magnetic loop containing sausage-mode MHD oscillations. The aim was to detect the observable signatures specific to the considered MHD mode and to study their dependence on the various source parameters. The MHD waves were simulated using a linear three-dimensional model of a magnetized plasma cylinder; both standing and propagating waves were considered. The curved loop was formed by replicating the MHD solutions along the plasma cylinder and bending the cylinder; this model allowed us to study the effect of varying the viewing angle along the loop. The radio emission was simulated using a three-dimensional model, and its spatial and temporal variations were analyzed. We considered several loop orientations and different parameters of the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic electrons in the loop. In the model with low plasma density, the intensity oscillations at all frequencies are synchronous (with the exception of a narrow spectral region below the spectral peak). In the model with high plasma density, the emission at low frequencies (where the Razin effect is important) oscillates in anti-phase with the emissions at higher frequencies. The oscillations at high and low frequencies are more pronounced in different parts of the loop (depending on the loop orientation). The layers where the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field changes sign can produce additional peculiarities in the oscillation patterns.

  8. Analysis and measurement of the 3D magnetic field in a rotating magnetic field driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2012-10-01

    A translatable three-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque and the rotating magnetic field (RMF) torque. The torque applied to the plasma is the RMF torque reduced by the shorting torque. An estimate of the plasma resistivity is made based on the steady state balance between the applied torque and the resistive torque. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be presented. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n=0 components of the calculated fields to the 3-axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  9. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library.

  10. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-15

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  11. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Logan, N. C.

    2016-08-11

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ~10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Lastly, applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  12. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    DOE PAGES

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; ...

    2016-08-11

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ~10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Lastly, applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  13. Anisotropic heat transport in integrable and chaotic 3-D magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Blazevski, D.; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    A study of anisotropic heat transport in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields is presented. The approach is based on the recently proposed Lagrangian-Green s function (LG) method in Ref. [1] that allows an efficient and accurate integration of the parallel transport equation applicable to general magnetic fields with local or non-local parallel flux closures. We focus on reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit separatrix reconnection and shearless transport barriers. The role of reconnection and magnetic field line chaos on temperature transport is studied. Numerical results are presented on the anomalous relaxation of radial temperature gradients in the presence of shearless Cantori partial barri- ers. Also, numerical evidence of non-local effective radial temperature transport in chaotic fields is presented. Going beyond purely parallel transport, the LG method is generalized to include finite perpendicular diffusivity, and the problem of temperature flattening inside a magnetic island is studied.

  14. The ITER 3D Magnetic Diagnostic Response to Applied n=3 and n=4 RMP's

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, S A

    2014-09-01

    The ITER magnetic diagnostic response to applied n=3 and n=4 RMPs has been calculated for the 15MA scenario. The VMEC code was utilized to calculate free boundary 3D ideal MHD equilibria, where the non-stellarator symmetric terms were included in the calculation. This allows an assessment to be made of the possible boundary displacements due to RMP application in ITER. As the VMEC code assumes a continuous set of nested flux surface, the possibility of island and stochastic region formation is ignored. At the start of the current at-top (L-Mode) application of n = 4 RMP's indicates approximately 1 cm peak-to-peak displacements on the low field side of the plasma while later in the shot (H-mode) perturbations as large as 3 cm are present. Forward modeling of the ITER magnetic diagnostics indicates significant non-axisymmetric plasma response, exceeding 10% the axisymmetric signal in many of the flux loops. Magnetic field probes seem to indicate a greater robustness to 3D effects but still indicate large sensitivities to 3D effects in a number of sensors. Forward modeling of the diagnostics response to 3D equilibria allows assessment of diagnostics design and control scenarios.

  15. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  16. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  17. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  18. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmy, P S; Jose, Merin; Feroze, M; Kumar, Rajesh K

    2017-09-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour is a newly described rare neoplasm. This tumour is characterised microscopically by admixture of three components- epithelial cells arranged in tubules and nests, angiomyomatous stroma and capillary sized interconnecting vascular channels in close association with the epithelial cell clusters. Microscopically it has wide range of differential diagnoses which include mixed epithelial and stromal tumour of kidney, angiomyolipoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma with angiomyolipomatous/angiomyoadenomatous areas. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour should be differentiated from these tumours. Till now, only 10 cases have been reported in English medical literature. Here, we are reporting a case of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour in a 29 year- old female patient who presented with hematuria and low backache and describing its main features so as to differentiate this entity from other renal tumours. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case to be reported from India.

  19. [Sarcoidosis : Renal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Löffler, C; Bergner, R

    2017-04-12

    Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is much more common than generally assumed from old epidemiological studies and is often only detected when actively searched for. Many patients with renal sarcoidosis present with no or only few symptoms. The diagnostic work-up of sarcoidosis should always include a possible renal involvement. In cases of impaired renal function, proteinuria or a pathological urine sediment, a renal biopsy specimen should be obtained to assess the type, severity and prognosis of the kidney disease. Treatment is primarily based on the use of corticosteroids. Steroid-sparing agents, such as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and infliximab can be applied; however, the evidence for efficacy of these therapies is mostly based on case series and expert opinions. Discontinuation of immunosuppression therapy bears a high risk of relapse.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, A.W.L.; Bydder, G.M.; Steinter, R.E.; Bryant, D.J.; Young, I.R.

    1984-12-01

    A study of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the kidneys in six normal volunteers and 52 patients is reported. Corticomedullary differentiation was seen with the inversion-recovery (IR 1400/400) sequence in the normal volunteers and in patients with functioning transplanted kidneys and acute tubular necrosis. Partial or total loss of corticomedullary differentiation was seen in glomerulonephritis, acute and chronic renal failure, renal artery stenosis, and transplant rejection. The T1 of the kidneys was increased in glomerulonephritis with neuphrotic syndrome, but the T1 was within the normal range for renal medulla in glomerulonephritis without nephrotic syndrome, renal artery stenosis, and chronic renal failure. A large staghorn calculus was demonstrated with MRI, but small calculi were not seen. Fluid within the hydonephrosis, simple renal cysts, and polycystic kidneys displayed very low signal intensity and long T1 values. Tumors displayed varied appearances. Hypernephromas were shown to be hypo- or hyperintense with the renal medulla on the IR 1400/400 sequence. After intravenous injection of gadolinium-DTPA, there was marked decrease in the tumor T1.

  1. [Renal artery stenosis. Pathophysiology--diagnosis--therapy].

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Konorza, Thomas Friedrich Michael; Eggebrecht, Holger; Naber, Christoph Kurt; Philipp, Sebastian; Philipp, Thomas; Kribben, Andreas; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-05-15

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is both a common and progressive disease and its prevalence in patients > 65 years is 6.8%. In patients with known or suspected atherosclerosis undergoing coronary angiography, a frequency of even 11-23% is reported in the literature. Despite this high prevalence, there is an ongoing discussion about the indications for revascularization and it is currently unclear, whether renal artery revascularization reduces adverse cardiovascular and renal events. Nevertheless, the number of interventions for RAS is rising steadily, although up to 40% of patients do not profit from this intervention. This fact underlines the necessity of a thorough diagnostic work-up before intervention, integrating morphological and functional tests. For morphological evaluation, multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance tomography or digital subtraction angiography can be done. In experienced centers, Doppler ultrasound can serve as an excellent functional tool, to assess the physiological relevance of an RAS, but also invasive measurements of pressure and flow provide valuable information about the significance of stenoses; however, these methods will have to be assessed with respect to their value to predict long-term outcome. Although percutaneous intervention of RAS is associated with a substantially lower risk of major adverse events as compared to surgery, by using contrast media this procedure holds the risk of deterioration of renal function and of a small number of procedure-dependent complications as well. Thus, a careful consideration of pros and cons of this procedure is mandatory.

  2. MRI phenotype in renal cancer: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Naomi; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is most commonly diagnosed as an incidental finding on cross-sectional imaging and represents a significant clinical challenge. Although most patients have a surgically curable lesion at the time of diagnosis, the variability in the biologic behavior of the different histologic subtypes and tumor grade of RCC, together with the increasing array of management options, creates uncertainty for the optimal clinical approach to individual patients. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a comprehensive assessment of renal lesions that includes multiple forms of tissue contrast as well as functional parameters, which in turn provides information that helps to address this dilemma. In this article, we review this evolving and increasingly comprehensive role of MRI in the detection, characterization, perioperative evaluation, and assessment of the treatment response of renal neoplasms. We emphasize the ability of the imaging "phenotype" of renal masses on MRI to help predict the histologic subtype, grade, and clinical behavior of RCC.

  3. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  4. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1977-09-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included several ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  5. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1976-01-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included severe ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  6. Solitary kidney with renal artery aneurysm repaired by ex vivo reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palcau, Laura; Gouicem, Djelloul; Joguet, Etienne; Cameliere, Lucie; Berger, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old pregnant female with pyelonephritis was found to have a 26-mm left renal artery aneurysm with unknown right kidney agenesis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomographic angiography with 3-dimensional reconstructions confirmed a saccular aneurysm localized at the bifurcation of the left posterior segmental artery. The patient ultimately underwent successful ex vivo left renal artery aneurysm repair with autotransplantation. Pathologic evaluation of the resected aneurysm confirmed the diagnosis of fibromuscular dysplasia. Fibromuscular dysplasia is the most common cause of renal artery stenosis and renovascular hypertension and can, in rare cases, be associated with the development of renal artery aneurysms.

  7. Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-11-01

    Recently my collection of historical physics teaching apparatus was given a group of 19th-century tuning forks on resonant boxes. Figure 1 shows the smallest fork sitting on the largest one. The large tuning fork oscillates at 128 Hz and has a resonator that is 57.9 cm long. The small fork has a frequency 10 times higher, but its resonator has a length of 11.0 cm instead of the 5.8 cm that simple scaling would suggest. How is this possible?

  8. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  9. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  10. Lactulose and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vogt, B; Frey, F J

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of lactulose as a new therapeutic agent for treatment of hepatic encephalopathy was a major breakthrough in this field. It was hypothesized that lactulose might prevent postoperative renal impairment after biliary surgery in patients with obstructive jaundice. The presumable mechanism purported was the diminished endotoxinemia by lactulose. Unfortunately, such a reno-protective effect has not been shown conclusively until now in clinical studies. In chronic renal failure lactulose is known to promote fecal excretion of water, sodium, potassium, amonium, urea, creatinine and protons. Thus, lactulose could be useful for the treatment of chronic renal failure. However, compliance to the therapy represents a major problem.

  11. Traumatic bilateral renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Peterson, N E

    1989-02-01

    Published examples of unilateral and bilateral renal artery thrombosis attest to their usual subjection to nephrectomy at diagnosis or soon thereafter, eliminating the opportunity for spontaneous improvement which would enlighten the issue of how often late recovery may occur, and under what circumstances. Seven cases of renal artery thrombosis and five patients with renal artery embolization extracted from the literature have included documentation of patchy histologic viability within otherwise total infarction. Conversely, 47 reports of renal artery thrombosis culminating in nephrectomy or examined post mortem include no reference to any of these histologic features. Presumptions are speculative regarding whether these features were absent, overlooked, or unexamined. Their incidence cannot be estimated--only the possibility of recoverable renal function in an unknown number of involved patients. It may be presumed that the majority of kidneys exposed to sustained arterial interruption will undergo irreversible infarction, with an undefined small subgroup later developing renal hypertension. An unknown number, however, may fortuitously possess arterial collateralization competent to support sufficient numbers of viable nephrons to sustain adequate renal function. It is further speculated that shared pathophysiologic features establish the opportunity for misdiagnosis of renal cortical necrosis, which carries a documented potential for spontaneous recovery. Impulsive bilateral nephrectomy may therefore be unjustified, particularly in consideration of the minimal potential hazards of nonremoval. In the event of convalescent problems of renal origin, delayed nephrectomy remains an option. The requirement for interval hemodialysis is further influenced by the advantages accruing from retention of the native kidneys relative to calcium metabolism and blood product replacement. A final consideration relates to the advisability of secondary revascularization of

  12. Renal oncocytoma: new observations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Hartman, D.S.; Friedman, A.C.; Sherman, J.L.; Lautin, E.M.; Pyatt, R.S.; Ho, C.K.; Csere, R.; Fromowitz, F.B.

    1984-10-01

    Renal oncocytomas are uncommon, benign tumors that can be treated by local incision or heminephrectomy; their preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, treated by radical nephrectomy, would be invaluable. A particularly important finding, a central scar, not stressed in previous reports, is frequently demonstrated by CT examination. The authors evaluated radiographic studies of 18 pathologically confirmed cases of oncocytoma and compared findings with results of CT, sonography, and angiogrpahy studies of 18 renal cell carcinoma cases. Oncocytomas can be suggested if a stellate scar is identified within an otherwise homogeneous tumor on ultrasound (US) and CT; if the mass appears homogeneous but no scar is present, angiography should be performed.

  13. Renal tubule cell repair following acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Humes, H D; Lake, E W; Liu, S

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data suggests the recovery of renal function after ischemic or nephrotoxic acute renal failure is due to a replicative repair process dependent upon predominantly paracrine release of growth factors. These growth factors promote renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and a differentiation phase dependent on the interaction between tubule cells and basement membrane. These insights identify the molecular basis of renal repair and ischemic and nephrotoxic acute renal failure, and may lead to potential therapeutic modalities that accelerate renal repair and lessen the morbidity and mortality associated with these renal disease processes. In this regard, there is a prominent vasoconstrictor response of the renal vasculature during the postischemic period of developing acute renal failure. The intravenous administration of pharmacologic doses of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in the postischemic period have proven efficacious by altering renal vascular resistance, so that renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate improve. ANF also appears to protect renal tubular epithelial integrity and holds significant promise as a therapeutic agent in acute renal failure. Of equal or greater promise are the therapeutic interventions targeting the proliferative reparative zone during the postischemic period. The exogenous administration of epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-1 in the postischemic period have effectively decreased the degree of renal insufficiency as measured by the peak serum creatinine and has hastened renal recovery as measured by the duration of time required to return the baseline serum creatinine values. A similarly efficacious role for hepatocyte growth factor has also been recently demonstrated.

  14. Continuous monitoring of dough fermentation and bread baking by magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bajd, Franci; Serša, Igor

    2011-04-01

    The consumer quality of baked products is closely related with dough structure properties. These are developed during dough fermentation and finalized during its baking. In this study, magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) was employed in a study of dough fermentation and baking. A small hot air oven was installed inside a 2.35-T horizontal bore superconducting magnet. Four different samples of commercial bread mixes for home baking were used to prepare small samples of dough that were inserted in the oven and allowed to rise at 33 °C for 112 min; this was followed by baking at 180 °C for 49 min. The entire process was followed by dynamic T(1)-weighted 3D magnetic resonance imaging with 7 min of temporal resolution and 0.23×0.23×1.5 mm(3) of spatial resolution. Acquired images were analyzed to determine time courses of dough pore distribution, dough volume and bread crust thickness. Image analysis showed that both the number of dough pores and the normalized dough volume increased in a sigmoid-like fashion during fermentation and decreased during baking due to the bread crust formation. The presented magnetic resonance method was found to be efficient in analysis of dough structure properties and in discrimination between different dough types.

  15. Discovery of 34gmCl(p, γ)35Ar Resonances Relevant for Classical Nova Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Cathleen; Wrede, Christopher; Bishop, Shawn; Brown, B. Alex; Chen, Alan A.; Faestermann, Thomas; Hertenberger, Ralf; Parikh, Anuj; Pérez-Loureiro, David; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Garcia, Alejandro; Ortez, Ronaldo

    Sulfur isotopic ratios have the potential to distinguish presolar grains of classical novae and type II supernovae origin. The current lack of experimentally determined 34g,mCl(p, γ)35Ar reaction rates leads to large uncertainties in the production of 34S in oxygen-neon classical nova models. As a first step toward determining these reaction rates, we have measured 35Ar resonances up to 800 keV above the 35Ar proton emission threshold. These resonances were populated using the 36Ar(d, t)35Ar reaction, and the tritons were momentum analyzed by a high resolution quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole (Q3D) magnetic spectrograph. Seventeen new 35Ar levels have been discovered, and uncertainties associated with the energies of the five previously known levels have been substantially reduced. Experimental level densities were then compared to calculated level densities, using the WBMB Hamiltonian within the sd-pf model space. This comparison indicates that most of the expected resonances in this region have been observed.

  16. MD CT Angiography and MR Angiography of Nonatherosclerotic Renal Artery Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Flors, Lucia; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Ahmad, Ehab Ali; Norton, Patrick T.; Turba, Ulku C.; Bozlar, Ugur; Hagspiel, Klaus D.

    2011-12-15

    We reviewed the computed tomographic and magnetic resonance angiographic appearances of the various nonatherosclerotic renal artery pathologies. Rapid progress in cross-sectional techniques has allowed computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography to replace digital subtraction angiography in most circumstances. When state-of-the-art equipment and optimized protocols are used, diagnosing a wide range of nonatherosclerotic pathologies is possible.

  17. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  18. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Krapf R, Seldin DW, Alpern RJ. Clinical syndromes of metabolic acidosis. In: Alpern RJ, Caplan M, Moe OW, ... 529. Read More Distal renal tubular acidosis Fanconi syndrome Low potassium level Metabolic acidosis Osteomalacia Respiratory acidosis Rickets Review Date 10/ ...

  19. Renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, J C

    1983-03-01

    In the past decade major advances in our understanding of renal tubular hydrogen ion secretion and bicarbonate reabsorption have provided new insight into the pathophysiology of renal tubular acidosis. Thus "fragment to fragment clings" and the number of disorders categorized within the syndrome grows, until we have come to know and name four types, with many subtypes. We hope this new perspective provides a basis for the physician to recognize renal tubular acidosis in its several forms so that an informed decision may be arrived at in choosing the best therapy. The physician may also be prepared to reasonably project the prognosis for each patient. We also hope that our detailed examination of renal acidification will provide a reference for delineation of new clinical expressions of acid-base disorders and kidney malfunction certain to be described in the years ahead.

  20. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  1. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  2. Renal mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNA(LEU) mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized.

  3. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  4. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney infection (pyelonephritis) Kidney transplant rejection Sickle cell anemia , a common cause of renal papillary necrosis in ... Controlling diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To ... provider's instructions when using medicines, including over- ...

  5. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  6. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  7. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  8. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  9. Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Marc; Moshfegh, Amiel; Talenfeld, Adam; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    In light of evidence linking radical nephrectomy and consequent suboptimal renal function to adverse cardiovascular events and increased mortality, research into nephron-sparing techniques for renal masses widely expanded in the past two decades. The American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines now explicitly list partial nephrectomy as the standard of care for the management of T1a renal tumors. Because of the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, up to 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more amenable to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. Cryosurgery has emerged as a leading option for renal ablation, and compared with surgical techniques it offers benefits in preserving renal function with fewer complications, shorter hospitalization times, and allows for quicker convalescence. A mature dataset exists at this time, with intermediate and long-term follow-up data available. Cryosurgical recommendations as a first-line therapy are made at this time in limited populations, including elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, and those with a solitary kidney. As more data emerge on oncologic efficacy, and technical experience and the technology continue to improve, the application of this modality will likely be extended in future treatment guidelines. PMID:24596441

  10. Cryoglobulinemia and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Charles E; Smith, Kelly D

    2008-05-01

    Cryoglobulinemia occurs in a variety of clinical settings including lymphoproliferative disorders, infection and autoimmune disease. The worldwide pandemic of hepatitis C virus infection has resulted in a significant increase in its extrahepatic complications including cryoglobulinemia and renal disease. Here we review the types of cryoglobulins, mechanisms of cryoglobulin formation, links between hepatitis C virus and renal disease, and current approaches to therapy. The prevalence of cryoglobulinemia in hepatitis C virus-infected individuals is surprisingly large and may be found in more than 50% of some infected subpopulations. Most of these patients will not have overt renal disease, but there is a population of unknown size of patients with subclinical glomerular disease that has the potential to become clinically significant. In cases of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemia, treatment remains focused on eradication of viremia, but interventions directed at B lymphocytes are increasingly utilized. The mechanisms of cryoglobulin formation and renal injury remain largely obscure, but recent evidence implicates the innate immune system in the initiation of disease. The most common renal injury associated with hepatitis C virus infection, in patients both with and without evidence of cryoglobulinemia, is membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. There has been increasing focus on defining the mechanisms that link these processes and the evolution of renal injury in all clinical settings of cryoglobulinemia.

  11. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A biphasic parameter estimation method for quantitative analysis of dynamic renal scintigraphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, T. S.; Zhang, Jeff L.; Ong, C. K.; Shuter, B.

    2006-06-01

    Dynamic renal scintigraphy is an established method in nuclear medicine, commonly used for the assessment of renal function. In this paper, a biphasic model fitting method is proposed for simultaneous estimation of both vascular and parenchymal parameters from renal scintigraphic data. These parameters include the renal plasma flow, vascular and parenchymal mean transit times, and the glomerular extraction rate. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the stability and confidence of the parameter estimates obtained by the proposed biphasic method, before applying the method on actual patient study cases to compare with the conventional fitting approach and other established renal indices. The various parameter estimates obtained using the proposed method were found to be consistent with the respective pathologies of the study cases. The renal plasma flow and extraction rate estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those previously obtained using dynamic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Therapeutic effects of renal denervation on renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is increased in both patients and experimental animals with renal failure. The kidney is a richly innervated organ and has both efferent and afferent nerves. Renal denervation shows protective effects against renal failure in both animals and humans. The underlying mechanisms include a decrease in blood pressure, a decrease in renal efferent SNA, a decrease in central SNA and sympathetic outflow, and downregulation of the reninangiotensin system. It has been demonstrated that re-innervation occurs within weeks after renal denervation in animals but that no functional re-innervation occurs in humans for over two years after denervation. Renal denervation might not be renal protective in some situations including bile duct ligation-induced renal failure and ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter-based renal denervation has been applied to patients with both early and end stage renal failure and the published results so far suggest that this procedure is safe and effective at decreasing blood pressure. The effectiveness of renal denervation in improving renal function in patients with renal failure needs to be further investigated.

  14. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  15. Multiquark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  16. Multiquark resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  17. Feature Selection in Order to Extract Multiple Sclerosis Lesions Automatically in 3D Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Combination of Support Vector Machine and Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Khotanlou, Hassan; Afrasiabi, Mahlagha

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new feature selection approach for automatically extracting multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. Presented method is applicable to different types of MS lesions. In this method, T1, T2, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images are firstly preprocessed. In the next phase, effective features to extract MS lesions are selected by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The fitness function of the GA is the Similarity Index (SI) of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The results obtained on different types of lesions have been evaluated by comparison with manual segmentations. This algorithm is evaluated on 15 real 3D MR images using several measures. As a result, the SI between MS regions determined by the proposed method and radiologists was 87% on average. Experiments and comparisons with other methods show the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:23724371

  18. [Hereditary renal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ortega, Julián; Olivier, Carlos; Pérez Segura, Pedro; Galante Romo, Isabel; San José Mansó, Luis; Saez, Mamen

    2009-02-01

    Kidney cancer is the tenth most common cause of cancer death. There are a growing number of genes known to be associated with an increased risk of specific types of kidney cancer. People with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome have about a 40% risk of developing multiple bilateral clear cell kidney cancers. They can also develop retinal and brain hemangioblastoma, kidneys or pancreas cysts, pheochromocytoma and endolymphatic sac tumor. Four phenotypes with different renal cancer and pheocromocitoma risk have been described depending on the germline mutation. Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma syndrome has type 1 papillary renal cell carcinomas associated with protooncogene c-MET germline mutations. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome has FLCN gene mutations associated with fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts with a high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax, and a 15% to 30% risk of kidney cancer (most classified as chromophobe carcinoma, oncocytoma or oncocytic hybrid, but clear cell and papillary kidney cancers have also been reported). Histopathological findings such as oncocytosis and oncocytic hybrids are very unusual outside the syndrome. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome shows mutations of Fumarate hydratase gene and cutaneous leiomyomata in 76% of affected individuals, uterine leiomyomata in 100% of females, and unilateral, solitary, and aggressive papillary renal cancer in 10 to 16% of patients. A specific histopathological change is eosinophilic prominent nucleoli with a perinucleolar halo. Tuberous sclerosis complex is one of the most prevalent (1/5.800) hereditary syndromes where renal disease is the second leading cause of death, associated with angiomyolipomas (70%), renal cysts, oncocytomas or clear cell cancer.

  19. Update on Renal Mass Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Renal masses are diagnosed with an increasing frequency. However, a significant proportion of these masses are benign, and the majority of malignant tumors are biologically indolent. Furthermore, renal tumors are often harbored by the elderly and comorbid patients. As such, matching of renal tumor biology to appropriate treatment intensity is an urgent clinical need. Renal mass biopsy is currently a very useful clinical tool that can assist with critical clinical decision-making in patients with renal mass. Yet, renal mass biopsy is associated with limitations and, as such, may not be appropriate for all patients.

  20. Malignant renal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Renal malignancies are common in children. While the majority of malignant renal masses are secondary to Wilms tumor, it can be challenging to distinguish from more aggressive renal masses. For suspicious renal lesions, it is crucial to ensure prompt diagnosis in order to select the appropriate surgical procedure and treatment. This review article will discuss the common differential diagnosis that can be encountered when evaluating a suspicious renal mass in the pediatric population. This includes clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, malignant rhabdoid tumor, renal medullary carcinoma and lymphoma. PMID:28326263

  1. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  2. Renal masses in children. An integrated imaging approach to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, B.J.; Gainey, M.A.; Faerber, E.N.; Capitanio, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    In view of the continuing technologic advancements in the development and availability of diagnostic imaging modalities, it is appropriate to assess periodically the currently accepted approaches to the evaluation of renal masses in children. The roles, advantages, and disadvantages of plain film, intravenous urography, ultrasonography, radionuclide scintigraphy, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the approach to the evaluation of renal masses in children are discussed. An integrated imaging approach that provides the most accurate and necessary information for diagnosis and treatment is recommended. 70 references.

  3. Simple renal cyst and renal dysfunction: A pilot study using dimercaptosuccinic acid renal Scan.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taekmin; Lim, Bumjin; You, Dalsan; Hong, Bumsik; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jeong, In Gab

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the association between renal cyst and renal dysfunction. We evaluated the deterioration of renal function in patients with unilateral, large, simple renal cysts. Fifty patients with unilateral, simple renal cysts measuring ≥ 4 cm (cyst group) and 50 kidney donors (control group) were enrolled. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scans were performed to calculate split renal function. The differences between split renal function were calculated and compared. Clinical factors affecting decreased renal function in the cyst group were assessed. The mean age of the patients in the cyst group was higher than the control group (59.1 vs 39.2 years; P = 0.001). Patients with renal cysts tended to be diagnosed with hypertension (P = 0.001), However, the two groups did not significantly differ in terms of the other characteristics. The median cyst size was 7.2 cm (range, 4.5-14.2), and 31 of the 50 patients (60.2%) in the cyst group demonstrated decreased renal function in the cystic kidney units (median: 5.8%; range, 0.2-33). Although there were no differences in split renal function (50.1% vs 49.9%; P = 0.629) in the control group, the relative renal function of the cystic kidney units were significantly lower than the contralateral kidney units in the cyst group (48.3% vs 51.7%; P = 0.001). The decrease in relative renal function (>8%) in the cystic kidney units was associated with a higher serum uric acid levels and higher RENAL complexity (P = 0.035 and P = 0.007, respectively). A significant proportion of unilateral, large, simple renal cysts are associated with decreased relative renal function on DMSA renal scans. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  4. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  5. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  6. Renal physiology of nocturia.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-04-01

    Renal function, diurnal fluctuations in arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, sex, and advanced age affect urine formation and may contribute to nocturia. Renal effects of AVP are mediated by AVP V2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct. Changes in AVP concentration have the greatest relative effects on urine volume when AVP levels are low; therefore small changes can have a large effect on renal water excretion. AVP is the major regulator of water excretion by the kidneys, and AVP levels have been shown to affect nocturnal voiding. Results of several studies show that patients with nocturia had no significant variation in plasma AVP, whereas patients without nocturia had significant diurnal variation in plasma AVP. The V2 receptor gene is located on the X chromosome, which has important sex-specific consequences. For example, mutations in the V2 gene can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, predominantly in men. Age-related changes in water metabolism are associated with overall body composition, kidney, and brain. Older people generally experience decreased extracellular fluid and plasma volume, which leads to increased adverse consequences from net body water gain or loss. Renal function declines with age, and the ability to concentrate urine and conserve sodium is reduced in the elderly. Thirst perception is also decreased in the elderly, who, compared with younger people, tend to hypersecrete AVP in response to higher plasma osmolality, possibly resulting in hyponatremia. These aspects of renal physiology should be considered when antidiuretic drugs are prescribed for the treatment of nocturia.

  7. Percutaneous renal tumour biopsy.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Martignoni, Guido; Srigley, John R; Evans, Andrew J; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The use of percutaneous renal tumour biopsy (RTB) as a diagnostic tool for the histological characterization of renal masses has increased dramatically within the last 30 years. This increased utilization has paralleled advances in imaging techniques and an evolving knowledge of the clinical value of nephron sparing surgery. Improved biopsy techniques using image guidance, coupled with the use of smaller gauge needles has led to a decrease in complication rates. Reports from series containing a large number of cases have shown the non-diagnostic rate of RTB to range from 4% to 21%. Re-biopsy has been shown to reduce this rate, while the use of molecular markers further improves diagnostic sensitivity. In parallel with refinements of the biopsy procedure, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of renal cell neoplasia. The 2013 Vancouver Classification is the current classification for renal tumours, and contains five additional entities recognized as novel forms of renal malignancy. The diagnosis of tumour morphotype on RTB is usually achievable on routine histology; however, immunohistochemical studies may be of assistance in difficult cases. The morphology of the main tumour subtypes, based upon the Vancouver Classification, is described and differentiating features are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  9. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  10. Management of incidental renal masses: Time to consider contrast-enhanced ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Di Vece, Francesca; Tombesi, Paola; Ermili, Francesca; Sartori, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Proliferation of imaging studies for different clinical purposes and continuous improvement of imaging technology have led to an increasing number of incidental findings of renal masses. It is estimated that over 50% of patients older than 50 years have at least one renal mass. The majority of incidental renal masses are simple cysts that can be easily diagnosed by conventional ultrasonography. However, some incidental renal masses are not simple cysts, and differentiation between benign and malignant entities requires further imaging modalities. In the past, multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were considered the primary imaging modalities used to characterize and stage complex cystic and solid renal lesions. Currently, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography represents a novel alternative to contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography employs microbubble contrast agents that allow the study of different enhancement phases of the kidney without risk of nephrotoxicity and radiation exposure. The diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in the characterization of complex renal cysts is comparable to that of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and several studies have demonstrated its reliability also in identifying solid lesions such as pseudotumors, typical angiomyolipomas, and clear cell renal carcinomas. Considering the high incidence of incidental renal masses and the need for rapid and reliable diagnosis, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography could be proposed as the first step in the diagnostic work-up of renal masses because of its safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, we propose a diagnostic algorithm for the characterization of cystic and solid renal masses.

  11. Homocysteine in Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yanjun; Nie, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Homocysteine (Hcy) is an intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) can result from a deficiency in the enzymes or vitamin cofactors required for Hcy metabolism. Patients with renal disease tend to be hyperhomocysteinemic, particularly as renal function declines, although the underlying cause of HHcy in renal disease is not entirely understood. Summary HHcy is considered a risk or pathogenic factor in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as well as the cardiovascular complications. Key Messages In this review, we summarize both clinical and experimental findings that reveal the contribution of Hcy as a pathogenic factor to the development of CKD. In addition, we discuss several important mechanisms mediating the pathogenic action of Hcy in the kidney, such as local oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation and hypomethylation. PMID:27536696

  12. Genetics Home Reference: renal hypouricemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal hypouricemia renal hypouricemia Enable ...

  13. Renal involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J; Cervera, Ricard

    2014-02-01

    Renal involvement can be a serious problem for patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, this complication has been poorly recognized and studied. It can be present in patients who have either primary or systemic lupus erythematosus-associated APS. Clinical and laboratory features of renal involvement in APS include hypertension, hematuria, acute renal failure, and progressive chronic renal insufficiency with mild levels of proteinuria that can progress to nephrotic-range proteinuria. The main lesions are renal artery stenosis, venous renal thrombosis, and glomerular lesions (APS nephropathy) that may be acute (thrombotic microangiopathy) and/or chronic (arteriosclerosis, arterial fibrous intimal hyperplasia, tubular thyroidization, arteriolar occlusions, and focal cortical atrophy). APS can also cause end-stage renal disease and allograft vascular thrombosis. This article reviews the range of renal abnormalities associated with APS, and their diagnosis and treatment options.

  14. Changes of renal sinus fat and renal parenchymal fat during an 18-month randomized weight loss trial.

    PubMed

    Zelicha, Hila; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Shelef, Ilan; Gepner, Yftach; Tsaban, Gal; Tene, Lilac; Yaskolka Meir, Anat; Bilitzky, Avital; Komy, Oded; Cohen, Noa; Bril, Nitzan; Rein, Michal; Serfaty, Dana; Kenigsbuch, Shira; Chassidim, Yoash; Sarusi, Benjamin; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Haviv, Yosef S; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2017-05-02

    Data regarding the role of kidney adiposity, its clinical implications, and its dynamics during weight-loss are sparse. We investigated the effect of long-term weight-loss induced intervention diets on dynamics of renal-sinus-fat, an ectopic fat depot, and %renal-parenchymal-fat, lipid accumulation within the renal parenchyma. We randomized 278 participants with abdominal obesity/dyslipidemia to low-fat or Mediterranean/low-carbohydrate diets, with or without exercise. We quantified renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat by whole body magnetic-resonance-imaging. Participants (age = 48 years; 89% men; body-mass-index = 31 kg/m(2)) had 86% retention to the trial after 18 months. Both increased renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat were directly associated with hypertension, and with higher abdominal deep-subcutaneous-adipose-tissue and visceral-adipose-tissue (p of trend < 0.05 for all) after adjustment for body weight. Higher renal-sinus-fat was associated with lower estimated-glomerular-filtration-rate and with higher microalbuminuria and %HbA1C beyond body weight. After 18 months of intervention, overall renal-sinus-fat (-9%; p < 0.05 vs. baseline) but not %renal-parenchymal-fat (-1.7%; p = 0.13 vs. baseline) significantly decreased, and similarly across the intervention groups. Renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat changes were correlated with weight-loss per-se (p < 0.05). In a model adjusted for age, sex, and visceral-adipose-tissue changes, 18 months reduction in renal-sinus-fat associated with decreased pancreatic, hepatic and cardiac fats (p < 0.05 for all) and with decreased cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) (β = 0.13; p = 0.05), triglycerides/HDL-c (β = 0.13; p = 0.05), insulin (β = 0.12; p = 0.05) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (β = 0.24; p = 0.001), but not with improved renal function parameters or blood pressure. Decreased intake of sodium was associated with a reduction in

  15. Renal Artery Stent Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Cooper, Christopher J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Pencina, Karol M.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Massaro, Joseph; Henrich, William; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple randomized clinical trials comparing renal artery stent placement plus medical therapy with medical therapy alone have not shown any benefit of stent placement. However, debate continues whether patients with extreme pressure gradients, stenosis severity, or baseline blood pressure benefit from stent revascularization. OBJECTIVES The study sought to test the hypothesis that pressure gradients, stenosis severity, and/or baseline blood pressure affects outcomes after renal artery stent placement. METHODS Using data from 947 patients with a history of hypertension or chronic kidney disease from the largest randomized trial of renal artery stent placement, the CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) study, we performed exploratory analyses to determine if subsets of patients experienced better outcomes after stent placement than the overall cohort. We examined baseline stenosis severity, systolic blood pressure, and translesion pressure gradient (peak systolic and mean) and performed interaction tests and Cox proportional hazards analyses for the occurrence of the primary endpoint through all follow-up, to examine the effect of these variables on outcomes by treatment group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes based on the examined variables nor were there any consistent nonsignificant trends. CONCLUSIONS Based on data from the CORAL randomized trial, there is no evidence of a significant treatment effect of the renal artery stent procedure compared with medical therapy alone based on stenosis severity, level of systolic blood pressure elevation, or according to the magnitude of the transstenotic pressure gradient. (Benefits of Medical Therapy Plus Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions [CORAL]; NCT00081731) PMID:26653621

  16. [Renal duplex: clinical usefulness].

    PubMed

    Miralles, M; Giménez, A; Cairols, M A; Riambau, V; Sáez, A

    1993-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to focus attention on the clinical usefulness of Renal Duplex for the diagnosis of patients with vasculo-renal diseases in terms of: 1. Accuracy of Duplex/Angiography in the measurement of the renal stenosis degree. 2. Correlationship between Duplex ans Isotopic Renogram with respect to the study of the parenchyma's perfusion. 3. The effect of the inhibitors of the conversor enzyme (Captopril) on the Doppler signal of the parenchyma, comparing it with the results from the captopril test about the peripheral plasmatic renin activity and the isotopic renogram, in patients with vasculo-renal HTA. Results obtains by Duplex and Angiography were compared in 92 renal arteries from 46 patients. For both technics, three degrees of stenosis were established: 0-59%, 60-99% and occlusion. The Duplex technique identified 49/54 stenosis < 60%, 28/33 stenosis > 60% and 5/5 occlusions (Kappa 0.8). Sensibility and specificity of Duplex for the diagnosis of stenosis > 60% were, respectively, 89.5% and 90.7%; with an exactness of 90.2%. The angiographies showed stenosis > 60% in 23 patients with HTA (diastolic pressures > 100 mmHg). In all of the patients, a measurement of the plasmatic renin activity, an isotopic renogram and a Doppler of the interlobar arteries basal and post-captopril, were performed. The correlationship between Duplex and isotopic renogram with respect to the measurement of the relative renal perfusion was statistically significant (r = 0.91; p < 0.0001). The captopril test for renin and isotopic renogram were positives for 5 patients (4 with unilateral stenosis an 1 with bilateral stenosis). All of them showed severe stenosis (> 80%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  18. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  19. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  20. Renal adaptation during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Jani, Alkesh; Martin, Sandra L; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-12-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation.

  1. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  2. Pediatric Renal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Sarangarajan

    2009-03-01

    Renal tumors in childhood consist of a diverse group of tumors ranging from the most common Wilms' tumor, to the uncommon and often fatal rhabdoid tumor. Diagnosis is based on morphologic features and aided by ancillary techniques such as immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics. Molecular techniques have helped identify a group of pediatric renal cell carcinomas that have specific translocations, called translocation-associated carcinomas. Differential diagnosis of the various tumors is discussed. Pathogenesis and nephroblastomatosis, the precursor lesions of Wilms tumor, also are discussed briefly, as are the handling of these tumor specimens and prognostic factors. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Amphibian renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Amphibians by nature have an intimate connection with the aquatic environment at some stage of development and fight an osmotic battle due to the influx of water. Many amphibians have acquired a more terrestrial existence at later stages of development and consequently have physiologic adaptations to conserve moisture. Renal adaptations have allowed amphibians successfully to bridge the gap between aqueous and terrestrial habitats. The kidneys, skin,and, in many amphibian species, the urinary bladder play key roles in fluid homeostasis. Renal impairment may be responsible for the clinical manifestation of disease, morbidity, and mortality.

  4. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  5. Renal lithiasis and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Costa-Bauza, Antonia; Prieto, Rafel M

    2006-01-01

    Renal lithiasis is a multifactorial disease. An important number of etiologic factors can be adequately modified trough diet, since it must be considered that the urine composition is directly related to diet. In fact, the change of inappropriate habitual diet patterns should be the main measure to prevent kidney stones. In this paper, the relation between different dietary factors (liquid intake, pH, calcium, phosphate, oxalate, citrate, phytate, urate and vitamins) and each type of renal stone (calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary, calcium oxalate monohydrate unattached, calcium oxalate dihydrate, calcium oxalate dihydrate/hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, struvite infectious, brushite, uric acid, calcium oxalate/uric acid and cystine) is discussed. PMID:16956397

  6. Obesity and renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Asma; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Marrakchi, Raja; El Gaaied, Amel; Kourda, Nadia; Derouiche, Amine; Chebil, Mohamed; Caignard, Anne; Perier, Aurélie

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies link obesity, as measured by increased body mass index (BMI) to the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well as to the cancer-related mortality of RCC patients. RCC is the third cancer most robustly associated with increased BMI. Understanding the role of the adipose tissue in renal carcinogenesis is therefore of major importance for the development of novel paradigms of RCC prevention and treatment. Here, we discuss the current knowledge on the impact of obesity on the development and progression of RCC as well as the role of adipose tissue-derived hormones (adipokines) in the conflict between growing tumors and the immune system. PMID:24804162

  7. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  9. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jalil, Jawad; Basheer, Faisal; Shafique, Mobeen

    2014-05-01

    The association of branchial arch anomalies (branchial cysts, branchial fistulas), hearing loss and renal anomalies constitutes the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome also known as Melnick Fraser syndrome. We present a case of this rare disorder in a girl child who presented with profound deafness, preauricular pits, branchial sinuses and renal hypoplasia.

  10. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  11. Renal diagnosis without renal biopsy. Nephritis and sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D; Shires, M; Davison, A M

    2001-06-01

    Two examples of hereditary nephropathy within the context of clinical syndromes are described. Emphasis is put on the ability to make a renal diagnosis without renal biopsy and the benefits of screening relatives once a diagnosis is achieved. A variant of Alport's syndrome with associated macrothrombocytic thrombocytopenia, known as Epstein's syndrome, is reported. In addition siblings with Alström's syndrome characterized by pigmentary retinal degeneration (causing blindness in early childhood), progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive renal failure are reported. Both cases had previously presented for non-renal pathology in advance of the onset of symptomatic renal failure and may have benefited from appropriate screening.

  12. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Renal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bindroo, Sandiya; Varshney, Neha; Mittal, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma of the kidney is a rare entity with less than one hundred cases reported so far. It was previously considered to have some similarities to various other renal cancers although this tumor has distinct macroscopic, microscopic and immuno-histochemical features. It is now a well-established entity in renal neoplastic pathology and has been recognized as a distinct entity in the 2012 Vancouver classification of renal tumors. This review aims to give an overview of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma after extensive literature search using PubMed and CrossRef.

  13. How reliable is routine lumbar spine MRI for detection of renal cysts? Correlation with abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Woo; Lee, Young Han; Chung, Soo Yoon; Park, Jin-Oh; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-04-01

    Incidental renal cysts are a very common finding in routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there is no report of the renal cyst detection rate on routine lumbar spine MRI. To determine the renal cyst detection rate in routine lumbar spine MRI based on findings of abdominal computed tomography (CT), and to investigate if the largest renal cyst seen by abdominal CT could be also detected by routine lumbar spine MRI. A retrospective study was conducted of 70 patients who underwent both routine lumbar spine MRI and abdominal CT between December 2011 and January 2014. The detection rate of all renal cysts>5 mm as well as the largest renal cyst seen by abdominal CT were assessed in routine lumbar spine MRI. On routine lumbar spine MRI, the detection rate of renal cysts was 46.5% (73/157) for>5-mm renal cysts and 68.0% (34/50) for>10-mm renal cysts, correlating with abdominal CT. The detection rate of the largest renal cyst seen by abdominal CT was 60.0% (27/45). Non-detection of the largest renal cyst could be caused by upper positioning (n = 7), lateral positioning (n = 6), or relatively small cyst size (n = 5). Approximately half of renal cysts>5 mm and two-thirds of renal cysts>10 mm were detected on routine lumbar spine MRI. However, radiologists should be aware that kidney lesions may not be included in the scan coverage of routine lumbar spine MRI. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  14. Imaging the renal mass: a historical review.

    PubMed

    McClennan, Bruce L

    2014-11-01

    A matter of months after Roentgen's landmark discovery in 1895, Roentgen's rays were focused on diseases and disorders of the urinary tract, specifically the kidney. At the dawn of the 20th century, urologists in the United States and around the world quickly recognized that by using a variety of metal stylets and radiopaque contrast agents, such as silver salts, the upper urinary tract, namely the ureter, pelvis, and calyces, could be depicted with radiography. Renal cysts and tumors were diagnosed on the basis of deformities in the kidney. Retrograde pyelography dominated the imaging evaluation of the kidney until the discovery of a safe intravenous method for urinary tract imaging (ie, intravenous pyelography). Pioneers and pathfinders in the field of contrast media development and radiologic procedures helped give radiologists the lead role in the work-up of renal masses, an area where urologists once held forth. The subspecialty of uroradiology was born in the middle of the 20th century. Intravenous urography, nephrotomography, and diagnostic angiography with pharmacologic manipulation followed by cyst or mass puncture and biopsy yielded unrivaled specificity for the diagnosis and staging of benign and malignant renal masses. The advent of cross-sectional and multiplanar imaging and the profound effects they had and continue to have on the discovery and characterization of renal masses has been detailed in the pages of Radiology since the 1920s. Ultrasonography, nuclear imaging, computed tomographic scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography each have made a claim to a part of the imaging algorithm of modern uroradiologic practice.

  15. Management of Renal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. Methods: A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Results: Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy. PMID:25848184

  16. Management of renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Bas, Okan; Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy.

  17. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ureter (s) or a tube connected to an external drainage bag. Both options are used to unblock the ureters in order to allow proper urine flow from the kidneys if this has been identified as the cause for the renal failure. Surgical treatment such as a urinary stent or ...

  18. Scleroderma Renal Crisis.

    PubMed

    Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2015-08-01

    Scleroderma renal crisis is a rare complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc) that remains severe. Prompt recognition and initiation of therapy with an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor offer the best chance to achieve a good outcome. SSc prevalence is poorly known, with disparities among countries.

  19. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  20. Bosniak classification for complex renal cysts: history and critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Muglia, Valdair F.; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Bosniak classification for renal cysts was developed in the late 1980s in an attempt to standardize the description and management of complex cystic renal lesions. Alterations were made to such a classification in the 1990s and, the last one, in 2005. Currently, five categories of cystic renal lesions are defined - namely, I, II, II-F, III and IV –, according to their degree of complexity and likelihood of malignancy. Despite being initially described for computed tomography, this classification has been also utilized with some advantages also for magnetic resonance imaging. The present article reviews the different phases of this classification, its diagnostic efficacy and the most controversial features of its use. PMID:25741120

  1. Bosniak classification for complex renal cysts: history and critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Bosniak classification for renal cysts was developed in the late 1980s in an attempt to standardize the description and management of complex cystic renal lesions. Alterations were made to such a classification in the 1990s and, the last one, in 2005. Currently, five categories of cystic renal lesions are defined - namely, I, II, II-F, III and IV -, according to their degree of complexity and likelihood of malignancy. Despite being initially described for computed tomography, this classification has been also utilized with some advantages also for magnetic resonance imaging. The present article reviews the different phases of this classification, its diagnostic efficacy and the most controversial features of its use.

  2. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  3. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  4. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  5. Functional renal imaging: new trends in radiology and nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Durand, Emmanuel; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Grenier, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the characteristics of various techniques for functional renal imaging, with a focus on nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Even with low spatial resolution and rather poor signal-to-noise ratio, classical nuclear medicine has the advantage of linearity and good sensitivity. It remains the gold standard technique for renal relative functional assessment. Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled diethylenetriamine penta-acetate remains the reference glomerular tracer. Tubular tracers have been improved: (123)I- or (131)I-hippuran, (99m)Tc-MAG3 and, recently, (99m)Tc-nitrilotriacetic acid. However, advancement in molecular imaging has not produced a groundbreaking tracer. Renal magnetic resonance imaging with classical gadolinated tracers probably has potential in this domain but has a lack of linearity and, therefore, its value still needs evaluation. Moreover, the advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has delayed its expansion. Other developments, such as diffusion or blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, may have a role in the future. The other modalities have a limited role in clinical practice for functional renal imaging.

  6. Transarterial embolization for serious renal hemorrhage following renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Liu, Guihua; Sun, Xiangzhou; Zhuang, Wenquan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Wenbo; Yang, Jianyong; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous transarterial embolization for the treatment of serious renal hemorrhage after renal biopsy. Nine patients with renal hemorrhage had frank pain and gross hematuria as main symptoms after renal biopsy. Intrarenal arterial injuries and perinephric hematoma were confirmed by angiography in all cases. The arterial injuries led to two types of renal hemorrhage, Type I: severe renal injure or intrarenal renal artery rupture (n=5), with contrast medium spilling out of the artery and spreading into renal pelvis or kidney capsule in angiography; Type II, pseudo aneurysm or potential risk of intrarenal artery injure (n=4), where contrast medium that spilled out of intraartery was retained in the parenchyma as little spots less than 5 mm in diameter in angiography. Transcatheter superselective intrarenal artery embolization was performed with coils or microcoils (Type I intrarenal artery injure) and polyvinyl alcohol particles (Type II injure). The intrarenal arterial injuries were occluded successfully in all patients. Light or mild back or abdominal pain in the side of the embolized kidney was found in three patients following embolization procedures and disappeared 3 days later. Serum creatinine and perinephric hematoma were stable, and gross hematuresis stopped immediately (n=4) or 3-5 days (n=3) after embolization. In conclusions, transcatheter superselective intrarenal artery embolization as a minimally invasive therapy is safe and effective for treatment of serious renal hemorrhage following percutaneous renal biopsy.

  7. Relationship between renal function and renal volume in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sánchez, M J; Ávila-Barranco, E; Esteban de la Rosa, R J; Fernández-Castillo, R; Esteban, M A; Carrero, J J; García-Valverde, M; Bravo-Soto, J A

    2016-03-01

    To determine in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease the relationship between total renal volume (the sum of both kidneys, TRV) as measured by magnetic resonance and renal function; and its behaviour according to sex and the presence of arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and hyperglycemia. Cross-sectional study including patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who underwent periodic reviews at Nephrology external consultations at Hospital de las Nieves de Granada, and who underwent an magnetic resonance to estimate renal volume between January 2008 and March 2011. We evaluated 67 patients (59.7% women, average age of 48±14.4 years) and found a significant positive association between TRV and serum creatinine or urea, which was reversed compared with estimated glomerular filtration by MDRD-4 and Cockcroft-Gault. Women showed an average serum creatinine level and a significantly lower TRV level compared with males. Subgroups affected by arterial hypertension and hyperuricemia presented average values for serum creatinine and urea, higher for TRV and lower for estimated glomerular filtration. The hypercholesterolaemia subgroup showed higher average values for urea and lower for estimated glomerular filtration, without detecting significant differences compared with TRV. The volume of polycystic kidneys measured by magnetic resonance is associated with renal function, and can be useful as a complementary study to monitor disease progression. The presence of arterial hypertension, hyperuricemia or hypercholesterolaemia is associated with a poorer renal function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. MR of superior mesenteric artery--renal vein fistula.

    PubMed

    Conces, D J; Kreipke, D L; Tarver, R D

    1986-01-01

    Traumatic arteriovenous fistulas involving the superior mesenteric artery are rare. Diagnosis is most commonly made shortly after the injury. Symptoms, when present, are usually related to intestinal ischemia. Angiography has been the conventional modality used in diagnosing arteriovenous fistulas. We report a patient with a superior mesenteric artery to left renal vein fistula who presented in overt heart failure five years after a gun shot wound. The fistula was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  10. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  11. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric kidney: benign and malignant masses.

    PubMed

    Gee, Michael S; Bittman, Mark; Epelman, Monica; Vargas, Sara O; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-11-01

    The differential diagnosis of renal masses in pediatric patients includes benign and malignant tumors, as well as nonneoplastic mass-like lesions mimicking tumors. Although the spectrum of renal masses in children has some overlap with that of adults, it is important to understand the renal pathologic processes specific to the pediatric population, as well as their characteristic imaging appearances and clinical presentations. This article reviews benign and malignant renal masses in children, with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging and clinical features that are specific to each lesion type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bilateral renal abscess in a previously healthy 11-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Saduf; Bolt, Roel

    2010-11-01

    Renal abscesses are infrequently encountered in children. We describe a girl diagnosed with bilateral renal abscess. Although ultrasonography and computerised tomography are used to establish the diagnosis, in our case magnetic resonance imaging proved to be a useful additional diagnostic method. Using percutaneous aspiration, we were able to establish the correct diagnosis and identify the causative micro-organism. The patient was successfully treated with a combined intravenous and oral course of antibiotics. In conclusion, renal abscesses can occur in children without a history of reflux or urinary tract infection; this should be kept in mind when evaluating a child with fever. In addition, full recovery can be achieved solely with antibiotics.

  14. A Literature Review of Renal Surgical Anatomy and Surgical Strategies for Partial Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Tobias; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gratzke, Christian; Kaouk, Jihad; Kutikov, Alexander; Macchi, Veronica; Mottrie, Alexandre; Porpiglia, Francesco; Porter, James; Rogers, Craig G; Russo, Paul; Thompson, R Houston; Uzzo, Robert G; Wood, Christopher G; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-12-01

    A detailed understanding of renal surgical anatomy is necessary to optimize preoperative planning and operative technique and provide a basis for improved outcomes. To evaluate the literature regarding pertinent surgical anatomy of the kidney and related structures, nephrometry scoring systems, and current surgical strategies for partial nephrectomy (PN). A literature review was conducted. Surgical renal anatomy fundamentally impacts PN surgery. The renal artery divides into anterior and posterior divisions, from which approximately five segmental terminal arteries originate. The renal veins are not terminal. Variations in the vascular and lymphatic channels are common; thus, concurrent lymphadenectomy is not routinely indicated during PN for cT1 renal masses in the setting of clinically negative lymph nodes. Renal-protocol contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is used for standard imaging. Anatomy-based nephrometry scoring systems allow standardized academic reporting of tumor characteristics and predict PN outcomes (complications, remnant function, possibly histology). Anatomy-based novel surgical approaches may reduce ischemic time during PN; these include early unclamping, segmental clamping, tumor-specific clamping (zero ischemia), and unclamped PN. Cancer cure after PN relies on complete resection, which can be achieved by thin margins. Post-PN renal function is impacted by kidney quality, remnant quantity, and ischemia type and duration. Surgical renal anatomy underpins imaging, nephrometry scoring systems, and vascular control techniques that reduce global renal ischemia and may impact post-PN function. A contemporary ideal PN excises the tumor with a thin negative margin, delicately secures the tumor bed to maximize vascularized remnant parenchyma, and minimizes global ischemia to the renal remnant with minimal complications. In this report we review renal surgical anatomy. Renal mass imaging allows detailed delineation of the

  15. A Literature Review of Renal Surgical Anatomy and Surgical Strategies for Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Tobias; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gratzke, Christian; Kaouk, Jihad; Kutikov, Alexander; Macchi, Veronica; Mottrie, Alexandre; Porpiglia, Francesco; Porter, James; Rogers, Craig G.; Russo, Paul; Thompson, R. Houston; Uzzo, Robert G.; Wood, Christopher G.; Gill, Inderbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Context A detailed understanding of renal surgical anatomy is necessary to optimize preoperative planning and operative technique and provide a basis for improved outcomes. Objective To evaluate the literature regarding pertinent surgical anatomy of the kidney and related structures, nephrometry scoring systems, and current surgical strategies for partial nephrectomy (PN). Evidence acquisition A literature review was conducted. Evidence synthesis Surgical renal anatomy fundamentally impacts PN surgery. The renal artery divides into anterior and posterior divisions, from which approximately five segmental terminal arteries originate. The renal veins are not terminal. Variations in the vascular and lymphatic channels are common; thus, concurrent lymphadenectomy is not routinely indicated during PN for cT1 renal masses in the setting of clinically negative lymph nodes. Renal-protocol contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is used for standard imaging. Anatomy-based nephrometry scoring systems allow standardized academic reporting of tumor characteristics and predict PN outcomes (complications, remnant function, possibly histology). Anatomy-based novel surgical approaches may reduce ischemic time during PN; these include early unclamping, segmental clamping, tumor-specific clamping (zero ischemia), and unclamped PN. Cancer cure after PN relies on complete resection, which can be achieved by thin margins. Post-PN renal function is impacted by kidney quality, remnant quantity, and ischemia type and duration. Conclusions Surgical renal anatomy underpins imaging, nephrometry scoring systems, and vascular control techniques that reduce global renal ischemia and may impact post-PN function. A contemporary ideal PN excises the tumor with a thin negative margin, delicately secures the tumor bed to maximize vascularized remnant parenchyma, and minimizes global ischemia to the renal remnant with minimal complications. Patient summary In this report

  16. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and a renal mass: renal cell carcinoma, renal tuberculosis, renal malakoplakia, or xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis?

    PubMed

    Chandrankunnel, Joseph; Cunha, Burke A; Petelin, Andrew; Katz, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Often patients with fevers of unknown origin (FUOs) present with loss of appetite, weight loss, and night sweats, without localizing signs. Some are found to have a renal mass during diagnostic evaluation. In patients with FUOs and a renal mass, the differential diagnosis includes renal tuberculosis, renal cell carcinoma (hypernephroma), renal malakoplakia, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. A 68-year-old woman presented with an FUO during her diagnostic workup. She manifested an irregularly enlarged kidney on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, as well as a highly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate of more than 100 mm/hour, an elevated serum ferritin level, and chronic thrombocytosis, which favored a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Renal malakoplakia and renal tuberculosis comprised further differential diagnostic considerations. Microscopic hematuria may be present with any of the disorders in the differential diagnosis, but was absent in this case. An abdominal CT scan was suggestive of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. Because of concerns regarding renal cell carcinoma, the patient received a nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis was of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, without renal cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural control of renal function.

    PubMed

    Johns, Edward J; Kopp, Ulla C; DiBona, Gerald F

    2011-04-01

    The kidney is innervated with efferent sympathetic nerve fibers that directly contact the vasculature, the renal tubules, and the juxtaglomerular granular cells. Via specific adrenoceptors, increased efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity decreases renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate, increases renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption, and increases renin release. Decreased efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity produces opposite functional responses. This integrated system contributes importantly to homeostatic regulation of sodium and water balance under physiological conditions and to pathological alterations in sodium and water balance in disease. The kidney contains afferent sensory nerve fibers that are located primarily in the renal pelvic wall where they sense stretch. Stretch activation of these afferent sensory nerve fibers elicits an inhibitory renorenal reflex response wherein the contralateral kidney exhibits a compensatory natriuresis and diuresis due to diminished efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. The renorenal reflex coordinates the excretory function of the two kidneys so as to facilitate homeostatic regulation of sodium and water balance. There is a negative feedback loop in which efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity facilitates increases in afferent renal nerve activity that in turn inhibit efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity so as to avoid excess renal sodium retention. In states of renal disease or injury, there is activation of afferent sensory nerve fibers that are excitatory, leading to increased peripheral sympathetic nerve activity, vasoconstriction, and increased arterial pressure. Proof of principle studies in essential hypertensive patients demonstrate that renal denervation produces sustained decreases in arterial pressure. © 2011 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 1:699-729, 2011.

  18. Management of renal angiomyolipoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J L; Hussain, S A; Riley, P; Wallace, D M A

    2003-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipomas are common in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), and the risk of severe haemorrhage from these angiomyolipomas can become substantial. This case illustrates a potentially life-threatening condition due to the development of a large aneurysm within an angiomyolipoma, which was discovered within 14 months of her screening renal ultrasound scan. Renal arterial embolisation and renal sparing surgery resulted in good recovery. Clear guidelines for the screening, surveillance, and treatment of angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC are required. This includes the appropriate frequency of surveillance for patients in different age groups and at different stages of angiomyolipoma development, based on a growing knowledge of the natural history of this condition, since growth of renal angiomyolipomas can be rapid and asymptomatic. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging may be required to demonstrate complications in large lesions, as three ultrasound examinations in this patient failed to detect the large aneurysm which had developed. Angiogenesis inhibitors could potentially play a role in preventing the development of angiomyolipomas, which could improve the prognosis for patients with TSC and therefore warrants investigation through phase II/III clinical trials.

  19. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  20. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively.

  1. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  2. Bilateral renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Sreenevasan, G

    1974-01-01

    Bilateral renal calculi were present in 114 (10.7%) of 1,070 cases of proved urinary calculus admitted to the Urological Department of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, during the period November 1968—May 1973. The management of bilateral renal calculi is discussed with reference to the first 100 cases in this series. The introduction of renography has greatly facilitated the decision as to which kidney should be operated on first. The management of patients with and without uraemia is discussed and the use of the modified V and V—Y incisions for the removal of staghorn calculi is described. Complications and results are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:4845653

  3. [Giant renal angiomyolipoma].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Fernández, G; Mansilla Roselló, A; Rubio Gil, F; Martínez Domínguez, A P; Villar Del Moral, J; Ferrón Orihuela, A

    2003-06-01

    We present a case report of a renal angiomyolipoma with the special feature of its big size at the moment of the diagnosis. It is appreciated an important alteration of the kidney morphology and the repercussion produced in the rest of the abdominal organs. Due to this an exeresis with nefrectomy is performed. We do a bibliographic review and we analyzed the relevant aspects of this tumour.

  4. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Bhadauria, Dharmendra

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23) and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body. PMID:23961477

  5. [Inherited tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hassan; Hayek, Donia; Nasr, Dhekra; Daudon, Michel; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a tubulopathy characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap secondary to abnormalities of renal acidification. RTA can be classified into four main subtypes: distal RTA, proximal RTA, combined proximal and distal RTA, and hyperkalemic RTA. Distal RTA (type 1) is caused by the defect of H(+) secretion in the distal tubules and is characterized by the inability to acidify the urine below pH 5.5 during systemic acidemia. Proximal RTA (type 2) is caused by an impairment of bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubules and characterized by a decreased renal bicarbonate threshold. Combined proximal and distal RTA (type 3) secondary to a reduction in tubular reclamation of bicarbonate and an inability to acidify the urine in the face of severe acidemia. Hyperkalemic RTA (type 4) may occur as a result of aldosterone deficiency or tubular insensitivity to aldosterone. Clinicians should be alert to the presence of RTA in patients with an unexplained normal anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, recurrent nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The mainstay of treatment of RTA remains alkali replacement.

  6. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  7. [Primary renal angiosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Costero-Barrios, Cesáreo B; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc

    2004-01-01

    The twenty-fourth case of primary renal angiosarcoma is described, according to the available international literature, this present in a 71-year-old male, a mechanic by trade, without carcinogenic antecedents. Hematuria, pain in flank, and left-side tumoral mass of approximately 20 cm in diameter located in kidney by computerized axial tomography (CT) constituted manifestations. A left nefrectomy was performed. No metastasis was found. The tumor replaced 4/5 of the organ and weighed 1145 g. It showed angiomatous structure with atypical proliferation of endothelial cells in a sinusoldal trauma and anastomosatic vascular channels that invaded neighboring parenchymal and capsule. Tymorous cells were positive for CD31 and CD34 and negative for cytokeratins, S100 and HMB 45 proteins. The patient was subjected to treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (lineal accelerator), but 12 months after surgery he presented retroperitonal tumoral relapse and hepatic metastasis. Diagnostic differentiation with benign vascular tumors is pointed out, as well as carcinomas and sarcomas that showed an outstanding angiomatous component, both primary and/or secondary. Primary renal angiosarcoma exposes the multiplicity of localizations that it is capable of with a tumor of this type, as well as renal parenquimatous capacity to be the seat of a great variety of neoplasias.

  8. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  9. Renal artery aneurysm mimicking renal calculus with hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanwen; Meng, Hongzhou; Cao, Min; Shen, Baihua

    2013-06-01

    A 51-year-old woman was found to have a left renal calculus with hydronephrosis. She underwent unsuccessful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, leading to the recommendation that percutaneous lithotomy was necessary to remove the renal calculus. In view of the unusual shape of the calculus and absence of abnormalities in urine sediment, preoperative computed tomography and renal angiography were performed, which instead showed a calcified left renal artery aneurysm. Subsequent efforts to perform an aneurysmectomy also failed, eventually necessitating left nephrectomy. This case illustrates the pitfalls in the diagnosis of a renal artery aneurysm, which is a relatively common condition that may have unusual presentations. Hence, it is suggested that the possibility of a renal artery aneurysm be considered in the differential diagnosis when one detects a renal calculus with an unusual appearance. In addition, we propose that 3-dimensional reconstruction computed tomography be performed before considering surgical options for such renal calculi to rule out the possibility of a renal artery aneurysm.

  10. Renal functional outcomes after surgery for renal cortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia B.; DeCastro, G. Joel; McKiernan, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, radical nephrectomy represented the gold standard for the treatment of small (≤ 4cm) as well as larger renal masses. Recently, for small renal masses, the risk of ensuing chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease has largely favored nephron-sparing surgical techniques, mainly partial nephrectomy. In this review, we surveyed the literature on renal functional outcomes after partial nephrectomy for renal tumors. The largest randomized control trial comparing radical and partial nephrectomy failed to show a survival benefit for partial nephrectomy. With regards to overall survival, surgically induced chronic kidney disease (GFR < 60 ml/min/ 1.73m2) caused by nephrectomy might not be as deleterious as medically induced chronic kidney disease. In evaluating patients who underwent donor nephrectomy, transplant literature further validates that surgically induced reductions in GFR may not affect patient survival, unlike medically induced GFR declines. Yet, because patients who present with a renal mass tend to be elderly with multiple comorbidities, many develop a mixed picture of medically, and surgically-induced renal disease after extirpative renal surgery. In this population, we believe that nephron sparing surgery optimizes oncological control while protecting renal function.

  11. Radionuclide evaluation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Bueschen, A J; Witten, D M

    1979-06-01

    The renal scintillation camera study and the excretory urogram should be considered to be complementary studies. The renal scintillation camera study provides an accurate evaluation of changes in total, differential, and segmental renal function but affords only a gross assessment of anatomic changes. The excretory urogram provides superior information about renal anatomic changes but only inferior information about functional changes of the kidney. The advantages of a renal scintillation camera study with regard to the patient are that it is done in a state of normal hydration, it requires no bowel preparation, it is not associated with allergic reactions, it provides a low radiation exposure, and it is a noninvasive procedure for differential renal function which requires no ureteral catheters.

  12. Scintigraphic imaging in renal infections.

    PubMed

    Rossleigh, M A

    2009-02-01

    The scintigraphic imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of renal infections is renal cortical scintigraphy utilizing [(99m)Tc]dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). This technique is able to demonstrate upper tract involvement with infection and to assess for the presence of renal cortical scarring following a urinary tract infection (UTI). There are recent publications advocating its use to determine which patients need to proceed to further investigation with cystography. It is also being utilized in the evaluation of different treatment regimes used in patients with UTI. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and leukocyte scanning have only a minor role in the diagnosis of renal infection. Their main application is in the diagnosis of renal cyst infections in patients with polycystic renal disease.

  13. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  14. Renal insufficiency and cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Launay-Vacher, Vincent; Janus, Nicolas; Deray, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Renal insufficiency has been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with cancer. This renal insufficiency has been reported to be associated with reduced overall survival and increased cancer-related mortality. Therefore, it is important to screen patients with cancer for renal insufficiency, using an adequate and reliable method of estimation of the renal function. Renal insufficiency may influence 1 or several of the 4 pharmacokinetic phases (absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination/excretion), potentially resulting in marked modifications of the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug in patients with renal insufficiency. Consequently, it is potentially necessary to adjust the dosage of anticancer drugs in case of renal insufficiency in order to avoid drug accumulation and in order to reduce overdosage-related side effects. This dosage adjustment of anticancer drugs should be performed according to the level of renal function and with an appropriate and validated method. It is not always easy to find clear information on anticancer drug handling in these patients. However, several guidelines, publications and handbooks are available on how to adjust anticancer drug dosages in patients with renal insufficiency and will help practitioners to manage anticancer drugs in such patients.

  15. The future of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Guo, Ling

    2017-05-01

    The rationale for the renal denervation treatment of severe, drug-resistant essential hypertension remains valid, but the field is now at a procedural watershed. With the commonly flawed procedures of the past, most notably in the Symplicity HTN-3 trial, which typically directed ablating energy into the proximal renal arteries, coupled with the absence of testing for achieved denervation, who could guess which of the past negative renal denervation trials, if any, are valid? But renal denervation procedures will now be different in two important ways. First, energy will be directed into the distal renal arteries and renal artery branches, where the renal nerves lie closest to the artery lumen. The need for this change is emphatic and unequivocal. Second, the number of energy point applications will be increased to 12-16 bilaterally. This is required because local perivascular anatomy distorts energy flow, making it unpredictable, so that multiple overlapping energy doses are needed. Applying these principles in experimental animals achieves near-total renal sympathetic nerve ablation, and lowers blood pressure. The "smart" renal denervation trials of the future will include a sham procedure and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure endpoints, but more important than these, which in comparison is clinical trialist "tinkering", will be the procedural revolution in ablative energy delivery.

  16. Solid renal masses in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Sureka, Binit

    2016-01-01

    With the ever increasing trend of using cross-section imaging in today's era, incidental detection of small solid renal masses has dramatically multiplied. Coincidentally, the number of asymptomatic benign lesions being detected has also increased. The role of radiologists is not only to identify these lesions, but also go a one step further and accurately characterize various renal masses. Earlier detection of small renal cell carcinomas means identifying at the initial stage which has an impact on prognosis, patient management and healthcare costs. In this review article we share our experience with the typical and atypical solid renal masses encountered in adults in routine daily practice. PMID:28104933

  17. Computed tomography of renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma is a relatively rare tumor that has an excellent prognosis and usually may be treated adequately by local resection. Preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, which requires radical nephrectomy, is thus of importance. The computed tomographic (CT) and pathologic features of three incidentally-detected renal oncocytomas were compared with those of six renal cell carcinomas of comparable size. Renal cell carcinoma appears on CT as a solid mass that generally has an indistinct interface with normal renal parenchyma, a lobulated contour, and a nonhomogeneous pattern of contrast enhancement. These features correlate with the pathologic findings of an irregular tumor margin and the frequent presence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis. Oncocytoma, on the other hand, generally has a distinct margin, a smooth contour, and a homogeneous appearance on contrast-enhanced CT scans. These findings correlate with a smooth tumor margin and absence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis on pathologic examination. These features are not pathognomonic of oncocytoma, as angiographic evidence suggests that renal cell carcinoma may show both distinct margination and a homogeneous blush in 6% of cases. However, their demonstration by CT should alert radiologists and surgeons to the possibility that a renal mass may be an oncocytoma. Such a presumptive diagnosis then can lead to a surgical approach that allows for renal-conserving surgery.

  18. Haemostatic aspects of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, P J; Schmidt, E B; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Kristensen, S D; Dyerberg, J; Kornerup, H J

    1988-01-01

    Platelet function and protein C activity and antigen level was studied in 31 renal transplant recipients and 10 healthy controls. The patients were divided into three groups: (I) cyclosporin treated, (II) azathioprine treated, and (III) azathioprine treated patients with chronic rejection. The platelet function in the renal transplant patients was normal and there was no difference between groups I and II. The specific activity of protein C was decreased in patients after renal transplantation and decreasing protein C activity and progressive renal failure was found to be positively correlated in the azathioprine treated groups.

  19. Renal denervation for hypertension refractory to renal artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Bausback, Yvonne; Friedenberger, Josef; Hertting, Klaus; Werner, Martin; Branzan, Daniela; Freitas, Bruno; Piorkowski, Michael; Schmidt, Andrej; Scheinert, Dierk

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the effect of renal denervation (RDN) on blood pressure and renal function in refractory hypertension after renal artery recanalization and optimal medical therapy. Ten patients (6 women; mean age 70.0±5.1 years) with an office systolic blood pressure >160 mmHg despite taking ≥3 antihypertensive drugs and uni- or bilateral renal artery stenting were treated with RDN. Radiofrequency (RF) energy was delivered to the native segment of the artery keeping a 5-mm safe distance from the stented segments. Standardized office (OBP) and ambulatory (ABP) blood pressure measurements, medication, and renal assessment, including renal duplex ultrasound and renal function, were determined at baseline and on follow-up to 12 months. OBP (systolic/diastolic) at baseline was 190.0±20.4 / 84.2±10.1 mmHg. It decreased to 171.1±28.7* / 82.2±8.7, 165.5±28.4(†) / 76.1±7.4, and 158.3±14.2(†) / 75.5±9.5(†) mmHg (*p<0.001; (†)p<0.01) at 3, 6, and 12 months after RDN, respectively. Average ABP (systolic/diastolic) after 6 and 12 months decreased by -7.6(‡) / -3.1 and -11.3(‡) / -5.1(‡) mmHg ((‡)p<0.05). There was no renal artery (re)stenosis, dissection, or aneurysm within 12 months. Creatinine, cystatin C, and glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Urine albumin excretion decreased in 4/10 patients. Renal resistive indices improved in native, but not in stented renal arteries within the follow-up period. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that RF-based RDN can be safely and effectively delivered in patients with resistant hypertension and previous renal artery stenting.

  20. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  1. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part II

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of renal tuberculosis (TB), including TB in transplant recipients and immunocompromised patients. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) forms the mainstay of cross-sectional imaging in renal TB. It can easily identify calcification, renal scars, mass lesions, and urothelial thickening. The combination of uneven caliectasis, with urothelial thickening and lack of pelvic dilatation, can also be demonstrated on MDCT. MRI is a sensitive modality for demonstration of features of renal TB, including tissue edema, asymmetric perinephric fat stranding, and thickening of Gerota's fascia, all of which may be clues to focal pyelonephritis of tuberculous origin. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values may help in differentiating hydronephrosis from pyonephrosis. ADC values also have the potential to serve as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of renal fibrosis. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of renal TB. In transplant patients, renal TB, including tuberculous interstitial nephritis, is an important cause of graft dysfunction. Renal TB in patients with HIV more often shows greater parenchymal affection, with poorly formed granulomas and relatively less frequent findings of caseation and stenosis. Atypical mycobacterial infections are also more common in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986619

  2. Renal cirsoid arteriovenous malformation masquerading as neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K; George, D

    1988-12-01

    A woman with renal colic and microscopic hematuria had filling defects in the left renal collecting system detected on excretory urography. A nephrectomy, performed because of suspected malignancy, might have been averted by renal angiography.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: renal coloboma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal coloboma syndrome renal coloboma syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Renal coloboma syndrome (also known as papillorenal syndrome) is ...

  4. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p < 0.05), higher ADCs (2.46 ± 0.20 vs. 2.18 ± 0.10 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, p < 0.05), lower R2*s (14.9 ± 1.7 vs. 18.1 ± 1.6 s(-1), p < 0.05), and lower tissue stiffness (3.2 ± 0.3 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5 kPa, p < 0.05). Excellent reproducibility of the quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal

  5. The metabolic syndrome induces early changes in the swine renal medullary mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R; Ferguson, Christopher M; Jordan, Kyra L; Tang, Hui; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-03-11

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with nutrient surplus and kidney hyperfiltration, accelerating chronic renal failure. Mitochondria can be overwhelmed by substrate excess, leading to inefficient energy production and thereby tissue hypoxia. Mitochondrial dysfunction is emerging as an important determinant of renal damage, but whether it contributes to MetS-induced renal injury remains unknown. We hypothesized that early MetS induces kidney mitochondrial abnormalities and dysfunction, which would be notable in the vulnerable renal medulla. Pigs were studied after 16 weeks of diet-induced MetS, MetS treated for the last 4 weeks with the mitochondria-targeted peptide elamipretide (0.1 mg/kg SC q.d), and Lean controls (n = 7 each). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were measured in-vivo, whereas cortical and medullary mitochondrial structure and function and renal injurious pathways were studied ex-vivo. Blood pressure was slightly elevated in MetS pigs, and their renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were elevated. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that this was associated with medullary hypoxia, whereas cortical oxygenation remained intact. MetS decreased renal content of the inner mitochondrial membrane cardiolipin, particularly the tetra-linoleoyl (C18:2) cardiolipin species, and altered mitochondrial morphology and function, particularly in the medullary thick ascending limb. MetS also increased renal cytochrome-c-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and tubular injury. Chronic mitoprotection restored mitochondrial structure, ATP synthesis, and antioxidant defenses and decreased mitochondrial oxidative stress, medullary hypoxia, and renal injury. These findings implicate medullary mitochondrial damage in renal injury in experimental MetS, and position the mitochondria as a therapeutic target.

  6. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Giorgio; Calabria, Santo; Lai, Silvia; Moscaritolo, Eleonora; Nofroni, Italo; Ronga, Giuseppe; Rossi, Michele; Ventroni, Guido; Sardella, Daniela; Ferrannini, Michele; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Cianci, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238) or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224), and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS), were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and/or Selective Angiography (SA). An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA). Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis. PMID:12622875

  7. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  8. Delayed rupture of renal artery after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.; Mali, W.P.; Rosenbusch, G.; van Straalen, A.M.; Klinge, J.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two cases are reported in which rupture of the renal artery occurred many hours after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Delayed rupture can be recognized by the angiographic appearance and by the presence of persistent flank pain. The typical angiographic finding is a poorly defined zone of contrast medium at the site of perforation.

  9. Near "real" time magnetic resonance images as a monitoring system for interstitial laser therapy: experimental protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Dan J.; Farahani, Keyvan; Soudant, Jacques; Zwarun, Andrew A.; Lufkin, Robert B.

    1992-06-01

    The failure rate of cancer treatment remains unacceptably high, still being a leading cause of mortality in adults and children despite major advances over the past 50 years in the fields of surgery, radiation therapy and, more recently, chemo and immunotherapy. Surgical access to some deep tumors of the head and neck and other areas often require extensive dissections with residual functional and cosmetic deformities. Repeated treatment is not possible after maximum dose radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still limited by its systemic toxicity. An attractive solution to these problems would be the development of a new adjunctive method combining the best features of interstitial laser therapy for selective tumor destruction via minimally invasive techniques for access and 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a monitoring system for laser-tissue interactions. Interstitial laser therapy (ILT) via fiberoptics allow laser energy to be delivered directly into deeper tissues. However, this concept will become clinically useful only when noninvasive, accurate, and reproducible monitoring methods are developed to measure energy delivery to tissues. MRI has numerous advantages in evaluating the irreversible effects of laser treatment in tissues, since laser energy includes changes not only in the thermal motions of hydrogen protons within the tissue, but also in the distribution and mobility of water and lipids. These techniques should greatly improve the use of ILT in combination with MRI to allow treatment of deeper, more difficult to reach tumors of head and neck and other anatomical areas with a single needle stick.

  10. Persistent Increase in Blood Pressure After Renal Nerve Stimulation in Accessory Renal Arteries After Sympathetic Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Hoogerwaard, Annemiek F; Gal, Pim; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Staessen, Jan A; Persu, Alexandre; Elvan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure response to renal denervation is highly variable, and the proportion of responders is disappointing. This may be partly because of accessory renal arteries too small for denervation, causing incomplete ablation. Renal nerve stimulation before and after renal denervation is a promising approach to assess completeness of renal denervation and may predict blood pressure response to renal denervation. The objective of the current study was to assess renal nerve stimulation-induced blood pressure increase before and after renal sympathetic denervation in main and accessory renal arteries of anaesthetized patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The study included 21 patients. Nine patients had at least 1 accessory renal artery in which renal denervation was not feasible. Renal nerve stimulation was performed in the main arteries of all patients and in accessory renal arteries of 6 of 9 patients with accessory arteries, both before and after renal sympathetic denervation. Renal nerve stimulation before renal denervation elicited a substantial increase in systolic blood pressure, both in main (25.6±2.9 mm Hg; P<0.001) and accessory (24.3±7.4 mm Hg; P=0.047) renal arteries. After renal denervation, renal nerve stimulation-induced systolic blood pressure increase was blunted in the main renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 8.6±3.7 mm Hg; P=0.020), but not in the nondenervated renal accessory renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 27.1±7.6 mm Hg; P=0.917). This residual source of renal sympathetic tone may result in persistent hypertension after ablation and partly account for the large response variability. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  12. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  13. Metallothioneins and renal ageing.

    PubMed

    Leierer, Johannes; Rudnicki, Michael; Braniff, Susie-Jane; Perco, Paul; Koppelstaetter, Christian; Mühlberger, Irmgard; Eder, Susanne; Kerschbaum, Julia; Schwarzer, Christoph; Schroll, Andrea; Weiss, Günter; Schneeberger, Stefan; Wagner, Silvia; Königsrainer, Alfred; Böhmig, Georg A; Mayer, Gert

    2016-09-01

    Human lifespan is increasing continuously and about one-third of the population >70 years of age suffers from chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of the loss of renal function with ageing is unclear. We determined age-associated gene expression changes in zero-hour biopsies of deceased donor kidneys without laboratory signs of impaired renal function, defined as a last serum creatinine >0.96 mg/dL in females and >1.18 mg/dL in males, using microarray technology and the Significance Analysis of Microarrays routine. Expression changes of selected genes were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for localization of respective mRNA and protein. Functional aspects were examined in vitro. Donors were classified into three age groups (<40, 40-59 and >59 years; Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively). In Group 3 especially, genes encoding for metallothionein (MT) isoforms were more significantly expressed when compared with Group 1; localization studies revealed predominant staining in renal proximal tubular cells. RPTEC/TERT1 cells overexpressing MT2A were less susceptible towards cadmium chloride-induced cytotoxicity and hypoxia-induced apoptosis, both models for increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Increased expression of MTs in the kidney with ageing might be a protective mechanism against increased oxidative stress, which is closely related to the ageing process. Our findings indicate that MTs are functionally involved in the pathophysiology of ageing-related processes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  14. Ifosfamide induced renal rickets.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Arul P; Chinnaswamy, Girish; John, Rikki R; Mathai, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Ifosfamide is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent in children. The authors report a 4-y-old boy who developed proximal renal tubulopathy with florid rickets a year after completion of ifosfamide therapy for Ewing's sarcoma. After initiation of treatment, there was complete healing of rickets and he did not need supplements beyond 18 mo. Growth monitoring and musculoskeletal system examination is important in all children who have received ifosfamide therapy. Routine monitoring for nephrotoxicity during and after ifosfamide therapy helps in early identification and intervention.

  15. [Tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Seidowsky, A; Moulonguet-Doleris, L; Hanslik, T; Yattara, H; Ayari, H; Rouveix, E; Massy, Z A; Prinseau, J

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTAs) are a group of metabolic disorders characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal plasma anion gap. There are three main forms of RTA: a proximal RTA called type II and a distal RTA (type I and IV). The RTA type II is a consequence of the inability of the proximal tubule to reabsorb bicarbonate. The distal RTA is associated with the inability to excrete the daily acid load and may be associated with hyperkalaemia (type IV) or hypokalemia (type I). The most common etiology of RTA type IV is the hypoaldosteronism. The RTAs can be complicated by nephrocalcinosis and obstructive nephrolithiasis. Alkalinization is the cornerstone of treatment.

  16. Autopsy Renal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2014-09-01

    We provide an overview of assessment of the kidneys at autopsy, with special considerations for pediatric versus adult kidneys. We describe the approach to gross examination, tissue allocation when needed for additional studies of potential medical renal disease, the spectrum of congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract, and approach to cystic diseases of the kidney. We also discuss common lesions seen at autopsy, including acute tubular injury, ischemic versus toxic contributions to this injury, interstitial nephritis, and common vascular diseases. Infections commonly involve the kidney at autopsy, and the key features and differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  17. [Pulmonary-renal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Risso, Jorge A; Mazzocchi, Octavio; De All, Jorge; Gnocchi, César A

    2009-01-01

    The pulmonary-renal syndrome is defined as a combination of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis. The coexistence of these two clinical conditions is due to diseases with different pathogenic mechanisms. Primary systemic vasculitis and Goodpasture syndrome are the most frequent etiologies. Systemic lupus erythematosus, connective tissue diseases, negative anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis and those secondary to drugs are far less common causes. An early diagnosis based on clinical, radiologic, laboratory and histologic criteria enables early treatment, thus diminishing its high morbidity-mortality rate. Therapy is based on high doses of corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and plasmapheresis.

  18. Magnetic resonance urography in pediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Cerwinka, Wolfgang H; Damien Grattan-Smith, J; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has emerged as a powerful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of the pediatric genitourinary tract. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the reader with the basic techniques, strengths and limitations, as well as the current and potential future applications of MRU in pediatric urology. MRU can provide detailed anatomical information and assess renal function and drainage in a single study. MRU does not employ ionizing radiation and may be utilized in patients with iodine-based contrast allergy or impaired renal function. MRU has been most often applied to the evaluation of hydronephrosis and provides valuable insight into a wide range of obstructive uropathies. MRU was shown to be superior to renal scintigraphy for the diagnosis of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. The use of MRU for the assessment of urolithiasis and vesicoureteral reflux is limited and technical refinements are required. Potential future applications include fetal MRU, virtual endoscopy, and MRU-guided procedures. The development of new contrast agents and new image-processing software will further enhance the diagnostic potential of MRU in pediatric urology. MRU is currently thought of as a problem-solving tool to define anatomy and function when conventional methods fall short. This technique is likely to emerge as the imaging modality of choice for children with complex genitourinary pathology.

  19. Acute Renal Failure in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Owais A; Hageman, Joseph R; Clardy, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in a neonate is a serious condition that impacts 8% to 24% of hospitalized neonates. There is a need for prompt evaluation and treatment to avoid additional complications. In this review, a neonate was found to have renal failure associated with renal vein thrombosis. There are varying etiologies of ARF. Causes of ARF are typically divided into three subsets: pre-renal, renal or intrinsic, and post-renal. Treatment of ARF varies based on the cause. Renal vein thrombosis is an interesting cause of renal or intrinsic ARF and can be serious, often leading to a need for dialysis.

  20. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  1. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  2. Renal tumour anatomical characteristics and functional outcome after partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Nisen, Harry; Heimonen, Petri; Kenttä, Lauri; Visapää, Harri; Nisen, Jessica; Taari, Kimmo

    2015-06-01

    Anatomical features of renal tumours may be useful in predicting glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after partial nephrectomy. In this study, anatomical classification systems (ACSs) were compared to predict changes in renal function after surgery. A group of 294 patients with T1 renal tumours receiving partial nephrectomy between January 2006 and June 2013 were identified from the institutional kidney tumour database. Preoperative images from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging were reviewed to assess diameter, PADUA (preoperative aspects and dimensions used for an anatomical) classification score, RENAL (radius, exophytic/endophytic properties of the tumour, nearness of tumour deepest portion to the collecting system or sinus, anterior/posterior descriptor and location relative to polar lines) nephrometry score, centrality index (C index) and renal tumour invasion index (RTII). GFR was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation preoperatively and 3 months after operation. Linear and logistic regression were applied as statistical methods. Mean tumour diameter was 3.0 ± 2.2 cm (range 1.0-7.0 cm). GFR was 85 ± 22 ml/min/1.73 m² before the operation and 77 ± 21 ml/min/1.73 m² (-8% change) 3 months after the operation. In univariate linear regression, the percentage change in GFR was weakly but statistically significantly associated with surgical approach (p = 0.04), indication for nephron sparing (p = 0.02), preoperative GFR (p < 0.001), PADUA (p = 0.02), RENAL (p = 0.01) and RTII (p = 0.003). In multivariate logistic regression analysis among patients with tumours 3 cm or larger, PADUA (odds ratio 1.55, p = 0.021) and RTII (odds ratio 3.87, p = 0.037) predicted at least a 20% reduction in GFR. Renal tumour ACSs may be clinically useful in predicting changes in renal function after partial nephrectomy in patients with larger tumours. The performance of RTII is equal to that of other ACSs in predicting changes in GFR.

  3. Renal Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction with Hemin Augments Renal Hemodynamics, Renal Autoregulation, and Excretory Function

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Fady T.; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO-1; HO-2) catalyze conversion of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin/bilirubin. To determine the effects of renal HO-1 induction on blood pressure and renal function, normal control rats (n = 7) and hemin-treated rats (n = 6) were studied. Renal clearance studies were performed on anesthetized rats to assess renal function; renal blood flow (RBF) was measured using a transonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. Hemin treatment significantly induced renal HO-1. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were not different (115 ± 5 mmHg versus 112 ± 4 mmHg and 331 ± 16 versus 346 ± 10 bpm). However, RBF was significantly higher (9.1 ± 0.8 versus 7.0 ± 0.5 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and renal vascular resistance was significantly lower (13.0 ± 0.9 versus 16.6 ± 1.4 [mmHg/(mL/min/g)], P < 0.05). Likewise, glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated (1.4 ± 0.2 versus 1.0 ± 0.1 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and urine flow and sodium excretion were also higher (18.9 ± 3.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.0 μL/min/g, P < 0.05 and 1.9 ± 0.6 versus 0.2 ± 0.1 μmol/min/g, P < 0.05, resp.). The plateau of the autoregulation relationship was elevated, and renal vascular responses to acute angiotensin II infusion were attenuated in hemin-treated rats reflecting the vasodilatory effect of HO-1 induction. We conclude that renal HO-1 induction augments renal function which may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of HO-1 induction observed in hypertension models. PMID:22518281

  4. Development of the renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel

    2011-12-01

    The kidney is a highly vascularized organ that normally receives a fifth of the cardiac output. The unique spatial arrangement of the kidney vasculature with each nephron is crucial for the regulation of renal blood flow, GFR, urine concentration, and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of kidney vessels with their respective nephrons is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning kidney necessary for independent extrauterine life. Mechanisms that govern the development of the kidney vasculature are poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the anatomical development, embryological origin, lineage relationships, and key regulators of the kidney arterioles and postglomerular circulation. Because renal disease is associated with deterioration of the kidney microvasculature and/or the reenactment of embryonic pathways, understanding the morphogenetic events and processes that maintain the renal vasculature may open new avenues for the preservation of renal structure and function and prevent the progression of renal disease.

  5. Renal denervation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Kindermann, Ingrid; Linz, Dominik; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2014-06-01

    Renal denervation has been developed in order to lower systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertension by a reduction in renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure sympathetic activation, in particular, renal norepinephrine release is closely associated with morbidity and mortality. Initial studies have shown that renal denervation is able to reduce not only blood pressure but also heart rate, and is associated with a reduction in myocardial hypertrophy, improved glucose tolerance, and ameliorated microalbuminuria. Since some experimental and observational data suggest an antiarrhythmic effect, it is possible that renal denervation might also play a therapeutic role in arrhythmias often occurring in chronic heart failure. The first proof-of-concept studies are planned to evaluate the clinical effect of this pathophysiologically plausible method, which might be able to change clinical practice.

  6. [Pediatric renal transplant in Japan].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuharu

    2010-09-01

    Transplantation is the optimal renal replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease. Compared with dialysis, successful transplantation in children and adolescents not only ameliorates uremic symptoms but also allows for significant improvement of delayed growth, sexual maturation, and psychosocial functioning. The child with a well-functioning kidney can enjoy a quality of life that cannot be achieved with dialysis therapy. The 5- and 10-year patient/graft survival rate in transplant recipients are 97.9/88.8% and 96.2%/79.4% based on Japanese Renal Transplant Registry Society data. This article reviews recent reports of pediatric renal transplantation including ABO-incompatible and preemptive renal transplantation in Japan.

  7. Bone disease after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Herberth, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In light of greatly improved long-term patient and graft survival after renal transplantation, improving other clinical outcomes such as risk of fracture and cardiovascular disease is of paramount importance. After renal transplantation, a large percentage of patients lose bone. This loss of bone results from a combination of factors that include pre-existing renal osteodystrophy, immunosuppressive therapy, and the effects of chronically reduced renal function after transplantation. In addition to low bone volume, histological abnormalities include decreased bone turnover and defective mineralization. Low bone volume and low bone turnover were recently shown to be associated with cardiovascular calcifications, highlighting specific challenges for medical therapy and the need to prevent low bone turnover in the pretransplant patient. This Review discusses changes in bone histology and mineral metabolism that are associated with renal transplantation and the effects of these changes on clinical outcomes such as fractures and cardiovascular calcifications. Therapeutic modalities are evaluated based on our understanding of bone histology. PMID:19918255

  8. Fetal programming of renal function.

    PubMed

    Dötsch, Jörg; Plank, Christian; Amann, Kerstin

    2012-04-01

    Results from large epidemiological studies suggest a clear relation between low birth weight and adverse renal outcome evident as early as during childhood. Such adverse outcomes may include glomerular disease, hypertension, and renal failure and contribute to a phenomenon called fetal programming. Other factors potentially leading to an adverse renal outcome following fetal programming are maternal diabetes mellitus, smoking, salt overload, and use of glucocorticoids during pregnancy. However, clinical data on the latter are scarce. Here, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms of fetal programming, including reduced nephron number via diminished nephrogenesis and other renal (e.g., via the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and non-renal (e.g., changes in endothelial function) alterations. It appears likely that the outcomes of fetal programming may be influenced or modified postnatally, for example, by the amount of nutrients given at critical times.

  9. Renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, James J; Purdue, Mark P; Signoretti, Sabina; Swanton, Charles; Albiges, Laurence; Schmidinger, Manuela; Heng, Daniel Y; Larkin, James; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2017-03-09

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) denotes cancer originated from the renal epithelium and accounts for >90% of cancers in the kidney. The disease encompasses >10 histological and molecular subtypes, of which clear cell RCC (ccRCC) is most common and accounts for most cancer-related deaths. Although somatic VHL mutations have been described for some time, more-recent cancer genomic studies have identified mutations in epigenetic regulatory genes and demonstrated marked intra-tumour heterogeneity, which could have prognostic, predictive and therapeutic relevance. Localized RCC can be successfully managed with surgery, whereas metastatic RCC is refractory to conventional chemotherapy. However, over the past decade, marked advances in the treatment of metastatic RCC have been made, with targeted agents including sorafenib, sunitinib, bevacizumab, pazopanib and axitinib, which inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR), and everolimus and temsirolimus, which inhibit mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), being approved. Since 2015, agents with additional targets aside from VEGFR have been approved, such as cabozantinib and lenvatinib; immunotherapies, such as nivolumab, have also been added to the armamentarium for metastatic RCC. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of RCC, with a focus on ccRCC, as well as updates to complement the current clinical guidelines and an outline of potential future directions for RCC research and therapy.

  10. Renal Cysts and Urinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica; Darcy, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Renal cysts are a common imaging finding. Although most cysts never have symptoms, some cause pain, collecting system compression, hematuria, hypertension, and secondary infection. The mere presence of a cyst is not an indication for intervention, but treatment may be indicated in symptomatic patients or those with secondary obstruction. Urinomas generally are a contained collection of urine outside of the normal pathways where urine travels. As such, urinomas can arise anywhere from the upper abdomen down into the low pelvis and have a variety of etiologies. Ureteral obstruction with forniceal rupture and trauma (blunt, penetrating, or iatrogenic) are the most common causes of urinomas. When urinomas arise spontaneously, the likely cause varies with the patient's age. Blunt or penetrating trauma can cause perinephric urinomas by two mechanisms—direct disruption of the pelvis or collecting system or by degeneration of nonviable tissue. These urinomas are often perinephric, but can also occur in a subcapsular location. This review will discuss diagnosis, classification, and treatment of renal cysts and urinomas. PMID:23204636

  11. Renal elimination of perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs).

    PubMed

    Han, Xing; Nabb, Diane L; Russell, Mark H; Kennedy, Gerald L; Rickard, Robert W

    2012-01-13

    Sex-, species-, and chain length-dependent renal elimination is the hallmark of mammalian elimination of perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) and has been extensively studied for almost 30 years. In this review, toxicokinetic data of PFCAs (chain lengths ranging from 4 to 10) in different species are compared with an emphasis on their relevance to renal elimination. PFCAs vary in their affinities to bind to serum albumins in plasma, which is an important factor in determining the renal clearance of PFCAs. PFCA-albumin binding has been well characterized and is summarized in this review. The mechanism of the sex-, species-, and chain length-dependent renal PFCA elimination is a research area that has gained continuous interest since the beginning of toxicological studies of PFCAs. It is now recognized that organic anion transport proteins play a key role in PFCA renal tubular reabsorption, a process that is sex-, species-, and chain length-dependent. Recent studies on the identification of PFCA renal transport proteins and characterization of their transport kinetics have greatly improved our understanding of the PFCA renal transport mechanism at the molecular level. A mathematical representation of this renal tubular reabsorption mechanism has been incorporated in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA). Improvement of PBPK models in the future will require more accurate and quantitative characterization of renal transport pathways of PFCAs. To that end, a basolateral membrane efflux pathway for the reabsorption of PFCAs in the kidney is discussed in this review, which could provide a future research direction toward a better understanding of the mechanisms of PFCA renal elimination.

  12. Current Status of Renal Biopsy for Small Renal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seung Beom

    2014-01-01

    Small renal masses (SRMs) are defined as radiologically enhancing renal masses of less than 4 cm in maximal diameter. The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased in recent years, which is mainly due to the rise in incidental detection of localized SRMs. However, the cancer-specific mortality rate is not increasing. This discrepancy may be dependent on the indolent nature of SRMs. About 20% of SRMs are benign, and smaller masses are likely to have pathologic characteristics of low Fuhrman grade and clear cell type. In addition, SRMs are increasingly detected in elderly patients who are likely to have comorbidities and are a high-risk group for active treatment like surgery. As the information about the nature of SRMs is improved and management options for SRMs are expanded, the current role of renal mass biopsy for SRMs is also expanding. Traditionally, renal mass biopsy has not been accepted as a standard diagnostic tool in the clinical scenario because of several issues about safety and accuracy. However, current series on SRM biopsy have reported high diagnostic accuracy with rare complications. Studies of modern SRM biopsy have reported diagnostic accuracy greater than 90% with very high specificity. Also, current series have shown very rare morbid cases caused by renal mass biopsy. Currently, renal biopsy of SRMs can be recommended in most cases except when patients have imaging or clinical characteristics indicative of pathology and in cases in which conservative management is not considered. PMID:25237457

  13. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  14. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  15. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care. PMID:27891093

  16. Preoperative nuclear renal scan underestimates renal function after radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Laurie; Negron, Edris; Liu, Joceline S; Su, Yu-Kai; Paparello, James J; Eggener, Scott; Kundu, Shilajit D

    2014-12-01

    To compare expected and actual renal function after nephrectomy. Nuclear renal scan estimates differential kidney function and is commonly used to calculate expected postoperative renal function after radical nephrectomy. However, the observed postoperative renal function is often different from the expected. A retrospective review was performed on 136 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy or nephroureterectomy and had a preoperative renal scan with calculated differential function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) values, preoperative and postoperative, were calculated with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation. The expected postoperative GFR based on renal scan was compared with the actual postoperative GFR. The average age of patients undergoing surgery was 58.6 years, and the indication for surgery was for benign causes in 59 (44%) patients and cancer in 76 (56%) patients. The average preoperative creatinine and estimated GFR were 1.0 mg/dL and 69.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2). At a median follow-up of 3.3 months, the actual postoperative GFR exceeded the expected GFR by an average of 12.1% (interquartile range, 2.6%-25.2%). When stratified by preoperative GFR >90, 60-90, and <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively, the observed GFR exceeded the expected GFR by 4.3%, 12.6%, and 14.9%, respectively (P = .16). This trend was maintained when GFR was plotted over time. After nephrectomy, the remaining kidney exceeded the expected postoperative GFR by 12% in this cohort of patients with preoperative renal scans. Patients with existing renal insufficiency had the greatest compensatory response, and this was durable over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exophytic renal masses: angular interface with renal parenchyma for distinguishing benign from malignant lesions at MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sachit K; Mitchell, Donald G; Yang, Roberta; Roth, Christopher G; O'Kane, Patrick; Verma, Manisha; Parker, Laurence

    2010-05-01

    To retrospectively determine whether benign exophytic renal masses can be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) on the basis of angular interface at single-shot fast spin-echo (SE) T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA and was approved by the institutional review board. Patient informed consent was waived. A total of 162 exophytic (2 cm or greater) renal masses in 152 patients (103 men, 49 women; mean age, 58 years; age range, 23-85 years) were included. Two radiologists independently recorded the mass size and angular interface on single-shot fast SE T2-weighted MR images. Surgical pathologic report and MR follow-up were used as reference standards. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the usefulness of these variables for differentiating benign masses from RCCs. Diagnostic performance was analyzed by comparing values for area under receiver operating characteristic curve (A(z)). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of angular interface for diagnosing benign masses were calculated. Reader agreement was assessed with kappa-weighted statistics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Of 162 masses, 65 were benign, and 97 were RCCs. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and A(z) of angular interface for diagnosing benign masses were 78%, 100%, 100%, 87%, and 0.813, respectively. Angular interface (P < .001) was a significant predictor of benign renal mass but mass size (P = .66) was not. There was almost perfect interobserver agreement for mass size (ICC = 0.96) and angular interface (kappa = 0.91). The presence of an angular interface with the renal parenchyma at single-shot fast SE T2-weighted MR imaging is a strong predictor of benignity in an exophytic renal mass 2 cm or greater in diameter with high specificity and diagnostic accuracy.

  18. A randomised controlled trial evaluating renal protective effects of selenium with vitamins A, C, E, verapamil, and losartan against extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    El-Nahas, Ahmed R; Elsaadany, Mohamed M; Taha, Diaa-Eldin; Elshal, Ahmed M; El-Ghar, Mohamed Abo; Ismail, Amani M; Elsawy, Essam A; Saleh, Hazem H; Wafa, Ehab W; Awadalla, Amira; Barakat, Tamer S; Sheir, Khaled Z

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effects of selenium with vitamins A, C and E (selenium ACE, i.e. antioxidants), verapamil (calcium channel blocker), and losartan (angiotensin receptor blocker) against extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL)-induced renal injury. A randomised controlled trial was conducted between August 2012 and February 2015. Inclusion criteria were adult patients with a single renal stone (<2 cm) suitable for ESWL. Patients with diabetes, hypertension, congenital renal anomalies, moderate or marked hydronephrosis, or preoperative albuminuria (>300 mg/L) were excluded. ESWL was performed using the electromagnetic DoLiS lithotripter. Eligible patients were randomised into one of four groups using sealed closed envelopes: Group1, control; Group 2, selenium ACE; Group 3, losartan; and Group 4, verapamil. Albuminuria and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) were estimated after 2-4 h and 1 week after ESWL. The primary outcome was differences between albuminuria and uNGAL. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed before ESWL, and at 2-4 h and 1 week after ESWL to compare changes in renal perfusion. Of 329 patients assessed for eligibility, the final analysis comprised 160 patients (40 in each group). Losartan was the only medication that showed significantly lower levels of albuminuria after 1 week (P < 0.001). For perfusion changes, there was a statistically significant decrease in the renal perfusion in patients with obstructed kidneys in comparison to before ESWL (P = 0.003). These significant changes were present in the control or antioxidant group, whilst in the losartan and verapamil groups renal perfusion was not significantly decreased. Losartan was found to protect the kidney against ESWL-induced renal injury by significantly decreasing post-ESWL albuminuria. Verapamil and losartan maintained renal perfusion in patients with post-ESWL renal obstruction. © 2016 The Authors BJU International

  19. Pediatric Renal Angiomyolipomas in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Warncke, Jason C; Brodie, Katie E; Grantham, Erin C; Catarinicchia, Salvatore P; Tong, Suhong; Kondo, Kimi L; Cost, Nicholas G

    2017-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of hamartomas in multiple organs. Up to 80% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex will have at least 1 angiomyolipoma in their lifetime. We describe the incidence and natural history of angiomyolipoma in a pediatric tuberous sclerosis complex population and analyze tumor growth to determine optimal renal imaging intervals in an effort to improve counseling, treatment and followup. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with tuberous sclerosis complex from 2004 to 2014. Patients were included if they had a clinical or genetic diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex and had undergone at least 1 renal imaging study. A total of 145 patients were analyzed. Median age was 14 years (range 0 to 28). Overall incidence of angiomyolipoma was 50.3%. Median age at first angiomyolipoma detection was 11 years (range 2 to 26). Median yearly angiomyolipoma growth rate stratified by age at first detection was 0.0 mm for patients 0 to 6 years old, 0.9 mm for those 7 to 11 years old, 2.5 mm for those 12 to 16 years old and 1.8 mm for those 17 years old or older. Median yearly angiomyolipoma growth rate stratified by tumor size at first detection was 0.1 mm for tumors 0.6 to 0.9 cm, 1.8 mm for those 1.0 to 1.9 cm and 4.3 mm for those 2.0 to 2.9 cm. A total of 35 patients (24.1%) received mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors. Eight patients underwent a total of 13 surgical interventions, of whom 2 had previously been treated with mTOR inhibitors. Median patient age at surgical intervention was 18.0 years and median angiomyolipoma size was 5.0 cm. Angiomyolipoma growth in children with tuberous sclerosis complex can be rapid and unpredictable. We recommend yearly renal ultrasound in all patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, with consideration of magnetic resonance imaging in those at risk for rapid growth and future intervention (ie those older than 11 years and/or those

  20. Unfused renal ectopia: a rare form of congenital renal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Nursal, Gül Nihal; Büyükdereli, Gülgün

    2005-09-01

    Unfused crossed renal ectopia observed 1 in 75,000 autopsies is a rare congenital anomaly. Typically one kidney is located in the proximity of the other kidney, and the ureter of the anatomically anomalous kidney crosses the midline to insert to the bladder in its normal anatomic position. Although renal function is usually not affected, the condition is generally accompanied by other congenital anomalies. In this case report, static and dynamic scintigraphic images of two patients with unfused crossed renal ectopia are presented. Besides properties of imaging modalities, clinical features are discussed in light of the available literature.

  1. Crossed fused renal ectopia: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Gupta, Arun K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Crossed fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital malformation, which is reported to be usually asymptomatic but may have varied presentations. This survey was conducted to study the clinical profile and the challenges posed in the management of this entity. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 6 patients diagnosed to have crossed fused renal ectopia during 1997-2010. The diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in one patient. In one patient it was detected on antenatal ultrasonography and in the other 4 patients it was detected during investigations for abdominal pain, abdominal mass, anorectal malformation and urinary tract infection. Results: The left moiety was crossed and fused with the right moiety in 4 cases. Ultrasonography was found to be a good screening investigation with useful diagnostic contributions from CT scans, radionuclide scintigraphy and magnetic resonance urography. Micturating cystourethrography revealed presence of VUR in 4 cases, 3 of whom have undergone ureteric reimplantation. Two patients required pyeloplasty for pelviureteric junction obstruction; in one of these patients the upper ureter was entrapped in the isthmus. In one patient, a non-functioning moiety resulted in nephrectomy. All children were asymptomatic at last follow-up with stable renal functions. Conclusions: Crossed fused renal ectopia was detected in most patients during investigation for other problems. It was found more commonly in boys. The left moiety was crossed to the right in the majority of cases. Associated urological problems were found in most cases and required the appropriate surgical management. PMID:23599575

  2. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  3. Doppler ultrasound and renal artery stenosis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Granata, A; Fiorini, F; Andrulli, S; Logias, F; Gallieni, M; Romano, G; Sicurezza, E; Fiore, C E

    2009-12-01

    Renovascular disease is a complex disorder, most commonly caused by fibromuscular dysplasia and atherosclerotic diseases. It can be found in one of three forms: asymptomatic renal artery stenosis (RAS), renovascular hypertension, and ischemic nephropathy. Particularly, the atherosclerotic form is a progressive disease that may lead to gradual and silent loss of renal function. Thus, early diagnosis of RAS is an important clinical objective since interventional therapy may improve or cure hypertension and preserve renal function. Screening for RAS is indicated in suspected renovascular hypertension or ischemic nephropathy, in order to identify patients in whom an endoluminal or surgical revascularization is advisable. Screening tests for RAS have improved considerably over the last decade. While captopril renography was widely used in the past, Doppler ultrasound (US) of the renal arteries (RAs), angio-CT, or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have replaced other modalities and they are now considered the screening tests of choice. An arteriogram is rarely needed for diagnostic purposes only. Color-Doppler US (CDUS) is a noninvasive, repeatable, relatively inexpensive diagnostic procedure which can accurately screen for renovascular diseases if performed by an expert. Moreover, the evaluation of the resistive index (RI) at Doppler US may be very useful in RAS affected patients for predicting the response to revascularization. However, when a discrepancy exists between clinical data and the results of Doppler US, additional tests are mandatory.

  4. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  5. Renal involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciascia, Savino; Cuadrado, Maria José; Khamashta, Munther; Roccatello, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease defined by the presence of arterial or venous thrombotic events and/or pregnancy morbidity in patients who test positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). APS can be isolated (known as primary APS) or associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; known as secondary APS). The kidney is a major target organ in APS and renal thrombosis can occur at any level within the vasculature of the kidney (renal arteries, intrarenal arteries, glomerular capillaries and renal veins); events reflect the site and size of the involved vessels. Histological findings vary widely, including ischaemic glomeruli and thrombotic lesions without glomerular or arterial immune deposits on immunofluorescence. Renal prognosis is affected by the presence of aPLs in patients with lupus nephritis and can be poor. In patients with SLE and aPLs, biopsy should be performed because inflammatory and thrombotic lesions require different therapeutic approaches. Renal involvement in patients with definite APS is treated by anticoagulation with long-term warfarin. The range of renal manifestations associated with APS is broadening and, therefore, aPLs have increasing relevance in end-stage renal disease, transplantation and pregnancy.

  6. Malignancy and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Certain malignant diseases, such as lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus, show an enhanced prevalence compared with the general population. In particular, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) shows an excess incidence in ESRD patients. A multitude of factors, directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens, may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) are prone to develop acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may subsequently lead to the development of RCC. In pre-dialysis patients with coexistent renal disease, as in dialysis and transplant patients, the presence of ACKD may predispose to RCC. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse, are additional risk factors for malignancy. Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the follow-up. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Finally, previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and post-malignancy screening.

  7. Renal aplastic dysplasia and ipsilateral ectopic ureter obstructing the seminal via: a possible cause of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Antonio; Palleschi, Giovanni; Tomiselli, Giulio; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rago, Rocco; Lenzi, Andrea; Pastore, Antonio Luigi

    2007-07-01

    Few cases of unilateral renal agenesis associated with ipsilateral seminal vesicle ectasia or cyst have been reported. Two cases of unilateral renal aplastic dysplasia and ipsilateral ectopic ureter opening in the ejaculatory ducts associated with infertility secondary to bilateral obstruction of the seminal via are reported. Clinical and physical assessment including transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are proposed as a comprehensive algorithm for the diagnostic evaluation of the pelvic cystic masses.

  8. [Travel and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Lavelle, O; Berland, Y

    1997-01-01

    Traveling can be dangerous for subjects with kidney insufficiency. Water loss or septic episodes can further increase renal dysfunction. Poor diet can lead to hyperkaliemia. Immunosuppression not only enhances the risk of infection but also complicates administration of live vaccines. Some antimalarial drugs are contraindicated (e.g. mefloquine) and others must be used with precaution. Prior to departure persons requiring hemodialysis should book sessions at centers listed in specialized guidebooks. In addition to infection, risks for hemodialysis patients include thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in case of dehydration or hypotension. In subjects with transplanted kidney, the risk of rejection can be enhanced either by poor compliance with immunodepressor treatment or by vaccination-induced antigenic stimulation. Pre-travel evaluation is necessary to determine metabolic, nutritional, and immune status. Subjects with kidney insufficiency and transplanted kidneys should be informed of the dangers and appropriate action in case of trouble.

  9. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  10. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  11. Lung and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caetano Mota, Patrícia; Vaz, Ana Paula; Castro Ferreira, Inês; Bustorff, Manuela; Damas, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the most common type of solid organ transplantation and kidney transplant recipients are susceptible to pulmonary complications of immunosuppressive therapy, which are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. To evaluate patients admitted to the Renal Transplant Unit (RTU) of Hospital de S. João with respiratory disease. We performed a retrospective study of all patients admitted to RTU with respiratory disease during a period of 12 months. Thirty-six patients were included. Mean age 55.2 (+/-13.4) years; 61.1% male. Immunosuppressive agents most frequently used were prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil associated with ciclosporin (38.9%) or tacrolimus (22.2%) or rapamycin (13.9%). Thirty-one patients (86.1%) presented infectious respiratory disease. In this group the main diagnoses were 23 (74.2%) pneumonias, 5 (16.1%) opportunistic infections, 2 (6.5%) tracheobronchitis, and 1 case (3.2%) of lung abscesses. Microbiological agent was identified in 7 cases (22.6%). Five patients (13.9%) presented rapamycin-induced lung disease. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 15 patients (41.7%), diagnostic in 10 cases (66.7%). Mean hospital stay was 17.1 (+/-18.5) days and no related death was observed. Respiratory infections were the main complications in these patients. Drug-induced lung disease implies recognition of its features and a rigorous monitoring of drug serum levels. A more invasive diagnostic approach was determinant in the choice of an early and more specific therapy.

  12. Renal Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    González León, Tania; Morera Pérez, Maricela

    2016-01-01

    The increase of the aging population corresponds with the rise of renal cancer in elderly patients. The distinction between functional and chronological age, quality of life, and survival estimate are important issues, among others, that should be considered in the management of renal cancer in elderly patients. We made this review with the purpose of synthesizing the most updated criteria regarding indications and outcomes of the different therapeutic options in the management of elderly patients with renal cancer, beginning from the physiologic considerations that characterize them, their capacity to tolerate different therapeutic possibilities, and the prognosis of the patients' risks and comorbidity assessment.

  13. Renal rickets-practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Rickets/osteomalacia is an important problem in a tropical country. Many cases are due to poor vitamin D intake or calcium deficient diets and can be corrected by administration of calcium and vitamin D. However, some cases are refractory to vitamin D therapy and are related to renal defects. These include rickets of renal tubular acidosis (RTA), hypophosphatemic rickets, and vitamin D dependent rickets (VDDR). The latter is due to impaired action of 1α-hydroxylase in renal tubule. These varieties need proper diagnosis and specific treatment. PMID:24251212

  14. Renal rickets-practical approach.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2013-10-01

    Rickets/osteomalacia is an important problem in a tropical country. Many cases are due to poor vitamin D intake or calcium deficient diets and can be corrected by administration of calcium and vitamin D. However, some cases are refractory to vitamin D therapy and are related to renal defects. These include rickets of renal tubular acidosis (RTA), hypophosphatemic rickets, and vitamin D dependent rickets (VDDR). The latter is due to impaired action of 1α-hydroxylase in renal tubule. These varieties need proper diagnosis and specific treatment.

  15. Imaging of Solid Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Kay, Fernando U; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Detection of solid renal masses has increased, although it has not resulted in significant mortality reduction from renal cell carcinoma. Efforts for improved lesion characterization have been pursued and incorporated in management algorithms, in order to distinguish clinically significant tumors from favorable or benign conditions. Concurrently, imaging methods have produced evidence supporting their role as useful tools not only in lesion detection but also characterization. In addition, newer modalities, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, and advanced applications of MR imaging, are being investigated. This article reviews the current role of different imaging methods in the characterization of solid renal masses.

  16. Replicative senescence in kidney aging, renal disease, and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Naesens, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Cellular or replicative senescence is classically seen as the key element of aging. In renal disease and after kidney transplantation, there is increasing evidence that replicative senescence pathways (p53 and p16) play a central role in disease progression and graft outcome, independent of chronological age. In this review, we summarize the current concepts in the molecular mechanisms of cellular senescence, and correlate these theories with the available literature on aging of native kidneys, kidney diseases, and outcome of renal allografts. Recent data illustrate the complex biology of senescence in vivo, and disprove the concept that senescence is an intrinsic injury process with immanent deleterious consequences. Senescence acts as a homeostatic mechanism that can even limit renal fibrosis, at least in animal studies. In a human setting, it remains to be investigated whether cellular senescence plays an active or a bystander role in fibrogenesis and atrophy of renal tissue.

  17. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  18. Renal and hypertensive complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: who is at risk?

    PubMed

    Bataille, P; Cardon, G; Bouzernidj, M; El Esper, N; Pruna, A; Ghazali, A; Westeel, P F; Achard, J M; Fournier, A

    1999-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is now used in the treatment of about 90% of renal and ureteral stones. Because of the non-punctual delivery of energy to the stone, a small volume of renal parenchyma is injured giving place to a fibrous scar which can be shown by highly resolutive imaging techniques like magnetic nuclear resonance. Isotopic clearances point to a reduction of 15% in the renal plasma flow on the side of the lithotripsy, but this alteration appears to be transient in nature. In a few cases an abrupt onset of transient hypertension has been reported in clear relation to a compressive perirenal hematoma. The responsibility of ESWL in the late occurrence of permanent hypertension is, however, still uncertain, probably because of the difficulty in showing that this occurrence is not only related to the older age of the patient. The American Food and Drug Administration-sponsored multicentric study begun in 1992 should solve this issue in the future. Recent articles suggest that altered renal function prior to ESWL would predict the late occurrence of hypertension and worsening of renal failure. Furthermore, age and the resistance index of arcuate or interlobar renal arteries (measured by Doppler) could help to screen patients at risk of developing hypertension. In practice in patients over 60 years of age and/or with a plasma creatinine of >to 300 micromol/l, ESWL should be performed with caution, and renal function and blood pressure should be carefully monitored.

  19. Bilateral Renal Artery Aneurysm: Percutaneous Treatment with Stent-Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, R.; Spinelli, A.; Pampana, E.; Fabiano, S.; Pendenza, G. Simonetti, G.

    2006-10-15

    A 51-year-old man with an 8-year history of hypertension (170/115 mmHg with two drugs) and altered renal function (5.6 mg/dl serum creatinine, 101 mg/dl BUN) was referred to our Department to evaluate the renal arteries and rule out renovascular hypertension. Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography revealed significant bilateral renal artery stenosis and the presence of bilateral renal artery aneurysms. A self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent-graft was deployed in each renal artery to treat the stenoses and to exclude the aneurysm. Postprocedural digital subtraction angiography confirmed the resolution of the renal artery stenoses and the complete exclusion of the aneurysms. At the 6 month follow-up, color Doppler confirmed normal patency of the renal arteries with complete exclusion of the aneurysms and significant reduction of the blood pressure (130/85 mmHg with one drug) and serum creatinine levels (2.1 mg/dl)

  20. Complications of sporadic, hereditary, and acquired renal cysts: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Rigiroli, Francesca; Villa, Federica; Bianco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Commonly encountered in the general adult and elderly population, in most cases simple renal cysts are confidently diagnosed on imaging studies and do not require further workup or treatment. However, large or growing renal cysts sometimes cause symptoms or signs such as hypertension, palpable mass, flank or abdominal pain, obstructive uropathy, and hematuria, which may indicate the need for minimally invasive percutaneous or laparoscopic treatment. Furthermore, severe complications such as cystic hemorrhage, rupture, or superinfection may occur, particularly in patients with polycystic renal disorders, either hereditary (namely adult polycystic kidney diseases) or acquired in chronic renal failure. This pictorial essay reviews and discusses the cross-sectional imaging appearances of symptomatic and complicated sporadic, hereditary, and acquired renal cysts. Early cross-sectional imaging with multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging or both, including contrast enhancement unless contraindicated by renal dysfunction, is warranted to investigate clinical and laboratory signs suggesting retroperitoneal hemorrhage or infection in patients with pre-existent renal cysts, particularly if large, multiple, or hereditary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Renal dysplasia in Beagle dogs: four cases.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Marc C; Shoieb, Ahmed M; Shirai, Norimitsu; Boucher, Germaine G; Brodie, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Anomalies of renal development comprise abnormalities in the amount of renal tissue (agenesis and hypoplasia); anomalies of renal position, form, and orientation; and renal dysplasia. There are previous reports of canine renal dysplasia in different breeds but none in the Beagle breed. This is the first report of renal dysplasia in this breed of dog. Morphologic descriptions of the range of microscopic features observed in four cases of renal dysplasia from preclinical studies in laboratory Beagle dogs are presented (including persistent primitive mesenchyme, persistence of metanephric ducts, asynchronous differentiation of nephrons, and atypical tubular epithelium), along with a basis for the classification of the lesion.

  2. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed.

  3. Scedosporium apiospermum causing brain abscess in a renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Singh, Divya

    2015-11-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is the asexual form of a rare fungus Pseudallescheria boydii that is usually present in the soil, sewage and dirty water. In immunocompromised patients, it is a rare infection involving multiple organs. We present a case of renal allograft recipient who developed fever two weeks post renal transplant. He was initially found to have dengue fever. After five days, he became drowsy and developed right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple irregular masses with associated edema consistent with fungal brain abscesses. Left parietal abscess was drained and he was started on voriconazole. His cyclosporine was stopped. Drained pus revealed fungal hyphae on potassium hydroxide stain and Scedosporium apiospermum on culture. Unfortunately, the patient died after five days. Scedosporium infections should be kept as a possibility in transplant recipients with disseminated infections, especially with a brain abscess. Despite antifungal therapy and surgical drainage, mortality rates are high.

  4. An unusual cause of acute renal failure: renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ozaltin, Fatih; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Orhan, Diclehan; Sari, Neriman; Caglar, Melda; Besbas, Nesrin; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2004-08-01

    Renal involvement is a common finding in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Acute renal failure at initial presentation due to lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys has been described infrequently. We report a 17-year-old male who presented with acute renal failure due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys, which necessitated hemodialysis. The diagnosis of B-cell NHL was established by tru-cut biopsy of the kidneys and the patient had an excellent response to high-dose chemotherapy with no major complication. The presence of extrarenal involvement in the testes and the retroperitoneal lymph nodes made the diagnosis of primary renal lymphoma debatable. However, considering the delay in diagnosis and the high proliferative rate of B-cell NHL, we might postulate that the disease had originated primarily in the kidneys. We recommend that in NHL cases with severe renal involvement, full-dose chemotherapy should be instituted with meticulous clinical and laboratory follow-up in order to improve clinical and renal failure status rapidly and to avoid further dissemination of NHL.

  5. [Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oki, Takashi; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Tahara, Hideo; Kino, Sigeo

    2011-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman visited our hospital with nausea and right flank pain. At first abdominal ultrasonography was performed, suggesting a right renal infarction. Computed tomography (CT) study of the abdomen with intravenous contrast was performed to determine the cause of the symptoms. The scan revealed poor enhancement in the lower half of the right kidney. She was diagnosed with a right renal infarction. She was initially treated with anticoagulant therapy, but 5 days later, she complained of nausea. This time, CT demonstrated exacerbation of a right renal infarction with renal artery dissection. Based on this finding, we performed a right nephrectomy. The result of pathology was segmental arterial mediolysis. She was discharged 12 days after the surgery and is doing well at 6 months after discharge. Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare disease. It constitutes approximately 0.05% of arteriographic dissections. In addition, spontaneous renal artery dissection shows nonspecific symptoms. Together, these two factors may cause a delay in diagnosis.

  6. Renal oxygenation in acute renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Amany; Ho, Julie; Ow, Connie P C; Eppel, Gabriela A; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Schlaich, Markus P; Evans, Roger G

    2014-05-01

    Tissue hypoxia has been demonstrated, in both the renal cortex and medulla, during the acute phase of reperfusion after ischemia induced by occlusion of the aorta upstream from the kidney. However, there are also recent clinical observations indicating relatively well preserved oxygenation in the nonfunctional transplanted kidney. To test whether severe acute kidney injury can occur in the absence of widespread renal tissue hypoxia, we measured cortical and inner medullary tissue Po2 as well as total renal O2 delivery (Do2) and O2 consumption (Vo2) during the first 2 h of reperfusion after 60 min of occlusion of the renal artery in anesthetized rats. To perform this experiment, we used a new method for measuring kidney Do2 and Vo2 that relies on implantation of fluorescence optodes in the femoral artery and renal vein. We were unable to detect reductions in renal cortical or inner medullary tissue Po2 during reperfusion after ischemia localized to the kidney. This is likely explained by the observation that Vo2 (-57%) was reduced by at least as much as Do2 (-45%), due to a large reduction in glomerular filtration (-94%). However, localized tissue hypoxia, as evidence by pimonidazole adduct immunohistochemistry, was detected in kidneys subjected to ischemia and reperfusion, particularly in, but not exclusive to, the outer medulla. Thus, cellular hypoxia, particularly in the outer medulla, may still be present during reperfusion even when reductions in tissue Po2 are not detected in the cortex or inner medulla.

  7. Renal failure in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mackelaite, Lina; Alsauskas, Zygimantas C; Ranganna, Karthik

    2009-07-01

    Renal failure in cirrhosis poses unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Laboratory values and predictive equations grossly overestimate renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Development of renal failure connotes a worse prognosis; mortality is especially high with hepatorenal syndrome. Classification of the causes of renal failure in patients with cirrhosis is provided with more extensive discussion of selected causes. Finally, a suggested diagnostic approach to renal failure in cirrhosis is given.

  8. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy were a helpful diagnostic clue of stenosis of the iliac segment proximal to the transplant renal artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, H; Saigo, K; Hasegawa, M; Akutsu, N; Maruyama, M; Otsuki, K; Matsumoto, I; Kawaguchi, T; Kitamura, H; Asano, T; Kenmochi, T; Itou, T; Matsubara, H

    2014-01-01

    Common iliac artery stenosis after renal transplantation is a rare complication; it can occur in the course of hypertension and renal dysfunction. We report a case of suspected renal allograft rejection with iliac artery stenosis proximal to a transplanted kidney. A 52-year-old man with a history of cadaveric kidney transplantation 26 years previously underwent a second cadaveric kidney transplantation in the left iliac fossa because of graft failure 3 years before. In June 2012, the patient had progressive renal dysfunction. In July, a percutaneous needle biopsy was taken, and it showed no rejection; however, his renal function continued to get worse through September. A percutaneous allograft renal biopsy was performed under ultrasound guidance and showed hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus and renin granules. Magnetic resonance angiography was used to evaluate the arteries in the pelvis and showed left common iliac artery stenosis, and a stent was placed. After percutaneous intervention, the patient's ankle brachial pressure index was within the normal range and the allograft function had improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Large Renal Artery Aneurysm Treated with Guglielmi Detachable Coils: Procedural and 4-Year Follow-up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Damascelli, Bruno; Bartorelli, Antonio L.; Ticha, Vladimira; Trabattoni, Daniela; Lanocita, Rodolfo

    2008-07-15

    A large aneurysm of the left renal artery was found incidentally during abdominal ultrasound in a 39-year-old woman with no medical or family history of cardiovascular disease. Vascular pathology with a dysplastic appearance was confirmed by magnetic resonance angiography and the patient was offered transcatheter embolization. Since the position and size of the neck of the aneurysm could not be determined at angiography, detachable platinum coils were used for occlusion. The procedure was performed without complications. During a 4-year follow-up no alterations of renal function, recanalization of the aneurysm, or perfusion defects in the rest of the left renal circulation were noted.

  10. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  11. Taurine and the renal system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Taurine participates in a number of different physiologic and biologic processes in the kidney, often reflected by urinary excretion patterns. The kidney is key to aspects of taurine body pool size and homeostasis. This review will examine the renal-taurine interactions relative to ion reabsorption; renal blood flow and renal vascular endothelial function; antioxidant properties, especially in the glomerulus; and the role of taurine in ischemia and reperfusion injury. In addition, taurine plays a role in the renal cell cycle and apoptosis, and functions as an osmolyte during the stress response. The role of the kidney in adaptation to variations in dietary taurine intake and the regulation of taurine body pool size are described. Finally, the protective function of taurine against several kidney diseases is reviewed. PMID:20804616

  12. Antibiotic managment in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Winter, R E

    1976-06-01

    This is a brief compilation of the work of many investigators. It includes facts about toxicity and recommendations about antibiotic management in patients with renal failure. As new data are accrued, changes in these recommendations will be necessary.

  13. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  14. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Karin M; Wu, Danny; Ebcioglu, Zeynep

    2007-12-01

    Women with renal disease face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy as they approach end-stage renal disease due to uremia. Renal transplantation has provided these patients the ability to return to a better quality of life, and for a number of women who are of child bearing age with renal disease, it has restored their fertility and provided the opportunity to have children. But, although fertility is restored, pregnancy in these women still harbors risk to the mother, graft, and fetus. Selected patients who have stable graft function can have successful pregnancies under the supervision of a multidisciplinary team involving maternal fetal medicine specialists and transplant nephrologists. Careful observation and management are required to optimize outcome for mother and fetus.

  15. Renal involvement in mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Bertini, Enrico; Salviati, Leonardo; Montini, Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial cytopathies constitute a group of rare diseases that are characterized by their frequent multisystemic involvement, extreme variability of phenotype and complex genetics. In children, renal involvement is frequent and probably underestimated. The most frequent renal symptom is a tubular defect that, in most severe forms, corresponds to a complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome. Incomplete proximal tubular defects and other tubular diseases have also been reported. In rare cases, patients present with chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis or cystic renal diseases. Finally, a group of patients develop primarily a glomerular disease. These patients correspond to sporadic case reports or can be classified into two major defects, namely 3243 A>G tRNA(LEU) mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this Educational Review, the principal characteristics of these diseases and the main diagnostic approaches are summarized.

  16. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  17. Kidney neoplasms: renal halo sign after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation--incidence and clinical importance in 101 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Schirmang, Todd C; Mayo-Smith, William W; Dupuy, Damian E; Beland, Michael D; Grand, David J

    2009-10-01

    To describe the incidence and clinical importance of the renal halo sign after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal neoplasms. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. The study population consisted of 101 consecutive patients with 106 solid renal neoplasms that were treated with percutaneous RFA. Postablation computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images were retrospectively reviewed by three board-certified radiologists to determine the presence of the renal halo sign. Statistical analyses were performed to determine reader agreement and assess the effect that tumor size and location, radiofrequency (RF) applicator type, RFA treatment time and success, maximum RFA treatment temperature, and number of RF applications performed had on development of the renal halo sign. The renal halo sign developed in 79 (75%) of the 106 ablated tumors. Average imaging follow-up lasted 25 months (range, 1-98 months). The renal halo sign appeared, on average, 6 months (range, 1 month to 3 years) after RFA. The renal halo sign resolved in five (6%) of 79 tumors treated. Interobserver agreement for the presence of the renal halo sign was high. Tumor size and location, RF applicator type, RFA treatment time and success, maximum RFA treatment temperature, and number of RF applications performed were not independent predictors of renal halo sign development. The renal halo sign is seen in 75% of patients after percutaneous RFA of renal neoplasms. It may decrease in size over time; however, it rarely disappears. It is important to recognize this sign, as it can be mistaken for recurrent tumor or angiomyolipoma by radiologists who are not familiar with RFA.

  18. From Pre-Existing Renal Failure to Perioperative Renal Protection: The Anesthesiologist’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Huti, Gentian; Sula, Hektor; Baftiu, Nehat; Kaci, Myzafer; Bodeci, Artan; Pesha, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-existing renal dysfunction presents specific features that anesthesiologists must deal with. Anesthesia and renal function are connected and can interfere with each other. Induced hypotension anesthesia and the toxic effects of anesthetic drugs can further deteriorate renal function. Evidence Acquisition Decreased renal function can prolong anesthetic drug effects by decreased elimination of these drugs. Anesthesia can deteriorate renal function and decreased renal function can interfere with drug elimination leading to their prolonged effect. The anesthesiologist must understand all the physiological aspects of the patient, renal protection, and the relationships between anesthetic drugs and renal function. This review article aims to summarize these aspects. Results Perioperative renal failure and renal protection is a crucial moment in clinical practice of every anesthesiologist. Conclusions Good knowledges for renal function remain a hallmark of daily practice of the anesthesiologist, considering renal function as an important determinant factor in anesthesia practice. PMID:27642570

  19. Glyoxalase I retards renal senescence.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yoichiro; Inagi, Reiko; Miyata, Toshio; Nagai, Ryoji; Arai, Makoto; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Itokawa, Masanari; Fujita, Toshiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2011-12-01

    Although kidney functions deteriorate with age, little is known about the general morphological alterations and mechanisms of renal senescence. We hypothesized that carbonyl stress causes senescence and investigated the possible role of glyoxalase I (GLO1), which detoxifies precursors of advanced glycation end products in the aging process of the kidney. We observed amelioration of senescence in GLO1-transgenic aged rats (assessed by expression levels of senescence markers such as p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1), and p16(INK4A)) and a positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SABG) staining, associated with reduction of renal advanced glycation end product accumulation (estimated by the amount of carboxyethyl lysine). GLO1-transgenic rats showed amelioration of interstitial thickening (observed as an age-related presentation in human renal biopsy specimens) and were protected against age-dependent decline of renal functions. We used GLO1 overexpression or knockdown in primary renal proximal tubular epithelial cells to investigate the effect of GLO1 on cellular senescence. Senescence markers were significantly up-regulated in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells at late passage and in those treated with etoposide, a chemical inducer of senescence. GLO1 cellular overexpression ameliorated and knockdown enhanced the cellular senescence phenotypes. Furthermore, we confirmed the association of decreased GLO1 enzymatic activity and age-dependent deterioration of renal function in aged humans with GLO1 mutation. These findings indicate that GLO1 ameliorates carbonyl stress to retard renal senescence. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Renal ammonia metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2013-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4(+) and 2 HCO3(-) for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3(-)-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4(+) trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4(+)-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K(+), and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis.

  1. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  2. Arterial spasm during renal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Beinart, C.; Sos, T.A.; Saddekni, S.; Weiner, M.A.; Sniderman, K.W.

    1983-10-01

    Spasm of the renal arteries during transluminal angioplasty is a well-documented phenomenon with serious potential sequelae, particularly in young patients with fibromusclar dysplasia. The authors report their experience in 98 cases (105 arteries). Tolazoline, lidocaine, nitrates (or calcium blockers, if available), and heparin should be administered either directly into the renal artery or systemically prior to angioplasty to decrease the incidence and severity of spasm.

  3. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  4. [Heterolateral renal dystopia (2 cases)].

    PubMed

    Anastasov, G; Peneva, S; Mushmov, D; Salambashev, L

    1982-01-01

    The authors observed two cases with crossed renal dystopia, to which venous urography, renal scintigraphy, echographic and gamma-chamber investigations were performed. The venous urography, in case of the appropriate symptomatics, is stressed to be able to establish the presence of heterolateral dystopia by as far as the distributional function of the anomaly is concerned--the gamma-chamber investigation is with the highest information value.

  5. Renal response to environmental toxics

    PubMed Central

    Finn, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Several characteristics of normal renal function increase the risk to the kidney of damage by environmental toxins. Due to the magnitude of renal blood flow the total amount of noxious substance delivered may be disproportionately high. Furthermore, the capacity to concentrate substances within the kidney by processes of filtration, reabsorption and secretion has the potential to increase the toxicity of agents which would otherwise not lead to tissue injury. Unfortunately, there are few tests of renal function which are able to detect early functional abnormalities and which, at the same time, are suited for screening purposes by virtue of their simplicity, cost and safety. Furthermore, interpretation of the tests is complicated by adaptive changes in renal function which occur with aging and in response to other disease processes. Environmental agents produce a wide spectrum of renal dysfunction. Acute renal damage follows exposure to glycols, organic solvents, heavy metals, diagnostic and therapeutic agents and a variety of miscellaneous substances. Chronic renal disease may take the form of isolated tubular defects as seen with cadmium, interstitial nephritis due to the ingestion of lead, or vascular damage induced by external radiation. Some forms of glomerulonephritis may also be related to environmental toxins as are certain tumors of the urinary tract. In a somewhat different fashion, patients whose renal function is limited by the presence of pre-existing disease may manifest toxicity from substances ordinarily excreted in the urine. Particular problems exist with the patients on dialysis, as they are at considerable risk to alterations in the environment. PMID:598348

  6. Joint inversions of two VTEM surveys using quasi-3D TDEM and 3D magnetic inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Vlad; Di Massa, Domenico; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In the current paper, we present results of a joint quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) inversion of two versatile time domain electromagnetic (VTEM) datasets, as well as a joint 3D inversion of associated aeromagnetic datasets, from two surveys flown six years apart from one another (2007 and 2013) over a volcanogenic massive sulphide gold (VMS-Au) prospect in northern Ontario, Canada. The time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were inverted jointly using the spatially constrained inversion (SCI) approach. In order to increase the coherency in the model space, a calibration parameter was added. This was followed by a joint inversion of the total magnetic intensity (TMI) data extracted from the two surveys. The results of the inversions have been studied and matched with the known geology, adding some new valuable information to the ongoing mineral exploration initiative.

  7. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism and Guide Field Strength on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lucas; Cassak, P.; Drake, J.; Gosling, J.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In two-ribbon flares, the fact that the ribbons separate in time is considered evidence of magnetic reconnection. However, in addition to the ribbons separating, they can also elongate (as seen in animations of, for example, the Bastille Day flare). The elongation is undoubtedly related to the reconnection spreading in the out-of-plane direction. Indeed, naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. For example, it was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the observation of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006), and has been seen in reconnection experiments. A sizeable out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is present at flare sites and in the solar wind. Here, we study the effect of dissipation mechanism and the strength of the guide field has on X-line spreading. We present results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, comparing spreading with the Hall term to spreading with anomalous resistivity. Applications to solar flares and magnetic reconnection in the solar wind will be discussed.

  8. Trans-Hudsonian far-field deformation effects in the Rae foreland: An integrated geological-3D magnetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, J. A.; Tschirhart, V.

    2017-03-01

    The intracratonic Rae cover sequence, deposited ca. 2.2-1.9 Ga, forms a useful marker for unravelling tectonic events that affected the Archean Rae Province at ca.2.0, 1.9 and 1.85 Ga. Polyphase deformation is recognized within the Rae cover rocks, including the 70 × 10 km Montresor belt, and attributed to distal effects of the ca. 1.85 Ga Trans-Hudson orogeny. In this contribution we explore the 3D geometry and structural history of the Montresor belt, previously considered to be a simple syncline lying unconformably on Archean basement. New geological, geophysical and geochronological results define a more complex history in which lower Montresor units were thrust-imbricated with basement gneisses and metamorphosed to the amphibolite facies. Mid-to upper greenschist facies upper Montresor units, exposed in an open synform, are superficially less deformed. However, using high-resolution aeromagnetic data and distinct magnetic marker units considered proxies for bedding, we constructed a set of forward models to explore the three-dimensional geometry of the belt. The re-analysis outlines a set of pre-synform structures defined by low-angle truncations of the magnetic markers. Geometric relationships indicate the presence of at least three faults at low angles to bedding, interpreted as D1 piggy-back thrusts, and bracketed by available geochronology between 1.924 and 1.87 Ga. D1 strain in the upper Montresor strata is significantly less intense than that further south in Rae cover rocks, consistent with a more distal foreland setting during the Trans-Hudson orogeny. The Montresor belt preserves a record of the Trans-Hudson tectonic style at relatively shallow crustal levels as a result of its foreland setting and structural history including a syn-orogenic extensional detachment event.

  9. The Need For High Resolution In Studies Of The 3-D Magnetic Field Structure Of AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, S. P.; Gabuzda, D. C.

    2009-08-01

    We are using ``broadband" (4.6 to 43 GHz) multi-frequency VLBA polarization observations of compact AGN to investigate the 3-D structure of their jet magnetic (B) fields. Observing at several frequencies, separated by short and long intervals, enables reliable determination of the distribution of Faraday Rotation, and thereby the intrinsic B field structure. Transverse Rotation Measure (RM) gradients were detected in the jets of 0954+658 and 1418+546, providing evidence for the presence of a helical B field surrounding the jet. The RM in the core regions of 2200+420 (BL Lac), 0954+658 and 1418+546 display different signs in different frequency-intervals (on different spatial scales); we suggest an explanation for this in terms of modest bends in a helical B field surrounding their jets. In future, polarization observations with a combination of VSOP-2 at 8, 22 and 43 GHz and ground arrays at frequencies with corresponding resolution will help map out the distributions of Faraday rotation, spectral index and the 3-D B field structure both across the jet and closer to the central engine, providing strong constraints for any jet B field models.

  10. Modeling of 3D magnetic equilibrium effects on edge turbulence stability during RMP ELM suppression in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Wilcox, R. S.; Wingen, Andreas; Cianciosa, Mark R.; ...

    2017-07-28

    Some recent experimental observations have found turbulent fluctuation structures that are non-axisymmetric in a tokamak with applied 3D fields. Here, two fluid resistive effects are shown to produce changes relevant to turbulent transport in the modeled 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium of tokamak pedestals with these 3D fields applied. Ideal MHD models are insufficient to reproduce the relevant effects. By calculating the ideal 3D equilibrium using the VMEC code, the geometric shaping parameters that determine linear turbulence stability, including the normal curvature and local magnetic shear, are shown to be only weakly modified by applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak.more » These ideal MHD effects are therefore not sufficient to explain the observed changes to fluctuations and transport. Using the M3D-C1 code to model the 3D equilibrium, density is shown to be redistributed on flux surfaces in the pedestal when resistive two fluid effects are included, while islands are screened by rotation in this region. Furthermore, the redistribution of density results in density and pressure gradient scale lengths that vary within pedestal flux surfaces between different helically localized flux tubes. This would produce different drive terms for trapped electron mode and kinetic ballooning mode turbulence, the latter of which is expected to be the limiting factor for pedestal pressure gradients in DIII-D.« less

  11. Age Dependent 3-D Magnetic Modeling of the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceanic Crust at Intermediate Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanez, Gonzalo A.; LaBrecque, John L.

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic modeling of the North Atlantic and Northeast pacific is performed at intermediate wavelengths using three models for the acquisition of a natural remanent magnetization. It is shown that a remanent magnetization which is dependent on the rustal age is the dominant source for the intermediate wavelength pattern in both basins.

  12. Renal stone formation among astronauts.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Robert A; Jones, Jeffrey A; Sams, Clarence F; Whitson, Peggy A

    2007-04-01

    With the continued construction of the International Space Station, humans are living longer in the microgravity environment of space. However, many questions still exist as to the physiological effects of spaceflight on the human body. Bone loss, cardiovascular changes, and muscle atrophy are well-documented health risks to humans during spaceflight. Another potential serious health complication is the development of renal stones. The development of a renal stone may not only impact the health of the crewmember, but also the success of the mission. A retrospective analysis of astronaut data from 24-h urine samples collected prior to launch and immediately after landing was performed. Urine characteristics associated with renal stone formation were analyzed and the relative injury supersaturations of stone-forming constituents calculated. In the current study, previously collected data to identify urinary factors associated with renal stone formation demonstrated an increased risk in astronauts who had actually formed a renal stone. Increased urinary supersaturation of the stone-forming salts was observed in those astronauts who formed renal stones. Similar changes in urinary supersaturation were noted among many astronauts after landing, indicating an increased postflight risk for stone formation. An assessment program should be undertaken to identify and evaluate astronauts with elevated risk factors prior to flight and immediately following landing. Individualized recommendations can be prescribed to astronauts and may include dietary changes, increased fluid intake, or medications to minimize the risk of stone formation.

  13. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  14. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  15. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, J S; Frey, D J; Matas, A J; Gillingham, K J; So, S S; Cook, M; Chavers, B; Mauer, S M; Nevins, T E

    1990-01-01

    The timing of renal transplantation in infants is controversial. Between 1965 and 1989, 79 transplants in 75 infants less than 2 years old were performed: 23 who were 12 months or younger, 52 who were older than 12 months; 63 donors were living related, 1 was living unrelated, and 15 were cadaver donors; 75 were primary transplants and 4 were retransplants. Infants were considered for transplantation when they were on, or about to begin, dialysis. All had intra-abdominal transplants with arterial anastomosis to the distal aorta. Sixty-four per cent are alive with functioning grafts. The most frequent etiologies of renal failure were hypoplasia (32%) and obstructive uropathy (20%); oxalosis was the etiology in 11%. Since 1983 patient survival has been 95% and 91% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival has been 86% and 73% at 1 and 5 years. For cyclosporine immunosuppressed patients, patient survival is 100% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival is 96% and 82% at 1 and 5 years. There was no difference in outcome between infants who were 12 months or younger versus those who were aged 12 to 24 months; similarly there was no difference between infants and older children. Sixteen (21%) patients died: 5 after operation from coagulopathy (1) and infection (4); and 11 late from postsplenectomy sepsis (4), recurrent oxalosis (3), infection (2), and other causes (2). Routine splenectomy is no longer done. There has not been a death from infection in patients transplanted since 1983. Rejection was the most common cause of graft loss (in 15 patients); other causes included death (with function) (7), recurrent oxalosis (3), and technical complications (3). Overall 52% of patients have not had a rejection episode; mean creatinine level in patients with functioning grafts is 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dL. Common postoperative problems include fever, atelectasis, and ileus. At the time of their transplants, the infants were small for age; but with a successful transplant, their growth, head

  16. Renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, M; Obialo, C; Hruska, K A

    1990-12-01

    Renal tubular acidosis refers to a group of disorders that result from pure tubular damage without concomitant glomerular damage. They could be hereditary (primary) or acquired (secondary to various disease states like sickle cell disease, obstructive uropathy, postrenal transplant, autoimmune disease, or drugs). The hallmark of the disorder is the presence of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with, or without, associated defects in potassium homeostasis, a UpH greater than 5.5 in the presence of systemic acidemia, and absence of an easily identifiable cause of the acidemia. There are three physiologic types whose basic defects are impairment of or a decrease in acid excretion, i.e., type 1 (dRTA); a failure in bicarbonate reabsorption, i.e., type 2 (pRTA); and deficiency of buffer or impaired generation of NH4+, i.e., type 4 RTA. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms have been postulated for these various types. pRTA is the least common of all in the adult population. It rarely occurs as an isolated defect. It is frequently accompanied by diffuse proximal tubule transport defects with aminoaciduria, glycosuria, hyperphosphaturia, and so forth (Fanconi syndrome). dRTA is associated with a high incidence of nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, osteodystrophy, and growth retardation (in children). Osteodystrophy also occurs in pRTA to a lesser degree and is believed to be secondary to hypophosphatemia. Patients with type 4 RTA usually have mild renal insufficiency from either diabetes mellitus or interstitial nephritis. Acute bicarbonate loading will result in a high fractional excretion of bicarbonate greater than 15% (FEHCO3- greater than 15%) in patients with pRTA, but FEHCO3- less than 3% in patients with dRTA. Type I patients will also have a low (U - B) PCO2 with bicarbonate loading. They are also unable to lower their urine pH to less than 5.5 with NH4Cl loading. The treatment of these patients involves avoidance of precipitating factors when possible, treatment

  17. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  18. Renal Hypoxia in CKD; Pathophysiology and Detecting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. Accumulating evidence suggests that CKD aggravates renal hypoxia, and in turn, renal hypoxia accelerates CKD progression. To eliminate this vicious cycle, hypoxia-related therapies, such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activation (prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibition) or NF-E2-related factor 2 activation, are currently under investigation. Clinical studies have revealed heterogeneity in renal oxygenation; therefore, the detection of patients with more hypoxic kidneys can be used to identify likely responders to hypoxia-oriented therapies. In this review, we provide a detailed description of current hypoxia detection methods. HIF degradation correlates with the intracellular oxygen concentration; thus, methods that can detect intracellular oxygen tension changes are desirable. The use of a microelectrode is a classical technique that is superior in quantitative performance; however, its high invasiveness and the fact that it reflects the extracellular oxygen tension are disadvantages. Pimonidazole protein adduct immunohistochemistry and HIF activation detection reflect intracellular oxygen tension, but these techniques yield qualitative data. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging has the advantage of low invasiveness, high quantitative performance, and application in clinical use, but its biggest disadvantage is that it measures only deoxyhemoglobin concentrations. Phosphorescence lifetime measurement is a relatively novel in vivo oxygen sensing technique that has the advantage of being quantitative; however, it has several disadvantages, such as toxicity of the phosphorescent dye and the inability to assess deeper tissues. Understanding the advantages and disadvantages of these hypoxia detection methods will help researchers precisely assess renal hypoxia and develop new therapeutics against renal hypoxia-associated CKD. PMID:28270773

  19. Postransplant lymphoproliferative disorder localized near the allograft in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kew, C E; Lopez-Ben, R; Smith, J K; Robbin, M L; Cook, W J; Gaston, R S; Deierhoi, M H; Julian, B A

    2000-03-15

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a complication of immunosuppression, develops in approximately 1% of renal allograft recipients. Typically, PTLD is a proliferation of B-cells associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection; it is said to be most often a systemic disease. Involvement occasionally is localized near the allograft. This is a retrospective analysis of all cases of PTLD in recipients of 1474 renal transplants performed at University of Alabama at Birmingham between 1993 and 1997. Of 14 patients developing PTLD, 10 had disease localized near the allograft. The mean interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 221 +/- 70 days. All patients presented with renal dysfunction; an ultrasound examination revealed a hilar mass, with hydronephrosis in five and stenosis of renal vessels in eight. No patient had lymphadenopathy, according to computerized tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging findings. After reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, seven required a nephrectomy because of rejection, progressive dysfunction, or mass enlargement. Tissue recovered in four patients was consistent with PTLD; the tumors in the remaining three patients were unresectable and regressed. One patient died 1 month after a nephrectomy, and another died 4 years after surgery; neither had evidence of PTLD when they died. Three patients retain functional grafts without clinical or radiographical evidence of progression. All patients with disseminated disease died. In a large cohort of renal allograft recipients, PTLD affected 1%. Disease localized near the allograft was the most common variant. For most patients with localized disease, the outcome was graft loss, and the mortality was low. Localized PTLD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction in the 1st posttransplant year.

  20. System for