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Sample records for renal cell populations

  1. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-04-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells.

  2. Renal transplant recipient with advanced HIV infection: graft and peripheral cell population analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Ian C; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Gómez-Martín, Diana; Lima, Guadalupe; Martin-Onraët, Alexandra; Sierra, Juan; Uribe-Uribe, Norma O; Vilatobá, Mario; Contreras, Alan G; Gabilondo, Bernardo; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Alberú, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The scenario of a renal transplant recipient who is diagnosed with HIV infection in the late post transplant period is very uncommon. The viral infection effect on immunologic stability, regulatory cells, and allogeneic response during immune quiescence and graft acceptance provides a fertile ground in organ transplantation research and translational immunology. PMID:25356218

  3. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  4. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care. PMID:27891093

  5. One-Carbon Metabolism Pathway Gene Variants and Risk of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hongzhou; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Shao, Pengfei; Qin, Chao; Yin, Changjun

    2013-01-01

    Background One-carbon metabolism is the basement of nucleotide synthesis and the methylation of DNA linked to cancer risk. Variations in one-carbon metabolism genes are reported to affect the risk of many cancers, including renal cancer, but little knowledge about this mechanism is known in Chinese population. Methods Each subject donated 5 mL venous blood after signing the agreement. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. 18 SNPs in six one-carbon metabolism-related genes (CBS, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, and TYMS) were genotyped in 859 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients and 1005 cancer-free controls by the Snapshot. Results Strong associations with ccRCC risk were observed for rs706209 (P = 0.006) in CBS and rs9332 (P = 0.027) in MTRR. Compared with those carrying none variant allele, individuals carrying one or more variant alleles in these two genes had a statistically significantly decreased risk of ccRCC [P = 0.001, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.06–0.90]. In addition, patients carrying one or more variant alleles were more likely to develop localized stage disease (P = 0.002, adjusted OR = 1.37, 95%CI = 1.11–1.69) and well-differentiated ccRCC (P<0.001, adjusted OR = 1.42, 95%CI = 0.87–1.68). In the subgroup analysis, individuals carrying none variant allele in older group (P = 0.007, adjusted OR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.49–0.91), male group (P = 0.007, adjusted OR = 0.71, 95%CI = 0.55–0.92), never smoking group (P = 0.002, adjusted OR = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.53–0.88) and never drinking group (P<0.001, adjusted OR = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.53–0.88) had an increased ccRCC risk. Conclusions Our results suggest that the polymorphisms of the one-carbon metabolism-related genes are associated with ccRCC risk in Chinese population. Future population-based prospective studies

  6. Age-dependent association between sex and renal cell carcinoma mortality: a population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haitao; Gu, Weijie; Gu, Chengyuan; Zhang, Hailiang; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-03-17

    Research on sex differences in renal cancer-specific mortality (RCSM), which considered the sex effect to be constant throughout life, has yielded conflicting results. This study hypothesized the sex effect may be modified by age, which is a proxy for hormonal status. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database (1988-2010) were used to identify 114,539 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study cohort was divided into three age groups using cutoffs of 42 and 58 years, which represent the premenopausal and postmenopausal periods. The cumulative incidence function and competing risks analyses were used to examine the effect of covariates on RCSM and other-cause mortality (OCM). In premenopausal period, male sex was a significant predictor of poor RCSM for both localized (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio [aSHR] = 1.63, P = 0.002) and advanced (aSHR = 1.20, P = 0.041) disease. In postmenopausal period, the sex disparity diminished (aSHR = 1.05, P = 0.16) and reversed (aSHR = 0.95, P = 0.017) in localized and advanced disease, respectively. On the contrary, similar trend was not found for OCM across all age groups. Our results demonstrated the sex effect on RCSM was strongly modified by age. These findings may aid in clinical practice and need further evaluation of underlying biological mechanisms.

  7. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios.

  8. Genetic variation in IGF1 predicts renal cell carcinoma susceptibility and prognosis in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qiang; Liang, Chao; Xue, Jianxin; Li, Pu; Li, Jie; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Qin, Chao; Lu, Qiang; Hua, Lixin; Shao, Pengfei; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) play an important role in the development and progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We evaluated the association of functional polymorphisms in IGF1 and IGFBP3 with susceptibility and prognosis of RCC. We genotyped nine potentially functional polymorphisms in IGF1 and IGFBP3 and assessed their association with risk of RCC in a two-stage case-control study compromising 1027 cases and 1094 controls, and with prognosis in a cohort of 311 patients. We found rs5742714 in the 3′-UTR of IGF1 was significantly associated with risk and prognosis of RCC. In the combined set, the rs5742714 GC/CC genotypes were significantly associated with decreased risk of RCC compared with the GG genotype (OR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68–0.98, P = 0.002). Furthermore, patients with the rs5742714 GC/CC genotypes showed improved survival than those with the GG genotype (Log-rank P = 0.025, HR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14–0.93). Besides, the rs5742714 GC/CC genotypes were associated with significantly decreased expression of IGF1 mRNA and lower IGF1 serum levels. Moreover, the luciferase reporter assays revealed the potential effect of rs5742714 genotype on the binding of microRNAs to IGF1. Our findings suggest that the IGF1 polymorphism rs5742714 may be a genetic predictor of susceptibility and prognosis of RCC. PMID:27976731

  9. Overall survival in renal cell carcinoma after introduction of targeted therapies: a Norwegian population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Beisland, Christian; Johannesen, Tom B; Klepp, Olbjorn; Axcrona, Ulrika; Torgersen, Knut Martin; Kowalski, Jan; Solli, Oddvar; Sandin, Rickard; Oldenburg, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background This population-wide retrospective, non-interventional registry study assessed changes in overall survival (OS) and factors influencing OS in Norwegian patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods Two population-wide health registries were used to identify all RCC patients with (mRCC) or without metastases diagnosed before (2002–2005) and after (2006–2008 and 2009–2011) introduction of targeted therapies. Median OS was estimated using Kaplan–Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to identify prognostic factors. Results Overall, 5,463 patients were diagnosed with RCC during 2002–2005 (n=1,898), 2006–2008 (n=1,631), and 2009–2011 (n=1,934); of these, 1,678 (31%) had mRCC. Patients diagnosed in 2009–2011 and 2006–2008 had significant (P<0.001) improvements in OS versus those diagnosed in 2002–2005: median OS, not reached and not reached versus 82.0 months in RCC; 14.0 and 12.0 months versus 9.0 months in mRCC. Similarly, OS improvements were seen in the primary and elderly (≥75 years) mRCC populations. Median OS was comparable (12 months) between clear cell and papillary mRCC, but it was longer (24.0 months) for chromophobe mRCC. Multivariate regression analyses showed that younger age, previous nephrectomy, and 1 or more prescriptions of targeted therapy were significantly associated with longer OS in mRCC patients. Conclusion OS increased in RCC and mRCC patients in Norway between 2002 and 2011 following introduction of targeted therapies. PMID:28144152

  10. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  11. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  12. Renal stem cells: fact or science fiction?

    PubMed

    McCampbell, Kristen K; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2012-06-01

    The kidney is widely regarded as an organ without regenerative abilities. However, in recent years this dogma has been challenged on the basis of observations of kidney recovery following acute injury, and the identification of renal populations that demonstrate stem cell characteristics in various species. It is currently speculated that the human kidney can regenerate in some contexts, but the mechanisms of renal regeneration remain poorly understood. Numerous controversies surround the potency, behaviour and origins of the cell types that are proposed to perform kidney regeneration. The present review explores the current understanding of renal stem cells and kidney regeneration events, and examines the future challenges in using these insights to create new clinical treatments for kidney disease.

  13. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Renal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bindroo, Sandiya; Varshney, Neha; Mittal, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma of the kidney is a rare entity with less than one hundred cases reported so far. It was previously considered to have some similarities to various other renal cancers although this tumor has distinct macroscopic, microscopic and immuno-histochemical features. It is now a well-established entity in renal neoplastic pathology and has been recognized as a distinct entity in the 2012 Vancouver classification of renal tumors. This review aims to give an overview of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma after extensive literature search using PubMed and CrossRef.

  14. PKCε inhibits isolation and stemness of side population cells via the suppression of ABCB1 transporter and PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK signaling in renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Fu, Shun Jun; Fan, Wen Zhe; Wang, Zhong Hua; Chen, Ze Bin; Guo, Sheng Jie; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2016-06-28

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a member of the novel PKC family, is known to be a transforming oncogene and tumor biomarker for many human solid cancers including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We isolated side population (SP) cells from the RCC 769P cell line, and proved that those cells possess cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics. In this study, to identify the function of PKCε in cancer stemness of 769P SP cells, we reduced the expression of PKCε in those cells, following the results demonstrated that PKCε depletion had a negative correlation with the existence of SP cells in 769P cell line. Down-regulation of PKCε also suppresses the CSC potential of sorted 769P SP cells in several ways: proliferation potential, resistance to chemotherapeutics and in vivo tumor formation ability. Our study also reveals that PKCε is associated with ABCB1 and this association probably contributed to the SP cells isolation from 769P cell line. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 is directly regulated by PKCε. Additionally, after the depletion of PKCε, the phosphorylation of pAkt, pStat3 and pERK was apparently suppressed in 769P SP cells, whereas PKCε overexpression could promote the phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3 and ERK in 769P Non-SP cells. Overall, PKCε down-regulation suppresses sorting and the cancer stem-like phenotype of RCC 769P SP cells through the regulation of ABCB1 transporter and the PI3K/Akt, Stat3 and MAPK/ERK pathways that are dependent on the phosphorylation effects. Thus, PKCε may work as an important mediator in cancer stem cell pathogenesis of renal cell cancer.

  15. IL-16 rs4778889 polymorphism contribution to the development of renal cell cancer in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yang, S X; Chen, F; Zhang, J W; Sun, Z Q; Chen, B P

    2016-06-10

    IL-16 plays an important role in affect the secretion of tumor-related inflammatory cytokines. We aimed to assess the role of interleukin-16 (IL-16) rs4778889 T/C and rs11556218 T/G polymorphisms in the occurrence of renal cell cancer (RCC). This study is composed of 274 RCC patients and 274 control subjects. Genotyping of polymorphisms was performed using polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. All statistical analysis was carried out by the SPSS statistical software package, version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Using conditional logistic regression analysis, the TC and CC genotypes of rs4778889 exhibited a higher risk of RCC, with adjusted ORs (and 95%CIs) of 1.79 (1.23-2.62) and 2.67 (1.29-5.69), respectively. Moreover, under dominant and recessive models, individuals carried the rs4778889 polymorphism was exhibited elevated RCC risk, with adjusted ORs (and 95%CI) of 1.93 (1.35-2.76) and 2.11 (1.05-4.45), respectively. No significant differences were observed in rs11556218 genotype frequencies between the study groups. In conclusion, the results of our study reveal an association between the IL-16 rs4778889 polymorphism and heightened risk of RCC.

  16. Sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Ehsan Taghizadeh; bin-Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Kadivar, Ali; Sabeti, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is among most important causes of death in recent decades. Whoever the renal cell carcinoma incidence is low but it seems it is more complicated than the other cancers in terms of pathophysiology and treatments. The purpose of this work is to provide an overview and also deeper insight to renal cell carcinoma and the steps which have been taken to reach more specific treatment and target therapy, in this type of cancer by developing most effective agents such as Sorafenib. To achieve this goal hundreds of research paper and published work has been overviewed and due to limitation of space in a paper just focus in most important points on renal cell carcinoma, treatment of RCC and clinical development of Sorafenib. The information presented this paper shows the advanced of human knowledge to provide more efficient drug in treatment of some complicated cancer such as RCC in promising much better future to fight killing disease.

  17. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  18. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  19. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  20. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  1. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  2. A Genetic Variant in pre-miR-27a Is Associated with a Reduced Renal Cell Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dongyan; Chu, Haiyan; Yan, Fu; Lv, Qiang; Qin, Chao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Meilin; Tong, Na; Zhang, Zhengdong; Yin, Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs to regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, development, and apoptosis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs895819 is located at the terminal loop of pre-miR-27a. Here, we aimed to investigate whether SNP rs895819 was associated with the development of renal cell cancer (RCC) in a Chinese population. Methods In this case-control study, we recruited 594 RCC patients and 600 cancer-free controls with frequency matched by age and sex. We genotyped this polymorphism using the TaqMan assay and assessed the effect of this polymorphism on RCC survival. Logistic regression model was used to assess the genetic effects on the development of RCC and interactions between rs895819 polymorphism and risk factors. Results Compared with AA homozygote, individuals carrying AG/GG genotypes had a statistically significant reduced susceptibility to RCC (adjusted OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.56–0.90). Furthermore, AG/GG genotypes were associated with reduced RCC susceptibility in localized clinical stage (adjusted OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.55–0.91), and similar effects were observed in well differentiated and poorly differentiated RCC (adjusted OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.55–0.93 for well differentiated, adjusted OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.28–0.93 for poorly differentiated). We also observed that rs895819 had multiplicative interactions with age and hypertension. However, the polymorphism did not influence the survival of RCC. Conclusion Our results suggest that the pre-miR-27a rs895819 polymorphism can predict RCC risk in a Chinese population. Larger population-based prospective studies should be used to validate our findings. PMID:23118855

  3. Biomarkers of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tin C; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased steadily in past few decades and is partially attributable to the increased utilization of cross-sectional imaging. Many of these carcinomas are small incidental discoveries, although a subset leads to locally advanced or distant disease. Although its molecular pathophysiology is not completely understood, knowledge of hereditary RCCs has shed light on some of the pathways involved. More recently, the rapid advances in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have allowed for a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the genetic aberrations that lead up to and result from the transformation of a renal tubular epithelial cell into a carcinoma. These discoveries have allowed for the development of novel therapeutics that target these pathways. They have also led to the development of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers that could radically change the way RCC is diagnosed and treated. Although some of the current investigations are nascent and it remains to be seen which biomarkers will become clinically available, many candidate biomarkers show promise and require external validation. Ultimately, biomarkers may allow for cost-effective screening of high-risk patients, the identification of aggressive cancers among small renal masses, the identification of high-risk patients, the detection of recurrences postoperatively with minimal imaging, and the ability to choose appropriate targeted therapies for patients with metastatic disease.

  4. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site. PMID:24455373

  5. Renal clear cell carcinoma and tonsil metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Macri, Gian Franco; Marinelli, Caterina; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site.

  6. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  7. Renal cell cancer among African Americans: an epidemiologic review.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2011-04-12

    Incidence rates for renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising more rapidly among blacks than whites, almost entirely accounted for by an excess of localized disease. This excess dates back to the 1970s, despite less access among blacks to imaging procedures in the past. In contrast, mortality rates for this cancer have been virtually identical among blacks and whites since the early 1990s, despite the fact that nephrectomy rates, regardless of stage, are lower among blacks than among whites. These observations suggest that renal cell cancer may be a less aggressive tumor in blacks. We have reviewed the epidemiology of renal cell cancer, with emphasis on factors which may potentially play a role in the observed differences in incidence and mortality patterns of renal cell cancer among blacks and whites. To date, the factors most consistently, albeit modestly, associated with increased renal cell cancer risk in epidemiologic studies among whites--obesity, hypertension, cigarette smoking--likely account for less than half of these cancers, and there is virtually no epidemiologic evidence in the literature pertaining to their association with renal cell cancer among blacks. There is a long overdue need for detailed etiologic cohort and case-control studies of renal cell cancer among blacks, as they now represent the population at highest risk in the United States. In particular, investigation of the influence on renal cell cancer development of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, both of which occur substantially more frequently among blacks, is warranted, as well as investigations into the biology and natural history of this cancer among blacks.

  8. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Great Imitator

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indraneel; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Suresh; Talreja, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRC) is a rare renal tumor. Patients are usually asymptomatic; it is usually detected incidentally, during imaging studies for Bosniak type III and type IV renal cysts. These tumors rarely metastasize. The role of targeted therapy in such rare tumors is still controversial. We report a case of TCRC initially presented as a Bosniak type II renal cyst and was discovered ultimately to be a metastatic disease. This type of presentation might broaden our understanding of this rare disease. PMID:27601972

  9. The renal microenvironment modifies dendritic cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chessa, Federica; Mathow, Daniel; Wang, Shijun; Hielscher, Thomas; Atzberger, Ann; Porubsky, Stefan; Gretz, Norbert; Burgdorf, Sven; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Popovic, Zoran V

    2016-01-01

    Renal dendritic cells are a major component of the renal mononuclear phagocytic system. In the renal interstitium, these cells are exposed to an osmotic gradient, mainly sodium, whose concentration progressively increases towards inner medulla. Renal allograft rejection affects predominantly the cortex, suggesting a protective role of the renal medullary micromilieu. Whether osmolar variations can modulate the function of renal dendritic cells is currently undefined. Considering the central role of dendritic cells in promoting allorejection, we tested whether the biophysical micromilieu, particularly the interstitial osmotic gradient, influences their alloreactivity. There was a progressive depletion of leukocytes towards the medulla of homeostatic kidney. Only macrophages opposed this tendency. Flow cytometry of homeostatic and post-transplant medullary dendritic cells revealed a switch towards a macrophage-like phenotype. Similarly, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells developed ex vivo in sodium chloride-enriched medium acquired a M2-like signature. Microarray analysis of allotransplant dendritic cells posed a medullary downregulation of genes mainly involved in alloantigen recognition. Gene expression profiles of both medullary dendritic cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells matured in hyperosmolar medium had an overlap with the macrophage M2 signature. Thus, the medullary environment inhibits an alloimmune response by modulating the phenotype and function of dendritic cells.

  10. Uptake of Polymyxin B into Renal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Chang, Kai-Tai; Yin, Taijun; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxin B is increasingly used as a treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. Using a mammalian kidney cell line, we demonstrated that polymyxin B uptake into proximal tubular epithelial cells was saturable and occurred primarily through the apical membrane, suggesting the involvement of transporters in the renal uptake of polymyxin B. Megalin might play a role in the uptake and accumulation of polymyxin B into renal cells. PMID:24733472

  11. A bioartificial renal tubule device embedding human renal stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Sciancalepore, Anna Giovanna; Sallustio, Fabio; Girardo, Salvatore; Gioia Passione, Laura; Camposeo, Andrea; Mele, Elisa; Di Lorenzo, Mirella; Costantino, Vincenzo; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We present a bio-inspired renal microdevice that resembles the in vivo structure of a kidney proximal tubule. For the first time, a population of tubular adult renal stem/progenitor cells (ARPCs) was embedded into a microsystem to create a bioengineered renal tubule. These cells have both multipotent differentiation abilities and an extraordinary capacity for injured renal cell regeneration. Therefore, ARPCs may be considered a promising tool for promoting regenerative processes in the kidney to treat acute and chronic renal injury. Here ARPCs were grown to confluence and exposed to a laminar fluid shear stress into the chip, in order to induce a functional cell polarization. Exposing ARPCs to fluid shear stress in the chip led the aquaporin-2 transporter to localize at their apical region and the Na(+)K(+)ATPase pump at their basolateral portion, in contrast to statically cultured ARPCs. A recovery of urea and creatinine of (20±5)% and (13±5)%, respectively, was obtained by the device. The microengineered biochip here-proposed might be an innovative "lab-on-a-chip" platform to investigate in vitro ARPCs behaviour or to test drugs for therapeutic and toxicological responses.

  12. Perioperative Considerations in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Kate; Vasdev, Nikhil; Ashead, Jim; Lane, Tim; Hanbury, Damian; Nathan, Paul; Gowrie-Mohan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma are complex, with the potential for significant complications, and require extensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative management. This article discusses, in depth, the necessary considerations in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27833463

  13. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  14. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Paget’s disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget’s disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget’s disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget’s disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget’s disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget’s disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone. PMID:27660736

  15. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgiades, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults. Nephron sparing resection (partial nephrectomy) has been the “gold standard” for the treatment of resectable disease. With the widespread use of cross sectional imaging techniques, more cases of renal cell cancers are detected at an early stage, i.e. stage 1A or 1B. This has provided an impetus for expanding the nephron sparing options and especially, percutaneous ablative techniques. Percutaneous ablation for RCC is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection or when there is a need to preserve renal function due to comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. During the last few years, percutaneous cryoablation has been gaining acceptance as a curative treatment option for small renal cancers. Clinical studies to date indicate that cryoablation is a safe and effective therapeutic method with acceptable short and long term outcomes and with a low risk, in the appropriate setting. In addition it seems to offer some advantages over radio frequency ablation (RFA) and other thermal ablation techniques for renal masses.

  16. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E.R.; Yates, J.R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to prevent morbidity and mortality by appropriate screening. In medical research recent advances in molecular genetics offer the prospect of isolating the genes involved in the pathogenesis of familial RCC and of the more common sporadic cases. In this article we review the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited renal cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma). PMID:1997093

  17. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor, and renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma relationship of 3 types of renal tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondrej; Compérat, Eva Maria; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor has been described in 2000, followed by description of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma in 2006. Discussions about possible relationship of both tumors were published since their description. The main differential diagnostic feature was considered presence/absence of fibroleiomyomatous stroma-relationship of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor in stroma-rich tumors. However, it was shown that stroma is reactive and nonneoplastic by its nature and that all other histologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular-genetic features of both entities are identical. In upcoming World Health Organization classification of renal tumors (2016), both lesions are considered as a single entity (clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma [CCPRCC]). Most published cases followed the benign/indolent clinical course. In addition, most tumors has normal status of VHL gene (methylation, LOH 3p, mutations); however, CCPRCC was referred in patients with VHL syndrome. Another issue covered by this review is possible relationship of CCPRCC and "renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma" (RCCLS). Renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma shows clear cell cytology and abundant leiomyomatous stroma. Some of RCCLS are positive for cytokeratin 7; some are negative. Similar situation exists for relation of RCCLS and VHL gene abnormalities. It is so far unclear whether any relation between CCPRCC and RCCLS exists. From all published studies, it seems that these tumors are less likely related to each other.

  18. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  19. Interdigitating reticulum cells in human renal grafts.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, T; Onoda, H

    1991-01-01

    Seventeen human renal graft biopsies taken 1 h to 50 days after transplantation and 3 human renal non-graft biopsies (2 minimal change and 1 non-tumour portion of angiomyolipoma) were investigated with immunoelectron microscopy in order to identify interdigitating reticulum cells (IDC) or dendritic cells (DC) in renal tissues. The antibodies used consisted of a rabbit polyclonal antibody of antihuman S100 beta protein, mouse monoclonal antibodies of antihuman HLA-DR, anti-CD3, and anti-CD1a. IDC or DC were identified in 11 renal grafts. They were found both in the glomerular and interstitial (peritubular) capillary lumens but not in the interstitium of 1 case: both were present in the interstitial capillary lumens and interstitium of another case, and in the interstitium only of 9 cases. In the remaining 6 grafts and 3 non-grafts they were not detected. These 6 grafts and 3 non-grafts did not show any pathological change except for foot process fusion of the glomerular epithelia in 2 cases of minimal change. These findings suggest that IDC or DC are not normally present in human renal tissues. The presence of the cell in the glomerular and peritubular capillary lumens of a biopsy taken after 1 h and their presence in the interstitial capillary lumens of another graft biopsy, suggest that the IDC or DC in human renal grafts are derived from recipients, not donors, and that they migrate from the circulating blood toward the interstitium.

  20. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    improves renal function and structure in other models of renal failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol...cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal. 305:F1804- F1812 6. Mason SB...successful long-term kidney cell engraftment and renal regeneration in diabetic nephropathy and also cell auto-transplants (9). We used adult

  1. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid transformation.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Neil A; Ayala, Alberto G; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2003-10-01

    We present a rare case of a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma that progressed to a high-grade spindle cell sarcoma. The tumor affected a 50-year-old man who had presented with right upper quadrant discomfort and hematuria and subsequently underwent a right radical nephrectomy. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of two distinct components, a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and a sarcomatoid component. The sarcomatoid component had exhibited aggressive behavior by spreading to a regional lymph node. This case report shows that chromophobe carcinoma can develop a sarcomatoid transformation with a high propensity for invasive growth and metastasis.

  2. Renal failure in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Y; Elliott-Mills, D; Powars, D

    1996-12-01

    ESRD is a major complication in young adults with sickle cell anemia. As more patients with sickle cell anemia reach the third and fourth decades of life, the incidence of clinically apparent renal insufficiency will increase. As we understand the pathophysiology of renal damage and the effects of various therapies on the sickle renal vasculature, we can tailor specific management without further compromising already impaired renal function. Diagnostic clues must be recognized prior to the onset of irreversible damage, with appropriate intervention initiated at each age group. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only available cure for SCA at the present time. The demonstration that several distinct haplotypes of the beta s gene cluster on chromosome 11 influence the clinical expression of sickle cell anemia may be useful in delineating children who are at high risk for severe disease, and hence candidates for such hazardous therapeutic interventions as BMT prior to onset of clinically discernable disease. Current BMT preparative regimens can produce renal cortical and pulmonary toxicity, posing a patient selection problem in those cases in which the vasculopathy of the major organs is at an early stage and might be potentially repairable. Gene therapy without toxic preparative regimens is the ultimate answer. The challenge for the near future is the development of effective early therapeutic intervention during childhood and young adulthood.

  3. Local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Thomas; Xu, Hua; Siegel, Cory D; Krichevsky, Igor E

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell apoptosis contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in neuronal and lymphocytic cell lines. We examined the effects of chronic (48 h) local anesthetic treatment (lidocaine, bupivacaine and tetracaine) on human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. Apoptosis induction was assessed by detecting poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase fragmentation, caspase activation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, DNA laddering and by cellular morphology. Cell death was quantified by measuring neutral red dye uptake and lactate dehydrogenase released into the cell culture medium. All 3 local anesthetics caused concentration-dependent cell death, induced HK-2 cell apoptosis and potentiated TNF-alpha induced apoptosis. Local anesthetics induced HK-2 cell apoptosis by activation of caspases 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9. ZVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked the local anesthetic induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. Local anesthetics also inhibited the activities of anti-apoptotic kinases protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated mitrogen-activated protein kinase. Local anesthetic's pro-apoptotic effects are independent of sodium channel inhibition as tetrodotoxin, a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, failed to mimic local anesthetic-mediated induction or potentiation of HK-2 cell apoptosis. We conclude that local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptotic signaling by caspase activation and via inhibition of pro-survival signaling pathways.

  4. Essential but differential role for CXCR4 and CXCR7 in the therapeutic homing of human renal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Ronconi, Elisa; Lazzeri, Elena; Sagrinati, Costanza; Ballerini, Lara; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Parente, Eliana; Mancina, Rosa; Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Becherucci, Francesca; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Gesualdo, Loreto; Rotondi, Mario; Maggi, Enrico; Lasagni, Laura; Serio, Mario; Romagnani, Sergio; Romagnani, Paola

    2008-02-18

    Recently, we have identified a population of renal progenitor cells in human kidneys showing regenerative potential for injured renal tissue of SCID mice. We demonstrate here that among all known chemokine receptors, human renal progenitor cells exhibit high expression of both stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7. In SCID mice with acute renal failure (ARF), SDF-1 was strongly up-regulated in resident cells surrounding necrotic areas. In the same mice, intravenously injected renal stem/progenitor cells engrafted into injured renal tissue decreased the severity of ARF and prevented renal fibrosis. These beneficial effects were abolished by blocking either CXCR4 or CXCR7, which dramatically reduced the number of engrafting renal progenitor cells. However, although SDF-1-induced migration of renal progenitor cells was only abolished by an anti-CXCR4 antibody, transendothelial migration required the activity of both CXCR4 and CXCR7, with CXCR7 being essential for renal progenitor cell adhesion to endothelial cells. Moreover, CXCR7 but not CXCR4 was responsible for the SDF-1-induced renal progenitor cell survival. Collectively, these findings suggest that CXCR4 and CXCR7 play an essential, but differential, role in the therapeutic homing of human renal progenitor cells in ARF, with important implications for the development of stem cell-based therapies.

  5. Concurrent Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Patient With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Khallouk, Abdelhak; Ahallal, Younes; Doublali, Mbarek; Tazi, Mohamed Fadl; Mellas, Soufiane; el Fassi, Mohamed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. These tumors are predominantly benign, although malignant forms do exist and are known to be associated with renal cell carcinoma. This case report describes a patient with tuberous sclerosis and massive bilateral AML. Total right nephrectomy was performed; histopathologic examination revealed the coexistence of AML and clear cell renal carcinoma in the same kidney. Because differentiation between renal cell carcinoma and AML with minimal or no fat component can be difficult, an accurate diagnosis is critical in the management of renal AML. PMID:20111634

  6. Concurrent bilateral renal angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma in a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Khallouk, Abdelhak; Ahallal, Younes; Doublali, Mbarek; Tazi, Mohamed Fadl; Mellas, Soufiane; El Fassi, Mohamed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. These tumors are predominantly benign, although malignant forms do exist and are known to be associated with renal cell carcinoma. This case report describes a patient with tuberous sclerosis and massive bilateral AML. Total right nephrectomy was performed; histopathologic examination revealed the coexistence of AML and clear cell renal carcinoma in the same kidney. Because differentiation between renal cell carcinoma and AML with minimal or no fat component can be difficult, an accurate diagnosis is critical in the management of renal AML.

  7. Diagnostic value of routine bone scintigraphy renal imaging in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, M.B.; Konnak, J.W.; Grossman, H.B.

    1989-05-01

    Technetium-99m-phosphate compounds used in bone scanning are excreted by the kidney, and excellent renal images can be obtained on routine bone scintigrams. The preoperative bone scans of 49 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1981 and 1985 were reviewed for renal imaging. Ninety-four percent of the patients had abnormal bone scan renal images (82% had focal decreased uptake, and 12% had focal increased uptake). Six percent of the renal images were symmetrical bilaterally. When bone scans are employed in the postoperative follow-up of patients with renal cancer, they can be used to assess the status of the remaining kidney.

  8. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is an autosomal-dominant hereditary syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the FH gene that encodes the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH). HLRCC patients are predisposed to develop cutaneous leiomyomas, multiple, symptomatic uterine fibroids in young women resulting in early hysterectomies, and early onset renal tumors with a type 2 papillary morphology that can progress and metastasize, even when small. Since HLRCC-associated renal tumors can be more aggressive than renal tumors in other hereditary renal cancer syndromes, caution is warranted, and surgical intervention is recommended rather than active surveillance. At-risk members of an HLRCC family who test positive for the familial germline FH mutation should undergo surveillance by annual magnetic resonance imaging from the age of 8 years. Biochemical studies have shown that FH-deficient kidney cancer is characterized by a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis. It is hoped that through ongoing clinical trials evaluating targeted molecular therapies, an effective form of treatment for HLRCC-associated kidney cancer will be developed that will offer an improved prognosis for individuals affected with HLRCC-associated kidney cancer. PMID:25018647

  9. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  10. Diagnosis of adults Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma by immunohistochemistry and FISH assays: clinicopathological data from ethnic Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Gu, Chengyuan; Wang, Hongkai; Chang, Kun; Yang, Xiaoqun; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Dai, Bo; Zhu, Yao; Shi, Guohai; Zhang, Hailiang; Ye, Dingwei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the utility of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay in diagnosis of Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma (Xp11.2 RCC) and to compare the clinicopathological features between adult Xp11.2 RCC and non-Xp11.2 RCC. 76 pathologically suspected Xp11.2 RCCs were recruited from our institution. Both TFE3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and TFE3 FISH assay were performed for the entire cohort. The progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. FISH analysis confirmed 30 Xp11.2 RCCs, including 28 cases with positive TFE3 immunostaining and 2 cases with negative immunostaining. The false-positive and false-negative rates were 6.7% (2/30) and 4.3% (2/46), respectively, for TFE3 IHC compared with FISH assay. Xp11.2 RCC was significantly associated with higher pathological stage and Fuhrman nuclear grade compared with non-Xp11.2 RCC (P < 0.05). The median PFS and OS for TFE3 FISH-positive group were 13.0 months (95% CI, 8.4–17.6 months) and 50.0 months (95% CI, 27.6–72.4 months), respectively, while the median PFS and OS had not been reached for TFE3 FISH-negative group. In conclusion, TFE3 break-apart FISH assay is a highly useful and standard diagnostic method for Xp11.2 RCC. Adult Xp11.2 RCC is clinically aggressive and often presents at advanced stage with poor prognosis. PMID:26880493

  11. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  12. Regenerative medicine for the kidney: renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Akito; Nakasatomi, Masao; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney has the capacity for regeneration and repair after a variety of insults. Over the past few decades, factors that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. By using kidney injury animal models, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic growth factors, transcription factors, and extracellular matrix in this process has been examined. The identification of renal stem cells in the adult kidney as well as in the embryonic kidney is an active area of research. Cell populations expressing putative stem cell markers or possessing stem cell properties have been found in the tubules, interstitium, and glomeruli of the normal kidney. Cell therapies with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have been highly effective for the treatment of acute or chronic renal failure in animals. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are also utilized for the construction of artificial kidneys or renal components. In this review, we highlight the advances in regenerative medicine for the kidney from the perspective of renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapies and discuss the issues to be solved to realize regenerative therapy for kidney diseases in humans.

  13. Giant kidney worms in a patient with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Jemima; Lombardo, Lindsay; Janda, William M; Hollowell, Courtney M P

    2016-03-07

    Dioctophyma renale (D. renale), or giant kidney worms, are the largest nematodes that infect mammals. Approximately 20 cases of human infection have been reported. We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a recent history of unintentional weight loss and painless haematuria, passing elongated erythematous tissue via his urethra. CT revealed a left renal mass with pulmonary nodules and hepatic lesions. On microscopy, the erythematous tissue passed was identified as D. renale. On subsequent renal biopsy, pathology was consistent with renal cell carcinoma. This is the first reported case of concomitant D. renale infection and renal cell carcinoma, and the second reported case of D. renale infection of the left kidney alone.

  14. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol. Renal in press) and in PKD (figure 1). 6    Figure 3...with SAA1 positive cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal, in press 6...survival and kidney function in diverse models of renal 5    Figure 2. The power of cytotherapy: When compared to no cell (C) groups, treatment of

  15. Genomics and epigenomics of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maher, Eamonn R

    2013-02-01

    Kidney cancer accounts for about 2% of all cancers and worldwide >250,000 new cases of kidney cancer are diagnosed each year. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common form of adult kidney cancer and this review describes our current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic basis of sporadic RCC. Though to date major advances in understanding the underlying the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have often been derived from studies of rare familial forms of renal cell carcinoma, large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies of sporadic tumours are beginning to provide clearer pictures of the genomic and epigenomic landscape of RCC and the key pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of the disease. Although current knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of RCC is incomplete, and mostly relates to clear cell (conventional) RCC, the next five years will see an unprecedented flood of genomic and epigenomic data and the key future challenges will relate to the utilisation of this data to develop novel genetic and epigenetic markers for diagnosis and prognosis and to develop novel targeted therapies in order to enable an age of personalised medicine.

  16. Composite renal cell carcinoma with clear cell renal cell carcinomatous and carcinoid tumoral elements: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, A; Delaunay, C; Gauchotte, G; Oliver, A; Boudrant, G; Montagne, K

    2010-02-01

    Renal endocrine tumours are extremely rare, and carcinoid tumoral elements in renal cell carcinoma have never been reported. This is the first report of a composite renal cell carcinoma containing a clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with carcinoid tumoral elements, in a patient with synchronous metastatic disease. In the absence of specific radiological and clinical manifestations, typical morphological features as well as an immunostaining profile of neuroendocrine differentiation were identified by microscopy. Secondary nodal and liver localisations were characterised by carcinoid elements only. Despite antiangiogenic therapy, liver metastasis progressed, suggesting that adjuvant therapy cannot be based on the presence of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma component. In this context, extensive tissue sampling is recommended to reveal the endocrine component that is the most aggressive element of such a composite carcinoma.

  17. Hereditary Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, 1 cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos that do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  18. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  19. Diabetes and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samy L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Luna, Maria; Werner, Sherry A

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives: There is evidence that the incidence of solid tumors is markedly increased in patients with diabetes mellitus. In the current study, we investigate the association between diabetes and renal cancer. Patients and Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis of 473 patients who underwent nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was performed. Diabetic RCC patients were screened for age, gender, ethnicity, HgA1C, glucose levels and renal function. Results: Of the 473 cases with RCC, we identified 120 patients (25.4%) with a history of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes in RCC patients was higher in female than male subjects and in Hispanic compared to White and Other ethnic backgrounds. At diagnosis, the majority of diabetic RCC patients were 50-59 years of age. In diabetic RCC cases, clear cell type histology (92.0%), nuclear grade 2 (56.1%) and tumor size range from 1-5 cm (65.7%) were the most common in each category. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that diabetic RCC patients have a predominance of localized, small clear cell RCC. In addition, females with a history of RCC have a higher frequency of diabetes compared to males. This is the first report of clinical and histopathological features of RCC associated with diabetes. PMID:22232697

  20. Synchronous Renal Neoplasm: Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma in the Same Kidney.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Huerto, Miguel Armando; Chávez-Valencia, Venice; Lagunas-Rangel, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography in a 64 year-old male presenting hematuria showed two malignant tumors in the left kidney, thus radical nephrectomy was realized. In histological preparations a clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a papillary urothelial carcinoma were identified occurring synchronously, which is a rare occurrence having only about 50 cases reported in the literature.

  1. Honey induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Afshari, Jalil Tavakkol; Davoodi, Saiedeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The fact that antioxidants have several preventative effects against different diseases, such as coronary diseases, inflammatory disorders, neurologic degeneration, aging, and cancer, has led to the search for food rich in antioxidants. Honey has been used as a traditional food and medical source since ancient times. However, recently many scientists have been concentrating on the antioxidant property of honey. By use of human renal cancer cell lines (ACHN), we investigated the antiproliferative activity, apoptosis, and the antitumor activity of honey. Materials and Methods: The cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with 10% fetal bovine serum treated with different concentrations of honey for 3 consecutive days. Cell viability was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) by flow cytometry. Results: Honey decreased the cell viability in the malignant cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The IC 50 values against the ACHN cell lines were determined as 1.7 ± 0.04% and 2.1 ± 0.03% μg/mL after 48 and 72 h, respectively. Honey induced apoptosis of the ACHN cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by flow cytometry histogram of treated cells. Conclusion: It might be concluded that honey may cause cell death in the ACHN cells, in which apoptosis plays an important role. Most of the drugs used in the cancer treatment are apoptotic inducers, hence apoptotic nature of honey is considered vital. Therefore, it prompted us to investigate honey as a potential candidate for renal cancer treatment. PMID:21472079

  2. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  3. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  4. Malignancies in a renal transplant population: The St. Michael's Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Saleeb, R.; Faragalla, H.; Yousef, G. M.; Stewart, R.; Streutker, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Previous publications have shown an increased incidence of various malignancies amongst renal transplant populations. The objective of this study was to analyze the rate and types of malignancies occurring in the St. Michael's Hospital renal transplant population and to determine whether our results were comparable to those previously published. Methods: After approval by the hospital's research ethic board, review of the records and pathology of the 1584 patients in the renal transplant clinic database patients was performed. The reports dated back to the year 1970. Results: Amongst the 1584 renal transplant patients, 106 patients with 132 dysplastic and malignant posttransplant lesions were identified. The highest incidence amid the malignancies was in nonmelanoma skin malignancies squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma, and Kaposi sarcoma, with a total of 32 patients having 54 separate tumors (2.02% of all patients, 43.2% of tumors). Following skin tumors in incidence were genitourinary (28 tumors), gastrointestinal tract (GIT) lesions (8 adenocarcinomas, 14 dysplastic lesions, 1 low grade neuroendocrine tumor/carcinoid), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) (10 cases), gynecologic (6 carcinomas), cervical/anal/vulvar dysplasia and invasive (SCCs) (4), and thyroid (3 papillary tumors). Nine patients had tumors of multiple sites/types. With respect to outcome, 14 patients died of malignancy, with the highest mortality being in the GIT malignancies (six patients). Second in mortality were the PTLD and skin tumor groups. Discussion: Information on the incidence and outcome of various malignancies in renal transplant patients is important in designing guidelines for the follow-up of these patients regarding tumor screening and prevention. The rate of malignancies in our group is comparable to that reported in other centers. PMID:27141185

  5. Isolation and characterization of cancer stem cells in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Rutigliano, Monica; Vavallo, Antonio; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several studies have investigated the presence of cancer stem cells in kidney cancer, performed characterization, and compared their profile with the normal stem cell counterparts. CD133, alone or in combination with other molecular markers, has been used to isolate normal and cancer stem cells from different sources, including renal carcinoma; however, it is still a matter of debate whether CD133+ cells really represent the main tumorigenic population within the heterogeneous pool of cancer cells that characterize this tumor. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current findings related to cancer stem cells isolation in renal cell carcinoma, focusing on controversies about their origin and the identification of a specific marker.

  6. Renal allograft rejection: possible involvement of lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J A; Forsythe, J L; Proud, G; Taylor, R M

    1989-01-01

    Human renal allograft tissue was recovered at transplant nephrectomy from three patients with irreversible loss of graft function. This tissue was disaggregated and separated into two fractions on the basis of particle size. Fraction 1 contained glomeruli and developed a mixed outgrowth containing adherent epithelial and mesangial cells after a limited period of culture. Fraction 2 contained fragments of renal tubules and produced monolayers of tubular epithelial cells during culture. A population of lymphoid cells was observed to grow from the primary disaggregate into medium supplemented with recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2). After culture for 5 days these lymphoid cells were predominantly CD3-positive and carried both class II major histocompatibility antigens (MHC) and the CD25 IL-2 receptor. Culture of peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells with IL-2 caused the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; these cells were able to lyse both glomerular and tubular cells grown from nephrectomy tissue without showing MHC antigen restriction. The lymphoid cells grown from renal allograft tissue showed a similar lytic potential for both renal cells prepared from the same nephrectomy specimen and from third party renal tissue. It is possible that any LAK cells formed within a renal allograft by the action of IL-2 may contribute to the tissue destruction observed during graft rejection. Images Figure 2 PMID:2661417

  7. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Ohe, Chisato; Kawakami, Fumi; Mikami, Shuji; Furuya, Mitsuko; Matsuura, Keiko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Nagashima, Yoji; Zhou, Ming; Petersson, Fredrik; López, José I; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Amin, Mahul B

    2014-01-01

    The disease concept of clear cell (tubulo) papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) as a distinct subtype of renal cell carcinoma has been recently established. First described in the setting of end stage renal disease, this tumor type is more frequently recognized and encountered in a sporadic setting. In this article, we provide an overview of the recent understanding of this tumor. Macroscopically, tumors are well circumscribed with well-developed tumor capsule. Histologically, the tumor cells are cuboidal to low columnar cell with clear cytoplasm and papillary and tubulo-papillary configuration. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells generally show diffuse expression for cytokeratin 7, CA9 (cup-shaped pattern), HIF-1, GLUT-1 and high molecular weight cytokeratin, but negative for AMACR, RCC Ma and TFE3. CD10 is negative or focally positive in most tumors. Genetically, this tumor has no characteristics of clear cell RCC or papillary RCC. Prognostically, patients with CCP-RCC behave in an indolent fashion in all previously reported cases. In conclusion, although this tumor has been integrated into recent International Society of Urologic Pathology Classification of renal neoplasia, both aspects of disease concept and clinical behavior are yet to be fully elucidated. Further publications of large cohorts of patients will truly help understand the biologic potential and the molecular underpinnings of this tumor type.

  8. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: micro-RNA expression profiling and comparison with clear cell renal cell carcinoma and papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Munari, Enrico; Marchionni, Luigi; Chitre, Apurva; Hayashi, Masamichi; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Gobbo, Stefano; Argani, Pedram; Allaf, Mohamad; Hoque, Mohammad O; Netto, George J

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a low-grade renal neoplasm with morphological characteristics mimicking both clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) and papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). However, despite some overlapping features, their morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular profiles are distinct. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression and are involved in various biological processes, including cancer development. To better understand the biology of this tumor, we aimed to analyze the miRNA expression profile of a set of CCPRCC using microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A total of 15 cases diagnosed as CCPRCC were used in this study. Among the most differentially expressed miRNA in CCPRCC, we found miR-210, miR-122, miR-34a, miR-21, miR-34b*, and miR-489 to be up-regulated, whereas miR-4284, miR-1202, miR-135a, miR-1973, and miR-204 were down-regulated compared with normal renal parenchyma. To identify consensus of differentially regulated miRNA between CCPRCC, CCRCC, and PRCC, we additionally determined differential miRNA expression using 2 publically available microarray data sets from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE41282 and GSE3798). This comparison revealed that the miRNA expression profile of CCPRCC shows some overlapping characteristics between CCRCC and PRCC. Moreover, CCPRCC lacks dysregulation of important miRNAs typically associated with aggressive behavior. In summary, we describe the miRNA expression profile of a relatively infrequent type of renal cancer. Our results may help in understanding the molecular underpinning of this newly recognized entity.

  9. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  10. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M; Reichel, Christoph A; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R; Green, Douglas R; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-11-25

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue are not affected by renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E J; de Klein, Annelies; Douben, Hannie; Korevaar, Sander S; Mensah, Fane K F; Dor, Frank J M F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are a potential therapeutic agent in renal disease and kidney transplantation. Autologous cell use in kidney transplantation is preferred to avoid anti-HLA reactivity; however, the influence of renal disease on mesenchymal stem cells is unknown. To investigate the feasibility of autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease, we isolated these cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy controls and patients with renal disease and compared them phenotypically and functionally. The mesenchymal stem cells from both groups showed similar morphology and differentiation capacity, and were both over 90% positive for CD73, CD105, and CD166, and negative for CD31 and CD45. They demonstrated comparable population doubling times, rates of apoptosis, and were both capable of inhibiting allo-antigen- and anti-CD3/CD28-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation. In response to immune activation they both increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. These mesenchymal stem cells were genetically stable after extensive expansion and, importantly, were not affected by uremic serum. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells of patients with renal disease have similar characteristics and functionality as those from healthy controls. Hence, our results indicate the feasibility of their use in autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease.

  12. B Cell Subsets Contribute to Both Renal Injury and Renal Protection after Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Brandon; Strassheim, Derek; Amura, Claudia R.; Kulik, Liudmila; Ljubanovic, Danica; Glogowska, Magdalena J.; Takahashi, Kazue; Carroll, Michael C.; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) triggers a robust inflammatory response within the kidney. Numerous components of the immune system contribute to the resultant renal injury including the complement system. We sought to identify whether natural antibodies bind to the post-ischemic kidney and contribute to complement activation after I/R. We depleted peritoneal B cells in mice by hypotonic shock. Depletion of the peritoneal B cells prevented the deposition of IgM within the glomeruli after renal I/R, and attenuated renal injury after I/R. We found that glomerular IgM activates the classical pathway of complement but does not cause substantial deposition of C3 within the kidney. Furthermore, mice deficient in classical pathway proteins were not protected from injury, indicating that glomerular IgM does not cause injury through activation of the classical pathway. We also subjected mice deficient in all mature B cells (μMT mice) to renal I/R and found that they sustained worse renal injury than wild-type controls. Serum IL-10 levels were lower in the μMT mice. Regarded together, these results indicate that natural antibody produced by peritoneal B cells binds within the glomerulus after renal I/R and contributes to functional renal injury. However, non-peritoneal B cells attenuate renal injury after I/R, possibly through the production of IL-10. PMID:20810984

  13. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  14. Targeting HIF2 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyejin; Kaelin, William G

    2016-12-08

    Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor-suppressor protein (pVHL) is the signature "truncal" event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is the most common form of kidney cancer. pVHL is part of a ubiquitin ligase the targets the α subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factor for destruction when oxygen is available. Preclinical studies strongly suggest that deregulation of HIF, and particularly HIF2, drives pVHL-defective renal carcinogenesis. Although HIF2α was classically considered undruggable, structural and chemical work by Rick Bruick and Kevin Gardner at University of Texas Southwestern laid the foundation for the development of small molecule direct HIF2α antagonists (PT2385 and the related tool compound PT2399) by Peloton Therapeutics that block the dimerization of HIF2α with its partner protein ARNT1. These compounds inhibit clear cell renal cell carcinoma growth in preclinical models, and PT2385 has now entered the clinic. Nonetheless, the availability of such compounds, together with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-based gene editing approaches, has revealed a previously unappreciated heterogeneity among clear cell renal carcinomas and patient-derived xenografts with respect to HIF2 dependence, suggesting that predictive biomarkers will be needed to optimize the use of such agents in the clinic.

  15. Enhanced propagation of adult human renal epithelial progenitor cells to improve cell sourcing for tissue-engineered therapeutic devices for renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Westover, Angela J; Buffington, Deborah A; Humes, H D

    2012-08-01

    Renal cell therapy employing cells derived from adult renal epithelial cell (REC) progenitors promises to reduce the morbidity of patients with renal insufficiency due to acute renal failure and end stage renal disease. To this end, tissue engineered devices addressing the neglected biologic component of renal replacement therapy are being developed. Because human donor tissue is limited, novel enhanced progenitor cell propagation (EP) techniques have been developed and applied to adult human kidney transplant discards from six donors. Changes include more efficient digestion and the amplification of progenitors prior to terminal epithelial differentiation promoted by contact inhibition and the addition of retinoic acid. Differentiated morphology in EP populations was demonstrated by the ability to form polarized epithelium with tight junctions, apical central cilia and expression of brush border membrane enzymes. Evaluation of lipopolysaccharide stimulated interleukin-8 secretion and γ-glutamyl transpeptisade activity in EP derived cells was used to confirm therapeutic equivalence to REC obtained using published techniques, which have previously shown efficacy in large animal models and clinical trials. Yield exceeded 10(16) cells/gram cortex from the only kidney obtained due to an anatomical defect, while the average yield from diseased kidneys ranged from 1.1 × 10(9) to 8.8 × 10(11) cells/gram cortex, representing an increase of more than 10 doublings over standard methods. Application of the EP protocol to REC expansion has solved the problem of cell sourcing as the limiting factor to the manufacture of cell based therapies targeting renal diseases and may provide a method for autologous device fabrication from core kidney biopsies.

  16. Contribution of apoptotic cell death to renal injury.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A; Lorz, C; Justo, P; Catalán, M P; Egido, J

    2001-01-01

    Cell number abnormalities are frequent in renal diseases, and range from the hypercellularity of postinfectious glomerulonephritis to the cell depletion of chronic renal atrophy. Recent research has shown that apoptosis and its regulatory mechanisms contribute to cell number regulation in the kidney. The role of apoptosis ranges from induction to repair and progression of renal injury. Death ligands and receptors, such as TNF and FasL, proapoptotic and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and caspases have all been shown to participate in apoptosis regulation in the course of renal injury. These proteins represent potential therapeutic targets, which should be further explored.

  17. The association between chronic renal failure and renal cell carcinoma may differ between black and white Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Schwartz, Kendra; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Shuch, Brian M; Karami, Sara; Rothman, Nathaniel; Wacholder, Sholom; Graubard, Barry I; Colt, Joanne S; Purdue, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In the United States, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence is higher among blacks than among whites. Risk of RCC is elevated among end-stage renal disease patients, although no studies have looked at differences by race in the relationship between chronic renal failure and RCC. Methods We investigated RCC risk in relation to chronic renal failure in a population-based case-control study of blacks and whites in Chicago and Detroit. Data, including information on kidney disease, were collected from interviews with 1,217 RCC cases (361 blacks, 856 whites) and 1,235 controls (523 blacks, 712 whites). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results Risk of RCC was increased in relation to chronic renal failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.2–10.1) and dialysis (OR 18.0, 95% CI 3.6–91). The association remained after defining exposure as those who had chronic renal failure ≥10 years prior to RCC diagnosis. Chronic renal failure was more strongly associated with RCC among blacks than among whites (OR 8.7, 95% CI 3.3–22.9 and 2.0, 0.7–5.6 respectively; Pinteraction=0.03) and among those without a history of diabetes relative to diabetic subjects (OR 8.3, 95% CI 3.1–22.7 and 1.9, 0.6–5.9 respectively; Pinteraction=0.03). Conclusions These results suggest that chronic renal failure is a strong risk factor for RCC, particularly among black and non-diabetic subjects. Our findings of differences in risk estimates by race, to our knowledge the first such report, require replication. PMID:23179659

  18. Renal differentiation of Mesenchymal stem cells seeded on nanofibrous scaffolds improved by Human renal tubular cell lines conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Vakilian, Saeid; Salehi, Mohammad

    2016-11-09

    Kidney injuries and renal dysfunctions are one of the most important clinical problems and tissue engineering could be a valuable method for solving it. The objective of this study was to investigate the synergistic effect of renal cell line conditioned medium and Polycaprolactone nanofibers on renal differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, after stem cells isolation and characterization, Polycaprolactone nanofibrous scaffold was fabricated using electrospinning methods and characterized morphologically, mechanically and biocompatibility. And then the renal differentiation of seeded mesenchymal stem cells on the surface of Polycaprolactone nanofibers with and without human renal tubular cell lines conditioned medium was investigated by evaluation of eight important renal related genes expression by Real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds were good in all characterized items. Almost highest expression of all genes was detected in stem cells seeded on Polycaprolactone under conditioned media in comparison with the stem cells seeded on Polycaprolactone, tissue culture polystyrene under renal induction medium and tissue culture polystyrene under conditioned medium. According to the results, Polycaprolactone nanofibers in contribution with conditioned medium can provide the optimal conditions for renal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and could be a promising candidate for renal tissue engineering application.

  19. Wnt Signaling in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Krause, Mirja; Samoylenko, Anatoly; Vainio, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of all kidney cancers. Due to poor diagnosis, high resistance to the systemic therapies and the fact that most RCC cases occur sporadically, current research switched its focus on studying the molecular mechanisms underlying RCC. The aim is the discovery of new effective and less toxic anti-cancer drugs and novel diagnostic markers. Besides the PI3K/Akt/mTOR, HGF/Met and VHL/hypoxia cellular signaling pathways, the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RCC is commonly studied. Wnt signaling and its targeted genes are known to actively participate in different biological processes during embryonic development and renal cancer. Recently, studies have shown that targeting this pathway by alternating/inhibiting its intracellular signal transduction can reduce cancer cells viability and inhibit their growth. The targets and drugs identified show promising potential to serve as novel RCC therapeutics and prognostic markers. This review aims to summarize the current status quo regarding recent research on RCC focusing on the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and how its understanding could facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic targets, new drugs and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:27322325

  20. Quiz. Correct answer to the quiz. Check your diagnosis. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Keva; Liu, Kai-Wen; Chang, I-Wei

    2015-06-01

    We incidentally observed a case of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma of an 81-year-old woman, presenting with intermittent left flank pain. It is a recently described rare renal parenchymal tumor.

  1. Bioartificial Renal Epithelial Cell System (BRECS): A Compact, Cryopreservable Extracorporeal Renal Replacement Device

    PubMed Central

    Buffington, Deborah A.; Pino, Christopher J.; Chen, Lijun; Westover, Angela J.; Hageman, Gretchen; Humes, H. David

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell therapy has shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute renal failure (ARF) and promise for treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by supplementing conventional small solute clearance (hemodialysis or hemofiltration) with endocrine and metabolic function provided by cells maintained in an extracorporeal circuit. A major obstacle in the widespread adoption of this therapeutic approach is the lack of a cryopreservable system to enable distribution, storage, and therapeutic use at point of care facilities. This report details the design, fabrication, and assessment of a Bioartificial Renal Epithelial Cell System (BRECS), the first all-in-one culture vessel, cryostorage device, and cell therapy delivery system. The BRECS was loaded with up to 20 cell-seeded porous disks, which were maintained by perfusion culture. Once cells reached over 5×106 cells/disk for a total therapeutic dose of approximately 108 cells, the BRECS was cryopreserved for storage at −80°C or −140°C. The BRECS was rapidly thawed, and perfusion culture was resumed. Near precryopreservation values of cell viability, metabolic activity, and differentiated phenotype of functional renal cells were confirmed postreconstitution. This technology could be extended to administer other cell-based therapies where metabolic, regulatory, or secretion functions can be leveraged in an immunoisolated extracorporeal circuit. PMID:24575327

  2. Are primary renal cell carcinoma and metastases of renal cell carcinoma the same cancer?

    PubMed

    Semeniuk-Wojtaś, Aleksandra; Stec, Rafał; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a process consisting of cells spreading from the primary site of the cancer to distant parts of the body. Our understanding of this spread is limited and molecular mechanisms causing particular characteristics of metastasis are still unknown. There is some evidence that primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and metastases of RCC exhibit molecular differences that may effect on the biological characteristics of the tumor. Some authors have detected differences in clear cell and nonclear cell component between these 2 groups of tumors. Investigators have also determined that primary RCC and metastases of RCC diverge in their range of renal-specific markers and other protein expression, gene expression pattern, and microRNA expression. There are also certain proteins that are variously expressed in primary RCCs and their metastases and have effect on clinical outcome, e.g., endothelin receptor type B, phos-S6, and CD44. However, further studies are needed on large cohorts of patients to identify differences representing promising targets for prognostic purposes predicting disease-free survival and the metastatic burden of a patient as well as their suitability as potential therapeutic targets. To sum up, in this review we have attempted to summarize studies connected with differences between primary RCC and its metastases and their influence on the biological characteristics of renal cancer.

  3. Sunitinib resistance in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Of the many targeted therapies introduced since 2006, sunitinib has carved its way to become the most commonly used first-line therapy for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite significant improvements in progression-free survival, 30% of the patients are intrinsically resistant to sunitinib and the remaining 70% who respond initially will eventually become resistant in 6–15 months. While the molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to sunitinib have been unravelling at a rapid rate, the mechanisms of intrinsic resistance remain elusive. Combination therapy, sunitinib rechallenge and sequential therapy have been investigated as means to overcome resistance to sunitinib. Of these, sequential therapy appears to be the most promising strategy. This mini review summarises our emerging understanding of the molecular mechanisms, and the strategies employed to overcome sunitinib resistance.

  4. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Errami, Mounir; Margulis, Vitali; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Because of the asymptomatic natural history of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), by the time a diagnosis is made, metastatic disease is present in about one third of the cases. Thus, the overall survival of patients with RCC remains poor. Ultimately up to 50% of patients with RCC will develop metastases. Metastatic lesions from RCC are usually observed in the lungs, liver or bone. Metastases to the brain or the skin from RCC are rare. Here we present a patient diagnosed with RCC, found to have no evidence of metastases at the time of nephrectomy, who presented two years later with metastases to the scalp. We review the literature of patients with this rare site of metastasis and outline the overall prognosis of this lesion compared to other site of metastases from RCC. PMID:28191289

  5. Unilateral Blepharoptosis from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Lorenzo; Sabatino, Francesco; Casale, Manuele; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2016-01-01

    Blepharoptosis is the drooping or inferior displacement of the upper eyelid. Blepharoptosis can be either congenital or acquired. Tumour metastasis is one of the acquired causes of blepharoptosis. The lungs, locoregional lymph nodes, bone and liver are the usual sites of metastases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC); however, unusual locations of RCC have also been reported. Herein, we describe a case of a 47-year-old man with unilateral ptosis and blurred vision due to metastatic RCC. We describe the different causes of blepharopstosis, the path that led to the diagnosis, and how RCC can metastasize to unusual anatomical regions such as the orbit. Symptoms such as exophthalmos, lid edema, diplopia, ptosis, cranial nerve paralysis or blurred vision may mime a benign disease; however, they could also be the symptoms of a systemic malignancy. PMID:28326282

  6. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  7. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  8. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John M.; Agrawal, Manish; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Doshi, Gury; Fleming, Mark T.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network’s Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future. PMID:28326277

  9. Natural Scaffolds for Renal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Kidney Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, Cynthia A; Martinez, Michele L; Tarantal, Alice F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enthusiasm for bioengineering of functional renal tissues for transplantation, many obstacles remain before the potential of this technology can be realized in a clinical setting. Viable tissue engineering strategies for the kidney require identification of the necessary cell populations, efficient scaffolds, and the 3D culture conditions to develop and support the unique architecture and physiological function of this vital organ. Our studies have previously demonstrated that decellularized sections of rhesus monkey kidneys of all age groups provide a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with sufficient structural properties with spatial and organizational influences on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) migration and differentiation. To further explore the use of decellularized natural kidney scaffolds for renal tissue engineering, pluripotent hESC were seeded in whole- or on sections of kidney ECM and cell migration and phenotype compared with the established differentiation assays for hESC. Results of qPCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated upregulation of renal lineage markers when hESC were cultured in decellularized scaffolds without cytokine or growth factor stimulation, suggesting a role for the ECM in directing renal lineage differentiation. hESC were also differentiated with growth factors and compared when seeded on renal ECM or a new biologically inert polysaccharide scaffold for further maturation. Renal lineage markers were progressively upregulated over time on both scaffolds and hESC were shown to express signature genes of renal progenitor, proximal tubule, endothelial, and collecting duct populations. These findings suggest that natural scaffolds enhance expression of renal lineage markers particularly when compared to embryoid body culture. The results of these studies show the capabilities of a novel polysaccharide scaffold to aid in defining a protocol for renal progenitor differentiation from hESC, and advance the promise

  10. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Creighton, Chad J.; Fei, Suzanne S.; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A.; Murray, Bradley A.; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D.; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M.; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Ho, Thai; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y.; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J.; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Reuter, Victor E.; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl Simon; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D.; Penny, Robert J.; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W. Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T.; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L.; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R.; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Drummond, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D. Neil; Holt, Robert A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Moore, Richard A.; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N.; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J. Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L.; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J.; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C.; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K.; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L.; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M.; Winemiller, Cythnia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary renal cell carcinoma, accounting for 15% of renal cell carcinoma, is a heterogeneous disease consisting of different types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal cell carcinoma; no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. Methods We performed comprehensive molecular characterization utilizing whole-exome sequencing, copy number, mRNA, microRNA, methylation and proteomic analyses of 161 primary papillary renal cell carcinomas. Results Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas were found to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with Type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups based on molecular differences that influenced patient survival. MET alterations were associated with Type 1 tumors, whereas Type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-ARE pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was found in a distinct subset of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma characterized by poor survival and mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Conclusions Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas are clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway are associated with Type 1 and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway with Type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in Type 2 convey a poor prognosis. Furthermore, Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma consists of at least 3 subtypes based upon molecular and phenotypic features. PMID:26536169

  11. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  12. Heparanase expression and glycosaminoglycans profile in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Batista, Lucas Teixeira E Aguiar; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Machado, Leopoldo Ruiz; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinogenesis could contribute to a decrease in the mortality rate of this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and heparanase expression in renal cell carcinoma. The study included 24 patients submitted to nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The majority of the samples (87.5%) were classified in the initial stage of renal cell carcinoma (clinical stages I and II). Heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis of renal cell carcinoma samples or non-neoplastic tissues obtained from the same patients (control group). The sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid were analyzed in urine samples of the patients before and after surgery. The data showed a significant statistical increase in chondroitin sulfate, and a decrease in heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate present in neoplastic tissues compared with non-neoplastic tissues. Higher heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the neoplastic tissues was also shown, compared with the non-neoplastic tissues. The urine glycosaminoglycans profile showed no significant difference between renal cell carcinoma and control samples. Extracellular matrix changes observed in the present study clarify that heparanase is possibly involved with heparan sulfate turnover, and that heparanase and the glycosaminoglycans can modulate initial events of renal cell carcinoma development.

  13. Bone Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have bone metastasis that are often osteolytic and cause substantial morbidity, such as pain, pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia. The presence of bone metastasis in RCC is also associated with poor prognosis. Bone-targeted treatment using bisphosphonate and denosumab can reduce skeletal complications in RCC, but does not cure the disease or improve survival. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tumor-induced changes in the bone microenvironment is needed to develop effective treatment. The “vicious cycle” hypothesis has been used to describe how tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment to drive bone destruction and tumor growth. Tumor cells secrete factors like parathyroid hormone-related peptide, transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor, which stimulate osteoblasts and increase the production of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). In turn, the overexpression of RANKL leads to increased osteoclast formation, activation and survival, thereby enhancing bone resorption. This review presents a general survey on bone metastasis in RCC by natural history, interaction among the immune system, bone and tumor, molecular mechanisms, bone turnover markers, therapies and healthcare burden. PMID:27338367

  14. A patient with Multiple myeloma and Renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Farhad; Ghalamkari, Marziye; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Khatuni, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of two malignancies is rarely seen. A little association between hematologic malignancies especially multiple myeloma and renal cell carcinoma has been reported in the recent past. Several case series revealed a bidirectional association between these two malignancies which may be due to the common risk factors, similar cytokine growth requirements and clinical presentation. Here, we aim to describe a patient who had multiple myeloma and in his work up renal cell carcinoma was found out incidentally. We would like to create awareness among clinicians for the coincidence of Renal cell carcinoma and Multiple myeloma.

  15. A patient with Multiple myeloma and Renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Farhad; Ghalamkari, Marziye; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Khatuni, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of two malignancies is rarely seen. A little association between hematologic malignancies especially multiple myeloma and renal cell carcinoma has been reported in the recent past. Several case series revealed a bidirectional association between these two malignancies which may be due to the common risk factors, similar cytokine growth requirements and clinical presentation. Here, we aim to describe a patient who had multiple myeloma and in his work up renal cell carcinoma was found out incidentally. We would like to create awareness among clinicians for the coincidence of Renal cell carcinoma and Multiple myeloma. PMID:27047652

  16. Axitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study Due to the emergence of new therapeutic opportunities in the second-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the choice of the appropriate medication requires consideration. Making the selection one should take into account the likelihood of response, the probability of toxicity, properties of the drug and the clinical characteristics of the patient. Aim of the work was to confirm antitumor efficacy of axitinib in patients with metastatic clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma in the second line treatment remaining under the care of our institution. The primary objective was to determine antitumor activity, secondary – to evaluate progression free survival, safety of the treatment and to analyse clinical characteristics of treated population. Results Treatment records of 27 patients (9 females, 18 males) treated from October 2014 to the present (July 2016) were reviewed. The median duration of treatment which corresponds to the time to disease progression in observed population was 6 months (range: under 1 month – 16 months). 1 patient (3.7%) had got objective response (PR, partial remission). Clinical benefit rate (PR + SD (stable disease) was 66%. 9 patients (33.33%) experienced treatment toxicity only in the first degree of CTCAE (common toxicity criteria for adverse events), 11 patients (40.74%) presented the second degree toxicity and 5 patients (18.5%) – third degree. The most commonly reported treatment related adverse events were diarrhea (47%), fatigue (26%), hand-foot syndrome (26%), deterioration of blood pressure control (22.2%), abnormal liver function tests (18.5%), mucositis (11.1%). We observed 3 cases of unacceptable toxicity. Conclusions Axitinib confirms its effectiveness also in situation outside clinical trials, however, it is characterized by significant toxicity. Therefore, qualification for treatment should take into account the clinical patient characteristics. Effective diagnosis and treatment of side effects and

  17. Transitional cell cancer of the urinary tract and renal cell cancer in relation to acetaminophen use (United States).

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L; Rao, R S; Palmer, J R; Strom, B L; Zauber, A; Warshauer, M E; Stolley, P D; Shapiro, S

    1998-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic evidence have suggested that phenacetin use increases the risk of transitional cell cancers of the urinary tract. The drug is no longer marketed but a commonly used metabolite, acetaminophen, has been linked recently to an increased risk of renal cancer. We assessed the relation of acetaminophen use to the risk of transitional cell cancer of the urinary tract and of renal cell cancer with data from a hospital-based study of cancers and medication use conducted from 1976-96 in the eastern United States. We compared 498 cases of transitional cell cancer and 383 cases of renal cell cancer with 8,149 noncancer controls and 6,499 cancer controls and controlled confounding factors with logistic regression. For transitional cell cancer, the relative risk (RR) estimate for regular acetaminophen use that had begun at least a year before admission was 1.1 (95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 0.6-1.9) based on noncancer controls, and 0.9 (CI = 0.5-1.6) based on cancer controls. RR estimates for use that lasted at least five years, and for nonregular use, were also close to 1.0. For renal cell cancer, the corresponding estimates were again close to 1.0. Our results suggest that acetaminophen, as used in present study population, does not influence the risk of transitional cell cancer of the urinary tract or of renal cell cancer.

  18. Human embryonic stem cells differentiate into functional renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Karl M; Tasnim, Farah; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Annegret; Ni, Ming; Gao, Shujun; Gopalan, Began; Zink, Daniele; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-04-01

    Renal cells are used in basic research, disease models, tissue engineering, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. In order to provide a reliable source of human renal cells, we developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into renal epithelial cells. The differentiated stem cells expressed markers characteristic of renal proximal tubular cells and their precursors, whereas markers of other renal cell types were not expressed or expressed at low levels. Marker expression patterns of these differentiated stem cells and in vitro cultivated primary human renal proximal tubular cells were comparable. The differentiated stem cells showed morphological and functional characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells, and generated tubular structures in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the differentiated stem cells contributed in organ cultures for the formation of simple epithelia in the kidney cortex. Bioreactor experiments showed that these cells retained their functional characteristics under conditions as applied in bioartificial kidneys. Thus, our results show that human embryonic stem cells can differentiate into renal proximal tubular-like cells. Our approach would provide a source for human renal proximal tubular cells that are not affected by problems associated with immortalized cell lines or primary cells.

  19. Renal cell carcinoma: complete pathological response in a patient with gastric metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    García-Campelo, Rosario; Quindós, Maria; Vázquez, Diana Dopico; López, Margarita Reboredo; Carral, Alberto; Calvo, Ovidio Fernández; Soto, José Manuel Rois; Grande, Enrique; Durana, Jesús; Antón-Aparicio, Luis Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A 75-year-old-man, with a 2-month history of abdominal pain, underwent a standard diagnostic workup that included a CT scan that showed a large right renal mass and subcentimeter nodes in the right and left lung lobes. In December 2003, the patient underwent right nephrectomy with adrenalectomy and a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (pT3N0M0 stage) was made. No further treatment was proposed and patient was followed up regularly. In October 2006, the annual gastrointestinal endoscopy showed asymptomatic multilobulated and polypoid masses in the gastric fundus and gastric body that corresponded to metastasis of the renal carcinoma that had been resected three years ago. Surgical treatment was refused and oral treatment with sunitinib (50 mg/day consecutively for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks off) was initiated. Patient completed one cycle and development of acute toxicity (grade 3 asthenia, anorexia and mucositis) led to treatment interruption. After recovering from acute toxicity, the patient was proposed to reinitiate treatment with dose reduction, but he refused any medical treatment. At the follow-up visit, three months later, the gastrointestinal endoscopy showed four unspecific 2 mm nodules without malignant evidence. The whole-body CT did not reveal any other abnormality except for the known lung nodes. PET scan six months after treatment confirmed complete gastric response.

  20. Plasmablastic multiple myeloma following clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Somanath; Mokkappan, Sudhagar; Varghese, Renu G’ Boy; Veerappan, Ilangovan

    2014-01-01

    We aim to describe the clinicohaematological profile of an elderly male with plasmablastic multiple myeloma (MM) (IgG λ, International System Stage II) with an unfavourable outcome following chemotherapy. The serum interleukin-6 level was found to be markedly elevated (2464 pg/mL, reference; <50 pg/mL). Thirty-six months prior to MM diagnosis, he underwent left radical nephrectomy for a stage III (pT3N0M0) clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC, Fuhrman grade 2). The unique MM-RCC association, shared risk factors, myeloma pathobiology and clinical implications are discussed with a brief literature review. PMID:25103318

  1. Incidentally detected clear cell renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh; Gowda, Kiran Krishne; Rao, Raman Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid differentiation (RCC-R) has an aggressive biologic behavior and poor prognosis. A recent consensus statement of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) proposed a nucleolar grading system (ISUP grade) for RCC to replace Fuhrman system and recommended reporting the presence of rhabdoid differentiation and considering tumors with rhabdoid differentiation to be ISUP Grade 4. We report a case of incidentally detected clear cell RCC-R in a 52-year-old man. This is one of the earliest cases of RCC-R (pT1b) detected and first such case from Indian subcontinent.

  2. Recent advances in the management of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have significantly improved over the past few years with the recent approval of two new agents resulting in prolonged progression-free and overall survival. PMID:27019698

  3. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non-sarcomatoid renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres-Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G W; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2015-10-01

    Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA-seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high-grade, high-stage non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome-scale microarray-based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA-seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non-sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology augurs a poor prognosis; suggest the

  4. Biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas are molecularly similar to each other, but distinct from, non‐sarcomatoid renal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Kanishka; Yoo, Suk‐Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Wani, Khalida; Patel, Lalit R.; Voicu, Horatiu; Torres‐Garcia, Wandaliz; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A.; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sarcomatoid transformation, wherein an epithelioid carcinomatous tumour component coexists with a sarcomatoid histology, is a predictor of poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Our understanding of sarcomatoid change has been hindered by the lack of molecular examination. Thus, we sought to characterize molecularly the biphasic epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and compare them to non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We examined the transcriptome of the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of advanced stage sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=43) and non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) from independent discovery and validation cohorts using the cDNA microarray and RNA‐seq platforms. We analyzed DNA copy number profiles, generated using SNP arrays, from patients with sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=10) and advanced non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=155). The epithelioid and sarcomatoid components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma had similar gene expression and DNA copy number signatures that were, however, distinct from those of high‐grade, high‐stage non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Prognostic clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression profiles were shared by the biphasic components of sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma and the sarcomatoid component showed a partial epithelial‐to‐mesenchymal transition signature. Our genome‐scale microarray‐based transcript data were validated in an independent set of sarcomatoid and non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinomas using RNA‐seq. Sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is molecularly distinct from non‐sarcomatoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with its genetic programming largely shared by its biphasic morphological components. These data explain why a low percentage of sarcomatoid histology

  5. Occupation and renal cell cancer in Central and Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Charbotel, Barbara; Moore, Lee E; Karami, Sara; Zaridze, David G; Matveev, Vsevolod; Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena; Foretova, Lenka; Bencko, Vladimir; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mates, Dana; Ferro, Gilles; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rothman, Nathaniel; Stewart, Patricia; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Objective Central and Eastern Europe has among the highest rates of renal cell cancer worldwide. Few studies have been conducted in these areas to investigate the possible role of occupational exposures in renal cell cancer etiology. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of renal cell cancer with employment in specific occupations and industries. Methods From 1999–2003, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study in seven areas of the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and Russia. A detailed occupational history was collected from renal cell cancer cases and controls, together with information on potential confounders. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of cancer risk were calculated for having ever been employed in selected jobs and industries, with follow-up analyses examining duration of employment. Results A total of 992 histologically confirmed incident renal cell cancer cases and 1,465 controls were included in the analysis. An increased risk of renal cell cancer was observed for workers in agricultural labor and animal husbandry (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.05, 1.93), particularly among women employed as general farm workers (OR=2.73, 95% CI 1.05, 7.13). Risk gradients for agricultural work increased with longer employment. An overall increased risk of renal cell cancer was seen among architects and engineers (OR=1.89, 95% CI 1.35, 2.65), and mechanical engineers (OR=1.71, 95% CI 1.03, 2.84). Conclusions Our data suggest an association between renal cell cancer and agricultural work, particularly among female workers. PMID:19737732

  6. Ion pump sorting in polarized renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Caplan, M J

    2001-08-01

    The plasma membranes of renal epithelial cells are divided into distinct apical and basolateral domains, which contain different inventories of ion transport proteins. Without this polarity vectorial ion and fluid transport would not be possible. Little is known of the signals and mechanisms that renal epithelial cells use to establish and maintain polarized distributions of their ion transport proteins. Analysis of ion pump sorting reveals that multiple complex signals participate in determining and regulating these proteins' subcellular localizations.

  7. Tumor Enucleation for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malkowicz, S. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The increased number of small renal masses (SRMs) detected annually has led to a rise in the use of nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). These techniques aim to preserve the largest amount of healthy renal tissue possible while maintaining the same oncologic outcomes as radical nephrectomy (RN). Additionally, partial nephrectomy (PN) has been linked to a lower risk of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality when compared to RN. There has been continual progress toward resecting less renal parenchyma. While the predominant surgical method of performing NSS is through traditional PN, simple enucleation (SE) of the tumor has increased in popularity over recent years. SE is a technique that aims to preserve the maximal amount of renal parenchyma possible by utilizing the renal tumor pseudocapsule to bluntly separate the lesion from its underlying parenchyma, offering the smallest possible margin of excised healthy renal tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the oncological safety of SE compared with PN in the treatment of SRMs, with lower overall incidence of positive surgical margins. Additionally, SE has been shown to have similar 5- and 10-year progression-free and cancer-specific survival as PN. We present a review of the literature and an argument for SE to be a routine consideration in the treatment of all renal tumors amenable to NSS.

  8. Transport of circulating serum cholesterol by human renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clayman, R.V.; Figenshau, R.S.; Prigge, W.F.; Forstrom, L.; Gebhard, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Clear cell renal cancer contains a large quantity of cholesterol ester (300-mg./gm. protein). To determine whether abnormalities in cholesterol transport could account for this sterol accumulation, the uptake, release, and imaging capabilities of intravenously injected /sup 131/I-6-iodomethyl-29-norcholesterol, a cholesterol analogue, were studied preoperatively in five patients with clear cell renal cancer. At surgery, samples of the liver, tumor, adrenal, and non-tumor kidney were obtained for analysis. /sup 131/I-sterol uptake by the tumor, when normalized for cholesterol content, was less than for adrenal, liver or kidney. In contrast, release of preloaded /sup 131/I-sterol from the human tumors was consistently slower than for normal kidney. The reduced release of free cholesterol from renal cancer cells may, in part, be responsible for the accumulation of cholesterol in human renal cancer.

  9. Fetal kidney stem cells ameliorate cisplatin induced acute renal failure and promote renal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashwani Kumar; Jadhav, Sachin H; Tripathy, Naresh Kumar; Nityanand, Soniya

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether fetal kidney stem cells (fKSC) ameliorate cisplatin induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats and promote renal angiogenesis. METHODS: The fKSC were isolated from rat fetuses of gestation day 16 and expanded in vitro up to 3rd passage. They were characterized for the expression of mesenchymal and renal progenitor markers by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The in vitro differentiation of fKSC towards epithelial lineage was evaluated by the treatment with specific induction medium and their angiogenic potential by matrigel induced tube formation assay. To study the effect of fKSC in ARF, fKSC labeled with PKH26 were infused in rats with cisplatin induced ARF and, the blood and renal tissues of the rats were collected at different time points. Blood biochemical parameters were studied to evaluate renal function. Renal tissues were evaluated for renal architecture, renal cell proliferation and angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, renal cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling assay and early expression of angiogenic molecules viz. vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by western blot. RESULTS: The fKSC expressed mesenchymal markers viz. CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105 as well as renal progenitor markers viz. Wt1, Pax2 and Six2. They exhibited a potential to form CD31 and Von Willebrand factor expressing capillary-like structures and could be differentiated into cytokeratin (CK)18 and CK19 positive epithelial cells. Administration of fKSC in rats with ARF as compared to administration of saline alone, resulted in a significant improvement in renal function and histology on day 3 (2.33 ± 0.33 vs 3.50 ± 0.34, P < 0.05) and on day 7 (0.83 ± 0.16 vs 2.00 ± 0.25, P < 0.05). The infused PKH26 labeled fKSC were observed to engraft in damaged renal tubules and showed increased proliferation and reduced

  10. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Giorgio; Calabria, Santo; Lai, Silvia; Moscaritolo, Eleonora; Nofroni, Italo; Ronga, Giuseppe; Rossi, Michele; Ventroni, Guido; Sardella, Daniela; Ferrannini, Michele; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Cianci, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238) or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224), and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS), were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and/or Selective Angiography (SA). An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA). Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis. PMID:12622875

  11. Potential relationship between BK virus and renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yasemin; Ozdemir, Enver; Ozercan, Halil Ibrahim; Etem, Ebru Onalan; Aker, Fugen; Toraman, Zulal Asci; Seyrek, Adnan; Firdolas, Fatih

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential association between the presence of BK virus (BKV) DNA and mRNA and renal cell carcinoma and bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples were obtained from 50 cancer patients with renal cell carcinoma, 40 cancer patients with bladder transitional cell carcinoma, 45 control patients with the benign renal pathology, and from another 25 control patients with benign bladder pathology. The samples were subjected to nested PCR for detection of BKV DNA and real-time reverse transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) for determining mRNA levels of BKV. The results of the nested PCR indicated that 23 (14.3%) of 160 samples were positive for BKV DNA. The relationship between the cancer and the presence of BKV DNA was significant (P < 0.05). The BKV DNA positivity was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (P = 0.03), but not with that of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The results of real-time RT-PCR showed that the mRNA of BKV VP1 was present in 69.5% of the BKV DNA positive samples. The levels of BKV mRNA were significantly higher in the renal cell cancer samples than in the control samples (P < 0.05). The results of the present study confirm the association between BKV and renal cell cancer. The findings also indicated that the presence of BKV DNA resulted in a fivefold increase in the risk of development of renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Renal coccidiosis in interior Canada geese, Branta canadensis interior Todd, of the Mississippi Valley population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, Benjamin N.; Crites, John L.

    1984-01-01

    Kidneys from 309 Interior Canada geese from three locations in the Mississippi Flyway were examined for renal coccidia. Oocysts and/or young zygotes of Eimeria sp. were found in 6.8% of goose kidneys sampled. Only one type of renal coccidian oocyst was observed. Significantly more immature geese were infected than adults; however, there was no significant difference observed between the prevalences of infection in male and female birds. A host cellular response to zygotes and oocysts was noted in the majority of infected adult geese. Heavily infected kidneys were hypertrophic with minute foci on the surface of the organ. Histological examinations showed large numbers of unsporulated oocysts accumulated in distended collecting tubules, resulting in pressure necrosis to adjacent tissue and urate retention. Zygotes were observed in the cytoplasm of tubule cells and extracellularly in interstitial tissue. Infected tubule cells were characterized by the peripheral location of the nuclei, cytoplasmic basophilia, and cellular hypertrophy. This is the first report of an Eimeria sp. in the kidneys of Canada geese of the Mississippi Valley population.

  13. [Tripeptides slow down aging process in renal cell culture].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaia, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Durnova, A O; Nichik, T E; Kvetnoĭ, I M; D'iakonov, M M; Iakutseni, P P

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of geroprotective effect of peptides AED and EDL was studied in ageing renal cell culture. Peptide AED and EDL increase cell proliferation, decreasing expression of marker of aging p16, p21, p53 and increasing expression of SIRT-6 in young and aged renal cell culture. The reduction of SIRT-6 synthesis in cell is one of the causes of cell senescence. On the basis of experimental data models of interaction of peptides with various sites of DNA were constructed. Both peptides form most energetically favorable complexes with d(ATATATATAT)2 sequences in minor groove of DNA. It is shown that interaction of peptides AED and EDL with DNA is the cause of gene expression, encoded marker of ageing in renal cells.

  14. Case from the aerospace medicine residents' teaching file. Case #35. Renal cell carcinoma in an aviator with a long history of renal lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Drehner, D M

    1990-02-01

    This case study discusses the presentation, evaluation, and aeromedical disposition of an aviator with renal cell carcinoma, a disease seldom seen in the military flying population. It emphasizes the necessity of flight surgeon awareness of preventive medicine aspects of waivered medical disorders.

  15. Expression of S-100 protein in renal cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Yang, Wannian; Betten, Mark; Teh, Bin Tean; Yang, Ximing J

    2006-04-01

    Polyclonal antibody to S-100 protein has been routinely applied for initial screening of various types of tumors, including, melanocytic tumors and neurogenic tumors. S-100 protein has been shown to have a broad distribution in human tissues, including renal tubules. The potential utility of S-100 protein in renal cell neoplasms has not been extensively investigated. Using an EnVision-Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP; Dako, Carpinteria, Calif) kit, we evaluated the diagnostic value of S-100 protein on tissue microarray sections from 175 cases of renal epithelial neoplasm (145 primary renal neoplasms and 30 metastatic renal cell carcinomas) and 24 non-neoplastic renal tissues. Immunohistochemical stains for pancytokeratin, HMB-45, and Mart-1 were also performed. Western blot using the same antibody (anti-S-100 protein) was performed on 10 cases of renal cell neoplasm. The results demonstrated that nuclear and cytoplasmic staining pattern for S-100 protein was observed in 56 (69%) of 81 conventional (clear cell) renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), 10 (30%) of 33 papillary RCCs, 1 (6%) of 16 ChRCCs, and 13 (87%) of 15 oncocytomas. Among the 81 cases of CRCC, positivity for S-100 protein was seen in 41 (71%) of 58 and 15 (65%) of 23 cases with Furhman nuclear grade I/II and III/IV, respectively. Focal immunostaining was present in 22 (92%) of 24 normal renal tubules. Similar staining pattern was observed in 21 (70%) of 30 metastatic RCCs. Western blotting demonstrated the S-100 protein expression in both renal cell neoplasm and normal renal tissue. Overexpression of S-100 in oncocytomas compared with ChRCCs was confirmed by the data of Western blot and cDNA microarray analysis. Importantly, 14.8% (12/81) of clear cell RCC and 13.3% (4/30) of metastatic RCC revealed an immunostaining profile of pancytokeratin (-)/S-100 protein (+). These data indicate that caution should be taken in interpreting an unknown primary with S-100 positivity and cytokeratin negativity. In addition, it

  16. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: a family affair.

    PubMed

    Teh, Jiasian; Kinnear, Ned; Douglass-Molloy, Hannah; Hennessey, Derek Barrry

    2017-01-25

    A 49-year-old woman with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, flank pain and a family history of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome sought genetic testing. She was found to harbour a fumarate hydratase (FH) genetic mutation and a previously undetected renal tumour. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy, and remains well at follow-up. HLRCC syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease, with patients at increased risk for cutaneous leiomyomas, early-onset uterine leiomyomas and aggressive renal carcinoma. Although the syndrome may manifest life-threatening complications, outcomes may be improved by preventative family screening and surveillance, compelling early diagnosis.

  17. Clear cell renal cell tumors: Not all that is "clear" is cancer.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Cheng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Continued improvement of our understanding of the clinical, histologic, and genetic features of renal cell tumors has progressively evolved renal tumor classification, revealing an expanding array of distinct tumor types with different implications for prognosis, patient counseling, and treatment. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma is unequivocally the most common adult renal tumor, there is growing evidence that some "clear cell" renal neoplasms, such as exemplified by multilocular cystic clear cell renal neoplasm of low malignant potential (formerly multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma), do not have the same potential for insidious progression and metastasis, warranting reclassification as low malignant potential tumors or benign neoplasms. Still other novel tumor types such as clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma have been more recently recognized, which similarly have shown a conspicuous absence of aggressive behavior to date, suggesting that these too may be recategorized as noncancerous or may be premalignant neoplasms. This importance for prognosis is increasingly significant in the modern era, in which renal masses are increasingly found incidentally by imaging techniques at a small tumor size, raising consideration for less aggressive management options guided by renal mass biopsy diagnosis, including imaging surveillance, tumor ablation, or partial nephrectomy.

  18. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential: A clinico-pathologic and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    We report a rare case of synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential in the same kidney. The tumors were seen incidentally in a 45-year-old man. Pathologic study revealed that the former tumor was nucleolar grade 2, and the multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential was nucleolar grade 1. At immunohistochemistry, the clear cells in both tumors were positive for CD10 and CA IX. Interestingly, these uncommon synchronous tumors showed a different KRAS/NRAS mutation analysis that was characterized by KRAS mutation at codon p.G12C in the clear cell renal cell carcinoma, while this mutation was not present in the case of multilocular cystic renal cell neoplasia of low malignant potential. NRAS mutation was not seen in any of the tumors.

  19. Lithium causes G2 arrest of renal principal cells.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Alsady, Mohammad; Jaklofsky, Marcel; Otte-Höller, Irene; Baumgarten, Ruben; Giles, Rachel H; Deen, Peter M T

    2014-03-01

    Vasopressin-regulated expression and insertion of aquaporin-2 channels in the luminal membrane of renal principal cells is essential for urine concentration. Lithium affects urine concentrating ability, and approximately 20% of patients treated with lithium develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia. Lithium-induced NDI is caused by aquaporin-2 downregulation and a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells, yet lithium induces principal cell proliferation. Here, we studied how lithium-induced principal cell proliferation can lead to a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells using two-dimensional and three-dimensional polarized cultures of mouse renal collecting duct cells and mice treated with clinically relevant lithium concentrations. DNA image cytometry and immunoblotting revealed that lithium initiated proliferation of mouse renal collecting duct cells but also increased the G2/S ratio, indicating G2/M phase arrest. In mice, treatment with lithium for 4, 7, 10, or 13 days led to features of NDI and an increase in the number of principal cells expressing PCNA in the papilla. Remarkably, 30%-40% of the PCNA-positive principal cells also expressed pHistone-H3, a late G2/M phase marker detected in approximately 20% of cells during undisturbed proliferation. Our data reveal that lithium treatment initiates proliferation of renal principal cells but that a significant percentage of these cells are arrested in the late G2 phase, which explains the reduced principal/intercalated cell ratio and may identify the molecular pathway underlying the development of lithium-induced renal fibrosis.

  20. An Integrated Metabolic Atlas of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, A Ari; Reznik, Ed; Lee, Chung-Han; Creighton, Chad J; Brannon, A Rose; Luna, Augustin; Aksoy, B Arman; Liu, Eric Minwei; Shen, Ronglai; Lee, William; Chen, Yang; Stirdivant, Steve M; Russo, Paul; Chen, Ying-Bei; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Cheng, Emily H; Sander, Chris; Hsieh, James J

    2016-01-11

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, manifested through alterations in metabolites. We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response. Tumor progression and metastasis were associated with metabolite increases in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism pathways. We develop an analytic pipeline and visualization tool (metabolograms) to bridge the gap between TCGA transcriptomic profiling and our metabolomic data, which enables us to assemble an integrated pathway-level metabolic atlas and to demonstrate discordance between transcriptome and metabolome. Lastly, expression profiling was performed on a high-glutathione cluster, which corresponds to a poor-survival subgroup in the ccRCC TCGA cohort.

  1. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with intratumoral and nodal extramedullary megakaryopoiesis: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Mast, Kelley J; Cheng, Liang; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is occasionally associated with erythrocytosis, hypothesized to result from tumoral production of erythropoietin. Rarely, intratumoral erythropoiesis has been identified, although intratumoral megakaryopoiesis has not, to our knowledge, been previously described. We report the case of an 81-year-old man with myelofibrosis who underwent resection of a 9.8-cm clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Numerous megakaryocytes were present within the renal cell carcinoma; regional lymph nodes; and, to a lesser extent, the nonneoplastic kidney, glomeruli, and renal hilar soft tissue, in some areas associated with trilineage hematopoiesis. Immunohistochemistry verified the megakaryocytic lineage of the atypical cells (CD61, CD42b, and von Willebrand factor +; cytokeratin -). Intratumoral extramedullary megakaryopoiesis is a novel finding in clear cell renal cell carcinoma with potential to mimic high-grade carcinoma and involvement of lymph nodes. Careful attention to morphology, presence of other hematopoietic elements, and immunoprofile can facilitate recognition of this rare phenomenon.

  2. Properties of B cells and Thy-1-antigen-expressing cells infiltrating rat renal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, D.; Halttunen, J.; Tiisala, S.; Ustinov, J.; Renkonen, R.; Haeyry, P. )

    1990-10-01

    We have examined (1) the frequency of B cells secreting antibodies against donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and (2) the properties of Thy-1-antigen-expressing leukocytes in rats rejecting renal allografts. Our results show that B cells secreting antibodies are present in the inflammatory cell population at the frequency of 1:850. Among them only 1 out of 2-150 is engaged in production of antibodies directed to the graft MHC antigens, depending on the method of assay. This suggests that despite the observed significant production of nonspecific immunoglobulin in situ, only a minority of the B-cell population is specifically committed to the graft MHC antigens. This finding is concordant with the described previously low frequencies of the T cells specifically directed toward the graft MHC antigen. The role of the immunologically noncommitted cells in graft rejection is unknown. We have found that a substantial part (up to 60%) of inflammatory cells invading a rat kidney allograft express the Thy-1 antigen. This suggests that they might be immature (progenitor ) cells and, therefore, unable to respond to the graft antigens. Progenitor-like properties of these cells have been confirmed by their ability to reconstitute lethally irradiated syngeneic rat. Finally, these immature cells are of lymphoid, not of myeloid, linkage, because they do not proliferate in the presence of GM-CSF.

  3. Renal cell carcinoma in kidney allografts: histologic types, including biphasic papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Higgins, John P

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for malignancy, with about 5% incidence of cancer in native end-stage kidneys. Carcinoma in the renal allograft is far less common. Prior studies have demonstrated a propensity for renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) of papillary subtypes in end-stage kidneys, and perhaps in allograft kidneys, but most allograft studies lack detailed pathologic review and predate the current classification system. We reviewed our experience with renal carcinoma in kidney allografts at 2 academic centers applying the International Society of Urological Pathology classification, informed by immunohistochemistry. The incidence of renal allograft carcinoma was about 0.26% in our population. Of 12 allograft carcinomas, 6 were papillary (50%), 4 were clear cell (33%), 1 was clear cell (tubulo)papillary, and 1 chromophobe. Two of the papillary carcinomas had distinctive biphasic glomeruloid architecture matching the newly named "biphasic squamoid alveolar" pattern and were difficult to classify on core biopsies. The 2 cell types had different immunophenotypes in our hands (eosinophilic cells: RCC-/CK34betaE12+ weight keratin +/cyclin D1+; clear cells: RCC+/cytokeratin high molecular weight negative to weak/cyclin D1-). None of the patients experienced cancer recurrences or metastasis. Our study confirms the predilection for papillary RCCs in kidney allografts and highlights the occurrence of rare morphologic variants. Larger studies are needed with careful pathologic review, which has been lacking in the literature.

  4. Acanthosis Nigricans associated with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Narvaez, Margarita Rosa Aveiga; Reis, Paola Vasconcellos Soares; Gomes, Augusto Cesar Marins; Paraskevopoulos, Daniela Kallíope de Sá; Santana, Frederico; Fugita, Oscar Eduardo Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN), an entity recognized since the 19th century, is a dermatopathy associated with insulin-resistant conditions, endocrinopathies, drugs, chromosome abnormalities and neoplasia. The latter, also known as malignant AN, is mostly related to abdominal neoplasms. Malignant AN occurs frequently among elderly patients. In these cases, the onset is subtle, and spreading involves the flexural regions of the body, particularly the axillae, palms, soles, and mucosa. Gastric adenocarcinoma is the most frequent associated neoplasia, but many others have been reported. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), although already reported, is rarely associated with malignant AN. The authors report the case of a woman who was being treated for depression but presented a long-standing and marked weight loss, followed by darkening of the neck and the axillary regions. Physical examination disclosed a tumoral mass in the left flank and symmetrical, pigmented, velvety, verrucous plaques on both axillae, which is classical for AN. The diagnostic work-up disclosed a huge renal mass, which was resected and further diagnosed as a RCC. The post-operative period was uneventful and the skin alteration was evanescent at the first follow-up consultation. The authors call attention to the association of AN with RCC. PMID:27284539

  5. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  6. Renal Neoplasms With Overlapping Features of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinicopathologic Study of 37 Cases From a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Hari P; McKenney, Jesse K; Khor, Li Yan; Reynolds, Jordan P; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Przybycin, Christopher G

    2016-02-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) was recently included in the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia as a subtype of RCC that is morphologically, immunohistochemically, and genetically distinct from both clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) and papillary renal cell carcinoma. In our clinical practice we have observed tumors with overlapping histologic features of CCPRCC and CCRCC; therefore, our aim was to describe the morphologic, immunohistochemical, and clinical characteristics of these tumors. We examined a large series of consecutive nephrectomies diagnosed as CCRCC and found 37 tumors with morphologic overlap between CCRCC and CCPRCC, identifying 2 patterns. Pattern 1 tumors (N=19) had areas diagnosable as CCRCC admixed with foci having a prominent linear arrangement of nuclei away from the basement membrane imparting a resemblance to CCPRCC; however, other morphologic features commonly seen in CCPRCC (such as branching acini and cystic spaces with papillary tufts) were not typical and, when present, were focal or poorly developed. Pattern 2 (N=18) tumors had 2 discrete areas, one area with an appearance strongly resembling CCPRCC and the other with higher grade nuclei and features diagnosable as CCRCC, sometimes including rhabdoid differentiation, sarcomatoid differentiation, necrosis, and high-stage disease. Four (21%) of the pattern 1 tumors had grade 3 nuclei in the CCRCC-like areas, and 4 were high stage (pT3a). Of the 16 immunostained pattern 1 tumors, all expressed cytokeratin 7 (CK7) at least focally in the CCPRCC-like areas, strongly and diffusely in 9 (56%) cases; 12 (75%) showed negative to focal and/or weak CK7 expression in the CCRCC-like areas. CD10, α-methylacyl-CoA-racemase, high-molecular-weight cytokeratin, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) had no significant differential expression between these foci. No cup-like staining pattern was seen with CA IX. Two (11%) patients

  7. Renal stem cell reprogramming: Prospects in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising future enterprise for renal replacement in patients with acute and chronic kidney disease, conditions which affect millions worldwide and currently require patients to undergo lifelong medical treatments through dialysis and/or organ transplant. Reprogramming differentiated renal cells harvested from the patient back into a pluripotent state would decrease the risk of tissue rejection and provide a virtually unlimited supply of cells for regenerative medicine treatments, making it an exciting area of current research in nephrology. Among the major hurdles that need to be overcome before stem cell therapy for the kidney can be applied in a clinical setting are ensuring the fidelity and relative safety of the reprogrammed cells, as well as achieving feasible efficiency in the reprogramming processes that are utilized. Further, improved knowledge about the genetic control of renal lineage development is vital to identifying predictable and efficient reprogramming approaches, such as the expression of key modulators or the regulation of gene activity through small molecule mimetics. Here, we discuss several recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technologies. We also explore strategies that have been successful in renal progenitor generation, and explore what these methods might mean for the development of cell-based regenerative therapies for kidney disease. PMID:25258667

  8. Tubular cell apoptosis and cidofovir-induced acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Justo, Pilar; Sanz, Ana; Melero, Rosa; Caramelo, Carlos; Guerrero, Manuel Fernández; Strutz, Frank; Müller, Gerhard; Barat, Antonio; Egido, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Cidofovir is an antiviral drug with activity against a wide array of DNA viruses including poxvirus. The therapeutic use of cidofovir is marred by a dose-limiting side effect, nephrotoxicity, leading to proximal tubular cell injury and acute renal failure. Treatment with cidofovir requires the routine use of prophylactic measures. A correct knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cidofovir toxicity may lead to the development of alternative prophylactic strategies. We recently cared for a patient with irreversible acute renal failure due to cidofovir. Renal biopsy showed tubular cell apoptosis. Cidofovir induced apoptosis in primary cultures of human proximal tubular cells in a temporal (peak apoptosis at 7 days) and concentration (10-40 microg/ml) pattern consistent with that of clinical toxicity. Apoptosis was identified by the presence of hypodiploid cells, by the exposure of annexin V binding sites and by morphological features and was associated with the appearance of active caspase-3 fragments. Cell death was specific as it was also present in a human proximal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2), but not in a human kidney fibroblast cell line, and was prevented by probenecid. An inhibitor of caspase-3 (DEVD) prevented cidofovir apoptosis. The survival factors present in serum, insulin-like growth factor-1 and hepatocyte growth factor, were also protective. The present data suggest that apoptosis induction is a mechanism contributing to cidofovir nephrotoxicity. The prophylactic administration of factors with survival activity for tubular epithelium should be further explored in cidofovir renal injury.

  9. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer.

  10. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer. PMID:27141211

  11. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  12. MET Inhibition in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zuoquan; Lee, Young H.; Boeke, Marta; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.; Liu, Zongzhi; Bottaro, Donald P.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Shuch, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most lethal form of kidney cancer. Small molecule VEGFR inhibitors are widely used but are not curative and various resistance mechanisms such as activation of the MET pathway have been described. Dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitors have recently shown clinical benefit but limited preclinical data evaluates their effects in ccRCC. Methods: An interrogation of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset was performed to evaluate oncogenic alterations in the MET/VEGFR2 pathway. We evaluated the in vitro effects of Cabozantinib, a dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, using a panel of ccRCC cell lines. Drug effects of cell viability and proliferation, migration, cell scatter, anchorage independent growth, and downstream MET/VEGFR2 signaling pathways were assessed. Results: Twelve percent of TCGA cases had possible MET/HGF oncogenic alterations with co-occurrence noted (p<0.001). MET/HGF altered cases had worse overall survival (p=0.044). Cabozantinib was a potent inhibitor of MET and VEGFR2 in vitro in our cell line panel. PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways were also suppressed by cabozantinib, however the effects on cell viability in vitro were modest. At nanomolar concentrations of cabozantinib, HGF-stimulated migration, invasion, cellular scattering and soft agar colony formation were inhibited. Conclusions: We provide further preclinical rationale for dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibition in ccRCC. While the MET pathway is implicated in VEGFR resistance, dual inhibitors may have direct anti-tumor effects in a patient subset with evidence of MET pathway involvement. Cabozantinib is a potent dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro and likely has anti-angiogenic effects similar to other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Future work involving in vivo models will be useful to better define mechanisms of potential anti-tumor activity. PMID:27390595

  13. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models.

    PubMed

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck; Cauffiez, Christelle; Glowacki, François

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies.

  14. Imaging the clear cell renal cell carcinoma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Todd M.; Seeley, Erin H.; Fadare, Oluwole; Caprioli, Richard M.; Clark, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key barrier to identification of tissue biomarkers of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the heterogeneity of protein expression within tissue. However, by providing spectra for every 0.05 mm2 area of tissue, imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) reveals the spatial distribution of peptides. We sought to determine whether this approach could be used to identify and map protein signatures of ccRCC. Methods We constructed two tissue microarrays (TMA) with two cores each of matched tumor and normal tissue from nephrectomy specimens of 70 patients with ccRCC. Samples were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS). Peptide signatures were identified within each TMA that differentiated cancer from normal tissue and then cross-validated. MS/MS sequencing was performed to determine identities of select differentially expressed peptides, and immunohistochemistry was used for validation. Results Peptide signatures were identified that demonstrated a classification accuracy within each TMA of 94.7–98.5% for each 0.05mm2 spot (spectrum) and 96.9–100% for each tissue core. Cross-validation across TMA's revealed classification accuracies of 82.6–84.7% for each spot and 88.9–92.4% for each core. We identified vimentin, histone 2A.X, and alpha-enolase as proteins with greater expression in cancer tissue, and validated this by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions IMS was able to identify and map specific peptides that accurately distinguished malignant from normal renal tissue, demonstrating its potential as a novel, high-throughput approach to ccRCC biomarker discovery. Given the multiple pathways and known heterogeneity involved in tumors such as ccRCC, multiple peptide signatures that maintain their spatial relationships may outperform traditional protein biomarkers. PMID:23009866

  15. General Information about Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter Go ...

  16. Urothelial and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Renal Pelvis – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hippargi, Surekha B.; Kumar, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the renal pelvis are relatively rare. Urothelial carcinoma of renal pelvis accounts for 7% of all renal neoplasms, with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) forming a very small percentage of these cases. Urothelial and SCC of renal pelvis is still a rarer entity. This malignancy of the renal pelvis lacks the characteristic presentation of common renal cell carcinoma and usually presents at an advanced disease stage. We report a case of urothelial and SCC of renal pelvis in a 61-year-old male who presented with non-specific clinical complaints like dysuria and right flank pain. PMID:27790450

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  18. Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma or Cystic Nephroma?

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Betancourt, Roberto; Alías-Melgar, Alejandro; Botello-Gómez, Pedro Jair; Ramírez-Garduño, Emilio; Trujillo-Vázquez, Eric Iván; Torres-Santos, Yosimart; Mata-Martínez, José Antonio; Carreño- de la Rosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) in literature is very low and confounding MCRCC with cystic nephroma (CN) is even more unusual. The aim of this report is to present a case of MCRCC and emphasize the importance of the preoperative radiologic evaluation and immunohistochemical staining confirmation to obtain an accurate diagnosis. A 73-year-old woman presented with a history of 4-month right flank pain. CT showed a Bosniak type III renal mass. After laparoscopic partial nephrectomy the initial report was cystic nephroma. Immunohistochemical staining was performed being positive for Epithelial Membrane Antigen thus changing the diagnosis to MCRCC. Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma cannot reliably be distinguished from cystic nephroma neither by physical examination nor by radiologic evaluation; immunohistochemical staining assay is useful to differentiate between these conditions allowing an accurate diagnosis and proper follow-up. PMID:28074169

  19. The effect of cyclosporin A on peripheral blood T cell subpopulations in renal allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Sweny, P; Tidman, N

    1982-01-01

    Treatment with cyclosporin A (CyA) produces a reversal of the normal ratio of OKT4+ (inducer type) to OKT84 (suppressor-cytotoxic type) cells so that renal allograft recipients on CyA alone develop a four-fold increase in the absolute number of circulating OKT8 positive cells. Conventional immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisolone reduces both populations of T cells without altering the ratio of OKT4+ to OKT8+ cells. This effect of CyA may help to explain its action as an immunosuppressive agent. PMID:6210475

  20. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  1. Prognostic factors for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: update 2008.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-15

    A variety of prognostic factor models to predict survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been developed. Diverse populations of patients with variable treatments have been used for these analyses. A variety of clinical, pathologic, and molecular factors have been studied, but current models use predominantly easily obtained clinical factors. These approaches are reviewed, and current approaches to further refine and develop these techniques are reviewed.

  2. Cells derived from young bone marrow alleviate renal aging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji; Fogo, Agnes B

    2011-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less β-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show β-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor β. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney.

  3. Common and uncommon adult unilateral renal masses other than renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ott; Roy, Anjali; Silverman, Paul M.; Kundra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many different masses can involve the kidney other than the commonly encountered renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The purpose of this article is to review the characteristic clinical and imaging findings of common and uncommon masses that predominantly present unilaterally in the adult patient, other than RCC. Awareness of such lesions and knowing the clinical scenario is important for appropriate diagnosis and management, especially in a multidisciplinary care setting. PMID:22752221

  4. Immunohistochemical detection of major histocompatibility complex antigens and quantitative analysis of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the anti-tumour immune responsiveness of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC), we examined 30 such patients for the degree of expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II antigens on RCC and the populations of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIM). Normal renal tubular cells expressed class I but not class II antigens. Most of the tumour cells expressed class I antigens in 25 (83%) cases, but the proportion of such cells was reduced in five cases, three of which were of granular cell type histologically. Class II antigens were detected in all specimens with class I positivity. Various numbers of TIM were detected in 25 cases, being composed mainly of T cells and a smaller number of macrophages. Examination for the phenotype of T cells showed that CD8-positive cells were the dominant population. B cells were not detected. Quantitative analysis revealed that the numbers of TIM were significantly lower in cases showing class I reduction than in those with normal class I expression. Therefore, it was clear that class I antigens were preserved in RCC cells in most cases. Furthermore, a higher rate of reduction of class I antigens was observed in cases of granular cell type, which has been reported to have a worse prognosis than the clear cell type. The present data suggest that degree of the expression of MHC class I antigen on RCC might influence the host immune responsiveness against it. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2206942

  5. Comparative Gene Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Stem Cell-Like Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna M.; Lewicki, Sławomir; Helbrecht, Igor; Brodaczewska, Klaudia; Koch, Irena; Zdanowski, Robert; Król, Magdalena; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advancement in cancer research has shown that tumors are highly heterogeneous, and multiple phenotypically different cell populations are found in a single tumor. Cancer development and tumor growth are driven by specific types of cells—stem cell-like cancer cells (SCLCCs)—which are also responsible for metastatic spread and drug resistance. This research was designed to verify the presence of SCLCCs in renal cell cancer cell lines. Subsequently, we aimed to characterize phenotype and cell biology of CD105+ cells, defined previously as renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells. The main goal of the project was to describe the gene-expression profile of stem cell-like cancer cells of primary tumor and metastatic origin. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR analysis of stemness genes (Oct-4, Nanog and Ncam) and soft agar colony formation assay were conducted to check the stemness properties of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. FACS analysis of CD105+ and CD133+ cells was performed on RCC cells. Isolated CD105+ cells were verified for expression of mesenchymal markers—CD24, CD146, CD90, CD73, CD44, CD11b, CD19, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR and alkaline phosphatase. Hanging drop assay was used to investigate CD105+ cell-cell cohesion. Analysis of free-floating 3D spheres formed by isolated CD105+ was verified, as spheres have been hypothesized to contain undifferentiated multipotent progenitor cells. Finally, CD105+ cells were sorted from primary (Caki-2) and metastatic (ACHN) renal cell cancer cell lines. Gene-expression profiling of sorted CD105+ cells was performed with Agilent’s human GE 4x44K v2 microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were further categorized into canonical pathways. Network analysis and downstream analysis were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results Metastatic RCC cell lines (ACHN and Caki-1) demonstrated higher colony-forming ability in comparison to primary RCC cell lines. Metastatic RCC cell lines harbor

  6. Discovering Biomarkers within the Genomic Landscape of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    A, Sankin

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in molecular sequencing technology have led to the discovery of numerous biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These biomarkers have the potential to predict clinical outcomes and aid in clinical management decisions. The following commentary is a review of the preliminary data on some of the most promising genetic biomarker candidates.

  7. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M.; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel–Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal

  8. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H

    2011-12-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel-Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal cell

  9. UOK 268 Cell Line for Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Urologic Oncology Branch seeks parties to co-develop the UOK 262 immortalized cell line as research tool to study aggressive hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC)-associated recurring kidney cancer.

  10. Comprehensive molecular characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2013-07-04

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (for example, VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (for example, PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumours using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI(3)K/AKT pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving downregulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 (also known as MIR21) and GRB10. Remodelling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumour stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment.

  11. COMPREHENSIVE MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLEAR CELL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Genetic changes underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) include alterations in genes controlling cellular oxygen sensing (e.g. VHL) and the maintenance of chromatin states (e.g. PBRM1). We surveyed more than 400 tumors using different genomic platforms and identified 19 significantly mutated genes. The PI3K/Akt pathway was recurrently mutated, suggesting this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. Widespread DNA hypomethylation was associated with mutation of the H3K36 methyltransferase SETD2, and integrative analysis suggested that mutations involving the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex (PBRM1, ARID1A, SMARCA4) could have far-reaching effects on other pathways. Aggressive cancers demonstrated evidence of a metabolic shift, involving down-regulation of genes involved in the TCA cycle, decreased AMPK and PTEN protein levels, up-regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glutamine transporter genes, increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase protein, and altered promoter methylation of miR-21 and GRB10. Remodeling cellular metabolism thus constitutes a recurrent pattern in ccRCC that correlates with tumor stage and severity and offers new views on the opportunities for disease treatment. PMID:23792563

  12. The epigenetic landscape of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kluzek, Katarzyna; Bluyssen, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype of all kidney tumors. During the last few years, epigenetics has emerged as an important mechanism in ccRCC pathogenesis. Recent reports, involving large-scale methylation and sequencing analyses, have identified genes frequently inactivated by promoter methylation and recurrent mutations in genes encoding chromatin regulatory proteins. Interestingly, three of detected genes (PBRM1, SETD2 and BAP1) are located on chromosome 3p, near the VHL gene, inactivated in over 80% ccRCC cases. This suggests that 3p alterations are an essential part of ccRCC pathogenesis. Moreover, most of the proteins encoded by these genes cooperate in histone H3 modifications. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest discoveries shedding light on deregulation of chromatin machinery in ccRCC. Newly described ccRCC-specific epigenetic alterations could potentially serve as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and become an object of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28326264

  13. Expression of Von Hippel – Lindau (VHL) gene mutation in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Humera; Kehar, Shahnaz Imdad; Ali, Shahzad; Tariq, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in department of Pathology, Basic Medical Sciences Institute, JPMC, Karachi, from January 2007 to December 2012. Paraffin embedded blocks of 30 cases of radical nephrectomy specimens diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma including CCRCC 21 (70%) CCPRCC, 3 (10%), PRCC 2 (6.79%), hybrid tumor 4 (13.3%), chromophobe tumor (0%) processed for VHL gene expression on Polymerase Chain Reaction. Results: All the 30 cases previously diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma were processed on PCR, VHL gene mutations were seen in 20 (95.23%) of CCRCC while a single case was negative for VHL mutations. All CCPRCC were negative for VHL mutation. Among the hybrid tumor 03 cases with foci of clear cells show VHL mutation while a single case showing combination of clear cells and chromophobe cells was negative for mutation. Both the cases of PRCC were positive for mutation. Exon 3 mutation at base pair 194 seen in 8 (32%) cases and Exon 2 mutation at base pair 150-159 seen in 17 (68%) cases. None of the cases showed Exon 1 mutation. Conclusion: The present study shows that majority of CCRCC showed VHL mutation including the hybrid tumor with clear cell component in our population. PMID:25097537

  14. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  15. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase C correlates with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yibo; Liang, Chao; Zhu, Jundong; Miao, Chenkui; Yu, Yajie; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Pu; Li, Shuang; Bao, Meiling; Yang, Jie; Qin, Chao; Wang, Zengjun

    2017-03-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase C is an isoenzyme of lactate dehydrogenase and a member of the cancer-testis antigens family. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and functional role of lactate dehydrogenase C and its basic mechanisms in renal cell carcinoma. First, a total of 133 cases of renal cell carcinoma samples were analysed in a tissue microarray, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analyses were performed to investigate the correlation between lactate dehydrogenase C expression and renal cell carcinoma progression. Lactate dehydrogenase C protein levels and messenger RNA levels were significantly upregulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues, and the patients with positive lactate dehydrogenase C expression had a shorter progression-free survival, indicating the oncogenic role of lactate dehydrogenase C in renal cell carcinoma. In addition, further cytological experiments demonstrated that lactate dehydrogenase C could prompt renal cell carcinoma cells to produce lactate, and increase metastatic and invasive potential of renal cell carcinoma cells. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase C could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. In summary, these findings showed lactate dehydrogenase C was associated with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma and played a pivotal role in the migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells. Lactate dehydrogenase C may act as a novel biomarker for renal cell carcinoma progression and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

  16. iPS cell technology: Future impact on renal care.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin S; Steinman, Theodore I

    2015-08-01

    iPS cells from patients with kidney disease are a new tool with the potential to impact the future of renal care. They can be used in the laboratory to model the pathophysiology of human kidney disease, and have the potential to establish a new area of immunocompatible, on-demand renal transplantation. Critical challenges remain before the full potential of these cells can be accurately assessed. We need to understand whether the derived cell types are mature and can replace kidney function(s). To what extent can iPS cells model kidney disease in the simplified environment of cell culture? Ultimately, successful integration of these cells as autograft therapies will require demonstration of safety and efficacy equal or superior to the existing gold standards of kidney allograft transplantation and dialysis. Specific educational and infrastructural changes will be necessary if these specialized technologies are to be adopted as an accepted modalities in clinical medicine. Given these barriers, the first fruit of these labors is likely to be improved understanding of pathophysiological pathways in human IPS cell disease models, followed by drug discovery and testing. These experiments will lead naturally to improvements in differentiation and experiments in animal models testing function. The time course to achieve the desired goals remains unknown, but the ultimate hope is that new, more effective and less expensive modalities for renal replacement therapy will occur in the foreseeable future. A new standard of care for patients is anticipated that addresses limitations of currently available treatments.

  17. Wnt and planar cell polarity signaling in cystic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Goggolidou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases can cause end stage renal disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. They may arise early or later in life, are characterized by a spectrum of symptoms and can be caused by diverse genetic defects. The primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle that can serve as a signaling antenna, has been demonstrated to have a significant role in ensuring correct kidney development and function. In the kidney, one of the signaling pathways that requires the cilium for normal development is Wnt signaling. In this review, the roles of primary cilia in relation to canonical and non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling in cystic renal disease are described. The evidence of the associations between cilia, Wnt signaling and cystic renal disease is discussed and the significance of planar cell polarity-related mechanisms in cystic kidney disease is presented. Although defective Wnt signaling is not the only cause of renal disease, research is increasingly highlighting its importance, encouraging the development of Wnt-associated diagnostic and prognostic tools for cystic renal disease.

  18. Sex Differences in Renal Proximal Tubular Cell Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Seppi, Thomas; Prajczer, Sinikka; Dörler, Maria-Magdalena; Eiter, Oliver; Hekl, Daniel; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Skvortsova, Iraida; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Lukas, Peter; Lechner, Judith

    2016-10-01

    Studies in human patients and animals have revealed sex-specific differences in susceptibility to renal diseases. Because actions of female sex hormones on normal renal tissue might protect against damage, we searched for potential influences of the female hormone cycle on basic renal functions by studying excretion of urinary marker proteins in healthy human probands. We collected second morning spot urine samples of unmedicated naturally ovulating women, postmenopausal women, and men daily and determined urinary excretion of the renal tubular enzymes fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glutathione-S-transferase-α Additionally, we quantified urinary excretion of blood plasma proteins α1-microglobulin, albumin, and IgG. Naturally cycling women showed prominent peaks in the temporal pattern of urinary fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glutathione-S-transferase-α release exclusively within 7 days after ovulation or onset of menses. In contrast, postmenopausal women and men showed consistently low levels of urinary fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase excretion over comparable periods. We did not detect changes in urinary α1-microglobulin, albumin, or IgG excretion. Results of this study indicate that proximal tubular tissue architecture, representing a nonreproductive organ-derived epithelium, undergoes periodical adaptations phased by the female reproductive hormone cycle. The temporally delimited higher rate of enzymuria in ovulating women might be a sign of recurring increases of tubular cell turnover that potentially provide enhanced repair capacity and thus, higher resistance to renal damage.

  19. Stepwise renal lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells tracing in vivo development

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Masaki; Yanagawa, Naomi; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Yuri, Shunsuke; Hauser, Peter V.; Jo, Oak D.; Yanagawa, Norimoto

    2012-01-13

    effective in inducing MM and UB markers, respectively. We also observed the emergence and gradual increase of cell populations expressing progenitor cell marker CD24 from Stage I to Stage III. These CD24{sup +} cells correlated with higher levels of expression of Brachyury at stage I, Pax2 and Lim1 at stage II and MM markers, such as WT1 and Cadherin 11, after exposure to UB-conditioned media at stage III. In conclusion, our results show that stepwise induction by tracing in vivo developmental stages was effective to generate renal lineage progenitor cells from mESC, and CD24 may serve as a useful surface marker for renal lineage cells at stage II and MM cells at stage III.

  20. Human Kidney-Derived Cells Ameliorate Acute Kidney Injury Without Engrafting into Renal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Santeramo, Ilaria; Herrera Perez, Zeneida; Illera, Ana; Taylor, Arthur; Kenny, Simon; Murray, Patricia; Wilm, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert

    2017-04-04

    Previous studies have suggested that CD133(+) cells isolated from human kidney biopsies have the potential to ameliorate injury following intravenous (IV) administration in rodent models of kidney disease by integrating into damaged renal tissue and generating specialized renal cells. However, whether renal engraftment of CD133(+) cells is a prerequisite for ameliorating injury has not yet been unequivocally resolved. Here, we have established a cisplatin-induced nephropathy model in immunodeficient rats to assess the efficacy of CD133(+) human kidney cells in restoring renal health, and to determine the fate of these cells after systemic administration. Specifically, following IV administration, we evaluated the impact of the CD133(+) cells on renal function by undertaking longitudinal measurements of the glomerular filtration rate using a novel transcutaneous device. Using histological assays, we assessed whether the human kidney cells could promote renal regeneration, and if this was related to their ability to integrate into the damaged kidneys. Our results show that both CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells improve renal function and promote renal regeneration to a similar degree. However, this was not associated with engraftment of the cells into the kidneys. Instead, after IV administration, both cell types were exclusively located in the lungs, and had disappeared by 24 hours. Our data therefore indicate that renal repair is not mediated by CD133(+) cells homing to the kidneys and generating specialized renal cells. Instead, renal repair is likely to be mediated by paracrine or endocrine factors. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  1. Intratumoral morphologic and molecular heterogeneity of rhabdoid renal cell carcinoma: challenges for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajesh R; Murugan, Paari; Patel, Lalit R; Voicu, Horatiu; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Wani, Khalida; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Creighton, Chad J; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Broaddus, Russell R; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Czerniak, Bogdan; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Sircar, Kanishka

    2015-09-01

    Rhabdoid histology in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with a poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma may also be influenced by molecular alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between histologic features and salient molecular changes in rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. We macrodissected the rhabdoid and clear-cell epithelioid components from 12 cases of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. We assessed cancer-related mutations from eight cases using a clinical next-generation exome-sequencing platform. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (n=8) and non-rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) was assessed by RNA-seq and gene expression microarray. VHL (63%) showed identical mutations in all regions from the same tumor. BAP1 (38%) and PBRM1 (13%) mutations were identified in the rhabdoid but not in the epithelioid component and were mutually exclusive in 3/3 cases and 1 case, respectively. SETD2 (63%) mutations were discordant between different histologic regions in 2/5 cases, with mutations called only in the epithelioid and rhabdoid components, respectively. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma was distinct from advanced-stage and high-grade clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. The diverse histologic components of rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma, however, showed a similar transcriptomic program, including a similar prognostic gene expression signature. Rhabdoid clear-cell renal cell carcinoma is transcriptomically distinct and shows a high rate of SETD2 and BAP1 mutations and a low rate of PBRM1 mutations. Driver mutations in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma are often discordant across different morphologic regions, whereas the gene expression program is relatively stable. Molecular profiling of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma may improve by assessing for gene expression and sampling tumor foci from different

  2. Intratumoral Morphologic and Molecular Heterogeneity of Rhabdoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Challenges for Personalized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh R.; Murugan, Paari; Patel, Lalit R.; Voicu, Horatiu; Yoo, Suk-Young; Majewski, Tadeusz; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Wani, Khalida; Tannir, Nizar; Karam, Jose A.; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G.; Creighton, Chad J.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Broaddus, Russell R.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Baggerly, Keith A.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Sircar, Kanishka

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdoid histology in clear cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with a poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma may also be influenced by molecular alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between histologic features and salient molecular changes in rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We macrodissected the rhabdoid and clear cell epithelioid components from 12 cases of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We assessed cancer related mutations from 8 cases using a clinical next generation exome sequencing platform. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=8) and non-rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma (n=37) was assessed by RNA-seq and gene expression microarray. VHL (63%) showed identical mutations in all regions from the same tumor. BAP1 (38%) and PBRM1 (13%) mutations were identified in the rhabdoid but not the epithelioid component and were mutually exclusive in 3/3 cases and 1 case, respectively. SETD2 (63%) mutations were discordant between different histologic regions in 2/5 cases, with mutations called only in the epithelioid and rhabdoid components, respectively. The transcriptome of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma was distinct from advanced stage and high grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The diverse histologic components of rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma, however, showed a similar transcriptomic program, including a similar prognostic gene expression signature. Rhabdoid clear cell renal cell carcinoma is transcriptomically distinct and shows a high rate of SETD2 and BAP1 mutations and a low rate of PBRM1 mutations. Driver mutations in clear cell renal cell carcinoma are often discordant across different morphologic regions whereas the gene expression program is relatively stable. Molecular profiling of clear cell renal cell carcinoma may improve by assessing for gene expression and sampling tumor foci from different histologic

  3. Omi/HtrA2 protease mediates cisplatin-induced cell death in renal cells.

    PubMed

    Cilenti, Lucia; Kyriazis, George A; Soundarapandian, Mangala M; Stratico, Valerie; Yerkes, Adam; Park, Kwon Moo; Sheridan, Alice M; Alnemri, Emad S; Bonventre, Joseph V; Zervos, Antonis S

    2005-02-01

    Omi/HtrA2 is a mitochondrial proapoptotic serine protease that is able to induce both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death. After apoptotic stimuli, Omi is released to the cytoplasm where it binds and cleaves inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. In this report, we investigated the role of Omi in renal cell death following cisplatin treatment. Using primary mouse proximal tubule cells, as well as established renal cell lines, we show that the level of Omi protein is upregulated after treatment with cisplatin. This upregulation is followed by the release of Omi from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and degradation of XIAP. Reducing the endogenous level of Omi protein using RNA interference renders renal cells resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Furthermore, we show that the proteolytic activity of Omi is necessary and essential for cisplatin-induced cell death in this system. When renal cells are treated with Omi's specific inhibitor, ucf-101, they become significantly resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Ucf-101 was also able to minimize cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic injury in animals. Our results demonstrate that Omi is a major mediator of cisplatin-induced cell death in renal cells and suggest a way to limit renal injury by specifically inhibiting its proteolytic activity.

  4. Molecular aspects of renal cell carcinoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Hari; Huh, Jung-Sik; Rove, Kyle O; Crompton, Luiza; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Kim, Fernando J

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tubules of the kidney. RCC, the incidence of which is increasing annually, represents five percent of adult epithelial cancers. Clear cell carcinoma represents the most frequent histological subtype. RCC is characterized by a lack of early warning signs, diverse clinical manifestations. Incidentally detected tumors in asymptomatic individuals have been steadily increasing owing to the increased usage of various imaging technologies. Currently there are no recommendations for screening to detect and make an early diagnosis of renal cancer. But in recent years, the discovery of new molecular and cytogenetic markers has led to the recognition and classification of several novel subtypes of RCC, and the introduction of molecular-targeted therapy for advanced-stage RCC. We performed a literature review using PubMed and discuss current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, treatment, and future research directions of RCC. PMID:21969126

  5. Simulating Heterogeneous Tumor Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Certain tumor phenomena, like metabolic heterogeneity and local stable regions of chronic hypoxia, signify a tumor’s resistance to therapy. Although recent research has shed light on the intracellular mechanisms of cancer metabolic reprogramming, little is known about how tumors become metabolically heterogeneous or chronically hypoxic, namely the initial conditions and spatiotemporal dynamics that drive these cell population conditions. To study these aspects, we developed a minimal, spatially-resolved simulation framework for modeling tissue-scale mixed populations of cells based on diffusible particles the cells consume and release, the concentrations of which determine their behavior in arbitrarily complex ways, and on stochastic reproduction. We simulate cell populations that self-sort to facilitate metabolic symbiosis, that grow according to tumor-stroma signaling patterns, and that give rise to stable local regions of chronic hypoxia near blood vessels. We raise two novel questions in the context of these results: (1) How will two metabolically symbiotic cell subpopulations self-sort in the presence of glucose, oxygen, and lactate gradients? We observe a robust pattern of alternating striations. (2) What is the proper time scale to observe stable local regions of chronic hypoxia? We observe the stability is a function of the balance of three factors related to O2—diffusion rate, local vessel release rate, and viable and hypoxic tumor cell consumption rate. We anticipate our simulation framework will help researchers design better experiments and generate novel hypotheses to better understand dynamic, emergent whole-tumor behavior. PMID:28030620

  6. Malignant renal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Renal malignancies are common in children. While the majority of malignant renal masses are secondary to Wilms tumor, it can be challenging to distinguish from more aggressive renal masses. For suspicious renal lesions, it is crucial to ensure prompt diagnosis in order to select the appropriate surgical procedure and treatment. This review article will discuss the common differential diagnosis that can be encountered when evaluating a suspicious renal mass in the pediatric population. This includes clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, malignant rhabdoid tumor, renal medullary carcinoma and lymphoma. PMID:28326263

  7. FOXM1 participates in PLK1-regulated cell cycle progression in renal cell cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHE; ZHANG, GUOJUN; KONG, CHUIZE

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of entry into and progression through mitosis is important for cell proliferation. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is involved in multiple stages of mitosis. Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) has multiple functions in tumorigenesis and, in elevated levels, is frequently associated with cancer progression. The present study reports that FOXM1, a substrate of PLK1, controls the transcription mechanism that mediates the PLK1-dependent regulation of the cell cycle. The present study investigated the expression of PLK1 and FOXM1 in the clear renal cell carcinoma 769-P and ACHN cell lines, and indicated that the expression of PLK1 and FOXM1 are correlated in human renal cell cancer cell lines and that the suppression of PLK1 may decrease the expression of FOXM1. The knockdown of FOXM1 or PLK1 in renal cell cancer cell lines caused cell cycle progression to be blocked. As a result, the present study indicated the involvement of FOXM1 in PLK1-regulated cell cycle progression. PMID:27073539

  8. Relationship between red cell distribution width and early renal injury in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Zhao, Jiangtao; Jian, Liguo; Ding, Tongbin; Liu, Shichao

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that red cell distribution width was related to adverse cardiovascular events. However, few studies reported the relationship between red cell distribution width and early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Using a cross-sectional design, 334 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus were enrolled according to the criterion of inclusion and exclusion. Demographic and clinical examination data were collected. Depended on the urine albumin, study population were divided into case group (n = 118) and control group (n = 216). Compared with control group, the case group tend to be higher red cell distribution width level (13.6 ± 0.9 vs.12.5 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). The red cell distribution width was positively associated with albuminuria creatinine ratio (r = 0.567, p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regressions showed that red cell distribution width was still associated with early-stage renal injury after adjusting for many other potential cofounders. Compared with the first quartile, the risk ratio of the second, the third and the fourth quartile were 1.38 (95%CI: 1.06-1.80), 1.57 (95%CI: 1.21-2.97), 2.71 (95%CI: 2.08-3.54), respectively. Besides, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, uric acid and blood urea nitrogen were also significantly associated with renal injury in gestational diabetes mellitus patients. The elevated red cell distribution width level might be a predictor of early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. As an easy and routine examination index, red cell distribution width may provide better clinical guidance when combined with other important indices.

  9. Axitinib in sequential therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hryciuk, Beata; Stec, Rafał; Mączewski, Michał; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy of new molecularly targeted drugs in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), confirmed in clinical studies in relation to survival and prolongation of time to progression, has became a big chance for patients with metastatic renal cell cancer. Axitinib is a potent and selective receptor tyrosine kinase for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR-1, -2, -3), platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGRF-β) and c-KIT. This is a case report of a 57-year old female patient with a history of left nephrectomy due to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The patient had received three prior systemic treatments (interferon – sorafenib – everolimus). After consecutive progression the patient was qualified to 4th line therapy – axitinib at a dose of 5 mg twice daily. Partial response to treatment was achieved. After 6 months therapy was stopped due to the disease progression. The total time to progression was 37.5 months. The total survival time from the disease diagnosis was 45 months. Based on literature date and own experience we showed that sequential treatment RCC is associated with improved survival. In summary, axitinib may be an effective drug after failure of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in previous lines of therapy.

  10. c-Met in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erlmeier, Franziska; Ivanyi, Philipp; Hartmann, Arndt; Autenrieth, Michael; Wiedemann, Max; Weichert, Wilko; Steffens, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    c-Met plays a role as a prognostic marker in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In addition, recently the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib targeting c-Met was approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In contrast to clear cell RCC, little is known about c-Met expression patterns in rarer RCC subtypes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, distribution and prognostic impact of c-Met expression on chromophobe (ch)RCC. Patients who underwent renal surgery due to chRCC were retrospectively evaluated. Tumor specimens were analyzed for c-Met expression by immunohistochemistry. Expression data were associated with clinicopathological parameters including patient survival. Eighty-one chRCC patients were eligible for analysis. Twenty-four (29.6%) patients showed a high c-Met expression (c-Met(high), staining intensity higher than median). Our results showed an association between c-Met(high) expression and the existence of lymph node metastasis (p = 0.007). No further significant clinicopathological associations with c-Met were identified, also regarding c-Met expression and overall survival. In conclusion, to our knowledge this is the first study evaluating the prognostic impact of c-Met in a considerably large cohort of chRCC. High c-Met expression is associated with the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. This indicates that c-Met might be implicated into metastatic progression in chRCC.

  11. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: a new treatment paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer has traditionally been treated with cytokines (interferon or interleukin-2). Improved understanding of biology has engendered novel targeted therapeutic agents that have altered the natural history of this disease. The vascular endothelial growth factor and its related receptor and the mTOR signal transduction pathway have particularly been exploited. Sunitinib malate, sorafenib tosylate, temsirolimus, and bevacizumab have improved clinical outcomes in randomized trials. Other multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lapatinib, axitinib, pazopanib) and antiangiogenic agents (VEGF Trap, lenalidomide) have also demonstrated activity in early studies. Combinations of these agents are being evaluated. The future of the therapy of renal cancer appears promising owing to the efficacy of these novel agents. PMID:17637878

  12. Patient-reported outcomes in a phase III, randomized study of sunitinib versus interferon-α as first-line systemic therapy for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in a European population

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, D.; del Muro, X. Garcia; Pérez-Gracia, J. L.; González-Larriba, J. L.; Abrio, M. V.; Ruiz, M. A.; Pardo, A.; Guzmán, C.; Cerezo, S. Díaz; Grande, E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of sunitinib versus interferon-alpha (IFN-α) treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and methods: In all, 304 mRCC patients (European cohort) were randomized 1 : 1 to receive sunitinib (50 mg/day for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks off) or IFN-α (9 million units s.c. injection three times/week). The following questionnaires were completed (days 1 and 28 per cycle): Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), the FACT-Kidney Symptom Index and the EuroQol Group's EQ-5D self-report questionnaire (EQ-5D). Results correspond to an ongoing trial with progression-free survival time as primary end point, and patients were still being followed up. Data were analyzed using repeated measures mixed effects models (MEMs) that allow the inclusion of initial differences and uncompleted repeated measures, with the assumption of data missing at random. Six-cycle results were included. Results: Results consistently showed that patients in sunitinib group experienced statistically significantly milder kidney-related symptoms, better cancer-specific HRQoL and general health status (in social utility scores) during the study period as measured by these patient-reported outcome end points. No statistical differences between groups were found on the FACT-G physical well-being subscale or the EQ-5D VAS values. Conclusions: Results from MEM showed the sunitinib's benefit on HRQoL compared with IFN-α. PMID:19549706

  13. Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C.; Uppal, Manpreet; Chumber, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the kidney are rare, and present a unique diagnostic challenge. We report the case of an elderly male who presented with a large cystic neoplasm, which was a diagnostic dilemma clinically and radiologically. Histopathological examination showed a tumour composed of variably sized tubules lined by atypical cells having large round nuclei with prominent nucleoli. Hobnailing was seen at places. Tumour cells were immunopositive for pancytokeratin, vimentin, CD10, CK19 and AMACR, confirming a diagnosis of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC). PMID:26425234

  14. Bone pulsating metastasis due to renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cınar, Murat; Derincek, Alihan; Karan, Belgin; Akpınar, Sercan; Tuncay, Cengiz

    2010-11-01

    Pulsation on the bone cortex surface is a rare condition. Pulsative palpation of the superficial-located bone tumors can be misperceived as an aneurysm. Fifty-eight-year-old man is presented with pulsating bone mass in his proximal tibia. During angiographic examination, hypervascular masses were diagnosed both at right kidney and at right proximal tibia. Renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed after abdominal CT scan. Proximal tibia biopsy was complicated with projectile bleeding.

  15. Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Liu, Qingdu; Binns, Thomas C; Urrutia, Andres A; Davidoff, Olena; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Pfaff, Andrew S; Olauson, Hannes; Wernerson, Annika; Fogo, Agnes B; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gross, Kenneth W; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-02

    Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2-/- renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2-/- mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation.

  16. Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingdu; Binns, Thomas C.; Davidoff, Olena; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P.; Pfaff, Andrew S.; Olauson, Hannes; Fogo, Agnes B.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2–/– renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2–/– mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation. PMID:27088801

  17. RENAL CELL CARCINOMA METASTASIS TO THE SINONASAL CAVITY: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marijan; Krvavica, Ana; Rudić, Milan

    2015-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3% of all adult malignant tumors. Common sites of metastases are lungs, bone, liver, brain and adrenal glands. Metastatic disease to the head and neck ranges from 15% to 30%. The 5-year survival rate after nephrectomy is 60%-75%, but with multiorgan metastases the 5-year survival rate is significantly lower, 0-7%. A case is presented of a female patient diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma metastases to the paranasal sinuses, diagnosed and treated at the Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Zadar General Hospital, Zadar, Croatia. The tumor was surgically removed. Unfortunately, the patient died one year after the procedure due to multiorgan failure. Although metastases of renal cell carcinoma to the head and neck are very rare, it should be first suspected when investigating a metastatic tumor in this region. Surgical excision offers the best hope for long term survival. In case of unresectable tumor, other treatment options should be considered such as radiotherapy, immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

  18. Intravenous renal cell transplantation with SAA1-positive cells prevents the progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic-diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2013-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common cause of progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease, has now reached global proportions. The only means to rescue diabetic patients on dialysis is renal transplantation, a very effective therapy but severely limited by the availability of donor kidneys. Hence, we tested the role of intravenous renal cell transplantation (IRCT) on obese/diabetic Zucker/SHHF F1 hybrid (ZS) female rats with severe ischemic and diabetic nephropathy. Renal ischemia was produced by bilateral renal clamping of the renal arteries at 10 wk of age, and IRCT with genetically modified normal ZS male tubular cells was given intravenously at 15 and 20 wk of age. Rats were euthanized at 34 wk of age. IRCT with cells expressing serum amyloid A had strong and long-lasting beneficial effects on renal function and structure, including tubules and glomeruli. However, donor cells were found engrafted only in renal tubules 14 wk after the second infusion. The results indicate that IRCT with serum amyloid A-positive cells is effective in preventing the progression of chronic kidney disease in rats with diabetic and ischemic nephropathy.

  19. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  20. Role of partial nephrectomy as cytoreduction in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karam, J A; Babaian, K N; Tannir, N M; Matin, S F; Wood, C G

    2015-06-01

    In this review, we describe the role, feasibility and safety of partial nephrectomy in the setting of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Partial nephrectomy is currently the preferred therapeutic modality in patients with localized renal tumors, while radical cytoreductive nephrectomy is the standard of care for appropriately selected patients with metastatic disease. Several studies have shown the prognostic value of percentage tumor removed when cytoreductive nephrectomy is done. This concept of percentage tumor removal and the associated benefit should also be applied when considering patients for cytoreductive partial nephrectomy; however, the potential adverse events after partial nephrectomy should be kept in mind, as these, when they occur, could delay time to starting systemic therapy. Several small retrospective studies have shown the feasibility of this approach in carefully selected patient groups. In well-selected patients with metastatic disease and primary tumors that are amenable to nephron sparing approaches, partial nephrectomy could offer an alternative to radical nephrectomy, with manageable adverse events, and good renal functional outcomes. Preserving renal function in this population could allow these patients to participate in clinical trial that they otherwise might not qualify for.

  1. Suppression of renal fibrosis by galectin-1 in high glucose-treated renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro Tsuruta, Yuki; Yamashita, Tetsuri; Takano, Mari; Echida, Yoshihisa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the ability of intracellular galectin-1 (Gal-1), a prototype of endogenous lectin, to prevent renal fibrosis by regulating cell signaling under a high glucose (HG) condition. We demonstrated that overexpression of Gal-1 reduces type I collagen (COL1) expression and transcription in human renal epithelial cells under HG conditions and transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulation. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is stimulated by Gal-1. HG conditions and TGF-{beta}1 treatment augment expression and nuclear translocation of Gal-1. In contrast, targeted inhibition of Gal-1 expression reduces COL1 expression and increases MMP1 expression. The Smad3 signaling pathway is inhibited, whereas two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), are activated by Gal-1, indicating that Gal-1 regulates these signaling pathways in COL1 production. Using specific inhibitors of Smad3, ERK, and p38 MAPK, we showed that ERK MAPK activated by Gal-1 plays an inhibitory role in COL1 transcription and that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway by Gal-1 plays a negative role in MMP1 production. Taken together, two MAPK pathways are stimulated by increasing levels of Gal-1 in the HG condition, leading to suppression of COL1 expression and increase of MMP1 expression.

  2. MUTATIONS IN THE VHL GENE FRIOM POTASSIUM BROMATE-INDUCED RAT CLEAR CELL RENAL TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a rat renal carcinogen and a major drinking water disinfection by-product in water disinfected with ozone. Clear cell renal tumors, the most common form of human renal epithelial neoplasm, are rare in animals but are inducible by KBrO3 in F344 rats. ...

  3. Urinary Signatures of Renal Cell Carcinoma Investigated by Peptidomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    De Sio, Gabriele; Smith, Andrew James; Gianazza, Erica; Grasso, Angelica; Rocco, Francesco; Signorini, Stefano; Grasso, Marco; Bosari, Silvano; Zoppis, Italo; Dakna, Mohammed; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.; Mauri, Giancarlo; Magni, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is typically asymptomatic and surgery usually increases patient's lifespan only for early stage tumours. Moreover, solid renal masses cannot be confidently differentiated from RCC. Therefore, markers to distinguish malignant kidney tumours and for their detection are needed. Two different peptide signatures were obtained by a MALDI-TOF profiling approach based on urine pre-purification by C8 magnetic beads. One cluster of 12 signals could differentiate malignant tumours (n = 137) from benign renal masses and controls (n = 153) with sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 87% in the validation set. A second cluster of 12 signals distinguished clear cell RCC (n = 118) from controls (n = 137) with sensitivity and specificity values of 84% and 91%, respectively. Most of the peptide signals used in the two models were observed at higher abundance in patient urines and could be identified as fragments of proteins involved in tumour pathogenesis and progression. Among them: the Meprin 1α with a pro-angiogenic activity, the Probable G-protein coupled receptor 162, belonging to the GPCRs family and known to be associated with several key functions in cancer, the Osteopontin that strongly correlates to tumour stages and invasiveness, the Phosphorylase b kinase regulatory subunit alpha and the SeCreted and TransMembrane protein 1. PMID:25202906

  4. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes.

  5. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Urinary signatures of Renal Cell Carcinoma investigated by peptidomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Chinello, Clizia; Cazzaniga, Marta; De Sio, Gabriele; Smith, Andrew James; Gianazza, Erica; Grasso, Angelica; Rocco, Francesco; Signorini, Stefano; Grasso, Marco; Bosari, Silvano; Zoppis, Italo; Dakna, Mohammed; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Mauri, Giancarlo; Magni, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is typically asymptomatic and surgery usually increases patient's lifespan only for early stage tumours. Moreover, solid renal masses cannot be confidently differentiated from RCC. Therefore, markers to distinguish malignant kidney tumours and for their detection are needed. Two different peptide signatures were obtained by a MALDI-TOF profiling approach based on urine pre-purification by C8 magnetic beads. One cluster of 12 signals could differentiate malignant tumours (n = 137) from benign renal masses and controls (n = 153) with sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 87% in the validation set. A second cluster of 12 signals distinguished clear cell RCC (n = 118) from controls (n = 137) with sensitivity and specificity values of 84% and 91%, respectively. Most of the peptide signals used in the two models were observed at higher abundance in patient urines and could be identified as fragments of proteins involved in tumour pathogenesis and progression. Among them: the Meprin 1α with a pro-angiogenic activity, the Probable G-protein coupled receptor 162, belonging to the GPCRs family and known to be associated with several key functions in cancer, the Osteopontin that strongly correlates to tumour stages and invasiveness, the Phosphorylase b kinase regulatory subunit alpha and the SeCreted and TransMembrane protein 1.

  7. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in a pediatric living-related kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Greco, Andres J; Baluarte, Jorge H; Meyers, Kevin E C; Sellers, Marty T; Suchi, Mariko; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Kaplan, Bernard S

    2005-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma can occur in children who have received renal allografts from adults. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma is a rare variant of renal carcinoma with distinct histochemical, ultrastructural, and genetic characteristics. We describe the incidental finding of a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in a 13 1/2-year-old boy 5 years after receiving a living-related renal transplant. This tumor was found by serendipity during the evaluation of fever and inguinal lymphadenopathy, with the presumptive diagnosis of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder. The patient was found to have cat-scratch disease. A renal cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pediatric recipient of an adult kidney with an incidental finding of a tumor in the graft.

  8. Demyelinating Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Kenya; Fujimaki, Motoki; Kanai, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Yuta; Nakazato, Tomoko; Tanaka, Ryota; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients who develop a paraneoplastic syndrome may present with neuromuscular disorders. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old man who suffered from progressive gait disturbance and muscle weakness. The results of a nerve conduction study fulfilled the criteria of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. An abdominal CT scan detected RCC, the pathological diagnosis of which was clear cell type. After tumor resection and a single course of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, the patient's symptoms drastically improved over the course of one year. The patient's neurological symptoms preceded the detection of cancer. A proper diagnosis and the initiation of suitable therapies resulted in a favorable outcome. PMID:28049985

  9. Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the paranasal sinuses and orbit

    PubMed Central

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Menon, Kavitha R; Jones, Graeme L; Whittet, Heiki; Williams, Wynne

    2012-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastasis to the paranasal sinuses. The authors review RCC and its potential for sinonasal metastasis and discuss the variable presentation and need for clinical suspicion for early diagnosis and treatment. A 74-year-old man presented with numbness of the left side of the face, reduced visual acuity and ptosis 12 years after nephrectomy for RCC. Imaging studies showed a lesion in the left pterygopalatine fossa and the histological features supported the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. RCC metastasis to the paranasal sinuses is very rare and can present with various symptoms depending on the affected organ. These symptoms occasionally are the initial manifestation of renal RCC and it is very important to recognise them so that the patient receives the appropriate therapy to improve survival. PMID:22605794

  10. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  11. Thyroid metastasis as initial presentation of clear cell renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Plaza, César Pablo; Domínguez-López, Marta Elena; Blanco-Reina, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic tumors account for 1.4–2.5% of thyroid malignancies. About 25–30% of patients with clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) have distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, being the thyroid gland a rare localization [5%]. Presentation of the case A 62-year woman who underwent a cervical ultrasonography and a PAAF biopsy reporting atypical follicular proliferation with a few intranuclear vacuoles “suggestive” of thyroid papillary cancer in the context of a multinodular goiter was reported. A total thyroidectomy was performed and the histology of a clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) was described in four nodules of the thyroid gland. A CT scan was performed and a renal giant right tumor was found. The patient underwent an eventful radical right nephrectomy and the diagnosis of CCRC was confirmed. Discussion Thyroid metastasis (TM) from CCRC are usually apparent in a metachronic context during the follow-up of a treated primary (even many years after) but may sometimes be present at the same time than the primary renal tumor. Our case is exceptional because the TM was the first evidence of the CCRC, which was subsequently diagnosed and treated. Conclusion The possibility of finding of an incidental metastatic tumor in the thyroid gland from a previous unknown and non-diganosed primary (as CCRC in our case was) is rare and account only for less than 1% of malignancies. Nonetheless, the thyroid gland is a frequent site of metastasis and the presence of “de novo” thyroid nodules in oncologic patients must be always considered and studied. PMID:25827295

  12. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shimakage, Misuzu; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Harada, Shizuko; Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Shinka, Toshiaki; Oka, Toshitsugu

    2007-07-01

    There have been few studies regarding the etiology of renal cell carcinoma. To examine the possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in this disease, 9 renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 2 nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumor) and 2 RCC cell lines were subjected to mRNA in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence staining. Messenger RNA in situ hybridization using BamHIW, EBNA LP, EBNA 2 and EBER1 probes of EBV revealed signals in all the examined samples, although some samples showed weak signals using the EBNA LP probe. Indirect immunofluorescence staining using anti-EBNA LP, anti-EBNA2, anti-LMP1 and anti-BZLF1 antibodies showed definitive fluorescence. PCR also revealed EBV DNA in all 8 RCC specimens including 7 cases other than hybridization and fluorescence. EBV infected all the RCC and nephroblastoma irrespective of the histological or clinical stage. On the other hand, EBV expression was stronger in papillary and clear cell-type RCC than chromophobe cell-type, as well as being stronger in the higher grades of RCC. These results suggest that the expression of EBV may be involved in the pathogenesis of RCC and nephroblastoma.

  13. In vitro effects of nanoparticles on renal cells

    PubMed Central

    L'Azou, Béatrice; Jorly, Joana; On, Dinhill; Sellier, Elisabeth; Moisan, Frédéric; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Cambar, Jean; Brochard, Patrick; Ohayon-Courtès, Céline

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability of nanoparticles to cross the lung-blood barrier suggests that they may translocate to blood and to targets distant from their portal of entry. Nevertheless, nanotoxicity in organs has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nanotoxicity in renal cells using in vitro models. Various carbon black (CB) (FW2–13 nm, Printex60-21 nm and LB101-95 nm) and titanium dioxide (TiO2-15 and TiO2-50 nm) nanoparticles were characterized on size by electron microscopy. We evaluated theirs effects on glomerular mesangial (IP15) and epithelial proximal tubular (LLC-PK1) renal cells, using light microscopy, WST-1 assay, immunofluorescence labeling and DCFH-DA for reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. Results Nanoparticles induced a variety of cell responses. On both IP15 and LLC-PK1 cells, the smallest FW2 NP was found to be the most cytotoxic with classic dose-behavior. For the other NPs tested, different cytotoxic profiles were found, with LLC-PK1 cells being more sensitive than IP15 cells. Exposure to FW2 NPs, evidenced in our experiments as the most cytotoxic particle type, significantly enhanced production of ROS in both IP15 and LLC-PK1 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy using latex beads indicated that depending on their size, the cells internalized particles, which accumulated in the cell cytoplasm. Additionally using transmission electronic microscope micrographs show nanoparticles inside the cells and trapped in vesicles. Conclusion The present data constitute the first step towards determining in vitro dose effect of manufactured CB and TiO2 NPs in renal cells. Cytotoxicological assays using epithelial tubular and glomerular mesangial cell lines rapidly provide information and demonstrated that NP materials exhibit varying degrees of cytotoxicity. It seems clear that in vitro cellular systems will need to be further developed, standardized and validated (relative to in vivo effects) in order to provide useful screening

  14. Delineating the Role of Various Factors in Renal Disposition of Digoxin through Application of Physiologically Based Kidney Model to Renal Impairment Populations

    PubMed Central

    Scotcher, Daniel; Jones, Christopher R.; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Development of submodels of organs within physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) principles and beyond simple perfusion limitations may be challenging because of underdeveloped in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approaches or lack of suitable clinical data for model refinement. However, advantage of such models in predicting clinical observations in divergent patient groups is now commonly acknowledged. Mechanistic understanding of altered renal secretion in renal impairment is one area that may benefit from such models, despite knowledge gaps in renal pathophysiology. In the current study, a PBPK kidney model was developed for digoxin, accounting for the roles of organic anion transporting peptide 4C1 (OATP4C1) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in its tubular secretion, with the aim to investigate the impact of age and renal impairment (moderate to severe) on renal drug disposition. Initial PBPK simulations based on changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) underestimated the observed reduction in digoxin renal excretion clearance (CLR) in subjects with moderately impaired renal function relative to healthy. Reduction in either proximal tubule cell number or the OATP4C1 abundance in the mechanistic kidney model successfully predicted 59% decrease in digoxin CLR, in particular when these changes were proportional to reduction in GFR. In contrast, predicted proximal tubule concentration of digoxin was only sensitive to changes in the transporter expression/ million proximal tubule cells. Based on the mechanistic modeling, reduced proximal tubule cellularity and OATP4C1 abundance, and inhibition of OATP4C1-mediated transport, are proposed as possible causes of reduced digoxin renal secretion in renally impaired patients. PMID:28057840

  15. Optimal management of renal cell carcinoma in the elderly: a review

    PubMed Central

    Quivy, Amandine; Daste, Amaury; Harbaoui, Asma; Duc, Sophie; Bernhard, Jean-Christophe; Gross-Goupil, Marine; Ravaud, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Both the aging population and the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are growing, making the question of tumor management in the elderly a real challenge. Doctors should be aware of the importance of assessing this specific subpopulation. An aggressive therapeutic approach may be balanced by the benefit of the treatment — care or cure — and the life expectancy and willingness of the patient. The treatment for local disease can be surgery (radical or partial nephrectomy) or ablative therapies (radiofrequency, cryotherapy). Even if in most cases surgery is safe, complications such as alteration of renal function may occur, especially in the elderly, with physiological renal impairment at baseline. More recently, another option has been developed as an alternative: active surveillance. In the past decade, new drugs have been approved in the metastatic setting. All the phase 3 trials have included patients without a limit on age. Nevertheless, data concerning the elderly are still poor and concern only a very selective subpopulation. The toxicity profile of targeted agents may interfere with pre-existent comorbidities. Furthermore, the metabolism of several agents via cytochrome P450 can cause drug interaction. The importance of quality of life is a major factor with regard to management of therapy. Finally, to date, there is no recommendation of systematic a priori dose reduction in the elderly. In this review we describe the various possibilities of treatment for localized RCC or metastatic RCC in an aging population. PMID:23626463

  16. Cystic Renal Oncocytoma and Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Morphologic and Immunohistochemical Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Skenderi, Faruk; Ulamec, Monika; Vranic, Semir; Bilalovic, Nurija; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Rotterova, Pavla; Kokoskova, Bohuslava; Trpkov, Kiril; Vesela, Pavla; Hora, Milan; Kalusova, Kristyna; Sperga, Maris; Perez Montiel, Delia; Alvarado Cabrero, Isabel; Bulimbasic, Stela; Branzovsky, Jindrich; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2016-02-01

    Renal oncocytoma (RO) may present with a tubulocystic growth in 3% to 7% of cases, and in such cases its morphology may significantly overlap with tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRCC). We compared the morphologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of these tumors, aiming to clarify the differential diagnostic criteria, which facilitate the discrimination of RO from TCRCC. Twenty-four cystic ROs and 15 TCRCCs were selected and analyzed for: architectural growth patterns, stromal features, cytomorphology, ISUP nucleolar grade, necrosis, and mitotic activity. Immunohistochemical panel included various cytokeratins (AE1-AE3, OSCAR, CAM5.2, CK7), vimentin, CD10, CD117, AMACR, CA-IX, antimitochondrial antigen (MIA), EMA, and Ki-67. The presence of at least focal solid growth and islands of tumor cells interspersed with loose stroma, lower ISUP nucleolar grade, absence of necrosis, and absence of mitotic figures were strongly suggestive of a cystic RO. In contrast, the absence of solid and island growth patterns and presence of more compact, fibrous stroma, accompanied by higher ISUP nucleolar grade, focal necrosis, and mitotic figures were all associated with TCRCC. TCRCC marked more frequently for vimentin, CD10, AMACR, and CK7 and had a higher proliferative index by Ki-67 (>15%). CD117 was negative in 14/15 cases. One case was weakly CD117 reactive with cytoplasmic positivity. All cystic RO cases were strongly positive for CD117. The remaining markers (AE1-AE3, CAM5.2, OSCAR, CA-IX, MIA, EMA) were of limited utility. Presence of tumor cell islands and solid growth areas and the type of stroma may be major morphologic criteria in differentiating cystic RO from TCRCC. In difficult cases, or when a limited tissue precludes full morphologic assessment, immunohistochemical pattern of vimentin, CD10, CD117, AMACR, CK7, and Ki-67 could help in establishing the correct diagnosis.

  17. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  18. Occupational exposure to dusts and risk of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karami, S; Boffetta, P; Stewart, P S; Brennan, P; Zaridze, D; Matveev, V; Janout, V; Kollarova, H; Bencko, V; Navratilova, M; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Mates, D; Gromiec, J; Slamova, A; Chow, W-H; Rothman, N; Moore, L E

    2011-01-01

    Background: Occupational exposures to dusts have generally been examined in relation to cancers of the respiratory system and have rarely been examined in relation to other cancers, such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Although previous epidemiological studies, though few, have shown certain dusts, such as asbestos, to increase renal cancer risk, the potential for other occupational dust exposures to cause kidney damage and/or cancer may exist. We investigated whether asbestos, as well as 20 other occupational dust exposures, were associated with RCC risk in a large European, multi-center, hospital-based renal case–control study. Methods: General occupational histories and job-specific questionnaires were reviewed by occupational hygienists for subject-specific information. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) between RCC risk and exposures were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Among participants ever exposed to dusts, significant associations were observed for glass fibres (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1–3.9), mineral wool fibres (OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.2–5.1), and brick dust (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0–2.4). Significant trends were also observed with exposure duration and cumulative exposure. No association between RCC risk and asbestos exposure was observed. Conclusion: Results suggest that increased RCC risk may be associated with occupational exposure to specific types of dusts. Additional studies are needed to replicate and extend findings. PMID:21540858

  19. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-02

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases.

  20. Multiple nephron-sparing procedures in solitary kidney with recurrent, metachronous, nonfamilial renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nosnik, Israel P; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Nelson, Rendon; Polascik, Thomas J

    2006-12-01

    Patients with metachronous bilateral renal cell carcinoma pose a significant challenge given the high mortality of renal cell carcinoma and the poor quality of life should dialysis become necessary. In addition, patients may be subject to morbidity due to potential multiple treatments of the multifocal renal tumors. We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with multifocal, bilateral clear cell carcinoma who maintained a minimal change in serum creatinine after undergoing unilateral radical nephrectomy, subsequent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous cryoablation, laparoscopic cryoablation, and open partial nephrectomy for recurrent renal cell carcinoma in a solitary kidney.

  1. Splenectomy and risk of renal and perinephric abscesses: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-08-01

    Little epidemiological research is available on the relationship between splenectomy and renal and perinephric abscesses. The purpose of the study was to examine this issue in Taiwan.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 16,426 participants aged 20 and older who were newly diagnosed with splenectomy from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the splenectomy group, whereas 65,653 sex-matched, age-matched, and comorbidity-matched, randomly selected participants without splenectomy were assigned to the nonsplenectomy group. The incidence of renal and perinephric abscesses at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of renal and perinephric abscesses associated with splenectomy and other comorbidities including cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis.The overall incidence rate of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.14-fold greater in the splenectomy group than that in the nonsplenectomy group (2.24 per 10,000 person-years vs 1.05 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 2.02, 2.28). After controlling for sex, age, cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis, the multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that the adjusted HR of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.24 for the splenectomy group (95 % CI 1.30, 3.88), when compared with the nonsplenectomy group. In further analysis, the adjusted HR markedly increased to 7.69 for those comorbid with splenectomy and diabetes mellitus (95% CI 3.31, 17.9).Splenectomy is associated with renal and perinephric abscesses, particularly comorbid with diabetes mellitus. In view of its potential morbidity and mortality, clinicians should consider the possibility of renal and perinephric abscesses when

  2. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results.

  3. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  4. [WHO classification 2016 and first S3 guidelines on renal cell cancer: What is important for the practice?].

    PubMed

    Moch, H

    2016-03-01

    The first S3 guidelines on renal cell cancer cover the practical aspects of imaging, diagnostics and therapy as well as the clinical relevance of pathology reporting. This review summarizes the changes in renal tumor classification and the new recommendations for reporting renal cell tumors. The S3 guidelines recommend the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of renal cell tumors. Novel renal cell tumor entities and provisional or emerging renal cell tumor entities of the 2016 WHO classification of renal tumors are discussed. The S3 guidelines for renal cell cancer also recommend the use of the WHO/International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) grading system for clear cell and for papillary renal cell carcinomas, which replaces the previously used Fuhrman grading system.

  5. The loss of renal dendritic cells and activation of host adaptive immunity are long-term effects of ischemia/reperfusion injury following syngeneic kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Kikumi S; Kimura, Shoko; Nalesnik, Michael A; Sico, Rita M; Zhang, Matthew; Ueki, Shinya; Ross, Mark A; Stolz, Donna B; Murase, Noriko

    2012-05-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury associated with kidney transplantation induces profound acute injury, influences early graft function, and affects long-term graft outcomes. To determine whether renal dendritic cells play any role during initial innate ischemia/reperfusion injury and the subsequent development of adaptive immune responses, we studied the behavior and function of renal graft and host infiltrating dendritic cells during early and late phases of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Wild type to green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rat kidney transplantation was performed with and without 24-h cold storage. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in cold-stored grafts resulted in histopathological changes of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy by 10 weeks, accompanied by upregulation of mRNAs of mediators of interstitial fibrosis and inflammation. In normal rat kidneys, we identified two populations of renal dendritic cells, predominant CD103(-)CD11b/c(+) and minor CD103(+)CD11b/c(+) cells. After transplantation without cold storage, grafts maintained CD103(-) but not CD103(+) GFP-negative renal dendritic cells for 10 weeks. In contrast, both cell subsets disappeared from cold-stored grafts, which associated with a significant GFP-expressing host CD11b/c(+) cell infiltration that included CD103(+) dendritic cells with a TNF-α-producing phenotype. These changes in graft/host dendritic cell populations were associated with progressive infiltration of host CD4(+) T cells with effector/effector-memory phenotypes and IFN-γ secretion. Thus, renal graft ischemia/reperfusion injury caused graft dendritic cell loss and was associated with progressive host dendritic cell and T-cell recruitment. Renal-resident dendritic cells might function as a protective regulatory network.

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  7. Management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma – mini review

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Himanshu; Sood, Swapan

    2015-01-01

    The management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has evolved considerably in the last decade. A number of different systemic molecular targeted agents that have been recently approved have improved the survival of patients with mRCC. This mini-review focuses on the implementation of multi-modality therapy in the management of mRCC and the approved indications of the various available novel agents. These novel agents have expanded our armamentarium and improved clinical outcomes of this challenging disease that has considerable biological heterogeneity and clinical variability. PMID:28326262

  8. Cell Adhesion Molecules in Chemically-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prozialeck, Walter C.; Edwards, Joshua R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules are integral cell-membrane proteins that maintain cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion, and in some cases, act as regulators of intracellular signaling cascades. In the kidney, cell adhesion molecules such as the cadherins, the catenins, ZO-1, occludin and the claudins are essential for maintaining the epithelial polarity and barrier integrity that are necessary for the normal absorption/excretion of fluid and solutes. A growing volume of evidence indicates that these cell adhesion molecules are important early targets for a variety of nephrotoxic substances including metals, drugs, and venom components. In addition, it is now widely appreciated that molecules such as ICAM-1, the integrins and selectins play important roles in the recruitment of leukocytes and inflammatory responses that are associated with nephrotoxic injury. This review summarizes the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicating that these cell adhesion molecules may be primary molecular targets in many types of chemically-induced renal injury. Some of the specific agents that are discussed include Cd, Hg, Bi, cisplatin, aminoglycoside antibiotics, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine) (DCVC) and various venom toxins. This review also includes a discussion of the various mechanisms by which these substances can affect cell adhesion molecules in the kidney. PMID:17316817

  9. The Role of Everolimus in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Roger; Dell’Oglio, Paolo; Trudeau, Vincent; Larcher, Alessandro; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2015-01-01

    Everolimus (RAD001) is an orally administered agent that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin serine-threonine kinase. A phase III pivotal trial on everolimus, published in 2008, provided the first evidence for the efficacy of sequential therapy for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this study, everolimus was used after failure of one or several previous lines of therapy, and it demonstrated a 3-month survival benefit relative to placebo. Currently, based on the level 1 evidence, everolimus represents the molecule of choice for third-line therapy after failure of previous two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, second-line use after failure of one TKI is challenged by two new molecules (nivolumab and cabozantinib), which proved to have better efficacy with similar toxicity profile. In non-clear cell metastatic RCC, the current evidence recommends everolimus as a second-line therapy after failure of previous first-line sunitinib.

  10. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  11. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  12. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24198613

  13. Renal cell carcinoma: Atypical metastasis to inguinal lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Qamar Saeed; Bhatty, Tanweer Ahmed Naveed; Khan, Ziauddin; Osman, Elsawi Medani

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common tumor of the urinary tract. It is known to have variable presentations due to the extremely vascular nature of the organ. RCC are known to metastasize to lungs, bone, and brain commonly but atypical metastasis to various sites are reported in literature but as very rare pathology. We report a case of a 60-year-old female who presented with multiple inguinal and axillary lymph node enlargements which on excision biopsy showed metastatic RCC. RCC can present with synchronous metastatic deposits in the various organs. RCC can metastasize to some atypical sites as well such as thyroid, orbit, and neck as mentioned earlier in literature. The patient presenting with extra-regional lymph nodes like inguinal and axillary is extremely rare, and so far only one clinical case could be found from India in 2008. A 61-year-old female presented in the emergency department with left flank pain and hematuria. Imaging showed left swollen kidney but multiple lymph nodes in retroperitoneum, left inguinal and axillary region. Excisional biopsy confirmed metastatic renal clear cell carcinoma. The case was referred to an oncologist after left radical nephrectomy for further treatment. Renal cancer is quite common aggressive disease. Due to its vascular nature, it may present quite atypically as evident from literature. Although treatment of metastatic carcinoma is still controversial surgery is the mainstay of treatment and guidelines consider metastasectomy and cytoreductive nephrectomy as valid option followed by targeted systemic therapies. RCC has quite a high potential to metastasize in the versatile pattern, in our case, it is evident that valid management is still surgery but needs support from the multidisciplinary team. PMID:28216937

  14. Histones from dying renal cells aggravate kidney injury via TLR2 and TLR4.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-08-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to gallbladder: a survival advantage to simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hellenthal, Nicholas J; Stewart, Gregory S; Cambio, Angelo J; Delair, Sean M

    2007-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a relatively uncommon cancer. Patients presenting with a renal adenocarcinoma are often found to have evidence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Herein, we describe the case of a 39-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma and a synchronous metastatic focus to the gallbladder. The patient underwent a successful simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy and is doing well 30 months after surgery without evidence of disease recurrence. A thorough metastatic work-up along with aggressive surgical intervention in patients with renal cell carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci can provide a long-term favorable outcome.

  16. Isolation, growth, and characterization of human renal epithelial cells using traditional and 3D methods.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; McGrath, Helen E; Van Sciver, Robert E; Wang, Dora Bigler; Felder, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The kidney is a highly heterogeneous organ that is responsible for fluid and electrolyte balance. Much interest is focused on determining the function of specific renal epithelial cells in humans, which can only be accomplished through the isolation and growth of nephron segment-specific epithelial cells. However, human renal epithelial cells are notoriously difficult to maintain in culture. This chapter describes the isolation, growth, immortalization, and characterization of the human renal proximal tubule cell. In addition, we describe new paradigms in 3D cell culture which allow the cells to maintain more in vivo-like morphology and function.

  17. A study of gizzard nematodes and renal coccidiosis in Canada geese (Branta canadensis interior) of the Mississippi Valley population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, B.N.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 309 Mississippi Valley Population Canada geese, Branta canadensis interior, of different sex and age groups was collected from three locations in the Mississippi Flyway from 1979-1981 and examined for gizzard nematodes and renal coccidia. Three species of nematodes were removed from the gizzards, Amidostomum anseris, A. spatulatum, and Epomidiostomum crami. The latter two species are reported from this population of geese for the first time. Gizzard nematodes were found in 95.2% of all Canada geese examined, with A. anseris being the most abundant of the three species. There was no statistically significant difference between immatures and adults in the abundance of total nematodes species however, immature geese carried significantly more A. anseris and adult geese harbored significantly more A. spatulatum and E. crami infections. No significant difference in gizzard worm infections between male and female birds was observed. The abundance of overall gizzard nematodes was greatest in Canada geese from Winisk, Ontario (11.9), but the abundance of worms in southern Illinois geese (10.0) was similar. Geese from Horicon National Wildlife Refuge had the lowest abundance of infection, 7.5. The overall abundance of nematodes showed a general increase the second year of the study in each sex and age group and at each collection area. Each of three species of nematodes was responsible for some degree of damage to the gizzard lining and koilin, but E. crami was the most pathogenic of the species recovered. The occurrence of renal coccidiosis in Canada geese of this flyway is reported for the first time; the etiologic agent is Eimeria clarkei. The oocysts and/or endogenous stages of E. clarkei were present in 6.8% of the Canada geese sampled and this was the only species found. Male and female geese showed no significant differences in E. clarkei infections, however, significantly more immature geese than adult geese were infected with this species. A cell

  18. Incidence of Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma in Low-Grade Renal Cell Carcinoma Cases: A 12-Year Retrospective Clinicopathologic Study From a Single Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simpal; Kauffman, Eric C; Kandel, Sirisa; George, Saby; Schwaab, Thomas; Xu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a recently recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma entity after 2004 World Health Organization classification of renal tumors. CCPRCC has unique histomorphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. The distinction of CCPRCC from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with clear cell morphology is crucial because the former is considered to have a favorable clinical outcome. CCPRCC may be interpreted in the past as other renal cell carcinomas, particularly low-grade clear cell RCC. In this study, the frequency of CCPRCC in previously diagnosed low-grade RCC and its clinicopathologic features were examined. A total of 126 cases of stage T1a with low nuclear grade RCC were identified from 625 consecutive RCCs removed by radical/partial nephrectomy over 12-year period (2000-2011). Archival tissue sections were retrospectively reviewed along with patient medical charts. Eight cases (1.3% of all RCC, 6.3% of pT1a low grade RCC) with characteristic histologic features of CCPRCC were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Seven cases were previously diagnosed as clear cell RCC and one as multilocular cystic RCC. Radiographically, CCPRCC favored a mid-pole location in the kidneys. At a median follow-up period of 52 months (range 20-114.5 months), there were no cases of local or distant recurrence. In conclusion, CCPRCC is not uncommon among small low-grade RCC tumors. CCPRCC can be correctly recognized by its unique histomorphological features and confirmed by immunohistochemistry studies, which is important due to the excellent clinical outcome following resection.

  19. Foretinib (XL880): c-MET inhibitor with activity in papillary renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Logan, Theodore F

    2013-04-01

    Papillary renal cell cancer (RCC) constitutes approximately 10 % of renal cancers and is the commonest form after clear cell RCC, which accounts for approximately 75 % of cases. Until recently, most clinical trials in RCC were open to patients of all histologic types. Very recent clinical trials have been performed predominately in patients with clear cell RCC and relatively few trials have been done for patients with papillary RCC. The clinical characteristics of papillary RCC are less well appreciated because of both its relative rarity in the general oncology population and the lack of related clinical studies. This article reviews papillary RCC as a clinical entity separate from clear cell RCC. The MET signaling pathway, its association with increased invasion and progression of human cancer, and its dysregulation in papillary RCC is discussed. Lastly, foretinib, a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of several receptors, including MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, is described in preclinical and phase I studies as well as in a phase II study in papillary RCC patients.

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells and asymmetric dimethylarginine after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Teplan, Vladimír; Mahrová, Andrea; Králová-Lesná, Ivana; Racek, Jaroslav; Valkovský, Ivo; Štollová, Milena

    2015-03-01

    Levels of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) are elevated and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) decreased in patients undergoing renal transplantation (Tx) and may contribute to cardiovascular complications. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that elevated ADMA and decreased EPC can be positively influenced with regular physical exercise early after Tx. Blood samples for analysis of ADMA and EPC were obtained from randomly selected 64 patients after Tx who agreed to participate in a supervised aerobic exercise program for 6 months (group I). Samples were collected before the training began, 1 month after surgery (with stabilized renal function), and at 6 months after initiation. Sixty-two age, sex, human leukocyte antigens (HLA) typing, duration of previous dialysis, history of cardiovascular disease, and immunosupression regimen-matched transplant patients who did not exercise regularly were examined as controls (group II). There were no differences in ADMA levels and EPC count between both groups before the training program began. After 6 months of exercise, ADMA concentration in the group I decreased (3.50 ± 0.45 vs. 2.11 ± 0.35 μmol/L; P < .01) and was also lower comparing with group II (2.11 ± 0.23 vs. 3.25 ± 0.35 μmol/L; P < .01). In the same period, EPC cells increased from 2.085 ± 650 cells/mL versus 3.991 ± 560 cells/mL, P < .01 in group I; but in group II, changes were nonsignificant (P = .11). Blood lipids, HbA1c, insulin, and systolic blood pressure were also affected by the training program. Elevated ADMA level and decreased EPC count were significantly influenced by early regular exercise in patients after Tx.

  1. PT2385 for the Treatment of Von Hippel-Lindau Disease-Associated Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    VHL Gene Mutation; VHL; VHL Syndrome; VHL Gene Inactivation; Von Hippel; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease; Von Hippel's Disease; Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome, Modifiers of; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell RCC; ccRCC

  2. Regulatory T cells participate in CD39-mediated protection from renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; McRae, Jennifer L; Robson, Simon C; Cowan, Peter J; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Polhill, Tania; Wang, Yiping; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Unwin, Robert J; Harris, David C H; Dwyer, Karen M; Alexander, Stephen I

    2012-09-01

    CD39 is an ecto-enzyme that degrades extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP, and is highly expressed on by the vasculature and circulating cells including Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. To study the role of purinergic regulation in renal disease, we used the adriamycin nephropathy (AN) mouse model of chronic renal injury, using human CD39-transgenic (hCD39Tg) and wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice. Effects of CD39 expression by Treg cells were assessed in AN by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) CD25(+) and CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells isolated from hCD39Tg and WT mice. hCD39Tg mice were protected from renal injury in AN with decreased urinary protein and serum creatinine, and significantly less renal injury compared with WT mice. While WT CD25(+) and hCD39Tg CD25(-) T cells conferred some protection against AN, hCD39Tg CD25(+) Treg cells offered greater protection. In vitro studies showed direct pro-apoptotic effects of ATP on renal tubular cells. In conclusion, hCD39 expressed by circulating leukocytes and intrinsic renal cells limits innate AN injury. Specifically, CD39 expression by Treg cells contributes to its protective role in renal injury. These findings suggest that extracellular nucleotides mediate AN kidney injury and that CD39, expressed by Treg cells and other cells, is protective in this model.

  3. Renal Cancer Stem Cells: Characterization and Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Alessandro; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a major neoplasm with high incidence in western countries. Tumors are heterogeneous and are composed of differentiated cancer cells, stromal cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs possess two main properties: self-renewal and proliferation. Additionally, they can generate new tumors once transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Several approaches have been described to identify them, through the expression of cell markers, functional assays, or a combination of both. As CSCs are involved in the resistance mechanisms to radio- and chemotherapies, several new strategies have been proposed to directly target CSCs in RCC. One approach drives CSCs to differentiate into cancer cells sensitive to conventional treatments, while the other proposes to eradicate them selectively. A series of innovative therapies aiming at eliminating CSCs have been designed to treat other types of cancer and have not been experimented with on RCC yet, but they reveal themselves to be promising. In conclusion, CSCs are an important player in carcinogenesis and represent a valid target for therapy in RCC patients. PMID:27293448

  4. Diffuse thyroid metastases and bilateral internal jugular vein tumor thrombus from renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Jha, Priyanka; Shekhar, Mallika; Wan, Jennifer; Mari-Aparici, Carina

    2016-12-01

    Renal cell cancer rarely metastasizes to the thyroid gland, and it has been reported to present as a solitary mass. We present a case of diffuse thyroid cancer metastases from renal cell cancer. Bilateral internal jugular vein tumor thrombi were also present. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of diffuse thyroid metastases from renal cell cancer in the English literature. Renal cell cancer metastases should be considered in the differential of thyroid imaging abnormalities arising in the setting of known renal cell carcinoma, particularly late in the course of disease. This is frequently associated with internal jugular vein thrombi, which should be evaluated with an abnormal thyroid. Thyroglobulin levels are usually normal in such patients.

  5. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  6. Foxp3-transduced polyclonal regulatory T cells protect against chronic renal injury from adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Min; Wu, Huiling; Watson, Debbie; Hori, Shohei; Alexander, Ian E; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2006-03-01

    Chronic proteinuric renal injury is a major cause of ESRD. Adriamycin nephropathy is a murine model of chronic proteinuric renal disease whereby chemical injury is followed by immune and structural changes that mimic human disease. Foxp3 is a gene that induces a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype. It was hypothesized that Foxp3-transduced Treg could protect against renal injury in Adriamycin nephropathy. CD4+ T cells were transduced with either a Foxp3-containing retrovirus or a control retrovirus. Foxp3-transduced T cells had a regulatory phenotype by functional and phenotypic assays. Adoptive transfer of Foxp3-transduced T cells protected against renal injury. Urinary protein excretion and serum creatinine were reduced (P<0.05), and there was significantly less glomerulosclerosis, tubular damage, and interstitial infiltrates (P<0.01). It is concluded that Foxp3-transduced Treg cells may have a therapeutic role in protecting against immune injury and disease progression in chronic proteinuric renal disease.

  7. Displacement of the Spleen Mimicking Renal Cell Cancer Recurrence Post-Nephrectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Emanuels, Carolina S.; Timmerman, Krista D.; Aijaz, Tabish; Nguyen, Thu-Cuc; Jest, Nathaniel; Drane, Walter E.; Gilbert, Scott M.; Crispen, Paul L.; Su, Li-Ming; Deitte, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Local regional recurrence of renal cell cancer post-nephrectomy most often occurs within three years after surgery. Post-nephrectomy, many processes may mimic RCC recurrence. We present the case of a 75 year-old Caucasian male patient with a mass in his renal fossa post-nephrectomy for renal cell cancer, suggesting local recurrence. Use of the technetium-99m sulfur colloid scan showed that the mass was his spleen which had been displaced into the renal fossa. With high index of suspicion, characterization of these processes as splenic in origin would prevent subjecting patients to risks of biopsy or even surgery.

  8. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC.

  9. Prospective study of percutaneous cryoablation combined with allogenic NK cell immunotherapy for advanced renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Xu, Kecheng; Liang, Shuzhen; Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Yinqing; Zhang, Mingjie; Chen, Jibing; Niu, LiZhi

    2017-03-05

    In this study, the clinical efficacy of cryosurgery combined with allogenic NK cell immunotherapy for advanced renal cell cancer was evaluated. From July to December 2016, we enrolled 60 patients who met the enrollment criteria and divided them into two groups: (1) the simple cryoablation group (n=30); and (2) the cryoablation combined with allogenic NK cells group (n=30). The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, and other related indicators were evaluated. Combining allogeneic NK cells with cryoablation had a synergistic effect, not only enhancing the immune function and improving the quality of life of the patients, but also significantly exhibiting good clinical efficacy of the patients. This study is the first clinical trial that has evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogenic NK cells combined with cryosurgery for the treatment of renal cell cancer.

  10. [Expression of LIM and SH3 protein 1 in renal clear cell carcinoma and its effects on invasion and migration of renal clear cell carcinoma 786-O cells].

    PubMed

    Jin, B; Gao, L; Li, W; Chen, J C; Wen, R M; Wang, J Q

    2017-03-23

    Objective: To investigate the expression of LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP1) in renal cell carcinoma and its significance in the invasion and migration of renal clear cell carcinoma 786-O cell line. Methods: The expression level of LASP1 in 41 cases of renal cell carcinoma tissues and normal renal tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the expression level of LASP1 and clinical characteristics was further analyzed. Expression of LASP1 in 10 cases of tumor tissues with or without lymph node metastasis was analyzed by Western blot. Furthermore, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting LASP1 was constructed and transfected into 786-O cells to downregulate LASP1 expression. The interference effect of LASP1 siRNA on LASP1 protein and the expression of related proteins in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway were detected by Western blot. The effects of LASP1 knockdown on cell proliferation, migration and invasion and gene expression were then assessed using CCK8 assay, transwell cell migration system and western blot analysis, respectively. Results: The positive rate of LASP1 expression in renal clear cell carcinoma tissues was 90.2% (37/41), which was significantly higher than that in the adjacent tissues (29.3%, P=0.002). The expression of LASP1 in renal cell carcinoma was positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and TNM stage of renal cell carcinoma (P<0.05). The results of Western blot showed that LASP1 (0.696±0.053) was highly expressed in renal cell carcinoma (1.459±0.628), especially in cases with lymph node metastasis (2.692±0.186, P<0.05). The LASP1 siRNA remarkably down-regulated the expression of LASP1 protein in 786-O cells. The abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of 786-O cells were decreased significantly in the LASP1 siRNA groups.The relative expression of E-cadherin protein in the siRNA group (0.848±0.020) was significantly higher than those in the siRNA-NC group (0.671±0.018) and control

  11. Crossing Paths in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma (hRCC)

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Guadalupe Aparicio; Villaamil, Vanessa Medina; Grande, Enrique; Caínzos, Isabel Santamarina; Antón Aparicio, Luís M.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, cell-signaling pathways have been studied as the compilation of isolated elements into a unique cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli to the tumor cell nucleus. Today, growing evidence supports the fact that intracellular drivers of tumor progression do not flow in a single linear pathway, but disseminate into multiple intracellular pathways. An improved understanding of the complexity of cancer depends on the elucidation of the underlying regulatory networks at the cellular and intercellular levels and in their temporal dimension. The high complexity of the intracellular cascades causes the complete inhibition of the growth of one tumor cell to be very unlikely, except in cases in which the so-called “oncogene addiction” is known to be a clear trigger for tumor catastrophe, such as in the case of gastrointestinal stromal tumors or chronic myeloid leukemia. In other words, the separation and isolation of the driver from the passengers is required to improve accuracy in cancer treatment. This review will summarize the signaling pathway crossroads that govern renal cell carcinoma proliferation and the emerging understanding of how these pathways facilitate tumor escape. We outline the available evidence supporting the putative links between different signaling pathways and how they may influence tumor proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metabolism and invasiveness. The conclusion is that tumor cells may generate their own crossroads/crosstalk among signaling pathways, thereby reducing their dependence on stimulation of their physiologic pathways. PMID:23202921

  12. Specific expression of heme oxygenase-1 by myeloid cells modulates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Maxime; Thierry, Antoine; Delbauve, Sandrine; Preyat, Nicolas; Soares, Miguel P; Roumeguère, Thierry; Leo, Oberdan; Flamand, Véronique; Le Moine, Alain; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-15

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major risk factor for delayed graft function in renal transplantation. Compelling evidence exists that the stress-responsive enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediates protection against IRI. However, the role of myeloid HO-1 during IRI remains poorly characterized. Mice with myeloid-restricted deletion of HO-1 (HO-1(M-KO)), littermate (LT), and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to renal IRI or sham procedures and sacrificed after 24 hours or 7 days. In comparison to LT, HO-1(M-KO) exhibited significant renal histological damage, pro-inflammatory responses and oxidative stress 24 hours after reperfusion. HO-1(M-KO) mice also displayed impaired tubular repair and increased renal fibrosis 7 days after IRI. In WT mice, HO-1 induction with hemin specifically upregulated HO-1 within the CD11b(+) F4/80(lo) subset of the renal myeloid cells. Prior administration of hemin to renal IRI was associated with significant increase of the renal HO-1(+) CD11b(+) F4/80(lo) myeloid cells in comparison to control mice. In contrast, this hemin-mediated protection was abolished in HO-1(M-KO) mice. In conclusion, myeloid HO-1 appears as a critical protective pathway against renal IRI and could be an interesting therapeutic target in renal transplantation.

  13. Sunitinib activates Axl signaling in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Mijn, Johannes C; Broxterman, Henk J; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R; De Haas, Richard R; Dekker, Henk; Pham, Thang V; Van Beusechem, Victor W; Halmos, Balazs; Mier, James W; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-06-15

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics provides a unique unbiased approach to evaluate signaling network in cancer cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is registered as treatment for patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). We investigated the effect of sunitinib on tyrosine phosphorylation in RCC tumor cells to get more insight in its mechanism of action and thereby to find potential leads for combination treatment strategies. Sunitinib inhibitory concentrations of proliferation (IC50) of 786-O, 769-p and A498 RCC cells were determined by MTT-assays. Global tyrosine phosphorylation was measured by LC-MS/MS after immunoprecipitation with the antiphosphotyrosine antibody p-TYR-100. Phosphoproteomic profiling of 786-O cells yielded 1519 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 675 unique proteins including 57 different phosphorylated protein kinases. Compared to control, incubation with sunitinib at its IC50 of 2 µM resulted in downregulation of 86 phosphopeptides including CDK5, DYRK3, DYRK4, G6PD, PKM and LDH-A, while 94 phosphopeptides including Axl, FAK, EPHA2 and p38α were upregulated. Axl- (y702), FAK- (y576) and p38α (y182) upregulation was confirmed by Western Blot in 786-O and A498 cells. Subsequent proliferation assays revealed that inhibition of Axl with a small molecule inhibitor (R428) sensitized 786-O RCC cells and immortalized endothelial cells to sunitinib up to 3 fold. In conclusion, incubation with sunitinib of RCC cells causes significant upregulation of multiple phosphopeptides including Axl. Simultaneous inhibition of Axl improves the antitumor activity of sunitinib. We envision that evaluation of phosphoproteomic changes by TKI treatment enables identification of new targets for combination treatment strategies.

  14. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  15. Systematic Comparative Protein Expression Profiling of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Dressler, Sven P.; Zobawa, Monica; Recktenwald, Christian V.; Ackermann, Angelika; Atkins, Derek; Kersten, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Puttkammer, Maria; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Seliger, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Proteome-based technologies represent powerful tools for the analysis of protein expression profiles, including the identification of potential cancer candidate biomarkers. Thus, here we provide a comprehensive protein expression map for clear cell renal cell carcinoma established by systematic comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based protein expression profiling of 16 paired tissue systems comprising clear cell renal cell carcinoma lesions and corresponding tumor-adjacent renal epithelium using overlapping narrow pH gradients. This approach led to the mapping of 348 distinct spots corresponding to 248 different protein identities. By implementing restriction criteria concerning their detection frequency and overall regulation mode, 28 up- and 56 down-regulated single target spots were considered as potential candidate biomarkers. Based on their gene ontology information, these differentially expressed proteins were classified into distinct functional groups and according to their cellular distribution. Moreover, three representative members of this group, namely calbindin, gelsolin, and heart fatty acid-binding protein, were selected, and their expression pattern was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Thus, this pilot study provides a significant update of the current renal cell carcinoma map and defines a number of differentially expressed proteins, but both their potential as candidate biomarkers and clinical relevance has to be further explored in tissues and for body fluids like serum and urine. PMID:19752005

  16. Prognostic Significance of CD24 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arik, Deniz; Can, Cavit; Dündar, Emine; Kabukçuoğlu, Sare; Paşaoğlu, Özgül

    2016-10-13

    The role of cancer stem cells in the initiation and progression of cancer has become a well-studied area of emerging research, and stem cells with different surface markers have been identified in various types of cancer. CD24 is a membrane protein that acts as the ligand for P-selectin and has been defined as a stem cell marker of colonic cancer. The immunohistochemical expression of CD24 is associated with worse patient outcomes in small cell lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer, and colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to determine CD24 expression in clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and investigated its relationship with other clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. A total of 108 cases of clear cell, 12 papillary and 13 choromophobe renal cell carcinoma were examined. Clinicopathological features including age, gender, vascular invasion, tumor necrosis, and T stage were recorded. Clinical stage and overall survival and disease-free survival times were recorded. The immunohistochemical expression of CD24 was classified as low or high based on the percentage and intensity of positive staining. CD24 expression was associated with both tumor grade and recurrence rates. The survival analysis revealed that patients with high CD24 expression exhibited significantly lower overall and disease-free survival. Increased expression of CD24 is related to the prognosis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This is the first study identifying a strong association between CD24 expression levels and survival. Thus, CD24 expression may aid in predicting prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  17. Cellular distribution of cell cycle-related molecules in the renal tubules of rats treated with renal carcinogens for 28 days: relationship between cell cycle aberration and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taniai, Eriko; Hayashi, Hitomi; Yafune, Atsunori; Watanabe, Maiko; Akane, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    Some renal carcinogens can induce karyomegaly, which reflects aberrant cell division in the renal tubules, from the early stages of exposure. To clarify the cell cycle-related changes during the early stages of renal carcinogenesis, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of tubular cells in male F344 rats treated with carcinogenic doses of representative renal carcinogens for 28 days. For this purpose, the karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens ochratoxin A (OTA), ferric nitrilotriacetic acid, and monuron, and the non-karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and potassium bromate were examined. For comparison, a karyomegaly-inducing non-carcinogen, p-nitrobenzoic acid, and a non-carcinogenic non-karyomegaly-inducing renal toxicant, acetaminophen, were also examined. The outer stripe of the outer medulla (OSOM) and the cortex + OSOM were subjected to morphometric analysis of immunoreactive proximal tubular cells. Renal carcinogens, irrespective of their karyomegaly-inducing potential, increased proximal tubular cell proliferation accompanied by an increase in topoisomerase IIα-immunoreactive cells, suggesting a reflection of cell proliferation. Karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens increased nuclear Cdc2-, γH2AX-, and phosphorylated Chk2-immunoreactive cells in both areas, the former two acting in response to DNA damage and the latter one suggestive of sustained G₂. OTA, an OSOM-targeting carcinogen, could easily be distinguished from untreated controls and non-carcinogens by evaluation of molecules responding to DNA damage and G₂/M transition in the OSOM. Thus, all renal carcinogens examined facilitated proximal tubular proliferation by repeated short-term treatment. Among these, karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens may cause DNA damage and G₂ arrest in the target tubular cells.

  18. Differences between renal effects of venom from two Bothrops jararaca populations from southeastern and southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Roberta Jeane Bezerra; Jorge, Antônio Rafael Coelho; de Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra; Mello, Clarissa Perdigão; Lima, Danya Bandeira; Silveira, João Alison de Moraes; Alves, Natacha Teresa Queiroz; Marinho, Aline Diogo; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; Corrêa-Netto, Carlos; Gonçalves Machado, Larissa; Zingali, Russolina Benedeta; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2017-01-01

    Components from animal venoms may vary according to the snake's age, gender and region of origin. Recently, we performed a proteomic analysis of Bothrops jararaca venom from southern (BjSv) and southeastern (BjSEv) Brazil, showing differences in the venom composition, as well as its biological activity. To continue the study, we report in this short communication the different effects induced by the BjSEv and BjSv on isolated kidney and MDCK renal cells. BjSEv decreased perfusion pressure (PP) and renal vascular resistance (RVR) and increased urinary flow (UF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), while BjSv did not alter PP and RVR and reduced UF and GFR. Both types of venom, more expressively BjSEv, reduced %TNa(+), %TK(+) and %Cl(-). In MDCK cells, the two types of venom showed cytotoxicity with IC50 of 1.22 μg/mL for BjSv and 1.18 μg/mL for BjSEv and caused different profiles of cell death, with BjSv being more necrotic. In conclusion, we suggest that BjSv is more nephrotoxic than BjSEv.

  19. Adjuvant Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.

    2014-01-01

    At the present time, the standard of care for patients who have received nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is radiographic surveillance. With a number of novel targeted agents showing activity in the setting of metastatic RCC, there has been great interest in exploring the potential of the same agents in the adjuvant setting. Herein, we discuss the evolution of adjuvant trials in RCC, spanning from the immunotherapy era to the targeted therapy era. Pitfalls of current studies are addressed to provide a context for interpreting forthcoming results. Finally, we outline avenues to incorporate promising investigational agents, such as PD-1 (programmed death-1) inhibitors and MNNG transforming gene inhibitors, in future adjuvant trials. PMID:24969163

  20. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caleb F.; Ricketts, Christopher; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C.; Hacker, Kathryn E.; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A.; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S.; Hsieh, James J.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A. Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Park, Peter J.; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A.; Linehan, W. Marston; Gibbs, Richard A.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and whole genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared to other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT up-regulation in cancer distinct from previously-observed amplifications and point mutations. PMID:25155756

  1. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caleb F; Ricketts, Christopher J; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bristow, Christopher A; Donehower, Lawrence A; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B; Tickoo, Satish K; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hakimi, A Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A Gordon; Laird, Peter W; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Park, Peter J; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A; Linehan, W Marston; Gibbs, Richard A; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J

    2014-09-08

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mtDNA and whole-genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared with other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT upregulation in cancer distinct from previously observed amplifications and point mutations.

  2. Serum and urine biomarkers for human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pastore, A L; Palleschi, G; Silvestri, L; Moschese, D; Ricci, S; Petrozza, V; Carbone, A; Di Carlo, A

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosis is mostly achieved incidentally by imaging provided for unrelated clinical reasons. The surgical management of localized tumors has reported excellent results. The therapy of advanced RCC has evolved considerably over recent years with the widespread use of the so-called "targeted therapies." The identification of molecular markers in body fluids (e.g., sera and urine), which can be used for screening, diagnosis, follow-up, and monitoring of drug-based therapy in RCC patients, is one of the most ambitious challenges in oncologic research. Although there are some promising reports about potential biomarkers in sera, there is limited available data regarding urine markers for RCC. The following review reports some of the most promising biomarkers identified in the biological fluids of RCC patients.

  3. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Lo, Hau-Yin; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs). In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1) by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation. PMID:27171144

  4. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents.

  5. Chinese medicinal herbs inhibit growth of murine renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lau, B H; Ruckle, H C; Botolazzo, T; Lui, P D

    1994-01-01

    Tumors are known to produce factors suppressing immune functions. We previously showed that a murine renal cell carcinoma (Renca) suppressed macrophage function in vitro and that this suppression was abolished by co-incubation with extracts of two Chinese medicinal herbs. We now report that these phytochemicals are capable of inhibiting growth of Renca in vivo. BALB/c mice were transplanted intraperitoneally (IP) with 1-2 x 10(5) Renca cells. One day after tumor transplant, mice were randomized into two groups. One group was treated IP, daily for 10 days, with 100 microliters of phytochemicals containing 500 micrograms each of Astragalus membranaceus and Ligustrum lucidum, while the other group received saline as controls. A cure rate of 57% was obtained with these phytochemicals when the initial tumor load was 2 x 10(5), and 100% when the initial tumor load was 1 x 10(5). Additional experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms involved in this protection. Splenic macrophages from tumor-bearing mice were shown to have depressed chemiluminescent oxidative burst activity, and this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Splenocytes from mice transplanted with Renca responded less favorably to interleukin-2 (IL-2) in generating lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; again this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Our data suggest that these phytochemicals may have exerted their antitumor effects via augmentation of phagocyte and LAK cell activities.

  6. The determination of relative renal function in a pediatric population using Tc-99m DTPA and Tc-99m DMSA

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, P.R.; Kuruc, A.; Treves, S.T.

    1985-05-01

    Three methods for evaluating relative renal function in a pediatric population were compared. The clinical and nuclear medicine data of 73 patients were reviewed. Pertinent data included patient age, serum creatinine and the referral diagnosis (reflux, hypertension, obstructive uropathy). Time activity curves for renal regions of interest (ROI) were obtained by renography with Tc-99m DTPA, and deconvolved by an externally detected blood pool curve Furosemide was then administered to evaluate the renal collecting system (if indicated). This was followed by DMSA administration. Relative function was determined in 3 ways: 1) Accumulated renal DTPA activity 60-120 sec. following injection. 2) Amplitude of the tubular phase of the deconvolved renal curve and, 3) Accumulated Tc-99m DMSA activity in renal ROI 4 or 24 hrs. post-injection. Regression analysis revealed: 1) The basic relationship of relative functional data obtained by all three methods was not affected by creatinine, age or other factors. 2) The relationship between the three methods is linear and highly correlated. 3) The DMSA values may be predicted from either method of analyzing the DTPA study using appropriate predictor equations. The authors conclude that Tc-99m DMSA, due to its higher cost and more radiation exposure should not be used for the routine evaluation of relative renal function.

  7. An association between overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 3B4 and clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, You; Sun, Liantao; Fong, Peter; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Zhuxia; Yin, Shuihui; Jiang, Shuyuan; Liu, Xiaolei; Ju, Hongge; Huang, Lihua; Bai, Jing; Gong, Kerui; Yan, Shaochun; Zhang, Chunyang; Shao, Guo

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that abnormal DNA methylations occur frequently in kidney cancer. However, it remains unclear exactly which types of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) contribute to the pathologies of kidney cancers. In order to determine the functions of DNA methyltransferase in kidney tumorigenesis on the molecular level, we examined the mRNA expression levels of DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and DNMT3B variants in renal cell carcinoma tissue. Both mRNA and protein levels of DNMT3B4, a splice variant of DNMT3B, were increased in renal cell carcinoma tissue compared with adjacent control tissues. Additionally, Alu elements and long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1) were hypomethylated in renal cell carcinoma tissue. Meanwhile, methylation of the promoter for RASSF1A, a tumor suppressor gene, was moderately increased in renal cell carcinoma tissue, while RASSF1A expression was decreased. Thus, our data suggest that the overexpression of DNMT3B4 may play an important role in human kidney tumorigenesis through chromosomal instability and methylation of RASSF1A.

  8. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor.

  9. Cell Therapy Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Renal Progenitors Ameliorates Acute Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toyohara, Takafumi; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Sueta, Shin-Ichi; Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Yamagishi, Yukiko; Kawamoto, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Tomoko; Hoshina, Azusa; Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Hiromi; Araoka, Toshikazu; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Sato, Yasunori; Yamaji, Noboru; Ogawa, Seishi; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is defined as a rapid loss of renal function resulting from various etiologies, with a mortality rate exceeding 60% among intensive care patients. Because conventional treatments have failed to alleviate this condition, the development of regenerative therapies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) presents a promising new therapeutic option for AKI. We describe our methodology for generating renal progenitors from hiPSCs that show potential in ameliorating AKI. We established a multistep differentiation protocol for inducing hiPSCs into OSR1+SIX2+ renal progenitors capable of reconstituting three-dimensional proximal renal tubule-like structures in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that renal subcapsular transplantation of hiPSC-derived renal progenitors ameliorated the AKI in mice induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury, significantly suppressing the elevation of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels and attenuating histopathological changes, such as tubular necrosis, tubule dilatation with casts, and interstitial fibrosis. To our knowledge, few reports demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy with renal lineage cells generated from hiPSCs have been published. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for kidney diseases could be developed using hiPSC-derived renal cells. Significance This report is the first to demonstrate that the transplantation of renal progenitor cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has therapeutic effectiveness in mouse models of acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury. In addition, this report clearly demonstrates that the therapeutic benefits come from trophic effects by the renal progenitor cells, and it identifies the renoprotective factors secreted by the progenitors. The results of this study indicate the feasibility of developing regenerative medicine strategy using iPS cells against renal diseases

  10. Influence of Renal Replacement Modalities on Amikacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Roger, Claire; Wallis, Steven C; Muller, Laurent; Saissi, Gilbert; Lipman, Jeffrey; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe amikacin pharmacokinetics (PK) in critically ill patients receiving equal doses (30 ml/kg of body weight/h) of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). Patients receiving amikacin and undergoing CVVH or CVVHDF were eligible. Population pharmacokinetic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation were undertaken using the Pmetrics software package for R. Sixteen patients (9 undergoing CVVH, 11 undergoing CVVHDF) and 20 sampling intervals were analyzed. A two-compartment linear model best described the data. Patient weight was the only covariate that was associated with drug clearance. The mean ± standard deviation parameter estimates were 25.2 ± 17.3 liters for the central volume, 0.89 ± 1.17 h(-1) for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the central to the peripheral compartment, 2.38 ± 6.60 h(-1) for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the peripheral to the central compartment, 4.45 ± 2.35 liters/h for hemodiafiltration clearance, and 4.69 ± 2.42 liters/h for hemofiltration clearance. Dosing simulations for amikacin supported the use of high dosing regimens (≥25 mg/kg) and extended intervals (36 to 48 h) for most patients when considering PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) targets of a maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax)/MIC ratio of ≥8 and a minimal concentration of ≤2.5 mg/liter at the end of the dosing interval. The mean clearance of amikacin was 1.8 ± 1.3 liters/h by CVVHDF and 1.3 ± 1 liters/h by CVVH. On the basis of simulations, a strategy of an extended-interval high loading dose of amikacin (25 mg/kg every 48 h) associated with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) should be the preferred approach for aminoglycoside treatment in critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). (This study is a substudy of a trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under number NCT01403220.).

  11. Influence of Renal Replacement Modalities on Amikacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Steven C.; Muller, Laurent; Saissi, Gilbert; Lipman, Jeffrey; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Roberts, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe amikacin pharmacokinetics (PK) in critically ill patients receiving equal doses (30 ml/kg of body weight/h) of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). Patients receiving amikacin and undergoing CVVH or CVVHDF were eligible. Population pharmacokinetic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation were undertaken using the Pmetrics software package for R. Sixteen patients (9 undergoing CVVH, 11 undergoing CVVHDF) and 20 sampling intervals were analyzed. A two-compartment linear model best described the data. Patient weight was the only covariate that was associated with drug clearance. The mean ± standard deviation parameter estimates were 25.2 ± 17.3 liters for the central volume, 0.89 ± 1.17 h−1 for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the central to the peripheral compartment, 2.38 ± 6.60 h−1 for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the peripheral to the central compartment, 4.45 ± 2.35 liters/h for hemodiafiltration clearance, and 4.69 ± 2.42 liters/h for hemofiltration clearance. Dosing simulations for amikacin supported the use of high dosing regimens (≥25 mg/kg) and extended intervals (36 to 48 h) for most patients when considering PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) targets of a maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax)/MIC ratio of ≥8 and a minimal concentration of ≤2.5 mg/liter at the end of the dosing interval. The mean clearance of amikacin was 1.8 ± 1.3 liters/h by CVVHDF and 1.3 ± 1 liters/h by CVVH. On the basis of simulations, a strategy of an extended-interval high loading dose of amikacin (25 mg/kg every 48 h) associated with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) should be the preferred approach for aminoglycoside treatment in critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). (This study is a substudy of a trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under number NCT01403220.) PMID:27270279

  12. MicroRNA-148b enhances proliferation and apoptosis in human renal cancer cells via directly targeting MAP3K9.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fang; Liu, Tianming; Zhong, Liang; Yang, Xianggui; Liu, Yunhong; Xia, Hongwei; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhou, Li; Mao, Zhaomin; Zhou, Qin; Chen, Tingmei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence revealed that miRNAs, the vital regulators of gene expression, are involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and progression. In addition, miRNAs act as oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. The present study aimed to verify the potential roles of miR148b in human renal cancer cells. miR‑148b was found to be downregulated in human renal cancel tissues and human renal cancer cell lines. Functional studies demonstrated that plasmid‑mediated overexpression of miR‑148b promoted cell proliferation, increased the S‑phase population of the cell cycle and enhanced apoptosis in the 786‑O and OS‑RC‑2 renal cancer cell lines, while it did not appear to affect the total number of viable cells according to a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay. Subsequently, a luciferase reporter assay verified that miR148b directly targeted mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase kinase 9 (MAP3K9), an upstream activator of MAPK kinase/c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, suppressing the protein but not the mRNA levels. Furthermore, western blot analysis indicated that overexpression of miR148b in renal cancer cells inhibited MAPK/JNK signaling by decreasing the expression of phosphorylated (p)JNK. In addition, overexpression of MAP3K9 and pJNK was detected in clinical renal cell carcinoma specimens compared with that in their normal adjacent tissues. The present study therefore suggested that miR‑148b exerts an oncogenic function by enhancing the proliferation and apoptosis of renal cancer cells by inhibiting the MAPK/JNK pathway.

  13. Cancer stem cells are underestimated by standard experimental methods in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gedye, Craig; Sirskyj, Danylo; Lobo, Nazleen C.; Meens, Jalna; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Robinette, Michael; Fleshner, Neil; Hamilton, Robert J; Kulkarni, Girish; Zlotta, Alexandre; Evans, Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Ailles, Laurie E.

    2016-01-01

    Rare cancer stem cells (CSC) are proposed to be responsible for tumour propagation and re-initiation and are functionally defined by identifying tumour-initiating cells (TICs) using the xenotransplantation limiting dilution assay (LDA). While TICs in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) appeared rare in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) mice, xenografts formed more efficiently from small tumour fragments, indicating the LDA underestimated ccRCC TIC frequency. Mechanistic interrogation of the LDA identified multiple steps that influence ccRCC TIC quantitation. For example, tissue disaggregation destroys most ccRCC cells, common assays significantly overestimate tumour cell viability, and microenvironmental supplementation with human extracellular factors or pharmacological inhibition of anoikis increase clonogenicity and tumourigenicity of ccRCC cell lines and primary tumour cells. Identification of these previously uncharacterized concerns that cumulatively lead to substantial underestimation of TICs in ccRCC provides a framework for development of more accurate TIC assays in the future, both for this disease and for other cancers. PMID:27121191

  14. Cytochrome P450 CYP3A in human renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G I; McFadyen, M C E; Mitchell, R T; Cheung, Y-L; Kerr, A C; Melvin, W T

    1999-01-01

    Renal cell cancer is the main malignant tumour of the kidney and has an increasing incidence. This type of tumour has a poor prognosis and shows intrinsic resistance to several anti-cancer drugs. The CYP3A P450 family, which consists of three closely related forms, is involved in the oxidative activation and deactivation of a variety of carcinogens and several anti-cancer drugs. In this study the presence and cellular localization of CYP3A has been investigated using a combination of immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in renal cell cancer and corresponding normal kidney. CYP3A was consistently expressed in both renal call cancer and in normal kidney. In renal cell cancer, CYP3A was localized to tumour cells and in normal kidney the predominant cellular localization of CYP3A was to proximal tubular epithelial cells. RT-PCR showed that both CYP3A5 mRNA and CYP3A7 mRNA were consistently present in both tumour and normal samples, while CYP3A4 mRNA was present in 65% of tumours and 90% of normal samples. This study indicates that individual members of the CYP3A family are expressed in renal cell cancer. The presence of CYP3A in renal cell cancer might be important in the metabolic potentiation as well as the detoxification of chemotherapeutic agents used to renal cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10206301

  15. Prognostic significance of metallothionein expression in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Dionisios; Kyroudi-Voulgari, Aspasia; Theocharis, Stamatis; Serafetinides, Efraim; Moraitis, Epaminondas; Zervas, Anastasios; Kittas, Christos

    2005-01-01

    Background Metallothionein (MT) protein expression deficiency has been implicated in carcinogenesis while MT over expression in tumors is indicative of tumor resistance to anti-cancer treatment. The purpose of the study was to examine the expression of MT expression in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to correlate MT positivity, the pattern and extent of MT expression with tumor histologic cell type and nuclear grade, pathologic stage and patients' survival. Patients and methods The immunohistochemical expression of MT was determined in 43 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded RCC specimens, using a mouse monoclonal antibody that reacts with both human MT-I and MT-II. Correlation was sought between immunohistochemical (MT positivity, intensity and extension of staining) and clinico-pathological data (histological cell type, tumor nuclear grade, pathologic stage and patients' survival). Results Positive MT staining was present in 21 cases (49%), being mild/moderate and intense in 8 and 13 cases, respectively. The pattern was cytoplasmic in 7 cases and was both cytoplasmic and nuclear in 14 cases. MT expression in a percentage of up to 25% of tumor cells (negative MT staining included) was observed in 31 cases, in a percentage 25–50% of tumor cells in 7 cases, and in a percentage of 50–75% of tumor cells in 5 cases. There was no significant correlation of MT intensity of staining to histological type, stage and patients' survival, while it was inversely correlated to higher tumor nuclear grade. MT extent of staining did not correlate with histological type, nuclear grade, and pathologic stage while a statistically significant association was found with patients' survival. Conclusions The inverse correlation between MT staining intensity and tumor nuclear grade in RCC suggests a role of MT in tumor differentiation process. Since extent of MT expression is inversely correlated with survival it may be possibly used as a clinical prognostic parameter. PMID

  16. Nivolumab in renal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Camille; Escudier, Bernard; Albiges, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Similar to melanoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically considered as an immunogenic tumor, with interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interferon alpha (IFN-α) being the first approved treatments in the 1990s. However, these therapies were effective in only 10–20% of cases and were not well tolerated. Recently, new insights on the interaction between the immune system and tumor have identified the programmed death-1/programmed death-ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway to be a key player in evading host immune responses. The strategy of immune checkpoint blockade is to reduce inhibitory signaling and restore the patient’s natural tumor-specific T-cell-mediated immune responses. Nivolumab is the first PD-1 inhibitor to have gained approval for the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma, squamous and nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), Hodgkin disease and recently RCC. In this review, we discuss results from studies of nivolumab in RCC, clinical experience with this agent, and its future development.

  17. Renal Cell Carcinoma with Paraneoplastic Manifestations: Imaging with CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D; Roarke, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of renal cell carcinoma with prominent inflammatory and paraneoplastic manifestations. The initial CT detection of renal malignancy and subsequent post-therapeutic F-18 FDG PET/CT diagnosis of occult osseous metastasis were based on the patient's anemia, thrombocytosis and abnormally increased levels of serum C-reactive protein.

  18. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  19. Implications of Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ashouri, Kenan; Mohseni, Sophia; Tourtelot, John; Sharma, Pranav

    2015-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHLS) is a rare hereditary neoplastic disorder caused by mutations in the vhl gene leading to the development of tumors in several organs including the central nervous system, pancreas, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Manifestations of VHLS can present at different ages based on the affected organ and subclass of disease. In the subclasses of VHLS that cause renal disease, renal involvement typically begins closer to the end of the second decade of life and can present in different ways ranging from simple cystic lesions to solid tumors. Mutations in vhl are most often associated with clear cell renal carcinoma, the most common type of renal cancer, and also play a major role in sporadic cases of clear cell renal carcinoma. The recurrent, multifocal nature of this disease presents difficult challenges in the long-term management of patients with VHLS. Optimization of renal function warrants the use of several different approaches common to the management of renal carcinoma such as nephron sparing surgery, enucleation, ablation, and targeted therapies. In VHLS, renal lesions of 3 cm or bigger are considered to have metastatic potential and even small lesions often harbor malignancy. Many of the aspects of management revolve around optimizing both oncologic outcome and long-term renal function. As new surgical strategies and targeted therapies develop, the management of this complex disease evolves. This review will discuss the key aspects of the current management of VHLS.

  20. Familial Non-VHL Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, one cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos which do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  1. Overexpressed CacyBP/SIP leads to the suppression of growth in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiren; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Jie; Liu, Lili; Chen, Yu; Han, Shuang; Zhang, Yanqi; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-05-18

    Calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a target protein of S100, has been identified as a component of a novel ubiquitinylation complex leading to {beta}-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer. However, the roles of CacyBP/SIP in renal cell carcinoma still remain unclear. In the present study, we had analyzed the expression of the CacyBP/SIP protein in human renal cancer cells and clinical tissue samples. The possible roles of CacyBP/SIP in regulating the malignant phenotype of renal cancer cells were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the expression of CacyBP/SIP was markedly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of CacyBP/SIP in A498 cells inhibited the proliferation of this cell and delayed cell cycle progression significantly, which might be related to the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 through reducing {beta}-catenin protein. CacyBP/SIP also suppressed colony formation in soft agar and its tumorigenicity in nude mice. Taken together, our work showed that CacyBP/SIP, as a novel down-regulated gene in renal cell carcinoma, suppressed proliferation and tumorigenesis of renal cancer cells.

  2. Wnt antagonist DICKKOPF-3 (Dkk-3) induces apoptosis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Koji; Hirata, Hiroshi; Majid, Shahana; Chen, Yi; Zaman, Mohd S; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Hinoda, Yuji; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-06-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is activated in most cancers while Wnt antagonist genes are inactivated. However, the functional significance and mechanisms of inactivation of Wnt antagonist Dkk-3 gene in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been reported. In this study, we examined potential epigenetic mechanisms regulating Dkk-3 expression in RCC cells and whether Dkk-3 expression affects cell growth and apoptosis. The expression of Dkk-3 is regulated by histone modification rather than CpG island DNA methylation in renal cancer cells. Renal cancer cell proliferation was significantly inhibited and apoptosis was promoted in Dkk-3 transfected renal cancer cells. Dkk-3 did not inhibit the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway but induced apoptosis via the noncanonical JNK pathway in renal cancer cells. Expression of p21, MDM-2, and Puma genes were increased after transfecting RCC cell lines with a Dkk-3 expression plasmid. Overexpression of Dkk-3 induced G(0)/G(1) arrest together with an increase in p21 expression. Growth of stable Dkk-3 transfected cells in nude mice was decreased compared to controls. Our data show for the first time that mRNA expression of Dkk-3 is regulated by histone modification and that Dkk-3 inhibits renal cancer growth through modulation of cell cycle and apoptotic pathways.

  3. Overexpressed CacyBP/SIP leads to the suppression of growth in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiren; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Jie; Liu, Lili; Chen, Yu; Han, Shuang; Zhang, Yanqi; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming

    2007-05-18

    Calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a target protein of S100, has been identified as a component of a novel ubiquitinylation complex leading to beta-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer. However, the roles of CacyBP/SIP in renal cell carcinoma still remain unclear. In the present study, we had analyzed the expression of the CacyBP/SIP protein in human renal cancer cells and clinical tissue samples. The possible roles of CacyBP/SIP in regulating the malignant phenotype of renal cancer cells were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the expression of CacyBP/SIP was markedly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of CacyBP/SIP in A498 cells inhibited the proliferation of this cell and delayed cell cycle progression significantly, which might be related to the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 through reducing beta-catenin protein. CacyBP/SIP also suppressed colony formation in soft agar and its tumorigenicity in nude mice. Taken together, our work showed that CacyBP/SIP, as a novel down-regulated gene in renal cell carcinoma, suppressed proliferation and tumorigenesis of renal cancer cells.

  4. Quantitative tumour necrosis is an independent predictor of overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Cheville, John C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting results regarding whether tumour necrosis is a predictor of survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In addition, studies quantifying the extent of necrosis are limited.The aim of this study was to determine if quantifying tumour necrosis could improve its predictive value for survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.We reviewed the clinical pathological information contained in The Cancer Genome Atlas for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and correlated it with overall survival using a Cox proportional hazard model. Necrosis was quantified on a single frozen section slide taken at the time of tissue harvesting for molecular studies.For all tumours, the presence of tumour necrosis was a significant predictor of overall survival (p < 0.001) on univariate analysis. When quantitated, >10% necrosis was associated with survival, but ≤10% necrosis was not. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.004), T3b stage (p = 0.02), M1 stage (p < 0.001), necrosis >30% (p < 0.001), and elevated serum calcium (p = 0.003) remained significant. For clinical stage 1-2 (T1-T2N0M0) tumours, necrosis >20% was significant on univariate analysis (p ≤ 0.005), and remained so on multivariate analysis (p < 0.001).We conclude that quantitating the extent of tumour necrosis adds prognostic information in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, including organ confined tumours.

  5. Maslinic Acid Inhibits Proliferation of Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines and Suppresses Angiogenesis of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Parth; Song, Wenzhe; Subramanian, Ramalingam B.; Thakkar, Vasudev R.; Vesey, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of many novel therapeutics in clinical practice, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a treatment-resistant cancer. As red and processed meat are considered risk factors for RCC, and a vegetable-rich diet is thought to reduce this risk, research into plant-based therapeutics may provide valuable complementary or alternative therapeutics for the management of RCC. Herein, we present the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of maslinic acid, which occurs naturally in edible plants, particularly in olive fruits, and also in a variety of medicinal plants. Human RCC cell lines (ACHN, Caki-1, and SN12K1), endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cell line [HUVEC]), and primary cultures of kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) were treated with maslinic acid. Maslinic acid was relatively less toxic to PTEC when compared with RCC under similar experimental conditions. In RCC cell lines, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and colony formation. In HUVEC, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in capillary tube formation in vitro and vascular endothelial growth factor. This study provides a rationale for incorporating a maslinic acid–rich diet either to reduce the risk of developing kidney cancer or as an adjunct to existing antiangiogenic therapy to improve efficacy.

  6. Comprehensive Evaluation of One-Carbon Metabolism Pathway Gene Variants and Renal Cell Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Todd M.; Brennan, Paul; Han, Summer; Karami, Sara; Zaridze, David; Janout, Vladimir; Kollarova, Helen; Bencko, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Mates, Dana; Slamova, Alena; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Mayne, Susan T.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nat; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Boffetta, Paolo; Moore, Lee E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Folate and one-carbon metabolism are linked to cancer risk through their integral role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Variation in one-carbon metabolism genes, particularly MTHFR, has been associated with risk of a number of cancers in epidemiologic studies, but little is known regarding renal cancer. Methods Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected to produce high genomic coverage of 13 gene regions of one-carbon metabolism (ALDH1L1, BHMT, CBS, FOLR1, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, SLC19A1, TYMS) and the closely associated glutathione synthesis pathway (CTH, GGH, GSS) were genotyped for 777 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cases and 1,035 controls in the Central and Eastern European Renal Cancer case-control study. Associations of individual SNPs (n = 163) with RCC risk were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and study center. Minimum p-value permutation (Min-P) tests were used to identify gene regions associated with risk, and haplotypes were evaluated within these genes. Results The strongest associations with RCC risk were observed for SLC19A1 (Pmin-P = 0.03) and MTHFR (Pmin-P = 0.13). A haplotype consisting of four SNPs in SLC19A1 (rs12483553, rs2838950, rs2838951, and rs17004785) was associated with a 37% increased risk (p = 0.02), and exploratory stratified analysis suggested the association was only significant among those in the lowest tertile of vegetable intake. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively examine variation in one-carbon metabolism genes in relation to RCC risk. We identified a novel association with SLC19A1, which is important for transport of folate into cells. Replication in other populations is required to confirm these findings. PMID:22039442

  7. Glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) expression in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Horti, Maria; Kandilaris, Kosmas; Skolarikos, Andreas; Trakas, Nikolaos; Kastriotis, Ioannis; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance correlates with unfavourable treatment outcomes in numerous cancers including renal cell carcinoma. The expression and clinical relevance of Glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi), a multidrug resistance factor, in kidney tumors remain controversial. We analyzed the expression of GST-pi in 60 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinoma samples by immunohistochemistry and compared them with matched normal regions of the kidney. A significantly higher expression of GST-pi was observed in 87% of clear cell carcinoma and 50% of papillary subtypes. GST-pi expression did not correlate with tumor grade or patient survival. GST-pi is unlikely to be a prognostic factor for renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with large number of samples are warranted to establish the role of GST-pi, if any, in intrinsic or acquired resistance of renal cell carcinoma to conventional treatments.

  8. Sleep Disorders and Cardio-Renal Disease: Implications for Minority Populations

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Judith; Salifu, Moro O.; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem that is reaching pandemic proportion. Currently two thirds of the American population is either overweight or obese and worldwide, 39% of the population is overweight and 13% are considered obese [1,2]. This rapid rise in obesity is associated with increased in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), hypertension (HTN), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the major killer of adults in the USA. Parallel to this epidemic is the rapid rise of sleep disorders such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). These disorders lead to increased morbidity and mortality and generally go undiagnosed and undertreated, particularly among minority groups. Accumulating evidence indicates common pathophysiologic background underlying all of these related disorders. Among these include: increased inflammation, increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia and hypercoagulability. We discuss the rising epidemic of sleep disorders and its interrelationship with DM2, HTN, CVD and renal disease highlighting the racial disparity in diagnosis and treatment of these disorders that disproportionately affects minority populations. We also discuss the various treatment modalities and the cutting edge developments in this field. PMID:27478683

  9. Identification and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma Gene Markers

    PubMed Central

    Dalgin, Gul S.; Holloway, Dustin T.; Liou, Louis S.; DeLisi, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling has been used to distinguish histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and consequently to identify specific tumor markers. The analytical procedures currently in use find sets of genes whose average differential expression across the two categories differ significantly. In general each of the markers thus identified does not distinguish tumor from normal with 100% accuracy, although the group as a whole might be able to do so. For the purpose of developing a widely used economically viable diagnostic signature, however, large groups of genes are not likely to be useful. Here we use two different methods, one a support vector machine variant, and the other an exhaustive search, to reanalyze data previously generated in our Lab (Lenburg et al. 2003). We identify 158 genes, each having an expression level that is higher (lower) in every tumor sample than in any normal sample, and each having a minimum differential expression across the two categories at a significance of 0.01. The set is highly enriched in cancer related genes (p = 1.6 × 10−12), containing 43 genes previously associated with either RCC or other types of cancer. Many of the biomarkers appear to be associated with the central alterations known to be required for cancer transformation. These include the oncogenes JAZF1, AXL, ABL2; tumor suppressors RASD1, PTPRO, TFAP2A, CDKN1C; and genes involved in proteolysis or cell-adhesion such as WASF2, and PAPPA. PMID:19455236

  10. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: The next lap

    PubMed Central

    Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Tan, Min-Han

    2014-01-01

    Advances in rationally targeted therapeutics over the last decade have transformed the clinical care of advanced kidney cancer. While oncologists consolidate the gains of the wave of new agents, comprising a panoply of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), there is an increasing sense that a plateau has been reached in the short term. It is sobering that all currently approved targeted therapies have not yielded durable remissions and remain palliative in intent. In the context of recent insights in kidney cancer biology, we review promising ongoing and future approaches for kidney cancer therapeutics aimed toward forging new paths in the systemic management of renal cell carcinoma. Broadly, candidate agents for such innovative strategies include immune check-point inhibitors, anti-cancer stem cell agents, next-generation anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-mTOR agents as well as more investigational agents in the preclinical and early clinical development settings. PMID:24737951

  11. Cannabinoid CB₁ receptor is downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Larrinaga, Gorka; Sanz, Begoña; Pérez, Itxaro; Blanco, Lorena; Cándenas, María L; Pinto, Francisco M; Gil, Javier; López, José I

    2010-12-01

    Several studies in cell cultures and in animal models have demonstrated that cannabinoids have important antitumoral properties. Because many of these effects are mediated through cannabinoid (CB) receptors CB₁ and CB₂, the study of their expression in human neoplasms has become of great interest in recent years. Fresh and formalin-fixed tissue samples of 20 consecutive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (CCRCCs) were collected prospectively and analyzed for the expression of both CB receptors by using RT-PCR, Western blot (WB), and immunohistochemical techniques. RT-PCR assays demonstrated the expression of mRNA encoding the CB₁ in tumor tissue and in adjacent non-neoplastic kidney. Conversely, WB and IHC revealed a marked downregulation of CB₁ protein in tumor tissue; CB₂ was not expressed. The obtained data suggest a possible implication of the endocannabinoid system in renal carcinogenesis. A posttranscriptional downregulation of CB₁ and the absence of expression of CB₂ characterize CCRCC.

  12. [RENAL CELL CARCINOMA PRESENTING WITH HIGH-OUTPUT HEART FAILURE DUE TO ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Akio; Isono, Makoto; Sinchi, Masayuki; Masunaga, Ayako; Ito, Keiichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman who has a history of congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with the exacerbation of exertional dyspnea and urinary retention due to severe gross hematuria. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a tumor involving the inferior and middle poles of the right kidney with no nodal involvement, or distant metastases, but that was accompanied by markedly proliferated blood vessels around the inferior vena cava and right renal vein, seemingly a result of an arteriovenous fistula. After embolization of the right renal artery, right radical nephrectomy was performed via a thoracoabdominal incision. The histological diagnosis of the tumor was clear cell renal cell carcinoma, G2 > G3, Fuhrman nuclear grade3, pT2a. Although the presence of an arteriovenous fistula was not confirmed histologically, the severely condensed proliferation of the blood vessels in the renal hilum is consistent with the diagnosis of an arteriovenous fistula accompanying renal cell carcinoma. Immediately after the operation, her symptoms of congestive heart failure, including dyspnea, subsided and her serum BNP levels and CTR value returned to normal levels. Two years after the operation, she shows no signs of recurrence or metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, there have been 25 cases of arteriovenous fistulas accompanied by renal cell carcinoma but only a few in which the symptoms were those of severe congestive heart failure. Clinicians should be aware that renal cell carcinoima could be a cause of heart failure.

  13. LMP2, a novel immunohistochemical marker to distinguish renal oncocytoma from the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Chaux, Alcides; Sharma, Rajni; Netto, George; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2013-02-01

    LMP2 is a subunit of the immunoproteasome that is overexpressed in oncocytic lesions of the thyroid gland. This study was designed to assess the expression profile and diagnostic utility of LMP2 in two renal oncocytic tumors that share similar morphologic features but have different clinical outcomes: renal oncocytoma (RO) and the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (CHRCC-EO). A total of 56 RO, 38 classic CHRCC, and 7 CHRCC-EO cases, as well 84 normal kidney controls, were selected from the Johns Hopkins surgical pathology archive and stained for LMP2 using a standard immunohistochemical protocol. Sections were scored for cellular location (nuclear versus cytosolic), intensity (from 0 to 3), and percent of area involved (from 0 to 100%), and an H score was calculated multiplying the intensity by the extent of the staining signal. The cytoplasmic expression of LMP2 was similar among the renal lesions, being present in 44 of 56 (79%) ROs, 27 of 38 (71%) CHRCCs, and 7 of 7 (100%) CHRCC-EO cases. The nuclear expression of LMP2, however, was more informative. All CHRCC-EO cases (7 of 7, 100%) strongly showed nuclear LMP2 staining, as opposed to only 2 of 56 (4%, P<0.0001) ROs and 9 of 38 (24%, P=0.0001) classic CHRCCs. These results suggest that the nuclear LMP2 expression can be used in clinical scenarios where histological distinction between RO and CHRCC-EO remains challenging.

  14. The isolation and characterization of renal cancer initiating cells from human Wilms' tumour xenografts unveils new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Shukrun, Rachel; Mark-Danieli, Michal; Tsvetkov, Peter; Bahar, Sarit; Pri-Chen, Sara; Goldstein, Ronald S; Rom-Gross, Eithan; Mor, Yoram; Fridman, Edward; Meir, Karen; Simon, Amos; Magister, Marcus; Kaminski, Naftali; Goldmacher, Victor S; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    There are considerable differences in tumour biology between adult and paediatric cancers. The existence of cancer initiating cells/cancer stem cells (CIC/CSC) in paediatric solid tumours is currently unclear. Here, we show the successful propagation of primary human Wilms' tumour (WT), a common paediatric renal malignancy, in immunodeficient mice, demonstrating the presence of a population of highly proliferative CIC/CSCs capable of serial xenograft initiation. Cell sorting and limiting dilution transplantation analysis of xenograft cells identified WT CSCs that harbour a primitive undifferentiated-NCAM1 expressing-"blastema" phenotype, including a capacity to expand and differentiate into the mature renal-like cell types observed in the primary tumour. WT CSCs, which can be further enriched by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, overexpressed renal stemness and genes linked to poor patient prognosis, showed preferential protein expression of phosphorylated PKB/Akt and strong reduction of the miR-200 family. Complete eradication of WT in multiple xenograft models was achieved with a human NCAM antibody drug conjugate. The existence of CIC/CSCs in WT provides new therapeutic targets.

  15. [Angiomyolipoma with epithelioid contingent mimicking renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Spie, Romain; Devevey, Jean-Marc; Ponnelle, Tibor; Michel, Frédéric

    2005-04-01

    The authors report the case of a patient followed for renal angiomyolipoma. On CT surveillance, this lesion developed features of a malignant tumour with loss of the fatty component and the patient was treated by nephrectomy. Histological examination demonstrated renal angiomyolipoma with an epithelioid contingent. The various aspects of this histological and radiological variant are discussed.

  16. Human CD133+ Renal Progenitor Cells Induce Erythropoietin Production and Limit Fibrosis After Acute Tubular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shikhar; Grange, Cristina; Iampietro, Corinne; Camussi, Giovanni; Bussolati, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Persistent alterations of the renal tissue due to maladaptive repair characterize the outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI), despite a clinical recovery. Acute damage may also limit the renal production of erythropoietin, with impairment of the hemopoietic response to ischemia and possible lack of its reno-protective action. We aimed to evaluate the effect of a cell therapy using human CD133+ renal progenitor cells on maladaptive repair and fibrosis following AKI in a model of glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis. In parallel, we evaluated the effect of CD133+ cells on erythropoietin production. Administration of CD133+ cells promoted the restoration of the renal tissue, limiting the presence of markers of injury and pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, it promoted angiogenesis and protected against fibrosis up to day 60. No effect of dermal fibroblasts was observed. Treatment with CD133+ cells, but not with PBS or fibroblasts, limited anemia and increased erythropoietin levels both in renal tissue and in circulation. Finally, CD133+ cells contributed to the local production of erythropoietin, as observed by detection of circulating human erythropoietin. CD133+ cells appear therefore an effective source for cell repair, able to restore renal functions, including erythropoietin release, and to limit long term maldifferentiation and fibrosis. PMID:27853265

  17. Copeptin Is Associated with Kidney Length, Renal Function, and Prevalence of Simple Cysts in a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Belen; Pruijm, Menno; Ackermann, Daniel; Vuistiner, Philippe; Guessous, Idris; Ehret, Georg; Alwan, Heba; Youhanna, Sonia; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Vogt, Bruno; Burnier, Michel; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has a key role in osmoregulation by facilitating water transport in the collecting duct. Recent evidence suggests that AVP may have additional effects on renal function and favor cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Whether AVP also affects kidney structure in the general population is unknown. We analyzed the association of copeptin, an established surrogate for AVP, with parameters of renal function and morphology in a multicentric population-based cohort. Participants from families of European ancestry were randomly selected in three Swiss cities. We used linear multilevel regression analysis to explore the association of copeptin with renal function parameters as well as kidney length and the presence of simple renal cysts assessed by ultrasound examination. Copeptin levels were log-transformed. The 529 women and 481 men had median copeptin levels of 3.0 and 5.2 pmol/L, respectively (P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, the copeptin level was associated inversely with eGFR (β=−2.1; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], −3.3 to −0.8; P=0.002) and kidney length (β=−1.2; 95% CI, −1.9 to −0.4; P=0.003) but positively with 24-hour urinary albumin excretion (β=0.11; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.20; P=0.03) and urine osmolality (β=0.08; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.10; P<0.001). A positive association was found between the copeptin level and the presence of renal cysts (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.4; P=0.02). These results suggest that AVP has a pleiotropic role in renal function and may favor the development of simple renal cysts. PMID:25270071

  18. Copeptin is associated with kidney length, renal function, and prevalence of simple cysts in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Belen; Pruijm, Menno; Ackermann, Daniel; Vuistiner, Philippe; Guessous, Idris; Ehret, Georg; Alwan, Heba; Youhanna, Sonia; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Vogt, Bruno; Burnier, Michel; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Devuyst, Olivier; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-06-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has a key role in osmoregulation by facilitating water transport in the collecting duct. Recent evidence suggests that AVP may have additional effects on renal function and favor cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Whether AVP also affects kidney structure in the general population is unknown. We analyzed the association of copeptin, an established surrogate for AVP, with parameters of renal function and morphology in a multicentric population-based cohort. Participants from families of European ancestry were randomly selected in three Swiss cities. We used linear multilevel regression analysis to explore the association of copeptin with renal function parameters as well as kidney length and the presence of simple renal cysts assessed by ultrasound examination. Copeptin levels were log-transformed. The 529 women and 481 men had median copeptin levels of 3.0 and 5.2 pmol/L, respectively (P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, the copeptin level was associated inversely with eGFR (β=-2.1; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -3.3 to -0.8; P=0.002) and kidney length (β=-1.2; 95% CI, -1.9 to -0.4; P=0.003) but positively with 24-hour urinary albumin excretion (β=0.11; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.20; P=0.03) and urine osmolality (β=0.08; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.10; P<0.001). A positive association was found between the copeptin level and the presence of renal cysts (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.4; P=0.02). These results suggest that AVP has a pleiotropic role in renal function and may favor the development of simple renal cysts.

  19. P53 inhibitor pifithrin-α prevents the renal tubular epithelial cells against injury

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yun-Lin; Sun, Lei; Hu, Yu-Jie; Liu, Hua-Jie; Kuang, Xin-Yu; Niu, Xiao-Ling; Huang, Wen-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The injury and repair of renal tubular epithelial cells play an important role in the pathological process of acute kidney injury (AKI). This study aimed to clarify the role of cell cycle change in renal tubular epithelial cell injury and repair in vivo and in vitro. Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 45 min (ischemia) followed by reperfusion. Pifithrin-α, a p53 inhibitor, was administered at 24 h before renal ischemia and 3 and 14 days after reperfusion. Results showed the tubular epithelial cells in M phase increased significantly at 2 h to 72 h after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), while pifithrin-α decreased them. Renal I/R caused renal tubular epithelial damage in rats, which was improved by pifithrin-α. The α-SMA mRNA expression was up-regulated significantly after I/R, while it was down-regulated by pifithrin-α.NRK-52E cells were cultured in vitro, cell damage was induced by addition of TNF-α, and then cells were treated with pifithrin-α. Cells treated with TNF-α alone in G2/M phase increased significantly, but they were reduced in the presence of pifithrin-α. In NRK-52E cells treated with pifithrin-α for 6 h, NGAL mRNA expression was significantly lower than in cells without pifithrin-α treatment. After NRK-52E cells were treated with pifithrin-α for 24 h, α-SMA and FN mRNA expression was significantly lower than in cells without the treatment. In summary, pifithrin-α can facilitate the progression of renal tubular epithelial cells through G2/M phase, protecting them against injury. PMID:27829991

  20. Nivolumab in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: clinical trial evidence and experience

    PubMed Central

    Mennitto, Alessia; Grassi, Paolo; Ratta, Raffaele; Verzoni, Elena; Prisciandaro, Michele; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is considered an immunogenic tumor with a prominent dysfunctional immune cell infiltrate, unable to control tumor growth. Cytokine-based immunotherapies, including interferon-α and interleukin-2, have been used for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC). Long-term responses and complete remissions were observed, but durable clinical benefit efficacy in the overall population was limited and associated with significant toxicity. As a consequence, new generation agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways replaced interferon alpha (IFN-α). Strategies of tumor immune evasion include T-cell suppression by negative signals deriving from the interaction between programmed death-1 (PD-1) on the T cell and its ligand (PDL-1) on the tumor cells. Nivolumab, a programmed death 1 checkpoint inhibitor, blocks this pathway, thus reversing T-cell suppression and activating antitumor responses. The aim of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy data of nivolumab in mRCC. Objective responses and safety profile of single-agent nivolumab are favorable in both previously treated and treatment-naïve mRCC patients. Despite toxic effects, combination therapies with nivolumab have shown promising results, indicating a potential role in the treatment of mRCC. Tailoring immunotherapy on a patient-to-patient basis represents a major challenge for the future. PMID:27695530

  1. Perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma in patients with dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kaori; Ito, Fumio; Nakazawa, Hayakazu

    2012-06-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to analyze the perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma in patients with dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease and (ii) to reveal perioperative management problems that are unique to these patients. Between June 2004 and June 2011, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed in 39 patients who had renal cell carcinoma and dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease. The operative outcomes of these patients were compared with the operative outcomes of 104 non-end-stage renal disease patients with sporadic renal cell carcinoma who underwent laparoscopic radical nephrectomy during the same period. Laparoscopic surgery was completed in thirty-eight end-stage renal disease patients. One patient was converted to open surgery because of an intraoperative injury to the inferior vena cava. This patient was excluded from the analysis. The mean operative time was 240 min; blood loss, 157 mL; and postoperative hospital stay, 9.6 days. Postoperative complications were observed in six patients, as follows: retroperitoneal hematoma and abscess in one patient, thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in three patients, pneumonia in one patient, and gastrointestinal bleeding in one patient. Eleven patients required blood transfusions. There was no significant difference between the end-stage renal disease patients and the non-end-stage renal disease patients in the mean operative time or the amount of blood loss. In conclusion, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is feasible for dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease patients, as well as for non-end-stage renal disease patients; however, end-stage renal disease patients may have a higher probability of experiencing non-life-threatening complications.

  2. Foci of Entotic Nuclei in Different Grades of Noninherited Renal Cell Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yuke; Liang, Yaojun; Wang, Jianqin

    2015-02-01

    We report here an intriguing pattern in nuclear appearance of renal clear cell cancer. In low grade clear cell cancer, detailed examination showed that in many cells, two or more nuclei were within the confines of a single cell membrane. This likely resulted from a cell being contained within its neighboring cell. Consequently, this resulted in appearance of multicellularity. This appearance of the nuclei were not associated with mitotic figures, suggesting that these did not result from nuclear fission. Additionally, the cells containing this nuclei did not show any evidence of cytokinesis including equatorial tapering, suggesting that the process may have resulted from cytokinesis failure. In some sections of higher grade clear cell cancer, these appearance were higher, though we did not observe any frank syncytium formation. On careful observation, there were isolated events of fusion of nuclei within a single cell in different grades of renal cell cancers. There occurrence was more frequent in higher grades of clear cell renal cancer and metastatic clear cell carcinoma. These features were also demonstrable in multiple fields of lower grades of clear cell carcinoma. This phenomenon of entosis may contribute to aneuploidy and tumor progression to dysplastic stages and genomic instability in renal cancers. Future studies are aimed at delineating the cell-cell boundaries and the mechanism contributing to this observation, either from peripheral cell engulfing or failure of cytosolic division for cell separation.

  3. New treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Kevin; Fang, Chunhui; Wu, Shenhong

    2017-02-02

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Agents targeting angiogenesis have played a primary role in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapy almost always occurs, and major progress has been made in understanding its underlying molecular mechanism. Axitinib and everolimus have been used extensively in patients whom have had disease progression after prior anti-angiogenesis therapy. Recently, several new agents have been shown to improve overall survival in comparison with everolimus. This review provides an in-depth summary of drugs employable in the clinical setting, the rationale to their use, and the studies conducted leading to their approval for use and provides perspective on the paradigm shift in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Highlighted are the newly approved agents cabozantinib, nivolumab, and lenvatinib for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

  4. Biomarkers for evaluating racial disparities in clinical outcome in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, Wayne B

    2015-11-01

    The bulk of the literature on kidney cancer in African Americans comes from population-based studies of incidence and survival over varying periods of time using databases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature on racial disparities in clinical outcome in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with the objective of identifying any biomarkers that might point to a biological explanation for these differences. Special attention is given to biomarkers of systemic inflammation and their potential utility for kinetic risk assessment. In addition, arguments are presented as to why the study of ethnic and racial disparities is a promising strategy for accelerating the pace of biomarker development for all patients with RCC.

  5. Targeted therapies used sequentially in metastatic renal cell cancer: overall results from a large experience.

    PubMed

    Procopio, Giuseppe; Verzoni, Elena; Iacovelli, Roberto; Guadalupi, Valentina; Gelsomino, Francesco; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Targeted therapies have improved survival in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC); however, expert opinion on the optimal therapeutic strategy is divided. This retrospective study evaluates different sequential schemes of targeted therapies in 310 patients with advanced/metastatic RCC who received different systemic agents - sorafenib, sunitinib, bevacizumab, everolimus, temsirolimus and axitinib - alone or in different sequences, until disease progression or intolerable toxicity (median follow-up: 37 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 22 months and the 5-year OS was 23.4%; differential therapeutic schemes were not associated with differences in OS. A worse performance status, no nephrectomy and a poor-risk classification according to the Motzer criteria was associated with a shorter OS. These findings support the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of RCC, even in a large unselected population from a single institution, and suggest that treatment should be tailored to meet individual circumstances and needs.

  6. Computational Modelling of Metastasis Development in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baratchart, Etienne; Benzekry, Sébastien; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Colin, Thierry; Cooley, Lindsay S.; Pineau, Raphäel; Ribot, Emeline J; Saut, Olivier; Souleyreau, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    The biology of the metastatic colonization process remains a poorly understood phenomenon. To improve our knowledge of its dynamics, we conducted a modelling study based on multi-modal data from an orthotopic murine experimental system of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The standard theory of metastatic colonization usually assumes that secondary tumours, once established at a distant site, grow independently from each other and from the primary tumour. Using a mathematical model that translates this assumption into equations, we challenged this theory against our data that included: 1) dynamics of primary tumour cells in the kidney and metastatic cells in the lungs, retrieved by green fluorescent protein tracking, and 2) magnetic resonance images (MRI) informing on the number and size of macroscopic lesions. Critically, when calibrated on the growth of the primary tumour and total metastatic burden, the predicted theoretical size distributions were not in agreement with the MRI observations. Moreover, tumour expansion only based on proliferation was not able to explain the volume increase of the metastatic lesions. These findings strongly suggested rejection of the standard theory, demonstrating that the time development of the size distribution of metastases could not be explained by independent growth of metastatic foci. This led us to investigate the effect of spatial interactions between merging metastatic tumours on the dynamics of the global metastatic burden. We derived a mathematical model of spatial tumour growth, confronted it with experimental data of single metastatic tumour growth, and used it to provide insights on the dynamics of multiple tumours growing in close vicinity. Together, our results have implications for theories of the metastatic process and suggest that global dynamics of metastasis development is dependent on spatial interactions between metastatic lesions. PMID:26599078

  7. Computational Modelling of Metastasis Development in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baratchart, Etienne; Benzekry, Sébastien; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Colin, Thierry; Cooley, Lindsay S; Pineau, Raphäel; Ribot, Emeline J; Saut, Olivier; Souleyreau, Wilfried

    2015-11-01

    The biology of the metastatic colonization process remains a poorly understood phenomenon. To improve our knowledge of its dynamics, we conducted a modelling study based on multi-modal data from an orthotopic murine experimental system of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The standard theory of metastatic colonization usually assumes that secondary tumours, once established at a distant site, grow independently from each other and from the primary tumour. Using a mathematical model that translates this assumption into equations, we challenged this theory against our data that included: 1) dynamics of primary tumour cells in the kidney and metastatic cells in the lungs, retrieved by green fluorescent protein tracking, and 2) magnetic resonance images (MRI) informing on the number and size of macroscopic lesions. Critically, when calibrated on the growth of the primary tumour and total metastatic burden, the predicted theoretical size distributions were not in agreement with the MRI observations. Moreover, tumour expansion only based on proliferation was not able to explain the volume increase of the metastatic lesions. These findings strongly suggested rejection of the standard theory, demonstrating that the time development of the size distribution of metastases could not be explained by independent growth of metastatic foci. This led us to investigate the effect of spatial interactions between merging metastatic tumours on the dynamics of the global metastatic burden. We derived a mathematical model of spatial tumour growth, confronted it with experimental data of single metastatic tumour growth, and used it to provide insights on the dynamics of multiple tumours growing in close vicinity. Together, our results have implications for theories of the metastatic process and suggest that global dynamics of metastasis development is dependent on spatial interactions between metastatic lesions.

  8. Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma successfully treated with pazopanib: impact of TKIs' antiangiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, Giovanni; Monterisi, Santa; Signorelli, Diego; Cona, Silvia; Cassano, Alessandra; Danza, Francesco; Barone, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma, especially without neoplastic thrombosis of the vena cava, is extremely rare. The prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been radically influenced by the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but very few reports in the literature have described their activity in heart metastasis. We report the case of a woman with a left ventricle metastasis from kidney cancer without renal vein involvement, who was treated with pazopanib. The patient achieved a prolonged partial response, with clear signs of metastasis devascularization and a favorable toxicity profile.

  9. Suppression of immune regulatory cells with combined therapy of celecoxib and sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Guo, Jianming; Wang, Guomin; Chu, Yiwei; Hu, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To observe the the potential benefit of sunitinib in combination with cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) inhibitor in renal cell carcinoma therapy. Methods 769-p cell lines were treated with sunitinib, celecoxib, or in combination at different concentrations respectively. We investigated the expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 769-p and cell proliferation in vitro. BALB/c mice implanted with Renca cells were divided into 4 groups and administered orally by gavage with sunitinib, COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) monotherapy or combination, and PBS respectively. Tumor growth and animal survival were observed. The myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in peripheral blood and spleen were determined by flow cytometry. The MDSCs protein was extracted for STAT3 analysis by western blot. Results 769-p cell lines were suppressed in a dose and time-dependent manner. The expression of GM-CSF was substantially inhibited by celecoxib and sunitinib. Combination of sunitinib and celecoxib in vivo could effectively reduce the MDSCs than those in control group. Meanwhile, the CD4+ lymphocytes were strongly increased and the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in MDSCs were significantly reduced. Conclusion Combination therapy with sunitinib and celecoxib intensified the curative effects to renal cell carcinoma by suppressing immune regulatory cells. PMID:27926489

  10. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment inhibited RCC cells proliferation by increasing expression of miR-26a in 786-O cells (P < 0.05). As a result, protein abundance of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 was decreased and PTEN was increased in cells exposed to metformin. Also over-expression of miR-26a can inhibited cell proliferation by down-regulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and up-regulating PTEN expression. Therefore, these data for the first time provide novel evidence for a mechanism that the anticancer activities of metformin are due to upregulation of miR-26a and affect its downstream target gene. PMID:25419360

  11. DNA damage response in renal ischemia-reperfusion and ATP-depletion injury of renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhengwei; Wei, Qingqing; Dong, Guie; Huo, Yuqing; Dong, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion leads to acute kidney injury (AKI) that is characterized pathologically by tubular damage and cell death, followed by tubular repair, atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Recent work suggested the possible presence of DNA damage response (DDR) in AKI. However, the evidence is sketchy and the role and regulation of DDR in ischemic AKI remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated the induction of phosphorylation of ATM, H2AX, Chk2 and p53 during renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice, suggesting DDR in kidney tissues. DDR was also induced in vitro during the recovery or "reperfusion" of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) after ATP depletion. DDR in RPTCs was abrogated by supplying glucose to maintain ATP via glycolysis, indicating that the DDR depends on ATP depletion. The DDR was also suppressed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD and the overexpression of Bcl-2, supporting a role of apoptosis-associated DNA damage in the DDR. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, suppressed the phosphorylation of ATM and p53 and, to a less extent, Chk2, but NAC increased the phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation of H2AX. Interestingly, NAC increased apoptosis, which may account for the observed H2AX activation. Ku55933, an ATM inhibitor, blocked ATM phosphorylation and ameliorated the phosphorylation of Chk2 and p53, but it increased H2AX phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation. Ku55933 also increased apoptosis in RPTCs following ATP depletion. The results suggest that DDR occurs during renal ischemia-reperfusion in vivo and ATP-depletion injury in vitro. The DDR is partially induced by apoptosis and oxidative stress-related DNA damage. ATM, as a sensor in the DDR, may play a cytoprotective role against tubular cell injury and death.

  12. Mechanisms of Inflammatory Injury of Renal Tubular Cells in a Cellular Model of Pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morosanova, M A; Plotnikov, E Y; Zorova, L D; Pevzner, I B; Popkov, V A; Silachev, D N; Jankauskas, S S; Babenko, V A; Zorov, D B

    2016-11-01

    Previously, we have assembled a cellular model of pyelonephritis which contains a primary culture of renal tubular epithelial cells, mononuclear leukocytes, and bacterial lysate or lipopolysaccharide. After cocultivation of renal cells with leukocytes and bacterial lysate, proinflammatory changes were observed in the renal cells, followed by nitrosative and oxidative stress and cell death. The interaction of bacterial antigens not only with leukocytes, but also with epithelial cells of the renal tubules, was partially mediated by signaling pathways involving Toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4). Activation of these receptors led to increased levels of oxidative stress and synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-6, IL-1α) in the renal epithelium, while TLR4 blockade decreased the severity of these processes. Apart from the fact that activation of inflammatory signaling in response to bacterial antigens is observed directly in the renal cells, the presence of leukocytes significantly amplifies the inflammatory response as measured by the level of cytokines generated in the ensemble. In the presence of activated leukocytes, higher expression of TLR2 on the surface of renal cells was observed in response to exposure to bacterial components, which might explain the increased inflammatory response in the presence of leukocytes. The synthesis of IL-1α in the epithelial cells of the renal tubules in this inflammatory model leads to its accumulation in the nuclei, which has been reduced by the TLR4 antagonist polymyxin. TLR2 agonists also led to increased levels of IL-1α. The elevation in the content of IL-1α in nuclei was accompanied by increased acetylation of nuclear proteins, which has been reduced to control values after exposure to protective agents (Trolox, mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQR1 or LiCl). The high level of acetylation of histones is probably regulated by proinflammatory cytokines, and to some extent it is a marker of inflammation, which

  13. Aristolochic acid exposure in Romania and implications for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turesky, Robert J; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Brennan, Paul; Mates, Dana; Jinga, Viorel; Harnden, Patricia; Banks, Rosamonde E; Blanche, Helene; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Chopard, Priscilia; Letourneau, Louis; Lathrop, G Mark; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aristolochic acid (AA) is a nephrotoxicant associated with AA nephropathy (AAN) and upper urothelial tract cancer (UUTC). Whole-genome sequences of 14 Romanian cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) recently exhibited mutational signatures consistent with AA exposure, although RCC had not been previously linked with AAN and AA exposure was previously reported only in localised rural areas. Methods: We performed mass spectrometric measurements of the aristolactam (AL) DNA adduct 7-(deoxyadenosin-N6-yl) aristolactam I (dA-AL-I) in nontumour renal tissues of the 14 Romanian RCC cases and 15 cases from 3 other countries. Results: We detected dA-AL-I in the 14 Romanian cases at levels ranging from 0.7 to 27 adducts per 108 DNA bases, in line with levels reported in Asian and Balkan populations exposed through herbal remedies or food contamination. The 15 cases from other countries were negative. Interpretation: Although the source of exposure is uncertain and likely different in AAN regions than elsewhere, our results demonstrate that AA exposure in Romania exists outside localised AAN regions and provide further evidence implicating AA in RCC. PMID:26657656

  14. Nitrate in public water supplies and the risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ward, Mary H; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Lynch, Charles F; Cantor, Kenneth P

    2007-12-01

    Drinking water and dietary sources of nitrate and nitrite can react in vivo with amines and amides to form N-nitroso compounds (NOC), potent animal carcinogens. Nitrate is a widespread contaminant of drinking water supplies especially in agricultural areas. We conducted a population-based case-control study of renal cell carcinoma in 1986-1989 in Iowa, a state with elevated levels in many public water supplies. We collected a lifetime water source history, but due to limited monitoring data, most analyses focused on the subpopulation, who used Iowa public supplies with nitrate measurements (actual or imputed data) for > or = 70% of their person-years since 1960 (201 cases, 1,244 controls). We computed the average nitrate level and years using a public supply with nitrate levels >5 and >10 mg/l. Dietary nitrate and nitrite were estimated from a 55-item food frequency questionnaire. There was no association of renal cell carcinoma with the average nitrate level and years using public supplies >5 and >10 mg/l nitrate-nitrogen (10+ years >5 mg/l odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66, 1.60). However, higher nitrate exposure was associated with an increased risk among subgroups with above the median red meat intake (10+ years >5 mg/l OR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.04-3.51) or below the median vitamin C intake (10+ years >5 mg/l OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.01, 3.56), dietary factors that increase the endogenous formation of NOC. Exclusion of long-term Des Moines residents, a large proportion of the high exposure categories, attenuated the association. These findings deserve additional study in populations with high water nitrate intake and information on dietary intakes.

  15. USE OF THE SPONTANEOUS TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA FOR THE STUDY OF RENAL CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kidney is a frequent site for chemically induced cancers in rodents and among the ten most frequent sites for cancer in human patients. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent upper urinary tract cancer in humans and accounts for 80-85% of malignant renal tumors. He...

  16. [Novelties in the treatment for advanced renal-cell cancer].

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anikó

    2011-04-24

    Therapeutic options in advanced renal-cell cancer have expanded through better understanding of molecular pathology and development of novel targeted therapeutics. Vascular endothelial growth factor, the key ligand of angiogenesis, has a major role in the progression of vascularized kidney tumors and this is the target molecule of modern medications. The three types of the mechanism of action of current therapies are: monoclonal antibodies blocking directly vascular endothelial growth factor ligand (bevacizumab), tyrosine-kinase inhibitors blocking vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib) and inhibitors of the intracellular mTOR-kinase (temsirolimus, everolimus). Based on randomized studies, sunitinib, pazopanib or interferon-α-bevacizumab combination should be the first-line therapy in patients with good/moderate prognosis, while temsirolimus is recommended in those with poor prognosis. Following an ineffective cytokine therapy sorafenib or pazopanib are the second-line treatment. In case of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor inefficacy, current evidence favors everolimus. Patient outcome can further be improved by the involvement of more modern and effective target products.

  17. Systemic Therapies for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Vanderwalde, Ari; Hurria, Arti; Figlin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapies has radically changed the treatment paradigm for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, multiple clinical dilemmas have emerged. For instance, limited data are available to juxtapose the safety and efficacy profile of targeted therapies between older and younger adults. Herein, pivotal trials of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed therapies are assessed in the context of their implications in treating older adults with mRCC. In general, subset analyses from these pivotal studies suggest similar efficacy of targeted therapies amongst older adults. Aging is accompanied by a multitude of physiological changes, as well as an increased prevalence of co-morbidities. The age-related toxicity profiles of targeted agents for mRCC are detailed to provide a framework for the risks and benefits of these therapies in older adults. Ultimately, tools such as the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) that account for physiological (as opposed to chronological) age may prove useful in the evaluation and treatment of older adults with mRCC. PMID:21812499

  18. Diagnostic biomarkers for renal cell carcinoma: selection using novel bioinformatics systems for microarray data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Yin-Goen, Qiqin; Phan, John H; Moffitt, Richard A; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D; Young, Andrew N

    2009-01-01

    Summary The differential diagnosis of clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma is clinically important, because these tumor subtypes are associated with different pathobiology and clinical behavior. For cases in which histopathology is equivocal, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR can assist in the differential diagnosis by measuring expression of subtype-specific biomarkers. Several renal tumor biomarkers have been discovered in expression microarray studies. However, due to heterogeneity of gene and protein expression, additional biomarkers are needed for reliable diagnostic classification. We developed novel bioinformatics systems to identify candidate renal tumor biomarkers from the microarray profiles of 45 clear cell, 16 papillary and 10 chromophobe renal cell carcinoma; the microarray data was derived from two independent published studies. The ArrayWiki biocomputing system merged the microarray datasets into a single file, so gene expression could be analyzed from a larger number of tumors. The caCORRECT system removed non-random sources of error from the microarray data, and the omniBioMarker system analyzed data with several gene-ranking algorithms, in order to identify algorithms effective at recognizing previously described renal tumor biomarkers. We predicted these algorithms would also be effective at identifying unknown biomarkers that could be verified by independent methods. We selected six novel candidate biomakers from the omniBioMarker analysis, and verified their differential expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The candidate biomarkers were carbonic anhydrase IX, ceruloplasmin, schwannomin-interacting protein 1, E74-like factor 3, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 5a and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed on 17 clear cell, 13 papillary and 7 chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. Carbonic anhydrase IX and ceruloplasmin were

  19. CRM1 inhibitor S109 suppresses cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Chong, Yulong; Liu, Huize; Han, Yan; Niu, Mingshan

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal localization of tumor suppressor proteins is a common feature of renal cancer. Nuclear export of these tumor suppressor proteins is mediated by chromosome region maintenance-1 (CRM1). Here, we investigated the antitumor eff ects of a novel reversible inhibitor of CRM1 on renal cancer cells. We found that S109 inhibits the CRM1-mediated nuclear export of RanBP1 and reduces protein levels of CRM1. Furthermore, the inhibitory eff ect of S109 on CRM1 is reversible. Our data demonstrated that S109 signifi cantly inhibits proliferation and colony formation of renal cancer cells. Cell cycle assay showed that S109 induced G1-phase arrest, followed by the reduction of Cyclin D1 and increased expression of p53 and p21. We also found that S109 induces nuclear accumulation of tumor suppressor proteins, Foxo1 and p27. Most importantly, mutation of CRM1 at Cys528 position abolished the eff ects of S109. Taken together, our results indicate that CRM1 is a therapeutic target in renal cancer and the novel reversible CRM1 inhibitor S109 can act as a promising candidate for renal cancer therapy.

  20. Role of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-03-01

    The secreted frizzled-related protein (sFRP) family plays an important role in the inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway in various cancers. The functional significance of Wnt antagonist sFRP3 has not been investigated in renal cancer. We performed tissue microarray and found that the level of sFRP3 protein was high in normal kidney, low in primary renal cancer tissues, and high in metastatic renal cancer tissues. Therefore, we hypothesized that sFRP3 may play an important role in metastatic renal cancer. To test this hypothesis, we performed a series of experiments to determine the role of sFRP3 using primary and metastatic renal cancer cell lines. Functional analysis showed increased numbers of viable and invaded cells and tube formation and decreased numbers of apoptotic cells in the sFRP3-transfected renal cancer cell line A498. Promotion of tumor growth was also observed in nude mice injected with sFRP3-transfected A498 cells. In contrast, the number of viable cells and invasive cells was decreased in sFRP3 mRNA knockdown metastatic cells (ACHN and Hs891.T). To investigate the mechanism of sFRP3 function, we performed microarray analysis to see which genes were upregulated or downregulated by sFRP3 expression. Among these genes, MMP-3 and ANGPT1 were significantly upregulated in sFRP3-transfected cells. In conclusion, this is the first report to show that sFRP3 expression promotes cell growth, invasion, and inhibition of apoptosis in renal cancer cells.

  1. Fluid intake and incidence of renal cell carcinoma in UK women

    PubMed Central

    Allen, N E; Balkwill, A; Beral, V; Green, J; Reeves, G

    2011-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that the apparent protective effect of alcohol intake on renal cell carcinoma may be due to the diluting effect of carcinogens by a high total fluid intake. We assessed the association between intakes of total fluids and of specific beverages on the risk of renal cell carcinoma in a large prospective cohort of UK women. Methods: Information on beverage consumption was obtained from a questionnaire sent ∼3 years after recruitment into the Million Women Study. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for renal cell carcinoma associated with beverage consumption adjusted for age, region of residence, socioeconomic status, smoking, and body mass index. Results: After an average of 5.2 years of follow-up, 588 cases of renal cell carcinoma were identified among 779 369 women. While alcohol intake was associated with a reduced risk of renal cell carcinoma (RR for ⩾2 vs <1 drink per day: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.61–0.96; P for trend=0.02), there was no association with total fluid intake (RR for ⩾12 vs <7 drinks per day: 1.15; 95% CI: 0.91–1.45; P for trend=0.3) or with intakes of specific beverages. Conclusions: The apparent protective effect of alcohol on the risk of renal cell carcinoma is unlikely to be related to a high fluid intake. PMID:21407222

  2. Primary cilia regulate the osmotic stress response of renal epithelial cells through TRPM3.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J; Varnell, Charles D; Comer, Raven G; Liu, Jialiu; Lu, Lu; Pachciarz, Nolan W; Bissler, John J; Dixon, Bradley P

    2017-04-01

    Primary cilia sense environmental conditions, including osmolality, but whether cilia participate in the osmotic response in renal epithelial cells is not known. The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV4 and TRPM3 are osmoresponsive. TRPV4 localizes to cilia in certain cell types, while renal subcellular localization of TRPM3 is not known. We hypothesized that primary cilia are required for maximal activation of the osmotic response of renal epithelial cells and that ciliary TRPM3 and TRPV4 mediate that response. Ciliated [murine epithelial cells from the renal inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD-3) and 176-5] and nonciliated (176-5Δ) renal cells expressed Trpv4 and Trpm3 Ciliary expression of TRPM3 was observed in mIMCD-3 and 176-5 cells and in wild-type mouse kidney tissue. TRPV4 was identified in cilia and apical membrane of mIMCD-3 cells by electrophysiology and in the cell body by immunofluorescence. Hyperosmolal stress at 500 mOsm/kg (via NaCl addition) induced the osmotic response genes betaine/GABA transporter (Bgt1) and aldose reductase (Akr1b3) in all ciliated cell lines. This induction was attenuated in nonciliated cells. A TRPV4 agonist abrogated Bgt1 and Akr1b3 induction in ciliated and nonciliated cells. A TRPM3 agonist attenuated Bgt1 and Akr1b3 induction in ciliated cells only. TRPM3 knockout attenuated Akr1b3 induction. Viability under osmotic stress was greater in ciliated than nonciliated cells. Akr1b3 induction was also less in nonciliated than ciliated cells when mannitol was used to induce hyperosmolal stress. These findings suggest that primary cilia are required for the maximal osmotic response in renal epithelial cells and that TRPM3 is involved in this mechanism. TRPV4 appears to modulate the osmotic response independent of cilia.

  3. Evaluation of renal function and immune system cells in elderly individuals from São Paulo City

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Daniela; Longo-Maugeri, Ieda Maria; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lucia; Bueno, Valquiria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Both renal function and immune system function decline with age. Although controversial, a significant number of studies have shown that the decline in kidney function is associated with the worsening of the immune system. These findings are reinforced by the increased susceptibility to infections and deficient immunization coverage after vaccination both in patients with chronic renal disease and in elderly individuals. Our objective was to evaluate a non-institutionalized elderly population from São Paulo City and correlate the estimated glomerular filtration rate with the percentage of lymphocytes in circulation. METHODS: A random population of 237 individuals (107 men and 130 women), ranging in age from 60 to 101 years, who were enrolled in the Health, Well-Being and Aging Study was evaluated for renal function (Modification on Diet in Renal Disease formula) and lymphocyte percentage (flow cytometry). RESULTS: Aging was associated with a decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate in both male and female individuals. We did not identify a significant correlation between the estimated glomerular filtration rate and either the percentage of CD4, CD8, and B cells or CD4/CD8 ratio. The median percentage of CD8+ T cells was significantly lower in individuals with an estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, no statistical correlation was found between the estimated glomerular filtration rate and either the lymphocyte phenotype (CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells) or the CD4/CD8 ratio in blood. PMID:23420155

  4. Genetic alterations of HER genes in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WENG, WEN HUI; CHEN, YING TZU; YU, KAI JIE; CHANG, YING HSU; CHUANG, CHENG KENG; PANG, SEE TONG

    2016-01-01

    Chromophobe (ch) renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the 3rd most common subtype of RCC and occurs in 5% of all RCCs. Although chRCC generally demonstrates more favorable outcomes compared with other subtypes of RCC, there is a 6–7% probability of tumor progression and metastasis in this disease. The subclassification of a more aggressive subtype of chRCC may be useful for the management of this cancer. The Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 [also known as human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2] gene has been reported to be important in chRCC. The present study aimed to further investigate the abnormalities of the HER family genes and their potential association with chRCC. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on 11 chRCC tissue specimens, and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis was used to assess the results. The loss of one copy of the HER2 and HER4 genes was observed to be the major alteration of the tumor cells in all chRCC cases. Statistical data indicated that loss of the HER2 gene was strongly correlated with loss of the HER4 gene (P=0.019). The findings of previous studies were also combined for analysis, and were consistent with those of the present study. In addition, the amplification of HER1 was also strongly correlated with the amplification of HER4 (P=0.004). Furthermore, a high percentage of genetic structural rearrangements was observed in HER3 genes, which was significantly associated with amplification of HER2 (P=0.005). Certain alterations in the HER gene family were also noted as a phenomenom in chRCC. Therefore, the characterization of the underlying aberrant functions of HER genes may be of interest for additional studies in the context of using HER genes to distinguish between RCC subtypes in order to establish improved treatment guidelines. PMID:26998131

  5. Sunitinib in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thomas A.; Gore, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that targets various receptors, including vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs). Sunitinib received approval in 2006 and became a standard treatment option in the first-line treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) after a phase III trial showed superiority compared with interferon alpha (IFN-α). Sunitinib has also shown activity in second-line treatment in several trials. Most of the combination trials with sunitinib with various agents have led to considerable toxicity without improving efficacy. Sunitinib alone causes significant side effects and has a distinct profile with diarrhoea, hypertension, skin effects hypothyroidism, fatigue and nausea of special interest. The recommended dose of sunitinib in mRCC is 50 mg orally daily for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks off treatment (4/2 schedule). An alternative 2 weeks on, 1 week off schedule (2/1 schedule) seems to be of similar efficacy and better tolerability and could be more widely used in the future. An intermittent treatment strategy with a stop in remission and re-induction after progression showed efficacy in smaller trials and is currently being evaluated in a phase III trial. Direct comparison of sunitinib with pazopanib in first-line treatment showed a similar efficacy for both TKIs with a distinct toxicity profile. Data from two phase II trials showed that sunitinib has also activity in non-clear cell cancer and is an option due to a lack of better alternatives. Currently, after immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown very promising results in the second-line treatment of RCC, they are being tested in a number of phase III trials in the first-line setting. The future will show the position of sunitinib in the first-line treatment of RCC in the era of the immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27904651

  6. The ISUP system of staging, grading and classification of renal cell neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gianduzzo, Troy; Delahunt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    There have been significant changes in the staging, classification and grading of renal cell neoplasia in recent times. Major changes have occurred in our understanding of extra-renal extension by renal cell cancer and how gross specimens must be handled to optimally display extra-renal spread. Since the 1981 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of renal tumors, in which only a handful of different entities were reported, many new morphological types have been described in the literature, resulting in 50 different entities reported in the 2004 WHO classification. Since 2004, further new entities have been recognized and reported necessitating an update of the renal tumor classification. There have also been numerous grading systems for renal cell carcinoma with Fuhrman grading, the most widely used system. In recent times, the prognostic value and the applicability of the Fuhrman grading system in practice has been shown to be, at best, suboptimal. To address these issues and to recommend reporting guidelines, the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) undertook a review of adult renal neoplasia through an international consensus conference in Vancouver in 2012. The conduct of the conference was based upon evidence from the literature and the current practice amongst recognized experts in the field. Working groups selected to deal with key topics evaluated current data and identified points of controversy. A pre-meeting survey of the ISUP membership was followed by the consensus conference at which a formal ballot was taken on each key issue. A 65% majority vote was taken as consensus. This review summarizes the outcome and recommendations of this conference with regards to staging, classification and grading of renal cell neoplasia. PMID:28326247

  7. CTGF Promotes Inflammatory Cell Infiltration of the Renal Interstitium by Activating NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rayego, Sandra; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Rodriguez, Javier Sánchez; Rodrigues-Díez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Carvajal, Gisselle; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Selgas, Rafael; Mezzano, Sergio A.; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an important profibrotic factor in kidney diseases. Blockade of endogenous CTGF ameliorates experimental renal damage and inhibits synthesis of extracellular matrix in cultured renal cells. CTGF regulates several cellular responses, including adhesion, migration, proliferation, and synthesis of proinflammatory factors. Here, we investigated whether CTGF participates in the inflammatory process in the kidney by evaluating the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, a key signaling system that controls inflammation and immune responses. Systemic administration of CTGF to mice for 24 h induced marked infiltration of inflammatory cells in the renal interstitium (T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages) and led to elevated renal NF-κB activity. Administration of CTGF increased renal expression of chemokines (MCP-1 and RANTES) and cytokines (INF-γ, IL-6, and IL-4) that recruit immune cells and promote inflammation. Treatment with a NF-κB inhibitor, parthenolide, inhibited CTGF-induced renal inflammatory responses, including the up-regulation of chemokines and cytokines. In cultured murine tubuloepithelial cells, CTGF rapidly activated the NF-κB pathway and the cascade of mitogen-activated protein kinases, demonstrating crosstalk between these signaling pathways. CTGF, via mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB activation, increased proinflammatory gene expression. These data show that in addition to its profibrotic properties, CTGF contributes to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the kidney by activating the NF-κB pathway. PMID:19423687

  8. Induction of apoptotic cell death by betulin in multidrug-resistant human renal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yim, Nam-Hui; Jung, Young Pil; Kim, Aeyung; Kim, Taesoo; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-08-01

    Betulin, a triterpene from the bark of various species of birch tree, has various biological effects, including antiviral, antifungal and anticancer activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the apoptotic effect of betulin in RCC4 multidrug-resistant human renal carcinoma cells. To evaluate anticancer activity, we performed cell viability and caspase activity assays, a proteome profiler array and western blot analysis in RCC4 cells. Betulin significantly decreased RCC4 cell viability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Betulin activated caspase family proteins, including caspase-3, -7, -8 and -9, and increased the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, including PARP and Bcl-2 family members. In an apoptosis array, betulin activated the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors TRAIL R1/DR4 and R2/DR5, and tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), suggesting that betulin treatment leads to induction of apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways in RCC4 cells. Notably, betulin significantly enhanced cytotoxicity and PARP cleavage in etoposide-treated RCC4 cells, and downregulated the expression of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). Taken together, our findings suggest that the anticancer effects of betulin involve induction of apoptosis and sensitisation of RCC4 cells, providing potentially useful information applicable to the use of betulin in renal cancer treatment.

  9. Proteasomal Processing of Albumin by Renal Dendritic Cells Generates Antigenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Chiabrando, Chiara; Schiarea, Silvia; Aiello, Sistiana; Cassis, Linda; Gagliardini, Elena; Noris, Marina; Buelli, Simona; Zoja, Carla; Corna, Daniela; Mele, Caterina; Fanelli, Roberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2009-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DC) that accumulate in the renal parenchyma of non–immune-mediated proteinuric nephropathies is not well understood. Under certain circumstances, DC capture immunologically ignored antigens, including self-antigens, and present them within MHC class I, initiating an autoimmune response. We studied whether DC could generate antigenic peptides from the self-protein albumin. Exposure of rat proximal tubular cells to autologous albumin resulted in its proteolytic cleavage to form an N-terminal 24–amino acid peptide (ALB1-24). This peptide was further processed by the DC proteasome into antigenic peptides that had binding motifs for MHC class I and were capable of activating syngeneic CD8+ T cells. In vivo, the rat five-sixths nephrectomy model allowed the localization and activation of renal DC. Accumulation of DC in the renal parenchyma peaked 1 wk after surgery and decreased at 4 wk, concomitant with their appearance in the renal draining lymph nodes. DC from renal lymph nodes, loaded with ALB1-24, activated syngeneic CD8+ T cells in primary culture. The response of CD8+ T cells of five-sixths nephrectomized rats was amplified with secondary stimulation. In contrast, DC from renal lymph nodes of five-sixths nephrectomized rats treated with the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib lost their capacity to stimulate CD8+ T cells in primary and secondary cultures. These data suggest that albumin can be a source of potentially antigenic peptides upon renal injury and that renal DC play a role in processing self-proteins through a proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:19092126

  10. Angiomotin promotes renal epithelial and carcinoma cell proliferation by retaining the nuclear YAP.

    PubMed

    Lv, Meng; Li, Shuting; Luo, Changqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Shen, Yanwei; Sui, Yan Xia; Wang, Fan; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jiao; Liu, Peijun; Yang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the common tumors in the urinary system without effective therapies. Angiomotin (Amot) can interact with Yes-associated protein (YAP) to either stimulate or inhibit YAP activity, playing a potential role in cell proliferation. However, the role of Amot in regulating the proliferation of renal epithelial and RCC cells is unknown. Here, we show that Amot is expressed predominantly in the nucleus of RCC cells and tissues, and in the cytoplasm and nucleus of renal epithelial cells and paracancerous tissues. Furthermore, Amot silencing inhibited proliferation of HK-2 and 786-O cells while Amot upregulation promoted proliferation of ACHN cells. Interestingly, the location of Amot and YAP in RCC clinical samples and cells was similar. Amot interacted with YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells, particularly in the nucleus. Moreover, Amot silencing mitigated the levels of nuclear YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells and reduced YAP-related CTGF and Cyr61 expression in 786-O cells. Amot upregulation slightly increased the nuclear YAP and YAP-related gene expression in ACHN cells. Finally, enhanced YAP expression restored proliferation of Amot-silencing 786-O cells. Together, these data indicate that Amot is crucial for the maintenance of nuclear YAP to promote renal epithelial and RCC proliferation.

  11. Thymoquinone induces apoptosis through downregulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 in renal carcinoma Caki cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Dong Cheol; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2016-10-01

    Renal carcinoma is a common and frequently fatal carcinoma occurring worldwide and death rates due to this carcinoma are increasing with time. In the present study, we investigated the potential of thymoquinone a natural compound to induce apoptosis in renal carcinoma Caki cells. Thymoquinone efficiently enhanced the apoptotic population of Caki cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, thymoquinone-mediated apoptosis caused downregulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2, the master regulators of the anti-apoptotic mechanism. However, we did not find any changes in mRNA expression level of c-FLIP, therefore; this regulation of c-FLIP was a result of post-translation modification by thymoquinone. In contrast, expression of the Bcl-2 protein was observed at both transcriptional and translational level. However, we also observed that thymoquinone enhanced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caki cells, which resulted in reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cytochrome c release into cytoplasm. Our results postulate that thymoquinone induces apoptosis through downregulating c-FLIP and Bcl-2 which can be utilized as a chemotherapeutic agent to treat renal carcinoma.

  12. Seroprevalence of antibodies against human herpesvirus 8 in a population of renal transplant recipients at Hôtel-Dieu de Québec Hospital.

    PubMed

    Delorme, S; Houde, I; Deschênes, L

    2003-11-01

    We conducted a seroepidemiologic study to determine the prevalence of anti-human herpesvirus 8 antibodies in a renal transplant population at Hôtel-Dieu de Québec Hospital. Testing for immunoglobulin G antibodies against lytic and latent antigens was performed on serum samples from 150 renal transplant patients. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with confirmed Kaposi's sarcoma were used as positive controls. None of the renal transplant patients tested positive.

  13. (1)H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors.

  14. Association between RASSF1A promoter methylation and renal cell cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Q; Guan, H; Liu, C H; Liu, D C; Xu, B; Jiang, L; Lin, Z X; Chen, M

    2016-04-25

    Epigenetic inactivation of Ras-associated domain family 1A (RASSF1A) by hyper-methylation of its promoter region has been identified in various cancers. However, the role of RASSF1A in renal cancer has neither been thoroughly investigated nor reviewed. In this study, we reviewed and performed a meta-analysis of 13 published studies reporting correlations between methylation frequency of the RASSF1A promoter region and renal cancer risk. The odds ratios (ORs) of eligible studies and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were used to correlate RASSF1A promoter methylation with renal cell cancer risk and clinical or pathological variables, respectively. RASSF1A promoter methylation was significantly associated with the risk of renal cell cancer (OR = 19.35, 95%CI = 9.57-39.13). RASSF1A promoter methylation was significantly associated with pathological tumor grade (OR = 3.32, 95%CI = 1.55-7.12), and a possible positive correlation between RASSF1A promoter methylation status and tumor stage was noted (OR = 1.89, 95%CI = 1.00-3.56, P = 0.051). Overall, this meta-analysis demonstrated that RASSF1A promoter methylation is significantly associated with increased risk of renal cell cancer. RASSF1A promoter methylation frequency was positively correlated with pathological tumor grade, but not the clinical stage. This study showed that RASSF1A promoter methylation could be utilized to predict renal cell cancer prognosis.

  15. mTOR activation is critical for betulin treatment in renal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenlong; Ji, Shiqi; Zhang, Haijian; Han, Zhixing; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Jianwen; Ping, Hao

    2017-01-22

    Betulin, a natural product isolated from the bark of the birch trees, exhibits multiple anticancer effects. Activation of mTOR signaling pathway has been found in numerous cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, we attempted to study whether mTOR signaling was essential for betulin to treat RCC. Based on cell survival and colony formation assays, we found that mTOR hyperactive RCC cell line 786-O cells were more sensitive to betulin treatment compared with mTOR-inactive Caki-2 cells. Knockdown of TSC2 in Caki-2 cells had similar results to 786-O cells, and mTOR silencing in 786-O cells rescued the inhibitory effect of betulin, indicating that betulin inhibited RCC cell proliferation in an mTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, betulin treatment decreases the levels of glucose consumption and lactate production in 786-O cells, while minimal effects were observed in Caki-2 cells. In addition, betulin significantly inhibited the expression of PKM2 and HK2 in 786-O cells. Finally, knockdown of PKM2 or HK2 in 786-O reversed the anti-proliferative effects of betulin, and overexpression of PKM2 or HK2 in Caki-2 cells enhanced the sensitivity to betulin treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the critical role of mTOR activation in RCC cells to betulin treatment, suggesting that betulin might be valuable for targeted therapies in RCC patients with mTOR activation.

  16. Nephron-sparing surgery in renal cell carcinoma: current perspectives on technical issues.

    PubMed

    González, Javier; Cózar, José Manuel; Gómez, Antonio; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina; Esteban, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Surgical resection remains the standard treatment for renal cell carcinoma. Although historically the concept of wide excision of the affected kidney dictated surgical thinking for more than half a century, a better understanding of the biology of this tumor, standardized staging, and changing patterns of presentation permit today a refined management approach with nephron-sparing surgery, thus limiting potential long-term morbidity by maximizing the preservation of functional renal parenchyma. This paper aims to review the current status of nephron-sparing surgery for solid renal masses with an emphasis on indications, preoperative assessment, and operative technical issues, summarizing the most recent existing data on the subject.

  17. Epigenomics of clear cell renal cell carcinoma: mechanisms and potential use in molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Xing, Tianying; He, Huiying

    2016-02-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one frequent form of urologic malignancy with numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations. This review summarizes the recent major findings of epigenetic alterations including DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs and recently identified long noncoding RNAs in the development and progression of ccRCC. These epigenetic profilings can provide a promising means of prognostication and early diagnosis for patients with ccRCCs. With the developed high-throughput technologies nowadays, the epigenetic analyses will have possible clinical applications in the molecular pathology of ccRCC.

  18. Oncology Gold Standard™ practical consensus recommendations 2016 for treatment of advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Batra, U; Parikh, PM; Prabhash, K; Tongaonkar, HB; Chibber, P; Dabkara, D; Deshmukh, C; Ghadyalpatil, N; Hingmire, S; Joshi, A; Raghunath, SK; Rajappa, S; Rajendranath, R; Rawal, SK; Singh, Manisha; Singh, R; Somashekhar, SP; Sood, R

    2016-01-01

    The Oncology Gold Standard (OGS) Expert Group on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) developed the consensus statement to provide community oncologists practical guidelines on the management of advanced clear cell (cc) RCC using published evidence, practical experience of experts in real life management, and results of a nationwide survey involving 144 health-care professionals. Six broad question categories containing 33 unique questions cover major situations in the routine management of RCC. This document serves as a ready guide for the standard of care to optimize outcome. The table of “Take Home Messages” at the end is a convenient tool for busy practitioners. PMID:28032079

  19. Epigenomics of clear cell renal cell carcinoma: mechanisms and potential use in molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Tianying

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one frequent form of urologic malignancy with numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations. This review summarizes the recent major findings of epigenetic alterations including DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs and recently identified long noncoding RNAs in the development and progression of ccRCC. These epigenetic profilings can provide a promising means of prognostication and early diagnosis for patients with ccRCCs. With the developed high-throughput technologies nowadays, the epigenetic analyses will have possible clinical applications in the molecular pathology of ccRCC. PMID:27041930

  20. Expert Recommendations for First-Line Management of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Special Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Puente, Javier; García Del Muro, Xavier; Pinto, Álvaro; Láinez, Nuria; Esteban, Emilio; Arranz, José Ángel; Gallardo, Enrique; Méndez, María José; Maroto, Pablo; Grande, Enrique; Suárez, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    The availability of agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor or mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] pathways has provided new treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Based on the results of pivotal randomized clinical trials, specific recommendations have been established for management of these patients in first- and second-line settings. However, certain subgroups of patients may be excluded or under-represented in clinical trials, including patients with poor performance status, brain metastases, and cardiac or renal comorbidities, elderly patients, and those with non-clear cell histology. For these subpopulations, management recommendations have emerged from expanded access programs (EAPs), small phase II studies, retrospective analysis of clinical data, and expert opinion. This paper describes recommendations from an expert panel for the treatment of metastatic RCC in these subpopulations. The efficacy of targeted agents appears to be inferior in these patient subgroups relative to the general RCC population. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mTOR inhibitors can be administered safely to elderly patients and those with poor performance status, although dose and schedule modifications are often needed, and close monitoring and management of adverse events is essential. In addition to local surgical treatment and radiotherapy for brain metastases, systemic treatment with a TKI should be offered as part of multidisciplinary care.While there are currently no data from randomized trials, sunitinib has the greatest body of evidence, and it should be considered the first choice in patients with a good prognosis. Patients with an acute cardiac event within the previous 6 months, New York Heart Association grade III heart failure, or uncontrolled high blood pressure should not be treated with TKIs. In patients with mild or moderate renal failure, there are no contraindications to TKI treatment. TKIs can be

  1. Impact of preoperative chronic renal failure on liver transplantation: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Peter Chi-Ho; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Lin, Jr-Rung; Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess whether preoperative chronic renal failure (CRF) affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. Methods This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2,931 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the presence or absence of preoperative CRF. Results The overall estimated survival rate of liver transplantation recipients (LTRs) with preoperative CRF was significantly lower than that of patients without preoperative CRF (P=0.0085). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of duration of intensive care unit stay, total hospital stay, bacteremia, postoperative bleeding, and pneumonia during hospitalization. Long-term adverse effects, including cerebrovascular disease and coronary heart disease, were not different between patients with versus without CRF. Conclusion These findings suggest that LTRs with preoperative CRF have a higher rate of mortality. PMID:28008264

  2. VHL-dependent alterations in the secretome of renal cell carcinoma: Association with immune cell response?

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Franziska; Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Schwurack, Nicolle; Weber, Nico; Massa, Chiara; Kalich, Jana; Fahldieck, Corinna; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Secreted proteins could modulate the interaction between tumor, stroma and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment thereby mounting an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In order to determine the secretome-mediated, von Hippel Lindau (VHL)-regulated cross-talk between tumor cells and T lymphocytes peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors were either cultured in conditioned media obtained from normoxic and hypoxic human VHL-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (786-0VHL−) and its wild type (wt) VHL-transfected counterpart (786-0VHL+) or directly co-cultured with both cell lines. An increased T cell proliferation was detected in the presence of 786-0VHL+-conditioned medium. By applying a quantitative proteomic-based approach using differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry fourteen proteins were identified to be differentially expressed within the secretome of 786-0VHL− cells when compared to that of 786-0VHL+ cells. All proteins identified were involved in multiple tumor-associated biological functions including immune responses. Functional studies on manganese superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD2) demonstrated that it was a regulator of T cell activation-induced oxidative signaling and cell death. Direct effects of soluble MnSOD2 on the growth properties and interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion of T cells could be demonstrated underlining the critical role of extracellular MnSOD2 levels for T cell proliferation and activation. PMID:26486078

  3. VHL-dependent alterations in the secretome of renal cell carcinoma: Association with immune cell response?

    PubMed

    Stehle, Franziska; Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Schwurack, Nicolle; Weber, Nico; Massa, Chiara; Kalich, Jana; Fahldieck, Corinna; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Secreted proteins could modulate the interaction between tumor, stroma and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment thereby mounting an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In order to determine the secretome-mediated, von Hippel Lindau (VHL)-regulated cross-talk between tumor cells and T lymphocytes peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors were either cultured in conditioned media obtained from normoxic and hypoxic human VHL-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (786-0VHL-) and its wild type (wt) VHL-transfected counterpart (786-0VHL+) or directly co-cultured with both cell lines. An increased T cell proliferation was detected in the presence of 786-0VHL+-conditioned medium. By applying a quantitative proteomic-based approach using differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry fourteen proteins were identified to be differentially expressed within the secretome of 786-0VHL- cells when compared to that of 786-0VHL+ cells. All proteins identified were involved in multiple tumor-associated biological functions including immune responses. Functional studies on manganese superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD2) demonstrated that it was a regulator of T cell activation-induced oxidative signaling and cell death. Direct effects of soluble MnSOD2 on the growth properties and interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion of T cells could be demonstrated underlining the critical role of extracellular MnSOD2 levels for T cell proliferation and activation.

  4. An atypical case of dermatomyositis associated with chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Lahouti, Arash H; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2016-01-19

    Dermatomyositis and polymyositis are the major idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in adults. They are associated with an elevated risk of malignancy. However, renal tumours have rarely been described in dermatomyositis patients. We report the case of a 27-year-old Caucasian man with chromophobe renal cell cancer (ChRCC) and antinuclear matrix protein (NXP-2)-associated dermatomyositis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of ChRCC presenting with dermatomyositis.

  5. A case of renal cell carcinoma with an extensive inferior vena cava thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alfreijat, Majd

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent primary renal malignant neoplasm in adults. Most of the cases are usually found incidentally. It is commonly associated with venous thrombosis. We demonstrate a case of a RCC which was associated with an extensive thrombus that reached the upper part of the inferior vena cava (IVC). We also perform a brief literature review about the association between RCC and IVC thrombosis. PMID:27802848

  6. Induction of trismus by sunitinib and pazopanib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ridhima; Montgomery, Bruce; Pandha, Hardev S.

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors sunitinib and pazopanib are used as first-line agents in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Treatment-related toxicities have been described with both these drugs. This report describes a patient with metastatic renal carcinoma who developed trismus while being treated with these agents and is, to the best of our knowledge, the first such case to be reported. PMID:28197036

  7. Flagellar cells and ciliary cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Luciano, L; Reale, E

    1989-01-01

    Flagella or cilia are present on most epithelial cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranch fishes (little skate, spiny dogfish, smooth dogfish, Atlantic sharpnose, scalloped hammerhead, cow-nosed ray). Flagellar cells, those with numerous flagella ordered in one, two, or more rows on the luminal surface, are shown here for the first time in a vertebrate. The flagellar cells are intercalated among other epithelial cells, each bearing a single cilium, from Bowman's capsule to the third subdivision of the intermediate segment of the nephron. The flagella form undulated ribbons up to 55 microns long. In every ribbon the axis of the central pair of microtubules in the axoneme is oriented parallel to the long axis of the flagellar row. This suggests a beat perpendicular to these two axes. The arrangement of the flagella in ribbons most likely promotes movement of glomerular filtrate down the renal tubule. Cells bearing numerous cilia occur in the large collecting ducts of spiny dogfish but without apparent preferential orientation of the cilia.

  8. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders. PMID:22873795

  9. Distinct role of Tim-3 in systemic lupus erythematosus and clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongying; Guo, Xingqing; Tian, Qingwu; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Tim-3 is considered as one of the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) gene family members, which contributes to the activating or silencing genes, but the mechanism of Tim-3 function in mediating SLE or tumor metastasis has not been well explored. Here, we reported Tim-3 was high expressed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with SLE, detected by RT-PCR, significantly, GATA-3 mRNA expression also increased in patients with SLE, compared with the healthy control groups. The bioinformatics used to detect the TCGA database indicated the abnormal expression of Tim-3 was involved in several different cancer types. Further, the higher expression of Tim-3 in kidney renal clear cell carcinoma TCGA database indicated it was a marker for worse 5-year survival. The high expression of Tim-3 in different ccRCC cell lines was detected in both RNA level and protein level. Further, two kinds of relative Tim-3 siRNAs in ccRCC cell lines inhibit cell migration and invasion in vitro, However, the inhibition could be partially rescued by the additional GATA3 knockdown. Further, the down regulation in the RNA and protein levels of GATA3, and the negative correlation between Tim-3 and GATA3 implied that suppression of downstream GATA3 was an important mechanism by which Tim-3 triggered metastasis in ccRCC cell lines. Together, our experiments reveal the role for Tim-3 in facilitating SLE or invasive potential of ccRCC cells by either activating GATA3 or inhibiting GATA3, suggesting that Tim-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for treating SLE or clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Targeting HIF2α Translation with Tempol in VHL-Deficient Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Manik C.; Ghosh, Sanchari; Yang, Youfeng; Gupta, Gopal; DeGraff, William; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.; Rouault, Tracey A.; Linehan, W. Marston

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene, Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), is frequently mutated in the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). In hypoxic conditions, or when there is a VHL mutation, the hypoxia inducible factors, HIF1α and HIF2α, are stabilized and transcribe a panel of genes associated with cancer such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Recent studies in clear cell kidney cancer have suggested that HIF2α, but not HIF1α, is the critical oncoprotein in the VHL pathway. Therefore, targeting HIF2α could provide a potential therapeutic approach for patients with advanced CCRCC. Since iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) is known to inhibit the translation of HIF2α, we investigated whether Tempol, a stable nitroxide that activates IRP1 towards IRE-binding, might have a therapeutic effect on a panel of human CCRCC cells expressing both HIF1α and HIF2α. We first evaluated the protein expression of HIF1α and HIF2α in 15 different clear cell renal carcinoma cell lines established from patient tumors in our laboratory. Tempol decreased the expression of HIF2α, and its downstream targets in all the cell lines of the panel. This effect was attributed to a dramatic increase of IRE-binding activity of IRP1. Several cell lines were found to have an increased IRP1 basal activity at 20% O2 compared to 5% O2, which may lower HIF2α expression in some of the cell lines in a VHL-independent manner. Taken together our data identify Tempol as an agent with potential therapeutic activity targeting expression of HIF2α in VHL-deficient clear cell kidney cancer and illustrate the importance of studying biochemical processes at relevant physiological O2 levels. PMID:23178531

  11. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of spleen diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Douglas H; Wu, Yaping; Weston, Allan P; McAnaw, Mary P; Bromfield, Cecil; Bhattatiry, Manu M

    2003-07-01

    Splenic metastases are infrequent, and determination of the primary site by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) can be complex. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who was found to have a large heterogeneously enhancing 8 x 7-inch splenic mass by abdominal computed tomography (CT). FNA by transesophageal endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated atypical cells conclusive for malignancy and consistent with metastatic renal cell carcinoma based on cytomorphology, histochemical lipid positivity, and immunohistochemical positivity for cytokeratin, vimentin, and renal cell carcinoma marker. Repeat CT with and without arteriovenous contrast demonstrated bilateral renal cysts, including a 0.9 x 0.8-cm lesion on the left with significant enhancement. Splenectomy confirmed the radiological and cytological findings, and left kidney exploration and nephrectomy demonstrated a small (1.5 cm) lower pole renal cell carcinoma of chromophil (papillary) type, histologically similar to the splenic metastasis. This case demonstrates the diagnostic importance of interdisciplinary involvement (oncology, radiology, gastroenterology, pathology, and general and urologic surgery); cytomorphology; histochemistry, including fat stain on frozen cell block; and immunohistochemistry, including the recently developed renal cell carcinoma marker.

  12. Lethal activity of FADD death domain in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Justo, P; Sanz, A B; Lorz, C; Egido, J; Ortiz, A

    2006-06-01

    Fas-associated death domain (FADD) is an adaptor protein that is required for the transmission of the death signal from lethal receptors of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. FADD contains a death domain (DD) and a death effector domain (DED). As death receptors contribute to renal tubular injury and tubular cell FADD increases in acute renal failure, we have studied the function of FADD in tubular epithelium. FADD expression was studied in kidney samples from mice. In order to study the contribution of FADD to renal tubular cell survival, FADD or FADD-DD were overexpressed in murine tubular epithelium. FADD is expressed in renal tubules of the healthy kidney. Both FADD and FADD-DD induce apoptosis in primary cultures of murine tubular epithelium and in the murine cortical tubular cell line. Death induced by FADD-DD has apoptotic morphology, but differs from death receptor-induced apoptosis in that it is not blocked by inhibitors of caspases. Neither an inhibitor of serine proteases nor overexpression of antiapoptotic BclxL prevented cell death. However, the combination of caspase and serine protease inhibition was protective. FADD and FADD-DD overexpression decreased nuclear factor kappa B activity. These data suggest that FADD has a death regulatory function in renal tubular cells that is independent of death receptors. FADD-DD is sufficient to induce apoptosis in these cells. This information is relevant to understanding the role of FADD in tubular injury.

  13. Vitamin K Dependent Protection of Renal Function in Multi-ethnic Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Drummen, Nadja E.A.; Schutte, Aletta E.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Jacobs, Lotte; Petit, Thibaut; Yang, Wen-Yi; Smith, Wayne; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Gu, Yu-Mei; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Verhamme, Peter; Allegaert, Karel; Schutte, Rudolph; Lerut, Evelyne; Evenepoel, Pieter; Vermeer, Cees; Staessen, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following activation by vitamin K (VK), matrix Gla protein (MGP) inhibits arterial calcification, but its role in preserving renal function remains unknown. Methods In 1166 white Flemish (mean age, 38.2 years) and 714 South Africans (49.2% black; 40.6 years), we correlated estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR [CKD-EPI formula]) and stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD [KDOQI stages 2–3]) with inactive desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), using multivariable linear and logistic regression. Results Among Flemish and white and black Africans, between-group differences in eGFR (90, 100 and 122 mL/min/1.73 m2), dp-ucMGP (3.7, 6.5 and 3.2 μg/L), and CKD prevalence (53.5, 28.7 and 10.5%) were significant, but associations of eGFR with dp-ucMGP did not differ among ethnicities (P ≥ 0.075). For a doubling of dp-ucMGP, eGFR decreased by 1.5 (P = 0.023), 1.0 (P = 0.56), 2.8 (P = 0.0012) and 2.1 (P < 0.0001) mL/min/1.73 m2 in Flemish, white Africans, black Africans and all participants combined; the odds ratios for moving up one CKD stage were 1.17 (P = 0.033), 1.03 (P = 0.87), 1.29 (P = 0.12) and 1.17 (P = 0.011), respectively. Interpretation In the general population, eGFR decreases and CKD risk increases with higher dp-ucMGP, a marker of VK deficiency. These findings highlight the possibility that VK supplementation might promote renal health. PMID:26981580

  14. Open partial nephrectomy in renal cell cancer - Essential or obsolete?

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Eleni; O'Brien, Timothy; Fernando, Archana

    2016-12-01

    Since the first partial nephrectomy was first conducted 131 years ago, the procedure has evolved into the gold standard treatment for small renal masses. Over the past decade, with the introduction of minimally invasive surgery, open partial nephrectomy still retains a valuable role in the treatment of complex tumours in challenging clinical situations (e.g. hereditary renal cancer or single kidneys), and enables surgeons to push the boundaries of nephron-sparing surgery. In this article, we consider the origin of the procedure and how it has evolved over the past century, the surgical techniques involved, and the oncological and functional outcomes.

  15. NQDI 1, an inhibitor of ASK1 attenuates acute ischemic renal injury by modulating oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Eman

    2013-09-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is among the signaling events that lead to postischemic cell death. Inhibition of ASK1 pathway protected hearts from ischemic damage. The present study evaluated the renal protective effects of NQDI 1, an inhibitor of ASK1, in an animal model of acute ischemic renal failure. Male Wistar rats were subjected to right nephrectomy and clamping of left renal pedicle for 45 min, or sham operation. The administration of NQDI 1 attenuated renal dysfunction and histological changes characteristic for renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Apoptosis of renal tissues, as detected by TUNEL staining, was also reduced together with p53 protein expression, and renal levels of MDA and SOD with NQDI 1 administration and BCL2 was up regulated. In conclusion, inhibition of ASK1 is of therapeutic potential against acute ischemic renal injury. Its protective effects are mediated via inhibition of apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  16. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  17. Amygdalin inhibits the growth of renal cell carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Thomas, Anita; Rutz, Jochen; Makarevic, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-01

    Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is a lack of information on the efficacy and toxicity of this natural compound. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amygdalin on the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells was examined. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to the RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, for 24 h or 2 weeks. Untreated cells served as controls. Tumor cell growth and proliferation were determined using MTT and BrdU tests, and cell cycle phases were evaluated. Expression of the cell cycle activating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1 and D3 as well as of the cell cycle inhibiting proteins p19 and p27 was examined by western blot analysis. Surface expression of the differentiation markers E- and N-cadherin was also investigated. Functional blockade by siRNA was used to determine the impact of several proteins on tumor cell growth. Amygdalin treatment caused a significant reduction in RCC cell growth and proliferation. This effect was correlated with a reduced percentage of G2/M-phase RCC cells and an increased percentage of cells in the G0/1-phase (Caki-1 and A498) or cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (KTC-26). Furthermore, amygdalin induced a marked decrease in cell cycle activating proteins, in particular cdk1 and cyclin B. Functional blocking of cdk1 and cyclin B resulted in significantly diminished tumor cell growth in all three RCC cell lines. Aside from its inhibitory effects on growth, amygdalin also modulated the differentiation markers, E- and N-cadherin. Hence, exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibited cell cycle progression and tumor cell growth by impairing cdk1 and cyclin B expression. Moreover, we noted that amygdalin affected differentiation markers. Thus, we suggest that amygdalin exerted RCC antitumor effects in vitro.

  18. Rhein Inhibits Autophagy in Rat Renal Tubular Cells by Regulation of AMPK/mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Gu, Liubao; Chen, Diping; Wu, Wei; Liu, Hong; Hu, Hao; Wan, Yigang; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Rhubarb and its bioactive component rhein are frequently used for the treatment of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) in eastern Asia countries. However, the potential therapeutic mechanism remains unclear. Autophagy plays an important role in CKD. However, there were some important related issues that remained unresolved in the role of autophagy in CKD and treatment by rhubarb and rhein. We designed a number of experiments to examine whether rhubarb may reduce renal fibrosis and autophagy in rats with adenine (Ade)-induced renal tubular injury, and whether rhein could affect autophagic pathways in rat renal tubular cells. We found that, autophagic activation accompanied with renal fibrosis in rats with Ade-induced renal tubular injury, and both autophagy and renal fibrosis were attenuated by rhubarb. In addition, we observed that rhein could inhibit autophagy through regulating the key molecules in the AMPK-dependent mTOR signaling pathways, as well as the Erk and p38 MAPKs signaling pathways. These findings may partly explain the therapeutic mechanisms of rhubarb and rhein in treating CKD patients in clinic, and further suggest that targeting autophagy and related signaling pathways may provide new strategies for the treatment of renal fibrosis in CKD. PMID:28252052

  19. Auxin induces cell proliferation in an experimental model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cernaro, Valeria; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Leonello, Giuseppa; Buemi, Antoine; Kohnke, Franz Heinrich; Villari, Antonino; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the main auxin produced by plants and plays a key role in the plant growth and development. This hormone is also present in humans where it is considered as a uremic toxin deriving from tryptophan metabolism. However, beyond this peculiar aspect, the involvement of auxin in human pathophysiology has not been further investigated. Since it is a growth hormone, we evaluated its proliferative properties in an in vitro model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells. We employed an experimental model of renal tubular epithelial cells belonging to the LLC-PK1 cell line that is derived from the kidney of healthy male pig. Growth effects of auxin against LLC-PK1 cell lines were determined by a rapid colorimetric assay. Increasing concentrations of auxin (to give a final concentration from 1 to 1000 ng/mL) were added and microplates were incubated for 72 h. Each auxin concentration was assayed in four wells and repeated four times. Cell proliferation significantly increased, compared to control cells, 72 h after addition of auxin to cultured LLC-PK1 cells. Statistically significant values were observed when 100 ng/mL (p < 0.01) and 1000 ng/mL (p < 0.05) were used. In conclusion, auxin influences cell growth not only in plants, where its role is well documented, but also in mammalian cell lines. This observation opens new scenarios in the field of tissue regeneration and may stimulate a novel line of research aiming at investigating whether this hormone really influences human physiology and pathophysiology and in particular, kidney regeneration.

  20. Reconstruction of cell population dynamics using CFSE

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Andrew; Chan, Cliburn; Strid, Jessica; Moon, Simon; Callard, Robin; George, Andrew JT; Stark, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Background Quantifying cell division and death is central to many studies in the biological sciences. The fluorescent dye CFSE allows the tracking of cell division in vitro and in vivo and provides a rich source of information with which to test models of cell kinetics. Cell division and death have a stochastic component at the single-cell level, and the probabilities of these occurring in any given time interval may also undergo systematic variation at a population level. This gives rise to heterogeneity in proliferating cell populations. Branching processes provide a natural means of describing this behaviour. Results We present a likelihood-based method for estimating the parameters of branching process models of cell kinetics using CFSE-labeling experiments, and demonstrate its validity using synthetic and experimental datasets. Performing inference and model comparison with real CFSE data presents some statistical problems and we suggest methods of dealing with them. Conclusion The approach we describe here can be used to recover the (potentially variable) division and death rates of any cell population for which division tracking information is available. PMID:17565685

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Prevented the Progression of Renovascular Hypertension, Improved Renal Function and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Sales, Elizabeth B.; Maquigussa, Edgar; Semedo, Patricia; Pereira, Luciana G.; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Câmara, Niels O.; Bergamaschi, Cassia T.; Campos, Ruy R.; Boim, Mirian A.

    2013-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension induced by 2 Kidney-1 Clip (2K-1C) is a renin-angiotensin-system (RAS)-dependent model, leading to renal vascular rarefaction and renal failure. RAS inhibitors are not able to reduce arterial pressure (AP) and/or preserve the renal function, and thus, alternative therapies are needed. Three weeks after left renal artery occlusion, fluorescently tagged mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) (2×105 cells/animal) were injected weekly into the tail vein in 2K-1C hypertensive rats. Flow cytometry showed labeled MSC in the cortex and medulla of the clipped kidney. MSC prevented a further increase in the AP, significantly reduced proteinuria and decreased sympathetic hyperactivity in 2K-1C rats. Renal function parameters were unchanged, except for an increase in urinary volume observed in 2K-1C rats, which was not corrected by MSC. The treatment improved the morphology and decreased the fibrotic areas in the clipped kidney and also significantly reduced renal vascular rarefaction typical of 2K-1C model. Expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α angiotensinogen, ACE, and Ang II receptor AT1 were elevated, whereas AT2 levels were decreased in the medulla of the clipped kidney. MSC normalized these expression levels. In conclusion, MSC therapy in the 2K-1C model (i) prevented the progressive increase of AP, (ii) improved renal morphology and microvascular rarefaction, (iii) reduced fibrosis, proteinuria and inflammatory cytokines, (iv) suppressed the intrarenal RAS, iv) decreased sympathetic hyperactivity in anesthetized animals and v) MSC were detected at the CNS suggesting that the cells crossed the blood-brain barrier. This therapy may be a promising strategy to treat renovascular hypertension and its renal consequences in the near future. PMID:24223811

  2. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  3. Effect of carbon nanoparticles on renal epithelial cell structure, barrier function, and protein expression

    PubMed Central

    BLAZER-YOST, BONNIE L.; BANGA, AMIRAJ; AMOS, ADAM; CHERNOFF, ELLEN; LAI, XIANYIN; LI, CHENG; MITRA, SOMENATH; WITZMANN, FRANK A.

    2011-01-01

    To assess effects of carbon nanoparticle (CNP) exposure on renal epithelial cells, fullerenes (C60), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were incubated with a confluent renal epithelial line for 48 h. At low concentrations, CNP-treated cells exhibited significant decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) but no changes in hormone-stimulated ion transport or CNP-induced toxicity or stress responses as measured by lactate dehydrogenase or cytokine release. The changes in TEER, manifested as an inverse relationship with CNP concentration, were mirrored by an inverse correlation between dose and changes in protein expression. Lower, more physiologically relevant, concentrations of CNP have the most profound effects on barrier cell function and protein expression. These results indicate an impact of CNPs on renal epithelial cells at concentrations lower than have been previously studied and suggest caution with regard to increasing CNP levels entering the food chain due to increasing environmental pollution. PMID:21067278

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and its effects on renal tubular cells apoptosis in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Min; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Han, Yafei; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Jisheng

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia is the most frequent cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is characterized by apoptosis of renal tubular cell. A common result of ischemia in AKI is dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which causes the protein-folding capacity to lag behind the protein-folding load. The abundance of misfolded proteins stressed the ER and results in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). While the UPR is an adaptive response, over time it can result in apoptosis when cells are unable to recover quickly. Recent research suggests that ER stress is a major factor in renal tubular cell apoptosis resulting from ischemic AKI. Thus, ER stress may be an important new progression factor in the pathology of ischemic AKI. In this article, we review UPR signaling, describe pathology and pathophysiology mechanisms of ischemic AKI, and highlight the dual function of ER stress on renal tubular cell apoptosis.

  5. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  6. In vivo maturation of functional renal organoids formed from embryonic cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, Christodoulos; Benedetti, Valentina; Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Mauro; Corna, Daniela; Azzollini, Nadia; Conti, Sara; Unbekandt, Mathieu; Davies, Jamie A; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    The shortage of transplantable organs provides an impetus to develop tissue-engineered alternatives. Producing tissues similar to immature kidneys from simple suspensions of fully dissociated embryonic renal cells is possible in vitro, but glomeruli do not form in the avascular environment. Here, we constructed renal organoids from single-cell suspensions derived from E11.5 kidneys and then implanted these organoids below the kidney capsule of a living rat host. This implantation resulted in further maturation of kidney tissue, formation of vascularized glomeruli with fully differentiated capillary walls, including the slit diaphragm, and appearance of erythropoietin-producing cells. The implanted tissue exhibited physiologic functions, including tubular reabsorption of macromolecules, that gained access to the tubular lumen on glomerular filtration. The ability to generate vascularized nephrons from single-cell suspensions marks a significant step to the long-term goal of replacing renal function by a tissue-engineered kidney.

  7. In Vivo Maturation of Functional Renal Organoids Formed from Embryonic Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Valentina; Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Mauro; Corna, Daniela; Azzollini, Nadia; Conti, Sara; Unbekandt, Mathieu; Davies, Jamie A.; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of transplantable organs provides an impetus to develop tissue-engineered alternatives. Producing tissues similar to immature kidneys from simple suspensions of fully dissociated embryonic renal cells is possible in vitro, but glomeruli do not form in the avascular environment. Here, we constructed renal organoids from single-cell suspensions derived from E11.5 kidneys and then implanted these organoids below the kidney capsule of a living rat host. This implantation resulted in further maturation of kidney tissue, formation of vascularized glomeruli with fully differentiated capillary walls, including the slit diaphragm, and appearance of erythropoietin-producing cells. The implanted tissue exhibited physiologic functions, including tubular reabsorption of macromolecules, that gained access to the tubular lumen on glomerular filtration. The ability to generate vascularized nephrons from single-cell suspensions marks a significant step to the long-term goal of replacing renal function by a tissue-engineered kidney. PMID:23085631

  8. Stage T3a renal cell carcinoma: staging accuracy of CT for sinus fat, perinephric fat or renal vein invasion

    PubMed Central

    Sokhi, H K; Mok, W Y

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the accuracy of CT for staging T3a (TNM 2009) renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Unenhanced and nephrographic phase CT studies of 117 patients (male:female = 82:35; age range, 21–86 years) with T1–T3a RCC were independently reviewed by 2 readers. The presence of sinus or perinephric fat, or renal vein invasion and tumour characteristics were noted. Results: Median (range) tumour size was 5.5 (0.9–19.0) cm; and 46 (39%), 16 (14%) and 55 (47%) tumours were pT1, pT2 and pT3a RCC, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity for sinus fat, perinephric fat and renal vein invasion were 71/79%, 83/76% and 59/93% (Reader 1) and 88/71%, 68/72% and 69/91% (Reader 2) with κ = 0.41, 0.43 and 0.61, respectively. Sinus fat invasion was seen in 47/55 (85%) cases with T3a RCC vs 16/55 (29%) and 33/55 (60%) for perinephric fat and renal vein invasion. Tumour necrosis, irregularity of tumour edge and direct tumour contact with perirenal fascia or sinus fat increased the odds of local invasion [odds ratio (OR), 2.5–3.7; p < 0.05; κ = 0.42–0.61]. Stage T3a tumours were centrally located (OR, 3.9; p = 0.0009). Conclusion: Stage T3a RCC was identified with a sensitivity of 59–88% and specificity of 71–93% (κ = 0.41–0.61). Sinus fat invasion was the most common invasive feature. Advances in knowledge: Centrally situated renal tumours with an irregular tumour edge, inseparable from sinus structures or the perirenal fascia and CT features of tumour necrosis should alert the reader to the possibility of Stage T3a RCC (OR, 2.5–3.9). PMID:25410425

  9. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells to renal lineage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells which have the unlimited proliferative capacity and extensive differentiation potency can be an attractive source for kidney regeneration therapies. Recent breakthroughs in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have provided with another potential source for the artificially-generated kidney. The purpose of this study is to know how to differentiate mouse ES and iPS cells into renal lineage. We used iPS cells from mouse fibroblasts by transfection of four transcription factors, namely Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Real-time PCR showed that renal lineage markers were expressed in both ES and iPS cells after the induction of differentiation. It also showed that a tubular specific marker, KSP progressively increased to day 18, although the differentiation of iPS cells was slower than ES cells. The results indicated that renal lineage cells can be differentiated from both murine ES and iPS cells. Several inducing factors were tested whether they influenced on cell differentiation. In ES cells, both of GDNF and BMP7 enhanced the differentiation to metanephric mesenchyme, and Activin enhanced the differentiation of ES cells to tubular cells. Activin also enhanced the differentiation of iPS cells to tubular cells, although the enhancement was lower than in ES cells. ES and iPS cells have a potential to differentiate to renal lineage cells, and they will be an attractive resource of kidney regeneration therapy. This differentiation is enhanced by Activin in both ES and iPS cells.

  10. Chelerythrine chloride induces apoptosis in renal cancer HEK-293 and SW-839 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Meng; Zhang, Meng; Fan, Peng-Li; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid chelerythrine chloride (CC) has inhibitory effects on various tumors. However, the anticancer activity of CC and its underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated in renal cancer cells. The present study examined the effects of CC on growth inhibition and apoptosis of renal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays revealed that CC markedly suppressed the growth of HEK-293 and human renal cancer SW-839 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The xenograft mouse model, which was performed in nude mice, exhibited a reduced tumor growth following CC treatment. In addition, the present study revealed that CC significantly decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, which was accompanied by upregulation of p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-2, caspase-3 and PARP. Furthermore, the use of PD98059, a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, potentiated the proapoptotic effects of CC, which indicated that CC may induce apoptosis in renal cancer cells partly via inhibition of ERK activity. Overall, the results of the present study demonstrated that CC may be developed as a potential anticancer treatment for patients with renal cancer.

  11. Induction of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase expression inhibits proliferation and migration of renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Piotr; Rybicka, Beata; Boguslawska, Joanna; Rodzik, Katarzyna; Visser, Theo J; Nauman, Alicja; Piekielko-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2017-02-15

    Type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO1) regulates peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones that control cellular proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. The significance of DIO1 in cancer is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that diminished expression of DIO1, observed in renal cancer, contributes to the carcinogenic process in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of DIO1 in renal cancer cells changes the expression of genes controlling cell cycle, including cyclin E1 and E2F5, and results in inhibition of proliferation. The expression of genes encoding collagens (COL1A1, COL4A2, COL5A1), integrins (ITGA4, ITGA5, ITGB3) and transforming growth factor-β-induced (TGFBI) is significantly altered in renal cancer cells with induced expression of DIO1. Finally, we show that overexpression of DIO1 inhibits migration of renal cancer cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that loss of DIO1 contributes to renal carcinogenesis and that its induced expression protects cells against cancerous proliferation and migration.

  12. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew J S; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367-16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.218 to 0.465). 3-93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches.

  13. Solitary parotid metastasis 8 years after a nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Faiz; Yedavalli, Nina; Loeffler, David; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common cancer, known for its aggressive behavior and ability to metastasize nearly every organ system in the body. While the cancer commonly spreads to a select few organs and metastasis usually develops within 5 years of diagnosis, there have been numerous case reports of atypical sites of metastasis and cases of relapse up to decades after treatment. We present a case a 65-year-old male who presented with right preauricular swelling 8 years after the initial diagnosis and right nephrectomy for clear cell renal cell cancer. We take a look at previous case reports with similar presentations. PMID:27609721

  14. Immunoglobulin therapy for plasma cell-rich rejection in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Adrogue, Horacio E; Soltero, Liliana; Land, Geoffrey A; Ramanathan, Venkataraman; Truong, Luan D; Suki, Wadi N

    2006-08-27

    Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is associated with poor allograft outcome in renal transplantation. Previous studies report a graft half-life of six months after a single PCAR episode. However, the management of this condition is unclear. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy, by virtue of its immunomodulating properties, and its influence on B-cell maturation into plasma cells, may be a good candidate for reversing this type of rejection. We report four episodes of PCAR in two patients who responded well to IVIG with improvement in renal function.

  15. Antifibrotic effects of KS370G, a caffeamide derivative, in renal ischemia-reperfusion injured mice and renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Sung-Ting; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a main cause of end-stage renal disease. Clinically, there are no beneficial treatments that can effectively reverse the progressive loss of renal functions. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is a natural phenolic antifibrotic agent, but rapid decomposition by an esterase leads to its low bioavailability. In this study, we evaluated the effects of KS370G, a caffeic acid phenylethyl amide, on murine renal fibrosis induced by unilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and in TGF-β1 stimulated renal tubular epithelial cells (NRK52E and HK-2). In the animal model, renal fibrosis was evaluated at 14 days post-operation. Immediately following the operation, KS370G (10 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage once a day. Our results show that KS370G markedly attenuates collagen deposition and inhibits an IRI-induced increase of fibronectin, vimentin, α-SMA and TGF-β1 expression and plasma TGF-β1 levels in the mouse kidney. Furthermore, KS370G reverses TGF-β1-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of α-SMA and also decreases the expression of fibronectin, collagen I and PAI-1 and inhibits TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. These findings show the beneficial effects of KS370G on renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro with the possible mechanism being the inhibition of the Smad2/3 signaling pathway. PMID:25056456

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of daptomycin in adult patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoying; Khadzhynov, Dmytro; Peters, Harm; Chaves, Ricardo L.; Levi, Micha; Corti, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    Aim The objective of this population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was to provide guidance for the dosing interval of daptomycin in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Methods A previously published population PK model for daptomycin was updated with data from patients undergoing continuous veno‐venous haemodialysis (CVVHD; n = 9) and continuous veno‐venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF; n = 8). Model‐based simulations were performed to compare the 24 h AUC, C max and C min of daptomycin following various dosing regimens (4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 mg kg−1 every [Q] 24 h and Q48 h), with the safety and efficacy exposure references for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia/right‐sided infective endocarditis. Results The previously developed daptomycin structural population PK model could reasonably describe data from the patients on CRRT. The clearance in patients undergoing CVVHDF and CVVHD was estimated at 0.53 and 0.94 l h−1, respectively, as compared with 0.75 l h−1 in patients with creatinine clearance (CrCl) ≥ 30 ml min−1. Daptomycin Q24 h dosing in patients undergoing CRRT resulted in optimal exposure for efficacy, with AUC comparable to that in patients with CrCl ≥ 30 ml min−1. In contrast, Q48 h dosing was associated with considerably lower AUC24–48h in all patients for doses up to 12 mg kg−1 and is therefore inappropriate. Conclusions Q24 h dosing of daptomycin up to 12 mg kg−1 provides comparable drug exposure in patients on CVVHD and in those with CrCl ≥ 30 ml min−1. Daily daptomycin use up to 8 mg kg−1 doses are appropriate for patients on CVVHDF, but higher doses may increase the risk of toxicity. PMID:27628437

  17. Prognostic significance of MST1R dysregulation in renal cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pires-Luís, Ana S; Vieira-Coimbra, Márcia; Ferreira, Maria João; Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Costa-Pinheiro, Pedro; Antunes, Luís; Dias, Paula C; Lobo, Francisco; Oliveira, Jorge; Graça, Inês; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage stimulating 1 receptor (MST1R) is a C-MET proto-oncogene family receptor tyrosine kinase. Promoter methylation patterns determine transcription of MST1R variants as hypermethylation of a region upstream of transcription start site (TSS) is associated with lack of MST1R long transcript (MST1R long) and expression of a short transcript with oncogenic potential. Thus, we aimed to investigate MST1R variant transcript regulation in renal cell tumors (RCT) and assess their prognostic potential. We found, in a series of 120 RCT comprising the four main subtypes (clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, and oncocytoma), that higher methylation levels close to TSS were associated with total MST1R expression levels (MST1R total) in primary tumors (p=0.049) and renal cancer cell lines. After demethylating treatment, MST1R long/MST1R total ratio increased, as expected, in two renal cell carcinoma cell lines tested. However, in primary tumors with hypermethylation upstream of TSS, a decrease in MST1R long/MST1R total ratio was not detected, although higher expression ratio of nuclear factor-κB was apparent. Furthermore, survival analysis demonstrated that MST1R long/MST1R total ratio was independently associated with shorter disease-specific and disease-free survival, whereas MST1R total expression associated with shorter disease-specific survival. In conclusion, although promoter methylation patterns seem to determine MST1R global transcription regulation in renal cell carcinoma, other mechanisms might contribute to deregulate MST1R variant expression in RCT. Nevertheless, MST1R total expression and MST1R long/MST1R total ratio modulate the biological and clinical aggressiveness of renal cell carcinoma, as depicted by its prognostic significance, a finding that requires validation in a larger independent series. PMID:27648366

  18. Glycogen synthase kinase-3: a new therapeutic target in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bilim, V; Ougolkov, A; Yuuki, K; Naito, S; Kawazoe, H; Muto, A; Oya, M; Billadeau, D; Motoyama, T; Tomita, Y

    2009-01-01

    Background: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is highly resistant to chemotherapy because of a high apoptotic threshold. Recent evidences suggest that GSK-3β positively regulates human pancreatic cancer and leukaemia cell survival in part through regulation of nuclear factor (NF-κB)-mediated expression of anti-apoptotic molecules. Our objectives were to determine the expression pattern of GSK-3β and to assess the anti-cancer effect of GSK-3β inhibition in RCC. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and nuclear/cytosolic fractionation were performed to determine the expression pattern of GSK-3β in human RCCs. We used small molecule inhibitor, RNA interference, western blotting, quantitative RT–PCR, BrDU incorporation and MTS assays to study the effect of GSK-3β inactivation on renal cancer cell proliferation and survival. Results: We detected aberrant nuclear accumulation of GSK-3β in RCC cell lines and in 68 out of 74 (91.89%) human RCCs. We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 led to a decrease in proliferation and survival of renal cancer cells. We observed that inhibition of GSK-3 results in decreased expression of NF-κB target genes Bcl-2 and XIAP and a subsequent increase in renal cancer cell apoptosis. Moreover, we show that GSK-3 inhibitor and Docetaxel synergistically suppress proliferation and survival of renal cancer cells. Conclusions: Our results show nuclear accumulation of GSK-3β as a new marker of human RCC, identify that GSK-3 positively regulates RCC cell survival and proliferation and suggest inhibition of GSK-3 as a new promising approach in the treatment of human renal cancer. PMID:19920820

  19. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingyi; Wang, Hainan; Chen, Feifei; Fang, Jianzheng; Xu, Aiming; Xi, Wei; Zhang, Shengli; Wu, Gang; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-05-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786‑0 and Caki‑1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E‑cadherin and decreased expression levels of N‑cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose‑dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis.

  20. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CAO, JINGYI; WANG, HAINAN; CHEN, FEIFEI; FANG, JIANZHENG; XU, AIMING; XI, WEI; ZHANG, SHENGLI; WU, GANG; WANG, ZENGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786-0 and Caki-1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:27035542

  1. Invasion and metastasis ability of renal cancer cell strains 786-0: under the influence of miR-141.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Lv, L N; Guo, Z Y; Zhang, W

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the invasion and metastasis ability of miR-141 in 786-0 renal cancer tissue cells, as well as identify the key function of endogenous miR-141 in adjustment and control of malignant activities of renal cancer. The renal cancer cell strain with overexpression of miR-141 and its control renal cancer cell line were constructed; methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay was adopted to measure proliferation of renal cancer cells; Transwell assay was performed to measure the invasion and metastasis ability of cells; MTT assay and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) were used for measurement of cell apoptosis and drug susceptibility. Results indicated that the expression of miR-141 in 786-0 cells could be significantly increased 400-fold by slow viruses that contained miR-141; moreover, c omprehensive functions showed that miR-141 inhibited the invasion and metastasis ability of renal cancer cells to a great extent (p less than 0.001), partially inhibited cell growth (p less than 0.05) and also induced cell cycle to be arrested in G0/G1 as well as reducing the number of cells in S phase (DNA replicative phase). Moreover, miR-141 could not induce morphologic changes of renal cancer cells, had no direct stimulating effect on cell apoptosis and could not improve the drug susceptibility of renal cancer cells to drugs such as cis-Dichlorodiamineplatinum (DDP), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and tumor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). In conclusion, miR-141 can be considered an important cancer suppressor gene of renal cancer by inhibiting proliferation and metastasis of renal cancer cells.

  2. MATE-1 modulation by kinin B1 receptor enhances cisplatin efflux from renal cells.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Gabriel R; Wasinski, Frederick; Felizardo, Raphael J F; Souza, Laura L; Câmara, Niels O S; Bader, Michael; Araujo, Ronaldo C

    2017-04-01

    Cisplatin is a drug widely used in chemotherapy that frequently causes severe renal dysfunction. Organic transporters have an important role to control the absorption and excretion of cisplatin in renal cells. Deletion and blockage of kinin B1 receptor has already been show to protect against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. To test whether it exerts its protective function by modulating the organic transporters in kidney, we studied kinin B1 receptor knockout mice and treatment with a receptor antagonist at basal state and in presence of cisplatin. Cisplatin administration caused downregulation of renal organic transporters; in B1 receptor knockout mice, this downregulation of organic transporters in kidney was absent; and treatment by a B1 receptor antagonist attenuated the downregulation of the transporter MATE-1. Moreover, kinin B1 receptor deletion and blockage at basal state resulted in higher renal expression of MATE-1. Moreover we observed that kinin B1 receptor deletion and blockage result in less accumulation of platinum in renal tissue. Thus, we propose that B1 receptor deletion and blockage protect the kidney from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by upregulating the expression of MATE-1, thereby increasing the efflux of cisplatin from renal cells.

  3. Targeted Therapies: Bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-01

    Rini and colleagues provide additional data on bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney; a comparison of these results with the findings from contemporary trials suggests that bevacizumab and interferon-alpha is another clinically useful treatment option for patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

  4. Polar release of pathogenic Old World hantaviruses from renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epithelio- and endotheliotropic viruses often exert polarized entry and release that may be responsible for viral spread and dissemination. Hantaviruses, mostly rodent-borne members of the Bunyaviridae family infect epithelial and endothelial cells of different organs leading to organ dysfunction or even failure. Endothelial and renal epithelial cells belong to the target cells of Old World hantavirus. Therefore, we examined the release of hantaviruses in several renal epithelial cell culture models. We used Vero cells that are commonly used in hantavirus studies and primary human renal epithelial cells (HREpC). In addition, we analyzed MDCKII cells, an epithelial cell line of a dog kidney, which represents a widely accepted in vitro model of polarized monolayers for their permissiveness for hantavirus infection. Results Vero C1008 and primary HREpCs were grown on porous-support filter inserts for polarization. Monolayers were infected with hantavirus Hantaan (HTNV) and Puumala (PUUV) virus. Supernatants from the apical and basolateral chamber of infected cells were analyzed for the presence of infectious particles by re-infection of Vero cells. Viral antigen and infectious particles of HTNV and PUUV were exclusively detected in supernatants collected from the apical chamber of infected Vero C1008 cells and HREpCs. MDCKII cells were permissive for hantavirus infection and polarized MDCKII cells released infectious hantaviral particles from the apical surface corresponding to the results of Vero and primary human epithelial cells. Conclusions Pathogenic Old World hantaviruses are released from the apical surface of different polarized renal epithelial cells. We characterized MDCKII cells as a suitable polarized cell culture model for hantavirus infection studies. PMID:23194647

  5. Kidney injury molecule-1 is up-regulated in renal epithelial cells in response to oxalate in vitro and in renal tissues in response to hyperoxaluria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2012-01-01

    Oxalate is a metabolic end product excreted by the kidney. Mild increases in urinary oxalate are most commonly associated with Nephrolithiasis. Chronically high levels of urinary oxalate, as seen in patients with primary hyperoxaluria, are driving factor for recurrent renal stones, and ultimately lead to renal failure, calcification of soft tissue and premature death. In previous studies others and we have demonstrated that high levels of oxalate promote injury of renal epithelial cells. However, methods to monitor oxalate induced renal injury are limited. In the present study we evaluated changes in expression of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1) in response to oxalate in human renal cells (HK2 cells) in culture and in renal tissue and urine samples in hyperoxaluric animals which mimic in vitro and in vivo models of hyper-oxaluria. Results presented, herein demonstrate that oxalate exposure resulted in increased expression of KIM-1 m RNA as well as protein in HK2 cells. These effects were rapid and concentration dependent. Using in vivo models of hyperoxaluria we observed elevated expression of KIM-1 in renal tissues of hyperoxaluric rats as compared to normal controls. The increase in KIM-1 was both at protein and mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional activation of KIM-1 in response to oxalate exposure. Interestingly, in addition to increased KIM-1 expression, we observed increased levels of the ectodomain of KIM-1 in urine collected from hyperoxaluric rats. To the best of our knowledge our studies are the first direct demonstration of regulation of KIM-1 in response to oxalate exposure in renal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that detection of KIM-1 over-expression and measurement of the ectodomain of KIM-1 in urine may hold promise as a marker to monitor oxalate nephrotoxicity in hyperoxaluria.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics and dosing simulations of cefepime in septic shock patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Mieke; Taccone, Fabio S; Beumier, Majorie; Seyler, Lucie; Cotton, Frédéric; Jacobs, Frédérique; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the population pharmacokinetics of cefepime in septic shock patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy and to determine whether current or alternative dosing regimens can achieve PK/PD targets. In this observational PK study, 62 samples from 13 patients were analysed using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. Different dosing regimens were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with ultrafiltration flow rates (UFRs) of 1000, 1500 and 2000 mL/h. The probability of target attainment was calculated against a conservative (60% T(>MIC)) and a higher PK/PD target (100% T(>MIC)) against an MIC of 8 mg/L, the clinical susceptibility breakpoint for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A one-compartment model with between-subject variability (BSV) on clearance and volume of distribution (V(d)) described the data adequately. UFR was supported as a covariate on both parameters. Typical values for clearance and V(d) were 4.4L/h (BSV 37%) and 40.9L (BSV 20%), respectively. Dosing simulations showed failure to achieve both a conservative and a higher PK/PD target using a dose of 1g q12h for patients treated with a high UFR (≥1500 mL/h). The dose of 2g q8h or 1g q6h leads to optimal target attainment for high UFR. One gram q8h is optimal for low UFR (≤1000 mL/h). We found important variability in PK parameters. Dosing simulations show that a dose of 2g q8h or 1g q6h is needed to ensure rapid achievement of adequate levels if the UFR is ≥1500 mL/h and 1g q8h for low UFR (≤1000 mL/h).

  7. Establishing a new formula for estimating renal depth in a Chinese adult population

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianjun; Deng, Huixing; Jia, Xi; Wang, Yuanbo; Lu, Xueni; Ding, Xiaoming; Li, Qiang; Yang, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to establish a new formula for estimating renal depth, based on anthropometric variables, and to compare the estimates with actual data from a group of living kidney donors undergoing computed tomography angiography (CTA). Renal depths in 167 living kidney donors were measured by CTA. Regression analysis was used to derive the formulae for estimation of renal depth of both kidneys based on patient age, sex, body height, body weight, and body mass index (BMI). The results of the renal depth estimation from the derived formulae were compared with those using existing formulae. Using regression analysis, we derived 2 new formulae as follows; for left kidney, renal depth (cm) = 0.083 × W − 0.058 × H + 11.541 (male) or 10.89 (female), for right kidney, renal depth (cm) = 13.498 × W/H + 2.141 (male) or 1.816 (female), in which W represents the weight (kg) and H represents the height (cm). The correlation coefficients between our left or right renal depth estimates and those obtained from other formulae in another 271 kidney donors were 0.864 (left) or 0.893 (right) by the Tønnesen, 0.937 (left) or 0.97 (right) by the Taylor, 0.937 (left) or 0.97 (right) by the Itoh, 0.927 (left) or 0.951 (right) by the Li-qian, and 0.937 (left) or 0.97 (right) by the Inoue formula. Our formula may be more precise than the Tønnesen formula in estimating the renal depth. Estimating formulae based on CT findings might be useful in clinical practice. PMID:28151880

  8. Remarkable shrinkage of sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma with single-agent gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Umemura, Shigeki; Omori, Masako; Gemba, Kenichi; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2008-04-01

    A 60-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a painful left hip. Computed tomography showed a tumor in the left kidney and metastases in the left gluteus maximus muscle and lung. The pathological diagnosis of a biopsy specimen obtained from a metastatic lesion in the left gluteus maximus muscle was sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. On admission, his general condition was extremely poor. He was confined to bed because of severe left hip pain and confusion, possibly caused by hypercalcemia. This seriously ill patient suffering from advanced sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma was treated with single-agent gemcitabine, resulting in symptom relief and a dramatic improvement in his status; all of the tumors had regressed significantly by the 11th dose of gemcitabine. These findings indicate that single-agent gemcitabine is one of the few chemotherapeutic agents effective for palliation in patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma, even those with poor performance status.

  9. Atypical cells in a voided urine cytology specimen in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lu, Miao; Ho, Julie; Azordegan, Nazila; Perry, Anamarija M; Gibson, Ian W; Baker, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Voided urine is routinely collected from renal transplant patients to screen for polyomavirus. In rare cases, atypical lymphoid cells can be detected in voided urine and raise the suspicion of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). However, further immunohistochemistry of the cell block and flow cytometry is frequently limited by the low cellularity and poor preservation of voided urine. Therefore, PTLD of the renal allograft is usually diagnosed from tissue biopsy or nephrectomy specimens. Herein, we report a rare case of atypical cells in a voided urine cytology specimen from a kidney transplant recipient. Needle core biopsy of the renal allograft showed monomorphic PTLD. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:69-72. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion but induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-ming; Ji, Shan; Li, Yan; Fu, Li-ye; Jiang, Tao; Meng, Fan-dong

    2017-01-01

    β-Catenin (CTNNB1 gene coding protein) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. Abnormal accumulation of CTNNB1 contributes to most cancers. This research studied the involvement of β-catenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were analyzed by using Cell Counting Kit-8 and by flow cytometry. Migration and invasion assays were measured by transwell analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of CTNNB1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 in RCC cell lines. It was found that CTNNB1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of A-498 cells. CTNNB1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis of 786-O cells. Moreover, knockdown of CTNNB1 decreased the levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 expression, but CTNNB1 overexpression increased the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18. Further in vivo tumor formation study in nude mice indicated that inhibition of CTNNB1 delayed the progress of tumor formation through inhibiting PCNA and Ki67 expression. These results indicate that CTNNB1 could act as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for RCC. PMID:28260916

  11. The effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, G. G.; Kaboo, R.; deKernion, J. B.; Figlin, R.; Belldegrun, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce specific and non-specific anti-tumour cytotoxicity and also stimulates the proliferation and function of peripheral lymphocytes and thymocytes. GM-CSF and interleukin 2 (IL-2) act synergistically on peripheral lymphocytes for the induction of a highly effective cytotoxic cell population. Thus, the goal of our investigation was to study the effects of GM-CSF upon expansion, proliferation and in vitro killing activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). TILs from seven consecutive tumours were cultured with GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1) without IL-2 supplementation, with suboptimal doses of IL-2 (8 and 40 U ml-1) plus GM-CSF (1000 nmol ml-1), and with a dose of IL-2 (400 U ml-1) which sufficed alone to induce TIL development plus GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1). GM-CSF alone or together with suboptimal doses of IL-2 was not able to induce or facilitate TIL development in these cultures. When GM-CSF at both concentrations studied was added to optimal doses of IL-2 the resulting TIL populations proliferated significantly better and faster (+66%), resulting in a higher cell yield (+24%) at the time of maximal expansion of the TIL cultures. The length of the culture periods of TILs was not affected by GM-CSF when compared with the control cultures supplemented with IL-2 alone. In vitro killing activity of TIL populations stimulated with IL-2 and GM-CSF remained unspecific, but lysis of the autologous tumour targets as well as the allogeneic renal tumour targets was significantly enhanced (+138%) as compared with the corresponding control TILs stimulated with IL-2 alone. Lysis of the natural killer (NK)-sensitive control cell line K562 and the NK-resistant Daudi cell line remained unchanged even though FACS analysis of TILs cultured with IL-2 and 1000 nmol of GM-CSF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of cells expressing the CD56

  12. KRT6 interacting with notch1 contributes to progression of renal cell carcinoma, and aliskiren inhibits renal carcinoma cell lines proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Li-Chao; Song, Xu; Lu, Jian-Rao; Jin, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling is a conserved and widely expressed signaling pathway, which mediates various physiological processes including tumorigenesis. This study aims to explore the potential role and mechanism of notch1 interacting with KRT6B in the progression of RCC. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein expression of notch1 and KRT6 were significantly increased in tumor tissues, and highly positive correlation existed between notch1 and KRT6. Moreover, the patients with high notch1 expression had a significantly poorer prognosis than those of low expression patients. In vitro, KRT6 loss-of-function could inhibit the expression of notch1 and induce renal carcinoma cell death. Eventually, we found that renin inhibitor, aliskiren, could inhibit cell proliferation and decrease the expression of notch1 and KRT6 as well as regulate apoptosis-related protein expression in 786-O and ACHN renal carcinoma cell lines. These results suggested that the upregulation of notch1 and KRT6B might be involved in the development, progression and prognosis of human RCC, and aliskiren could suppress renal carcinoma cell proliferation, at least partially, through downregulation the expression of notch1 and KRT6.

  13. Renal type a intercalated cells contain albumin in organelles with aldosterone-regulated abundance.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells.

  14. Renal Type A Intercalated Cells Contain Albumin in Organelles with Aldosterone-Regulated Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells. PMID:25874770

  15. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  16. Interval scanning photomicrography of microbial cell populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A single reproducible area of the preparation in a fixed focal plane is photographically scanned at intervals during incubation. The procedure can be used for evaluating the aerobic or anaerobic growth of many microbial cells simultaneously within a population. In addition, the microscope is not restricted to the viewing of any one microculture preparation, since the slide cultures are incubated separately from the microscope.

  17. Cell metal interactions: A comparison of natural uranium to other common metals in renal cells and bone osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgram, S.; Carrière, M.; Thiebault, C.; Berger, P.; Khodja, H.; Gouget, B.

    2007-07-01

    Uranium acute intoxication has been documented to induce nephrotoxicity. Kidneys are the main target organs after short term exposures to high concentrations of the toxic, while chronic exposures lead to its accumulation in the skeleton. In this paper, chemical toxicity of uranium is investigated for rat osteoblastic bone cells and compared to results previously obtained on renal cells. We show that bone cells are less sensitive to uranium than renal cells. The influence of the chemical form on U cytotoxicity is demonstrated. For both cell types, a comparison of uranium toxicity with other metals or metalloids toxicities (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd) permits classification of Cd, Zn, Se IV and Cu as the most toxic and Ni, Se VI, Mn and U as the least toxic. Chemical toxicity of natural uranium proves to be far less than that of cadmium. To try to explain the differences in sensitivities observed between metals and different cell types, cellular accumulations in cell monolayers are quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), function of time or function of dose: lethal doses which simulate acute intoxications and sub-lethal doses which are more realistic with regard to environmentally metals concentrations. In addition to being more resistant, bone cells accumulated much more uranium than did renal cells. Moreover, for both cell models, Mn, U-citrate and U-bicarbonate are strongly accumulated whereas Cu, Zn and Ni are weakly accumulated. On the other hand, a strong difference in Cd behaviour between the two cell types is shown: whereas Cd is very weakly accumulated in bone cells, it is very strongly accumulated in renal cells. Finally, elemental distribution of the toxics is determined on a cellular scale using nuclear microprobe analysis. For both renal and osteoblastic cells, uranium was accumulated in as intracellular precipitates similar to those observed previously by SEM/EDS.

  18. Successful Embolization of a Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Arteriovenous Fistula and Extravasations Using Onyx After Partial Nephrectomy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sopilko, Igor; Svihra, Jan; Kliment, Jan

    2009-01-15

    Partial nephrectomy can be associated with vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) with CT angiography is ideal for noninvasive imaging of this process. The treatment of choice is selective embolization. Successful transcatheter embolization of right renal subsegmental artery pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula and extravasations using Onyx was performed in a 66-year-old woman with macrohematuria 12 days after partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma.

  19. The platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase contributes to metabolic reprogramming and maintains cell proliferation in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ping; Zhong, Jie; Tan, Mingyue; Ge, Jifu; Tao, Le; Li, Yakui; Zhu, Yemin; Wu, Lifang; Qiu, Jianxin; Tong, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations underlying clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) progression include aerobic glycolysis, increased pentose phosphate pathway activity and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Phosphofructokinase (PFK), a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, has L, M, and P isoforms with different tissue distributions. The mRNA level of the platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase (PFKP) is reported to be up-regulated in ccRCC patients. However, it remains unclear whether PFKP plays an important role in promoting aerobic glycolysis and macromolecular biosynthesis to support cell proliferation in ccRCC. Here we found that the up-regulated PFKP became the predominant isoform of PFK in human ccRCC. Suppression of PFKP not only impaired cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but also led to decreased glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and nucleotide biosynthesis, accompanied by activated tricarboxylic acid cycle in ccRCC cells. Moreover, we found that p53 activation contributed to cell proliferation and metabolic defects induced by PFKP knockdown in ccRCC cells. Furthermore, suppression of PFKP led to reduced ccRCC tumor growth in vivo. Our data indicate that PFKP not only is required for metabolic reprogramming and maintaining cell proliferation, but also may provide us with a valid target for anti-renal cancer pharmaceutical agents. PMID:27049827

  20. Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial function induces cell death in starvation-resistant renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takahiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Yonese, Junji; Yuasa, Takeshi

    2016-05-09

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have two types of cells for carbon metabolism and for cell signaling under nutrient-deprivation conditions, namely starvation-resistant and starvation-sensitive cells. Here, we evaluated the mitochondrial characteristics of these cell types and found that the resistant type possessed higher activities for both mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis than the sensitive types. These higher activities were supported by the stored carbon, lipid and carbohydrate sources, and by a low level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to sustained SOD2 expression in the resistant RCC cells. In metastatic RCC cases, higher SOD2 expression was associated with a significantly shorter survival period. We found that treatment with the drugs etomoxir and buformin significantly reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and induced cell death under glucose-deprivation conditions in starvation-resistant RCC cells. Our data suggest that inhibitory targeting of mitochondria might offer an effective therapeutic option for metastatic RCC that is resistant to current treatments.

  1. Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial function induces cell death in starvation-resistant renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Takahiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Yonese, Junji; Yuasa, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have two types of cells for carbon metabolism and for cell signaling under nutrient-deprivation conditions, namely starvation-resistant and starvation-sensitive cells. Here, we evaluated the mitochondrial characteristics of these cell types and found that the resistant type possessed higher activities for both mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis than the sensitive types. These higher activities were supported by the stored carbon, lipid and carbohydrate sources, and by a low level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to sustained SOD2 expression in the resistant RCC cells. In metastatic RCC cases, higher SOD2 expression was associated with a significantly shorter survival period. We found that treatment with the drugs etomoxir and buformin significantly reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and induced cell death under glucose-deprivation conditions in starvation-resistant RCC cells. Our data suggest that inhibitory targeting of mitochondria might offer an effective therapeutic option for metastatic RCC that is resistant to current treatments. PMID:27157976

  2. MiRNA-30a-mediated autophagy inhibition sensitizes renal cell carcinoma cells to sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing; Zhu, Hua; Gu, Donghua; Pan, Xiaodong; Qian, Lin; Xue, Boxin; Yang, Dongrong; Zhou, Jundong; Shan, Yuxi

    2015-04-03

    Chemotherapy-induced autophagy activation often contributes to cancer resistance. MiRNA-30a (miR-30a) is a potent inhibitor of autophagy by downregulating Beclin-1. In this study, we characterized the role of miR-30a in sorafenib-induced activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. We found that expression of miR-30a was significantly downregulated in several human RCC tissues and in RCC cell lines. Accordingly, its targeted gene Beclin-1 was upregulated. Sorafenib activated autophagy in RCC cells (786-0 and A489 lines), evidenced by p62 degradation, Beclin-1/autophagy protein 5 (ATG-5) upregulation and light chain (LC)3B-I/-II conversion. Exogenously expressing miR-30a in 786-0 or A489 cells inhibited Beclin-1 expression and enhanced sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, knockdown of miR-30a by introducing antagomiR-30a increased Beclin-1 expression, and inhibited sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity against RCC cells. Autophagy inhibitors, including chloroquine, 3-methyaldenine or Bafliomycin A1, enhanced sorafenib activity, causing substantial cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, knockdown of Beclin-1 or ATG-5 by targeted siRNAs also increased sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity in above RCC cells. These findings indicate that dysregulation of miR-30a in RCC may interfere with the effectiveness of sorafenib-mediated apoptosis by an autophagy-dependent pathway, thus representing a novel potential therapeutic target for RCC.

  3. Osseous metastases from renal cell carcinoma: embolization and surgery for restoration of function. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D.M.; Becker, G.J.; Rabe, F.E.; Holden, R.W.; Richmond, B.D.; Wass, J.L.; Sequeira, F.W.

    1984-03-01

    Five patients underwent preoperative embolization of osseous metastases from renal cell carcinoma. The group consisted of four men and one woman who ranged in age from 46 to 79 years. The lesions were located in the pubic ramus and acetabulum, proximal femur, femoral midshaft, proximal humerus, and proximal tibia. All embolizations were performed within 24 hours of surgery. The internal fixation and tumor curettage was accomplished with estimated perioperative blood loss ranging from 10 ml to 1,250 ml. All patients had significant restoration of function following surgery. The authors suggest that preoperative embolization is an important and efficacious adjunct in the management of hypervascular renal cell osseous metastases.

  4. Temsirolimus Is Highly Effective as Third-Line Treatment in Chromophobe Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Meisel, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C.; Stenner-Liewen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We report unexpectedly high efficacy of temsirolimus as third-line treatment in a patient with metastatic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. After failure of two sequentially administered tyrosine kinase inhibitors, treatment with temsirolimus resulted in a prolonged partial remission of 14 months, and the response is still continuing. Up to now, no data from randomized clinical studies have been published addressing the question of efficacy of temsirolimus as third-line treatment after failure of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The case presented here implies that temsirolimus could be a viable option for patients with metastatic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. PMID:21526001

  5. Temsirolimus is highly effective as third-line treatment in chromophobe renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Meisel, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Stenner-Liewen, Frank

    2011-01-15

    We report unexpectedly high efficacy of temsirolimus as third-line treatment in a patient with metastatic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. After failure of two sequentially administered tyrosine kinase inhibitors, treatment with temsirolimus resulted in a prolonged partial remission of 14 months, and the response is still continuing. Up to now, no data from randomized clinical studies have been published addressing the question of efficacy of temsirolimus as third-line treatment after failure of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The case presented here implies that temsirolimus could be a viable option for patients with metastatic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Staging of renal cell carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of routine preoperative bone scans

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.J.; Broaddus, S.B.; Leadbetter, G.W. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    The use of bone scans in the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma has become routine in many centers. In a retrospective analysis of 42 patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma, the authors analyzed the cost-effectiveness of routine preoperative bone scans. Although these scans accurately predict metastatic disease to bone, they are not cost-effective as a routine preoperative tool because they do not alter outcome. In selected patients with bone pain and no other positive staging studies, preoperative bone scans may be of value in the decision to perform extirpative surgery.

  7. Predictive factors of response to treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: new evidence.

    PubMed

    Tonini, Giuseppe; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Imperatori, Marco; Pantano, Francesco; Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele

    2011-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma represents approximately 3% of adult malignancies and 90-95% of neoplasms arising from the kidney. Many agents that target angiogenesis (e.g., sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab and pazopanib) and mTOR-targeted therapy (e.g., temsirolimus and everolimus) have been approved as first-line agents. The choice of the most suitable treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma depends on the definition of risk. In this article, we reviewed the scientific literature identifying predictive factors on the activity/efficacy of a specific therapy.

  8. Targeted therapies in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: overview of the past year.

    PubMed

    Gross-Goupil, Marine; Massard, Christophe; Ravaud, Alain

    2012-02-01

    During the past half-decade, clinical trials have permitted major progress in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with the first generation of targeted therapies (bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib, everolimus, and temsirolimus). New targeted agents such as axitinib, tivozanib, and dovitinib, all of which are tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have been developed in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In the same time, more information regarding mechanism of disease and drug resistance shed light on new targets and new potent agents. We report an overview of the more relevant data published over the past year, which may modify the therapeutic landscape of kidney cancer in the near future.

  9. A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis in association with Schistosoma hematobium.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad A A; Kar, Ashok; Walker, Marjorie M; Lloyd, Jo; Vale, Justin A; Mayer, Erik K

    2012-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with painless frank haematuria. Investigations included intravenous urogram and abdominal/pelvic CT which revealed a marked focal thickening of the wall of the inferior aspect of the left renal pelvis extending into the lower pole calyx and into the pelviureteric junction resulting in left hydronephrosis. Urine cytology demonstrated clusters of malignant keratinised squamous cells and schistosome ova. He underwent left laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy and histology revealed moderately differentiated keratinising squamous cell carcinoma in the renal pelvis.

  10. Autocrine stimulation of clear-cell renal carcinoma cell migration in hypoxia via HIF-independent suppression of thrombospondin-1

    PubMed Central

    Bienes-Martínez, Raquel; Ordóñez, Angel; Feijoo-Cuaresma, Mónica; Corral-Escariz, María; Mateo, Gloria; Stenina, Olga; Jiménez, Benilde; Calzada, María J.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 is a matricellular protein with potent antitumour activities, the levels of which determine the fate of many different tumours, including renal carcinomas. However, the factors that regulate this protein remain unclear. In renal carcinomas, hypoxic conditions enhance the expression of angiogenic factors that help adapt tumour cells to their hostile environment. Therefore, we hypothesized that anti-angiogenic factors should correspondingly be dampened. Indeed, we found that hypoxia decreased the thrombospondin-1 protein in several clear cell renal carcinoma cell lines (ccRCC), although no transcriptional regulation was observed. Furthermore, we proved that hypoxia stimulates multiple signals that independently contribute to diminish thrombospondin-1 in ccRCC, which include a decrease in the activity of oxygen-dependent prolylhydroxylases (PHDs) and activation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. In addition, thrombospondin-1 regulation in hypoxia proved to be important for ccRCC cell migration and invasion. PMID:23145312

  11. MicroRNAs in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: biological functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that govern many biological processes. They frequently acquire a gain or a loss of function in cancer and hence play a causative role in the development and progression of neoplasms. They could be used as biomarkers to improve our knowledge on diagnosis, prognosis and drug resistance, and to attempt therapeutic approaches in several types of cancer including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). ccRCC is the most predominant subtype of RCC that accounts for about 90% of all renal cancers. Since ccRCC is generally asymptomatic until very late, it is difficult to diagnose early. Moreover, in the absence of preventive treatments for metastatic ccRCC after surgical resection of the primary cancer, predictive prognostic biomarkers are needed in order to achieve appropriate therapies. Herein the role of miRs in the biology of ccRCC and the potential applications of these molecules are discussed. Moreover, future applications in the diagnostic and prognostic field, as well as their impact on drug response and therapeutic targets are also explored. Their use in clinical practice as molecular biomarkers alone, or in combination with other biological markers could accelerate progress, help design personalized therapies, limit side effects, and improve quality of life of ccRCC patients.

  12. Independent Tumor Origin in Two Cases of Synchronous Bilateral Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jialu; Zhao, Tian; Han, Yuying; Zhang, Yujun; Ye, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) pose a challenge for clinical treatment and management. Most bilateral RCCs are sporadic, and do not show a hereditary pattern indicative of VHL syndrome or other inherited cancers. The origin and evolution of these sporadic bilateral RCCs remains elusive. We obtained normal and tumor samples from two male patients suffering from early stage synchronous bilateral clear cell RCC (ccRCC), and analyzed genomic DNA using whole exome sequencing and bisulfite pyrosequencing. We detected distinct 3p loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in both tumors in each patient. Two tumors within the same patient harbored distinct driver mutations and different CpG hypermethylation sites in the VHL promoter. Moreover, tumors exhibit independent evolutionary trajectories. Therefore, distinct 3p LOH, combined with contingent driver gene mutations and independent VHL hypermethylation, led to independent tumor origin and parallel evolution of bilateral ccRCC in these two patients. Our results indicate that tumors in these two cases were not due to common germline oncogenic mutations. They were results of multiple de novo mutations in each kidney, rather than primary ccRCC with contralateral renal metastasis. Therefore, histopathologic and genetic profiling from single tumor specimen may underestimate the mutational burden and somatic heterogeneity of bilateral ccRCCs. PMID:27383411

  13. Comparative proteomic profiling identifies potential prognostic factors for human clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Zhang, Hongwei; Luo, Longhua; Zhong, Kezhao; Ma, Yushui; Fan, Linlin; Fu, Da; Wan, Lijuan

    2016-12-01

    The identification of markers for disease diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive purposes will have a great effect in improving patient management. Proteomic‑based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis on four patients including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and paired adjacent non‑cancerous renal tissues using label‑free quantitative proteomics and liquid chromatography‑tandem mass spectrometry (LC‑MS/MS) to identify differentially expressed proteins. Among 3,061 identified non‑redundant proteins, we found that 210 proteins were differentially expressed (83 overexpressed and 127 underexpressed) in ccRCC tissue when compared with normal kidney tissues. Two most significantly dysregulated proteins (PCK1 and SNRPF) were chosen to be confirmed by western blotting. Pathway analysis of 210 differentially expressed proteins showed that dysregulated proteins are related to many cancer‑related biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and amino acid synthetic pathways. Online survival analysis indicated the prognostic value of these dysregulated proteins. In conclusion, we identified some potential diagnostic biomarkers for ccRCC and an in‑depth understanding of their involved biological pathways may help pave the way to discover new therapeutic strategies for ccRCC.

  14. GFOD1 and peejar are promising markers for clear-cell renal cell carcinoma disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Kong, Wen; Huang, Ji-wei; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Wei; Liu, Dong-ming; Huang, Yi-ran

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is a common genitourinary malignancy. The molecular pathogenesis of ccRCC remains unclear and biomarkers for daily practice were still limited. We performed an integrative analysis of two public ccRCC microarray datasets, E-GEOD-22541 and E-MTAB-1050, The candidate differential expression genes (DEG) were then confirmed in the E-GEOD-53757 dataset. In addition, an independent cohort of 50 ccRCC and 36 non-tumor kidney tissues were analyzed to examine the selected DGEs by qRT-PCR. We identified and validated two DEGs, namely GFOD1 and peejar, which were significantly up-regulated in ccRCC compared with normal renal tissues (p < 0.001). Moreover, the expression of these two genes are related to histological grade and stage and decrease of their expression correlated with disease progression (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found the expression of peejar was positively correlated with the expression of GFOD1 in ccRCC tissue, with Pearson correlation coefficiency reaching 0.939 (p < 0.001). GFOD1 and peejar were novel genes correlated with ccRCC disease progression and patients' poor prognosis. PMID:27191742

  15. Programming microbial population dynamics by engineered cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Payne, Stephen; Tan, Cheemeng; You, Lingchong

    2011-07-01

    A major aim of synthetic biology is to program novel cellular behavior using engineered gene circuits. Early endeavors focused on building simple circuits that fulfill simple functions, such as logic gates, bistable toggle switches, and oscillators. These gene circuits have primarily focused on single-cell behaviors since they operate intracellularly. Thus, they are often susceptible to cell-cell variations due to stochastic gene expression. Cell-cell communication offers an efficient strategy to coordinate cellular behavior at the population level. To this end, we review recent advances in engineering cell-cell communication to achieve reliable population dynamics, spanning from communication within single species to multispecies, from one-way sender-receiver communication to two-way communication in synthetic microbial ecosystems. These engineered systems serve as well-defined model systems to better understand design principles of their naturally occurring counterparts and to facilitate novel biotechnology applications.

  16. Development of intercellular communication during the epithelial reorganization of a renal cell line (LLC-PK1).

    PubMed

    Rabito, C A; Jarrell, J A; Abraham, E H

    1987-01-25

    Junctional permeability determinations after microinjection of the fluorescent tracer, Lucifer Yellow CH, show that the cells in confluent monolayers of the renal epithelial cell lines LLC-PK1 and A6 are interconnected by intercellular junctions. This cell-to-cell communication network permits the fluorescent dye to diffuse from the microinjected cell into multiple adjacent neighboring cells. Cell-to-cell diffusion of the fluorescent dye was not observed at pH 6.0. Full recovery occurred, however, when the pH of the extracellular medium was adjusted to 7.4. To provide a sensitive index of the averaged efficacy of junctional communication, we measured the number of cells that survived ouabain treatment in a 50% mixture of wild and ouabain-resistant mutant LLC-PK1 cells. Electron probe microanalysis in uncoupled cells showed that ouabain treatment produced two populations of cells, with totally different intracellular Na+ and K+ content. Under this condition, only 50% of the population survived after 48 h of treatment. When ouabain treatment was initiated 24 h after plating, however, 100% survival was observed, and the cells contained uniform intracellular Na+ and K+ concentration. This finding is consistent with the theory that this protective effect is mediated through the presence of the functional communicating intercellular junctions. When ouabain was applied at different times after plating, full protection is reached by 2 h. The early development of cell-to-cell communication, which precedes the development of the occluding junctions and several transport systems by several hours, is consistent with the involvement of the intercellular junctions in the synchronization of the polarization process.

  17. Direct reprogramming of human bone marrow stromal cells into functional renal cells using cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-04-14

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes-formation of "domes" and tubule-like structures-and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  18. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  19. A Renal Variant of Fabry Disease Diagnosed by the Presence of Urinary Mulberry Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimohata, Homare; Ogawa, Yujiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A. This disease is classified into two types, namely a classical and variant type. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old man who showed a renal variant of Fabry disease and was diagnosed at an early stage by the presence of mulberry cells. He had no history of general symptoms except for proteinuria. The presence of mulberry cells caused us to suspect Fabry disease and he was thereafter diagnosed to have a renal variant of Fabry disease based on the findings of a renal biopsy, a mutation analysis and a low level of α-galactosidase A activity. PMID:27904112

  20. Paraneoplastic Glomerulopathy in a Case of Collecting Duct Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devarsetty, Srikanth Prasad; Bhat, Shailaja; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic glomerulopathy has been described in established cases of the solid tumors of lung, gastrointestinal system, breast, etc., and rarely in patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). Studies on secondary glomerular diseases have described a higher incidence of IgA nephropathy in patients with RCC compared to membranous glomerulopathy, which are commonly reported in malignancies of the lung and gastrointestinal tract. Collecting Duct Carcinoma (CDC), a rare high grade adenocarcinoma accounts for <1% of all renal malignancies. It arises from the cells of the collecting ducts of Bellini. We report a case of an elderly male who was diagnosed to have a disseminated CDC during his evaluation for nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy was suggestive of a secondary membranous glomerulonephropathy. PMID:28384915

  1. [Current strategies in the treatment of renal-cell cancer: targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Trigo, José Manuel; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2008-03-22

    Renal-cell carcinoma represents 95% of all renal tumours. The Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is mutated or silenced in most clear cell renal carcinomas. pVHL loss results in the stabilization of the heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and enhanced transactivation of HIF target genes. HIF itself has been difficult to inhibit with drug-like molecules although a number of agents that indirectly inhibit HIF, including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors, have been identified. Moreover, a number of drugs have been developed that target HIF-responsive gene products, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), implicated in tumor angiogenesis. Many of these targeted therapies, especially sunitinib, have demonstrated significant activity in kidney cancer clinical trials and represent a substantive advance in the treatment of this disease.

  2. Fucan-coated silver nanoparticles synthesized by a green method induce human renal adenocarcinoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Rocha Amorim, Monica Oliveira; Lopes Gomes, Dayanne; Dantas, Larisse Araujo; Silva Viana, Rony Lucas; Chiquetti, Samanta Cristina; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Silva Costa, Leandro; Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    Polysaccharides containing sulfated L-fucose are often called fucans. The seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi synthesizes three fucans, among which fucan A is the most abundant. This polymer is not cytotoxic against various normal cell lines and is non-toxic to rats when administered at high doses. In addition, it exhibits low toxicity against tumor cells. With the aim of increasing the toxicity of fucan A, silver nanoparticles containing this polysaccharide were synthesized using a green chemistry method. The mean size of these nanoparticles was 210nm. They exhibited a spherical shape and negative surface charge and were stable for 14 months. When incubated with cells, these nanoparticles did not show any toxic effects against various normal cell lines; however, they decreased the viability of various tumor cells, especially renal adenocarcinoma cells 786-0. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the nanoparticles induced cell death responses of 786-0 cells through necrosis. Assays performed with several renal cell lines (HEK, VERO, MDCK) showed that these nanoparticles only induce death of 786-0 cells. The data obtained herein leads to the conclusion that fucan A nanoparticles are promising agents against renal adenocarcinoma.

  3. Left Hand-assisted Laparoscopic Nephrectomy With Renal Vein Thrombectomy for Stage T3b Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, George M; Kenleigh, Dorian A; Brown, James A

    2016-04-01

    A 60-year-old male was found to have an 8.0 cm left renal mass and associated renal vein thrombus on computed tomography. The thrombus extended 3 mm beyond the right aortic border to within 1.6 cm of the left border of the inferior vena cava. The patient underwent left nephrectomy with renal vein thrombectomy using a hand-assisted laparoscopic approach. The tumor thrombus was "milked" proximally back into left renal vein, which was then divided with an endovascular stapler. Left renal vein thrombi extending to right margin of the aorta can be managed with hand-assisted laparoscopic approach.

  4. Evaluation of Argonaute protein as a predictive marker for human clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Min; Feng, Yuan; Xu, Yun-Fei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Zheng, Jun-Hua; Gao, Heng-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Argonaute subfamily proteins are involved in human organ growth and development. Recent studies found its association with human breast cancer, however, its expression profile and its prognostic value in clear cell renal cancer (ccRCC) have not been investigated. Methods: Expression of the Argonaute proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tissue microarrays (TMA), containing paired tumor tissue and adjacent non-cancer tissue from 176 patients who had undergone surgery in hospital for histologically proven ccRCC. Prognostic value and correlation with other clinico-pathologic factors were evaluated in two classifications. Results: Data showed a significant higher expression of Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 present in neoplastic tissues compared with that in adjacent tissue; A significant correlation existed between the higher expression of Argonaute 1 protein with the T stage, lymph node metastasis and clinical TNM (cTNM); Survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank test demonstrated that elevated Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 expression in cancer tissue predicted poorer overall survival (OS) compared with group in lower expression (36.3% VS 67.1%; 37.3% VS 53.9%; respectively). Notably, multivariate analyses by Cox’s proportional hazard model revealed that expression of Argonaute 2 was an independent prognostic factor in renal cancer. Conclusions: In summary, our present study clarify that the aberrant expression of Argonaute in human RCC is possibly involved with tumorigenesis and development, and the Argonaute protein could act as a potential biomarker for prognosis assessment of renal cancer. Related mechanism is worthy of further investigation. PMID:23696926

  5. Cellular Uptake and Localization of Polymyxins in Renal Tubular Cells Using Rationally Designed Fluorescent Probes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bo; Azad, Mohammad A. K.; Nowell, Cameron J.; Nation, Roger L.; Thompson, Philip E.; Roberts, Kade D.

    2015-01-01

    Polymyxins are cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics that serve as a last line of defense against Gram-negative bacterial superbugs. However, the extensive accumulation of polymyxins in renal tubular cells can lead to nephrotoxicity, which is the major dose-limiting factor in clinical use. In order to gain further insights into the mechanism of polymyxin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have rationally designed novel fluorescent polymyxin probes to examine the localization of polymyxins in rat renal tubular (NRK-52E) cells. Our design strategy focused on incorporating a dansyl fluorophore at the hydrophobic centers of the polymyxin core structure. To this end, four novel regioselectively labeled monodansylated polymyxin B probes (MIPS-9541, MIPS-9542, MIPS-9543, and MIPS-9544) were designed, synthesized, and screened for their antimicrobial activities and apoptotic effects against rat kidney proximal tubular cells. On the basis of the assessment of antimicrobial activities, cellular uptake, and apoptotic effects on renal tubular cells, incorporation of a dansyl fluorophore at either position 6 or 7 (MIPS-9543 and MIPS-9544, respectively) of the polymyxin core structure appears to be an appropriate strategy for generating representative fluorescent polymyxin probes to be utilized in intracellular imaging and mechanistic studies. Furthermore, confocal imaging experiments utilizing these probes showed evidence of partial colocalization of the polymyxins with both the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in rat renal tubular cells. Our results highlight the value of these new fluorescent polymyxin probes and provide further insights into the mechanism of polymyxin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:26392495

  6. Low molecular weight fucoidan protects renal tubular cells from injury induced by albumin overload

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yingli; Sun, Yi; Weng, Lin; Li, Yingjie; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria is a causative and aggravating factor for progressive renal damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to determine if low molecular weight fucoidan (LMWF) could protect renal function and tubular cells from albumin overload caused injury. Treatment with 10 mg/g bovine serum albumin caused renal dysfunction, morphological changes, and overexpression of inflammation and fibrosis associated proteins in 129S2/Sv mice. LMWF (100 mg/kg) protected against kidney injury and renal dysfunction with decreased blood creatinine by 34% and urea nitrogen by 25%, increased creatinine clearance by 48%, and decreased significantly urinary albumin concentration. In vitro proximal tubule epithelial cell (NRK-52E) model showed that LMWF dose-dependently inhibited overexpression of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, oxidative stress and apoptosis caused by albumin overload. These experimental results indicate that LMWF protects against albumin overload caused renal injury by inhibiting inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress and apoptosis, which suggests that LMWF could be a promising candidate drug for preventing CKD. PMID:27545472

  7. A unique presentation of a renal clear cell carcinoma with atypical metastases

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, F.; Cianchi, F.; Badii, B.; Skalamera, I.; Fiorenza, G.; Foppa, C.; Qirici, E.; Perigli, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal cancer is a relatively common neoplasia with renal clear cell carcinoma being the most frequent histological type. This tumor has a strong tendency to metastasize virtually to all organs. Today, new diagnostic tools allow physicians to distinguish between those patients with “incidental findings” and those with advanced metastatic disease. Presentation of case A 70-year-old male with multiple indolent subcutaneous masses underwent colonoscopy after a positive fecal screening test for colorectal carcinoma. A rectal lesion was discovered but biopsy was negative. CT scan revealed advanced renal cancer involving the peritoneal cavity, retroperitoneum and lung. Biopsy of subcutaneous masses confirmed the suspected metastases. The patient underwent surgery (an open left nephrectomy with rectosigmoid resection and metastases debulking) because of a high risk of bowel obstruction and increasing anemia. After three years of multi-targeted therapy and follow-up, the patient is still asymptomatic and in good general condition. Discussion Treatment of metastatic renal cancer is still controversial even if more than 30% of patients have metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Recently introduced targeted therapies are encouraging but still present problems with side effects and an unlimited period of efficacy. Although there is no consensus, several studies and guidelines consider metastasectomy to be a valid option. Conclusion Recent series highlight surgery as a key-point in the management of advanced renal clear cell carcinoma. Our case demonstrates the validity of a surgical strategy supported by a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:25911241

  8. Importance of adenosine triphosphate in phospholipase A2-induced rabbit renal proximal tubule cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V D; Cieslinski, D A; Humes, H D

    1988-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ischemic renal tubular cell injury involves a complex interaction of different processes, including membrane phospholipid alterations and depletion of high-energy phosphate stores. To assess the role of membrane phospholipid changes due to activation of phospholipases in renal tubule cell injury, suspensions enriched in rabbit renal proximal tubule segments were incubated with exogenous phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Exogenous PLA2 did not produce any significant change in various metabolic parameters reflective of cell injury in control nonhypoxic preparations despite a significant decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and moderate increases in lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE). In contrast, exogenous PLA2 treatment of hypoxic tubules resulted in a severe degree of cell injury, as demonstrated by marked declines in tubule K+ and ATP contents and significant decreases in tubule uncoupled respiratory rates, and was associated with significant phospholipid alterations, including marked declines in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PE and significant rises in LPC, LPE, and free fatty acids (FFA). The injurious metabolic effects of exogenous PLA2 on hypoxic tubules were reversed by addition of ATP-MgCl2 to the tubules. The protective effect of ATP-MgCl2 was associated with increases in tubule PC and PE contents and declines in LPC, LPE, and FFA contents. These experiments thus indicate that an increase in exogenous PLA2 activity produces renal proximal tubule cell injury when cell ATP levels decline, at which point phospholipid resynthesis cannot keep pace with phospholipid degradation with resulting depletion of phospholipids and accumulation of lipid by-products. High-energy phosphate store depletion appears to be an important condition for exogenous PLA2 activity to induce renal tubule cell injury. PMID:3417866

  9. Kidney specific protein-positive cells derived from embryonic stem cells reproduce tubular structures in vitro and differentiate into renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Fujii, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Homma, Koichiro; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hideyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be induced in vitro because of the complexity of kidney structures and the diversity of kidney-component cells. Here, we describe a method of inducing renal tubular cells from mouse embryonic stem cells via the cell purification of kidney specific protein (KSP)-positive cells using an anti-KSP antibody. The global gene expression profiles of KSP-positive cells derived from ES cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of cells in the developing kidney, and KSP-positive cells had the capacity to form tubular structures resembling renal tubular cells when grown in a 3D culture in Matrigel. Moreover, our results indicated that KSP-positive cells acquired the characteristics of each segment of renal tubular cells through tubular formation when stimulated with Wnt4. This method is an important step toward kidney disease research using pluripotent stem cells, and the development of kidney regeneration therapies.

  10. Comparison of circulating and intratumoral regulatory T cells in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asma, Gati; Amal, Gorrab; Raja, Marrakchi; Amine, Derouiche; Mohammed, Chebil; Amel, Ben Ammar Elgaaied

    2015-05-01

    The clear evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) exists in the tumor microenvironment raises the question why renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progresses. Numerous studies support the implication of CD4(+)CD25(high) regulatory T (Treg) cells in RCC development. We aimed in this study to characterize the phenotype and function of circulating and intratumoral Treg cells of RCC patient in order to evaluate their implication in the inhibition of the local antitumor immune response. Our results demonstrate that the proportion of Treg in TIL was, in average, similar to that found in circulating CD4(+) T cells of patients or healthy donors. However, intratumoral Treg exhibit a marked different phenotype when compared with the autologous circulating Treg. A higher CD25 mean level, HLA-DR, Fas, and GITR, and a lower CD45RA expression were observed in intratumoral Treg, suggesting therefore that these cells are effector in the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, intratumoral Treg showed a higher inhibitory function on autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when compared with circulating Treg that may be explained by an overexpression of FoxP3 transcription factor. These findings suggest that intratumoral Treg could be major actors in the impairment of local antitumor immune response for RCC patients.

  11. ABT-737, a Bcl-2 Selective Inhibitor, and Chloroquine Synergistically Kill Renal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Pei; Jia, Jinpeng; Li, Jijun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yiyan; Chen, Fengkun

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common malignancy in the kidney in the world, and the 5-year overall survival for patients remains poor due to the lack of effective treatment strategies. Although ABT-737, as a Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor, has recently emerged as a novel cancer therapeutic reagent, apoptosis induced by ABT-737 is often blocked in several types of cancer cells. This study investigated whether the combination of the small-molecule BH3 mimetic ABT-737 and the lysosome inhibitor chloroquine was an effective strategy for treating renal cancer cells. We found that the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine synergistically decreased cell viability when compared to treatment with either single reagent. Cell apoptosis induced by a combined treatment was markedly inhibited by the caspase inhibitors z-DEVD-FMK and z-VAD-FMK. It was also inhibited by cathepsin inhibitor E-64 and CTSI (cathepsin inhibitor), which suggested that apoptosis was dependent on the cascade of caspase activation and cathepsins released from lysosomes. Furthermore, we found that ABT-737 could increase the cell level of ROS, which triggers cathepsin-mediated cell death and augments the role of chloroquine in cell death. So the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine was an effective strategy for the treatment of renal cancer cells, and this combined strategy may widen the therapeutic window of ABT-737 and chloroquine as well as enhance the clinical efficacy of synergistic drug combinations.

  12. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide by Trypanosoma cruzi in renal cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel M; Yoshida, Nobuko; Higa, Elisa M S; Shenkman, Sérgio; Alves, Monique; Staquicini, Daniela; Cascabulho, Cynthia; Schor, Nestor

    2011-08-01

    Chagas disease is typically associated with cardiac involvement. During the acute phase of murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, severe acute myocarditis can develop. Prior to cardiac alteration, however, infected mice present with renal inflammatory infiltration causing acute kidney injury due to an ischemia/reperfusion lesion. Thus, the present study was undertaken in order to evaluate whether the parasites or some of their components would directly affect renal cells. As such, this study employed kidney cell lines (mesangial, epithelial, and proximal tubular) that mimic different regions of the renal system. Mesangial cells are more resistant to infection, showing reduced parasite internalization relative to epithelial and proximal tubular cells. Upon infection, mesangial cells produced more nitric oxide, tumor factor necrosis-α, and interferon-γ and showed decreased viability when compared to the other cell lines. These results indicate that the resistance of mesangial cells to infection may be related to the increased expression of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines. Conversely, the high levels of nitric oxide produced by these cells caused impairment of cell integrity and viability. Higher nitric oxide concentrations promote cellular injury and can be involved in the genesis of ischemia/reperfusion lesions in acute kidney injury.

  13. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  14. Phase transitions in unstable cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, R. V.

    2003-09-01

    The dynamics of cancer evolution is studied by means of a simple quasispecies model involving cells displaying high levels of genetic instability. Both continuous, mean-field and discrete, bit-string models are analysed. The string model is simulated on a single-peak landscape. It is shown that a phase transition exists at high levels of genetic instability, thus separating two phases of slow and rapid growth. The results suggest that, under a conserved level of genetic instability the cancer cell population will be close to the threshold level. Implications for therapy are outlined.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney: successful organ-preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    Höppner, W; Grosse, K; Dreikorn, K

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of a de novo renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney, which was detected 3 years after the transplantation. The tumor was excised under hypothermia and perfusion. Immunosuppression was not stopped and the function remained excellent. Close-mesh follow-up of 45 months showed no evidence or recurrence or metastasis.

  16. Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells blunts renal vascular resistance following acute cyclosporine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Cristian A.; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Andre-Gregoire, Gwennan; Placier, Sandrine; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Stefan; Warnock, David G.; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rieu, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) are still commonly used after renal transplantation, despite CsA–induced nephrotoxicity (CIN), which is partly related to vasoactive mechanisms. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is now recognized as a key player in the control of vascular tone, and both endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-MR modulate the vasoactive responses to vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Here we tested whether vascular MR is involved in renal hemodynamic changes induced by CsA. The relative contribution of vascular MR in acute CsA treatment was evaluated using mouse models with targeted deletion of MR in endothelial cell or SMC. Results indicate that MR expressed in SMC, but not in endothelium, contributes to the increase of plasma urea and creatinine, the appearance of isometric tubular vacuolization, and overexpression of a kidney injury biomarker (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin) after CsA treatment. Inactivation of MR in SMC blunted CsA–induced phosphorylation of contractile proteins. Finally, the in vivo increase of renal vascular resistance induced by CsA was blunted when MR was deleted from SMC cells, and this was associated with decreased L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Thus, our study provides new insights into the role of vascular MR in renal hemodynamics during acute CIN, and provides rationale for clinical studies of MR antagonism to manage the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26422501

  17. Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma with osteogenic differentiation and paraneoplastic hepatopathy in a dog, possibly related to human Stauffer's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Bovero, A; Nigrisoli, E; Ratto, A; Rampazzo, A; Zatelli, A

    2003-11-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is an uncommon tumour in human beings, and osteogenic differentiation is a rare feature. This report describes such a case in a male dog aged 8 years. The tumour, which showed extensive osseous metaplasia and a few necrotic areas, protruded into the renal pelvis, disrupting the renal capsule. Light microscopical and immunohistochemical examination revealed the epithelial nature of the tumour. Abnormal liver biochemistry, mild hepatocyte degeneration and the absence of histological evidence of metastasis suggested a paraneoplastic hepatopathy.

  18. Bone-targeted therapies for elderly patients with renal cell carcinoma: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Roza, Thomas; Hakim, Lukman; van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Bone metastases are very common in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and can have a huge impact on quality of life by leading to skeletal-related events (SREs), including pain, pathologic fractures and spinal cord compression with need for surgery or radiotherapy. Because of their osteolytic aspect and biologic behaviour, these SREs are more common in patients with bone metastases from RCC than from other malignancies. As overall survival is increased by new anti-angiogenic drugs like tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, the incidence of SREs is rising, making the clinical management of bone metastases in RCC ever more important, especially in the more vulnerable elderly patient. In this review we discuss the current advances and future directions in bone-targeted therapies in patients with RCC with a special focus on the elderly population. Recently, two bone-targeted agents have been approved in the prevention of SREs in advanced RCC: zoledronic acid and denosumab. To date, there is no specific data on the use of bisphosphonates or denosumab in the elderly and specific studies in this setting are warranted. We compare the available evidence for the use and implications of both agents in the elderly patient and give general information on safety concerns that could be more important in these patients.

  19. Pazopanib: a multikinase inhibitor with activity in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-05-01

    Treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have changed dramatically, and a new paradigm has evolved. IFN-alpha and IL-2 were previously mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the USA for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three of these new agents are multitargeted kinase inhibitors, including sunitinib, sorafenib, and recently pazopanib, two target the mTOR (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with IFN-alpha) that targets VEGF. Sunitinib has emerged as the standard of care for treatment-naive RCC patients, with the recently approved bevacizumab and IFN-alpha combination providing an additional option for this population. The recent approval of pazopanib, based on the results from sequential Phase II and III clinical trials demonstrating improved overall response rates and progression-free survival, provides yet another option for front-line therapy. The current article examines the pazopanib preclinical and clinical data, provides an overview of the development of this tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and provides some speculation concerning its role in RCC therapy.

  20. High expression of HMGA2 predicts poor survival in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na, Ning; Si, Tujie; Huang, Zhengyu; Miao, Bin; Hong, Liangqing; Li, Heng; Qiu, Jiang; Qiu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes and is upregulated in several tumors, but its role in renal carcinoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of HMGA2 and its relationship to the overall survival (OS) of patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) following surgery. The expression of HMGA2 was evaluated retrospectively by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 162 patients with ccRCC who underwent nephrectomy in 2003 and 2004. An IHC analysis revealed that HMGA2 was expressed in the nuclei of tumor cells in 146 (90.1%) patients with ccRCC. The level of HMGA2 was positively correlated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and Fuhrman Grade. A Kaplan–Meier analysis with log-rank test found that patients with high HMGA2 expression had a poor outcome and that patients with low HMGA2 expression had better survival. Cox regression analysis showed that HMGA2 expression could serve as an independent prognostic factor for ccRCC patients. The efficacy of the following prognostic models was improved when HMGA2 expression was added: tumor node metastasis stage, UCLA Integrated Scoring System, Mayo Clinic stage, size, grade, and necrosis score. In summary, this study showed that HMGA2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with ccRCC. HMGA2 was found to be a valuable biomarker for ccRCC progression. PMID:27932890

  1. Homocysteine and the C677T Gene Polymorphism of Its Key Metabolic Enzyme MTHFR Are Risk Factors of Early Renal Damage in Hypertension in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Lin; Xu, Rui; Li, Guohua; Yao, Yucai; Li, Jiamin; Cong, Dehong; Xu, Xingshun; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The combined hyperhomocysteinemia condition is a feature of the Chinese hypertensive population. This study used the case-control method to investigate the association between plasma homocysteine and the C677T gene polymorphism of its key metabolic enzyme, 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and early renal damage in a hypertensive Chinese Han population. A total of 379 adult essential hypertensive patients were selected as the study subjects. The personal information, clinical indicators, and the C677T gene polymorphism of MTHFR were texted. This study used the urine microalbumin/urine creatinine ratio (UACR) as a grouping basis: the hypertension without renal damage group (NRD group) and the hypertension combined with early renal damage group (ERD group). Early renal damage in the Chinese hypertensive population was associated with body weight, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, cystatin C, uric acid, aldosterone, and glomerular filtration rate. The homocysteine level and the UACR in the TT genotype group were higher than those in the CC genotype group. The binary logistic regression analysis results showed that after sex and age were adjusted, the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism was correlated with early renal damage in hypertension in both the recessive model and in the additive model. Plasma homocysteine and the C677T gene polymorphism of its key metabolic enzyme MTHFR might be independent risk factors of early renal damage in the hypertensive Chinese Han population. PMID:26717388

  2. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency from human embryonic renal cortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Ruifang; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qi; Tang, Hailiang; Sun, Huaping

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) emerges as a prospective therapeutic angle in regenerative medicine and a tool for drug screening. Although increasing numbers of iPSCs from different sources have been generated, there has been limited progress in yield of iPSC. Here, we show that four Yamanaka factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can convert human embryonic renal cortical cells (hERCCs) to pluripotent stem cells with a roughly 40-fold higher reprogramming efficiency compared with that of adult human dermal fibroblasts. These iPSCs show pluripotency in vitro and in vivo, as evidenced by expression of pluripotency associated genes, differentiation into three embryonic germ layers by teratoma tests, as well as neuronal fate specification by embryoid body formation. Moreover, the four exogenous genes are effectively silenced in these iPSCs. This study highlights the use of hERCCs to generate highly functional human iPSCs which may aid the study of genetic kidney diseases and accelerate the development of cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:27904699

  3. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Guilhem; El Bouchtaoui, Morad; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-08-07

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities.We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived.Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC.

  4. Bone scintigraphy in the initial staging of patients with renal-cell carcinoma: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, P.R.; Murphy, K.G.

    1984-03-01

    The records of 40 consecutive patients who received bone scintigraphy in conjunction with the initial evaluation and staging of renal-cell carcinoma were reviewed to determine the role of bone imaging in this clinical context. Bone scintigrams were positive in three out of 40 patients at the time of diagnosis. In view of the low yield of bone imaging, it appears that routine scintigraphy is unwarranted in the absence of skeletal symptoms before the diagnosis of renal lesions. The presence of a positive bone image did not alter the indication for nephrectomy.

  5. [Renal cell carcinoma in patient with situs inversus and Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Verdejo, A; Martínez Torres, J L; Palao Yago, F; Tinaut Ranera, J; Arrabal Martín, M; Miján Ortiz, J L; Zuluaga Gómez, A

    2000-02-01

    A case of a adenocarcinoma renal in a patient with situs inversus complete to which was associated bronchiectasis and chronic sinusitis (kartagener's syndrome) is reported. It is the third case described in the international literature of a renal cells carcinoma in a patient with situs inversus totalis and the first in patient the one which has the triada classic of the kartagener's syndrome plus sterility. The tumor was discovered in a way incidental upon accomplishing a TAC toracoabdominal and was solved through nefrectomia for lumbotomy approach.

  6. [Social medicine assessment after surgical and targeted treatment of renal cell cancer].

    PubMed

    Vahlensieck, W; Hoffmann, W; Zermann, D-H

    2016-12-01

    In Germany, renal cell cancer counts for 2.5 % of all carcinomas in women and 3.5 % in men. Curative therapy ensures good chances of recovery. But there might be permanent complications like renal insufficiency, pain, incisional hernia, flank muscle relaxation, and paresis. In addition, targeted therapy is associated with several potential side effects. In both therapy groups, severe psychological problems may occur. Still employed patients with these problems must be examined by an expert to estimate the possibilities of returning to working (positive scope of work) and occupations which can not be performed anymore (negative scope of work).

  7. Rapidly Growing Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Mass in Patient with Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jongmin; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jeong Su; Hwang, Ki Won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Chon, Min Ku; Lee, Soo Yong; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) without inferior vena cava (IVC) involvements is extremely rare with few reported cases. Sarcomatoid RCC with rhabdoid feature is a rare pathologic type of RCC having aggressive behavior due to great metastatic potential. Here, we report a case of rapidly growing cardiac metastasis of RCC which brought on right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction without IVC and right atrial involvement in a 61-year-old woman. Cardiac arrest occurred during radical nephrectomy and echocardiography revealed mass nearly obstructing the RVOT which was not recognized by preoperative echocardiography 1 month ago. Postoperative immunohistochemical evaluation of renal mass revealed sarcomatoid RCC with rhabdoid feature. PMID:28090262

  8. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Lee, Mi-Ra; Hwang, Kyu-Hee; Chung, Hyun Chul; Jung, Jae Hung; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Eom, Minseob

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca{sup 2+} regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) is a major Ca{sup 2+} entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration.

  9. Downregulated ECRG4 is associated with poor prognosis in renal cell cancer and is regulated by promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liya; Wu, Jianting; Xie, Jun; Xia, Lingling; Qian, Xuemin; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer-related gene 4 (ECRG4) has been proposed as a putative tumor suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the role and regulation of ECRG4 in the pathogenesis of human renal cancer remain largely unknown. Our current study revealed that expression of ECRG4 is downregulated in renal cell lines and renal cancer tissues. ECRG4 expression was significantly associated with histological grade of tumors (p < 0.001), primary tumor stage (p = 0.017), and distant metastasis (p = 0.017). Low expression of ECRG4 was an independent prognostic indicator for survival of renal cancer patients. Silencing of ECRG4 expression in renal cell lines was associated with its promoter methylation. Moreover, ectopic expression of ECRG4 markedly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in renal cancer cell lines. These results indicated that ECRG4 is frequently silenced by the methylation of promoter in renal cell cancers. ECRG4 may be a tumor suppressor in renal cancer and serve as a prognostic marker.

  10. Expansion of CCR8+ inflammatory myeloid cells in cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Stoffs, Taryn; Kim, Wan-Ju; Daurkin, Irina; Gilbert, Scott M.; Su, Li-Ming; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chemokines are involved in cancer-related inflammation and malignant progression. In this study we evaluated expression of CCR8 and its natural cognate ligand CCL1 in patients with urothelial carcinomas of bladder and renal cell carcinomas. Experimental Design We examined CCR8 expression in peripheral blood and tumor tissues from patients with bladder and renal carcinomas. CCR8-positive myeloid cells were isolated from cancer tissues with magnetic beads and tested in vitro for cytokine production and ability to modulate T cell function. Results We demonstrate that monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cell subsets in peripheral blood of cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas display increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR8. Up-regulated expression of CCR8 is also detected within human cancer tissues and primarily limited to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). When isolated, CD11b+CCR8+ cell subset produces the highest levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors among intratumoral CD11b myeloid cells. Tumor-infiltrating CD11b+CCR8+ cells selectively display activated Stat3 and are capable of inducing FoxP3 expression in autologous T lymphocytes. Primary human tumors produce substantial amounts of the natural CCR8 ligand CCL1. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that CCR8+ myeloid cell subset is expanded in cancer patients. Elevated secretion of CCL1 by tumors, increased presence of CCR8+ myeloid cells in peripheral blood and cancer tissues indicate that CCL1/CCR8 axis is a component of cancer-related inflammation and may contribute to immune evasion. Obtained results also implicate that blockade of CCR8 signals may provide an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in human urothelial and renal cancers. PMID:23363815

  11. Comparative capacitative calcium entry mechanisms in canine pulmonary and renal arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sean M; Mason, Helen S; Smith, Gregory D; Nicholson, Neil; Johnston, Louise; Janiak, Robert; Hume, Joseph R

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) can be activated in canine pulmonary and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and whether activation of CCE parallels the different functional structure of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in these two cell types. The cytosolic [Ca2+] was measured by imaging fura-2-loaded individual cells. Increases in the cytosolic [Ca2+] due to store depletion in pulmonary ASMCs required simultaneous depletion of both the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)- and ryanodine (RY)-sensitive SR Ca2+ stores. In contrast, the cytosolic [Ca2+] rises in renal ASMCs occurred when the SR stores were depleted through either the InsP3 or RY pathways. The increase in the cytosolic [Ca2+] due to store depletion in both pulmonary and renal ASMCs was present in cells that were voltage clamped and was abolished when cells were perfused with a Ca2+-free bathing solution. Rapid quenching of the fura-2 signal by 100 μM Mn2+ following SR store depletion indicated that extracellular Ca2+ entry increased in both cell types and also verified that activation of CCE in pulmonary ASMCs required the simultaneous depletion of the InsP3- and RY-sensitive SR Ca2+ stores, while CCE could be activated in renal ASMCs by the depletion of either of the InsP3- or RY-sensitive SR stores. Store depletion Ca2+ entry in both pulmonary and renal ASMCs was strongly inhibited by Ni2+ (0.1–10 mM), slightly inhibited by Cd2+ (200–500 μM), but was not significantly affected by the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) blocker nisoldipine (10 μM). The non-selective cation channel blocker Gd3+ (100 μM) inhibited a portion of the Ca2+ entry in 6 of 18 renal but not pulmonary ASMCs. These results provide evidence that SR Ca2+ store depletion activates CCE in parallel with the organization of intracellular Ca2+ stores in canine pulmonary and renal ASMCs. PMID:12231648

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Allograft: What Is the Role of Polyomavirus?

    PubMed Central

    Neirynck, Valerie; Claes, Kathleen; Naesens, Maarten; De Wever, Liesbeth; Pirenne, Jacques; Kuypers, Dirk; Vanrenterghem, Yves; Poppel, Hendrik Van; Kabanda, Andre; Lerut, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is known to cause subclinical infection in childhood. The virus remains latent in the human body, mainly in the urinary tract epithelium. After initiation of an immunosuppressive treatment, reactivation can occur in renal transplant recipients. BKV can cause hemorrhagic cystitis, ureteral stenosis and BKV nephropathy in immunocompromised patients. Furthermore, a number of case reports suggest an association between BKV infection and the development of urinary tract cancer. So far, an oncogenic potential of BKV has been observed in vitro and in animal models; however, its oncogenic capacity in humans remains unclear. We report the case of a 59-year-old patient who developed a poorly differentiated renal cell carcinoma in her renal allograft, with pulmonary and abdominal metastasis. Surgical removal of the allograft and cessation of the immunosuppressive therapy resulted in complete resolution of the metastatic disease. PMID:23197968

  13. Functional genomics identifies novel genes essential for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumor cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    von Roemeling, Christina A.; Marlow, Laura A.; Radisky, Derek C.; Rohl, Austin; Larsen, Hege E.; Wei, Johnny; Sasinowska, Heather; Zhu, Heng; Drake, Richard; Sasinowski, Maciek; Tun, Han W.; Copland, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is a lack of targeted therapies that lead to long-term attenuation or regression of disease in patients with advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Our group has implemented a high-throughput genetic analysis coupled with a high-throughput proliferative screen in order to investigate the genetic contributions of a large cohort of overexpressed genes at the functional level in an effort to better understand factors involved in tumor initiation and progression. Patient gene array analysis identified transcripts that are consistently elevated in patient ccRCC as compared to matched normal renal tissues. This was followed by a high-throughput lentivirus screen, independently targeting 195 overexpressed transcripts identified in the gene array in four ccRCC cell lines. This revealed 31 ‘hits’ that contribute to ccRCC cell proliferation. Many of the hits identified are not only presented in the context of ccRCC for the first time, but several have not been previously linked to cancer. We further characterize the function of a group of hits in tumor cell invasion. Taken together these findings reveal pathways that may be critical in ccRCC tumorigenicity, and identifies novel candidate factors that could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention or diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for patients with advanced ccRCC. PMID:24979721

  14. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S. Chuang, L.-Y.; Guh, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S.

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27{sup Kip1}, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  15. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Gulati, Sakshi; Bates, Paul A; Stamp, Gordon; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Hazell, Steven; Futreal, P Andrew; Stewart, Aengus; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73–75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome 3p loss and VHL aberrations were the only ubiquitous events. The proportion of C>T transitions at CpG sites increased during tumor progression. M-seq permits the temporal resolution of ccRCC evolution and refines mutational signatures occurring during tumor development. PMID:24487277

  16. Characterizing the interactions of organic nanoparticles with renal epithelial cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anil V; Keliher, Edmund J; Core, Amanda B; Brown, Dennis; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology approaches are actively being pursued for drug delivery, novel diagnostics, implantable devices, and consumer products. While considerable research has been performed on the effects of these materials on targeted tumor or phagocytic cells, relatively little is known about their effects on renal cells. This becomes critical for supersmall nanoparticles (<10 nm), designed to be renally excreted. The active endocytic machinery of kidney proximal tubules avidly internalizes filtered proteins, which may also be the case for filtered nanoparticles. To test whether such interactions affect kidney function, we injected mice with either 5 nm dextran-based nanoparticles (DNP) that are similar in composition to FDA-approved materials or poly(amido amine) dendrimer nanoparticles (PNP) of comparable size. These fluorescently tagged nanoparticles were both filtered and internalized by renal tubular epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. The biological effects were quantitated by immunocytochemistry, measuring kidney injury markers and performing functional tests. DNP administration resulted in a dose-dependent increase in urinary output, while cellular albumin endocytosis was increased. The expression of megalin, a receptor involved in albumin uptake, was also increased, but AQP1 expression was unaffected. The effects after PNP administration were similar but additionally resulted in increased clathrin expression and increased endocytosis of dextran. We conclude that there are no major detrimental renal effects of DNP on overall kidney function, but changes in endocytosis-mediating protein expression do occur. These studies provide a framework for the testing of additional nanoparticle preparations as they become available.

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of tacrolimus in Mexican paediatric renal transplant patients: role of CYP3A5 genotype and formulation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo-Cabral, Carlos Orlando; García-Roca, Pilar; Romero-Tejeda, Elba Margarita; Reyes, Herlinda; Medeiros, Mara; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of this study were (i) to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model of tacrolimus in a Mexican renal transplant paediatric population (n = 53) and (ii) to test the influence of different covariates on its PK properties to facilitate dose individualization. Methods Population PK and variability parameters were estimated from whole blood drug concentration profiles obtained at steady-state using the non-linear mixed effect modelling software NONMEM® Version 7.2. Results Tacrolimus PK profiles exhibited high inter-patient variability (IPV). A two compartment model with first order input and elimination described the tacrolimus PK profiles in the studied population. The relationship between CYP3A5 genotype and tacrolimus CL/F was included in the final model. CL/F in CYP3A5*1/*1 and *1/*3 carriers was approximately 2- and 1.5-fold higher than in CYP3A5*3/*3 carriers (non-expressers), respectively, and explained almost the entire IPV in CL/F. Other covariates retained in the final model were the tacrolimus dose and formulation type. Limustin® showed markedly lower concentrations than the rest of the formulations. Conclusions Population PK modelling of tacrolimus in paediatric renal transplant recipients identified the tacrolimus formulation type as a significant covariate affecting the blood concentrations and confirmed the previously reported significant effect of CYP3A5 genotype on CL/F. It allowed the design of a proposed dosage based on the final model that is expected to help to improve tacrolimus dosing. PMID:25846845

  18. Effect of perineoplasm perinephric adipose tissues on migration of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells: a potential role of WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Xiaolin; Lusch, Achim; Blair, Christopher A.; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Yokoyama, Noriko N.; Liu, Shuman; Baker, Molly; Huynh, Victor; Landman, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the cellular and molecular interactions between clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and perinephric adipose tissue (PAT), perineoplasm PAT, PAT away from the neoplasm, renal sinus and subcutaneous adipose tissues were collected at the time of renal surgery for renal masses and conditioned medium (CM) was generated from 62 patients. Perineoplasm PAT CMs from 44 out of 62 (about 71%) of patients with ccRCC or benign renal diseases (e.g. oncocytomas, angiomyolipomas, multicystic kidney, interstitial fibrosis, etc.) enhanced the migration of CaKi-2 cells. Perineoplasm PAT CMs from ccRCC significantly increased migration of ACHN and CaKi-2 cells by ~8.2 and ~2.4 folds, respectively, relative to those from benign renal diseases, whereas there is no significant difference in migration between ccRCC and benign renal diseases in CMs collected from culturing PAT away from neoplasm, renal sinus and subcutaneous adipose tissues. High Fuhrman Grade was associated with increased migration of Caki-2 cells by perineoplasm PAT CMs. Perineoplasm PATs from pT3 RCCs overexpressed multiple WNTs and their CMs exhibited higher WNT/ß-catenin activity and increased the migration of Caki-2 cells compared to CMs from benign neoplasms. Addition of secreted WNT inhibitory factor-1 recombinant protein into perineoplasm PAT CMs completely blocked the cell migration. These results indicate that WNT related factors from perineoplasm PAT may promote progression of local ccRCC to locally advanced (pT3) disease by increasing ccRCC cell mobility. PMID:27409168

  19. Overexpression of G6PD Represents a Potential Prognostic Factor in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiao; Yi, Xiaojia; Yang, Zhe; Han, Qiaoqiao; Di, Xuesong; Chen, Fufei; Wang, Yanling; Yi, Zihan; Kuang, Yingmin; Zhu, Yuechun

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) participates in glucose metabolism and it acts as the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Recently, G6PD dysregulation has been found in a variety of human cancers. Through analyzing published data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), our pilot study indicated that G6PD mRNA expression was significantly higher in advanced Fuhrman grade in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). These clues promoted us to further evaluate the expression profile of G6PD and its prognostic impact in patients with ccRCC. In this study, G6PD expression levels were analyzed in 149 human ccRCC and normal tissues using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that compared with that in the normal renal samples, G6PD was found highly expressed in 51.0% of ccRCC (p<0.05). High expression of G6PD was significantly correlated to tumor extent, lymph node metastasis, Fuhrman grade, and TNM stage of ccRCC (all p<0.05). Moreover, positive G6PD expression was associated with poorer overall survival in ccRCC (p<0.001). In Cox regression analyses, high expression of G6PD also could be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in ccRCC (p=0.007). This study suggests that overexpression of G6PD is associated with advanced disease status and therefore may become an important prognosticator for poor outcomes in ccRCC, as well as a potential therapeutic target for developing effective treatment modalities. PMID:28367246

  20. Hormone signaling pathways as treatment targets in renal cell cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Niedzwiedzka, Magdalena; Porta, Camillo; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, biochemical and genetic research has revealed that renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology is hormone-related. It was shown that hormone receptors are abnormally expressed in RCC cells. Abnormal endocrine stimulation also plays a significant role in RCC pathophysiology. Cellular proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and drug resistance in RCC is modulated by para- and autocrine hormonal stimulation. In particular, RCC overexpression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and its receptor was reported. On the contrary, corticotropin releasing hormone was reported to inhibit RCC cell proliferation and regulate angiogenesis. Overexpression of luteinizing hormone also promotes RCC tumor angiogenesis. Estrogen receptor α overexpression increases the transcriptional factor activity of hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, but estrogen receptor β has a cancer suppressive role. Glucocorticoid receptors and androgen receptor are markers of indolent RCC and assigned tumor suppressive activity. Proopiomelanocortin is upregulated in VHL-mutated renal cell carcinoma via Nur77 transcription factor signaling. In RCC, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor promotes angiogenesis and metastatic formation via VEGF release. Mineralocorticoid receptor overexpression promotes cell survival and increases RCC cell proliferation. Vitamin D receptor expression is downregulated or absent in RCC and differentiate subtypes of renal cell tumors. RAR-β promotes tumorigenesis but retinoic acid receptor γ expression correlates negatively with the TNM stage at diagnosis. Finally, progesterone receptor expression is negatively correlated with the cancer stage. Molecular data analysis revealed the possibility of renal cancer cell proliferation induction via hormone activated pathways. Inhibition of hormonal signaling may thus play a putative role in supportive therapies against this cancer type.

  1. Features of renal vasculitis in autoimmune MRL lpr/lpr mice: phenotypes and functional properties of infiltrating cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tarkowski, A; Jonsson, R; Sanchez, R; Klareskog, L; Koopman, W J

    1988-01-01

    MRL lpr/lpr (MRL/1) mice spontaneously develop a widespread renal vasculitis. The majority of the cells in vasculitic lesions are bright Ly-1, L3T4 and la-positive in contrast to the cells found in lymph nodes and spleens of the old MRL/1 mice. However, despite differences in phenotypical patterns, B and T cells from arteritic lesions do not differ from mononuclear cells (MNC) eluted from MRL/1 lymph nodes with regard to the frequency of IgG secreting cells and the proliferative responses to Concanavalin A (Con A). Co-culture experiments with congeneic MRL+/+ (MRL/n) spleen cells indicate that the poor response to Con A of the MNC eluted from vasculitic lesions is, unlike the case of lymph node MNC, due to suppressive action of vasculitic cells on the indicator cell population. Further support for the activation status of infiltrating MHC in kidney vasculitic lesions, expressed by high in vivo uptake of 3H-thymidine, was obtained by autoradiography performed on frozen sections. The observed differences in phenotypic patterns and functional features between lymph node MNC and infiltrating vasculitic MNC indicate that different immune mechanisms may be responsible for the development of lymphadenopathy and vasculopathy, respectively in MRL/1 mouse. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3293853

  2. Association of HbA1c and cardiovascular and renal disease in an adult Mediterranean population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests a mechanistic link between the glycemic environment and renal and cardiovascular events, even below the threshold for diabetes. We aimed to assess the association between HbA1c and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A cross-sectional study involving a random representative sample of 2270 adults from southern Spain (Malaga) was undertaken. We measured HbA1c, serum creatinine and albuminuria in fasting blood and urine samples. Results Individuals without diabetes in the upper HbA1c tertile had an unfavorable cardiovascular and renal profile and shared certain clinical characteristics with the patients with diabetes. Overall, a higher HbA1c concentration was strongly associated with CKD or CVD after adjustment for traditional risk factors. The patients with known diabetes had a 2-fold higher odds of CKD or CVD. However, when both parameters were introduced in the same model, the HbA1c concentration was only significantly associated with clinical endpoints (OR: 1.4, 95% CI, 1.1-1.6, P = 0.002). An increase in HbA1c of one percentage point was associated with a 30% to 40% increase in the rate of CKD or CVD. This relationship was apparent in persons with and without known diabetes. ROC curves illustrated that a HbA1c of 37 mmol/mol (5.5%) was the optimal value in terms of sensitivity and specificity for predicting endpoints in this population. Conclusion HbA1c levels were associated with a higher prevalence of CKD and CVD cross-sectionally, regardless of diabetes status. These data support the value of HbA1c as a marker of cardiovascular and renal disease in the general population. PMID:23865389

  3. RhoB Acts as a Tumor Suppressor That Inhibits Malignancy of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Yu; Fan, Yang; Pang, Haigang; Gong, Huijie; Shen, Donglai; Gu, Liangyou; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological role of RhoB in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The expression of RhoB was examined in specimens of patients and cell lines by Western blot and Immunohistochemistry. The correlation between RhoB expression and clinicopathologic variables was also analyzed. The effects of RhoB on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis, and invasion/migration were detected by over-expression and knockdown of RhoB level in ccRCC cells via plasmids and RNAi. The results showed that RhoB was low-expressed in ccRCC surgical specimens and cell lines compared with adjacent normal renal tissues and normal human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell lines (HKC), and its protein expression level was significantly associated with the tumor pathologic parameter embracing tumor size(P = 0.0157), pT stage(P = 0.0035), TNM stage(P = 0.0024) and Fuhrman tumor grade(P = 0.0008). Further, over-expression of RhoB remarkably inhibited the cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis, and aslo reduced the invasion and migration ability of ccRCC cells. Interestingly, up-regulation of RhoB could induce cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and led to cell cycle regulators(CyclineB1,CDK1) and pro-apoptotic protein(casp3,casp9) aberrant expression. Moreover, knockdown of RhoB in HKC cells promoted cell proliferation and migration. Taken together, our study indicates that RhoB expression is decreased in ccRCC carcinogenesis and progression. Up-regulation of RhoB significantly inhibits ccRCC cell malignant phenotype. These findings show that RhoB may play a tumor suppressive role in ccRCC cells, raising its potential value in futural therapeutic target for the patients of ccRCC. PMID:27384222

  4. C-met inhibition blocks bone metastasis development induced by renal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Lucia; Belisario, Dimas; Migliardi, Giorgia; Grange, Cristina; Bussolati, Benedetta; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Perera, Timothy; Dalmasso, Ettore; Carbonare, Luca Dalle; Godio, Laura; Comoglio, Paolo; Trusolino, Livio; Ferracini, Riccardo; Roato, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key players in bone metastasis. In some renal tumors CSCs overexpress the HGF receptor c-MET, speculating that c-MET targeting could lead to bone metastasis inhibition. To address this hypothesis we isolated renal CD105+/CD24−CSCs, expressing c-MET receptor from a primary renal carcinoma. Then, to study their ability to metastasize to bone, we injected renal CSCs in NOD/SCID mice implanted with a human bone and we tested the effect of a c-MET inhibitor (JNJ-38877605) on bone metastasis development. JNJ-38877605 inhibited the formation of metastases at bone implant site. We showed that JNJ-38877605 inhibited the activation of osteoclasts induced by RCC stem cells and it stimulated osteoblast activity, finally resulting in a reduction of bone turnover consistent with the inhibition of bone metastases. We measured the circulating levels of osteotropic factors induced by RCC stem cells in the sera of mice treated with c-Met inhibitor, showing that IL-11 and CCL20 were reduced in mice treated with JNJ-38877605, strongly supporting the involvement of c-MET in the regulation of this process. To address the clinical relevance of c-MET upregulation during tumor progression, we analysed c-MET in renal cancer patients detecting an increased expression in the bone metastatic lesions by IHC. Then, we dosed CCL20 serum levels resulting significantly increased in patients with bone metastases compared to non-metastatic ones. Collectively, our data highlight the importance of the c-MET pathway in the pathogenesis of bone metastases induced by RCC stem cells in mice and humans. PMID:27322553

  5. AE-941, a multifunctional antiangiogenic compound: trials in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2003-08-01

    The therapy of renal cell carcinoma remains a challenge for medical oncologists and urologists. During the past 10 years, the molecular abnormalities occurring in various subtypes of renal cancer, such as clear cell renal carcinoma, have been well described. The genetic abnormalities found in clear cell tumours involve chromosome 3p and, additionally, hypermethylation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene can be detected. The VHL protein is involved in the angiogenic cascade in non-hypoxic conditions, and the possible role of mutant or hypermethylated VHL protein in promoting angiogenesis is, therefore, of interest. The majority of patients with renal cell carcinoma who receive treatment, such as IL-2 and/or IFN, fail and develop progressive disease. Therapy is therefore inadequate and novel appro