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Sample records for renal disease chronic

  1. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical...

  2. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical...

  3. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b) A...

  4. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b) A...

  5. Sympatho-renal axis in chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, Paul A; Mahfoud, Felix; Schlaich, Markus P; Hoppe, Uta C; Böhm, Michael; Krum, Henry

    2011-12-01

    Essential hypertension, insulin resistance, heart failure, congestion, diuretic resistance, and functional renal disease are all characterized by excessive central sympathetic drive. The contribution of the kidney's somatic afferent nerves, as an underlying cause of elevated central sympathetic drive, and the consequences of excessive efferent sympathetic signals to the kidney itself, as well as other organs, identify the renal sympathetic nerves as a uniquely logical therapeutic target for diseases linked by excessive central sympathetic drive. Clinical studies of renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension using an endovascular radiofrequency ablation methodology have exposed the sympathetic link between these conditions. Renal denervation could be expected to simultaneously affect blood pressure, insulin resistance, sleep disorders, congestion in heart failure, cardiorenal syndrome and diuretic resistance. The striking epidemiologic evidence for coexistence of these disorders suggests common causal pathways. Chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system has been associated with components of the metabolic syndrome, such as blood pressure elevation, obesity, dyslipidemia, and impaired fasting glucose with hyperinsulinemia. Over 50% of patients with essential hypertension are hyperinsulinemic, regardless of whether they are untreated or in a stable program of treatment. Insulin resistance is related to sympathetic drive via a bidirectional mechanism. In this manuscript, we review the data that suggests that selective impairment of renal somatic afferent and sympathetic efferent nerves in patients with resistant hypertension both reduces markers of central sympathetic drive and favorably impacts diseases linked through central sympathetics-insulin resistance, heart failure, congestion, diuretic resistance, and cardiorenal disorders.

  6. Odour perception in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Griep, M I; Van der Niepen, P; Sennesael, J J; Mets, T F; Massart, D L; Verbeelen, D L

    1997-10-01

    The sense of smell plays an important role in the quality of life. Many studies have shown a declining odour perception in the elderly, as well as in subjects in poor health or nutritional state. Considering the high prevalence of poor nutritional state in renal disease and the importance of odour perception in nutrition and health, the relationship between renal function, nutritional state, and odour perception is explored in this study. A total of 101 patients with chronic renal failure participated in the study. Thirty-eight haemodialysis patients (mean age = 64.3 years) were evaluated both before and after dialysis. Sixteen patients on peritoneal dialysis treatment (mean age = 64.0 years), 28 transplanted patients (mean age = 53.5 years, mean creatinine clearance = 64.0 ml/min) and 19 patients with varying degrees of renal insufficiency were also included (mean age = 63.7 years, mean creatinine clearance = 29.5 ml/min). Patients with cognitive deficits or upper respiratory airway diseases were excluded. A validated objective procedure was used to measure odour perception, by determining the detection threshold for isoamyl acetate (banana odour) as the lowest detectable odour concentration. Healthy control persons had significantly lower odour thresholds compared to patients on peritoneal (P = 0.001) and haemodialysis (P = 0.002). No significant difference was observed in odour perception between patients on peritoneal and haemodialysis (P = 0.779) and for patients on haemodialysis before and after a dialysis session. Transplanted patients had significantly better odour perception compared to matched patients on dialysis (P < 0.001). Odour perception of transplanted patients and matched healthy control persons was similar (P = 0.81). In patients with varying degrees of renal insufficiency, including healthy controls and transplanted patients, a significant positive correlation was found between odour perception and creatinine clearance (P = 0.02). A significant

  7. [Chronic renal disease as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Hermans, M M H; Kooman, J P; Stehouwer, C D A

    2008-07-19

    A lowering of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and/or the presence of albuminuria are signs of chronic renal disease. Both variables are for the most part independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Albuminuria is a marker of endothelial dysfunction. A decrease of the GFR is associated with non-traditional risk factors, e.g. renal anaemia, uraemic toxins due to a decrease of the renal clearance, hyperhomocysteinaemia caused by a diminished homocysteine metabolism, excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system which is related to sleep apnoea syndrome, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia associated with the formation of vasotoxic, oxidised LDL cholesterol. These non-traditional risk factors may, alone or in combination with traditional atherogenic risk factors (e.g. age, male gender, smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, obesity, positive family history and diabetes mellitus), partially via endothelial dysfunction, result in harmful effects on arterial function, increasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Different stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with specific risk factors, making a specific therapeutic approach essential.

  8. Pregnancy in patients with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bear, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Pregnancy is not invariably contra-indicated in patients with pre-existing renal disease. Clinical data now exist that permit the clinician to distinguish such patients who are likely to experience difficulty during pregnancy from those in whom pregnancy can be undertaken with high expectation of success. Patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus, active or inactive, with or without lupus nephritis, should avoid pregnancy. Patients with other forms of chronic renal disease in whom the serum creatinine concentration prior to pregnancy is less than 1.5 mg/dL are not exposed to increased maternal or fetal risk. On the other hand, patients with serum creatinine values exceeding 1.6 mg/dL experience a high incidence of maternal and fetal complications and should avoid pregnancy. The life expectancy of recipients of a renal transplant is uncertain, and these patients should receive counselling as to the advisability of undertaking pregnancy. The maternal risk in such patients is not inordinately high, but the fetal risk is considerable. PMID:350371

  9. Kidney dendritic cells in acute and chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hochheiser, Katharina; Tittel, André; Kurts, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Dendritic cells are not only the master regulators of adaptive immunity, but also participate profoundly in innate immune responses. Much has been learned about their basic immunological functions and their roles in various diseases. Comparatively little is still known about their role in renal disease, despite their obvious potential to affect immune responses in the kidney, and immune responses that are directed against renal components. Kidney dendritic cells form an abundant network in the renal tubulointerstitium and constantly survey the environment for signs of injury or infection, in order to alert the immune system to the need to initiate defensive action. Recent studies have identified a role for dendritic cells in several murine models of acute renal injury and chronic nephritis. Here we summarize the current knowledge on the role of kidney dendritic cells that has been obtained from the study of murine models of renal disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Brown Nail-bed Arcs and Chronic Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, W. K.; Raffle, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    A brown arc affecting the distal part of the fingernail-bed, just proximal to the point of separation of the nail from its bed, has been found in 12 out of 34 patients with chronic renal disease (35%) compared with an incidence of less than 2% in a series of unselected patients. It represents a distinctive form of pigmentation, possibly due to lipochromes. No decisive association could be found between the presence or absence of the pigmented nail arc and the level of impaired renal function. Nevertheless it seems that renal disease predisposes towards the development of brown nail arcs. Imagesp786-a PMID:5014252

  11. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    PubMed

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013<0.05) and presence of hepatitis C virus were particularly correlated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with

  12. Frequency and clinical predictors of coronary artery disease in chronic renal failure renal transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque Seixas, Emerson; Carmello, Beatriz Leone; Kojima, Christiane Akemi; Contti, Mariana Moraes; Modeli de Andrade, Luiz Gustavo; Maiello, José Roberto; Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Martin, Luis Cuadrado

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality in chronic renal failure patients before and after renal transplantation. Among them, coronary disease presents a particular risk; however, risk predictors have been used to diagnose coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the frequency and importance of clinical predictors of coronary artery disease in chronic renal failure patients undergoing dialysis who were renal transplant candidates, and assessed a previously developed scoring system. Coronary angiographies conducted between March 2008 and April 2013 from 99 candidates for renal transplantation from two transplant centers in São Paulo state were analyzed for associations between significant coronary artery diseases (≥70% stenosis in one or more epicardial coronary arteries or ≥50% in the left main coronary artery) and clinical parameters. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified diabetes, angina, and/or previous infarction, clinical peripheral arterial disease and dyslipidemia as predictors of coronary artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified only diabetes and angina and/or previous infarction as independent predictors. The results corroborate previous studies demonstrating the importance of these factors when selecting patients for coronary angiography in clinical pretransplant evaluation.

  13. Renal creatinine handling in very old patients with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Michelángelo, Hernán; Vilas, Manuel; Martinez, Bernardo; Bonetto, Alberto; Jauregui, Ricardo; Algranati, Luis

    2011-09-01

    Renal creatinine handling is basically the result of its glomerular filtration and proximal tubular secretion. However, creatinine reabsorption has been documented in certain conditions, such as premature babies, newborns, and healthy elderly people. Additionally, it is known that there is an increase in the proportion of secreted creatinine in chronic renal disease. In this paper, we report our studies on the characteristic reabsorption pattern of creatinine in the elderly with chronic renal disease. We studied twenty-seven volunteers with chronic kidney disease, eleven of whom were young and the rest were very old (age > 75 years old). We measured creatinine clearance without (Ccr) and with cimetidine (CcrWC) and Ccr/CcrWC ratio from each volunteer, in timed urine samples. Then, Ccr, CcrWC, and Ccr/CcrWC ratio were compared between young and very old people in two chronic kidney disease subgroups: stages II-III and stages IV-V. Statistical analysis was performed applying a non-parametric test (Wilcoxon). We observed a tendency towards a lower Ccr/CcrWC ratio in the very old stage II-III group compared with the young one: 1 (0.96-1.26) (very old) vs 1.3 (1.1-1.5) (young), P = 0.09, on the contrary, there was no significant difference in Ccr/CcrWC ratio between very old and young person with stage IV-V CKD: 1.66 (1.41-2.21) (young) vs 1.77 (1.1-2.7) (young), P = NS. Creatinine secretion pattern in very old patients with advanced chronic renal disease is similar to that observed in young ones with similar level of CKD.

  14. A new perspective on the pathogenesis of chronic renal disease in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus)

    PubMed Central

    Prozesky, Leon; Lawrence, John

    2018-01-01

    The sustainability of captive cheetah populations is limited by high mortality due to chronic renal disease. This necropsy study, conducted on 243 captive cheetahs from one institution, investigated the relationships between focal palatine erosions, gastritis, enterocolitis, glomerulosclerosis, chronic renal infarcts, renal cortical and medullary fibrosis, and renal medullary amyloidosis at death. Associations between the individual renal lesions and death due to chronic renal disease and comparisons of lesion prevalence between captive bred and wild born and between normal and king coated cheetahs were also assessed. All lesions were significantly positively correlated with age at death. Renal medullary fibrosis was the only lesion associated with the likelihood of death being due to chronic renal disease, and cheetahs with this lesion were younger, on average, than cheetahs with other renal lesions. Alimentary tract lesions were not associated with amyloidosis. All lesions, except for palatine erosions, were more common in wild born than in captive bred cheetahs; the former were older at death than the latter. Having a king coat had no clear effect on disease prevalence. These results suggest that age and renal medullary fibrosis are the primary factors influencing the pathogenesis of chronic renal disease in captive cheetahs. Apart from amyloidosis, these findings are analogous to those described in chronic renal disease in domestic cats, which is postulated to result primarily from repetitive hypoxic injury of renal tubules, mediated by age and stress. Cheetahs may be particularly susceptible to acute renal tubular injury due to their propensity for stress and their extended life span in captivity, as well as their adaptation for fecundity (rather than longevity) and adrenaline-mediated high speed prey chases. The presence of chronic renal disease in subadult cheetahs suggests that prevention, identification and mitigation of stress are critical to the

  15. A new perspective on the pathogenesis of chronic renal disease in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Emily P; Prozesky, Leon; Lawrence, John

    2018-01-01

    The sustainability of captive cheetah populations is limited by high mortality due to chronic renal disease. This necropsy study, conducted on 243 captive cheetahs from one institution, investigated the relationships between focal palatine erosions, gastritis, enterocolitis, glomerulosclerosis, chronic renal infarcts, renal cortical and medullary fibrosis, and renal medullary amyloidosis at death. Associations between the individual renal lesions and death due to chronic renal disease and comparisons of lesion prevalence between captive bred and wild born and between normal and king coated cheetahs were also assessed. All lesions were significantly positively correlated with age at death. Renal medullary fibrosis was the only lesion associated with the likelihood of death being due to chronic renal disease, and cheetahs with this lesion were younger, on average, than cheetahs with other renal lesions. Alimentary tract lesions were not associated with amyloidosis. All lesions, except for palatine erosions, were more common in wild born than in captive bred cheetahs; the former were older at death than the latter. Having a king coat had no clear effect on disease prevalence. These results suggest that age and renal medullary fibrosis are the primary factors influencing the pathogenesis of chronic renal disease in captive cheetahs. Apart from amyloidosis, these findings are analogous to those described in chronic renal disease in domestic cats, which is postulated to result primarily from repetitive hypoxic injury of renal tubules, mediated by age and stress. Cheetahs may be particularly susceptible to acute renal tubular injury due to their propensity for stress and their extended life span in captivity, as well as their adaptation for fecundity (rather than longevity) and adrenaline-mediated high speed prey chases. The presence of chronic renal disease in subadult cheetahs suggests that prevention, identification and mitigation of stress are critical to the

  16. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  17. Evaluation of chronic kidney disease in chronic heart failure: From biomarkers to arterial renal resistances

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Leone, Marta; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and its worsening are recurring conditions in chronic heart failure (CHF) which are independently associated with poor patient outcome. The heart and kidney share many pathophysiological mechanisms which can determine dysfunction in each organ. Cardiorenal syndrome is the condition in which these two organs negatively affect each other, therefore an accurate evaluation of renal function in the clinical setting of CHF is essential. This review aims to revise the parameters currently used to evaluate renal dysfunction in CHF with particular reference to the usefulness and the limitations of biomarkers in evaluating glomerular dysfunction and tubular damage. Moreover, it is reported the possible utility of renal arterial resistance index (a parameter associated with abnormalities in renal vascular bed) for a better assesment of kidney disfunction. PMID:25610846

  18. Hypertension in chronic kidney disease: the influence of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Azancot, Maria A; Ramos, Natalia; Moreso, Francesc J; Ibernon, Meritxell; Espinel, Eugenia; Torres, Irina B; Fort, Joan; Seron, Daniel

    2014-09-15

    Hypertension is one of the most prevalent cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney transplants. The contribution of transplantation to hypertension in comparison to patients with CKD and similar renal function has not been characterized. Ninety-two transplants and 97 CKD patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m not receiving dialysis were enrolled. At entry, office blood pressure (BP) and 24-hr ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were obtained. Office BP was not different between transplants and CKD patients (139.5±14.3 vs. 135.2±19.3, P=1.00, respectively). ABPM 24-hr systolic blood pressure (SBP) (133.9±14.3 vs. 126.2±16.1, P=0.014), awake SBP (135.6±15.2 vs. 128.7±16.2, P=0.042), and sleep SBP (131.2±16.2 vs. 120.2 ±17.9, P=0.0014) were higher in renal transplants. When patients were classified according to BP patterns associated with highest cardiovascular risk, the proportion of patients with both nocturnal hypertension and non-dipper pattern was higher in transplants (68.5% vs. 47.4%, P=0.03). In the multivariate regression analysis, transplantation was an independent predictor of 24-hr, awake, and sleep SBP. Office BP is similar in kidney transplants and CKD patients with similar renal function. On the contrary, hypertension is more severe in kidney transplants when evaluated with ABPM mainly as a result of increased sleep systolic BP. Thus, precise evaluation of hypertension in kidney transplants requires ABPM.

  19. Chronic Colovesical Fistula Leading to Chronic Urinary Tract Infection Resulting in End-Stage Renal Disease in a Chronic Granulomatous Disease Patient.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M R; Sanford, T; Nair, A; Zerbe, C S; Hughes, M S; Folio, L; Agarwal, Piyush K; Brancato, S J

    2017-02-01

    A 46-year old man with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) being followed at the National Institute of Health with uncontrolled CGD colitis who developed chronic colovesical fistula, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Despite aggressive medical management of symptoms with immunomodulators and antibiotic prophylaxis, the chronic colovesical fistula led to chronic pyelonephritis, recurrent urinary tract infections, persistent air in the collecting system and bladder, and post-renal obstruction resulting in renal failure. Patient is now hemodialysis dependent and required diverting loop ileostomy placement. This report highlights multiple potential etiologies of rising serum creatinine in patients with CGD.

  20. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  1. Retinopathy and chronic kidney disease in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Alexander, Judith; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; McWilliams, Kathleen; Lo, Joan C; Go, Alan; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Lash, James P; Fink, Jeffrey C; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the association between retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. In this observational, cross-sectional study, 2605 patients of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a multicenter study of chronic kidney disease, were offered participation. Nonmydriatic fundus photographs of the disc and macula in both eyes were obtained in 1936 of these subjects. The photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center using standard protocols. Presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed by trained graders and a retinal specialist using protocols developed for large epidemiologic studies. Kidney function measurements and information on traditional and nontraditional risk factors for decreased kidney function were obtained from the CRIC study. Greater severity of retinopathy was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate after adjustment for traditional and nontraditional risk factors. The presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate. We found no strong direct relationship between estimated glomerular filtration rate and average arteriolar or venular calibers. Our findings show a strong association between severity of retinopathy and its features and level of kidney function after adjustment for traditional and nontraditional risk factors for chronic kidney disease, suggesting that retinovascular pathology reflects renal disease.

  2. [Suplemented restricted diet in old patients with chronic renal disease].

    PubMed

    Teplan, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    In last decades was confirmed remarkable increase in number of old patients with chronic kidney disease. Despide of developments in dialysis technology and kidney transplantation there is a growing number of old patients who are not suitable for these methods. Recently were published data showing long-term effect of protein restricted diet supplemented with keto amino acids in elderly. Based on our results obtained in re-analysis of 3 000 patients we can confirm also good compliance and low risk of malnutrition.Key words: chronic kidney disease - keto amino acids - old age - restricted diet.

  3. Leptospirosis Renal Disease: Emerging Culprit of Chronic Kidney Disease Unknown Etiology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most prevalent zoonosis affecting more than 1 million populations worldwide. Interestingly, leptospirosis endemic regions coincide with chronic kidney disease (CKD) hotspots largely due to flooding and agricultural overlaps. Acute leptospirosis induces multiple organ dysfunction including acute kidney injury and may predispose to CKD and end-stage renal disease, if not treated timely. Asymptomatic infection may carry the bacteria in the kidney and CKD progresses insidiously. Histologic finding of leptospirosis renal disease includes tubulointerstitial nephritis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy. Proximal tubule dysfunction and hypokalemia are observed in adult male workers with leptospirosis, a characteristic similarity to CKD unknown etiology (CKDu). CKDu is a form of CKD that is not attributable to traditional risk factors clustering in agricultural communities affecting young male farmers. Kidney pathology shows a chronic tubulointerstitial disease. CKDu is being reported as an endemic nephropathy across the globe. Recent surveys suggest that asymptomatic leptospira renal colonization is an overlooked risk for renal fibrosis and CKDu. Population with anti-leptospira seropositivity is associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate in endemic regions and carrier may progress to CKD. Leptospirosis has been considered as a risk factor for CKDu in Sri Lanka and in Mesoamerican area. Sugarcane workers in Nicaragua showed increased anti-leptospira seropositivity and higher urinary biomarkers for kidney injury. Emerging evidence with signs of infection were reported in these endemic population, indicating that leptospira exposure could play a role in CKDu as a cause of primary kidney disease or a susceptible factor when secondary injury such as heat stress or dehydration aggravates kidney disease. Therefore, leptospirosis as an emerging culprit of CKDu deserves further in-depth investigation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Metabolic bone disease in chronic renal failure. II. Renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Huffer, W. E.; Kuzela, D.; Popovtzer, M. M.; Starzl, T. E.

    1975-01-01

    Trabecular vertebral bone of renal transplant patients was quantitatively compared with bone from normal individuals and dialyzed and nondialyzed patienets with chronic renal failure reported in detail in an earlier study. Long- and short-term transplant patients have increased bone resorption and mineralization defects similar to renal osteodystrophy in dialyzed and nondialyzed patients. However, in transplant patients the magnitude of resorption is greater, and bone volume tends to decrease rather than increase. Resorptive activity in transplant patients is maximal during the first year after transplantation. Bone volume decreases continuously for at least 96 months after transplantation. Only decreased bone volume correlated with success or failure of the renal transplant. Morphologic findings in this study correlate with other clinical and morphologic data to suggest that reduction in bone volume in transplant patients results from a combination of persistent hyperparathyroidism and suppression of bone formation by steroid therapy. Images Fig 1 PMID:1091152

  5. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, p<0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for traditional, but not novel, AVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between renal iron accumulation and renal interstitial fibrosis in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yoshiro; Fujii, Aya; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Okuhara, Yoshitaka; Morisawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Akiyo; Hirotani, Shinichi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2015-07-01

    Iron accumulation is associated with the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Renal fibrosis is a final common feature that contributes to the progression of CKD; however, little is known about the association between renal iron accumulation and renal interstitial fibrosis in CKD. Here we investigate the effects of iron chelation on renal interstitial fibrosis in a rat model of CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 8 weeks after operation, 5/6 nephrectomized rats were administered an oral iron chelator, deferasirox (DFX), in chow for 8 weeks. Other CKD rats were given a normal diet. Sham-operative rats given a normal diet served as a control. CKD rats exhibited hypertension, glomerulosclerosis and renal interstitial fibrosis. Iron chelation with DFX did not change hypertension and glomerulosclerosis; however, renal interstitial fibrosis was attenuated in CKD rats. Consistent with these findings, renal gene expression of collagen type III and transforming growth factor-β was increased in CKD rats compared with the controls, while iron chelation suppressed these increments. In addition, a decrease in vimentin along an increase in E-cadherin in renal gene expression was observed in CKD rats with iron chelation. CKD rats also showed increased CD68-positive cells in the kidney, whereas its increase was attenuated by iron deprivation. Similarly, increased renal gene expression of CD68, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was suppressed in CKD rats with iron chelation. Renal iron accumulation seems to be associated with renal interstitial fibrosis in a rat model of CKD.

  7. Genomic integration of ERRγ-HNF1β regulates renal bioenergetics and prevents chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Lupino, Katherine; Wilkins, Benjamin J; Qiu, Chengxiang; Liu, Jian; Omura, Yasuhiro; Allred, Amanda L; McDonald, Caitlin; Susztak, Katalin; Barish, Grant D; Pei, Liming

    2018-05-22

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized as a critical determinant of both hereditary and acquired kidney diseases. However, it remains poorly understood how mitochondrial metabolism is regulated to support normal kidney function and how its dysregulation contributes to kidney disease. Here, we show that the nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta (HNF1β) link renal mitochondrial and reabsorptive functions through coordinated epigenomic programs. ERRγ directly regulates mitochondrial metabolism but cooperatively controls renal reabsorption via convergent binding with HNF1β. Deletion of ERRγ in renal epithelial cells (RECs), in which it is highly and specifically expressed, results in severe renal energetic and reabsorptive dysfunction and progressive renal failure that recapitulates phenotypes of animals and patients with HNF1β loss-of-function gene mutations. Moreover, ERRγ expression positively correlates with renal function and is decreased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). REC-ERRγ KO mice share highly overlapping renal transcriptional signatures with human patients with CKD. Together these findings reveal a role for ERRγ in directing independent and HNF1β-integrated programs for energy production and use essential for normal renal function and the prevention of kidney disease.

  8. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  9. Well Preserved Renal Function in Children With Untreated Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ulla B; Németh, Antal

    2018-04-01

    On the basis of studies with hepatorenal syndrome, it is widely regarded that renal function is impacted in chronic liver disease (CLD). Therefore, we investigated renal function in children with CLD. In a retrospective study of 277 children with CLD, renal function was investigated as glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), measured as clearance of inulin and para-amino hippuric acid or clearance of iohexol. The data were analyzed with regard to different subgroups of liver disease and to the grade of damage. Hyperfiltration (>+2 SD of controls) was found in the subgroups of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (44%), glycogenosis (75%), and acute fulminant liver failure (60%). Patients with biliary atresia, most other patients with metabolic disease and intrahepatic cholestasis, and those with vascular anomalies and cryptogenic cirrhosis had normal renal function. Decreased renal function was found in patients with Alagille's syndrome (64% < -2 SD). Increased GFR and ERPF was found in patients with elevated transaminases, low prothrombin level, high bile acid concentration, and high aspartate-aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio. Most children with CLD had surprisingly well preserved renal function and certain groups had even hyperfiltration. The finding that children with decompensated liver disease and ongoing liver failure had stable kidney function suggests that no prognostic markers of threatening hepatorenal syndrome were at hand. Moreover, estimation of GFR based on serum creatinine fails to reveal hyperfiltration.

  10. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease.

  11. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. Material and Methods In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. Results All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Conclusions Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD. PMID:26587240

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration versus Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equations for renal function evaluation in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shikanov, Sergey; Clark, Melanie A; Raman, Jay D; Smith, Benjamin; Kaag, Matthew; Russo, Paul; Wheat, Jeffrey C; Wolf, J Stuart; Huang, William C; Shalhav, Arieh L; Eggener, Scott E

    2010-11-01

    A novel equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, has been proposed to replace the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease for estimated glomerular filtration rate due to higher accuracy, particularly in the setting of normal renal function. We compared these equations in patients with 2 functioning kidneys undergoing partial nephrectomy. We assembled a cohort of 1,158 patients from 5 institutions who underwent partial nephrectomy between 1991 and 2009. Only subjects with 2 functioning kidneys were included in the study. The end points were baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, last followup estimated glomerular filtration rate (3 to 18 months), absolute and percent change estimated glomerular filtration rate ([absolute change/baseline] × 100%), and proportion of newly developed chronic kidney disease stage III. The agreement between the equations was evaluated using Bland-Altman plots and the McNemar test for paired observations. Mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate derived from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations were 73 and 77 ml/minute/1.73 m(2), respectively, and following surgery were 63 and 67 ml/minute/1.73 m(2), respectively. Mean percent change estimated glomerular filtration rate was -12% for both equations (p = 0.2). The proportion of patients with newly developed chronic kidney disease stage III following surgery was 32% and 25%, according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations, respectively (p = 0.001). For patients with 2 functioning kidneys undergoing partial nephrectomy the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation provides slightly higher glomerular filtration rate estimates compared to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation, with 7% fewer patients categorized as having chronic kidney disease stage III or worse. Copyright © 2010

  13. Preoperative Renal Volume: A Surrogate Measure for Radical Nephrectomy-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fiona Mei Wen; Tay, Melissa Hui Wen; Tai, Bee Choo; Chen, Zhaojin; Tan, Lincoln; Goh, Benjamin Yen Seow; Raman, Lata; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-12-01

    Surgically induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been found to have less impact on survival as well as function when compared to medical causes for CKD. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether preoperative remaining kidney volume correlates with renal function after nephrectomy, which represents an individual's renal reserve before surgically induced CKD. A retrospective review of 75 consecutive patients (29.3% females) who underwent radical nephrectomy (RN) (2000-2010) was performed. Normal side kidney parenchyma, excluding renal vessels and central sinus fat, was manually outlined in each transverse slice of CT image and multiplied by slice thickness to calculate volume. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. CKD is defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Mean preoperative normal kidney parenchymal volume (mean age 55 [SD 13] years) is 150.7 (SD 36.4) mL. Over median follow-up of 36 months postsurgery, progression to CKD occurred in 42.6% (n = 32) of patients. On multivariable analysis, preoperative eGFR and preoperative renal volume <144 mL are independent predictors for postoperative CKD. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, median time to reach CKD postnephrectomy is 12.7 (range 0.03-43.66) months for renal volume <144 mL but not achieved if renal volume is >144 mL. Normal kidney parenchymal volume and preoperative eGFR are independent predictive factors for postoperative CKD after RN and may represent renal reserve for both surgically and medically induced CKD, respectively. Preoperative remaining kidney volume may be an adjunct representation of renal reserve postsurgery and predict later renal function decline due to perioperative loss of nephrons.

  14. [Chronic renal disease--a global problem in the XXI century].

    PubMed

    Shutov, A M

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, it was proposed to consider functional renal disorders 3 and more months in duration under the general name chronic renal disease (CRD) bearing in mind the common mechanism behind progressive nephropathy and high cardiovascular mortality of such patients. The prevalence of CRD in Russia is unknown; it is supposed that every tenth adult in the world has CRD. Diagnostics of CRD requires at least measurement of serum creatinine, calculation of the glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI formula, and determination of albuminuria. A main cause of CRD is cardiovascular disorders. Complicated relationships between cardiac insufficiency and CRD account for 5 types of cardiorenal syndrome. CRD patients are at risk of terminal renal insufficiency requiring replacement therapy; moreover, CRD enhances cardiovascular morbidity and predisposes to acute renal lesion that in turn accelerates progress of CRD. Taken together these events account for the global character of the CRD problem.

  15. Renal arterial resistive index is associated with severe histological changes and poor renal outcome during chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing public health problem and end stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a large human and economic burden. It is important to identify patients at high risk of ESRD. In order to determine whether renal Doppler resistive index (RI) may discriminate those patients, we analyzed whether RI was associated with identified prognosis factors of CKD, in particular histological findings, and with renal outcome. Methods RI was measured in the 48 hours before renal biopsy in 58 CKD patients. Clinical and biological data were collected prospectively at inclusion. Arteriosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis were quantitatively assessed on renal biopsy in a blinded fashion. MDRD eGFR at 18 months was collected for 35 (60%) patients. Renal function decline was defined as a decrease in eGFR from baseline of at least 5 mL/min/ 1.73 m2/year or need for chronic renal replacement therapy. Pearson’s correlation, Mann–Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for analysis of quantitative and qualitative variables respectively. Kaplan Meier analysis was realized to determine renal survival according to RI value using the log-rank test. Multiple logistic regression was performed including variables with p < 0.20 in univariate analysis. Results Most patients had glomerulonephritis (82%). Median age was 46 years [21–87], eGFR 59 mL/min/ 1.73m2 [5–130], percentage of interstitial fibrosis 10% [0–90], glomerulosclerosis 13% [0–96] and RI 0.63 [0.31-1.00]. RI increased with age (r = 0.435, p = 0.0063), pulse pressure (r = 0.303, p = 0.022), renal atrophy (r = −0.275, p = 0.038) and renal dysfunction (r = −0.402, p = 0.0018). Patients with arterial intima/media ratio ≥ 1 (p = 0.032), interstitial fibrosis > 20% (p = 0.014) and renal function decline (p = 0.0023) had higher RI. Patients with baseline RI ≥ 0.65 had a poorer renal outcome than those with baseline RI < 0.65 (p = 0.0005). In multiple logistic

  16. Transforming growth factor beta-1 An important biomarker for developing cardiovascular diseases in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Avci, E; Avci, G Alp; Ozcelik, B; Cevher, S Coskun; Suicmez, M

    2017-01-01

    Our study focuses on the determination and evaluation of TGF-β1 levels of patients receiving hemodialysis treatment because of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure, characterized by irreversible loss of renal function, is a major public health problem in the world. Transforming growth factor-beta is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the cellular growth, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and immune regulation. Among the three TGF-β isoforms, TGF-β1 plays a key role in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. We studied 24 patients who were on regular hemodialysis, with non-diabetic nephropathy. 20 healthy people who proved to be in a good state of health and free from any signs of chronic diseases or disorders were enrolled as a control group. Serum samples were collected both before and after hemodialysis treatment from each patient. TGF-β1 levels were determined by Enzyme Immunoassay method. TGF-β1 levels were found significantly higher in the hemodialysis patients than those of the control groups. Also, the TGF-β1 was significantly reduced after hemodialysis treatment but it was still higher than in control groups. This result indicates that hemodialysis is an effective treatment method to decrease the serum TGF-B1 levels. Nevertheless, this decrease is not enough to reduce existing risks (Tab. 1, Fig. 2, Ref. 28).

  17. Histomorphometry of feline chronic kidney disease and correlation with markers of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Elliott, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in geriatric cats, but most cases have nonspecific renal lesions, and few studies have correlated these lesions with clinicopathological markers of renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions best correlated with renal function and likely mediators of disease progression in cats with chronic kidney disease. Cats were recruited through 2 first-opinion practices between 1992 and 2010. When postmortem examinations were authorized, renal tissues were preserved in formalin. Sections were evaluated by a pathologist masked to all clinicopathological data. They were scored semiquantitatively for the severity of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. Glomerular volume was measured using image analysis; the percentage of glomeruli that were obsolescent was recorded. Sections were assessed for hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis and tubular mineralization. Kidneys from 80 cats with plasma biochemical data from the last 2 months of life were included in the study. Multivariable linear regression (P < .05) was used to assess the association of lesions with clinicopathological data obtained close to death. Interstitial fibrosis was the lesion best correlated with the severity of azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and anemia. Proteinuria was associated with interstitial fibrosis and glomerular hypertrophy, whereas higher time-averaged systolic blood pressure was associated with glomerulosclerosis and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis.

  18. Effects of fenoldopam on renal blood flow in hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rovella, Valentina; Ferrannini, Michele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Marrone, Giulia; Busca, Andrea; Sorge, Roberto; Manca di Villahermosa, Simone; Casasco, Maurizio; Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa

    2018-05-15

    The synthetic drug fenoldopam mesylate (FM) may have a renoprotective role, and a "renal dose" of 0.1 µg/kg/min intravenous (IV) infusion of FM has been reported as able to increase renal blood flow without affecting systemic blood pressure. But conclusive data are still lacking. We aimed to investigate by color-Doppler ultrasonography the effects of IV administration of FM at this dosage in hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and verify whether it may induce any systemic hemodynamic alteration. In 60 hypertensive CKD patients, we measured by duplex Doppler ultrasonography, at baseline and during infusion of 0.1 µg/kg/min of FM, the systolic and diastolic flow velocity (sampled at the renal hilum, intermediate section and origin of both renal arteries) and the intra-parenchymal renal resistive index (RRI) sampled on interlobular arteries of both kidneys. Patients were divided into four subgroups (I-IV) according to classification of National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-DOQI). Infusion of 0.1 µg/kg/min FM significantly decreased the RRI (0.73 ± 0.05 vs. 0.65 ± 0.06; p < 0.0001) and increased the systolic and diastolic flow velocities in all renal artery tracts examined. No single episode of systemic hypotension was observed. Very low-dose FM may significantly increase renal blood flow and exert a renal protective effect in hypertensive CKD patients. Infusion of FM at such low dosage appears also to be quite safe, even in CKD and hypertensive patients.

  19. Increased Blood Pressure Variability Prior to Chronic Kidney Disease Exacerbates Renal Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Frederico F. C. T.; Araujo, Gilberto; Porto, Marcella L.; Freitas, Flavia P. S.; Graceli, Jones B.; Balarini, Camille M.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Gava, Agata L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased blood pressure variability (BPV), which can be experimentally induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD), has emerged as a new marker of the prognosis of cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Considering that increased BPV can lead to organ-damage, the goal of the present study was to evaluate the effects of SAD on renal function in an experimental model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). SAD was performed in male Wistar rats 2 weeks before 5/6 nephrectomy and the animals were evaluated 4 weeks after the induction of CKD. Our data demonstrated that BPV was increased in SAD and CKD animals and that the combination of both conditions (SAD+CKD) exacerbated BPV. The baroreflex sensitivity index was diminished in the SAD and CKD groups; this reduction was more pronounced when SAD and CKD were performed together. 5/6 nephrectomy led to hypertension, which was higher in SAD+CKD animals. Regarding renal function, the combination of SAD and CKD resulted in reduced renal plasma and blood flow, increased renal vascular resistance and augmented uraemia when compared to CKD animals. Glomerular filtration rate and BPV were negatively correlated in SAD, CKD, and SAD+CKD animals. Moreover, SAD+CKD animals presented a higher level of glomerulosclerosis when compared to all other groups. Cardiac and renal hypertrophy, as well as oxidative stress, was also further increased when SAD and CKD were combined. These results show that SAD prior to 5/6 nephrectomy exacerbates renal dysfunction, suggesting that previous augmented BPV should be considered as an important factor to the progression of renal diseases. PMID:27721797

  20. Niacin improves renal lipid metabolism and slows progression in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-hyang; Kim, Hyun-ju; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence points to lipid accumulation in the diseased kidney and its contribution to progression of nephropathy. We recently found heavy lipid accumulation and marked dysregulation of lipid metabolism in the remnant kidneys of rats with chronic renal failure (CRF). Present study sought to determine efficacy of niacin supplementation on renal tissue lipid metabolism in CRF. Kidney function, lipid content, and expression of molecules involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism were determined in untreated CRF (5/6 nephrectomized), niacin-treated CRF (50 mg/kg/day in drinking water for 12 weeks) and control rats. CRF resulted in hypertension, proteinuria, renal tissue lipid accumulation, up-regulation of scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1), carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS), acyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), liver X receptor (LXR), ATP binding cassette (ABC) A-1, ABCG-1, and SR-B1 and down-regulation of sterol responsive element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), SREBP-2, HMG-CoA reductase, PPAR-alpha, fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and CPT1A. Niacin therapy attenuated hypertension, proteinuria, and tubulo-interstitial injury, reduced renal tissue lipids, CD36, ChREBP, LXR, ABCA-1, ABCG-1, and SR-B1 abundance and raised PPAR-alpha and L-FABP. Niacin administration improves renal tissue lipid metabolism and renal function and structure in experimental CRF.

  1. Is Fluid Overload More Important than Diabetes in Renal Progression in Late Chronic Kidney Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Hung-Tien; Chen, Szu-Chia; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Tzu-Hui; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Fluid overload is one of the major presentations in patients with late stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the leading cause of renal failure, and progression of diabetic nephropathy has been associated with changes in extracellular fluid volume. The aim of the study was to assess the association of fluid overload and diabetes in commencing dialysis and rapid renal function decline (the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than -3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/y) in 472 patients with stages 4-5 CKD. Fluid status was determined by bioimpedance spectroscopy method, Body Composition Monitor. The study population was further classified into four groups according to the median of relative hydration status (△HS =fluid overload/extracellular water) and the presence or absence of diabetes. The median level of relative hydration status was 7%. Among all patients, 207(43.9 %) were diabetic. 71 (15.0%) subjects had commencing dialysis, and 187 (39.6%) subjects presented rapid renal function decline during a median 17.3-month follow-up. Patients with fluid overload had a significantly increased risk for commencing dialysis and renal function decline independent of the presence or absence of diabetes. No significantly increased risk for renal progression was found between diabetes and non-diabetes in late CKD without fluid overload. In conclusion, fluid overload has a higher predictive value of an elevated risk for renal progression than diabetes in late CKD. PMID:24349311

  2. Clinical course of dengue fever and its impact on renal function in renal transplant recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Arun Thomas, E T; George, Jacob; Sruthi, Devi; Vineetha, N S; Gracious, Noble

    2018-04-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease endemic in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. There is only limited data in the literature about dengue fever in renal transplant recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease. This study compares the clinical course of dengue fever and its impact on renal function in renal transplant recipients, patients with chronic kidney disease and patients with normal base line renal function. An observational study was conducted from 1 st May to 31 st July 2017, at a tertiary care centre of South India. A major epidemic of dengue had occurred during the study period. Twelve renal transplant recipients, 22 patients with CKD and 58 patients with normal baseline renal function (control group) admitted with dengue fever were prospectively studied. Nadir WBC count was lowest in renal transplant recipients (2575 + 1187/mm 3 ), [P<0.001]. Renal transplant recipients took more time for normalisation of platelet count (6 + 4.5 days), [P<0.001]. All 22 patients with CKD and 11 of 12 renal transplant recipients had worsening of renal function where as only 17 of 58 patients in the control group had worsening [P<0.001]. Sixteen patients with CKD, one renal transplant recipient and none among control group required hemodialysis [P<0.001]. Dialysis requiring patients had more hemoconcentration (52.5+ 19.9% increase in haemoglobin), [P<0.001]. Seven patients with CKD were dialysis dependent at the end of 2 weeks. Clinical features of dengue fever were different in renal transplant recipients and patients with CKD. Severe worsening of renal function was common in CKD patients. Worsening of renal function in renal transplant recipients was less severe and transient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary Investigation of Cardiovascular-Renal Disorders in Dogs with Chronic Mitral Valve Disease.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, E; Locatelli, C; Bassis, S; Crosara, S; Paltrinieri, S; Scarpa, P; Spalla, I; Zanaboni, A M; Quintavalla, C; Brambilla, P

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary literature lacks data about cardiovascular-renal disorders (CvRD) and cardiorenal-anemia syndrome (CRAS) in dogs. A direct correlation exists between ACVIM class and IRIS stage; chronic kidney disease (CKD) complicates chronic mitral valve disease (CMVD) more often than does anemia in dogs. One hundred and fifty-eight client-owned dogs with CMVD. Signalment, physical examination findings, electrocardiography, thoracic radiographs, echocardiography, and blood analysis were retrospectively evaluated to assess the prevalence of CKD and anemia in dogs with CMVD and to investigate the relationships among ACVIM class, IRIS stage, and survival. The prevalence of CKD and anemia in dogs with CMVD was significantly higher than in the general population of dogs. Dogs being treated for heart failure had a significantly higher prevalence of CKD than did dogs that had not received treatment. A statistically significant direct correlation was found between ACVIM class and IRIS stage. Severe heart disease, severe renal disease or both, furosemide administration, and advanced age at diagnosis of heart disease were associated with shorter survival time. Survival time of dogs affected by CvRD was statistically shorter than survival time of dogs affected by CMVD alone. Chronic mitral valve disease is associated with increased prevalence of CKD and anemia in dogs. Treatment for medical management of heart failure may play a role in inducing CKD. Class of heart disease and IRIS stage were directly correlated. Cardiovascular-renal disorders decrease survival time compared to the only presence of CMVD alone, whereas anemia does not play a central role in worsening heart function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Role of oxidants/inflammation in declining renal function in chronic kidney disease and normal aging.

    PubMed

    Vlassara, Helen; Torreggiani, Massimo; Post, James B; Zheng, Feng; Uribarri, Jaime; Striker, Gary E

    2009-12-01

    Oxidant stress (OS) and inflammation increase in normal aging and in chronic kidney disease (CKD), as observed in human and animal studies. In cross-sectional studies of the US population, these changes are associated with a decrease in renal function, which is exhibited by a significant proportion of the population. However, since many normal adults have intact renal function, and longitudinal studies show that some persons maintain normal renal function with age, the link between OS, inflammation, and renal decline is not clear. In aging mice, greater oxidant intake is associated with increased age-related CKD and mortality, which suggests that interventions that reduce OS and inflammation may be beneficial for older individuals. Both OS and inflammation can be readily lowered in normal subjects and patients with CKD stage 3-4 by a simple dietary modification that lowers intake and results in reduced serum and tissue levels of advanced glycation end products. Diabetic patients, including those with microalbuminuria, have a decreased ability to metabolize and excrete oxidants prior to observable changes in serum creatinine. Thus, OS and inflammation may occur in the diabetic kidney at an early time. We review the evidence that oxidants in the diet directly lead to increased serum levels of OS and inflammatory mediators in normal aging and in CKD. We also discuss a simple dietary intervention that helps reduce OS and inflammation, an important and achievable therapeutic goal for patients with CKD and aging individuals with reduced renal function.

  5. Renal oxygenation and hemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhleen; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Nordquist, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Acute kidney injury (AKI) puts a major burden on health systems that may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radio-contrast administration as well as sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). 2. Although the mechanisms for development of AKI and progression of CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance is likely to constitute a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that will in turn induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop-diuretics, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and atrial natriuretic peptide, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. PMID:23360244

  6. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  7. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  8. Dietary mobile apps and their effect on nutritional indicators in chronic renal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lai, Janice; Porter, Judi

    2015-05-10

    Dietary apps for mobile technology are becoming increasingly available and can assist in recording food and fluid intake for nutrition assessment or monitoring. Patients with chronic renal disease, particularly those on dialysis, are required to make significant dietary changes. This study systematically reviews the current literature to assess whether dietary mobile apps improve dietary intake and clinical outcomes in the renal population, specifically those with Chronic Kidney Disease levels 3-5, including dialysis. A systematic search of Medline Complete, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library was performed and supplemented by manual searches of citation and reference lists. Of the 712 studies considered, five were eligible for inclusion in this review. The quality of each included study was assessed using a Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Among five studies (two RCTs and three case studies/reports), none found significant changes in nutrient intake, biochemical markers or intradialytic weight gain, through the use of dietary mobile apps. The included studies show potential for clinical benefits of mobile app interventions in a renal population. However there is a need for additional rigorous trials to demonstrate if there is a clinical benefit to mobile phone app interventions in this population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Compensatory Structural and Functional Adaptation after Radical Nephrectomy for Renal Cell Carcinoma According to Preoperative Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Don Kyoung; Jung, Se Bin; Park, Bong Hee; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han-Yong; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated structural hypertrophy and functional hyperfiltration as compensatory adaptations after radical nephrectomy in patients with renal cell carcinoma according to the preoperative chronic kidney disease stage. We retrospectively identified 543 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1997 and 2012. Patients were classified according to preoperative glomerular filtration rate as no chronic kidney disease--glomerular filtration rate 90 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) or greater (230, 42.4%), chronic kidney disease stage II--glomerular filtration rate 60 to less than 90 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) (227, 41.8%) and chronic kidney disease stage III--glomerular filtration rate 30 to less than 60 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) (86, 15.8%). Computerized tomography performed within 2 months before surgery and 1 year after surgery was used to assess functional renal volume for measuring the degree of hypertrophy of the remnant kidney, and the preoperative and postoperative glomerular filtration rate per unit volume of functional renal volume was used to calculate the degree of hyperfiltration. Among all patients (mean age 56.0 years) mean preoperative glomerular filtration rate, functional renal volume and glomerular filtration rate/functional renal volume were 83.2 ml/minute/1.73 m(2), 340.6 cm(3) and 0.25 ml/minute/1.73 m(2)/cm(3), respectively. The percent reduction in glomerular filtration rate was statistically significant according to chronic kidney disease stage (no chronic kidney disease 31.2% vs stage II 26.5% vs stage III 12.8%, p <0.001). However, the degree of hypertrophic functional renal volume in the remnant kidney was not statistically significant (no chronic kidney disease 18.5% vs stage II 17.3% vs stage III 16.5%, p=0.250). The change in glomerular filtration rate/functional renal volume was statistically significant (no chronic kidney disease 18.5% vs stage II 20.1% vs stage III 45.9%, p <0.001). Factors that increased glomerular

  10. Vascular toxicity of urea, a new "old player" in the pathogenesis of chronic renal failure induced cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Giardino, Ida; D'Apolito, Maria; Brownlee, Michael; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Colia, Anna Laura; Sacco, Michele; Ferrara, Pietro; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease in children is an irreversible process that may lead to end-stage renal disease. The mortality rate in children with end-stage renal disease who receive dialysis increased dramatically in the last decade, and it is significantly higher compared with the general pediatric population. Furthermore, dialysis and transplant patients, who have developed end-stage renal disease during childhood, live respectively far less as compared with age/race-matched populations. Different reports show that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in children with end-stage renal disease and in adults with childhood-onset chronic kidney disease, and that children with chronic kidney disease are in the highest risk group for the development of cardiovascular disease. Urea, which is generated in the liver during catabolism of amino acids and other nitrogenous metabolites, is normally excreted into the urine by the kidneys as rapidly as it is produced. When renal function is impaired, increasing concentrations of blood urea will steadily accumulate. For a long time, urea has been considered to have negligible toxicity. However, the finding that plasma urea is the only significant predictor of aortic plaque area fraction in an animal model of chronic renal failure -accelerated atherosclerosis, suggests that the high levels of urea found in chronic dialysis patients might play an important role in accelerated atherosclerosis in this group of patients. The aim of this review was to provide novel insights into the role played by urea in the pathogenesis of accelerated cardiovascular disease in renal failure.

  11. Vascular toxicity of urea, a new “old player” in the pathogenesis of chronic renal failure induced cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    D’Apolito, Maria; Brownlee, Michael; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Colia, Anna Laura; Sacco, Michele; Ferrara, Pietro; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease in children is an irreversible process that may lead to end-stage renal disease. The mortality rate in children with end-stage renal disease who receive dialysis increased dramatically in the last decade, and it is significantly higher compared with the general pediatric population. Furthermore, dialysis and transplant patients, who have developed end-stage renal disease during childhood, live respectively far less as compared with age/race-matched populations. Different reports show that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in children with end-stage renal disease and in adults with childhood-onset chronic kidney disease, and that children with chronic kidney disease are in the highest risk group for the development of cardiovascular disease. Urea, which is generated in the liver during catabolism of amino acids and other nitrogenous metabolites, is normally excreted into the urine by the kidneys as rapidly as it is produced. When renal function is impaired, increasing concentrations of blood urea will steadily accumulate. For a long time, urea has been considered to have negligible toxicity. However, the finding that plasma urea is the only significant predictor of aortic plaque area fraction in an animal model of chronic renal failure -accelerated atherosclerosis, suggests that the high levels of urea found in chronic dialysis patients might play an important role in accelerated atherosclerosis in this group of patients. The aim of this review was to provide novel insights into the role played by urea in the pathogenesis of accelerated cardiovascular disease in renal failure. PMID:29483797

  12. Inhibition of G0/G1 Switch 2 Ameliorates Renal Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miyako; Shindo, Naoya; Tsuruta, Akito; Ikeyama, Hisako; Hamamura, Kengo; Higashi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Ogino, Takashi; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Nakao, Takaharu; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ojida, Akio; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem, and novel therapies to treat CKD are urgently needed. Here, we show that inhibition of G 0 /G 1 switch 2 (G0s2) ameliorates renal inflammation in a mouse model of CKD. Renal expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) was increased in response to p65 activation in the kidneys of wild-type 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. Moreover, 5/6Nx Clk/Clk mice, which carry homozygous mutations in the gene encoding circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), did not exhibit aggravation of apoptosis or induction of F4/80-positive cells. The renal expression of G0s2 in wild-type 5/6Nx mice was important for the transactivation of Ccl2 by p65. These pathologies were ameliorated by G0s2 knockdown. Furthermore, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of G0s2 expression was identified by high-throughput chemical screening, and the inhibitor suppressed renal inflammation in 5/6Nx mice. These findings indicated that G0s2 inhibitors may have applications in the treatment of CKD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Restoration of podocyte structure and improvement of chronic renal disease in transgenic mice overexpressing renin.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Rastaldi, Maria-Pia; Caron, Kathleen; Smithies, Oliver; Dussaule, Jean-Claude; Chatziantoniou, Christos

    2009-08-21

    Proteinuria is a major marker of the decline of renal function and an important risk factor of coronary heart disease. Elevated proteinuria is associated to the disruption of slit-diaphragm and loss of podocyte foot processes, structural alterations that are considered irreversible. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether proteinuria can be reversed and to identify the structural modifications and the gene/protein regulation associated to this reversal. We used a novel transgenic strain of mouse (RenTg) that overexpresses renin at a constant high level. At the age of 12-month, RenTg mice showed established lesions typical of chronic renal disease such as peri-vascular and periglomerular inflammation, glomerular ischemia, glomerulosclerosis, mesangial expansion and tubular dilation. Ultrastructural analysis indicated abnormal heterogeneity of basement membrane thickness and disappearance of podocyte foot processes. These structural alterations were accompanied by decreased expressions of proteins specific of podocyte (nephrin, podocin), or tubular epithelial cell (E-cadherin and megalin) integrity. In addition, since TGFbeta is considered the major pro-fibrotic agent in renal disease and since exogenous administration of BMP7 is reported to antagonize the TGFbeta-induced phenotype changes in kidney, we have screened the expressions of several genes belonging in the TGFbeta/BMP superfamily. We found that the endogenous inhibitors of BMPs such as noggin and Usag-1 were several-fold activated inhibiting the action of BMPs and thus reinforcing the deleterious action of TGFbeta.Treatment with an AT1 receptor antagonist, at dose that did not decrease arterial pressure, gradually reduced albuminuria. This decrease was accompanied by re-expression of podocin, nephrin, E-cadherin and megalin, and reappearance of podocyte foot processes. In addition, expressions of noggin and Usag-1 were markedly decreased, permitting thus activation of the beneficial

  14. NiaoDuQing granules relieve chronic kidney disease symptoms by decreasing renal fibrosis and anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Yu, Suyun; Jia, Qi; Chen, Lichuan; Zhong, Jinqiu; Pan, Yanhong; Shen, Peiliang; Shen, Yin; Wang, Siliang; Wei, Zhonghong; Cao, Yuzhu; Lu, Yin

    2017-01-01

    NiaoDuQing (NDQ) granules, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been clinically used in China for over fourteen years to treat chronic kidney disease (CKD). To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefits of NDQ, we designed an approach incorporating chemoinformatics, bioinformatics, network biology methods, and cellular and molecular biology experiments. A total of 182 active compounds were identified in NDQ granules, and 397 putative targets associated with different diseases were derived through ADME modelling and target prediction tools. Protein-protein interaction networks of CKD-related and putative NDQ targets were constructed, and 219 candidate targets were identified based on topological features. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that the candidate targets were mostly related to the TGF-β, the p38MAPK, and the erythropoietin (EPO) receptor signaling pathways, which are known contributors to renal fibrosis and/or renal anemia. A rat model of CKD was established to validate the drug-target mechanisms predicted by the systems pharmacology analysis. Experimental results confirmed that NDQ granules exerted therapeutic effects on CKD and its comorbidities, including renal anemia, mainly by modulating the TGF-β and EPO signaling pathways. Thus, the pharmacological actions of NDQ on CKD symptoms correlated well with in silico predictions. PMID:28915563

  15. Epidemiology of chronic renal disease in the Galician population: results of the pilot Spanish EPIRCE study.

    PubMed

    Otero, Alfonso; Gayoso, Pilar; Garcia, Fernando; de Francisco, Angel L

    2005-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major social health problem because of the aging of the population, the high incidence of diabetes mellitus, and the epidemic of silent CKD resulting from inadequate diagnosis of early chronic renal insufficiency The sociodemographic, baseline characteristics and CKD prevalence measured by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula were studied in a randomly selected sample of people aged 20 years or older in the general population. We report the results of the analysis of the EPIRCE (Estudio Epidemiológico de la Insuficiencia Renal en España) pilot study performed in Galicia, Spain, in the last quarter of 2004. Baseline characteristics, sociodemographic characteristics, and results of a clinical examination and blood variables were collected from 237 patients who fulfilled the study's inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean age of the sample was 49.58 years (95% confidence interval, 47.39-51.76). The prevalence of Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative grade 3 CKD was 5.1%, but the coexistence of an albumin/creatinine ratio>30 mg/g with grade 1 to 2 CKD raised the final rate to 12.7% in this population. We found a high prevalence of hypertension (31.5%), isolated systolic hypertension (20.1%), diabetes mellitus (8%), obesity (13.1%), smoking habit (22.7%), high atherogenic index (30.8%), and high alcohol intake (24%). Risk factors significantly associated with renal disease were age [P=0.018; odds ratio (OR) 2.7], hypertension (P=0.023; OR 2.13), pulse pressure (P=0.04; OR 0.10), diabetes mellitus (P=0.08; OR 4.48), obesity (P=0.000; OR 7.7), and insulin resistance index (P=0.04; OR 4.95). The prevalence of CKD and conventional cardiovascular risk factors is high in this randomly selected sample of the general population. Secondary preventive measures are needed to detect chronic kidney impairment as early as possible and to reduce the incidence and mortality arising from the associated comorbidities.

  16. Predicting Renal Failure Progression in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Integrated Intelligent Fuzzy Expert System.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Jamshid; Yadollahpour, Ali; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a covert disease. Accurate prediction of CKD progression over time is necessary for reducing its costs and mortality rates. The present study proposes an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for predicting the renal failure timeframe of CKD based on real clinical data. This study used 10-year clinical records of newly diagnosed CKD patients. The threshold value of 15 cc/kg/min/1.73 m(2) of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used as the marker of renal failure. A Takagi-Sugeno type ANFIS model was used to predict GFR values. Variables of age, sex, weight, underlying diseases, diastolic blood pressure, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, and GFR were initially selected for the predicting model. Weight, diastolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus as underlying disease, and current GFR(t) showed significant correlation with GFRs and were selected as the inputs of model. The comparisons of the predicted values with the real data showed that the ANFIS model could accurately estimate GFR variations in all sequential periods (Normalized Mean Absolute Error lower than 5%). Despite the high uncertainties of human body and dynamic nature of CKD progression, our model can accurately predict the GFR variations at long future periods.

  17. Changes in renal function after discontinuation of vitamin D analogues in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Caravaca, Francisco; Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Azevedo, Lilia; Luna, Enrique

    In routine clinical practice, the prescription of vitamin D analogues (VDA) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with a decline of the estimated renal function. The reason for this is not fully understood. To analyse the effects of VDA discontinuation in advanced CKD and to determine the factors associated with changes in renal function. Retrospective cohort study of adult patients with advanced CKD. The case subgroup was treated with VDA and this medication was discontinued at baseline (the first visit). The control subgroup was not treated with VDA and they were selected according to comparability principles for CKD progression by propensity score matching. The primary outcome measure was a change to both the estimated glomerular filtration rate (MDRD-GFR) and the measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR by combined creatinine and urea clearances). Baseline parameters related to mineral metabolism and creatinine generation were analysed as potential determinants of renal function changes. The study sample consisted of 67 cases and 67 controls. Renal function improved in 67% of cases and worsened in 72% of controls (p<0.0001). Changes in MDRD-GFR for the case subgroup and the control subgroup were +0.455±0.997 vs. -0.436±1.103ml/min/1.73 m 2 /month (p<0.0001), respectively. Total creatinine excretion was slightly higher in cases than in controls but the difference was not significant. According to multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses, baseline total serum calcium was one of the best determinants of both renal function recovery (Odds ratio=3.49; p=0.001), and of the extent of renal function recovery (beta=0.276; p=0.001). Discontinuation of VDA treatment in CKD patients is associated with significant recovery of estimated renal function. The extent of these changes is mainly associated with baseline total serum calcium. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All

  18. [Management of patients with chronic renal failure during surgical correction of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Iarustovskiĭ, M B; Stupchenko, O S; Abramian, M V; Nazarova, E I; Popok, Z V

    2010-01-01

    End-stage of chronic renal failure (CRF) is frequently associated with cardiac and vascular comorbidities requiring cardiosurgical interventions. Over 9 years, from 2000 to 2009, the A. N. Bakulev Research Center of Cardiovascular Surgery, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, delivered cardiosurgical care to 16 patients aged 20 to 74 years with end-stage CRF. The duration of programmed hemodialysis was 1 to 102 months. The preoperative patient preparation protocol comprised correction of anemia, hypoproteinemia, hypertension, and water-electrolyte and acid-base balances. Five patients underwent endovascular myocardial revascularization; open heart surgery was performed in one patient. Interventions under extracorporeal circulation were made in 10 other patients. Ultrafiltration was intraoperatively carried out. On-line hemodiafiltration was performed following coronary artery stenting. After open operations, renal replacement therapy (first hemodiafiltration, then hemodialysis) as daily sessions was initiated on day 2 and, when the patients were transferred to intensive care units, it was performed by the programmed hemodialysis protocol. There were no fatal outcomes at the follow-up. The key aspects of treatment success achievement and improved quality of life in patients on programmed hemodialysis are the detection of cardiovascular diseases requiring surgery, the timely referral of the patients to a cardiosurgical hospital, the meticulous pre- and perioperative management (correction of anemia, hypoproteinemia, water-electrolyte balance, use of ultrafiltration and the adequate rate of perfusion at the stage of extracorporeal circulation, and daily renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period), and continuity in the work of all specialists.

  19. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The importance of accurate measurement of aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Adenwalla, Sherna F; Graham-Brown, Matthew P M; Leone, Francesca M T; Burton, James O; McCann, Gerry P

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of death in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A key driver in this pathology is increased aortic stiffness, which is a strong, independent predictor of CV mortality in this population. Aortic stiffening is a potentially modifiable biomarker of CV dysfunction and in risk stratification for patients with CKD and ESRD. Previous work has suggested that therapeutic modification of aortic stiffness may ameliorate CV mortality. Nevertheless, future clinical implementation relies on the ability to accurately and reliably quantify stiffness in renal disease. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an indirect measure of stiffness and is the accepted standard for non-invasive assessment of aortic stiffness. It has typically been measured using techniques such as applanation tonometry, which is easy to use but hindered by issues such as the inability to visualize the aorta. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging now allow direct measurement of stiffness, using aortic distensibility, in addition to PWV. These techniques allow measurement of aortic stiffness locally and are obtainable as part of a comprehensive, multiparametric CV assessment. The evidence cannot yet provide a definitive answer regarding which technique or parameter can be considered superior. This review discusses the advantages and limitations of non-invasive methods that have been used to assess aortic stiffness, the key studies that have assessed aortic stiffness in patients with renal disease and why these tools should be standardized for use in clinical trial work.

  1. The importance of accurate measurement of aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Adenwalla, Sherna F.; Leone, Francesca M.T.; Burton, James O.; McCann, Gerry P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of death in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A key driver in this pathology is increased aortic stiffness, which is a strong, independent predictor of CV mortality in this population. Aortic stiffening is a potentially modifiable biomarker of CV dysfunction and in risk stratification for patients with CKD and ESRD. Previous work has suggested that therapeutic modification of aortic stiffness may ameliorate CV mortality. Nevertheless, future clinical implementation relies on the ability to accurately and reliably quantify stiffness in renal disease. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an indirect measure of stiffness and is the accepted standard for non-invasive assessment of aortic stiffness. It has typically been measured using techniques such as applanation tonometry, which is easy to use but hindered by issues such as the inability to visualize the aorta. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging now allow direct measurement of stiffness, using aortic distensibility, in addition to PWV. These techniques allow measurement of aortic stiffness locally and are obtainable as part of a comprehensive, multiparametric CV assessment. The evidence cannot yet provide a definitive answer regarding which technique or parameter can be considered superior. This review discusses the advantages and limitations of non-invasive methods that have been used to assess aortic stiffness, the key studies that have assessed aortic stiffness in patients with renal disease and why these tools should be standardized for use in clinical trial work. PMID:28852490

  2. Renal function assessment in atrial fibrillation: Usefulness of chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration vs re-expressed 4 variable modification of diet in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Abumuaileq, Rami Riziq-Yousef; Abu-Assi, Emad; López-López, Andrea; Raposeiras-Roubin, Sergio; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Martínez-Sande, Luis; García-Seara, Francisco Javier; Fernandez-López, Xesus Alberte; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón

    2015-10-26

    To compare the performance of the re-expressed Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation vs the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We studied 911 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation on vitamin-K antagonist. The performance of the re-expressed Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation vs the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation with respect to either a composite endpoint of major bleeding, thromboembolic events and all-cause mortality or each individual component of the composite endpoint was assessed using continuous and categorical ≥ 60, 59-30, and < 30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) estimated glomerular filtration rate. During 10 ± 3 mo, the composite endpoint occurred in 98 (10.8%) patients: 30 patients developed major bleeding, 18 had thromboembolic events, and 60 died. The new equation provided lower prevalence of renal dysfunction < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (32.9%), compared with the re-expressed equation (34.1%). Estimated glomerular filtration rate from both equations was independent predictor of composite endpoint (HR = 0.98 and 0.97 for the re-expressed and the new equation, respectively; P < 0.0001) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.98 for both equations, P < 0.01). Strong association with thromboembolic events was observed only when estimated glomerular filtration rate was < 30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2): HR is 5.1 for the re-expressed equation, and HR = 5.0 for the new equation. No significant association with major bleeding was observed for both equations. The new equation reduced the prevalence of renal dysfunction. Both equations performed similarly in predicting major adverse outcomes.

  3. [The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study: To better understand chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Édouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-04-01

    Preserving kidney function and improving the transition from chronic kidney disease to end stage is a research and healthcare challenge. The national Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort was established to identify the determinants, biomarkers and practice patterns associated with chronic kidney disease outcomes. The study will include more than 3000 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease from a representative sample of 40 nephrology clinics with respect to regions and legal status, public or private. Patients are recruited during a routine visit and followed for 5 years, before and after starting renal replacement therapy. Patient-level clinical, biological, and lifestyle data are collected annually, as well as provider-level data on clinical practices, coordinated with the International Chronic Kidney Disease Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. Blood and urine samples are stored in a biobank. Major studied outcomes include survival, patient-reported outcomes, disease progression and hospitalizations. More than 13,000 eligible patients with chronic kidney disease were identified, 60% with stage 3 and 40% with stage 4. Their median age is 72 years [interquartile range, 62-80 years], 60% are men and 38% have diabetes. By the end of December 2015, 2885 patients were included. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of chronic kidney disease and provide evidence to improve patient survival and quality of life as well as health care system performances. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurements of renal shear wave velocities in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Takuya; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Goto, Hidemi

    2018-07-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have advanced glomerulosclerosis and renal interstitial fibrosis. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is useful to diagnose liver fibrosis. However, there are few data available regarding evaluation of kidney function on the use of SWE. Purpose To assess the utility of SWE by evaluating the correlation between renal function and renal elasticity using SWE. Material and Methods A total of 187 participants who had available serum creatinine levels and also underwent SWE of the kidney using a transabdominal ultrasonography were recruited at Nagoya University Hospital. We measured the depth of the shear wave (SW) in the right and left kidneys and calculated the measurement success rates. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) classification and shear wave value (SWV) were compared. Results The success rates of the right and left kidneys were 93.6% and 71.6%, respectively. Based on these results, the correlation between GFR classification and SWV were analyzed in only the right kidneys because the success rates and the number of enrolled patients were low for the left kidney. There were significant differences found between G1 and G3a, G2 and G3a, G3a and G3b, G3a and G4, and G3a and G5. SWV significantly negatively and positively correlated with the G2-G3a and G3a-G3b classifications. Conclusion There is no correlation between renal function and SW. However, we can diagnose the progression to the CKD stages G3a and G3b by observing the changes over time using the SWV.

  5. Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica and chronic non-malignant renal disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Möhner, Matthias; Pohrt, Anne; Gellissen, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    While occupational exposure to respirable silica is known to lead to lung disease, most notably silicosis, its association with chronic kidney disease is unclear. This review explores the association between occupational exposure to respirable silica and chronic non-malignant renal disease such as glomerulonephritis. The evidence has been collected and compiled. Possible sources of bias are thoroughly discussed. Cohort studies with silica exposure and case-control studies of renal disease were searched in PubMed until January 2015. Two authors independently abstracted data; any disagreement was resolved by consulting a third reviewer. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association to silica exposure. A total of 23 cohort and four case-control studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis of cohort studies yielded elevated overall SMRs for renal disease. Some studies, however, included dose-response analyses, most of which did not show a positive trend. The approaches and results of the case-control studies were very heterogeneous. While the studies of cohorts exposed to silica found elevated SMRs for renal disease, no clear evidence of a dose-response relationship emerged. The elevated risk may be attributed to diagnostic and methodological issues. In order to permit a reliable estimation of a possible causal link, exposed cohorts should be monitored for renal disease, as the information from mortality studies is hardly reliable in this field.

  6. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis in a captive Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Helmick, Kelly E; Koplos, Peter; Raymond, James

    2006-12-01

    A 19-yr-old, 78.2-kg captive female Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) from the El Paso Zoo (El Paso, Texas, USA) with chronic renal disease was euthanized after a 10-day course of anorexia, depression, progressive rear limb weakness, muscle fasciculations, and head tremors. Postmortem findings included pericardial effusion, generalized lymphadenopathy, glomerulosclerosis, glomerular atrophy with membranous glomerulonephropathy, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pyogranulomatous pneumonia, pericarditis, and lymphadenitis were associated with fungal spherules histomorphologically consistent with Coccidioides immitis. Rising antibodies to C. immitis were detected on samples obtained perimortem and 2 mo before euthanasia. Retrospective serology was negative for two additional Indochinese tigers, two Iranian leopards (Panthera pardus saxicolor), two jaguars (Panthera onca), two bobcats (Lynx rufus texensis), two ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), and three Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) housed at the zoo over an 8-yr period. Despite being located within the endemic region for C. immitis, this is only the second case of coccidioidomycosis reported from this institution.

  7. Progression of Renal Impairment and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chronic Heart Failure: An Analysis From GISSI-HF.

    PubMed

    Damman, Kevin; Masson, Serge; Lucci, Donata; Gorini, Marco; Urso, Renato; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tarantini, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni; Voors, Adriaan; Latini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Data on the natural change in renal function in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 36 months in 6934 patients included in the GISSI-HF study. Associations from baseline, changes in renal function, and occurrence of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization were assessed. Mean age was 67 years, mainly men (78%), and mean eGFR was 68 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 . Change in eGFR in the 1st year was -1.5 ± 16 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 , and over 36 months it was -3.7 ± 18 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 . Over the latter period, only 25% deteriorated ≥1 Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiatives (KDOQI) class of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fifteen percent of patients had >15 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 decrease in eGFR in the 1st 12 months. Lower eGFR was associated with outcome: hazard ratio (HR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.10 (P < .001) per 10 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 decrease, as well as every 10 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 decrease over the 1st year (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.04-1.17; P < .001). A deterioration in eGFR >15 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 in the 1st year showed the highest risk of events (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.36; P < .001). Mean decrease in renal function over time in patients with chronic HF was modest. Only 25% deteriorated ≥1 KDOQI class of CKD after 3 years. Any decrease in eGFR over time was associated with strongly increased event rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2014-08-01

    While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60-90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and the performances of the

  9. Serum protease activity in chronic kidney disease patients: The GANI_MED renal cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wolke, Carmen; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Endlich, Nicole; Rettig, Rainer; Stracke, Sylvia; Fiene, Beate; Aymanns, Simone; Felix, Stephan B; Hannemann, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Serum or plasma proteases have been associated with various diseases including cancer, inflammation, or reno-cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate whether the enzymatic activities of serum proteases are associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study population comprised 268 participants of the “Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine” (GANI_MED) cohort. Enzymatic activity of aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B, alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leucine aminopeptidase 3, prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), angiotensin I-converting enzyme, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) proteases was measured in serum. Linear regression of the respective protease was performed on kidney function adjusted for age and sex. Kidney function was modeled either by the continuous Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-based eGFR or dichotomized by eGFR < 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 or <45 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. Results with a false discovery rate below 0.05 were deemed statistically significant. Among the 10 proteases investigated, only the activities of ACE2 and DPP4 were correlated with eGFR. Patients with lowest eGFR exhibited highest DPP4 and ACE2 activities. DPP4 and PEP were correlated with age, but all other serum protease activities showed no associations with age or sex. Our data indicate that ACE2 and DPP4 enzymatic activity are associated with the eGFR in patients with CKD. This finding distinguishes ACE2 and DPP4 from other serum peptidases analyzed and clearly indicates that further analyses are warranted to identify the precise role of these serum ectopeptidases in the pathogenesis of CKD and to fully elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms. Impact statement • Renal and cardiac diseases are very common and often occur concomitantly

  10. Serum protease activity in chronic kidney disease patients: The GANI_MED renal cohort.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Carmen; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Endlich, Nicole; Rettig, Rainer; Stracke, Sylvia; Fiene, Beate; Aymanns, Simone; Felix, Stephan B; Hannemann, Anke; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Serum or plasma proteases have been associated with various diseases including cancer, inflammation, or reno-cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate whether the enzymatic activities of serum proteases are associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study population comprised 268 participants of the "Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine" (GANI_MED) cohort. Enzymatic activity of aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B, alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leucine aminopeptidase 3, prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), angiotensin I-converting enzyme, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) proteases was measured in serum. Linear regression of the respective protease was performed on kidney function adjusted for age and sex. Kidney function was modeled either by the continuous Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-based eGFR or dichotomized by eGFR < 15 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively. Results with a false discovery rate below 0.05 were deemed statistically significant. Among the 10 proteases investigated, only the activities of ACE2 and DPP4 were correlated with eGFR. Patients with lowest eGFR exhibited highest DPP4 and ACE2 activities. DPP4 and PEP were correlated with age, but all other serum protease activities showed no associations with age or sex. Our data indicate that ACE2 and DPP4 enzymatic activity are associated with the eGFR in patients with CKD. This finding distinguishes ACE2 and DPP4 from other serum peptidases analyzed and clearly indicates that further analyses are warranted to identify the precise role of these serum ectopeptidases in the pathogenesis of CKD and to fully elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms. Impact statement • Renal and cardiac diseases are very common and often occur concomitantly

  11. Relation of Aortic Valve Calcium to Chronic Kidney Disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort [CRIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Guerraty, Marie A.; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Yenchih; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2015-01-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relationship between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relationship of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relationship of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relationship between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11 ml/min/1.73m2, 44.17 ml/min/1.73m2, and 39 ml/min/1.73m2, respectively, p< 0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for traditional, but not novel, AVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and non-black patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25791240

  12. Multiple Novel Loci are Associated with Indices of Renal Function and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Glazer, Nicole L; Dehghan, Abbas; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Katz, Ronit; Li, Man; Yang, Qiong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Astor, Brad C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ehret, Georg B; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scharpf, Robert B; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; de Boer, Ian H; Haritunians, Talin; Lumley, Thomas; Sarnak, Mark; Siscovick, David; Benjamin, Emelia J; Levy, Daniel; Upadhyay, Ashish; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Chasman, Daniel I; Paré, Guillaume; Ridker, Paul M; Kao, WH Linda; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Coresh, Josef; Shlipak, Michael G; Fox, Caroline S

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a heritable component and is an important global public health problem because of its high prevalence and morbidity.1 We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify susceptibility loci for glomerular filtration rate estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea<60 ml/min/1.73m2) in European-ancestry participants of four populations-based cohorts (ARIC, CHS, FHS, RS; n=19,877, 2,388 CKD cases), and tested for external replication in 21,466 participants (1,932 CKD cases). Significant associations (p<5*10−8) were identified for SNPs with [1] CKD at the UMOD locus; [2] eGFRcrea at the UMOD, SHROOM3, and GATM/SPATA5L1 loci; [3] eGFRcys at the CST and STC1 loci. UMOD encodes the most common protein in human urine, Tamm-Horsfall protein,2 and rare mutations in UMOD cause Mendelian forms of kidney disease.3 Our findings provide new insights into CKD pathogenesis and underscore the importance of common genetic variants influencing renal function and disease. PMID:19430482

  13. Podocyte is the major culprit accounting for the progression of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Wilhelm

    2002-05-15

    The concept that the podocyte is the major culprit underlying development and progression of glomerular diseases leading to chronic renal failure is well established. The essential steps in this process are (1) the establishment of tuft adhesions to Bowman's capsule; (2) the formation by capillaries contained in a tuft adhesion of a filtrate that is delivered, instead into Bowman's space, towards the interstitium; and (3) the spreading of this filtrate on the outer aspect of the affected nephron leading to the degeneration of this nephron. The present review summarizes the pros and cons concerning the relevance of misdirected filtration for a nephron-to-nephron transfer of the disease at the level of the tubular interstitium. Surprisingly, the histopathology clearly shows that interstitial proliferation surrounding degenerating nephrons tends to encapsulate the degenerative process, confining it to the already affected nephron. No evidence is available that the disease, mediated by interstitial proliferation and matrix deposition, may jump to a neighboring, so far unaffected, nephron. It appears that the process that leads to the degeneration of a nephron in the context of "classic" FSGS always starts separately in the respective glomerulus by severe podocyte injury. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Renal protection of losartan 50 mg in normotensive Chinese patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei-Cheng; He, Li-Qun; Yang, Xue-Jun; Cao, He-Xin

    2012-10-01

    Nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the leading major cause of end-stage renal disease in developing countries including China. Among the 5 stages of CKD, it is critical to retard the progression of stage 3 because renal disorder could accelerate aggravation behind that stage. Data suggest that high dosages of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) could retard the progression of renal disease in hypertensive and/or diabetic patients. Nevertheless, in daily practice of nephrology, quite a number of nondiabetic patients with CKD who are normotensive do not tolerate even moderate dosages of ARBs because of adverse effects such as systemic hypotension, epically for Chinese patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the renoprotective effects of relatively low dosages of ARBs in normotensive Chinese patients with nondiabetic stage 3 CKD. A prospective, randomized, parallel-group, open-label study was performed over a period of 12 months. A total of 238 enrolled patients were randomly allocated to treatment with losartan 50 mg (n = 119) or placebo (n = 119). All patients were followed up at 2-month intervals. At each visit, blood pressure was measured, and urinalysis and serum biochemistry tests were performed. Finally, 112 patients given losartan and 114 patients given placebo completed the study. In the losartan group, there was a significant and biphasic time-dependent decline in proteinuria during therapy (1.72 ± 0.47 to 0.99 ± 0.48 g/d; P < 0.001). Conversely, placebo did not simultaneously change the amount of proteinuria (1.73 ± 0.49 to 1.64 ± 0.50 g/d; P = 0.337). Estimated glomerular filtration rate remained stable during the entire study period in the patients given losartan (44.8 ± 8.1 to 44.1 ± 7.7 mL/min per 1.73 m; P = 0.120) but were significantly reduced in the placebo group (44.5 ± 8.5 to 39.1 ± 7.4 mL/min per 1.73 m, P < 0.001). The changes in blood pressure were kept constant in the 2 groups. All adverse events were minimal and

  15. Cardiovascular Disease Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Lora, Claudia M.; Budoff, Matthew; Keane, Martin G.; Kusek, John W.; Martinez, Monica; Nessel, Lisa; Stamos, Thomas; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States. The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about its prevalence among Hispanics with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted cross-sectional analyses of prevalent self-reported clinical and subclinical measures of CVD among 497 Hispanics, 1638 non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 1650 non-Hispanic African Americans, aged 21 to 74 years, with mild-to-moderate CKD at enrollment in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic CRIC (HCRIC) studies. Measures of subclinical CVD included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and ankle-brachial index. Results Self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) was lower in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (18% versus 23%, P = 0.02). Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of CAC >100 (41% versus 34%, P = 0.03) and CAC >400 (26% versus 19%, P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, these differences were no longer significant. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics had a higher odds of LVH compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.17, P = 0.005), and a higher odds of CAC >400 compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (odds ratio, 2.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 5.58, P = 0.03). Hispanic ethnicity was not independently associated with any other CVD measures. Conclusions Prevalent LVH was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Caucasians, and elevated CAC score was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic African Americans. Understanding reasons for these racial/ethnic differences and their association with long-term clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:21896829

  16. Precision Medicine for Hypertension Management in Chronic Kidney Disease: Relevance of SPRINT for Therapeutic Targets in Nondiabetic Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2017-05-01

    In this review we evaluate the literature to determine if lower blood pressure (BP) targets are beneficial for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK), and Ramipril Efficacy in Nephropathy-2 (REIN-2), designed to assess the benefit of lower BP on progression of nondiabetic CKD, generally came to the same negative conclusion. They were not designed and powered to assess an effect of lower BP on cardiovascular outcomes. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was the first trial designed and powered to address this issue, and showed a clear benefit of a lower targeted and achieved BP. SPRINT did not show any renal benefits from lower BP, and it was not designed to assess this outcome, and it enrolled patients with less "renal risk" per se. A distinguishing feature of SPRINT compared with other large trials is that it highlighted the importance of precise BP measurement methods in defining targets in hypertension treatment. Accordingly, we propose that SPRINT is truly a "game-changing" clinical trial that sets the bar for management of hypertension in select patients with nondiabetic CKD. In these patients, systolic BP target depends critically on the BP measurement method: < 140 mm Hg when derived from 3 readings using a mercury sphygmomanometer after 5 minutes of rest, < 130 mm Hg when calculated from at a minimum of 3 readings using an automated oscillometric device, and < 120 mm Hg when taken using an automated oscillometric device after 5 minutes of unattended rest. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage in a patient with chronic renal failure and coronary artery disease treated with Plavix.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Rocco; Aurilia, Pasquale; Mele, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    To report a case of massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage in a patient with chronic renal failure and coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix). Case report. A 75-year-old man presented with pain and loss of vision in the left eye for 1 week. His medical history was remarkable for systemic hypertension, chronic renal failure, and artery coronary disease. For 6 months, he had been taking 75 mg/day of Plavix after coronary angioplasty. Ocular examination revealed the patient to be in angle closure. Ultrasonography and computed tomography scan revealed a massive choroidal hemorrhage pushing the iris-lens diaphragm forward. Pain and intraocular pressure were treated successfully with evacuative sclerotomies, but the final exitus after 6 months was bulbar phthisis. Massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage is an extremely rare event that usually has been described in older patients (65-87 years old) receiving anticoagulants or thrombolytic agents. Systemic hypertension, generalized atherosclerosis, and age-related macular degeneration are additional risk factors. In the present case, massive choroidal hemorrhage was associated with use of clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix) in a patient with chronic renal failure. Our report indicates that Plavix should be administered with caution in patients with chronic renal failure owing to the risk of serious choroidal bleeding. Chronic renal failure should be also included in the list of risk factors for massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage. Evacuative sclerotomies may have value in the relief of pain and elevated intraocular pressure but has not been shown to be beneficial in visual and anatomic outcomes.

  18. The effect of renin-angiotensin system blockade on renal protection in chronic kidney disease patients with hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Jung Tak; Lee, Mi Jung; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade maintenance on renal protection in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperkalemia occurring during treatment with RAS blockade. CKD III or IV patients, who were prescribed with RAS blockers and also had hyperkalemia, were included. The study population was divided into two groups based on maintenance or withdrawal of RAS blocker. Renal outcomes (doubling of creatinine or end-stage renal disease) and incidence of hyperkalemia were compared between the two groups. Out of 258 subjects who developed hyperkalemia during treatment with RAS blockers, 150 (58.1%) patients continued on RAS blockades, while RAS blockades were discontinued for more than 3 months in the remaining 108 patients. Renal event-free survival was significantly higher in the maintenance group compared with the withdrawal group. Cox proportional hazard ratio for renal outcomes was 1.35 (95% CI: 1.08-1.92, p=0.04) in the withdrawal group compared with the maintenance group. However, the incidence of hyperkalemia and hyperkalemia-related hospitalization or mortality did not differ between the two groups. This study demonstrated that the maintenance of RAS blockade is beneficial for the preservation of renal function and relatively tolerable in patients with CKD and hyperkalemia occurring during treatment with RAS blockade. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Left Ventricular Structure and Function in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faraz S; Cai, Xuan; Kunkel, Katherine; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Raj, Dominic S; He, Jiang; Anderson, Amanda H; Budoff, Matthew J; Wright Nunes, Julie A; Roy, Jason; Wright, Jackson T; Go, Alan S; St John Sutton, Martin G; Kusek, John W; Isakova, Tamara; Wolf, Myles; Keane, Martin G

    2017-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and it is especially common among Blacks. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an important subclinical marker of CVD, but there are limited data on racial variation in left ventricular structure and function among persons with CKD. In a cross-sectional analysis of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, we compared the prevalence of different types of left ventricular remodeling (concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, and concentric remodeling) by race/ethnicity. We used multinomial logistic regression to test whether race/ethnicity associated with different types of left ventricular remodeling independently of potential confounding factors. We identified 1,164 non-Hispanic Black and 1,155 non-Hispanic White participants who completed Year 1 visits with echocardiograms that had sufficient data to categorize left ventricular geometry type. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks had higher mean left ventricular mass index (54.7 ± 14.6 vs. 47.4 ± 12.2 g/m2.7; P < 0.0001) and prevalence of concentric LVH (45.8% vs. 24.9%). In addition to higher systolic blood pressure and treatment with >3 antihypertensive medications, Black race/ethnicity was independently associated with higher odds of concentric LVH compared to White race/ethnicity (odds ratio: 2.73; 95% confidence interval: 2.02, 3.69). In a large, diverse cohort with CKD, we found significant differences in left ventricular mass and hypertrophic morphology between non-Hispanic Blacks and Whites. Future studies will evaluate whether higher prevalence of LVH contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular outcomes among CKD patients. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Incident Atrial Fibrillation and Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease in Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Nisha; Fan, Dongjie; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Ordonez, Juan D.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Go, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) frequently occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the long-term impact of development of AF on the risk of adverse renal outcomes in patients with CKD is unknown. In this study, we determined the association between incident AF and risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among adults with CKD. Methods and Results We studied adults with CKD (defined as persistent glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 by the CKD-EPI equation) enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California who were identified between 2002–2010 and who did not have prior ESRD or previously documented AF. Incident AF was identified using primary hospital discharge diagnoses and/or two or more outpatient visits for AF. Incident ESRD was ascertained from a comprehensive health plan registry for dialysis and renal transplant. Among 206,229 adults with CKD, 16,463 developed incident AF. During a mean follow-up of 5.1± 2.5 years, there were 345 cases of ESRD that occurred after development of incident AF (74 per 1000 person-years) compared with 6505 cases of ESRD during periods without AF (64 per 1000 person-years, P<0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, incident AF was associated with a 67% increase in rate of ESRD (hazard ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.46–1.91). Conclusions Incident AF is independently associated with increased risk of developing ESRD in adults with CKD. Further study is needed to identify potentially modifiable pathways through which AF leads to a higher risk of progression to ESRD. PMID:23275377

  1. Relationship between body mass index and renal function deterioration among the Taiwanese chronic kidney disease population.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tian-Jong; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Wu, Mei-Yi; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Wu, Yun-Chun; Wu, Yi-Lien; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Zheng, Jing-Quan; Chu, Nain-Feng; Lin, Yu-Me; Su, Sui-Lung; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Chen, Jin-Shuen; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lee, Chien-Te; Yang, Yu; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Kao, Senyeong; Lin, Yuh-Feng

    2018-05-02

    This study investigated the characteristics of patients with different chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages according to various body mass index (BMI) categories and determined the influence of BMI in renal function deterioration. We conducted a multicenter, longitudinal cohort study based on the Epidemiology and Risk Factors Surveillance of CKD project (2008-2013) and National Health Insurance Research Database (2001-2013). A total of 7357 patients with CKD aged 20-85 years from 14 hospitals were included in the study. A higher male sex, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension were noted among overweight and obese CKD patients, while more cancer prevalence was noted among underweight CKD patients. Charlson comorbidity index was significantly higher and correlated with BMI among late CKD patients. Patients with BMI < 18.5 kg/m 2 exhibited non-significantly higher events of eGFR decline events in both early and late CKD stages than other BMI groups. BMI alone is not a determinant of CKD progression among our Taiwanese CKD patients. Obesity should be re-defined and body weight manipulation should be individualized in CKD patients.

  2. [Port device central venous access in children with chronic renal disease--personal experience].

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Maria; Szprynger, Krystyna; Stoksik, Piotr; Morawiec-Knysak, Aurelia; Adamczyk, Piotr; Ziora, Katarzyna; Oswiecimska, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    The application of central venous lines in children has been widely accepted in the case of pediatric cancer treatment. This is of particular importance when the treatment must be continued during the long period of time. The indication to long-term application of central venous lines became significantly frequent within last years. They are necessary in the treatment of chronic pediatric patients, in whom the central venous line allows continuous access for medication, parenteral rehydration, nutrition and frequent blood sampling. In the current study authors present their experience in subcutaneous port devices application in children with kidney disease. The case history data obtained from 8 children were retrospectively analysed. In these children subcutaneous port devices were applied for mean 26.7 months (totally 9 port devices). The mean age at the time of implantation was 2.2 years, and the mean body weight--10.6 kg. Peripheral venous access in all children was bad. In one child during the time of implantation the hematoma of coli and chest was present. Infectious complications connected with implanted port device were not detected. Thrombotic complications were present in 6 children with chronic renal failure--in 5 the lumen of port device has been successfully recanalysed, in 3 cases even several times. In 1 child the thrombus on the tip of central venous line was detected. In 2 children the removal of port device was necessary because of breakage of venous line and in the second case because of port device thrombosis. Two children died with functioning port device. The cause of death was not connected with implanted port device. The application of subcutaneous port devices definitely improved the comfort of treatment but was significantly associated with thrombotic complications. Infectious complications were not detected as compared to hematological group of patients.

  3. Pandemic influenza A 2009 (H1N1) vaccination in high risk children with chronic renal diseases: acceptance and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Printza, Nikoleta; Farmaki, Evagelia; Bosdou, Julia; Gkogka, Chrysa; Papachristou, Fotios

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the acceptance of pandemic influenza A 2009 vaccination in our high risk children with chronic renal diseases. A total of 64 children/parents of pediatric nephrology department were approached to fill in a standardised questionnaire on influenza immunization profile. The H1N1 vaccination rates were 57.1% for transplant recipients, 61.5% for patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD), 36.4% for patients with various stages of chronic renal disease (CRD) and 26.7% for patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) on immunosuppressive therapy. Children on renal transplantation or PD had a fourfold higher rate of being vaccinated than children with GN (p=0.04). Causes of denying vaccination included fear of adverse effects (48.9%), lack of sufficient data on the new vaccine (31.9%) and others (19.2%). Patients being vaccinated were all urged by their pediatric nephrologist (100%), while patients not vaccinated were negatively influenced by media (41.4%), friends (24.1%), pediatrician (20.7%) and others (13.8%). Regarding parents education, higher level was associated with increased rate of children vaccination (p=0.04). It seems that patients with severe renal disease had better compliance with vaccination. The pediatric nephrologists had the most significant positive influence in contrast to the media which had the most negative influence.

  4. Serum cystatin C is an independent biomarker associated with the renal resistive index in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ogawa-Akiyama, Ayu; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Keiko; Onishi, Akifumi; Yamanari, Toshio; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Ito, Hiroshi; Wada, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Cystatin C is a cysteine protease inhibitor that is produced by nearly all human cells. The serum level of cystatin C is a stronger predictor of the renal outcome and the risk of cardiovascular events than the creatinine level. The resistive index (RI) on renal Doppler ultrasonography is a good indicator of vascular resistance as well as the renal outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it is unclear whether serum cystatin C is associated with signs of vascular dysfunction, such as the renal RI. We measured the serum cystatin C levels in 101 CKD patients and investigated the relationships between cystatin C and markers of vascular dysfunction, including the renal RI, ankle-brachial pulse wave velocity (baPWV), intima-media thickness (IMT), and cardiac function. The renal RI was significantly correlated with the serum cystatin C level (p < 0.0001, r = 0.6920). The serum cystatin C level was found to be a significant determinant of the renal RI (p < 0.0001), but not the baPWV, in a multivariate regression analysis. The multivariate odds ratio of the serum cystatin C level for a renal RI of more than 0.66 was statistically significant (2.92, p = 0.0106). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve comparing the sensitivity and specificity of cystatin C for predicting an RI of more than 0.66 was 0.882 (cutoff value: 2.04 mg/L). In conclusion, the serum cystatin C level is an independent biomarker associated with the renal RI in patients with CKD.

  5. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings.

  6. Recruitment of Hispanics into an observational study of chronic kidney disease: the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study experience.

    PubMed

    Lora, Claudia M; Ricardo, Ana C; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Fischer, Michael J; Rosman, Robert T; Carmona, Eunice; Lopez, Amada; Balaram, Manjunath; Nessel, Lisa; Tao, Kaixiang Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Kusek, John W; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P

    2012-11-01

    Despite the large burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics, this population has been underrepresented in research studies. We describe the recruitment strategies employed by the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, which led to the successful enrollment of a large population of Hispanic adults with CKD into a prospective observational cohort study. Recruitment efforts by bilingual staff focused on community clinics with Hispanic providers in high-density Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago, academic medical centers, and private nephrology practices. Methods of publicizing the study included church meetings, local Hispanic print media, Spanish television and radio stations, and local health fairs. From October 2005 to July 2008, we recruited 327 Hispanics aged 21-74 years with mild-to-moderate CKD as determined by age-specific estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of 716 individuals completing a screening visit, 49% did not meet eGFR inclusion criteria and 46% completed a baseline visit. The mean age at enrollment was 57.1 and 67.1% of participants were male. Approximately 75% of enrolled individuals were Mexican American, 15% Puerto Rican, and 10% had other Latin American ancestry. Eighty two percent of participants were Spanish-speakers. Community-based and academic primary care clinics yielded the highest percentage of participants screened (45.9% and 22.4%) and enrolled (38.2% and 24.5%). However, academic and community-based specialty clinics achieved the highest enrollment yield from individuals screened (61.9% to 71.4%). A strategy focused on primary care and nephrology clinics and the use of bilingual recruiters allowed us to overcome barriers to the recruitment of Hispanics with CKD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  8. Risk Factors for Heart Failure in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: The CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Shlipak, Michael; Anderson, Amanda; Roy, Jason A; Feldman, Harold I; Kallem, Radhakrishna Reddy; Kanthety, Radhika; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Ricardo, Ana C; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Wolf, Myles; Zhang, Xiaoming; Raj, Dominic; Hamm, Lee

    2017-05-17

    Heart failure is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. We studied risk factors for incident heart failure among 3557 participants in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Kidney function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using serum creatinine, cystatin C, or both, and 24-hour urine albumin excretion. During an average of 6.3 years of follow-up, 452 participants developed incident heart failure. After adjustment for age, sex, race, and clinical site, hazard ratio (95% CI) for heart failure associated with 1 SD lower creatinine-based eGFR was 1.67 (1.49, 1.89), 1 SD lower cystatin C-based-eGFR was 2.43 (2.10, 2.80), and 1 SD higher log-albuminuria was 1.65 (1.53, 1.78), all P <0.001. When all 3 kidney function measures were simultaneously included in the model, lower cystatin C-based eGFR and higher log-albuminuria remained significantly and directly associated with incidence of heart failure. After adjusting for eGFR, albuminuria, and other traditional cardiovascular risk factors, anemia (1.37, 95% CI 1.09, 1.72, P =0.006), insulin resistance (1.16, 95% CI 1.04, 1.28, P =0.006), hemoglobin A1c (1.27, 95% CI 1.14, 1.41, P <0.001), interleukin-6 (1.15, 95% CI 1.05, 1.25, P =0.002), and tumor necrosis factor-α (1.10, 95% CI 1.00, 1.21, P =0.05) were all significantly and directly associated with incidence of heart failure. Our study indicates that cystatin C-based eGFR and albuminuria are better predictors for risk of heart failure compared to creatinine-based eGFR. Furthermore, anemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, and poor glycemic control are independent risk factors for the development of heart failure among patients with chronic kidney disease. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Renal Function Can Improve at Any Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Lise; Metzger, Marie; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Gauci, Cédric; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Stengel, Bénédicte; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Even though renal function decline is considered relentless in chronic kidney disease (CKD), improvement has been shown in patients with hypertensive nephropathy. Whether this can occur in any type of nephropathy and at any stage is unknown as are the features of patients who improve. Methods We identified 406 patients in the NephroTest cohort with glomerular filtration rates (mGFR) measured by 51Cr-EDTA clearance at least 3 times during at least 2 years of follow-up. Individual examination of mGFR trajectories by 4 independent nephrologists classified patients as improvers, defined as those showing a sustained mGFR increase, or nonimprovers. Twelve patients with erratic trajectories were excluded. Baseline data were compared between improvers and nonimprovers, as was the number of recommended therapeutic targets achieved over time (specifically, for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, proteinuria, and use of renin angiotensin system blockers). Results Measured GFR improved over time in 62 patients (15.3%). Their median mGFR slope was +1.88[IQR 1.38, 3.55] ml/min/year; it was −2.23[−3.9, −0.91] for the 332 nonimprovers. Improvers had various nephropathies, but not diabetic glomerulopathy or polycystic kidney disease. They did not differ from nonimprovers for age, sex, cardiovascular history, or CKD stage, but their urinary albumin excretion rate was lower. Improvers achieved significantly more recommended therapeutic targets (2.74±0.87) than nonimprovers (2.44±0.80, p<0.01). They also had fewer CKD-related metabolic complications and a lower prevalence of 25OH-vitamin-D deficiency. Conclusion GFR improvement is possible in CKD patients at any CKD stage through stage 4–5. It is noteworthy that this GFR improvement is associated with a decrease in the number of metabolic complications over time. PMID:24349134

  10. Creation of a Natural Health Products Database for Assessing Safety for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease or Renal Transplant.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sharon; Shalansky, Karen; Vashisht, Puneet; Leung, Marianna; Marin, Judith G

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of published safety information on the use of natural health products (NHPs) for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or renal transplant. To create an online database to provide evidence-based safety recommendations for commonly used NHPs, specific to patients with CKD or renal transplant. NHPs used by CKD and transplant patients in British Columbia were identified from the records of the BC Provincial Renal Agency. For each NHP, several databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Lexi-Natural Products, PubMed Dietary Supplement Subset, and Natural Medicines) were searched for any information pertaining to dosage, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, immunomodulatory effects, and pharmacokinetics in patients with renal disease. Each NHP was given 1 of 4 safety ratings: likely safe, possibly safe, possibly unsafe, and likely unsafe. An NHP was classified as "possibly unsafe" for patients with renal transplant if it had demonstrated in vitro immunomodulatory effects and/or significant interactions with transplant medications due to effects on the cytochrome P450 3A4 isozyme. Of the 19 627 BC-registered patients with renal disease (as of August 2014), 4122 (21%) were using one or more NHPs. The Herbal-CKD website (www.herbalckd.com) was created in 2015 to provide information about 47 commonly used NHPs and 2 known nephrotoxins (aristolochic acid and silver). This website provides a systematic evaluation of safety information for selected NHPs for patients with CKD (both nondialysis and dialysis-dependent) and kidney transplant. The most common NHP safety classification was "possibly safe", reflecting the paucity of studies in renal populations and the availability of safety data for the general population. Limitations of the website include difficulty in interpreting and generalizing the safety literature because most NHP formulations are not standardized, and others are combination products. The website www.herbalckd.com provides an easy-to-use, evidence

  11. CHRONIOUS: an open, ubiquitous and adaptive chronic disease management platform for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosso, R; Munaro, G; Salvetti, O; Colantonio, S; Ciancitto, F

    2010-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an highly innovative Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) research Initiative that aspires to implement its vision for ubiquitous health and lifestyle monitoring. The 17 European project partners are strictly working together since February 2008 to realize and open platform to manage and monitor elderly patients with chronic diseases and many difficulties to reach hospital centers for routine controls. The testing activities will be done in Italy and Spain involving COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) patients, these being widespread and highly expensive in terms of social and economic costs. Patients, equipped by wearable technologies and sensors and interacting with lifestyle interfaces, will be assisted by healthcare personnel able to check the health record and critical conditions through the Chronious platform data analysis and decision support system. Additionally, the new ontology based literature search engine will help the clinicians in the standardization of care delivery process. This paper is to present the main project objectives and its principal components from the intelligent system point of view.

  12. The role of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system genes in the progression of chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Tanika N.; Raj, Dominic; Rahman, Mahboob; Kretzler, Matthias; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Ricardo, Ana C.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Tao, Kaixiang; Xie, Dawei; Hamm, Lotuce Lee; He, Jiang; Appel, J.; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted single-marker, gene- and pathway-based analyses to examine the association between renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) variants and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression among Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. Methods A total of 1523 white and 1490 black subjects were genotyped for 490 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 RAAS genes as part of the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array. CKD progression phenotypes included decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over time and the occurrence of a renal disease event, defined as incident end-stage renal disease or halving of eGFR from baseline. Mixed-effects models were used to examine SNP associations with eGFR decline, while Cox proportional hazards models tested SNP associations with renal events. Gene- and pathway-based analyses were conducted using the truncated product method. All analyses were stratified by race, and a Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust for multiple testing. Results Among white and black participants, eGFR declined an average of 1.2 and 2.3 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively, while renal events occurred in a respective 11.5 and 24.9% of participants. We identified strong gene- and pathway-based associations with CKD progression. The AGT and RENBP genes were consistently associated with risk of renal events in separate analyses of white and black participants (both P < 1.00 × 10−6). Driven by the significant gene-based findings, the entire RAAS pathway was also associated with renal events in both groups (both P < 1.00 × 10−6). No single-marker associations with CKD progression were observed. Conclusions The current study provides strong evidence for a role of the RAAS in CKD progression. PMID:25906781

  13. The role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes in the progression of chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tanika N; Raj, Dominic; Rahman, Mahboob; Kretzler, Matthias; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Ricardo, Ana C; Rosas, Sylvia E; Tao, Kaixiang; Xie, Dawei; Hamm, Lotuce Lee; He, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    We conducted single-marker, gene- and pathway-based analyses to examine the association between renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) variants and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression among Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. A total of 1523 white and 1490 black subjects were genotyped for 490 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 RAAS genes as part of the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array. CKD progression phenotypes included decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over time and the occurrence of a renal disease event, defined as incident end-stage renal disease or halving of eGFR from baseline. Mixed-effects models were used to examine SNP associations with eGFR decline, while Cox proportional hazards models tested SNP associations with renal events. Gene- and pathway-based analyses were conducted using the truncated product method. All analyses were stratified by race, and a Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust for multiple testing. Among white and black participants, eGFR declined an average of 1.2 and 2.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year, respectively, while renal events occurred in a respective 11.5 and 24.9% of participants. We identified strong gene- and pathway-based associations with CKD progression. The AGT and RENBP genes were consistently associated with risk of renal events in separate analyses of white and black participants (both P < 1.00 × 10(-6)). Driven by the significant gene-based findings, the entire RAAS pathway was also associated with renal events in both groups (both P < 1.00 × 10(-6)). No single-marker associations with CKD progression were observed. The current study provides strong evidence for a role of the RAAS in CKD progression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 With Atrial Fibrillation in Chronic Kidney Disease, From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rupal; Cai, Xuan; Lee, Jungwha; Scialla, Julia J.; Bansal, Nisha; Sondheimer, James H.; Chen, Jing; Hamm, L. Lee; Ricardo, Ana C.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Deo, Rajat; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.; Isakova, Tamara; Wolf, Myles

    2016-01-01

    Importance Levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are elevated in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and strongly associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and death. Whether FGF23 is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation in CKD is unknown. Objective To investigate the association of FGF23 with atrial fibrillation in CKD. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective cohort study of 3876 individuals with mild to severe CKD who enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study between June 19, 2003, and September 3, 2008, and were followed up through March 31, 2013. Exposures Baseline plasma FGF23 levels. Main Outcomes and Measures Prevalent and incident atrial fibrillation. Results The study cohort comprised 3876 participants. Their mean (SD) age was 57.7 (11.0) years, and 44.8% (1736 of 3876) were female. Elevated FGF23 levels were independently associated with increased odds of prevalent atrial fibrillation (n = 660) after adjustment for cardiovascular and CKD-specific factors (odds ratio of highest vs lowest FGF23 quartile, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.69-3.13; P < .001 for linear trend across quartiles). During a median follow-up of 7.6 years (interquartile range, 6.3-8.6 years), 247 of the 3216 participants who were at risk developed incident atrial fibrillation (11.9 events per 1000 person-years). In fully adjusted models, elevated FGF23 was independently associated with increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation after adjustment for demographic, cardiovascular, and CKD-specific factors, and other markers of mineral metabolism (hazard ratio of highest vs lowest FGF23 quartile, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.00-2.53; P = .02 for linear trend across quartiles). The results were unchanged when further adjusted for ejection fraction, but individual adjustments for left ventricular mass index, left atrial area, and interim heart failure events partially attenuated the association of elevated FGF23 with incident atrial fibrillation. Conclusions and

  15. Renal involvement in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, A.; Gutman, A.; Shapiro, M. S.; Griffel, B.

    1981-01-01

    A patient with chronic Gaucher's disease is described who developed glomerulopathy 24 years after splenectomy terminating in renal failure. The pathological changes of this very rare complication of Gaucher's disease are described. The few similar cases reported in the literature are reviewed and the possible pathogenetic pathways discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7301691

  16. Diagnosis of renal disease in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Brown, Frances Margaret

    2013-01-01

    There are differences in renal anatomy and physiology between rabbits and other domestic species. Neurogenic renal ischemia occurs readily. Reversible prerenal azotemia may be seen in conjunction with gut stasis. Potentially fatal acute renal failure may be due to structural kidney damage or post-renal disease. Chronic renal failure is often associated with encephalitozoonosis. Affected rabbits cannot vomit and often eat well. Weight loss, lethargy, and cachexia are common clinical signs. Polydypsia/polyuria may be present. Derangements in calcium and phosphorus metabolism are features of renal disease. Radiography is always indicated. Urolithiasis, osteosclerosis, aortic and renal calcification are easily seen on radiographs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient and Disease Characteristics Associated with Activation for Self-Management in Patients with Diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Heart Failure and Chronic Renal Disease: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  18. The NLRP3 inflammasome is a potential target of ozone therapy aiming to ease chronic renal inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Bai, Zhiming; Chen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hui; Wang, Guoren; Wang, Gang; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2017-02-01

    Ozone therapy is an effective medical treatment for various diseases. A previous study has demonstrated its reno-protective effect in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanism involved is not completely known. This study produced the 5/6 nephrectomized CKD rat model and investigated whether the reno-protective effect of ozone therapy was achieved by its anti-inflammatory property through the modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The results showed that ozone therapy at a low concentration improved renal function and ameliorated renal morphological injury in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. The expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1-p10 in the kidney of these rats was simultaneously lowered by ozone therapy. Moreover, renal inflammation caused by IL-1β was significantly alleviated by ozone therapy. The Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the protein level of IL-1β was positively correlated with renal injury scores. Taken together, these results indicated that ozone therapy might reduce sterile renal inflammation and slow down CKD progression through the modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An unusual renal manifestation of chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, Ananthakrishnapuram; Yong, Jim; Killingsworth, Murray; Strasser, Simone; Suranyi, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Hepatitis B viral infection is usually a self-limiting disease in immunocompetent individuals. Chronic infection can be seen in up to 5% of infected patients. Renal manifestations of chronic HBV infection are usually glomerular. We describe here an uncommon presentation of a patient with chronic HBV infection with very high viral load and rapidly progressive renal failure. Renal biopsy showed features of tubulointerstitial nephritis and tubular epithelial inclusion bodies suggestive of HBV infection. Entecavir treatment slowed down the progression of his renal disease. Tubulointerstitial nephritis should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis in patients with HBV infection. Early antiviral treatment may halt the progression of renal disease.

  20. Acute exercise does not impair renal function in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients regardless of disease stage.

    PubMed

    Santana, Davi A; Poortmans, Jacques R; Dórea, Egidio Lima; Machado, Juliana Bannwart de Andrade; Fernandes, Alan Lins; Sá-Pinto, Ana Lúcia; Gualano, Bruno; Roschel, Hamilton

    2017-08-01

    Exercise has been overlooked as a potential therapy in chronic kidney disease (CKD), mainly because of a lack of understanding on its safety aspects. Notably, there are no data on renal function after exercise in CKD considering its stages. We investigated the acute effects of a 30-min moderate-intensity aerobic exercise bout on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria in 22 nondialysis CKD patients divided into: CKD stages 1 and 2 (CKD 1-2 ) and CKD stages 3 and 4 (CKD 3-4 ). Eleven body mass index-, age-, and sex-matched healthy individuals served as control (CON). Blood and urine samples were collected before, immediately after, and up to 90 min postexercise for creatinine and albumin assessments. GFR was determined by creatinine clearance (GFR Cr-Cl ). All CKD patients had significantly lower peak oxygen uptake than CON. CKD 1-2 and CKD 3-4 had increasingly higher serum creatinine than CON (9.6 ± 2.6, 25.6 ± 1.01, and 7.5 ± 1.4 mg/l, respectively); however, no within-group changes in serum or urinary creatinine were observed across time. GFR Cr-Cl was decreased in CKD 1-2 and CKD 3-4 compared with CON (91 ± 17 ml·min -1 ·1.73 m -2 ; 34 ± 15 ml·min -1 ·1.73 m -2 ; 122 ± 20 ml·min -1 ·1.73 m -2 , respectively). Most importantly, exercise did not affect GFR Cr-Cl in none of the groups across time. Albuminuria was significantly higher in CKD 3-4 (297 ± 284 µg/min) than in CON (5.4 ± 1.4 µg/min), but no within-group changes were observed after exercise. In conclusion, a single 30-min moderate-intensity aerobic exercise bout does not impair renal function in nondialysis CKD patients, regardless of disease stage, supporting the notion that exercise training can be safe in this disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. The impact of renal protection clinics on prescription of and adherence to cardioprotective drug therapy in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lepeytre, Fanny; Cardinal, Héloise; Fradette, Lorraine; Verhave, Jacobien; Dorais, Marc; LeLorier, Jacques; Pichette, Vincent; Madore, François

    2017-06-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of follow-up in renal protection clinics on the prescription of and adherence to cardioprotective drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: We studied stage 4 and 5 CKD patients who initiated follow-up in three renal protection clinics. The prescription pattern of antihypertensive agents (AHA) and lipid-lowering agents (LLAs) was measured as the percentage of patients who are prescribed the agents of interest at a given time. Adherence to drug therapy was defined as the percentage of days, during a pre-defined observation period, in which patients have an on-hand supply of their prescribed medications. Results: A total of 259 CKD patients were enrolled and followed for up to 1 year after referral to renal protection clinics. There was a significant increase in the prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (34-39%), angiotensin II receptor blockers (11-14%), beta-blockers (40-51%), calcium channel blockers (62-74%), diuretics (66-78%) and LLAs (39-47%) during follow-up in the renal protection clinic compared with baseline (P-values <0.01 for all comparisons). The proportions of patients with good (≥ 80%) and poor (< 80%) adherence to AHA (P = 0.41) and LLAs (P = 0.11) were similar in the year preceding and the year following the first visit to the renal protection clinics. Conclusion: Our results suggest that referral and follow-up in a renal protection clinic may increase the prescription of cardioprotective agents in CKD patients, but does not appear to improve adherence to these medications.

  2. Different impact of aspirin on renal progression in patients with predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease with or without previous stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Huang, Jing-Yang; Lee, Chun-Te; Hung, Tung-Wei; Liaw, Yung-Po; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The benefit of reducing the risk of stroke against increasing the risk of renal progression associated with antiplatelet therapy in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. We enrolled 1301 adult patients with advanced CKD treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents from January 1, 2002 to June 30, 2009 from the 2005 Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. All of the patients were followed until the development of the primary or secondary endpoints, or the end of the study (December 31, 2011). The primary endpoint was the development of ischemic stroke, and the secondary endpoints included hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and renal failure. The adjusted cumulative probability of events was calculated using multivariate Cox proportional regression analysis. Adjusted survival curves showed that the usage of aspirin was not associated with ischemic stroke, hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality, however, it was significantly associated with renal failure. In subgroup analysis, aspirin use was associated with renal failure in the patients with no history of stroke (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.73), and there was a borderline interaction between previous stroke and the use of aspirin on renal failure (interaction p=0.0565). There was no significant benefit in preventing ischemic stroke in the patients with advanced CKD who received aspirin therapy. Furthermore, the use of aspirin was associated with the risk of renal failure in the patients with advanced CKD without previous stroke. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistent high serum bicarbonate and the risk of heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): A report from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    PubMed

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J; Ham, L L; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Rosas, Sylvia E; Scialla, Julia J; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-04-20

    Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time-updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long-term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end-stage renal disease), and mortality. Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time-dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow-up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person-years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person-years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate <22 mmol/L had almost a 2-fold increased risk of renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Persistent High Serum Bicarbonate and the Risk of Heart Failure in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD): A Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J.; Ham, L. L.; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G.; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Scialla, Julia J.; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-01-01

    Background Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time‐updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long‐term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end‐stage renal disease), and mortality. Methods and Results Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time‐dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow‐up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person‐years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person‐years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow‐up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co‐morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate <22 mmol/L had almost a 2‐fold increased risk of renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. Conclusion In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:25896890

  5. Cardiac and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes who have chronic kidney disease: potential effects of bardoxolone methyl.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Ali, Sajid

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular and tissue balance of oxidant and antioxidant forces is a potential therapeutic target for a variety of agents in the treatment of complications due to chronic disease including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. There are a myriad of processes controlled at the level of genes, transcription factors, and protein messages that work to control the normal use of oxidative reactions within cells. Loss of control of these processes may lead to reversible dysfunction in many cell lines including the podocyte, renal tubular cells, and cardiac myocytes. Bardoxolone methyl is a novel nuclear regulator factor (Nrf-2) activator which works to tip the balance of effects towards antioxidation and as an observation made serendipitously, improves renal filtration function in humans after approximately 12 weeks of therapy. The improvement in estimated glomerular filtration can be up to 30% in those with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. However, experimental evidence suggests there may be a consequence of relative hyperfiltration in diseased kidneys as well as potential adverse effects on skeletal and cardiac myocytes. Only large, prospective randomized trials with carefully collected and adjudicated clinical outcomes will inform the research community on the therapeutic risks and benefits of this important new agent.

  6. Cardiac and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes who have chronic kidney disease: potential effects of bardoxolone methyl

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Peter A; Ali, Sajid

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular and tissue balance of oxidant and antioxidant forces is a potential therapeutic target for a variety of agents in the treatment of complications due to chronic disease including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. There are a myriad of processes controlled at the level of genes, transcription factors, and protein messages that work to control the normal use of oxidative reactions within cells. Loss of control of these processes may lead to reversible dysfunction in many cell lines including the podocyte, renal tubular cells, and cardiac myocytes. Bardoxolone methyl is a novel nuclear regulator factor (Nrf-2) activator which works to tip the balance of effects towards antioxidation and as an observation made serendipitously, improves renal filtration function in humans after approximately 12 weeks of therapy. The improvement in estimated glomerular filtration can be up to 30% in those with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. However, experimental evidence suggests there may be a consequence of relative hyperfiltration in diseased kidneys as well as potential adverse effects on skeletal and cardiac myocytes. Only large, prospective randomized trials with carefully collected and adjudicated clinical outcomes will inform the research community on the therapeutic risks and benefits of this important new agent. PMID:22787387

  7. The role of renal function loss on circadian misalignment of cytokines EPO, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-alfa in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Karien; Koch, Birgit; van Someren, Eus; Wielders, Jos; Ter Wee, Piet; Nagtegaal, Elsbeth; Gaillard, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of renal disease. Circadian sleep-wake rhythm is disturbed in renal disease. Awareness of other disturbed rhythms, such as inflammation processes, can affect the treatment of patients with renal disease. Knowledge of possibly related circadian misalignment of the cytokines erythropoietin (EPO), Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and interleukins (IL) however is limited. We therefore performed an observational study. The objective of this study was to characterize levels of EPO, IGF-1 and inflammation markers IL-6 and TNF-α, related to renal function. The study population consisted of patients with various degrees of renal function, admitted to our hospital. During 24 hours, blood of 28 subjects with various degrees of renal function was collected every 2 hours. The patients were stable, not acutely ill and they were waiting for a procedure, such as elective surgery. Circadian parameters of EPO, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured in serum and were correlated with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and Hb, using Pearson correlations. Although diurnal variations in EPO level were found in 15 out of 28 patients, the curves did not show a consistent phase. The presence of an EPO rhythm was not related to GFR. No diurnal rhythm could be detected for IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α. Mean levels of IGF-1 were correlated inversely to mean levels of EPO (p=0.03). When divided based on GFR and Hb subjects with GFR 10-30 ml/min and lower Hb had the highest IGF-1 levels (p=0.02). A relationship between Il-6, TNF-α and EPO or GFR was not found. The existence of a circadian (mis)alignment of EPO, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α was not found. The association between high IGF-1 and low Hb suggests that EPO and IGF-1 have an alternating role, dependent on GFR, in stimulating erythropoiesis. These results could have consequences for the treatment of anemia.

  8. Skin autofluorescence is associated with renal function and cardiovascular diseases in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Tani, Yoshihiro; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Kusano, Yuki; Suzuki, Hodaka; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) is thought to be a contributing factor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive measure of AGE accumulation using autofluorescence of the skin under ultraviolet light, has shown associations with CVD in haemodialysis patients. The present study aimed to evaluate relationships of skin autofluorescence to renal function as well as CVD in pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects in this cross-sectional analysis comprised 304 pre-dialysis CKD patients [median age, 62.0 years; median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 54.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2); diabetes, n = 81 (26.6%)]. AGE accumulation in skin was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Relationships between skin autofluorescence, eGFR, CVD history and other parameters were evaluated. Skin autofluorescence correlated negatively with eGFR (r = -0.42, P < 0.01) and increased as CKD stage advanced. Multiple regression analysis revealed significant correlations of skin autofluorescence with age, presence of diabetes, eGFR and CVD history in CKD patients (R(2) = 30%). Age, male gender, smoking history, skin autofluorescence and eGFR were significantly correlated with CVD history, and multiple logistic regression analysis identified age [odds ratio (OR), 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.15; P < 0.01], history of smoking (OR, 6.50; 95%CI, 1.94-21.83; P < 0.01) and skin autofluorescence (OR, 3.74; 95%CI, 1.54-9.24; P < 0.01) as independent factors. Tissue AGE accumulation measured as skin autofluorescence increased as GFR decreased and was related to CVD history in CKD patients. Non-invasive autofluorescence readers may provide potential markers for clinical risk assessment in pre-dialysis CKD patients.

  9. Immune and Inflammatory Role in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and acute renal diseases, irrespective of the initiating cause, have inflammation and immune system activation as a common underlying mechanism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of immune cells and inflammatory proteins that contribute to the pathogenesis of renal disease, and to discuss some of the physiological changes that occur in the kidney as a result of immune system activation. An overview of common forms of acute and chronic renal disease is provided, followed by a discussion of common therapies that have antiinflammatory or immunosuppressive effects in the treatment of renal disease. PMID:23720336

  10. Hyponatremia is Associated with Fluid Imbalance and Adverse Renal Outcome in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Treated with Diuretics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Moay; Tsai, Ni-Chin; Lin, Ming-Yen; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-11-14

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is frequently complicated with hyponatremia, probably because of fluid overload or diuretic usage. Hyponatremia in CKD population is associated with increased mortality, but the effect on renal outcome was unknown. We investigated whether hyponatremia is associated with fluid status and is a prognostic indicator for adverse outcomes in a CKD cohort of 4,766 patients with 1,009 diuretic users. We found that diuretic users had worse clinical outcomes compared with diuretic non-users. Hyponatremia (serum sodium <135 mEq/L) was associated with excessive volume and volume depletion, measured as total body water by bioimpedance analysis, in diuretic users, but not in diuretic non-users. Furthermore, in Cox survival analysis, hyponatremia was associated with an increased risk for renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.13-1.85, P < 0.05) in diuretic users, but not in diuretic non-users (P for interaction <0.05); restricted cubic spline model also showed a similar result. Hyponatremia was not associated with all-cause mortality or cardiovascular event whereas hypernatremia (serum sodium >141 mEq/L) was associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality. Thus, hyponatremia is an indicator of fluid imbalance and also a prognostic factor for renal replacement therapy in CKD patients treated with diuretics.

  11. Hyponatremia is Associated with Fluid Imbalance and Adverse Renal Outcome in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Treated with Diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lee Moay; Tsai, Ni-Chin; Lin, Ming-Yen; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is frequently complicated with hyponatremia, probably because of fluid overload or diuretic usage. Hyponatremia in CKD population is associated with increased mortality, but the effect on renal outcome was unknown. We investigated whether hyponatremia is associated with fluid status and is a prognostic indicator for adverse outcomes in a CKD cohort of 4,766 patients with 1,009 diuretic users. We found that diuretic users had worse clinical outcomes compared with diuretic non-users. Hyponatremia (serum sodium <135 mEq/L) was associated with excessive volume and volume depletion, measured as total body water by bioimpedance analysis, in diuretic users, but not in diuretic non-users. Furthermore, in Cox survival analysis, hyponatremia was associated with an increased risk for renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.13–1.85, P < 0.05) in diuretic users, but not in diuretic non-users (P for interaction <0.05); restricted cubic spline model also showed a similar result. Hyponatremia was not associated with all-cause mortality or cardiovascular event whereas hypernatremia (serum sodium >141 mEq/L) was associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality. Thus, hyponatremia is an indicator of fluid imbalance and also a prognostic factor for renal replacement therapy in CKD patients treated with diuretics. PMID:27841359

  12. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Turkish Adults With Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome: A Post Hoc Analysis from Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey Study.

    PubMed

    Arinsoy, Turgay; Deger, Serpil Muge; Ates, Kenan; Altun, Bulent; Ecder, Tevfik; Camsari, Taner; Serdengecti, Kamil; Suleymanlar, Gultekin

    2016-11-01

    Obesity confers an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is increased further by accompanying metabolic abnormalities. To investigate the relationship of the risk of CKD with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) in adults by means of post hoc analysis of data from the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study. The anthropometric measurements of a total of 9,100 adult participants in the CREDIT study were included in the analyses. Subjects were classified according to the presence or absence of obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30) and MS. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratio for CKD. Effect modification analyses were also performed. The prevalence of obesity was 20.6% and that of MS was 31.3%. The prevalence of CKD was higher among obese subjects compared to those with a normal BMI (20.5% vs. 14%; P < .001). The odds ratio (OR) for CKD was 1.296 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.121-1.498) for subjects who were overweight, 1.718 (95% CI, 1.444-2.044) for those with class I obesity, 1.983 (95% CI, 1.489-2.641) for those with class II obesity and 2.799 (95% CI, 1.719-4.557) for subjects with extreme obesity (P < .001 for each subgroup) compared to subjects with a normal BMI. CKD was significantly more prevalent in subjects with MS (21.9% vs. 12.3%, P < .001). The OR for CKD was higher in obese subjects with MS (adjusted OR, 1.321; 95% CI, 1.109-1.573; P = .002). The stratification of obese individuals based on their metabolic phenotype is important for prevention and treatment of CKD. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of survival analysis and palliative care involvement in patients aged over 70 years choosing conservative management or renal replacement therapy in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Jamilla A; Mooney, Andrew; Russon, Lynne

    2013-10-01

    There are limited data on the outcomes of elderly patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing renal replacement therapy or conservative management. We aimed to compare survival, hospital admissions and palliative care access of patients aged over 70 years with chronic kidney disease stage 5 according to whether they chose renal replacement therapy or conservative management. Retrospective observational study. Patients aged over 70 years attending pre-dialysis clinic. In total, 172 patients chose conservative management and 269 chose renal replacement therapy. The renal replacement therapy group survived for longer when survival was taken from the time estimated glomerular filtration rate <20 mL/min (p < 0.0001), <15 mL/min (p < 0.0001) and <12 mL/min (p = 0.002). When factors influencing survival were stratified for both groups independently, renal replacement therapy failed to show a survival advantage over conservative management, in patients older than 80 years or with a World Health Organization performance score of 3 or more. There was also a significant reduction in the effect of renal replacement therapy on survival in patients with high Charlson's Comorbidity Index scores. The relative risk of an acute hospital admission (renal replacement therapy vs conservative management) was 1.6 (p < 0.05; 95% confidence interval = 1.14-2.13). A total of 47% of conservative management patients died in hospital, compared to 69% undergoing renal replacement therapy (Renal Registry data). Seventy-six percent of the conservative management group accessed community palliative care services compared to 0% of renal replacement therapy patients. For patients aged over 80 years, with a poor performance status or high co-morbidity scores, the survival advantage of renal replacement therapy over conservative management was lost at all levels of disease severity. Those accessing a conservative management pathway had greater access to palliative care services and were less

  14. Relationship of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic function with cardiovascular and renal outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gail E; de Backer, Tine; Contreras, Gabriel; Wang, Xuelei; Kendrick, Cynthia; Greene, Tom; Appel, Lawrence J; Randall, Otelio S; Lea, Janice; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Phillips, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    African Americans with hypertension are at high risk for adverse outcomes from cardiovascular and renal disease. Patients with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease have a high prevalence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Our goal was to study prospectively the relationships of LV mass and diastolic function with subsequent cardiovascular and renal outcomes in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort study. Of 691 patients enrolled in the cohort, 578 had interpretable echocardiograms and complete relevant clinical data. Exposures were LV hypertrophy and diastolic parameters. Outcomes were cardiovascular events requiring hospitalization or causing death; a renal composite outcome of doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (censoring death); and heart failure. We found strong independent relationships between LV hypertrophy and subsequent cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.27) events, but not renal outcomes. After adjustment for LV mass and clinical variables, lower systolic tissue Doppler velocities and diastolic parameters reflecting a less compliant LV (shorter deceleration time and abnormal E/A ratio) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with future heart failure events. This is the first study to show a strong relationship among LV hypertrophy, diastolic parameters, and adverse cardiac outcomes in African Americans with hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These echocardiographic risk factors may help identify high-risk patients with chronic kidney disease for aggressive therapeutic intervention.

  15. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  16. Hyperhomocysteinaemia as a potential marker of early renal function decline in middle-aged Asian people without chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tak, Young Jin; Jeong, Dong Wook; Kim, Yun Jin; Lee, Sang Yeoup; Lee, Jeong Gyu; Song, Sang Heon; Cha, Kwang Soo; Kang, Yang Ho

    2016-02-01

    High levels of serum total homocysteine (tHcy), often observed in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the relationship between tHcy and renal function in healthy individuals. We examined whether tHcy levels are related to renal function in Asian individuals without CKD. This cross-sectional study examined 2032 subjects, aged 40-64 years. Individuals with kidney diseases or other conditions that could affect tHcy were excluded. Renal function was determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from levels of serum creatinine (sCr) and cystatin C. Age, tHcy, sCr, and cystatin C of the subjects were 54.1 ± 6.0 years, 9.5 (8.0-11.4) μmol/L, 0.81 ± 0.1 mg/dL, and 0.82 ± 0.1 mg/L, respectively. In a multiple linear regression analysis, tHcy was a significant independent determinant of sCr and cystatin C in men (β = 0.206 and β = 0.282, respectively) and women (β = 0.247 and β = 0.229, respectively). Highest tHcy levels were independently associated with increased cystatin C (>s1.10 mg/L) with an odds ratio (OR) of 5.00 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.81-8.09] and decreased eGFR (<90 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) with an OR of 1.69 (95% CI 1.36-2.11) compared to tHcy levels in the 1st-3rd quartiles. Higher levels of tHcy are independently associated with sCr and cystatin C elevation. Our study suggests that tHcy levels may be influenced by renal function in Asian populations without CKD. Future studies are needed to define the role of tHcy in renal function.

  17. Alterations of Hepatic Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease via D-box-binding Protein Aggravate the Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kengo; Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kondo, Hideaki; Ikeyama, Hisako; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Irino, Yasuhiro; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-03-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increase in serum retinol; however, the underlying mechanisms of this disorder are poorly characterized. Here, we found that the alteration of hepatic metabolism induced the accumulation of serum retinol in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. The liver is the major organ responsible for retinol metabolism; accordingly, microarray analysis revealed that the hepatic expression of most CYP genes was changed in 5/6Nx mice. In addition, D-box-binding protein (DBP), which controls the expression of several CYP genes, was significantly decreased in these mice. Cyp3a11 and Cyp26a1, encoding key proteins in retinol metabolism, showed the greatest decrease in expression in 5/6Nx mice, a process mediated by the decreased expression of DBP. Furthermore, an increase of plasma transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in 5/6Nx mice led to the decreased expression of the Dbp gene. Consistent with these findings, the alterations of retinol metabolism and renal dysfunction in 5/6Nx mice were ameliorated by administration of an anti-TGF-β1 antibody. We also show that the accumulation of serum retinol induced renal apoptosis in 5/6Nx mice fed a normal diet, whereas renal dysfunction was reduced in mice fed a retinol-free diet. These findings indicate that constitutive Dbp expression plays an important role in mediating hepatic dysfunction under CKD. Thus, the aggravation of renal dysfunction in patients with CKD might be prevented by a recovery of hepatic function, potentially through therapies targeting DBP and retinol. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Transient renal impairment in the absence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease in patients with unilateral ureteric stone impaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Youn; Choe, Hyun-Sop; Lee, Dong Sup; Yoo, Jae Mo; Lee, Seung-Ju

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to describe the rate and characteristics of transient renal impairment in unilateral ureteric stone patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to identify factors that may have influenced renal function of these patients. Unilateral ureteric stone patients who visited our hospital's emergency department from December, 2009 to December, 2015 were divided into two groups based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): group I (patients with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) and group II (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ). A univariate comparison between groups I and II was performed. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors that influenced renal function. There were 107 patients in group II, which constituted 5.6 % of the total patients. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, age (p < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 1.069, confidence interval [CI] = 1.049-1.089), hypertension (p < 0.001, OR = 2.302, CI = 1.467-3.611), stone size (p = 0.001, OR = 1.141, CI = 1.057-1.231), white blood cell count (p = 0.001, OR = 1.132, CI = 1.055-1.215) and hematuria (p < 0.001, OR = 0.383, CI = 0.231-0.636) were found to be independent factors for renal impairment. Based on the results of this study, the rate of renal impairment was 6 % of the unilateral ureteric stone patients without pre-existing CKD. Age and hypertension were found to be independent factors for renal impairment; NSAIDs should be used cautiously or other agents for pain relief such as opioids should be considered in old aged patients with hypertension.

  19. Urine proteome analysis in Dent's disease shows high selective changes potentially involved in chronic renal damage.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Anglani, Franca; Bruschi, Maurizio; Tosetto, Enrica; Cremasco, Daniela; Murer, Luisa; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Petretto, Andrea; Caridi, Gianluca; Rossi, Roberta; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Definition of the urinary protein composition would represent a potential tool for diagnosis in many clinical conditions. The use of new proteomic technologies allows detection of genetic and post-trasductional variants that increase sensitivity of the approach but complicates comparison within a heterogeneous patient population. Overall, this limits research of urinary biomarkers. Studying monogenic diseases are useful models to address this issue since genetic variability is reduced among first- and second-degree relatives of the same family. We applied this concept to Dent's disease, a monogenic condition characterised by low-molecular-weight proteinuria that is inherited following an X-linked trait. Results are presented here on a combined proteomic approach (LC-mass spectrometry, Western blot and zymograms for proteases and inhibitors) to characterise urine proteins in a large family (18 members, 6 hemizygous patients, 6 carrier females, and 6 normals) with Dent's diseases due to the 1070G>T mutation of the CLCN5. Gene ontology analysis on more than 1000 proteins showed that several clusters of proteins characterised urine of affected patients compared to carrier females and normal subjects: proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodelling were the major group. Specific analysis on metalloproteases and their inhibitors underscored unexpected mechanisms potentially involved in renal fibrosis. Studying with new-generation techniques for proteomic analysis of the members of a large family with Dent's disease sharing the same molecular defect allowed highly repetitive results that justify conclusions. Identification in urine of proteins actively involved in interstitial matrix remodelling poses the question of active anti-fibrotic drugs in Dent's patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin autofluorescence and the association with renal and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease stage 3.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Natasha J; Fluck, Richard J; McIntyre, Christopher W; Taal, Maarten W

    2011-10-01

    Tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic stress. Assessment of tissue AGE by skin autofluorescence (SAF) correlates well with cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in diabetic, transplant, and dialysis patients, and may be a useful marker of CV risk in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). 1707 patients with estimated GFR 59 to 30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) were recruited from primary care practices for the Renal Risk In Derby (RRID) study. Detailed medical history was obtained, and each participant underwent clinical assessment as well as urine and serum biochemistry tests. SAF was assessed (mean of three readings) as a measure of skin AGE deposition using a cutaneous AF device (AGE Reader™, DiagnOptics, Groningen, The Netherlands). Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between AF readings and several potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and progression of CKD. SAF readings (arbitrary units) were also significantly higher among males (2.8 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), diabetics (3.0 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), patients with evidence of self-reported CVD (2.9 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), and those with no formal educational qualifications (2.8 ± 0.6 versus 2.6 ± 0.6; P < 0.01 for all). Multivariable linear regression analysis identified hemoglobin, diabetes, age, and eGFR as the most significant independent determinants of higher SAF (standardized coefficients -0.16, 0.13, 0.12, and -0.10, respectively; R(2) = 0.17 for equation). Increased SAF is independently associated with multiple CV and renal risk factors in CKD 3. Long-term follow-up will assess the value of SAF as a predictor of CV and renal risk in this population.

  1. Chronic asymptomatic pyuria precedes overt urinary tract infection and deterioration of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) occurs in 30%-50% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, the clinical relevance of asymptomatic pyuria in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 256 ADPKD patients who registered to the ADPKD clinic at Seoul National University Hospital from Aug 1999 to Aug 2010. We defined the asymptomatic pyuria as more than 5-9 white blood cells in high-power field with no related symptoms or signs of overt UTI. Patients were categorized into 2 groups depending on its duration and frequency: Group A included non-pyuria and transient pyuria patients; Group B included recurrent and persistent pyuria patients. The association between asymptomatic pyuria and both the development of overt UTI and the deterioration of renal function were examined. Results With a mean follow-up duration of 65.3 months, 176 (68.8%) out of 256 patients experienced 681 episodes of asymptomatic pyuria and 50 episodes of UTI. The annual incidence of asymptomatic pyuria was 0.492 episodes/patient/year. The patients in group B showed female predominance (58.5% vs. 42.0%, P=0.01) and experienced an upper UTI more frequently (hazard ratio: 4.612, 95% confidence interval: 1.735-12.258; P=0.002, adjusted for gender and hypertension). The annual change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) was significantly larger in magnitude in group B than in group A (-2.7±4.56 vs. -1.17±5.8, respectively; P=0.01). Age and Group B found to be the independent variables for ΔeGFR and developing end-stage renal disease (16.0% vs. 4.3%, respectively; P=0.001). Conclusions Chronic asymptomatic pyuria may increase the risk of developing overt UTI and may contribute to declining renal function in ADPKD. PMID:23295127

  2. Robotic Partial Nephrectomy in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Objective Measurement of Short- and Long-term Renal Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chalouhy, Charbel; Ruck, Jessica Moore; Zhou, Tian Cheng; Srivastava, Abhishek; Keehn, Aryeh; Watts, Kara L; Maria, Pedro; Ghavamian, Reza

    2018-05-31

    Minimal literature informs the use of robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, we evaluated the renal functional outcomes in CKD patients undergoing RPN. We reviewed a prospective database of patients undergoing RPN 2010-2015 and identified 182 patients who had preoperative and postoperative nuclear renal scintigraphy (at 2 and 12 months postop). Pre-operative and 12-month post-operative eGFR (mL/min/1.73m2, by MDRD) were calculated. CKD was defined as eGFR <60mL/min/1.73m2 (CKD stages III&IV). Changes in creatinine, eGFR and split function on Mercaptuacetyltriglycine (MAG) 3 scan were compared by baseline CKD status. Correlations between pre- and post-operative eGFR were calculated. Of 182 patients, 30 (16.5%) had baseline CKD. Preoperative eGFR was 48.5 and 99.0 in CKD and non-CKD patients, respectively (p<0.001). From pre-operation to 12 months post-operation, eGFR decreased by 2.8 and 1.1 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively (p=0.6). On MAG-3 scan, the contribution of the surgical kidney to overall renal function decreased by 5.0% and 4.8% (p = 0.9) in the CKD and non-CKD cohorts, respectively. When comparing renal scans at 2 and 12 months post-operation, in both groups the surgical kidney significantly recovered (both p<0.001) and the patterns of kidney function recovery was similar in both groups (CKD +2.0%, non-CKD +1.4%, p=0.6). On long-term follow-up (>2years), eGFR did not change significantly in either the CKD or non-CKD group (-2.8 vs -1.1 mL/min/1.73m2, p=0.6). On pathology, tumors were more frequently malignant in CKD vs. non-CKD patients (93.3% vs 73.2%, p=0.02) and of higher Fuhrman Grade (grade >3: 49.7% vs 28.1%, p<0.001). RPN is a reasonable treatment option in patients with CKD, as it did not lead to a greater decline in renal function contributed by the surgical kidney. The patterns of kidney function recovery after surgery are similar between patients with and without CKD.

  3. Ameliorative effect of ursolic acid on renal fibrosis in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Richa; Sharma, Anshuk; Lingaraju, Madhu C; Begum, Jubeda; Kumar, Dhirendra; Mathesh, Karikalan; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Kumar, Dinesh

    2018-05-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), an ursane-type pentacyclic triterpenoid commonly found in apple peels and holy basil has been shown to possess many beneficial effects. Renal fibrosis is a complication of kidney injury and associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In our previous investigation, a lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenoid, betulinic acid (BA) was found to have protective effect on chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal fibrosis. This prompted us to explore the therapeutic value of UA, a chemically related compound to BA in CKD. CKD was induced by feeding adenine with the feed at a concentration of 0.75% for 28 days. UA at the dose rate of 30 mg/kg in 0.5% carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) was administered by oral route, simultaneously with adenine feeding for 28 days. Adenine feeding increased the kidney weight to body weight index, decreased the kidney function due to injury as indicated by increased markers like serum urea, uric acid, creatinine, cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and initiated the fibrotic response in kidney by increasing the profibrotic proteins viz. transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), fibronectin and collagen. However, treatment with UA reversed the damage induced by adenine as shown by reduced kidney injury and fibrosis markers which was further clearly evident in histological picture indicating the suitability of UA for use in CKD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

  5. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Ping; Tan, Huan; Thacker, Jon M; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ying; Kohn, Orly; Sprague, Stuart M; Prasad, Pottumarthi V

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is known to be associated with reduced renal blood flow. However, data to-date in humans is limited. In this study, non-invasive arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI data was acquired in 33 patients with diabetes and stage-3 CKD, and 30 healthy controls. A significantly lower renal blood flow both in cortex (108.4±36.4 vs . 207.3±41.8; p<0.001, d=2.52) and medulla (23.2±8.9 vs . 42.6±15.8; p<0.001, d=1.5) was observed. Both cortical (ρ=0.67, p<0.001) and medullary (ρ=0.62, p<0.001) blood flow were correlated with eGFR, and cortical blood flow was found to be confounded by age and BMI. However, in a subset of subjects that were matched for age and BMI (n=6), the differences between CKD and control subjects remained significant both in cortex (107.4±42.8 vs . 187.51±20.44; p=0.002) and medulla (15.43±8.43 vs . 39.18±11.13; p=0.002). A threshold value to separate healthy and CKD was estimated to be Cor_BF=142.9 and Med_BF=24.1. These results support the use of ASL in the evaluation of renal blood flow in patients with moderate level of CKD. Whether these measurements can identify subjects at risk of progressive CKD requires further longitudinal follow-up.

  6. Comparison of Renal Function and Other Predictors in Lacto-Ovo Vegetarians and Omnivores With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chou-Yueh; Chang, Horng-Rong; Lin, Hsing-Chun; Chang, Han-Hsin

    2018-03-13

    Objective Vegetarian diets have been shown to increase the risk of certain nutritional deficiencies, such as iron. As a number of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Taiwan are lacto-ovo vegetarians, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different proportions and sources of protein in lacto-ovo vegetarian and omnivorous diets, as well as the influence of adequate dietary protein intake, on renal function and nutritional status of Taiwanese patients with stage 3 to stage 5 CKD. Methods This is a cross-sectional study. In total, 100 outpatients with stage 3 to stage 5 CKD were enrolled in this study, including 40 lacto-ovo vegetarians and 60 omnivores. Subjects were divided into the lacto-ovo vegetarian group and omnivorous group based on dietary protein patterns. The indicators of renal function included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Albumin, hemoglobin (Hb), and red blood cell count (RBC) measurements served as nutritional indicators. The levels of dietary energy and protein, as well as protein sources (plant or animal), were also analyzed. Results The levels of serum phosphate and triglycerides were significantly lower in the lacto-ovo vegetarian group than in the omnivore group, suggesting that lacto-ovo vegetarian diets have both phosphate-lowering and lipid-lowering effects, which could reduce the development of hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia. However, since all groups consumed higher than the recommended amounts of protein diet intake, no significant differences were observed in other renal function indices between the two groups. Conclusion Although a larger cohort study is necessary, the findings of this study could help patients with CKD to make healthier food choices and be used to support future medical nutritional therapies.

  7. Cocaine-induced renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gitman, Michael D; Singhal, Pravin C

    2004-09-01

    Cocaine has anaesthetic, vasoconstrictive and CNS stimulatory effects. Presently, it is used clinically as a local anaesthetic and abused as a recreational drug. It has been implicated in both acute and chronic renal failure and has been reported to affect every aspect of the nephron. This article will review the spectrum of cocaine-induced kidney disease and attempt to give insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms involved.

  8. [Safety and effectiveness of nicotinic acid in the management of patients with chronic renal disease and hyperlipidemia associated to hyperphosphatemia].

    PubMed

    Restrepo Valencia, C A; Cruz, J

    2008-01-01

    To establish if the nicotinic acid in patients with chronic renal disease reduce significantly and with security the levels of lipids and serum phosphate in refractory patients to the classical management. Observational study Place: Renal Unity RTS Ltda Caldas Santa Sofìa Hospital. All the patients with chronic renal disease in dialysis therapy to whom the classical treatment for their hyperlipidaemia and hyperphosphatemia didn't manage a satisfactory reduce of their serum levels. It was identified that those patients who in the 3 previous months to the intervention hadn't presented changes in the lipids profile even though they received low fats diet and a lipid lowering therapies (statin o fibric acid derivates). It was determined in them whether they presented levels of serum phosphorus greater than 5.5 mg/dl even though having received nutritional recommendations and treatment with oral phosphate binding agents (Aluminum hydroxide, Calcium salts or Sevelamer). In them it was proceeded to administrate nicotinic acid via oral at night until a doses of 1,000 milligrams was reached (preceded of 100 mgs of acetylsalicylic acid 1 hour before) during a period of 8 months, observing its therapeutical effectivity and security profile to improve the lipids profile and reduce the serum phosphorus. 9 patients complied with the requirements, average time in dialysis 34 months, 3 in hemodialysis and 6 in peritoneal dialysis. All patients started with 500 mgs and 3 months later correctly tolerated the dose of 1,000 mgs. Between the evaluated variables, the most important changes were: the phosphorus reduced reaching a significant value at eight months: initial 6.46+/-0.53, four months 4.37+/-0.63 (p>0.05) and eight months 3.94+/-0.76 (p<0.01); the product Ca x P obtained important reductions at four and eight months; the total Cholesterol and Triglyceride was significant reduced at all periods, not being so for the LDL, although the HDL elevated to significant values at

  9. [Chronic renal disease in Puerto Rico: incidence, prevalence, and mortality in 2000-2008].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Ortiz, Ylene D; Miranda, Glenda; Burgos Calderón, Rafael; Depine, Santos; Ojo, Otegbola

    2011-01-01

    End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is a global public health problem. Although there are strategies for its prevention, the number of cases has increased. In order to understand current situation in Puerto Rico (PR) we review available data, which is presented in a descriptive report of the incidence, prevalence and mortality of ESRD during the period 2000-2008. In addition, we compare the incidence and prevalence rates with regard to other countries. We used 2000-2008 USRDS statistics and the QIRN3 for patients on dialysis. Transplanted patients were excluded. Crude rates of incidence and prevalence in PR were calculated for comparison with the United States and other countries. Percentages were calculated to describe the demographic characteristics and primary diagnosis in 2008. During the period 2000-2008 the incidence rate increased by 21.6 percent; from 286.8 to 348.7 pmp. The prevalence rate increased by 27.3 percent; from 861.2 to 1096.2 pmp. The average annual growth in the incidence and prevalence was 2.4 percent and 3.0 percent respectively. During the same period, diabetes mellitus was the leading cause of ESRD reaching 67.4 percent of total new cases in 2008, while in the U.S. was 44.4 percent. Unadjusted mortality decreased slightly in 2008 to 18.5 percent. PR is the fifth country with the highest incidence of patient on dialysis and the first with ESRD due to diabetes mellitus. ESRD is becoming more common and prevalent in PR. We should be more aggressive in establishing public health strategies to reduce ESRD.

  10. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in a population in southern Brazil (Pro-Renal Study).

    PubMed

    Piccolli, Ana Paula; Nascimento, Marcelo Mazza do; Riella, Miguel Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 10-12% of the adult population in many countries. In Brazil, there is no reliable information about the actual prevalence of CKD. To determine the prevalence of CKD by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria/albuminuria in an urban population randomly selected in Southern Brazil. Patients and. 5,216 individuals were randomly selected out of a pool of 10,000 individuals identified from the database of a local energy company. The screening consisted of collection of demographic data, history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, kidney/cardiovascular disease in the family and obesity through the body mass index - BMI (CKD risk factors). Blood samples were collected for determination of serum creatinine and subsequent eGFR estimation by the MDRD formula and urine samples for determination of albuminuria by dipstick. Albuminuria was further evaluated by HemoCue© in a selected CKD risk group. The population was predominantly Caucasians (93%), 64% were females and the mean age of participants was 45 years old (18-87). BMI (kg/m2) was 27±5. Albuminuria was found in 5.25% of individuals. 88.6% of this population had no CKD (eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73m2 & normoalbuminuria) and 11.4% were identified as having CKD, with majority on stages 3A (7.2%) and 3B (1.1%). Hypertension, diabetes, older age and obesity was associated with a higher prevalence of CKD (p < 0.001). The prevalence of CKD in an urban population in southern Brazil mirrors other developed countries and indicates that kidney disease is an important public health problem in Brazil.

  11. Renal perfusion index reflects cardiac systolic function in chronic cardio-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2015-04-17

    Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2-4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=-0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation.

  12. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Score Is Associated With Incident Heart Failure Hospitalization in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Without Previously Diagnosed Heart Failure: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Yang, Wei; Roy, Jason; Anderson, Amanda H; Bansal, Nisha; Chen, Jing; DeFilippi, Christopher; Delafontaine, Patrice; Feldman, Harold I; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Rosas, Sylvia E; Go, Alan S; Shlipak, Michael G

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for heart failure (HF). Patients with chronic kidney disease without diagnosed HF have an increased burden of symptoms characteristic of HF. It is not known whether these symptoms are associated with occurrence of new onset HF. We studied the association of a modified Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire with newly identified cases of hospitalized HF among 3093 participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study who did not report HF at baseline. The annually updated Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire score was categorized into quartiles (Q1-4) with the lower scores representing the worse symptoms. Multivariable-adjusted repeated measure logistic regression models were adjusted for demographic characteristics, clinical risk factors for HF, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide level and left ventricular hypertrophy, left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Over a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 4.3±1.6 years, there were 211 new cases of HF hospitalizations. The risk of HF hospitalization increased with increasing symptom quartiles; 2.62, 1.85, 1.14, and 0.74 events per 100 person-years, respectively. The median number of annual Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire assessments per participant was 5 (interquartile range, 3-6). The annually updated Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire score was independently associated with higher risk of incident HF hospitalization in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio, 3.30 [1.66-6.52]; P=0.001 for Q1 compared with Q4). Symptoms characteristic of HF are common in patients with chronic kidney disease and are associated with higher short-term risk for new hospitalization for HF, independent of level of kidney function, and other known HF risk factors. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Comparison of clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of chronic glomerulonephritis and patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of other diseases.

    PubMed

    Popova, J A; Yadrihinskaya, V N; Krylova, M I; Sleptsovа, S S; Borisovа, N V

    frequent complications of hemodialysis treatments are coagulation disorders. This is due to activation of the coagulation of blood flow in the interaction with a dialysis membrane material vascular prostheses and extracorporeal circuit trunks. In addition, in hemodialysis patients receiving heparin for years, there is depletion of stocks in endothelial cells in tissue factor inhibitor, inhibits the activity of an external blood clotting mechanism. the aim of our study was to evaluate the hemostatic system parameters in patients with end-stage renal failure, depending on the cause of renal failure. to evaluate the hemostatic system parameters in patients with end-stage renal failure, depending on the cause of renal failure and hemodialysis treatment duration conducted a study that included 100 patients observed in the department of chronic hemodialysis and nephrology hospital №1 Republican National Medical Center in the period of 2013-2016. in patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of chronic glomerulonephritis, a great expression of activation of blood coagulation confirm increased the mean concentration of fibrinogen, whereas in the group, which included patients with end-stage renal failure in the outcome of other diseases, such is not different from the norm, and a higher rate of hyperfibrinogenemia, identified in 2/3 patients in this group. it was revealed that the state of homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal failure in increasingly characterizes the level of fibrinogen and the activation of the hemostatic markers: soluble fibrin monomer complexes, D-dimers.

  14. Advances in Ethical, Social, and Economic Aspects of Chronic Renal Disease in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Paz Zambrana, S

    2016-03-01

    Since 2005, great progress has been made in health care provision to patients with terminal renal failure in Bolivia. Access to dialysis and transplantation is regulated by the Ministry of Health, based on clinical criteria, applied equitably, without favoritism or discrimination based on race, sex, economic means, or political power. Until December 2013, there were no restrictions in dialysis and transplantation in Health Insurance institutions, but they covered only 30% of the population. Now the remaining 70% has access to free dialysis funded by the communities where patients live, with funds coming from the government and taxes on oil products. More than 2,231 people are getting dialysis, reaching a population growth of >60% annually. The number of hemodialysis units has increased by >200% (60 units), making access easier for end-stage renal failure patients. Treatment protocols have been drawn up to guarantee the best quality of life for the patients. The Law on Donation and Transplantation was enacted in 1996, and Supplementary Regulations were enacted in 1997 with various amendments over the past 5 years. A National Transplant Coordination Board, working under the National Renal Health Program, supervises and regulates transplants and promotes deceased-donor transplantation in an attempt to cover the demand for donors. Rules have been drawn up for accreditation of transplant centers and teams to guarantee the best possible conditions and maximum guaranties. Since January 2014, the National Renal Health Program has been providing free kidney transplants from living donors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Skin Autofluorescence and the Association with Renal and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Natasha J.; Fluck, Richard J.; McIntyre, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic stress. Assessment of tissue AGE by skin autofluorescence (SAF) correlates well with cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in diabetic, transplant, and dialysis patients, and may be a useful marker of CV risk in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements 1707 patients with estimated GFR 59 to 30ml/min per 1.73 m2 were recruited from primary care practices for the Renal Risk In Derby (RRID) study. Detailed medical history was obtained, and each participant underwent clinical assessment as well as urine and serum biochemistry tests. SAF was assessed (mean of three readings) as a measure of skin AGE deposition using a cutaneous AF device (AGE Reader™, DiagnOptics, Groningen, The Netherlands). Results Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between AF readings and several potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and progression of CKD. SAF readings (arbitrary units) were also significantly higher among males (2.8 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), diabetics (3.0 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), patients with evidence of self-reported CVD (2.9 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), and those with no formal educational qualifications (2.8 ± 0.6 versus 2.6 ± 0.6; P < 0.01 for all). Multivariable linear regression analysis identified hemoglobin, diabetes, age, and eGFR as the most significant independent determinants of higher SAF (standardized coefficients −0.16, 0.13, 0.12, and −0.10, respectively; R2 = 0.17 for equation). Conclusion Increased SAF is independently associated with multiple CV and renal risk factors in CKD 3. Long-term follow-up will assess the value of SAF as a predictor of CV and renal risk in this population. PMID:21885790

  16. Geographic Variation of Chronic Kidney Disease Prevalence: Correlation with the Incidence of Renal Cell Carcinoma or Urothelial Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Chuang, Kai-Wen; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) exist and are associated with incidence rates of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), or lower tract urothelial carcinoma (LTUC). Methods. Prevalence rates of late-stage CKD for 366 townships (n > 30) in Taiwan were calculated for 1,518,241 and 1,645,151 subjects aged 40 years or older in years 2010 and 2009, respectively. Late-stage CKD prevalence in year 2010 was used as a training set and its age-adjusted standardized morbidity rates (ASMR) were divided into three groups as defined <1.76%, 1.76% ≤ ASMR < 2.64%, and ≥2.64%, respectively. Year 2009, defined as the validation set, was used to validate the results. Results. The ASMR of late-stage CKD in years 2010 and 2009 were 1.76%, and 2.09%, respectively. Geographic variations were observed, with notably higher rates of disease in areas of the central, southwestern mountainside, and southeastern seaboard. There were no significant differences among different combined risk groups of RCC, UTUC, and LTUC incidence. Conclusion. The substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage CKD exist, but are not correlated with RCC, UTUC, or LTUC incidence. PMID:26605329

  17. Geographic Variation of Chronic Kidney Disease Prevalence: Correlation with the Incidence of Renal Cell Carcinoma or Urothelial Carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Chuang, Kai-Wen; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) exist and are associated with incidence rates of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), or lower tract urothelial carcinoma (LTUC). Prevalence rates of late-stage CKD for 366 townships (n > 30) in Taiwan were calculated for 1,518,241 and 1,645,151 subjects aged 40 years or older in years 2010 and 2009, respectively. Late-stage CKD prevalence in year 2010 was used as a training set and its age-adjusted standardized morbidity rates (ASMR) were divided into three groups as defined <1.76%, 1.76% ≤ ASMR < 2.64%, and ≥2.64%, respectively. Year 2009, defined as the validation set, was used to validate the results. The ASMR of late-stage CKD in years 2010 and 2009 were 1.76%, and 2.09%, respectively. Geographic variations were observed, with notably higher rates of disease in areas of the central, southwestern mountainside, and southeastern seaboard. There were no significant differences among different combined risk groups of RCC, UTUC, and LTUC incidence. The substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage CKD exist, but are not correlated with RCC, UTUC, or LTUC incidence.

  18. Impaired renal function and dysbiosis of gut microbiota contribute to increased trimethylamine-N-oxide in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai-Yu; Xia, Geng-Hong; Lu, Jun-Qi; Chen, Mu-Xuan; Zhen, Xin; Wang, Shan; You, Chao; Nie, Jing; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Yin, Jia

    2017-05-03

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The present study aimed to investigate the gut microbiota and blood trimethylamine-N-oxide concentration (TMAO) in Chinese CKD patients and explore the underlying explanations through the animal experiment. The median plasma TMAO level was 30.33 μmol/L in the CKD patients, which was significantly higher than the 2.08 μmol/L concentration measured in the healthy controls. Next-generation sequence revealed obvious dysbiosis of the gut microbiome in CKD patients, with reduced bacterial diversity and biased community constitutions. CKD patients had higher percentages of opportunistic pathogens from gamma-Proteobacteria and reduced percentages of beneficial microbes, such as Roseburia, Coprococcus, and Ruminococcaceae. The PICRUSt analysis demonstrated that eight genes involved in choline, betaine, L-carnitine and trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism were changed in the CKD patients. Moreover, we transferred faecal samples from CKD patients and healthy controls into antibiotic-treated C57BL/6 mice and found that the mice that received gut microbes from the CKD patients had significantly higher plasma TMAO levels and different composition of gut microbiota than did the comparative mouse group. Our present study demonstrated that CKD patients had increased plasma TMAO levels due to contributions from both impaired renal functions and dysbiosis of the gut microbiota.

  19. A population-based survey of Chronic REnal Disease In Turkey--the CREDIT study.

    PubMed

    Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Utaş, Cengiz; Arinsoy, Turgay; Ateş, Kenan; Altun, Bülent; Altiparmak, Mehmet Riza; Ecder, Tevfik; Yilmaz, Mehmet Emin; Çamsari, Taner; Başçi, Ali; Odabas, Ali Riza; Serdengeçti, Kamil

    2011-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing health problem worldwide that leads to end-stage kidney failure and cardiovascular complications. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CKD in Turkey, and to evaluate relationships between CKD and cardiovascular risk factors in a population-based survey. Medical data were collected through home visits and interviews. Serum creatinine, blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and uric acid were determined from 12-h fasting blood samples, and spot urine tests were performed for subjects who gave consent to laboratory evaluation. A total of 10 872 participants were included in the study. The final analysis was performed on 10 748 subjects (mean age 40.5 ± 16.3 years; 55.7% women) and excluded 124 pregnant women. A low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (< 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was present in 5.2% of the subjects who were evaluated for GFR, while microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria were observed in 10.2% and 2% of the subjects, respectively. The presence of CKD was assessed in subjects who gave consent for urinary albumin excretion measurement (n = 8765). The overall prevalence of CKD was 15.7%; it was higher in women than men (18.4% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001) and increased with increasing age of the subjects. The prevalence of hypertension (32.7% in the general population), diabetes (12.7%), dyslipidaemia (76.3%), obesity (20.1%) and metabolic syndrome (31.3%) was significantly higher in subjects with CKD than subjects without CKD (P < 0.001 for all). The prevalence of CKD in Turkey is 15.7%. Cardiovascular risk factors were significantly more prevalent in CKD patients.

  20. Reproducibility of MRI renal artery blood flow and BOLD measurements in patients with chronic kidney disease and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Khatir, Dinah S; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Buus, Niels H

    2014-11-01

    Determine the reproducibility of renal artery blood flow (RABF) and blood-oxygenation level dependent (R2 *) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and healthy controls. RABF and R2 * were measured in 11 CKD patients and 9 controls twice with 1- to 2-week interval. R2 * in the cortex and medulla were determined after breathing atmospheric air and 100% oxygen. Reproducibility was evaluated by coefficients of variation (CV), limits of agreements and intra-class coefficient calculated by variance components by maximum likelihood modeling. Single-kidney RABF (mL/min) for patients was: 170 ± 130 and 186 ± 137, and for controls: 365 ± 119 and 361 ± 107 (P < 0.05 versus patients), for first and second scans, respectively. RABF measurements were reproducible with a CV of 12.9% and 8.3% for patients and controls, respectively. Renal cortical R2 * was: 13.6 ± 0.9 and 13.5 ± 1.2 in patients (CV = 8.0%), and 13.8 ± 1.6 and 14.0 ± 1.5 in controls (CV = 5.6%), while medullary R2 *(s(-1) ) was: 26.9 ± 2.0 and 27.0 ± 4.0 (CV = 8.0%) in patients, and 26.0 ± 2.4 and 26.1 ± 2.1 (CV = 3.6%) in controls, for first and second scans, respectively. In both groups R2 * in medulla decreased after breathing 100% oxygen. The reproducibility was high for both RABF and R2 * in patients and controls, particularly in the cortex. Inhalation of 100% oxygen reduced medullary R2 *. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pulmonary vein isolation alone and combined with renal sympathetic denervation in chronic kidney disease patients with refractory atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Márcio G; Chen, Shaojie; E Silva, Gustavo R; Paz, Luis M R; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; de Paula Filho, Ary G; Souto, Gladyston L L

    2016-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) commonly occurs in association with chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting in adverse outcomes. Combining pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) may reduce the recurrence of AF in patients with CKD and hypertension. We considered that RSD could reduce the recurrence of AF in patients with CKD by modulating sympathetic hyperactivity. Our goal was to compare the impact of PVI + RSD with that of PVI alone in patients with concurrent AF and CKD. This was a single-center, prospective, longitudinal, randomized, double-blind study. Forty-five patients with controlled hypertension, symptomatic paroxysmal AF and/or persistent AF, stage 2 or 3 CKD, and a dual-chamber pacemaker were enrolled from January 2014 to January 2015. We assessed the 30-second recurrence of AF recorded by the pacemaker, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements, estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, echocardiographic parameters, and safety of RSD. No patient developed procedural or other complications. The ambulatory blood pressure measurements did not differ within the PVI + RSD group or between the PVI + RSD and PVI groups throughout the study. Significantly more patients in the PVI + RSD group than in the PVI group were free of AF at the 12-month follow-up evaluation. The PVI group had an unacceptable response to ablation with respect to changes in echocardiographic parameters, whereas these parameters improved in the PVI + RSD group. PVI + RSD were associated with a lower AF recurrence rate than PVI alone; it also improved renal function and some echocardiographic parameters. These encouraging data will serve as baseline information for further long-term studies on larger patient populations.

  2. Effects of statin therapy on cerebrovascular and renal outcomes in patients with predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease and dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chang-Min; Lin, Ming-Shyan; Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li; Lin, Chun-Liang; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    Treatment with statin may be beneficial for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the debate over the clinical importance of statin in patients with predialysis advanced CKD remains unresolved. The objective of the article was to evaluate the effect of statin on mortality, cerebrovascular, and renal outcomes in patients with predialysis advanced CKD and dyslipidemia. Data on predialysis advanced CKD patients were retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database based on the guidelines for prescribing regular erythropoietin-stimulating agent in CKD patients. Patients with dyslipidemia were further selected and divided into 2 groups by their statin use after the prescribed erythropoietin-stimulating agent. All-cause mortality and cerebrovascular and renal outcomes were analyzed after propensity score matching. There were 2016 and 14,412 patients in the statin and nonstatin groups. Their average follow-up periods were 3.7 and 3.0 years, respectively. After 1:2 propensity score matching, the annual all-cause mortality rate was higher in the nonstatin than in the statin group (143.99 vs 109.50 per 1000 person-years; P < .001; hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval: 0.68-080). The annual risk of ischemic stroke (P = .186) and intracranial hemorrhage (P = .322) were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The nonstatin group had a higher risk of dialysis than the statin group (1269.45 vs 1095.00 per 1000 person-years; P = .002). Adverse events were not significant between the 2 groups. Statins may reduce the all-cause mortality and reduced the risk of dialysis in patients with predialysis advanced CKD and dyslipidemia. However, statins have no impact on ischemic-hemorrhage stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary trends and management of hyperphosphatemia among patients with chronic kidney disease: an international survey of renal care professionals.

    PubMed

    Fouque, Denis; Cruz Casal, Maria; Lindley, Elizabeth; Rogers, Susan; Pancířová, Jitka; Kernc, Jennifer; Copley, J Brian

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the opinions and experiences of renal care professionals to examine dietary trends among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and problems associated with the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. This was an online survey comprising open and closed questions requesting information on patient dietary trends and the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. The study was conducted in 4 European countries (the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Participants were 84 renal care professionals. This was an online survey. Responder-reported experiences and perceptions of patient dietary trends and hyperphosphatemia management were assessed. Most survey responders (56%) observed an increase in the consumption of processed convenience food, 48% noticed an increase in the consumption of foods rich in phosphorus-containing additives, and 60% believed that there has been a trend of increasing patient awareness of the phosphorus content of food. Patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) were most likely to experience difficulties in following advice on dietary phosphorus restriction (38% of responders estimated that 25-50% of their patients experienced difficulties, and 29% estimated that 51-75% experienced difficulties). Maintaining protein intake and restricting dietary phosphorus were perceived as being equally important by at least half of responders for predialysis patients (56%) and for those undergoing peritoneal dialysis and HD (54% and 50%, respectively). There were international variations in dietary trends and hyperphosphatemia management. Although most responders have observed a trend of increasing awareness of the phosphorus content of food among patients with CKD, the survey results indicate that many patients continue to experience difficulties when attempting to restrict dietary phosphorus. The survey responses reflect the global trend of increasing consumption of processed convenience foods and

  4. Sex and gender differences in chronic kidney disease: progression to end-stage renal disease and haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Gabriela; Hecking, Manfred; Port, Friedrich K; Exner, Isabella; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Sex and gender differences are of fundamental importance in most diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Men and women with CKD differ with regard to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease and its complications, present different symptoms and signs, respond differently to therapy and tolerate/cope with the disease differently. Yet an approach using gender in the prevention and treatment of CKD, implementation of clinical practice guidelines and in research has been largely neglected. The present review highlights some sex- and gender-specific evidence in the field of CKD, starting with a critical appraisal of the lack of inclusion of women in randomized clinical trials in nephrology, and thereafter revisits sex/gender differences in kidney pathophysiology, kidney disease progression, outcomes and management of haemodialysis care. In each case we critically consider whether apparent discrepancies are likely to be explained by biological or psycho-socioeconomic factors. In some cases (a few), these findings have resulted in the discovery of disease pathways and/or therapeutic opportunities for improvement. In most cases, they have been reported as merely anecdotal findings. The aim of the present review is to expose some of the stimulating hypotheses arising from these observations as a preamble for stricter approaches using gender for the prevention and treatment of CKD and its complications. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Comparison of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study and the Cockcroft-Gault equation in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Szummer, Karolina; Evans, Marie; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Benson, Lina; Lund, Lars H

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown how the creatinine-based renal function estimations differ for dose adjustment cut-offs and risk prediction in patients with heart failure. The renal function was similar with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) (median 59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , IQR 42 to 77) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) (59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , IQR 43 to 75) and slightly lower with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation (57 mL/min, IQR 39 to 82). Across the commonly used renal function stages, the CKD-EPI and the MDRD classified patients into the same stage in 87.2% (kappa coefficient 0.83, p<0.001); the CKD-EPI and the CG equation agreed in 52.3% (kappa coefficient 0.39, p<0.001). Hence, a differing number of patients will receive dose adjustment depending on which formula is used as cut-off. The CG equation predicted worse prognosis better (c-statistics 0.740, 95% CI 0.734 to 0.746) than CKD-EPI (0.697, 95% CI 0.690 to 0.703, p<0.001) and MDRD (0.680, 95% CI 0.734 to 0.746). Using net reclassification improvement (NRI), the CG identified 12.8% more patients at higher risk of death as compared with the CKD-EPI equation. Patients registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (n= 40 736) with standardised creatinine values between 2000 and 2012 had their renal function estimated with the CKD-EPI, the MDRD and the CG. Agreement between the formulas was compared for categories. Prediction of death was assessed with c-statistics and with NRI. The choice of renal function estimation formula has clinical implications and differing results at various cut-off levels. For prognosis, the CG predicts mortality better than the CKD-EPI and MDRD.

  6. Comparison of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study and the Cockcroft-Gault equation in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Szummer, Karolina; Evans, Marie; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Benson, Lina; Lund, Lars H

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unknown how the creatinine-based renal function estimations differ for dose adjustment cut-offs and risk prediction in patients with heart failure. Method and results The renal function was similar with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) (median 59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 42 to 77) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) (59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 43 to 75) and slightly lower with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation (57 mL/min, IQR 39 to 82). Across the commonly used renal function stages, the CKD-EPI and the MDRD classified patients into the same stage in 87.2% (kappa coefficient 0.83, p<0.001); the CKD-EPI and the CG equation agreed in 52.3% (kappa coefficient 0.39, p<0.001). Hence, a differing number of patients will receive dose adjustment depending on which formula is used as cut-off. The CG equation predicted worse prognosis better (c-statistics 0.740, 95% CI 0.734 to 0.746) than CKD-EPI (0.697, 95% CI 0.690 to 0.703, p<0.001) and MDRD (0.680, 95% CI 0.734 to 0.746). Using net reclassification improvement (NRI), the CG identified 12.8% more patients at higher risk of death as compared with the CKD-EPI equation. Patients registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (n= 40 736) with standardised creatinine values between 2000 and 2012 had their renal function estimated with the CKD-EPI, the MDRD and the CG. Agreement between the formulas was compared for categories. Prediction of death was assessed with c-statistics and with NRI. Conclusion The choice of renal function estimation formula has clinical implications and differing results at various cut-off levels. For prognosis, the CG predicts mortality better than the CKD-EPI and MDRD. PMID:28761677

  7. Comparison of four different cardiac troponin assays in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helleskov Madsen, Lene; Ladefoged, Søren; Hildebrandt, Per; Atar, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have documented the importance of troponin elevation as a prognostic marker in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The reason for the elevated concentrations is not clarified. We do not know whether the different assays recognize the same patients within ESRD populations. The aim of this study was to compare concentrations of troponin measured by four different assays in a cohort of patients with ESRD, to investigate whether haemodialysis affects troponin concentrations, and to compare the prognostic potential of the different assays. We included 109 patients on chronic haemodialysis. Serum cardiac troponin T (cTnT) was measured pre- and postdialysis using Elecsys 2010 and troponin I (cTnI) using Access AccuTnI, Dimension RxL and AIA-600II. The cTnT assay had the highest percentage of elevated concentrations for all chosen cut-offs with a reduction in percentage of patients with elevated concentrations during haemodialysis. Elecsys 2010 and AIA-600II demonstrated a significant increased mortality with raised concentrations of troponin. The diverging results in previous studies are most likely based on substantial differences in the analytical performance of the assays. The prognostic value of cTnT appears superior to cTnI, which amplifies the prognostic significance of this cardiovascular marker in patients with ESRD.

  8. Assessment of Endothelial Dysfunction: The Role of Symmetrical Dimethylarginine and Proinflammatory Markers in Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Giga, Vojislav; Dopsaj, Violeta; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The study was designed to evaluate associations between symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), inflammation, and superoxide anion (O2∙−) with endothelial function and to determine their potential for screening of endothelial dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplant (RT) recipients. Materials and Methods. We included 64 CKD and 52 RT patients. Patients were stratified according to brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results. Logistic regression analysis showed that high SDMA and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were associated with impaired FMD in CKD and RT patients, after adjustment for glomerular filtration rate. The ability of inflammation, SDMA, and O2∙− to detect impaired FMD was investigated by receiving operative characteristic analysis. Hs-CRP (area under the curves (AUC) = 0.754, P < 0.001), IL-6 (AUC = 0.699, P = 0.002), and SDMA (AUC = 0.689, P = 0.007) had the highest ability to detect impaired FMD. SDMA in combination with inflammatory parameters and/or O2∙− had better screening performance than SDMA alone. Conclusions. Our results indicate a strong predictable association between hs-CRP, SDMA, and endothelial dysfunction in CKD patients and RT recipients. The individual marker that showed the strongest discriminative ability for endothelial dysfunction is hs-CRP, but its usefulness as a discriminatory marker for efficient diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction should be examined in prospective studies. PMID:24167363

  9. Assessment of endothelial dysfunction: the role of symmetrical dimethylarginine and proinflammatory markers in chronic kidney disease and renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Memon, Lidija; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Bogavac-Stanojevic, Natasa; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Simic-Ogrizovic, Sanja; Giga, Vojislav; Dopsaj, Violeta; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana; Spasic, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate associations between symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), inflammation, and superoxide anion (O2∙-) with endothelial function and to determine their potential for screening of endothelial dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplant (RT) recipients. We included 64 CKD and 52 RT patients. Patients were stratified according to brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Logistic regression analysis showed that high SDMA and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were associated with impaired FMD in CKD and RT patients, after adjustment for glomerular filtration rate. The ability of inflammation, SDMA, and O2∙- to detect impaired FMD was investigated by receiving operative characteristic analysis. Hs-CRP (area under the curves (AUC) = 0.754, P < 0.001), IL-6 (AUC = 0.699, P = 0.002), and SDMA (AUC = 0.689, P = 0.007) had the highest ability to detect impaired FMD. SDMA in combination with inflammatory parameters and/or O2∙- had better screening performance than SDMA alone. Our results indicate a strong predictable association between hs-CRP, SDMA, and endothelial dysfunction in CKD patients and RT recipients. The individual marker that showed the strongest discriminative ability for endothelial dysfunction is hs-CRP, but its usefulness as a discriminatory marker for efficient diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction should be examined in prospective studies.

  10. Tolerating increases in the serum creatinine following aggressive treatment of chronic kidney disease, hypertension and proteinuria: pre-renal success.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Sheldon; Hirsch, Jackie; Bhatt, Udayan; Rovin, Brad H

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) reduction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly with a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASI), commonly leads to an initial decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The current clinical guideline, based on studies with single RASIs, is to tolerate an increase in the serum creatinine only up to 30%. This guideline has aptly guided CKD care for over a decade, but should be updated in the contemporary context of more aggressive RASI and diuretic use. This study is a retrospective review of 48 mostly African-American patients with CKD treated with multiple and/or high-dose renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition and diuretics, targeting both low BP and reduction of urine protein. RASI was not reduced in response to initial increases in serum creatinine greater than 30%. A clinically well-tolerated increase in serum creatinine over 30% during the first year occurred in 41% of the patients. Treatment was unaltered, and target goals for BP and urine protein were typically achieved. After the point of maximal serum creatinine in the first year, these patients had minimal progression of disease over the next 6 years, with a long-term estimated glomerular filtration rate slope of only -0.52 ml/min/year/1.73 m(2). Only 25% progressed to end-stage renal disease or death. The 30% limitation to initial increases in the serum creatinine still pertains for single RASI at usual doses. However, favorable long-term outcomes suggest that initial increases over 30% should be tolerated in the context of dual goal-directed, more aggressive RASI and diuretic use. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Rationale and trial design of Bardoxolone Methyl Evaluation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes: the Occurrence of Renal Events (BEACON).

    PubMed

    de Zeeuw, Dick; Akizawa, Tadao; Agarwal, Rajiv; Audhya, Paul; Bakris, George L; Chin, Melanie; Krauth, Melissa; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Meyer, Colin J; McMurray, John J; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Pergola, Pablo E; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Toto, Robert D; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wanner, Christoph; Warnock, David G; Wittes, Janet; Chertow, Glenn M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus constitutes a global epidemic complicated by considerable renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, despite the provision of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Bardoxolone methyl, a synthetic triterpenoid that reduces oxidative stress and inflammation through Nrf2 activation and inhibition of NF-κB was previously shown to increase estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with CKD associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. To date, no antioxidant or anti-inflammatory therapy has proved successful at slowing the progression of CKD. Herein, we describe the design of Bardoxolone Methyl Evaluation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes: the Occurrence of Renal Events (BEACON) trial, a multinational, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 3 trial designed to determine whether long-term administration of bardoxolone methyl (on a background of standard therapy, including RAAS inhibitors) safely reduces renal and cardiac morbidity and mortality. The primary composite endpoint is time-to-first occurrence of either end-stage renal disease or cardiovascular death. Secondary endpoints include the change in eGFR and time to occurrence of cardiovascular events. BEACON will be the first event-driven trial to evaluate the effect of an oral antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug in advanced CKD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Healthcare costs in chronic kidney disease and renal replacement therapy: a population-based cohort study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Jonas K; Neovius, Martin; Jacobson, Stefan H; Elinder, Carl-Gustaf; Hylander, Britta

    2016-10-07

    To compare healthcare costs in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4 or 5 not on dialysis (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73m 2 ), peritoneal dialysis, haemodialysis and in transplanted patients with matched general population comparators. Population-based cohort study. Swedish national healthcare system. Prevalent adult patients with CKD 4 or 5 (n=1046, mean age 68 years), on peritoneal dialysis (n=101; 64 years), on haemodialysis (n=460; 65 years) and with renal transplants (n=825; 52 years) were identified in Stockholm County clinical quality registers for renal disease on 1 January 2010. 5 general population comparators from the same county were matched to each patient by age, sex and index year. Annual healthcare costs in 2009 incurred through inpatient and hospital-based outpatient care and dispensed prescription drugs ascertained from nationwide healthcare registers. Secondary outcomes were annual number of hospital days and outpatient care visits. Patients on haemodialysis had the highest mean annual cost (€87 600), which was 1.49 (95% CI 1.38 to 1.60) times that observed in peritoneal dialysis (€58 600). The mean annual cost was considerably lower in transplanted patients (€15 500) and in the CKD group (€9600). In patients on haemodialysis, outpatient care costs made up more than two-thirds (€62 500) of the total, while costs related to fluids ($29 900) was the largest cost component in patients on peritoneal dialysis (51%). Compared with their matched general population comparators, the mean annual cost (95% CI) in patients on haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, transplanted patients and patients with CKD was 45 (39 to 51), 29 (22 to 37), 11 (10 to 13) and 4.0 (3.6 to 4.5) times higher, respectively. The mean annual costs were ∼50% higher in patients on haemodialysis than in those on peritoneal dialysis. Compared with the general population, costs were substantially elevated in all groups, from 4-fold in

  13. Effects of Statins on Renal Outcome in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanguankeo, Anawin; Upala, Sikarin; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Ungprasert, Patompong; Knight, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Background HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are known to prevent cardiovascular disease and improve lipid profiles. However, the effects of statins on renal outcomes, including decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), are controversial. This meta-analysis evaluated the impact of statins on renal outcomes in patients with CKD. Materials and Methods We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Databases. The inclusion criteria were published RCT and cohort studies comparing statin therapy to placebo or active controls in patients with CKD (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2) not requiring dialysis. The primary outcome was the differences in the change of eGFR. We also examined change of protein concentration in urine as a secondary outcome. A meta-analysis comparing statin and its control groups and a subgroup analysis examining intensity of statin were performed. Results From 142 full-text articles, 10 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, there was a significant difference in rate of eGFR change per year favoring statin group (mean difference (MD) = 0.10 ml/min/1.73 m2, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.12). In our subgroup analysis, those who received high-intensity statins had a significant difference in eGFR with a MD of 3.35 (95% CI: 0.91 to 5.79) ml/min/1.73 m2 compared to control. No significant change in eGFR was found with moderate- and low-intensity statin therapy. Compared with the control group, the statin group did not have a difference in reduction of proteinuria with MD in change of proteinuria of 0.19 gm/day (95% CI: -0.02 to 0.40). Conclusion Overall, there was a difference in change of eGFR between the statin and control group. High-intensity statins were found to improve a decline in eGFR in population with CKD not requiring dialysis compared with control, but moderate- and low-intensity statins were not. Statins were not found to decrease

  14. The role of sympathetic nervous system in the progression of chronic kidney disease in the era of catheter based sympathetic renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Petras, Dimitrios; Koutroutsos, Konstantinos; Kordalis, Athanasios; Tsioufis, Costas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2013-08-01

    The kidney has been shown to be critically involved as both trigger and target of sympathetic nervous system overactivity in both experimental and clinical studies. Renal injury and ischemia, activation of renin angiotensin system and dysfunction of nitric oxide system have been implicated in adrenergic activation from kidney. Conversely, several lines of evidence suggest that sympathetic overactivity, through functional and morphological alterations in renal physiology and structure, may contribute to kidney injury and chronic kidney disease progression. Pharmacologic modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity has been found to have a blood pressure independent renoprotective effect. The inadequate normalization of sympathoexcitation by pharmacologic treatment asks for novel treatment options. Catheter based renal denervation targets selectively both efferent and afferent renal nerves and functionally denervates the kidney providing blood pressure reduction in clinical trials and renoprotection in experimental models by ameliorating the effects of excessive renal sympathetic drive. This review will focus on the role of sympathetic overactivity in the pathogenesis of kidney injury and CKD progression and will speculate on the effect of renal denervation to these conditions.

  15. Body Composition Analysis Allows the Prediction of Urinary Creatinine Excretion and of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Carlo

    2017-05-28

    The aim of this study was to predict urinary creatinine excretion (UCr), creatinine clearance (CCr) and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from body composition analysis. Body cell mass (BCM) is the compartment which contains muscle mass, which is where creatinine is generated. BCM was measured with body impedance analysis in 165 chronic kidney disease (CKD) adult patients (72 women) with serum creatinine (SCr) 0.6-14.4 mg/dL. The GFR was measured ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and was predicted using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. The other examined parameters were SCr, 24-h UCr and measured 24-h CCr (mCCr). A strict linear correlation was found between 24-h UCr and BCM ( r = 0.772). Multiple linear regression (MR) indicated that UCr was positively correlated with BCM, body weight and male gender, and negatively correlated with age and SCr. UCr predicted using the MR equation (MR-UCr) was quite similar to 24-h UCr. CCr predicted from MR-UCr and SCr (MR-BCM-CCr) was very similar to mCCr with a high correlation ( r = 0.950), concordance and a low prediction error (8.9 mL/min/1.73 m²). From the relationship between the GFR and the BCM/SCr ratio, we predicted the GFR (BCM GFR). The BCM GFR was very similar to the GFR with a high correlation ( r = 0.906), concordance and a low prediction error (12.4 mL/min/1.73 m²). In CKD patients, UCr, CCr and the GFR can be predicted from body composition analysis.

  16. Body Composition Analysis Allows the Prediction of Urinary Creatinine Excretion and of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Donadio, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to predict urinary creatinine excretion (UCr), creatinine clearance (CCr) and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from body composition analysis. Body cell mass (BCM) is the compartment which contains muscle mass, which is where creatinine is generated. BCM was measured with body impedance analysis in 165 chronic kidney disease (CKD) adult patients (72 women) with serum creatinine (SCr) 0.6–14.4 mg/dL. The GFR was measured (99mTc-DTPA) and was predicted using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. The other examined parameters were SCr, 24-h UCr and measured 24-h CCr (mCCr). A strict linear correlation was found between 24-h UCr and BCM (r = 0.772). Multiple linear regression (MR) indicated that UCr was positively correlated with BCM, body weight and male gender, and negatively correlated with age and SCr. UCr predicted using the MR equation (MR-UCr) was quite similar to 24-h UCr. CCr predicted from MR-UCr and SCr (MR-BCM-CCr) was very similar to mCCr with a high correlation (r = 0.950), concordance and a low prediction error (8.9 mL/min/1.73 m2). From the relationship between the GFR and the BCM/SCr ratio, we predicted the GFR (BCM GFR). The BCM GFR was very similar to the GFR with a high correlation (r = 0.906), concordance and a low prediction error (12.4 mL/min/1.73 m2). In CKD patients, UCr, CCr and the GFR can be predicted from body composition analysis. PMID:28555040

  17. Switching from allopurinol to febuxostat for the treatment of hyperuricemia and renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Yuki; Mochizuki, Toshio; Moriyama, Takahito; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-11-01

    Hyperuricemia is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Febuxostat is a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor that is metabolized by many metabolic pathways in the kidney and the liver. We performed a 1-year cohort study of 73 hyperuricemic patients who had an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) below 45 ml/min and were being treated with urate-lowering therapy. In 51 patients, treatment was changed from allopurinol to febuxostat, and the other 22 patients were continued on allopurinol. The serum levels of uric acid (UA) level, creatinine, and other biochemical parameters were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of treatment. The serum UA levels significantly decreased from 6.1 ± 1.0 to 5.7 ± 1.2 mg/dl in the febuxostat group and significantly increased from 6.2 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 1.1 mg/dl in the allopurinol group. The eGFR decreased 27.3 to 25.7 ml/min in the febuxostat group and from 26.1 to 19.9 ml/min in the allopurinol group. The switch from allopurinol to febuxostat was significantly associated with the changes in eGFR according to a multiple regression analysis (β = -0.22145, P < 0.05). Febuxostat reduced the serum UA levels and slowed the progression of renal disease in our CKD cohort in comparison with allopurinol.

  18. Renal Replacement Therapy and Incremental Hemodialysis for Veterans with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Crowley, Susan T.; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Chen, Joline LT; Daugirdas, John T; Goldfarb, David S.; Jin, Anna; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Leehey, David J.; Moradi, Hamid; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Norris, Keith C; Obi, Yoshitsugu; O’Hare, Ann; Shafi, Tariq; Streja, Elani; Unruh, Mark L.; Vachharajani, Tushar; Weisbord, Steven; Rhee, Connie M.

    2017-01-01

    Each year approximately 13,000 Veterans transition to maintenance dialysis, mostly in the traditional form of thrice-weekly hemodialysis from the start. Among >6,000 dialysis units nationwide, there are currently approximately 70 Veterans Affairs (VA) dialysis centers. Given this number of VA dialysis centers and their limited capacity, only 10% of all incident dialysis Veterans initiate treatment in a VA center. Evidence suggests that, among Veterans, receipt of care within the VA system is associated with favorable outcomes, potentially due to enhanced access to healthcare resources. Data from the United States Renal Data System Special Study Center “Transition-of-Care-in-CKD” suggest that Veterans who receive dialysis in a VA unit exhibit greater survival compared to non-VA centers. Substantial financial expenditures arise from the high volume of outsourced care and higher dialysis reimbursement paid by the VA than by Medicare to outsourced providers. Given the exceedingly high mortality and abrupt decline in residual kidney function (RKF) in the first dialysis year, it is possible that incremental transition to dialysis through an initial twice-weekly hemodialysis regimen preserves RKF, prolongs vascular access longevity, improves patients’ quality of life, and is a more patient-centered approach and consistent with “personalized” dialysis. Broad implementation of incremental dialysis may also result in more Veterans receiving care within a VA dialysis unit. Controlled trials are urgently needed to examine safety and efficacy of incremental hemodialysis in Veterans and other populations, and the administrative and health care as well as provider structure within the VA system would facilitate the performance of such trials. PMID:28421638

  19. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  20. Association of Pulse Wave Velocity With Chronic Kidney Disease Progression and Mortality: Findings From the CRIC Study (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort).

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Chirinos, Julio A; Feldman, Harold I; Grunwald, Juan E; Nessel, Lisa; Roy, Jason; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Bansal, Nisha; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2018-06-01

    Patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) are at risk for further loss of kidney function and death, which occur despite reasonable blood pressure treatment. To determine whether arterial stiffness influences CKD progression and death, independent of blood pressure, we conducted a prospective cohort study of CKD patients enrolled in the CRIC study (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort). Using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), we examined the relationship between PWV and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD), ESRD or halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate, or death from any cause. The 2795 participants we enrolled had a mean age of 60 years, 56.4% were men, 47.3% had diabetes mellitus, and the average estimated glomerular filtration rate at entry was 44.4 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 During follow-up, there were 504 ESRD events, 628 ESRD or halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate events, and 394 deaths. Patients with the highest tertile of PWV (>10.3 m/s) were at higher risk for ESRD (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.37 [1.05-1.80]), ESRD or 50% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.25 [0.98-1.58]), or death (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.72 [1.24-2.38]). PWV is a significant predictor of CKD progression and death in people with impaired kidney function. Incorporation of PWV measurements may help define better the risks for these important health outcomes in patients with CKDs. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness deserve study in people with CKD. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Chronic renal disease in spain: prevalence and related factors in persons with diabetes mellitus older than 64 years.

    PubMed

    Martínez Candela, Juan; Sangrós González, Javier; García Soidán, Francisco Javier; Millaruelo Trillo, José Manuel; Díez Espino, Javier; Bordonaba Bosque, Daniel; Ávila Lachica, Luis

    2018-02-07

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are conditions which have a high prevalence in individuals ≥ 65 years of age and represent a major public health problem. To determine the prevalence of CKD, its categories and its relationship with various demographic and clinical factors in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain. Observational, cross-sectional, multicenter, Spanish epidemiological study. Patients with known type 2 diabetes mellitus, age ≥ 65 years of age treated in Primary Care were included. We collected demographic, anthropometric and analytical variables from the previous 12 months, including the albumin-to-creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate to evaluate renal function. The prevalence of CKD was 37.2% (95% CI, 34.1-40.3%), renal failure was 29.7% (95% CI, 26.8-32.6%) and increased albuminuria was 20.6% (95% CI, 17.3-23.9%), moderately increased albuminuria was 17.8% (95% CI, 14.7-20.9%) and severely increased albuminuria was 2.8% (95% CI, 1.4-4.2%). In turn, the prevalence of CKD categories were: G1 1.3% (95% CI, 0.6-2%), G2 6.2% (95% CI, 4.6-7.8%), G3a 17.2% (95% CI, 14.8-19.6%), G3b 9.8% (95% CI, 7.9-11.7%), G4 2% (95% CI, 1.1-2.9%) and G5 0.7% (95% CI, 0.2-1.2%). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for the remaining variables, CKD was associated with elderly age (OR 5.13, 95% CI, 3.15-8.35), high comorbidity (OR 3.36. 95% CI, 2.2-5.12) and presence of antihypertensive treatment (OR 2.43. 95% CI, 1.48-4.02). CKD is frequent in the diabetic population ≥ 65 years of age and is associated with elderly age, high comorbidity and with treated hypertension. No relationship has been found with gender and time in years since onset of diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of serum uric acid reduction on renal function and blood pressure in chronic kidney disease patients with hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takayuki; Ohishi, Kazuhisa; Takeda, Asumi; Goto, Daiki; Sato, Taichi; Ohashi, Naro; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Kato, Akihiko; Yasuda, Hideo

    2018-04-26

    Febuxostat is tolerable in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperuricemia. However, the long-term effect of lowering uric acid with febuxostat on renal function and blood pressure has not been elucidated. This was a 2 years retrospective observational study. 86 CKD patients with hyperuricemia who continued with allopurinol (allopurinol group, n = 30), switched from allopurinol to febuxostat (switched group, n = 25), or were newly prescribed febuxostat (febuxostat group, n = 31) were included in this study. Serum uric acid, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), blood pressure, and urinary protein were analyzed. Moreover, the impact of serum uric acid reduction on renal function and blood pressure was assessed. Serum uric acid in the switched and febuxostat groups was significantly reduced at 6 months (switched group; 8.49 ± 1.32-7.19 ± 1.14 mg/dL, p < 0.0001, febuxostat group; 9.43 ± 1.63-6.31 ± 0.90 mg/dL, p < 0.0001). In the allopurinol group, serum uric acid was increased (6.86 ± 0.87-7.10 ± 0.85 mg/dL, p = 0.0213). eGFR was significantly increased (35.2 ± 12.8-37.3 ± 13.9 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , p = 0.0232), while mean arterial pressure (93.1 ± 10.8-88.2 ± 9.5 mmHg, p = 0.0039) was significantly decreased at 6 months in the febuxostat group, resulting in the retention of eGFR for 2 years. The impact of serum uric acid reduction might have beneficial effects on CKD progression and blood pressure. However, a large prospective study is needed to determine the long-term efficacy of febuxostat therapy in CKD patients with hyperuricemia.

  3. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  4. Periodontitis associated with chronic renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khocht, A

    1996-11-01

    Chronic renal disease is associated with well-documented impairments in polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function. PMNs are important in defending the periodontium against plaque infections. This report discusses a case of periodontitis in a patient with chronic renal failure. It presents treatment provided and 1-year follow up. It shows that periodontal infections in patients with depressed PMN function could still be managed successfully with standard periodontal treatment emphasizing plaque control.

  5. Yonsei nomogram: A predictive model of new-onset chronic kidney disease after on-clamp partial nephrectomy in patients with T1 renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Shin, Tae Young; Chang, Ki Don; Santok, Glen Denmer R; Alenzi, Mohamed Jayed; Yoon, Young Eun; Ham, Won Sik; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2018-06-19

    To develop a predictive nomogram for chronic kidney disease-free survival probability in the long term after partial nephrectomy. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 698 patients with T1 renal tumors undergoing partial nephrectomy at a tertiary academic institution. A multivariable Cox regression analysis was carried out based on parameters proven to have an impact on postoperative renal function. Patients with incomplete data, <12 months follow up and preoperative chronic kidney disease stage III or greater were excluded. The study end-points were to identify independent risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease development, as well as to construct a predictive model for chronic kidney disease-free survival probability after partial nephrectomy. The median age was 52 years, median tumor size was 2.5 cm and mean warm ischemia time was 28 min. A total of 91 patients (13.1%) developed new-onset chronic kidney disease at a median follow up of 60 months. The chronic kidney disease-free survival rates at 1, 3, 5 and 10 year were 97.1%, 94.4%, 85.3% and 70.6%, respectively. On multivariable Cox regression analysis, age (1.041, P = 0.001), male sex (hazard ratio 1.653, P < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio 1.921, P = 0.046), tumor size (hazard ratio 1.331, P < 0.001) and preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio 0.937, P < 0.001) were independent predictors for new-onset chronic kidney disease. The C-index for chronic kidney disease-free survival was 0.853 (95% confidence interval 0.815-0.895). We developed a novel nomogram for predicting the 5-year chronic kidney disease-free survival probability after on-clamp partial nephrectomy. This model might have an important role in partial nephrectomy decision-making and follow-up plan after surgery. External validation of our nomogram in a larger cohort of patients should be considered. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in women compared with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanjue; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Dong, Xue; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Wang, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a strong risk factor for chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Whether sex differences in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease incidence exist among diabetic patients remains unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative effect of diabetes on chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease risk in women compared with men. We systematically searched Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for both cohort and case-control studies until October 2015. Studies were selected if they reported a sex-specific relationship between diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. We generated pooled estimates across studies using random-effects meta-analysis after log transformation with inverse variance weighting. Ten studies with data from more than 5 million participants were included. The pooled adjusted risk ratio of chronic kidney disease associated with diabetes mellitus was 3.34 (95 % CI 2.27, 4.93) in women and 2.84 (95 % CI 1.73, 4.68) in men. The data showed no difference in diabetes-related chronic kidney disease risk between the sexes (pooled adjusted women-to-men relative risk ratio was 1.14 [95 % CI 0.97, 1.34]) except for end-stage renal disease-the pooled adjusted women-to men relative risk ratio was 1.38 (95 % CI 1.22, 1.55; p = 0.114, I² = 38.1 %). The study found no evidence of a sex difference in the association between diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. However, the excess risk for end-stage renal disease was higher in women with diabetes than in men with the same condition, from which we assume that the female gender could accelerate the disease progression. Further studies are needed to support this notion and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  7. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  8. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate A to Z Health Guide About Chronic Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Chronic kidney disease ( ... about Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Chronic kidney disease includes conditions that ...

  9. Transition of adolescent and young adult patients with childhood-onset chronic kidney disease from pediatric to adult renal services: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Motoshi; Iwano, Masayuki; Sako, Mayumi; Honda, Masataka; Okada, Hirokazu; Akioka, Yuko; Ashida, Akira; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Terada, Yoshio; Hirano, Daishi; Fujieda, Mikiya; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Masaki, Takao; Maruyama, Shoichi; Mastuo, Seiich

    2016-12-01

    Transition of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with childhood-onset chronic kidney diseases (C-CKD) from pediatric to adult renal services has received increasing attention. However, information on transition of Japanese patients with C-CKD is limited. The Transition Medicine Working Group, in collaboration with the Japanese Society for Nephrology, the Japanese Society for Pediatric Nephrology and the Japanese Society of Pediatric Urology, conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study in 2014 on issues concerning the transition of Japanese patients with C-CKD. Few institutions in Japan had transition programs and/or transition coordinators for patients with C-CKD. Refusal to transfer by patients or their families, lack of concern about transition and inability to decide on transfer were common reasons for non-transfer of patients still followed by pediatric renal services. Around 25 % of patients who had ended or interrupted follow-up by pediatric renal services presented to adult renal services because of symptoms associated with C-CKD. Patients with various types of childhood-onset nephrourological diseases were transferred from pediatric to adult renal services. IgA nephropathy, minimal change nephrotic syndrome and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract were the most frequent primary kidney diseases in adult patients with C-CKD. These survey results indicate the need for introduction of transitional care for Japanese AYA patients with C-CKD. Consensus guidelines for the optimal clinical management of AYA patients with C-CKD are required to ensure the continuity of care from child to adult renal services.

  10. Serum Bicarbonate and Structural and Functional Cardiac Abnormalities in Chronic Kidney Disease - A Report from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Dobre, Mirela; Roy, Jason; Tao, Kaixiang; Anderson, Amanda H; Bansal, Nisha; Chen, Jing; Deo, Rajat; Drawz, Paul; Feldman, Harold I; Hamm, L Lee; Hostetter, Thomas; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Shrama, Kumar; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a frequent occurrence in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and predicts poor survival. Serum bicarbonate is associated with increased rates of HF in CKD; however, the mechanisms leading to this association are incompletely understood. This study aims to assess whether serum bicarbonate is independently associated with structural and functional cardiac abnormalities in CKD. The association between serum bicarbonate and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH), LV mass indexed to height2.7, LV geometry, ejection fraction (EF) and diastolic dysfunction was assessed in 3,483 participants without NYHA class III/IV HF, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 42.5 ± 17 ml/min/1.73 m2. The overall prevalence of LVH was 51.2%, with 57.8, 50.9 and 47.7% for bicarbonate categories <22, 22-26 and >26 mmol/l, respectively. Participants with low bicarbonate were more likely to have LVH and abnormal LV geometry (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.07-1.64, and OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.14-2.16, respectively). However, the association was not statistically significant after adjustment for demographics, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, medications and kidney function (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.66-1.72, and OR 1.27; 95% CI 0.64-2.51, respectively). No association was found between bicarbonate and systolic or diastolic dysfunction. During follow-up, no significant changes in LV mass or EF were observed in any bicarbonate strata. In a large CKD study, serum bicarbonate was associated with LV mass and concentric LVH; however, this association was attenuated after adjustment for clinical factors suggesting that the observed cardiac effects are mediated through yet unknown mechanisms. © 2016 Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed Central

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction. The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant. This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients. PMID:21897751

  12. Effects of renal denervation with a standard irrigated cardiac ablation catheter on blood pressure and renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease and resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Maia, George Luiz Marques; de Queiroz Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhães; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; Chen, Shaojie; Andrea, Bruno Rustum; Graciano, Miguel Luis; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of renal denervation with a standard irrigated cardiac ablation catheter (SICAC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with refractory hypertension. Twenty-four patients were included and treated with a SICAC. Denervation was performed by a single operator following the standard technique. Patients included with CKD were on stages 2 (n = 16), 3 (n = 4), and 4 (n = 4). Data were obtained at baseline and monthly until 180th day of follow-up. Baseline values of blood pressure (mean ± SD) were 186 ± 19 mmHg/108 ± 13 mmHg in the office, and 151 ± 18 mmHg/92 ± 11 mmHg by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Office blood pressure values at 180th day after the procedure were 135 ± 13 mmHg/88 ± 7 mmHg (P < 0.0001, for both comparisons). The mean ABPM decreased to 132 ± 15 mmHg/85 ± 11 mmHg at the 180th day after the procedure (P < 0.0001 for systolic and P = 0.0015 for diastolic). Estimated glomerular filtration (mean ± SD) increased from baseline (64.4 ± 23.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) to the 180th day (85.4 ± 34.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P < 0.0001) of follow-up. The median urine albumin:creatinine ratio decreased from baseline (48.5, IQR: 35.8-157.2 mg/g) to the 180th day after ablation (ACR = 15.7, IQR: 10.3-34.2 mg/g, P = 0.0017). No major complications were seen. The procedure using SICAC seemed to be feasible, effective, and safe resulting in a better control of BP, a short-term increase in estimated glomerular filtration rate, and reduced albuminuria. Although encouraging, our data are preliminary and need to be validated in the long term.

  13. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and risk of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD: results from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathleen D; Yang, Wei; Go, Alan S; Anderson, Amanda H; Feldman, Harold I; Fischer, Michael J; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Kusek, John W; Master, Stephen R; Miller, Edgar R; Rosas, Sylvia E; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tao, Kaixiang; Weir, Matthew R; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common and is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Currently, markers of renal tubular injury are not used routinely to describe kidney health and little is known about the risk of cardiovascular events and death associated with these biomarkers independent of glomerular filtration-based markers (such as serum creatinine or albuminuria). Cohort study, CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. 3,386 participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20 to 70mL/min/1.73m(2) enrolled from June 2003 through August 2008. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) concentration. Adjudicated heart failure event, ischemic atherosclerotic event (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or peripheral artery disease), and death through March 2011. Urine NGAL measured at baseline with a 2-step assay using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay technology on an ARCHITECT i2000SR (Abbott Laboratories). There were 428 heart failure events (during 16,383 person-years of follow-up), 361 ischemic atherosclerotic events (during 16,584 person-years of follow-up), and 522 deaths (during 18,214 person-years of follow-up). In Cox regression models adjusted for estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, demographics, traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, and cardiac medications, higher urine NGAL levels remained associated independently with ischemic atherosclerotic events (adjusted HR for the highest [>49.5ng/mL] vs lowest [≤6.9ng/mL] quintile, 1.83 [95% CI, 1.20-2.81]; HR per 0.1-unit increase in log urine NGAL, 1.012 [95% CI, 1.001-1.023]), but not heart failure events or deaths. Urine NGAL was measured only once. Among patients with chronic kidney disease, urine levels of NGAL, a marker of renal tubular injury, were associated independently with future ischemic atherosclerotic events, but not with heart failure events or deaths. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights

  14. Impaired endogenous nighttime melatonin secretion relates to intrarenal renin-angiotensin system activation and renal damage in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Sayaka; Ohashi, Naro; Isobe, Shinsuke; Tsuji, Naoko; Iwakura, Takamasa; Ono, Masafumi; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Tsuji, Takayuki; Kato, Akihiko; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Yasuda, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension. The circadian rhythm of intrarenal RAS activation leads to renal damage and hypertension, which are associated with diurnal blood pressure (BP) variation. The activation of intrarenal RAS following reactive oxygen species (ROS) activation, sympathetic hyperactivity and nitric oxide (NO) inhibition leads to the development of renal damage. Melatonin is a hormone regulating the circadian rhythm, and has multiple functions such as anti-oxidant and anti-adrenergic effects and enhancement of NO bioavailability. Nocturnal melatonin concentrations are lower in CKD patients. However, it is not known if impaired endogenous melatonin secretion is related to BP, intrarenal RAS, or renal damage in CKD patients. We recruited 53 CKD patients and conducted 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring. urine was collected during the daytime and nighttime. We investigated the relationship among the melatonin metabolite urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (U-aMT6s), BP, renal function, urinary angiotensinogen (U-AGT), and urinary albumin (U-Alb). Patients' U-aMT6s levels were significantly and negatively correlated with clinical parameters such as renal function, systolic BP, U-AGT, and U-Alb, during both day and night. Multiple regression analyses for U-aMT6s levels were performed using age, gender, renal function, and each parameter (BPs, U-AGT or U-Alb), at daytime and nighttime. U-aMT6s levels were significantly associated with U-AGT (β = -0.31, p = 0.044) and U-Alb (β = -0.25, p = 0.025) only at night. Impaired nighttime melatonin secretion may be associated with nighttime intrarenal RAS activation and renal damage in CKD patients.

  15. Microbial origins of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Lisa M; Hughes, James M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer are among the leading causes of death worldwide and have been on the rise over the past decade. Associations between microbial agents and development of chronic diseases have been made in the past, and new connections are currently being assessed. Investigators are examining the relationship between infectious agents and chronic disease using new technologies with more rigor and specificity. This review examines microbial agents' links to and associations with cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, renal diseases, psychiatric disorders, and obesity and addresses the important role of the human microbiome in maintenance of health and its potential role in chronic diseases. These associations and relationships will impact future research priorities, surveillance approaches, treatment strategies, and prevention programs for chronic diseases.

  16. [Diagnostic ability of Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease-4 equations to estimate glomerular filtration rate in with multimorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Cabrerizo-García, José Luis; Díez-Manglano, Jesús; García-Arilla, Ernesto; Revillo-Pinilla, Paz; Ramón-Puertas, José; Sebastián-Royo, Mariano

    2015-01-06

    The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation is recommended by most scientific societies to calculate the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Recently the group Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKP-EPI) has published a new, more precise and accurate equation. We have analyzed its behavior in a group of polypathological patients (PP) and compared it with the classic MDRD-4.version Multicenter, observational, descriptive and transversal study. We calculated GFR by MDRD-4 and CKD-EPI in 425 PP. Each stage was assigned according to the GFR: 1:>90; 2: 60-89; 3: 30-59; 4: 15-29; and 5 < 15 ml/min/1.73m(2). We analyzed the correlation between both and the patients reclassified by CKD-EPI. Mean age was (mean [SD]) 81.7 (7.9) years. 55.3% were women. The mean estimated GFR was 58.6 (26.3) ml/min/1,73m(2) by MDRD-4 and 52.7 (23.0) ml/min/1.73m(2) by CKD-EPI (P<.001; Spearman's Rho correlation and Lin concordance coefficients: 0.993 and 0.948). The Bland-Altman plots reflected lower values for GFR for CKD-EPI equation. In the stage 2, 21.2% were reclassified by CKD-EPI to the stage 3, with women older than 83 years being the more disadvantaged subgroup with 27.3% or reclassification. CKD-EPI equation applied to PP worsens the results of MDRD-4. In general, it originates low values of GFR and increases the degree of renal insufficiency, especially in older women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Etiology of chronic renal failure in Jenin district, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Abumwais, Jamal Qasem

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted on chronic renal failure patients treated by medications or by hemodialysis at The Martyr Dr. Khalil Sulaiman Hospital in Jenin city, Palestine, from 1/8/2005 to 1/8/2006 to know the underlying etiology of chronic renal failure. The subjects included were 84 patients. The information was obtained from files of the patients. The diagnosis was based on medical history, laboratory tests, X-rays, CT scans, ultrasound and renal biopsies. The results showed that the three most common causes of chronic renal failure in Jenin district were diabetes mellitus (33.32%), hypertension (16.7%), and chronic glomerulonephritis (13.1%). Inherited kidney diseases formed an important percentage (17.85%) and included primary hyperoxaluria (10.71%), Alport's syndrome (5.95%), and adult polycystic kidney disease (1.19%). These results differ from what is found in most developing countries including many Arab countries where the principal causes of chronic renal failure are chronic glomerulonephritis and interstitial nephritis. The high prevalence of inherited kidney diseases in some families (primary hyperoxaluria and Alport's) syndrome may be explained by the very high prevalence of consanguineous marriage especially among cousins in these families.

  18. Higher plasma CXCL12 levels predict incident myocardial infarction and death in chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nehal N.; Matthews, Gregory J.; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shah, Rhia; McLaughlin, Catherine; Patel, Parth; Budoff, Matthew; Chen, Jing; Wolman, Melanie; Go, Alan; He, Jiang; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Master, Stephen R.; Rader, Daniel J.; Raj, Dominic; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Shah, Rachana; Schreiber, Marty; Fischer, Michael J.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Kusek, John; Feldman, Harold I.; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Genome-wide association studies revealed an association between a locus at 10q11, downstream from CXCL12, and myocardial infarction (MI). However, the relationship among plasma CXCL12, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, incident MI, and death is unknown. Methods and results We analysed study-entry plasma CXCL12 levels in 3687 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study, a prospective study of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Mean follow-up was 6 years for incident MI or death. Plasma CXCL12 levels were positively associated with several cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia), lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and higher inflammatory cytokine levels (P < 0.05). In fully adjusted models, higher study-entry CXCL12 was associated with increased odds of prevalent CVD (OR 1.23; 95% confidence interval 1.14, 1.33, P < 0.001) for one standard deviation (SD) increase in CXCL12. Similarly, one SD higher CXCL12 increased the hazard of incident MI (1.26; 1.09,1.45, P < 0.001), death (1.20; 1.09,1.33, P < 0.001), and combined MI/death (1.23; 1.13–1.34, P < 0.001) adjusting for demographic factors, known CVD risk factors, and inflammatory markers and remained significant for MI (1.19; 1.03,1.39, P = 0.01) and the combined MI/death (1.13; 1.03,1.24, P = 0.01) after further controlling for eGFR and urinary albumin:creatinine ratio. Conclusions In CKD, higher plasma CXCL12 was associated with CVD risk factors and prevalent CVD as well as the hazard of incident MI and death. Further studies are required to establish if plasma CXCL12 reflect causal actions at the vessel wall and is a tool for genomic and therapeutic trials. PMID:24306482

  19. Higher plasma CXCL12 levels predict incident myocardial infarction and death in chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nehal N; Matthews, Gregory J; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shah, Rhia; McLaughlin, Catherine; Patel, Parth; Budoff, Matthew; Chen, Jing; Wolman, Melanie; Go, Alan; He, Jiang; Kanetsky, Peter A; Master, Stephen R; Rader, Daniel J; Raj, Dominic; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Shah, Rachana; Schreiber, Marty; Fischer, Michael J; Townsend, Raymond R; Kusek, John; Feldman, Harold I; Foulkes, Andrea S; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-08-14

    Genome-wide association studies revealed an association between a locus at 10q11, downstream from CXCL12, and myocardial infarction (MI). However, the relationship among plasma CXCL12, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, incident MI, and death is unknown. We analysed study-entry plasma CXCL12 levels in 3687 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study, a prospective study of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Mean follow-up was 6 years for incident MI or death. Plasma CXCL12 levels were positively associated with several cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia), lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and higher inflammatory cytokine levels (P < 0.05). In fully adjusted models, higher study-entry CXCL12 was associated with increased odds of prevalent CVD (OR 1.23; 95% confidence interval 1.14, 1.33, P < 0.001) for one standard deviation (SD) increase in CXCL12. Similarly, one SD higher CXCL12 increased the hazard of incident MI (1.26; 1.09,1.45, P < 0.001), death (1.20; 1.09,1.33, P < 0.001), and combined MI/death (1.23; 1.13-1.34, P < 0.001) adjusting for demographic factors, known CVD risk factors, and inflammatory markers and remained significant for MI (1.19; 1.03,1.39, P = 0.01) and the combined MI/death (1.13; 1.03,1.24, P = 0.01) after further controlling for eGFR and urinary albumin:creatinine ratio. In CKD, higher plasma CXCL12 was associated with CVD risk factors and prevalent CVD as well as the hazard of incident MI and death. Further studies are required to establish if plasma CXCL12 reflect causal actions at the vessel wall and is a tool for genomic and therapeutic trials. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology 2013. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. The Serum Analysis of Dampness Syndrome in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease and Chronic Renal Failure Based on the Theory of "Same Syndromes in Different Diseases".

    PubMed

    Hao, Yiming; Yuan, Xue; Qian, Peng; Bai, Guanfeng; Wang, Yiqin

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the serum metabolites in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) showing dampness syndrome and patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) showing dampness syndrome and to seek the substance that serves as the underlying basis of dampness syndrome in "same syndromes in different diseases." Methods . Metabolic spectrum by GC-MS was performed using serum samples from 29 patients with CHD showing dampness syndrome and 32 patients with CRF showing dampness syndrome. The principal component analysis and statistical analysis of partial least squares were performed to detect the metabolites with different levels of expression in patients with CHD and CRF. Furthermore, by comparing the VIP value and data mining in METLIN and HMDB, we identified the common metabolites in both patient groups. (1) Ten differential metabolites were found in patients with CHD showing dampness syndrome when compared to healthy subjects. Meanwhile, nine differential metabolites were found in patients with CRF showing dampness syndrome when compared to healthy subjects. (2) There were 9 differential metabolites identified when the serum metabolites of the CHD patients with dampness syndrome were compared to those of CRF patients with dampness syndrome. There were 4 common metabolites found in the serums of both patient groups.

  1. Long-term changes of renal function in relation to ace inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker dosing in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Nelges, Christoph; Täger, Tobias; Schwenger, Vedat; Cebola, Rita; Schnorbach, Johannes; Goode, Kevin M; Kazmi, Syed; Katus, Hugo A; Cleland, John G F; Clark, Andrew L; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have become cornerstones of therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF). Guidelines advise high target doses for ACEIs/ARBs, but fear of worsening renal function may limit dose titration in patients with concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this retrospective observational study, we identified 722 consecutive patients with systolic CHF, stable CKD stage III/IV (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-60 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2)) and chronic ACEI/ARB treatment from the outpatient heart failure clinics at the Universities of Hull, UK, and Heidelberg, Germany. Change of renal function, worsening CHF, and hyperkalemia at 12-month follow-up were analyzed as a function of both baseline ACEI/ARB dose and dose change from baseline. ΔeGFR was not related to baseline dose of ACEI/ARB (P = .58), or to relative (P = .18) or absolute change of ACEI/ARB dose (P = .21) during follow-up. Expressing change of renal function as a categorical variable (improved/stable/decreased) as well as subgroup analyses with respect to age, sex, New York Heart Association functional class, left ventricular ejection fraction, diabetes, concomitant aldosterone antagonists, CKD stage, hypertension, ACEI vs ARB, and congestion status yielded similar results. There was no association of dose/dose change with incidence of either worsening CHF or hyperkalemia. In patients with systolic CHF and stable CKD stage III/IV, neither continuation of high doses of ACEI/ARB nor up-titration was related to adverse changes in longer-term renal function. Conversely, down-titration was not associated with improvement in eGFR. Use of high doses of ACEI/ARB and their up-titration in patients with CHF and CKD III/IV may be appropriate provided that the patient is adequately monitored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Very low-protein diet plus ketoacids in chronic kidney disease and risk of death during end-stage renal disease: a historical cohort controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Chiodini, Paolo; Cupisti, Adamasco; Viola, Battista Fabio; Pezzotta, Mauro; De Nicola, Luca; Minutolo, Roberto; Barsotti, Giuliano; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Di Iorio, Biagio

    2015-01-01

    Very low-protein intake during chronic kidney disease (CKD) improves metabolic disorders and may delay dialysis start without compromising nutritional status, but concerns have been raised on a possible negative effect on survival during dialysis. This study aimed at evaluating whether a very low-protein diet during CKD is associated with a greater risk of death while on dialysis treatment. This is an historical, cohort, controlled study, enrolling patients at dialysis start previously treated in a tertiary nephrology clinic with a very low-protein diet supplemented with amino acids and ketoacids (s-VLPD group, n = 184) or without s-VLPD [tertiary nephrology care (TNC) group, n = 334] and unselected patients [control (CON) group, n = 9.092]. The major outcome was survival rate during end-stage renal disease associated to s-VLPD treatment during CKD. The propensity score methods and Cox regression model were used to match groups at the start of dialysis to perform survival analysis and estimate adjusted hazard ratio (HR). In s-VLPD, TNC and CON groups, average age was 67.5, 66.0 and 66.3 years, respectively (P = 0.521) and male prevalence was 55, 55 and 62%, respectively (P = 0.004). Diabetes prevalence differed in the three groups (P < 0.001), being 18, 17 and 31% in s-VLPD, CON and TNC, respectively. A different prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease was found (P < 0.001), being similar in TNC and CON (31 and 25%) and higher in s-VLPD (41%). Median follow-up during renal replacement therapy (RRT) was 36, 32 and 36 months in the three groups. Adjusted HR estimated on matched propensity patients was 0.59 (0.45-0.78) for s-VLPD versus CON. Subgroup analysis showed a lower mortality risk in s-VLPD versus matched-CON in younger patients (<70 years) and those without CV disease. No significant difference in HRs was found between s-VLPD and TNC. s-VLPD during CKD does not increase mortality in the subsequent RRT period. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford

  3. Association of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide with Left Ventricular Structure and Function in Chronic Kidney Disease (From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort [CRIC])

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K.; Li, Yongmei; Ricardo, Ana C.; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin; Cuevas, Magdalena; Christenson, Robert; DeFilippi, Christopher; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Raj, Dominic S.; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Wright, Jackson; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the cross-sectional associations of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) with cardiac structural and functional abnormalities in a cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients without clinical heart failure (HF), the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (n=3,232). Associations of NT-proBNP with echocardiographically determined left ventricular (LV) mass and LV systolic and diastolic function were evaluated by multivariable logistic and linear regression models. Reclassification of participants’ predicted risk of LV hypertrophy (LVH), systolic and diastolic dysfunction was performed using a category-free net reclassification improvement (NRI) index that compared a clinical model with and without NT-proBNP. The median (interquartile range) NT-proBNP was 126.6 pg/ml (55.5–303.7). The highest quartile of NT-proBNP was associated with nearly three-fold odds of LVH (odds ratio (OR) 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8–4.0) and LV systolic dysfunction (2.7, 1.7–4.5) and two-fold odds of diastolic dysfunction (2.0, 1.3–2.9) in the fully adjusted models. When evaluated alone as a screening test, NT-proBNP functioned modestly for the detection of LVH (area under the curve, AUC 0.66) and LV systolic dysfunction (AUC 0.62), and poorly for the detection of diastolic dysfunction (AUC 0.51). However, when added to the clinical model, NT-proBNP significantly reclassified participants’ likelihood of having LVH (NRI 0.14, 95% CI 0.13–0.15; p<0.001) and LV systolic dysfunction (0.28, 0.27–0.30; p<0.001), but not diastolic dysfunction (0.10, 0.10–0.11; p=0.07). In conclusion, in this large CKD cohort without HF, NT-proBNP had strong associations with prevalent LVH and LV systolic dysfunction. PMID:23178053

  4. A Clinical and Electrophysiological Study of Peripheral Neuropathies in Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients and Relation of Severity of Peripheral Neuropathy with Degree of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jasti, Dushyanth Babu; Mallipeddi, Sarat; Apparao, A.; Vengamma, B.; Sivakumar, V.; Kolli, Satyarao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence, clinical features, electrophysiological features, and severity of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with respect to severity of renal failure and presence of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: Between May 2015 and December 2016, 200 predialysis CKD patients were assessed prospectively. Results: The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis CKD patients in the present study was 45% based on clinical symptoms and 90% electrophysiologically. Mean age of 200 predialysis CKD patients who participated in the study was 53.2 ± 13.2 years. One hundred and thirty-six (68%) patients were male and 64 (32%) patients were female. Mean duration of disease was 2.2 ± 1.6 years. Nearly 45% patients of patients had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy in the present study, which was more common in mild-to-moderate renal failure group. One hundred twenty-six patients (63%) had definite damage and 54 patients (27%) had early damage. In mild-to-moderate renal failure (n = 100) and severe renal failure patients (n = 100), 88% and 92% had significant peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Most common nerves involved were sural nerve, median sensory nerve, and ulnar sensory nerve. Diabetic patients (97%) showed more severe and high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy when compared to nondiabetic patients (83%). Most common patterns were pure axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. Conclusion: Peripheral neuropathy is common in predialysis patients, prevalence and severity of which increases as renal failure worsens. Predialysis patients with diabetes show higher prevalence and severity of peripheral neuropathy when compared with nondiabetics. PMID:29204008

  5. A Clinical and Electrophysiological Study of Peripheral Neuropathies in Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients and Relation of Severity of Peripheral Neuropathy with Degree of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Dushyanth Babu; Mallipeddi, Sarat; Apparao, A; Vengamma, B; Sivakumar, V; Kolli, Satyarao

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence, clinical features, electrophysiological features, and severity of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with respect to severity of renal failure and presence of diabetes mellitus. Between May 2015 and December 2016, 200 predialysis CKD patients were assessed prospectively. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis CKD patients in the present study was 45% based on clinical symptoms and 90% electrophysiologically. Mean age of 200 predialysis CKD patients who participated in the study was 53.2 ± 13.2 years. One hundred and thirty-six (68%) patients were male and 64 (32%) patients were female. Mean duration of disease was 2.2 ± 1.6 years. Nearly 45% patients of patients had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy in the present study, which was more common in mild-to-moderate renal failure group. One hundred twenty-six patients (63%) had definite damage and 54 patients (27%) had early damage. In mild-to-moderate renal failure ( n = 100) and severe renal failure patients ( n = 100), 88% and 92% had significant peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Most common nerves involved were sural nerve, median sensory nerve, and ulnar sensory nerve. Diabetic patients (97%) showed more severe and high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy when compared to nondiabetic patients (83%). Most common patterns were pure axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is common in predialysis patients, prevalence and severity of which increases as renal failure worsens. Predialysis patients with diabetes show higher prevalence and severity of peripheral neuropathy when compared with nondiabetics.

  6. Prognostic assessment of estimated glomerular filtration rate by the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in comparison with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation.

    PubMed

    Skali, Hicham; Uno, Hajime; Levey, Andrew S; Inker, Lesley A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Solomon, Scott D

    2011-09-01

    Systematic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation is recommended for detection of chronic kidney disease and prediction of cardiovascular (CV) risk. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation is a newly developed and validated formula for eGFR that is more accurate at normal or near-normal eGFR. We aimed to assess the incremental prognostic accuracy of eGFR(CKD-EPI) versus eGFR(MDRD) in subjects at increased risk for CV disease. We performed a post hoc analysis of the VALIANT trial that enrolled 14,527 patients with acute myocardial infarction with signs and symptoms of heart failure and/or left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The eGFR(MDRD) and eGFR(CKD-EPI) were computed using age, gender, race, and baseline creatinine level. Patients were categorized according to their eGFR using each equation. To assess the incremental prognostic value of eGFR(CKD-EPI), the net reclassification improvement was calculated for the composite end point of CV death, recurrent myocardial infarction, heart failure, or stroke. Twenty-four percent of the subjects were reclassified into a different eGFR category using eGFR(CKD-EPI). The composite end point occurred in 33% of the subjects in this cohort. Based on eGFR(CKD-EPI), subjects reclassified into a higher eGFR experienced fewer events than those reclassified into a lower eGFR (21% vs 43%). In unadjusted analyses, the composite end point risk in subjects with eGFR between 75 and 90 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) was comparable with the referent group (eGFR between 90 and 105) using eGFR(MDRD) (hazard ratio 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.2) but was significantly higher using eGFR(CKD-EPI) (hazard ratio 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.4). The net reclassification improvement for eGFR(CKD-EPI) over eGFR(MDRD) was 8.7%. The CKD-EPI equation provides more accurate risk stratification than the MDRD Study equation in patients at high risk for CV disease

  7. Organochlorine pesticide level in patients with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology and its association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rishila; Siddarth, Manushi; Singh, Neeru; Tyagi, Vipin; Kare, Pawan Kumar; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2017-05-26

    Involvement of agrochemicals have been suggested in the development of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu). The association between CKDu and blood level of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in CKDu patients has been examined in the present study. All the recruited study subjects (n = 300) were divided in three groups, namely, healthy control (n = 100), patients with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (n = 100), and patients with chronic kidney disease of known etiology (CKDk) (n = 100). Blood OCP levels of all three study groups were analyzed by gas chromatography. Increased level of OCPs, namely α-HCH, aldrin, and β-endosulfan, were observed in CKDu patients as compared to healthy control and CKD patients of known etiology. The levels of these pesticides significantly correlated negatively with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and positively with urinary albumin of CKD patients. Logistic regression analysis revealed association of γ-HCH, p, p'-DDE, and β-endosulfan with CKDu on adjustment of age, sex, BMI, and total lipid content. Increased blood level of certain organochlorine pesticides is associated with the development of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology.

  8. The Impact of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade on Renal Outcomes and Mortality in Pre-Dialysis Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun Jung; Kim, Sun Moon; Shin, Byung Chul; Kim, Hyun Lee; Chung, Jong Hoon; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Chungsik; Jung, Ji Yong

    2017-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) blockade is thought to slow renal progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it remains uncertain if the habitual use of RAS inhibitors affects renal progression and outcomes in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD. In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we identified 2,076 pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD (stage 4 or 5) from a total of 33,722 CKD patients. RAS blockade users were paired with non-users for analyses using inverse probability of treatment-weighted (IPTW) and propensity score (PS) matching. The outcomes were renal death, all-cause mortality, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, and interactive factors as composite outcomes. RAS blockade users showed an increased risk of renal death in PS-matched analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.381; 95% CI, 1.071-1.781; P = 0.013), which was in agreement with the results of IPTW analysis (HR, 1.298; 95% CI, 1.123-1.500; P < 0.001). The risk of composite outcomes was higher in RAS blockade users in IPTW (HR, 1.154; 95% CI, 1.016-1.310; P = 0.027), but was marginal significance in PS matched analysis (HR, 1.243; 95% CI, 0.996-1.550; P = 0.054). The habitual use of RAS blockades in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD may have a detrimental effect on renal outcome without improving all-cause mortality. Further studies are warranted to determine whether withholding RAS blockade may lead to better outcomes in these patients.

  9. Renal pelvic and ureteral ultrasonographic characteristics of cats with chronic kidney disease in comparison with normal cats, and cats with pyelonephritis or ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Dowers, Kristy; Herndon, Andrea K; Randall, Elissa K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The objective was to describe ultrasonographic characteristics of cats with stable chronic kidney disease (CKD) and determine if these were significantly different from cats with pyelonephritis (Pyelo) and ureteral obstruction (UO), to aid in clinical assessment during uremic crisis. Methods Sixty-six cats with stable CKD were prospectively enrolled, as well as normal control cats (n = 10), cats with a clinical diagnosis of Pyelo (n = 13) and cats with UO confirmed by surgical resolution (n = 11). Renal ultrasound was performed and routine still images and cine loops were obtained. Analysis included degree of pelvic dilation, and presence and degree of ureteral dilation. Measurements were compared between groups using non-parametric one-way ANOVA with Dunn's post-hoc analysis. Results In total, 66.6% of CKD cats had measurable renal pelvic dilation compared with 30.0% of normal cats, 84.6% of Pyelo cats and 100% of UO cats. There was no statistically significant difference in renal pelvic widths between CKD cats and normal cats, or CKD cats and Pyelo cats. On almost all measurement categories, UO cats had significantly greater renal pelvic widths compared with CKD cats and normal cats ( P <0.05) but not Pyelo cats. Six percent of stable CKD cats had measurable proximal ureteral dilation on one or both sides vs 46.2% of Pyelo cats and 81.8% of UO cats. There was no statistically significant difference in proximal ureteral width between normal and CKD cats, or between Pyelo and UO cats. There was a statistically significant difference in proximal ureteral width between CKD and Pyelo cats, CKD and UO cats, normal and UO cats, and normal and Pyelo cats. Conclusions and relevance No significant difference in renal pelvic widths between CKD cats and Pyelo cats was seen. These data suggest CKD cats should have a baseline ultrasonography performed so that abnormalities documented during a uremic crisis can be better interpreted.

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Now Give Monthly Give In Honor Chronic kidney disease (CKD) www.kidneyfund.org > Kidney Disease > Chronic ... Kidney-friendly diet for CKD What causes chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Anyone can get CKD. Some people ...

  11. Chronic Diseases Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of blindness among adults. 6 Health Risk Behaviors that Cause Chronic Diseases Health risk behaviors are ... The Cost of Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Behaviors In the United States, chronic diseases and conditions ...

  12. The effect of the World Kidney Day campaign on the awareness of chronic kidney disease and the status of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and renal progression.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ho Jun; Ahn, Jeong Myeong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Lee, Tae Woo; Heo, Nam Joo; Kim, Suhnggwon

    2010-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide problem. We describe the trends in CKD awareness before and after the World Kidney Day (WKD) campaign and the impact of the WKD campaign in increasing awareness and appropriate management of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and renal progression. We selected 57 718 people who had undergone a routine health check-up. The average CKD awareness was 3.1% (95% CI: 2.6-3.7%) and was increased with progressing CKD stage. The awareness was increased from 1.1% before the WKD campaign to 5.8% after the campaign (P < 0.001). CKD awareness in the post-WKD period was increased in CKD stages 2 (OR 4.535: 95% CI: 2.044-10.062) and 3 (OR 6.614: 95% CI: 4.282-10.217) and profoundly increased in stage 4 (OR 13.800: 95% CI: 2.127-89.524), compared to the pre-WKD period. In the CKD-aware group compared to the CKD-unaware group, the awareness of diabetes mellitus (90.0% versus 54.2%, P < 0.001) and hypertension (87.2% versus 64.7%, P < 0.001) was higher and the levels of systolic blood pressure (116.9 +/- 1.0 versus 120.1 +/- 0.2, P < 0.01) and serum cholesterol (198.3 +/- 2.7 versus 205.0 +/- 0.5, P < 0.05) were lower by covariance analysis. The WKD campaign had a positive impact on the awareness and control of risk factors in CKD subjects but the absolute frequency of CKD awareness still remains undesirable in Korea. We need new campaign strategies to publicize the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management of CKD.

  13. Renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure with preserved versus reduced ejection fraction: impact of the new Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration Group formula.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Finlay A; Ezekowitz, Justin; Tarantini, Luigi; Squire, Iain; Komajda, Michel; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Gotsman, Israel; Whalley, Gillian; Earle, Nikki; Poppe, Katrina K; Doughty, Robert N

    2012-05-01

    Prior studies in heart failure (HF) have used the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration Group (CKD-EPI) equation provides a more-accurate eGFR than the MDRD when compared against the radionuclide gold standard. The prevalence and prognostic import of renal dysfunction in HF if the CKD-EPI equation is used rather than the MDRD is uncertain. We used individual patient data from 25 prospective studies to stratify patients with HF by eGFR using the CKD-EPI and the MDRD equations and examined survival across eGFR strata. In 20 754 patients (15 962 with HF with reduced ejection fraction [HF-REF] and 4792 with HF with preserved ejection fraction [HF-PEF]; mean age, 68 years; deaths per 1000 patient-years, 151; 95% CI, 146-155), 10 589 (51%) and 11 422 (55%) had an eGFR <60 mL/min using the MDRD and CKD-EPI equations, respectively. Use of the CKD-EPI equation resulted in 3760 (18%) patients being reclassified into different eGFR risk strata; 3089 (82%) were placed in a lower eGFR category and exhibited higher all-cause mortality rates (net reclassification improvement with CKD-EPI, 3.7%; 95% CI, 1.5%-5.9%). Reduced eGFR was a stronger predictor of all-cause mortality in HF-REF than in HF-PEF. Use of the CKD-EPI rather than the MDRD equation to calculate eGFR leads to higher estimates of renal dysfunction in HF and a more-accurate categorization of mortality risk. Renal function is more closely related to outcomes in HF-REF than in HF-PEF.

  14. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process.

  15. Inflammation in renal atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Udani, Suneel M; Dieter, Robert S

    2008-07-01

    The study of renal atherosclerotic disease has conventionally focused on the diagnosis and management of renal artery stenosis. With the increased understanding of atherosclerosis as a systemic inflammatory process, there has been increased interest in vascular biology at the microvasculature level. While different organ beds share some features, the inflammation and injury in the microvasculature of the kidney has unique elements as well. Understanding of the pathogenesis yields a better understanding of the clinical manifestations of renal atherosclerotic disease, which can be very subtle. Furthermore, identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the progression of kidney damage can also direct clinicians and scientists toward targeted therapies. Existing therapies used to treat atherosclerotic disease in other vascular beds may also play a role in the treatment of renal atherosclerotic disease.

  16. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-09-22

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight / body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions.

  17. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight /body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions. PMID:26322503

  18. [A case of Poncet's disease (tuberculous rheumatism) in a patient with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy].

    PubMed

    Miki, Yusuke; Fujita, Yoshiro; Kawai, Ryosuke; Danbara, Atsushi; Ueno, Yukio; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-10-01

    A 78-year-old man who was undergoing hemodialysis therapy was admitted to our hospital because of sore throat, remittent cervical lymphadenopathy, and polyarthritis over the preceding 4 weeks. On admission, he had bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. He complained of arthralgia associated with tenderness, warmth and swelling of both elbows, left side wrist and left shoulder joint. The C-reactive protein level on admission was 15.3 mg/dl. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies, tuberculin skin test and blood culture were negative. Joint fluid was not aspirated. Radiographs of the joints did not reveal any abnormalities. Acid-fast bacilli were demonstrated in the smear of the cervical lymph node with a fluorochrome rhodamine-auramine stain. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA was identified by polymerase chain reaction. We found the presence of caseating granuloma on the biopsy specimens and M.tuberculosis was detected from culture. At that point, we diagnosed this patient as having tuberculous lymphadenitis. His general symptoms resolved rapidly after starting with a three-drug regimen consisting of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide. His polyarthritis also improved dramatically. Finally we considered that his polyarthritis was tuberculous rheumatism, also called Poncet's disease. Poncet's disease is characterized by sterile polyarthritis during active tuberculosis infection. It is considered a reactive arthritis, which is a different entity from tuberculous arthritis. Although this is a rare disease, we should be aware of it in hemodialysis patient clinics, because the incidence of tuberculosis infection has been reported to be increasing in patients with end-stage renal failure.

  19. The End-Stage Renal Disease Program: Basis for the Army Organ Transplant Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-19

    gradually lost, the condition is known as chronic renal failure . End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is the late and terminal phase of chronic renal ...extended Medicare coverage to persons suffering from kidney ( renal ) failure who either were currently or fully insured under the Social Security Act or...NO.NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) THE END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE PROGRAM: BASIS FOR THE ARMY ORGAN TRANSPLANT PROGRAM 12. PERSONAL

  20. Endothelin-A Receptor Antagonism after Renal Angioplasty Enhances Renal Recovery in Renovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tullos, Nathan; Stewart, Nicholas J.; Surles, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty/stenting (PTRAS) is frequently used to treat renal artery stenosis and renovascular disease (RVD); however, renal function is restored in less than one half of the cases. This study was designed to test a novel intervention that could refine PTRAS and enhance renal recovery in RVD. Renal function was quantified in pigs after 6 weeks of chronic RVD (induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis), established renal damage, and hypertension. Pigs with RVD then underwent PTRAS and were randomized into three groups: placebo (RVD+PTRAS), chronic endothelin-A receptor (ET-A) blockade (RVD+PTRAS+ET-A), and chronic dual ET-A/B blockade (RVD+PTRAS+ET-A/B) for 4 weeks. Renal function was again evaluated after treatments, and then, ex vivo studies were performed on the stented kidney. PTRAS resolved renal stenosis, attenuated hypertension, and improved renal function but did not resolve renal microvascular rarefaction, remodeling, or renal fibrosis. ET-A blocker therapy after PTRAS significantly improved hypertension, microvascular rarefaction, and renal injury and led to greater recovery of renal function. Conversely, combined ET-A/B blockade therapy blunted the therapeutic effects of PTRAS alone or PTRAS followed by ET-A blockade. These data suggest that ET-A receptor blockade therapy could serve as a coadjuvant intervention to enhance the outcomes of PTRAS in RVD. These results also suggest that ET-B receptors are important for renal function in RVD and may contribute to recovery after PTRAS. Using clinically available compounds and techniques, our results could contribute to both refinement and design of new therapeutic strategies in chronic RVD. PMID:25377076

  1. Association between biomarkers of carbonyl stress with increased systemic inflammatory response in different stages of chronic kidney disease and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aveles, Paulo R; Criminácio, Ciro R; Gonçalves, Simone; Bignelli, Alexandre T; Claro, Ligia Maria; Siqueira, Sérgio S; Nakao, Lia S; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by progressive kidney dysfunction accompanied by accumulation of uremic toxins and a potential disequilibrium between the redox status and the generation of prooxidants, resulting in oxidative stress and chronic inflammation which is associated with complications (particularly cardiovascular disease) in this population. We aimed to analyze the concentration of total plasma thiols (indicator of antioxidant capacity) and the protein carbonyl content (a marker of carbonyl stress) in relation to kidney function and inflammation in a group of patients with CKD. A group of 68 patients with CKD (stages 2-5; mean age 57 ± 12 years, 46% male, 34% diabetics) and another group of 21 patients who underwent living donor kidney transplantation (mean age 36 ± 17 years, 50% male, 10% diabetics, and 9 ± 2 months after renal transplantation) were included in the study. Total plasma thiol and protein carbonyl levels were determined by the DTNB and DNPH methods, respectively, and were adjusted to the plasma albumin concentrations. Plasma levels of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by routine methods and used as markers of inflammation. Mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 48 ml/min, and there was a positive correlation between GFR and thiol (r = 0.25, p < 0.05) and a negative correlation between GFR and carbonyl (r = -0.26, p < 0.05), fibrinogen (r = -0.45, p < 0.0001) and CRP (r = -0.14, p = ns). Carbonyl strongly correlated with CRP (0.49, p < 0.0001) and fibrinogen (0.30, p < 0.01). There was a significant reduction in plasma carbonyl after renal transplantation (1.4 ± 0.4 nmol/mg albumin), compared with the levels before the procedure (2.0 ± 1.4 nmol/mg albumin, p < 0.05), which parallels an improvement in thiol levels (15 ± 4 vs. 21 ± 5 nmol/mg albumin, p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between CRP and carbonyl after the transplantation (r = 0.65; p < 0.005). We observed that

  2. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  3. Etiology of the protein-energy wasting syndrome in chronic kidney disease: a consensus statement from the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM).

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Stenvinkel, Peter; Cuppari, Lilian; Ikizler, T Alp; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kaysen, George; Mitch, William E; Price, S Russ; Wanner, Christoph; Wang, Angela Y M; ter Wee, Pieter; Franch, Harold A

    2013-03-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), a term proposed by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM), refers to the multiple nutritional and catabolic alterations that occur in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associate with morbidity and mortality. To increase awareness, identify research needs, and provide the basis for future work to understand therapies and consequences of PEW, ISRNM provides this consensus statement of current knowledge on the etiology of PEW syndrome in CKD. Although insufficient food intake (true undernutrition) due to poor appetite and dietary restrictions contribute, other highly prevalent factors are required for the full syndrome to develop. These include uremia-induced alterations such as increased energy expenditure, persistent inflammation, acidosis, and multiple endocrine disorders that render a state of hypermetabolism leading to excess catabolism of muscle and fat. In addition, comorbid conditions associated with CKD, poor physical activity, frailty, and the dialysis procedure per se further contribute to PEW. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mortality risk disparities in children receiving chronic renal replacement therapy for the treatment of end-stage renal disease across Europe: an ESPN-ERA/EDTA registry analysis.

    PubMed

    Chesnaye, Nicholas C; Schaefer, Franz; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Holman, Rebecca; Baiko, Sergey; Baskın, Esra; Bjerre, Anna; Cloarec, Sylvie; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A M; Espinosa, Laura; Heaf, James; Stone, Rosário; Shtiza, Diamant; Zagozdzon, Ilona; Harambat, Jérôme; Jager, Kitty J; Groothoff, Jaap W; van Stralen, Karlijn J

    2017-05-27

    We explored the variation in country mortality rates in the paediatric population receiving renal replacement therapy across Europe, and estimated how much of this variation could be explained by patient-level and country-level factors. In this registry analysis, we extracted patient data from the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ESPN/ERA-EDTA) Registry for 32 European countries. We included incident patients younger than 19 years receiving renal replacement therapy. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and the explained variation were modelled for patient-level and country-level factors with multilevel Cox regression. The primary outcome studied was all-cause mortality while on renal replacement therapy. Between Jan 1, 2000, and Dec 31, 2013, the overall 5 year renal replacement therapy mortality rate was 15·8 deaths per 1000 patient-years (IQR 6·4-16·4). France had a mortality rate (9·2) of more than 3 SDs better, and Russia (35·2), Poland (39·9), Romania (47·4), and Bulgaria (68·6) had mortality rates more than 3 SDs worse than the European average. Public health expenditure was inversely associated with mortality risk (per SD increase, aHR 0·69, 95% CI 0·52-0·91) and explained 67% of the variation in renal replacement therapy mortality rates between countries. Child mortality rates showed a significant association with renal replacement therapy mortality, albeit mediated by macroeconomics (eg, neonatal mortality reduced from 1·31 [95% CI 1·13-1·53], p=0·0005, to 1·21 [0·97-1·51], p=0·10). After accounting for country distributions of patient age, the variation in renal replacement therapy mortality rates between countries increased by 21%. Substantial international variation exists in paediatric renal replacement therapy mortality rates across Europe, most of which was explained by disparities in public health expenditure, which seems to limit the availability and

  5. Postoperative chronic renal failure: a new syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Merino, G E; Buselmeier, T J; Kjellstrand, C M

    1975-01-01

    Of 125 patients with postsurgical acute tubular necrosis, 87 died, 34 regained clinical normal renal function, and 4 survivors (9.5%) were left with severe permanent renal failure, two of whom required chronic dialysis and transplantation. Preoperatively these 4 patients had normal renal function. The 4 patients were above age 60, two had undergone methoxyflurane anesthesia, and nephrotoxic antibiotics were used in all. The incidence of permanent renal failure is much higher than ever reported and may reflect the survival of patients who previously died because of less ideal dialysis. We believe that the cause of this permanent lesion is multifactorial, including age (over 60 years), nephrotoxic antibiotics (particularly cephalothin and gentamicin sulfate), and nephrotoxic anesthetic (methoxyflurane) agents. This combination of factors should be avoided whenever possible. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1147707

  6. Renal function in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease receiving intravenous ferric carboxymaltose: an analysis of the randomized FIND-CKD trial.

    PubMed

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Roger, Simon D

    2017-01-17

    Preclinical studies demonstrate renal proximal tubular injury after administration of some intravenous iron preparations but clinical data on renal effects of intravenous iron are sparse. FIND-CKD was a 56-week, randomized, open-label, multicenter study in which patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD), anemia and iron deficiency without erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy received intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting either higher (400-600 μg/L) or lower (100-200 μg/L) ferritin values, or oral iron. Mean (SD) eGFR at baseline was 34.9 (11.3), 32.8 (10.8) and 34.2 (12.3) mL/min/1.73 m 2 in the high ferritin FCM (n = 97), low ferritin FCM (n = 89) and oral iron (n = 167) groups, respectively. Corresponding values at month 12 were 35.6 (13.8), 32.1 (12.7) and 33.4 (14.5) mL/min/1.73 m 2 . The pre-specified endpoint of mean (SE) change in eGFR from baseline to month 12 was +0.7 (0.9) mL/min/1.73 m 2 with high ferritin FCM (p = 0.15 versus oral iron), -0.9 (0.9) mL/min/1.73 m 2 with low ferritin FCM (p = 0.99 versus oral iron) and -0.9 (0.7) mL/min/1.73 m 2 with oral iron. No significant association was detected between quartiles of FCM dose, change in ferritin or change in TSAT versus change in eGFR. Dialysis initiation was similar between groups. Renal adverse events were rare, with no indication of between-group differences. Intravenous FCM at doses that maintained ferritin levels of 100-200 μg/L or 400-600 μg/L did not negatively impact renal function (eGFR) in patients with ND-CKD over 12 months versus oral iron, and eGFR remained stable. These findings show no evidence of renal toxicity following intravenous FCM over a 1-year period. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00994318 (first registration 12 October 2009).

  7. Are levels of NT-proBNP and SDMA useful to determine diastolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease and renal transplant patients?

    PubMed

    Memon, Lidija; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Stanojevic, Natasa Bogavac; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Simic-Ogrizovic, Sanja; Giga, Vojislav; Dopsaj, Violeta; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana; Spasic, Slavica

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the clinical usefulness of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) for detection of renal and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and renal transplant (RT) recipients. We included 98 CKD and 44 RT patients. We assessed LV function using pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound. Diastolic dysfunction was defined when the E:A ratio was <1. Independent predictors of NT-proBNP levels were age, creatinine, and albumin in CKD patients and age and urea in RT patients. Determinants of SDMA in CKD patients were glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and NT-proBNP and creatinine in RT patients. In RT patients with diastolic dysfunction, NT-proBNP and SDMA were significantly higher than in patients without diastolic dysfunction (F = 7.478, P < 0.011; F = 2.631, P < 0.017). After adjustment for GFR, the differences were not seen. In CKD patients adjusted NT-proBNP and SDMA values for GFR were not significantly higher in patients with diastolic dysfunction than in patients without diastolic dysfunction. NT-proBNP is useful for detection of LV diastolic dysfunction in RT recipients. When evaluating both NT-proBNP and SDMA it is necessary to consider GFR as a confounding factor. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Possible discrepancy of HbA1c values and its assessment among patients with chronic renal failure, hemodialysis and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kaori; Goto, Atsushi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Noto, Hiroshi; Kajio, Hiroshi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA) are frequently used as glycemic control markers. However, these markers are influenced by alterations in hemoglobin and albumin metabolism. Thus, conditions such as anemia, chronic renal failure, hypersplenism, chronic liver diseases, hyperthyroidism, hypoalbuminemia, and pregnancy need to be considered when interpreting HbA1c or GA values. Using data from patients with normal albumin and hemoglobin metabolism, we previously established a linear regression equation describing the GA value versus the HbA1c value to calculate an extrapolated HbA1c (eHbA1c) value for the accurate evaluation of glycemic control. In this study, we investigated the difference between the measured HbA1c and the eHbA1c values for patients with various conditions. Data sets for a total of 2461 occasions were obtained from 731 patients whose HbA1c and GA values were simultaneously measured. We excluded patients with missing data or changeable HbA1c levels, and patients who had received transfusions or steroids within the previous 3 months. Finally, we included 44 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), 10 patients who were undergoing hemodialysis (HD), 7 patients with hematological malignancies and a hemoglobin level of less than 10 g/dL (HM), and 12 patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In all the groups, the eHbA1c values were significantly higher than the measured HbA1c values. The median difference was 0.75 % (95 % CI 0.40-1.10 %, P for the difference is <0.001) in the CRF group, 0.80 % (95 % CI 0.30-1.65 %, P for the difference is 0.041) in the HD group, 0.90 % (95 % CI 0.90-1.30 %, P for the difference is 0.028) in the HM group, and 0.85 % (95 % CI 0.40-1.50 %, P for the difference is 0.009) in the CLD group. We found that the measured HbA1c values were lower than the eHbA1c values in each of the groups.

  9. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity predicts decline in renal function and cardiovascular events in early stages of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Shin, Dong Il; Kim, Sung Jun; Koh, Eun Sil; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Chung, Sungjin; Shin, Seok Joon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the predictive capacity of the brachial-ankle aortic pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of arterial stiffness, for the decline in renal function and for cardiovascular events in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Two hundred forty-one patients who underwent a comprehensive check-up were included and were divided into two groups according to their estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR): patients with CKD categories G2, G3a and G3b (30 ≤ eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73m(2), eGFR < 90 group; n=117) and those with eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (eGFR ≥ 90 group; n=124). The change in renal function, the eGFR change, was determined by the slope of eGFR against time. We analysed whether baPWV was associated with eGFR change or predicted cardiovascular events. baPWV was independently associated with eGFR change in a multivariate analysis of the total patients (β=-0.011, p=0.011) and remained significantly associated with eGFR change in a subgroup analysis of the eGFR < 90 group (β=-0.015, p=0.035). baPWV was independently associated with cardiovascular events (odds ratio=1.002, p=0.048) in the eGFR < 90 group, but not in the eGFR ≥ 90 group. The receiver operative characteristic curve analysis showed that 1,568 cm/sec was the cut-off value of baPWV for predicting CV events in the eGFR < 90 group (area under curve=0.691, p=0.03) CONCLUSIONS: In patients with early stages of CKD, baPWV was independently associated with the decline in renal function and short-term cardiovascular events.

  10. Increased urine semaphorin-3A is associated with renal damage in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Ramesh, Ganesan; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Leoncini, Giovanna; Garneri, Debora; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Semaphorins are guidance proteins implicated in several processes such as angiogenesis, organogenesis, cell migration, and cytokine release. Experimental studies showed that semaphorin-3a (SEMA3A) administration induces transient massive proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement and endothelial cell damage in healthy animals. While SEMA3A signaling has been demonstrated to be mechanistically involved in experimental diabetic glomerulopathy and in acute kidney injury, to date its role in human chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been investigated. To test the hypothesis that SEMA3A may play a role in human CKD, we performed a cross-sectional, nested, case-control study on 151 matched hypertensive patients with and without CKD. SEMA3A was quantified in the urine (USEMA) by ELISA. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) by the CKD-EPI formula and albuminuria was measured as albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). USEMA levels were positively correlated with urine ACR (p = 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). USEMA was higher in patients with both components of renal damage as compared to those with only one and those with normal renal function (p < 0.007 and <0.001, respectively). The presence of increased USEMA levels (i.e. top quartile) entailed a fourfold higher risk of combined renal damage (p < 0.001) and an almost twofold higher risk of macroalbuminuria (p = 0.005) or of reduced eGFR, even adjusting for confounding factors (p = 0.002). USEMA is independently associated with CKD in both diabetic and non diabetic hypertensive patients. Further studies may help clarify the mechanisms underlying this association and possibly the pathogenic changes leading to the development of CKD.

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koratala, Abhilash; Bhattacharya, Deepti; Kazory, Amir

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide, the number of pregnant women with various degrees of renal dysfunction is expected to increase. There is a bidirectional relation between CKD and pregnancy in which renal dysfunction negatively affects pregnancy outcomes, and the pregnancy can have a deleterious impact on various aspects of kidney disease. It has been shown that even mild renal dysfunction can increase considerably the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Moreover, data suggest that a history of recovery from acute kidney injury is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition to kidney dysfunction, maternal hypertension and proteinuria predispose women to negative outcomes and are important factors to consider in preconception counseling and the process of risk stratification. In this review, we provide an overview of the physiologic renal changes during pregnancy as well as available data regarding CKD and pregnancy outcomes. We also highlight the important management strategies in women with certain selected renal conditions that are seen commonly during the childbearing years. We call for future research on underexplored areas such as the concept of renal functional reserve to develop a potential clinical tool for prognostication and risk stratification of women at higher risk for complications during pregnancy.

  12. Clinical Application and Pharmacodynamic Monitoring of Apixaban in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease Requiring Chronic Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kufel, Wesley D; Zayac, Adam S; Lehmann, David F; Miller, Christopher D

    2016-11-01

    Despite prescribing guidance, limited data exist to describe the use of apixaban in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis (HD). Current apixaban dosing recommendations for this patient population are based largely on a single-dose pharmacokinetic study of eight patients. We describe the clinical application and pharmacodynamic monitoring of apixaban in a 62-year-old 156-kg African-American woman with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and ESRD requiring hemodialysis who developed calciphylaxis while receiving warfarin therapy. Based on a multidisciplinary clinical judgment decision due to concern for drug accumulation after multiple doses in patients with ESRD receiving HD, she was anticoagulated with apixaban 2.5 mg twice/day, as opposed to 5 mg twice/day as recommended by the package insert. Antifactor Xa monitoring was used, and resultant peak and trough apixaban concentrations were above the upper limit of detection for our clinical laboratory (more than 2.00 IU/ml). On day 7 of her hospitalization, the patient developed gastrointestinal bleeding, and apixaban was discontinued; no further clinical signs of bleeding occurred during her subsequent hospitalization course. Use of the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between apixaban exposure and the manifestation of gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient ultimately died 44 days after the acute bleeding event; however, coagulation concerns were not implicated in the patient's death. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that describes apixaban use and associated antifactor Xa monitoring in a patient with ESRD receiving HD, and it provides concern for current apixaban dosing recommendations in this patient population. Further pharmacokinetic and clinical data are likely necessary to better characterize apixaban use in these patients to optimize safety and efficacy. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  13. Acquired perforating dermatosis in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Karen de Almeida Pinto; Lima, Lourenço de Azevedo; Guedes, Juliana Chaves Ruiz; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; D'Acri, Antônio Macedo; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Perforating dermatoses are a group of skin diseases characterized by transepidermal elimination of dermal material. The disease is divided into two groups: the primary group and the secondary group. The classical or primary perforating dermatoses are subdivided into four types according to the eliminated dermal materials: Kyrle disease, perforating reactive collagenosis, elastosis perforans serpiginosa, and perforating folliculitis. The secondary form is known as acquired perforating dermatosis. The term was proposed in 1989 by Rapini to designate the perforating dermatoses affecting adult patients with systemic disease, regardless of the dermal materials eliminated. This report describes a case of the disease with elimination of collagen and elastic fibers in a patient with chronic renal failure.

  14. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    extend the utility of organs available for transplant. Data obtained to date demonstrate markedly lower renal cyst volume and fibrosis and better...Nephrology in November, 2013. 15. SUBJECT TERMS polycystic kidney diseases; renal insufficiency, chronic; kidney failure, chronic; fibrosis 16. SECURITY...reflect better diagnosis and reporting, they illustrate that ESRD from PKD is a huge health problem. The main goal of this proposal is the development

  15. The Oxford Renal (OxRen) cross-sectional study of chronic kidney disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nathan R; Lasserson, Daniel; Fatoba, Samuel; O'Callaghan, Chris A; Pugh, Chris; Perera-Salazar, Rafael; Shine, Brian; Thompson, Ben; Wolstenholme, Jane; McManus, Richard; Hobbs, F D Richard

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosed with objective measures of kidney damage and function has been recognised as a major public health burden. Independent of age, sex, ethnicity and comorbidity, strong associations exist between cardiovascular disease, mortality, morbidity and CKD, defined by reduced glomerular filtration rate and increased urinary albumin excretion. Detection of CKD within the population is therefore a priority for health systems. Methods and analysis 15 000 patients aged 60 years or over meeting the inclusion criteria will be invited to the study. Recruitment will be stratified to represent the distribution of socioeconomic position in the UK general population. Patients will be excluded if terminally ill (expected survival <1 year), or if they have received a solid organ transplant. Patients will attend up to two screening visits, to determine if they have CKD, followed by an assessment visit where demographic and physiological parameters will be recorded alongside questionnaires on exercise, diet, cognitive assessment and quality of life. Blood and urine specimens will be taken for immediate routine assays as well as for freezing pending peptide and genetic studies. Patients will have office and home blood pressure measurements as well as pulse wave velocity assessment. Healthcare costs of screening and subsequent monitoring will be calculated. Ethics and dissemination The protocol and related documents have been approved by NRES Committee South Central—Oxford B—Reference 13/SC/0020. PMID:24345903

  16. Design and methods of a strategic outcome study for chronic kidney disease: Frontier of Renal Outcome Modifications in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kunihiro; Makino, Hirofumi; Akizawa, Tadao; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Itoh, Sadayoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Koya, Daisuke; Narita, Ichiei; Mitarai, Tetsuya; Miyazaki, Masanobu; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takashi; Sakai, Osamu

    2010-04-01

    The continuous increase in the number of people requiring dialysis is a major clinical and socioeconomical issue in Japan and other countries. This study was designed to encourage chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients to consult a physician, enhance cooperation between nephrologists and general practices, and prevent the progression of kidney disease. Subjects comprise CKD patients aged between 40 and 74 years consulting a general physician, and patients in CKD stage 3 with proteinuria and diabetes or hypertension. This trial is a stratified open cluster-randomized study with two intervention groups: group A (weak intervention) and group B (strong intervention). We have recruited 49 local medical associations (clusters) in 15 different prefectures, which were classified into four regions (strata) based on the level of increase rate of dialysis patients. The patients in group A clusters were instructed initially to undergo treatment in accordance with the current CKD treatment guide, whereas patients in group B clusters were not only instructed in the same fashion but also received support from an information technology (IT)-based system designed to help achieve the goals of CKD treatment, consultation support centers, and consultations by dietitians visiting the local general practice offices. We assessed the rates of continued consultation, collaboration between general practitioners and nephrologists, and progression of CKD (as expressed by CKD stage). Through this study, filling the evidence-practice gap by facilitating effective communication and supporting general physicians and nephrologists, we will establish a CKD care system and decrease the number of advanced-stage CKD patients.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Periodontal Status of Chronic Renal Failure Patients and Systemically Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhika; Kumar, Uttam; Mallapragada, Siddharth; Agarwal, Pallavi

    2018-03-01

    Periodontitis, a chronic infectious disease, affects most of the population at one time or the other and its expression is a combination of hosts, microbial agents, and environmental factors. Extensive literature exists for the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Only a few studies performed in a limited number of patients have reported peri-odontal health status in chronic renal failure patients. Hence, the aim of the present study is to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with chronic renal failure undergoing dialysis, predialysis with systemically healthy individuals. A total of 90 patients were divided into three groups. Group I: 30 renal dialysis patients. Group II: 30 predialysis patients. Control group comprised 30 systemically healthy patients who formed group III. Periodontal examination was carried out using oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S), plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth, and clinical attachment loss. The results of the study showed that the periodontal status of patients with chronic renal failure undergoing dialysis (dialysis group) and patients with chronic renal failure not undergoing renal dialysis (predialysis) when compared with systemically healthy subjects showed significantly higher mean scores of OHI-S, PI, and clinical attachment loss. Thus, patients with chronic renal failure showed poor oral hygiene and higher prevalence of periodontal disease. The dental community's awareness of implications of poor health within chronic renal failure patients should be elevated.

  18. Interferon-γ production by tubulointerstitial human CD56bright natural killer cells contributes to renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Law, Becker M P; Wilkinson, Ray; Wang, Xiangju; Kildey, Katrina; Lindner, Mae; Rist, Melissa J; Beagley, Kenneth; Healy, Helen; Kassianos, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphoid cells that play a significant role in mediating innate immune responses. Studies in mice suggest a pathological role for NK cells in models of kidney disease. In this study, we characterized the NK cell subsets present in native kidneys of patients with tubulointerstitial fibrosis, the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease. Significantly higher numbers of total NK cells (CD3 - CD56 + ) were detected in renal biopsies with tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with diseased biopsies without fibrosis and healthy kidney tissue using multi-color flow cytometry. At a subset level, both the CD56 dim NK cell subset and particularly the CD56 bright NK cell subset were elevated in fibrotic kidney tissue. However, only CD56 bright NK cells significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function. Expression of the tissue-retention and -activation molecule CD69 on CD56 bright NK cells was significantly increased in fibrotic biopsy specimens compared with non-fibrotic kidney tissue, indicative of a pathogenic phenotype. Further flow cytometric phenotyping revealed selective co-expression of activating receptor CD335 (NKp46) and differentiation marker CD117 (c-kit) on CD56 bright NK cells. Multi-color immunofluorescent staining of fibrotic kidney tissue localized the accumulation of NK cells within the tubulointerstitium, with CD56 bright NK cells (NKp46 + CD117 + ) identified as the source of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ within the NK cell compartment. Thus, activated interferon-γ-producing CD56 bright NK cells are positioned to play a key role in the fibrotic process and progression to chronic kidney disease. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth / For Kids / Chronic Kidney Diseases What's ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  20. Chronic renal disease in children aged 5-18 years: a population-based survey in Turkey, the CREDIT-C study.

    PubMed

    Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Duzova, Ali; Yalçinkaya, Fatos; Arinsoy, Turgay; Süleymanlar, Gültekin

    2012-10-01

    Data on the epidemiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is a serious health problem and refers to a condition related to irreversible kidney damage that further progress to end-stage renal disease in children, are insufficient and data that are available were based on hospital records. The aim of this nationwide, population-based field study was to determine the prevalence of CKD in children in Turkey and to evaluate the association between CKD and possible risk factors such as obesity and hypertension. The study was the paediatric stratum (3622 children aged 5-18 years) of the previously published population-based survey of Chronic REnal Disease In Turkey (CREDIT study). Medical data were collected through home visits and interviews between November 2007 and July 2008; height, weight and blood pressure were also measured. Serum creatinine, total cholesterol, uric acid and complete blood count were determined from 12-h fasting blood samples, and spot urine tests were performed for subjects who gave consent to laboratory evaluation. Following adjustment according to gender, residence, age groups and geographical regions, the prevalence of children with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was 0.94 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-1.35], and the prevalence of children with CKD Stages 3-5 [National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI)] was 2600 (95% CI 1100-5100) per million age related population. The mean eGFR was found to increase with age; the ratios of children with eGFR <90 and <75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were higher in younger age groups. The frequencies of overweight and obese children were 9.3 and 8.9%, respectively, and the mean eGFR was lower in patients with higher body mass index. The prevalence of hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia was 6.1 and 5.8%, respectively; the mean eGFR was lower in children with hypercholesterolaemia. This is the first population-based CKD study performed in

  1. Residual Renal Function in Children Treated with Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Residual renal function (RRF) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving renal replacement therapy is defined as the ability of native kidneys to eliminate water and uremic toxins. Preserved RRF improves survival and quality of life in adult ESRD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis. In children, RRF was shown not only to help preserve adequacy of renal replacement therapy but also to accelerate growth rate, improve nutrition and blood pressure control, reduce the risk of adverse myocardial changes, facilitate treatment of anemia and calcium-phosphorus balance abnormalities, and result in reduced serum and dialysate fluid levels of advanced glycation end-products. Factors contributing to RRF loss in children treated with peritoneal dialysis include the underlying renal disease such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome and hereditary nephropathy, small urine volume, severe proteinuria at the initiation of renal replacement therapy, and hypertension. Several approaches can be suggested to decrease the rate of RRF loss in pediatric patients treated with chronic peritoneal dialysis: potentially nephrotoxic drugs (e.g., aminoglycosides), episodes of hypotension, and uncontrolled hypertension should be avoided, urinary tract infections should be treated promptly, and loop diuretics may be used to increase salt and water excretion. PMID:24376376

  2. Early renal damage among children living in the region of highest burden of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Agampodi, S B; Amarasinghe, G S; Naotunna, P G C R; Jayasumana, C S; Siribaddana, S H

    2018-05-16

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu) in Sri Lanka is grouped with several other epidemics of similar nature across the world as Chronic Interstitial Nephritis in Agricultural Communities (CINAC). In CKDu endemic countries, the focus has mainly been on adults. We hypothesized that studying distribution and factors associated with elevated urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR), an early marker of kidney injury, among children living in a CKDu endemic area may provide important clues about the onset and progression of the disease. This cross sectional study was performed in rural primary schools in North Central Province of Sri Lnaka, a CKDu high endemic region. Total of 2880 students aging 5 to 11 years from 67 schools were enrolled for urinalysis in a random spot urine sample. Bedside Schwartz formula was used to measure estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) on all children with UACR > 30 mg/g in Polonnaruwa district and a group of age matched controls. A standard multiple linear regression using log transformed UACR as the dependent variable was performed. Mean eGFR were compared between UACR elevated group and controls using independent sample t test. Median UACR was 10.3 mg/g. Sex, ethnicity, history of having a chronic disease and age uniquely contributed to the multiple regression model which only explained 2.8% of the variance in the log of the UACR (p < 0.001). Only 15 (0.5%) had UACR> 300 mg/g while 8.2% (n = 236) had UACR between 30 to 300 mg/g and 89.8% (n = 203) of them did not have a chronic disease (Chi square 2.21, p = 0.091). Mean eGFR was significantly lower in the group with elevated UACR (88.9 mg/dl/1.73 m2, 95% CI for mean 86.4- 91.3) compared to group with normal UACR (93.7 mg/dl/1.73 m2,95% CI 91.1- 96.3) (t 2.7, p 0.007). Three out of the four students with eGFR less than 60 mg/dl/1.73 m2 had moderately elevated UACR. This study provides evidence to suggest that children in CKDu endemic regions are

  3. Cost-utility analysis of radical nephrectomy versus partial nephrectomy in the management of small renal masses: Adjusting for the burden of ensuing chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Klinghoffer, Zachary; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Novara, Giacomo; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Kapoor, Anil; Shayegan, Bobby; Braga, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We compare the cost-utility of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (LRN), laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and open partial nephrectomy (OPN) in the management of small renal masses (SRMs) when the impact of ensuing chronic kidney disease (CKD) disease is considered. Methods: We designed a Markov decision analysis model with a 10-year time horizon. Estimates of costs, utilities, complication rates and probabilities of developing CKD were derived from the literature. The base case patient was assumed to be a 65-year-old patient with a <4-cm unilateral renal mass, a normal contralateral kidney and a normal preoperative serum creatinine. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to address the uncertainty associated with the study parameters. Results: OPN was the least costly strategy at $25 941 USD and generated 7.161 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) over 10 years. LPN yielded 0.098 additional QALYs at an additional cost of $888 for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $9057 per QALY, well below a commonly cited willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per QALY. LRN was more costly and yielded fewer QALYs than OPN and LPN. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated our model to be robust to changes to key parameters. Age had no effect on preferred strategy. Conclusions: Partial nephrectomy (PN) is the preferred treatment strategy for SRMs. In centres where LPN is not available, OPN remains considerably more cost-effective than LRN. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that there is no age at which PN is not preferred to LRN. Our study provides additional evidence to advocate PN for the management of all amenable SRMs. PMID:23671525

  4. Children with chronic renal disease undergoing dialysis or conservative treatment--differences in structural and functional echocardiographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Scavarda, Valeska Tavares; Pinheiro, Aurelio Carvalho; Costa, Symône Damasceno; de Andrade, Zélia Maria; Carvalhaes, João Tomás de Abreu; Campos, Orlando; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Moises, Valdir Ambrosio

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac disease frequently occurs in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing dialysis (DI), but it is not well studied in patients undergoing conservative treatment (CT). The aim of our study was to use echocardiography to analyze and compare the cardiac involvement of children with CKD undergoing DI or CT. Seventy-one children with CKD were included; 41 undergoing DI and 30 undergoing CT. There were 33 controls. Measurements of arterial pressure and structural and functional echocardiographic variables were obtained; the children were followed up for 18 months. Tests of comparison and multiple regression were used; significant if P < 0.05. Arterial hypertension (AH) was present in 37 of 71 (52%) children with CKD: 27 (65.8%) in DI and 10 (33.3%) in CT (X2 = 8.7; P = 0.003). An abnormal left ventricular geometric pattern was present in 37/41 (90.3%) undergoing DI, 33 had left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and in 14/30 (46.7%) undergoing CT, 5 had LVH. Ejection fraction was normal in all groups; diastolic function alteration (DFA) occurred in 28/41 (68.3%) children on DI and in 10/30 (33.3%) on CT (X2 = 9.2; P = 0.002). For children with CKD, DI (P = 0.002) and hypertension (P = 0.04) were associated with LVH; among those on DI, only AH was associated with LVH (P = 0.02). During the follow-up, 18 (43.9%) children undergoing DI had at least one cardiovascular event. Children with CKD undergoing CT had less cardiac involvement than those undergoing DI. LVH was associated with DI and AH in all children with CKD and with AH in those on DI.

  5. Neural control of renal function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    DiBona, G F

    1994-04-01

    The renal sympathetic innervation of the kidney exerts significant effects on multiple aspects of renal function, including renal haemodynamics, tubular sodium and water reabsorption and renin secretion. These effects constitute an important control system which is important in the physiological regulation of arterial pressure and total body fluid and sodium homeostasis. Abnormalities in this regulatory mechanism have pathophysiological consequences and are manifest in clinically relevant human disease states. Decreased renal sympathetic nerve activity results in impaired renin secretion, the inability to conserve sodium normally and an attenuated ability to dispose of both acute and chronic sodium loads. Increased renal sympathetic nerve activity contributes significantly to the excess renal sodium retention and related renal abnormalities observed in both hypertension and oedema forming conditions, such as cardiac failure, cirrhosis and nephrotic syndrome.

  6. Baseline Predictors of Mortality among Predominantly Rural-Dwelling End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Chronic Dialysis Therapies in Limpopo, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mapiye, Darlington; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Bello, Aminu K.; Ratsela, Andrew R.; Okpechi, Ikechi G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) continues to be the readily available renal replacement option in developing countries. While the impact of rural/remote dwelling on mortality among dialysis patients in developed countries is known, it remains to be defined in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods A single-center database of end-stage renal disease patients on chronic dialysis therapies treated between 2007 and 2014 at the Polokwane Kidney and Dialysis Centre (PKDC) of the Pietersburg Provincial Hospital, Limpopo South Africa, was retrospectively reviewed. All-cause, cardiovascular, and infection-related mortalities were assessed and associated baseline predictors determined. Results Of the 340 patients reviewed, 52.1% were male, 92.9% were black Africans, 1.8% were positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and 87.5% were rural dwellers. The average distance travelled to the dialysis centre was 112.3 ± 73.4 Km while 67.6% of patients lived in formal housing. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at dialysis initiation was 7.1 ± 3.7 mls/min while hemodialysis (HD) was the predominant modality offered (57.1%). Ninety-two (92) deaths were recorded over the duration of follow-up with the majority (34.8%) of deaths arising from infection-related causes. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (HR: 1.62, CI: 1.07–2.46) and infection-related mortality (HR: 2.27, CI: 1.13–4.60). On multivariable cox regression, CAPD remained a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (HR: 2.00, CI: 1.29–3.10) while the risk of death among CAPD patients was also significantly modified by diabetes mellitus (DM) status (HR: 4.99, CI: 2.13–11.71). Conclusion CAPD among predominantly rural dwelling patients in the Limpopo province of South Africa is associated with an increased risk of death from all-causes and infection-related causes. PMID:27300372

  7. The Serum Analysis of Dampness Syndrome in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease and Chronic Renal Failure Based on the Theory of “Same Syndromes in Different Diseases”

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Bai, Guanfeng

    2017-01-01

    Aim To analyze the serum metabolites in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) showing dampness syndrome and patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) showing dampness syndrome and to seek the substance that serves as the underlying basis of dampness syndrome in “same syndromes in different diseases.” Methods. Metabolic spectrum by GC-MS was performed using serum samples from 29 patients with CHD showing dampness syndrome and 32 patients with CRF showing dampness syndrome. The principal component analysis and statistical analysis of partial least squares were performed to detect the metabolites with different levels of expression in patients with CHD and CRF. Furthermore, by comparing the VIP value and data mining in METLIN and HMDB, we identified the common metabolites in both patient groups. Results (1) Ten differential metabolites were found in patients with CHD showing dampness syndrome when compared to healthy subjects. Meanwhile, nine differential metabolites were found in patients with CRF showing dampness syndrome when compared to healthy subjects. (2) There were 9 differential metabolites identified when the serum metabolites of the CHD patients with dampness syndrome were compared to those of CRF patients with dampness syndrome. There were 4 common metabolites found in the serums of both patient groups. PMID:28713825

  8. Serum phosphorus is related to left ventricular remodeling independent of renal function in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Yu, Yi; Wu, Ping; Lin, Fu-Jun; Yao, Yao; Xie, Yun; Jiang, Geng-Ru

    2016-10-15

    Increasing evidence indicated that phosphorus emerged as an important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The fact that serum phosphorus was closely linked to vascular and valvar calcification may account for one important reason. However, left ventricular remodeling may also serve as another potential mechanism of the cardiac toxicity of phosphorus. In the present study, we evaluated the association of serum phosphorus with left ventricular remodeling. We investigated consecutive hospitalized patients with pre-dialysis CKD, who did not have symptomatic heart failure or take any phosphorus binder or calcitriol medications. Transthoracic echocardiography was applied to assess their left ventricular remodeling indices, both structural and functional. The 296 study subjects (mean age 56.4years) included 169 (57.1%) men, 203 (68.6%) hypertensive patients. In addition to gender, systolic blood pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum phosphorus was an independent determinant of left ventricular mass index (LVMI, P=0.001). Similarly, serum phosphorus was also a determinant of left ventricular end diastolic dimension (P=0.0003), but not of relative wall thickness. In multivariate logistic analyses, serum phosphorus was significantly and independently associated with the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH, odds ratio [OR] 2.38 for each 1mmol/L increase, 95% CI 1.20-4.75, P=0.01). Moreover, the association was only confirmatory in eccentric LVH (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.43-6.32, P=0.003) but not in concentric LVH (1.38, 95% CI, 0.54-3.49, P=0.50). Serum phosphorus was significantly and independently associated with LVMI and the prevalence of eccentric LVH in hospitalized patients with CKD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Salivary markers in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pallos, Debora; Leão, Mariella V P; Togeiro, Fernanda C F B; Alegre, Larissa; Ricardo, Lucilene Hernandes; Perozini, Caroline; Ruivo, Gilson Fernandes

    2015-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a progressive loss of renal function over a period of months or years. The major function of the kidneys is the removal of metabolic waste products, electrolytes and water. When this function is impaired, systemic changes, oral complications and alterations in salivary composition may occur. This study aimed to compare the levels of immunological and inflammatory components in the saliva samples from patients that undergo to hemodialysis treatment (HD), without HD and control. This study evaluated IgA, IgG, C reactive protein (CRP) and nitric oxide (NO) in saliva samples from 119 patients, who were divided into the control group (C), chronic renal failure (CRF) patient group and CRF patients on hemodialysis treatment (HD) group. IgA and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. Nitric oxide levels were determined indirectly by the nitrite concentration using Griess reagent; CRP by agglutination tests; and total proteins, by Bradford assay. The HD group showed significantly higher levels of IgG, IgA and CRP compared with the control and CRF groups. The CRF group presented the same amounts of IgG, IgA and CRP as the C group but significantly higher levels of NO similar to the HD group. Renal disease, particularly hemodialysis treatment during renal disease, seems to alter salivary immunological and inflammatory components. Thus, analyzing the levels of IgA, IgG, NO and CRP in saliva may be beneficial for monitoring renal disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk of Progression of Nonalbuminuric CKD to End-Stage Kidney Disease in People With Diabetes: The CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study.

    PubMed

    Koye, Digsu N; Magliano, Dianna J; Reid, Christopher M; Jepson, Christopher; Feldman, Harold I; Herman, William H; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2018-05-18

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the absence of albuminuria is a common manifestation of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetes. However, the frequency with which it progresses to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is unknown. Multicenter prospective cohort study. We included 1,908 participants with diabetes and reduced GFR enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study in the United States. Urinary albumin and protein excretion. Incident ESKD, CKD progression (ESKD or ≥50% reduction in estimated GFR [eGFR] from baseline), and annual rate of decline in kidney function. ESKD was ascertained by self-report and by linkage to the US Renal Data System. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to estimate the association of albuminuria and proteinuria with incident ESKD or CKD progression and linear mixed-effects models to assess differences in eGFR slopes among those with and without albuminuria. Mean eGFR at baseline was 41.2mL/min/1.73m 2 . Normal or mildly increased 24-hour urinary albumin excretion (<30mg/d) at baseline was present in 28% of participants, but in only 5% of those progressing to ESKD. For those with baseline normal or mildly increased albuminuria, moderately increased albuminuria (albumin excretion, 30-299mg/d), and 2 levels of severely increased albuminuria (albumin excretion, 300-999 and ≥1,000mg/d): crude rates of ESKD were 7.4, 34.8, 78.7, and 178.7 per 1,000 person-years, respectively; CKD progression rates were 17.0, 61.4, 130.5, and 295.1 per 1,000 person-years, respectively; and annual rates of eGFR decline were -0.17, -1.35, -2.74, and -4.69mL/min/1.73m 2 , respectively. We were unable to compare the results with healthy controls. In people with diabetes with reduced eGFRs, the absence of albuminuria or proteinuria is common and carries a much lower risk for ESKD, CKD progression, or rapid decline in eGFR compared with those with albuminuria or proteinuria. The rate of eGFR decline in normoalbuminuric

  11. Pulmonary vein isolation combined with spironolactone or renal sympathetic denervation in patients with chronic kidney disease, uncontrolled hypertension, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and a pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Chen, Shaojie; Hoye, Neil Alexander; Pürerfellner, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) commonly occurs in chronic kidney disease (CKD), occasioning adverse outcomes. Merging pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) may decrease the recurrence of AF in subjects with CKD and uncontrolled hypertension. We considered that RSD could reduce the recurrence of AF in patients with CKD by modulating sympathetic hyperactivity. We aimed to evaluate the impact of RSD or spironolactone 50 mg/day associated with PVI in reducing systolic blood pressure (BP), AF recurrence, and AF burden in patients with a history of paroxysmal AF and mild CKD. This was a single-center, prospective, longitudinal, randomized, double-blind study. The individuals were randomly divided into two groups (PVI + spironolactone, n = 36, and PVI + RSD, n = 33). All of them were followed for exactly 1 year to assess maintenance of sinus rhythm and to monitor the other variables. Ambulatory BP measurements were reduced in both groups and at the 12th month also differed between groups. Significantly more patients in the PVI + RSD (61%) than in the PVI + spironolactone group (36%) were AF-free at the 12th month of follow-up, P = 0.0242. Toward the end of the study, the mean AF burden was lower in the PVI + RSD group as compared to PVI + spironolactone group, at the 9th month: ∆ = - 10% (P < 0.0001), and at the 12th month: ∆ = - 12% (P < 0.0001), respectively. PVI + RSD is safe and appears to be superior to PVI + spironolactone in BP reduction, augmentation of AF event-free rate, reduction of AF burden, and improvement of renal function.

  12. Long-term effects of moderate protein diet on renal function and low-grade inflammation in older adults with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Mauro; Ciarambino, Tiziana; Castellino, Pietro; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Malatino, Lorenzo; Ferrara, Nicola; Politi, Cecilia; Paolisso, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects of a moderate protein diet (MPD) on renal function, low-grade inflammation, and oxidative stress in older adults with type 2 diabetes, which to date are unclear. Seventy-four older adults with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease (stage G3b-G4) were enrolled in the study. During the 4-wk baseline period (T0), all patients were asked to follow a normal protein diet regimen, providing 1.1 g/kg daily. Successively, all patients were asked to follow an MPD, for 36 mo, providing 0.7 g/kg daily, for only 6 d/wk. Patients who refused to follow an MPD treatment were included in the control (NPD [normal protein diet] group). During the 36 mo of the study, creatinine clearance, blood urea nitrogen, proteinuria, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin (Hb)A1c, fat-free mass, low-grade inflammation (interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein) were evaluated monthly and oxidative stress (urinary 8-epiprostaglandin [Epi-PG]F2α) was evaluated every 3 mo. During T0, mean creatinine clearance, proteinuria, blood urea nitrogen, blood pressure, HbA1c, fat free mass, low-grade inflammation, and oxidative stress were similar in both groups. After 36 mo, a significant reduction in decline of renal function was observed in the MPD group but not in controls (2.4 ± 0.2 versus 5.7 ± 0.5 mL·min·y, respectively; P < 0.05 versus control). Similarly, a significant reduction in proteinuria, serum interleukin-6, serum C-reactive protein, and urinary 8-Epi-PGF2α excretion, was observed in the MPD group (P < 0.05 versus NPD). In older adults with type 2 diabetes, long-term effects of an MPD regimen are associated with a significant decline of renal function, proteinuria, low-grade inflammation, and oxidative stress without a change in fat-free mass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  14. Healthy Lifestyle and Risk of Kidney Disease Progression, Atherosclerotic Events, and Death in CKD: Findings From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Anderson, Cheryl A.; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Fischer, Michael J.; Dember, Laura M.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Frydrych, Anne; Jensvold, Nancy; Lustigova, Eva; Nessel, Lisa C.; Porter, Anna C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Wright, Julie A.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Lash, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Background In general populations, healthy lifestyle is associated with fewer adverse outcomes. We estimated the degree to which adherence to a healthy lifestyle decreases the risk of renal and cardiovascular events among adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study Design Prospective cohort. Setting & Participants 3006 adults enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Predictors Four lifestyle factors (regular physical activity, body mass index [BMI] 20–<25 kg/m2, nonsmoking, and “healthy diet”), individually and in combination. Outcomes CKD progression (50% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate or end-stage renal disease), atherosclerotic events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease), and all-cause mortality. Measurements Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards. Results During median follow-up of 4 years, we observed 726 CKD progression events, 353 atherosclerotic events, and 437 deaths. BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and nonsmoking were associated with reduced risk of CKD progression (HRs of 0.75 [95% CI, 0.58–0.97] and 0.61 [95% CI, 0.45–0.82] for BMIs of 25–<30 and ≥30, respectively, vs. 20–<25 kg/m2; HR for nonsmoking of 0.68 [95% CI, 0.55–0.84] compared to current smoker reference group) and reduced risk of atherosclerotic events (HRs of 0.67 [95% CI, 0.46–0.96] for BMI 25–<30 vs. 20–<25 kg/m2 and 0.55 [95% CI, 0.40–0.75] vs. current smoker). Factors associated with reduced all-cause mortality were regular physical activity (HR, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.52–0.79] vs. inactive), BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (HR, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.43–0.96] vs. 20–<25 kg/m2) and nonsmoking (HR, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.34–0.60] vs. current smoker). BMI <20 kg/m2 was associated with increased all-cause mortality risk (HR, 2.11 [95% CI, 1.13–3.93] vs. 20–25 kg/m2). Adherence to all four lifestyle factors was associated with 68% lower risk of all-cause mortality compared to adherence to no lifestyle factors (HR, 0.32; 95

  15. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sung; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Yoon, Kun Ho

    2015-06-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

  16. Dosing of antirheumatic drugs in renal disease and dialysis.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Areena; Sachdeva, Namita; Schumacher, H Ralph

    2004-08-01

    Many patients with rheumatic diseases have their management complicated by renal problems. Renal failure modifies the metabolism of many drugs, especially by retention. Questions often arise about the effects of renal failure on the handling of drugs commonly used in rheumatology. For which drugs must we be especially concerned about increased toxicity? Patients on chronic dialysis may also need a variety of drugs for rheumatic disease. How are our drugs dialyzed, and which of these can be safety used and how best to use them?Decisions about dosing of rheumatic drugs are often required for the patients with chronic renal insufficiency or on long-term dialysis, although many drugs have not been formally studied in these settings. Patients with renal insufficiency are excluded from most drug trials. Data for some of these drugs have to be extrapolated based on the information available about the pharmacokinetics of the drug.This review addresses dosing of commonly used drugs in rheumatology in patients with chronic renal insufficiency or failure. It is compiled from a MEDLINE search of papers dealing with renal handling of antirheumatic drugs and suggestions for dose adjustments for these drugs. Drugs reviewed include commonly used disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS), drugs used for treatment of gout, commonly used nonsteroidal antnflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and the newer COX-2 inhibitors.

  17. The in vivo effects of adenine-induced chronic kidney disease on some renal and hepatic function and CYP450 metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Al Za'abi, M; Shalaby, A; Manoj, P; Ali, B H

    2017-05-04

    Adenine-induced model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a widely used model especially in studies testing novel nephroprotective agents. We investigated the effects of adenine-induced CKD in rats on the activities of some xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in liver and kidneys, and on some in vivo indicators of drug metabolism (viz pentobarbitone sleeping time, and plasma concentration of theophylline 90 min post administration). CKD was induced by orally feeding adenine (0.25 % w/w) for 35 days. Adenine induced all the characteristics of CKD, which was confirmed by biochemical and histological findings. Glutathione concentration and activities of some enzymes involved in its metabolism were reduced in kidneys and livers of rats with CKD. Renal CYP450 1A1 activity was significantly inhibited by adenine, but other measured isoenzymes (1A2, 3A4 and 2E1) were not significantly affected. Adenine significantly prolonged pentobarbitone-sleeping time and increased plasma theophylline concentration 90 min post administration. Adenine also induced a moderate degree of hepatic damages as indicated histologically and by significant elevations in some plasma enzymes. The results suggest that adenine-induced CKD is associated with significant in vivo inhibitory activities on some drug-metabolizing enzymes, with most of the effect on the kidneys rather than the liver.

  18. Blunted cyclic variation of heart rate predicts mortality risk in post-myocardial infarction, end-stage renal disease, and chronic heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Junichiro; Yasuma, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Eiichi; Carney, Robert M.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Blumenthal, James A.; Arsenos, Petros; Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A.; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hideki; Kiyono, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Yoshida, Yutaka; Yuda, Emi; Kodama, Itsuo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims Cyclic variation of heart rate (CVHR) associated with sleep-disordered breathing is thought to reflect cardiac autonomic responses to apnoeic/hypoxic stress. We examined whether blunted CVHR observed in ambulatory ECG could predict the mortality risk. Methods and results CVHR in night-time Holter ECG was detected by an automated algorithm, and the prognostic relationships of the frequency (FCV) and amplitude (ACV) of CVHR were examined in 717 patients after myocardial infarction (post-MI 1, 6% mortality, median follow-up 25 months). The predictive power was prospectively validated in three independent cohorts: a second group of 220 post-MI patients (post-MI 2, 25.5% mortality, follow-up 45 months); 299 patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis (ESRD, 28.1% mortality, follow-up 85 months); and 100 patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, 35% mortality, follow-up 38 months). Although CVHR was observed in ≥96% of the patients in all cohorts, FCV did not predict mortality in any cohort. In contrast, decreased ACV was a powerful predictor of mortality in the post-MI 1 cohort (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1 ln [ms] decrement, 2.9 [2.2–3.7], P < 0.001). This prognostic relationship was validated in the post-MI 2 (1.8 [1.4–2.2], P < 0.001), ESRD (1.5 [1.3–1.8], P < 0.001), and CHF (1.4 [1.1–1.8], P = 0.02) cohorts. The prognostic value of ACV was independent of age, gender, diabetes, β-blocker therapy, left ventricular ejection fraction, sleep-time mean R-R interval, and FCV. Conclusion Blunted CVHR detected by decreased ACV in a night-time Holter ECG predicts increased mortality risk in post-MI, ESRD, and CHF patients. PMID:27789562

  19. Blunted cyclic variation of heart rate predicts mortality risk in post-myocardial infarction, end-stage renal disease, and chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Hayano, Junichiro; Yasuma, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Eiichi; Carney, Robert M; Stein, Phyllis K; Blumenthal, James A; Arsenos, Petros; Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hideki; Kiyono, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Yoshida, Yutaka; Yuda, Emi; Kodama, Itsuo

    2017-08-01

    Cyclic variation of heart rate (CVHR) associated with sleep-disordered breathing is thought to reflect cardiac autonomic responses to apnoeic/hypoxic stress. We examined whether blunted CVHR observed in ambulatory ECG could predict the mortality risk. CVHR in night-time Holter ECG was detected by an automated algorithm, and the prognostic relationships of the frequency (FCV) and amplitude (ACV) of CVHR were examined in 717 patients after myocardial infarction (post-MI 1, 6% mortality, median follow-up 25 months). The predictive power was prospectively validated in three independent cohorts: a second group of 220 post-MI patients (post-MI 2, 25.5% mortality, follow-up 45 months); 299 patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis (ESRD, 28.1% mortality, follow-up 85 months); and 100 patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, 35% mortality, follow-up 38 months). Although CVHR was observed in ≥96% of the patients in all cohorts, FCV did not predict mortality in any cohort. In contrast, decreased ACV was a powerful predictor of mortality in the post-MI 1 cohort (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1 ln [ms] decrement, 2.9 [2.2-3.7], P < 0.001). This prognostic relationship was validated in the post-MI 2 (1.8 [1.4-2.2], P < 0.001), ESRD (1.5 [1.3-1.8], P < 0.001), and CHF (1.4 [1.1-1.8], P = 0.02) cohorts. The prognostic value of ACV was independent of age, gender, diabetes, β-blocker therapy, left ventricular ejection fraction, sleep-time mean R-R interval, and FCV. Blunted CVHR detected by decreased ACV in a night-time Holter ECG predicts increased mortality risk in post-MI, ESRD, and CHF patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Association of Hypothyroidism with Body Mass Index, Systolic Blood Pressure and Proteinuria in Diabetic Patients: Does treated Hypothyroidism with Thyroxine Replacement Therapy Prevent Nephropathy/Chronic Renal Disease?

    PubMed

    Aziz, Kamran M A

    2016-01-01

    Untreated or sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, adverse effects on cardiovascular system, hypertension and in turn risk of nephropathy. However, these changes are reversible with thyroxine replacement therapy (TRT). Current research studied 4235 diabetic patients, divided into two groups, those with clinical hypothyroidism /on TRT, compared to those without thyroid disease or undiagnosed. BMI, blood pressure, creatinine, urine microalbumin and spot urine protein levels were compared between these two groups. Study finding demonstrated that for hypothyroid cases, BMI was higher (32.2 ± 7.44 versus 29.4 ± 5.7; p < 0.0001), serum creatinine was on lower levels (0.75 ± 0.27 versus 1.0 ± 0.74; p = 0.001), systolic BP was on lower side (123.7 ± 15.9 versus 128.13 ± 16.8; p= 0.015); spot urine microalbumin was on lower side (52.58 ± 71.65; versus 87.77 ± 140.86; p=0.010) and spot urine protein had lower levels (25.3 ± 38.3 versus 44.28 ± 123.58; p < 0.0001). Current research also demonstrated that Pearson`s x2 and odds/protective odds for hypothyroidism (on TRT) was strongly associated with obesity (p <0.0001; odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.56). However, they were protected from HTN (p= 0.272; protective odds ratio 1.28, 95%CI 0.824 to 1.98), nephropathy (p=0.386; protective odds 1.36, 95% CI 0.861 to 2.14) and chronic renal disease (p= 0.112; protective odds 3.42, 95% CI 0.83 to 14.13). In conclusion, TRT itself has protective effects on cardiovascular and renal system. Hence, thyroid screening is essential among diabetics to detect sub clinical or clinical hypothyroidism.

  1. Cardiovascular disease in live related renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Sharm, R K; Gupta, A; Sinha, N; Singh, U

    2011-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease has become the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients, although its pathogenesis and treatment are poorly understood. Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and graft dysfunction both play an important role in development of post transplant cardiovascular events. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease was studied in stable kidney transplant patients on cyclosporine based triple immunosuppression in relation to the various risk factors and post transplant cardiovascular events. Analysis of 562 post transplant patients with stable graft function for 6 months, the patients were evaluated for cardiovascular events in post transplant period. Pre and post transplant risk factors were analyzed using the COX proportional hazard model. 174 patients had undergone pre transplant coronary angiography, 15 of these patients underwent coronary revascularization (angioplasty in 12, CABG in 3). The prevalence of CAD was 7.2% in transplant recipients. Of 42 patients with CAD 31 (73.8%) had cardiovascular event in post transplant period. Age > or = 40 yrs, male sex, graft dysfunction, diabetes as primary renal disease, pre transplant cardiovascular event, chronic rejection showed significant correlation in univariate analysis and there was significant between age > or = 40 years (OR = 2.16 with 95% CI, 0.977-4.78) S creatinine > or = 1.4 mg % (OR = 2.40 with 95% CI, 1.20 - 4.82), diabetes as primary disease (OR with 95% CI 3.67, 3.2-14.82), PTDM (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.45-9.40), pre-transplant cardiovascular disease (OR 4.14, 95% CI .38-13.15) with post transplant cardiovascular event on multivariate analysis. There was poor patient and graft survival among those who suffered post transplant cardiovascular event. The incidence of cardiovascular disease continues to be high after renal transplantation and modifiable risk factors should be identified to prevent occurrence of events in post transplant period.

  2. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Coexistence of chronic renal failure, hashimoto thyroiditis and idiopathic hypoparathyroidism: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Saliha; Soyoral, Yasemin; Demirkiran, Davut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is an uncommon disease and its coexistence with chronic renal failure is quite rare. Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia are seen in both diseases. Diagnosis of hypoparathyroidism may be overlooked when parathormone response is not evaluated in patients with chronic renal failure. A 19-year-old female patient who had been receiving hemodialysis for 3 years because of chronic renal failure was diagnosed as idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and hashimoto thyroiditis. When her medical records on the first admission and medical history were evaluated, hypoparathyroidism and hashimoto thyroiditis were seen to be present also when she was started hemodialysis. Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism should be suspected in case as absence of parathormone response to hypocalcemia in patients with chronic renal failure. It should be taken into consideration that hashimoto thyroiditis may accompany and required analysis should be done.

  4. Effect of Levosimendan on Renal Outcome in Cardiac Surgery Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Perioperative Cardiovascular Dysfunction: A Substudy of a Multicenter Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Zangrillo, Alberto; Alvaro, Gabriele; Belletti, Alessandro; Pisano, Antonio; Brazzi, Luca; Calabrò, Maria G; Guarracino, Fabio; Bove, Tiziana; Grigoryev, Evgeny V; Monaco, Fabrizio; Boboshko, Vladimir A; Likhvantsev, Valery V; Scandroglio, Anna M; Paternoster, Gianluca; Lembo, Rosalba; Frassoni, Samuele; Comis, Marco; Pasyuga, Vadim V; Navalesi, Paolo; Lomivorotov, Vladimir V

    2018-02-26

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently after cardiac surgery. Levosimendan might reduce the incidence of AKI in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The authors investigated whether levosimendan administration could reduce AKI incidence in a high-risk cardiac surgical population. Post hoc analysis of a multicenter randomized trial. Cardiac surgery operating rooms and intensive care units of 14 centers in 3 countries. The study comprised 90 patients who underwent mitral valve surgery with an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and perioperative myocardial dysfunction. Patients were assigned randomly to receive levosimendan (0.025-0.2 μg/kg/min) or placebo in addition to standard inotropic treatment. Forty-six patients were assigned to receive levosimendan and 44 to receive placebo. Postoperative AKI occurred in 14 (30%) patients in the levosimendan group versus 23 (52%) in the placebo group (absolute difference -21.8; 95% confidence interval -41.7 to -1.97; p = 0.035). The incidence of major complications also was lower (18 [39%]) in the levosimendan group versus that in the placebo group (29 [66%]) (absolute difference -26.8 [-46.7 to -6.90]; p = 0.011). A trend toward lower serum creatinine at intensive care unit discharge was observed in the levosimendan group (1.18 [0.99-1.49] mg/dL) versus that in the placebo group (1.39 [1.05-1.76] mg/dL) (95% confidence interval -0.23 [-0.49 to 0.01]; p = 0.07). Levosimendan may improve renal outcome in cardiac surgery patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing mitral valve surgery who develop perioperative myocardial dysfunction. Results of this exploratory analysis should be investigated in future properly designed randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transition of care from pre-dialysis prelude to renal replacement therapy: the blueprints of emerging research in advanced chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Streja, Elani; Rhee, Connie M.; Soohoo, Melissa; Chen, Joline L.T.; Molnar, Miklos Z.; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Gillen, Daniel; Nguyen, Danh V.; Norris, Keith C.; Sim, John J.; Jacobsen, Steve S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In patients with advanced (estimated glomerular filtration rate <25 mL/min/1.73 m2) non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) the optimal transition of care to renal replacement therapy (RRT), i.e. dialysis or transplantation, is not known. Mortality and hospitalization risk are extremely high upon transition and in the first months following the transition to dialysis. Major knowledge gaps persist pertaining to differential or individualized transitions across different demographics and clinical measures during the ‘prelude’ period prior to the transition, particularly in several key areas: (i) the best timing for RRT transition; (ii) the optimal RRT type (dialysis versus transplant), and in the case of dialysis, the best modality (hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis), format (in-center versus home), frequency (infrequent versus thrice-weekly versus more frequent) and vascular access preparation; (iii) the post-RRT impact of pre-RRT prelude conditions and events such as blood pressure and glycemic control, acute kidney injury episodes, and management of CKD-specific conditions such as anemia and mineral disorders; and (iv) the impact of the above prelude conditions on end-of-life care and RRT decision-making versus conservative management of CKD. Given the enormous changes occurring in the global CKD healthcare landscape, as well as the high costs of transitioning to dialysis therapy with persistently poor outcomes, there is an urgent need to answer these important questions. This review describes the key concepts and questions related to the emerging field of ‘Transition of Care in CKD’, systematically defines six main categories of CKD transition, and reviews approaches to data linkage and novel prelude analyses along with clinical applications of these studies. PMID:28201698

  6. Improvement in Nutritional Status in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease-4 by a Nutrition Education Program With No Impact on Renal Function and Determined by Male Sex.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Almudena; González Garcia, Elena; Garcia-Llana, Helena; Del Peso, Gloria; López-Sobaler, Ana María; Selgas, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a rapid deterioration of kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is little information regarding the effect of nutrition intervention. The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a nutrition education program (NEP) in patients with nondialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD), based on the diagnostic criteria for PEW proposed by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism. The design of the study was a 6-month longitudinal, prospective, and interventional study. The study was conducted from March 2008 to September 2011 in the Nephrology Department of La Paz University Hospital in Madrid, Spain. A total of 160 patients with NDD-CKD started the NEP, and 128 finished it. The 6-month NEP consisted of designing an individualized diet plan based on the patient's initial nutritional status, and 4 nutrition education sessions. Changes in nutritional status (PEW) and biochemical, anthropometric and body composition parameters. After 6 months of intervention, potassium and inflammation levels decreased, and an improved lipid profile was found. Body mass index lowered, with increased muscle mass and a stable fat mass. Men showed increased levels of albumin and prealbumin, and women showed decreased proteinuria levels. The prevalence of PEW decreased globally (27.3%-10.9%; P = .000), but differently in men (29.5%-6.5%; P = .000) and in women (25.4%-14.9%; P = .070), 3 of the women having worsened. Kidney function was preserved, despite increased protein intake. The NEP in NDD-CKD generally improved nutritional status as measured by PEW parameters, but individual poorer results indicated the need to pay special attention to female sex and low body mass index at the start of the program. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of Continuous Administration of Tolvaptan on Preventing Medium-Term Worsening Renal Function and Long-Term Adverse Events in Heart Failure Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yusuke; Mizuno, Tomofumi; Niwa, Toru; Mukai, Kentaro; Wakabayashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Atsushi; Ando, Hirohiko; Takashima, Hiroaki; Murotani, Kenta; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Amano, Tetsuya

    2018-01-27

    Tolvaptan (TLV) has an inhibiting effect for worsening renal function (WRF) in acute decompensated heart failure (HF) patients. However, there are limited data regarding the effect of continuous TLV administration on medium-term WRF.This was a retrospective observational study in hospitalized HF patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). TLV was administered to those patients with fluid retention despite standard HF therapy. We compared 34 patients treated with TLV (TLV group) to 33 patients treated with conventional HF therapy with high-dose loop diuretics (furosemide ≥ 40 mg) (Loop group). Clinical outcomes, including the incidence of medium-term WRF, defined as increase of serum creatinine > 0.3 mg/dL, at 6 months after discharge and adverse events rate, were evaluated.Baseline patient characteristics were not different between the TLV and Loop group. The TLV group consisted of less frequent use of loop diuretics and carperitide compared with the Loop group. The incidence of medium-term WRF was significantly lower in the TLV group than in the Loop group (3.2% versus 31.0%, P = 0.002). Multivariate logistic analysis showed that the TLV non-user was an independent predictor of medium-term WRF. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the long-term event-free survival was significantly higher in the TLV group (log-rank P = 0.01).Continuous administration of TLV may reduce the risk of medium-term WRF, resulting possibility in improvement of long-term adverse outcomes in HF patients with CKD.

  8. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Quantification in the Evaluation of Renal Parenchyma Elasticity in Pediatric Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Bekci, Tumay; Genc, Gurkan; Tekcan, Demet; Tomak, Leman

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate renal parenchymal elasticity with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and compare with healthy volunteers. Thirty-eight healthy volunteers and 30 pediatric CKD patients were enrolled in this prospective study. The shear wave velocity (SW) values of both kidneys in CKD patients and healthy volunteers were evaluated. The mean SW in healthy volunteers was 2.21 ± 0.34 m/s, whereas the same value was 1.81 ± 0.49, 1.72 ± 0.63, 1.66 ± 0.29, 1.48 ± 0.37, and 1.23 ± 0.27 for stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in CKD patients, respectively. The SW was significantly lower for each stage in the CKD patients compared with healthy volunteers. Acoustic radiation force impulse could not predict the different stages of CKD, with the exception of stage 5. The cut-off value for predicting CKD was 1.81 m/s; at this threshold, sensitivity was 76.5% and specificity was 92.1% (area under the curve = 0.870 [95% confidence interval: 0.750-0.990]; P < .001). Interobserver agreement expressed as intraclass coefficient correlation was 0.65 (95% confidence interval: 0.34 to 0.83; P < .001). Acoustic radiation force impulse may be a potentially useful tool in detecting CKD in pediatric patients. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Predictors of new-onset chronic kidney disease in patients managed surgically for T1a renal cell carcinoma: An Australian population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Thomas; Ellis, Robert J; White, Victoria M; Bolton, Damien M; Coory, Michael D; Davis, Ian D; Francis, Ross S; Giles, Graham G; Gobe, Glenda C; Hawley, Carmel M; Johnson, David W; Marco, David J T; McStea, Megan; Neale, Rachel E; Pascoe, Elaine M; Wood, Simon T; Jordan, Susan J

    2018-05-22

    New-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) following surgical management of kidney tumors is common. This study evaluated risk factors for new-onset CKD after nephrectomy for T1a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in an Australian population-based cohort. There were 551 RCC patients from the Australian states of Queensland and Victoria included in this study. The primary outcome was new-onset CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ) and the secondary outcome was new-onset moderate-severe CKD (<45 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ). Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between patient, tumor and health-service characteristics and these outcomes. Forty percent (219/551) of patients developed new-onset CKD, and 12% (68/551) experienced new-onset moderate-severe CKD. Risk factors for new-onset CKD were age, lower preoperative eGFR, tumor size >20 mm, radical nephrectomy, lower hospital caseloads (<20 cases/year), and rural place of residence. The associations between rural place of residence and low center volume were a consequence of higher radical nephrectomy rates. Risk factors for CKD after nephrectomy generally relate to worse baseline health, or likelihood of undergoing radical nephrectomy. Surgeons in rural centres and hospitals with low caseloads may benefit from formalized integration with specialist centers for continued professional development and case-conferencing, to assist in management decisions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Renal cortical thickness and PON1 activity both decrease in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ak, Gülçin; Ozgönül, Mert; Sözmen, Eser Y; Aslan, S Leyla; Sözmen, Bülent

    2002-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with a tendency to atherosclerosis due to the enhanced oxidative stress and insufficient antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and paraoxonase (PON 1), together with abnormalities in lipid parameters. We determined the in vitro susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation and PON1 activities in patients with chronic renal insufficiency to see how PON1 affected the progression of the disease and whether hemodialysis influenced these parameters. Thirty-seven patients (21 men, 16 women, mean age 43.9 +/- 16) with CRF were included, 23 were receiving hemodialysis treatment. Exclusion criteria were diabetes mellitus and acute coronary disease. Eighteen healthy subjects (9 men and 9 women, mean age 39.9 +/- 10.5) volunteered to participate as controls. All patients were evaluated by renal ultrasound (USG) and two-dimensional echography, and their lipid profiles, PON1 activity, basal and Cu-induced LDL oxidation were determined. PON1 activities of patients were lower than controls (14.4 +/- 11 vs 30.9 +/- 19 U/L, p < 0.05) while basal ox-LDL levels determined by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method were higher (0.6 +/- 0.4 vs 0.4+/- 0.2 nmol/mg LDL protein, p<0.01). There was no significant difference between the groups treated with hemodialysis or not. There was a positive correlation between renal cortical thickness and HDL levels (r=0.47, p=0.006) and PON1 activity (r=0.45, p=0.01). Our data showed that HDL cholesterol levels and PON1 activities were both lower in patients, indicating depletion of the protective antioxidant capacity. PON1 activities and phenotypes were no different in patients with coronary disease and others so it does not appear to be a significant indicator of coronary artery disease in patients with CRF.

  11. Acute and chronic effects of the insecticide endrin on renal function and renal hemodynamics.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-10-01

    Chronic and acute effects of the insecticide endrin on renal function were studied in dogs. Animals were exposed to endrin chronically by intramuscular injection and acutely by intravenous infusion. In acute studies dogs developed systemic hypertensi...

  12. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  13. Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar bristles. In Brazil, most reports of erucism provoked by Lonomia caterpillars are from the southern region. Most manifestations of erucism are local and include burning pain, itching, local hyperthermia and, rarely, blisters (benign symptoms with spontaneous regression in a few hours). General symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, headache, fever, myalgia, abdominal pain and conjunctivitis may also occur. Uncommon symptoms include arthritis, coagulation disorders (manifested as bruising and bleeding), intracerebral hemorrhage and acute renal failure, which comprise serious complications. The present study reports the case of 60-year-old patient from Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, who came into contact with a caterpillar and developed, a few days later, chronic renal disease. PMID:23849585

  14. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  15. Corneal Endothelial Alterations in Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Sati, Alok; Jha, Ashok; Moulick, P S; Shankar, Sandeep; Gupta, Sandeep; Khan, M A; Dogra, Manu; Sangwan, Virender S

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the corneal endothelial changes in patients with chronic renal failure. A total of 128 corneas of 128 subjects were studied, and 3 groups were formed. The first, the dialyzed group, composed of 32 corneas of 32 patients; the second, the nondialyzed group, composed of 34 corneas of 34 patients; and the third, the age-matched control group, composed of 64 corneas of 64 healthy subjects were examined by a specular microscope and the endothelial parameters were compared. The dialyzed group (enhanced level of toxins in the blood) was further analyzed to assess the influence of blood urea, serum creatinine, serum calcium, and serum phosphorus including the duration of dialysis on corneal endothelium. On comparing the 3 groups using analysis of variance and posthoc tests, a significant difference was found in the central corneal thickness (CCT) and endothelial cell density (CD) between the control (CCT: 506 ± 29 μm, CD: 2760 ± 304 cells/mm) and dialyzed groups (CCT: 549 ± 30 μm, CD: 2337 ± 324 cells/mm) [P < 0.001 (CCT); P < 0.001 (CD)]; control and nondialyzed groups (CCT: 524 ± 27 μm, CD: 2574 ± 260 cells/mm) [P = 0.023 (CCT); P = 0.016 (CD)]; and dialyzed and nondialyzed groups [P = 0.002 (CCT); P = 0.007 (CD)]. Using the linear generalized model, a significant correlation was found between the endothelial parameters and blood urea only [P = 0.006 (CCT), 0.002 (coefficient of variation), 0.022 (CD), and 0.026 (percentage of hexagonality)], although the correlation was poorly positive for CCT but poorly negative for the remaining endothelial parameters. Corneal endothelial alteration is present in patients with chronic renal failure, more marked in patients undergoing hemodialysis and with raised blood urea level.

  16. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  17. Renal cell carcinoma in a cat with polycystic kidney disease undergoing renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel J; Demchur, Jolie A; Aronson, Lillian R

    2018-01-01

    A 10-year-old spayed female American Shorthair cat underwent renal transplantation due to worsening chronic kidney disease secondary to polycystic kidney disease. During transplantation, the right kidney grossly appeared to be more diseased than the left and was firmly adhered to the surrounding tissues. An intraoperative fine-needle aspirate of the right native kidney revealed inflammatory cells but no evidence of neoplasia. To create space for the allograft, a right nephrectomy was performed. Following nephrectomy, the right native kidney was submitted for biopsy. Biopsy results revealed a renal cell carcinoma. Although the cat initially recovered well from surgery, delayed graft function was a concern in the early postoperative period. Significant azotemia persisted and the cat began to have diarrhea. Erythematous skin lesions developed in the perineal and inguinal regions, which were suspected to be secondary to thromboembolic disease based on histopathology. The cat's clinical status continued to decline with development of signs of sepsis, followed by marked obtundation with uncontrollable seizures. Given the postoperative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma and the cat's progressively declining clinical status, humane euthanasia was elected. This case is the first to document renal cell carcinoma in a cat with polycystic kidney disease. An association of the two diseases has been reported in the human literature, but such a link has yet to be described in veterinary medicine. Given the association reported in the human literature, a plausible relationship between polycystic kidney disease and renal cell carcinoma in cats merits further investigation.

  18. Renal Involvement in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Corica, Domenico; Romano, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases varies from 6% to 46%. The aetiology of extraintestinal manifestations remains unclear. There are theories based on an immunological response influenced by genetic factors. Extraintestinal manifestations can involve almost every organ system. They may originate from the same pathophysiological mechanism of intestinal disease, or as secondary complications of inflammatory bowel diseases, or autoimmune diseases susceptibility. The most frequently involved organs are the joints, skin, eyes, liver and biliary tract. Renal involvement has been considered as an extraintestinal manifestation and has been described in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The most frequent renal involvements in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are nephrolithiasis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis. The aim of this review is to evaluate and report the most important data in the literature on renal involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Bibliographical searches were performed of the MEDLINE electronic database from January 1998 to January 2015 with the following key words (all fields): (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn's disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (kidney OR renal OR nephrotoxicity OR renal function OR kidney disease OR renal disease OR glomerulonephritis OR interstitial nephritis OR amyloidosis OR kidney failure OR renal failure) AND (5-aminosalicylic acid OR aminosalicylate OR mesalazine OR TNF-α inhibitors OR cyclosporine OR azathioprine OR drugs OR pediatric). Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes and ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  20. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newman LS. Re-examination of the blood lymphocyte transformation test in the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease. ... et al. A study on the beryllium Lymphocyte Transformation Test and the beryllium levels in working environment. ...

  1. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Mohd; Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-06-01

    Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with delayed ages of presentation, which at times have suffered

  2. Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Thakkar, Umang G; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-10-01

    Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of learning disabilities in children. Although the incidence of renal and urological involvement in Down syndrome is not very common, monitoring of patients with Down syndrome for renal diseases should be done regularly as patient's age into the second and third decades. With increased survival, it appears that a growing number of these patients present with chronic renal failure. Down syndrome patients are apparently not suited for peritoneal dialysis because of lacking cooperation. This procedure can be prone to failure, mainly because of an increased risk of peritonitis. Handling such patients especially those on peritoneal dialysis is challenging. Here we report a case of Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease treated with hemodialysis for 6 months. To the best of our knowledge and current literature review this is the first case report of a patient with Down syndrome undergoing hemodialysis.

  3. Histological pattern of paediatric renal diseases in northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Ali, Mohammad Usman; Akhtar, Sultan Zafar

    2011-07-01

    To determine histological spectrum of renal diseases among the paediatric population in the province Khyber Pukhtunkhwa, and to note any change in histological pattern with age and serum creatinine. This is a retrospective analysis of 415 paediatric renal biopsies performed at the department of nephrology, Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar from 1998-2005. Children from 3 to 15 years of age, having renal disease and indications for biopsy, underwent ultrasound guided percutaneous renal biopsy. Indications included nephrotic syndrome, nephritic/nephrotic syndrome with renal insufficiency and nephrotic syndrome with steroid resistance. Patients with acute or chronic renal failure were not included. The specimens were examined without immunoflorescence, under light microscopy using different staining techniques, Results were analyzed for different age groups, serum creatinine levels and for both male and females with renal disease. The overall male to female ratio in the study was 1.6: 1. Nephrotic syndrome was most common indication for renal biopsy in 50% of the cases, followed by renal insufficiency (26%) and steroid resistance (24%). In children with primary glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease (MCD) was found to be the most common histological pattern (24.09%), followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), 18.30%; mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) (MsePGN), 17.83%; mesangiocapillary GN (MPGN), 11.08%; post streptococcal proliferative GN (Post. strep GN), 10.60%; membranous GN (MGN), 4.82%; crescentic GN (Cres.GN), 4.34%. Among children with secondary GN, chronic sclerosing GN was found to be most common (1.93%), followed by chronic tubulo interstitial nephritis (Chr.TIN), 1.69% and hypertensive nephropathy (H.Neph), 1.69%; Renal Amyloidosis, 0.96% and Lupus Nephritis III, 0.96%; acute tubular necrosis (ATN), 0.72%; Alport's Syndrome (0.48%). Overall, MCD was the most common histological pattern in all age groups and among children with

  4. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  5. Combination therapy of exendin-4 and allogenic adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell preserved renal function in a chronic kidney disease and sepsis syndrome setting in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ben-Chung; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Shao, Pei-Lin; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Yang, Chih-Chao; Lin, Kun-Chen; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Lee, Mel S.; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2017-01-01

    Combined therapy with exendin-4 (Ex4) and allogenic adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) was tested against either therapy alone for protecting kidney function against chronic kidney disease (CKD) complicated by sepsis syndrome (SS) [i.e., by intraperitoneal injection of cecal-derived bacteria (1.0 × 104) cells/milliliter/total 5.0 cc].Adult-male-Sprague Dawley rats (n=36) were equally divided into group 1 (sham-control), group 2 (CKD), group 3 (CKD-SS), group 4 (CKD-SS-Ex4), group 5 (CKD-SS-ADMSC) and group 6 (CKD-SS-Ex4-ADMSC). At day 42 after CKD induction SS was induced. Thirty-minutes after SS induction, ADMSCs (2.0 ×106 cells) were intravenously administered to groups 5 and 6. Ex4 (10 μg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered groups 4 and 6 at 30 min and days 1 to 5 after SS induction. Animals were euthanized at day 47 after CKD induction. Kidney-injury score, collagen-deposition area, and creatinine/BUN levels were lowest in group 1, highest in group 3 and significantly higher in group 2 than in groups 4 to 6 in a progressively increasing manner (all P<0.0001). Protein expressions of inflammatory (MMP-9/TNF-α/NF-κB/IL-1ß/ICAM-1), oxidative-stress (NOX-1/NOX-2/oxidized protein), apoptotic (mitochondrial-Bax/cleaved-caspase-3/cleaved-PARP) and fibrotic/DNA-damaged (Smad3/TGF-ß/γ-H2AX) biomarkers showed an identical pattern, whereas anti-fibrotic (BMP-2/Smad1/5), anti-apoptotic/endothelial-integrity (Bcl-2/eNOS) and podocyte-integrity (ZO-1/p-cadherin) biomarkers exhibited an opposite pattern of kidney-injury score among the six groups (all P>0.0001). Cellular expressions of inflammatory (CD14/CD68) and glomerulus/tubular-injury (WT-1/KIM-1) biomarkers displayed an identical pattern, whereas glomerulus/podocyte-component (dystroglycan/nephrin/ZO-1/fibronectin/p-cadherin) biomarkers showed an opposite kidney-injury score among the six groups (all P<0.0001). In conclusion, Ex4-ADMSC therapy effectively preserved renal function in the CKD

  6. [Chronic kidney disease in the source documentation of the outpatient clinic Department of Nephrology. Part I. Causes of renal failure and characteristics of the studied population].

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Januszek, Rafał; Wieczorek-Surdacka, Ewa; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    During the last years the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is permanently increasing and has become a global social and economical problem in the world as well as in Poland. The aim of the study was the retrospective analysis of medical records of patients with renal failure under supervision at the outpatient clinic, Department of Nephrology, University Hospital in Cracow. The study population enclosed 1183 patients (640 men and 543 women) aged between 17 and 98 years (mean 64.7) with creatinine concentration >120 micromol/l and/or creatinine clearance <90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Hemoglobin, iron, creatinine, urea, sodium, potasium, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, PTH, uric acid, albumin, total protein, bilirubin, glucose, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, triglicerydes concentration and values of hematocrite, MCV, HbA1, as well as alkaline phosphatase, AspAT, AIAT activity were estimated based on standard laboratory methods. Creatinine clearances were evaluated based on 3 different methods: simplified MDRD formula, Cockcroft-Gault formula and 24-h urine collection. Mean creatinine concentration in the studied population was 172.8 micromol/l (1.95 mg/dl). Hypertension was diagnosed in 65% of patients. In spite of treatment, more than half of the patients (51.9%) have increased systolic blood pressure and above 1/3 (35%) increased diastolic blood pressure. Mean hemoglobin concentration was 13.02 g/dl; more than 12% of patients had decreased hemoglobin below 11 g/dl. Mean values of parameters discovering calcium-phosphate metabolism were: calcium--2.33 mmol/l, phosphate--1.23 mmol/l and parathormon--169.3 pg/ml. Increased value of total serum cholesterol level was noted more than half of the patients (56.5%). Significant positive correlations were found between GFR calculated based on Cockcroft-Gault formula and BMI, hemoglobin, hematocrite, serum iron, diastolic blood pressure, total and LDL serum cholesterol, triglicerydes level, as well as AIAT activity

  7. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The "Nutritional Light Signal" of the Renal Acid Load.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-17

    Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T -test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP ( p < 0.0001), DBP ( p < 0.001), plasma urea ( p < 0.0001) protein intake ( p < 0.0001), calcemia ( p < 0.0001), phosphatemia ( p < 0.0001), phosphate intake ( p < 0.0001), urinary sodium ( p < 0.0001), urinary potassium ( p < 0.002), and urinary phosphate ( p < 0.0001). NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks-the "acid load dietary traffic

  8. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The “Nutritional Light Signal” of the Renal Acid Load

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p < 0.0001), DBP (p < 0.001), plasma urea (p < 0.0001) protein intake (p < 0.0001), calcemia (p < 0.0001), phosphatemia (p < 0.0001), phosphate intake (p < 0.0001), urinary sodium (p < 0.0001), urinary potassium (p < 0.002), and urinary phosphate (p < 0.0001). NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. Conclusion: VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks

  9. Complications and Mortality in Chronic Renal Failure Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Comparison Between Dialysis and Renal Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Chen, Antonia F; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Post, Zachary D; Orozco, Fabio R; Ong, Alvin C

    2016-02-01

    In total joint arthroplasty (TJA) literature, there is a paucity of large cohort studies comparing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-CKD/ESRD patients. Thus, the purposes of this study were (1) to identify inhospital complications and mortality in CKD/ESRD and non-CKD/ESRD patients and (2) compare inhospital complications and mortality between dialysis and renal transplantation patients undergoing TJA. We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for patients with and without diagnosis of CKD/ESRD and those with a renal transplant or on dialysis undergoing primary or revision total knee or hip arthroplasty from 2007 to 2011. Patient comorbidities were identified using the Elixhauser comorbidity index. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes were used to identify postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs), wound complications, deep vein thrombosis, and transfusions. Chronic kidney disease/ESRD was associated with greater risk of SSIs (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; P<.001), wound complications (OR, 1.1; P=.01), transfusions (OR, 1.6; P<.001), deep vein thrombosis (OR, 1.4; P=.03), and mortality (OR, 2.1; P<.001) than non-CKD/ESRD patients. Dialysis patients had higher rates of SSI, wound complications, transfusions, and mortality compared to renal transplant patients. Chronic kidney disease/ESRD patients had a greater risk of SSIs and wound complications compared to those without renal disease, and the risk of these complications was even greater in CKD/ESRD patients receiving dialysis. These findings emphasize the importance of counseling CKD patients about higher potential complications after TJA, and dialysis patients may be encouraged to undergo renal transplantation before TJA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum lipoprotein changes in dogs with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Behling-Kelly, E

    2014-01-01

    People with renal disease develop a dyslipidemia that contributes to progression of renal injury and development of cardiovascular disease. Lipoproteins in dogs with renal disease have not been investigated. Dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have dyslipidemia characterized by increased lower density lipoproteins and decreased high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). The degree of dyslipidemia is positively correlated with severity of disease, as reflected by serum creatinine concentration. Prospective study of client-owned dogs presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals: 29 dogs with confirmed CKD, 5 dogs with nephrotic syndrome (NS), and 12 healthy control dogs presented for routine vaccinations, dental cleaning, or owned by students. Lipoprotein electrophoresis was used to quantify relative proportions of the 3 main classes of lipoproteins in canine serum: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and HDL. Serum cholesterol and creatinine concentrations; urinalysis and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured by standard methods. Dyslipidemia was consistently found in dogs with CKD and NS and was characterized by a decrease in HDL and variable increases in LDL and VLDL. Dogs with NS had a proportionately greater increase in the VLDL fraction, as compared with dogs with CKD. Dyslipidemia similar to that documented in people with renal disease occurs in dogs with CKD, despite serum cholesterol concentrations often being within the reference interval. The contribution of altered lipoproteins to the pathogenesis of renal disease in dogs warrants additional study. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Clinical outcome of renal artery stenting for hypertension and chronic kidney disease up to 12 months in the J-RAS Study – prospective, single-arm, multicenter clinical study.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Masahiko; Yokoi, Yoshiaki; Abe, Takaaki; Soga, Yoshimitsu; Yamashita, Takehiro; Miyashita, Yusuke; Nakamura, Masato; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) causes renovascular hypertension (HTN) and impairs renal function, leading to chronic kidney disease (CKD). The J-RAS study was a prospective, multicenter study to assess the clinical outcome of renal artery stenting for up to 1 year in Japanese patients with ARAS. One hundred and forty-nine patients were enrolled between November 2010 and January 2013. The patients were classified into an HTN (n=121) group and a CKD (n=108) group in the primary analysis. The primary efficacy endpoints were change in blood pressure for the HTN group and change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for the CKD group at 1 months. The primary safety endpoint was freedom from major cardiovascular or renal events at 12 months. In the HTN group, the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly decreased from 161.6 ± 21 mmHg at baseline to 137.0 ± 21 mmHg (P<0.0001). In the CKD group, there was no significant difference in eGFR from 40.7 ± 10 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)at baseline to 40.8 ± 13 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)(P=0.32). The primary safety endpoint was 89.4% at 12 months. In the J-RAS trial, significant SBP reduction was seen in the HTN group, and stabilization of renal function in the CKD group. Renal artery stenting for ARAS is safe and effective in Japanese patients.

  12. [Chronic kidney disease and dyslipidaemia].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Vicente; Serrano, Adalberto; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Ascaso, Juan; Barrios, Vivencio; Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Cases, Aleix

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has to be considered as a high, or even very high risk cardiovascular risk condition, since it leads to an increase in cardiovascular mortality that continues to increase as the disease progresses. An early diagnosis of CKD is required, together with an adequate identification of the risk factors, in order to slow down its progression to more severe states, prevent complications, and to delay, whenever possible, the need for renal replacement therapy. Dyslipidaemia is a factor of the progression of CKD that increases the risk in developing atherosclerosis and its complications. Its proper control contributes to reducing the elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality presented by these patients. In this review, an assessment is made of the lipid-lowering therapeutic measures required to achieve to recommended objectives, by adjusting the treatment to the progression of the disease and to the characteristics of the patient. In CKD, it seems that an early and intensive intervention of the dyslipidaemia is a priority before there is a significant decrease in kidney function. Treatment with statins has been shown to be safe and effective in decreasing LDL-Cholesterol, and in the reduction of cardiovascular events in individuals with CKD, or after renal transplant, although there is less evidence in the case of dialysed patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND PREGNANCY--A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Amaliev, G M; Uchikova, E; Malinova, M

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic renal failure is a complex therapeutic problem requiring a multidisciplinary approach. It is associated with a higher risk of many perinatal complications. The most common abnormalities are related to: progression of renal failure, development of preeclampsia development of nephrotic syndrome, anemic syndrome, IUGR and fetal death. The prognosis depends on the values of serum creatinine prior to pregnancy, the degree of deterioration of renal function, development of additional obstetric complications and the specific etiological reasons that have led to the occurrence of renal failure. Determining the optimum time for authorization birth depends on the condition of the mother, the condition of the fetus and the rate of progression of renal failure, and the deadline the pregnancy should be terminated is 35 weeks. We present a case of a patient with chronic renal failure, with favorable perinatal outcome.

  14. Association between vascular access creation and deceleration of estimated glomerular filtration rate decline in late-stage chronic kidney disease patients transitioning to end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Keiichi; Molnar, Miklos Z; Potukuchi, Praveen K; Thomas, Fridtjof; Lu, Jun Ling; Ravel, Vanessa A; Soohoo, Melissa; Rhee, Connie M; Streja, Elani; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2017-08-01

    Prior studies have suggested that arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or graft (AVG) creation may be associated with slowing of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline. It is unclear if this is attributable to the physiological benefits of a mature access on systemic circulation versus confounding factors. We examined a nationwide cohort of 3026 US veterans with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) transitioning to dialysis between 2007 and 2011 who had a pre-dialysis AVF/AVG and had at least three outpatient eGFR measurements both before and after AVF/AVG creation. Slopes of eGFR were estimated using mixed-effects models adjusted for fixed and time-dependent confounders, and compared separately for the pre- and post-AVF/AVG period overall and in patients stratified by AVF/AVG maturation. In all, 3514 patients without AVF/AVG who started dialysis with a catheter served as comparators, using an arbitrary 6-month index date before dialysis initiation to assess change in eGFR slopes. Of the 3026 patients with AVF/AVG (mean age 67 years, 98% male, 75% diabetic), 71% had a mature AVF/AVG at dialysis initiation. eGFR decline accelerated in the last 6 months prior to dialysis in patients with a catheter (median, from -6.0 to -16.3 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, P < 0.001), while a significant deceleration of eGFR decline was seen after vascular access creation in those with AVF/AVG (median, from -5.6 to -4.1 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, P < 0.001). Findings were independent of AVF/AVG maturation status and were robust in adjusted models. The creation of pre-dialysis AVF/AVG appears to be associated with eGFR slope deceleration and, consequently, may delay the onset of dialysis initiation in advanced CKD patients. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

  16. Chronic renal failure in a patient with bilateral ureterocele

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Samuel A.; Rafiu, Mojeed O.; Olanrewaju, Timothy O.

    2015-01-01

    Ureterocele is a congenital anomaly, in which there is mal-development of the caudal segments of the ureter. There is a female preponderance with most cases seen in Caucasians. Among the reported complications of this condition, chronic renal failure occurring in the setting of ureterocele has not been well documented. We report a case of a young girl with bilateral ureterocele presenting with chronic renal failure, whose management presented a diagnostic failure and inadequate treatment. PMID:26108593

  17. AGXT2 rs37369 polymorphism predicts the renal function in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Li, Mu-Peng; Yang, Yong-Long; Kuang, Da-Bin; Li, He; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Jiang, Chun; Peng, Li-Ming; Qi, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-12-30

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are often accompanied with varying degrees of renal diseases. The purpose of this study was to identify rs37369 polymorphism of AGXT2 specific to the renal function of CHF patients. A total of 1012 southern Chinese participants, including 487 CHF patients without history of renal diseases and 525 healthy volunteers, were recruited for this study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to determine the genotypes of AGXT2 rs37369 polymorphism. Levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) were detected to indicate the renal function of the participants. BUN level was significantly higher in CHF patients without history of renal diseases compared with healthy volunteers (p=0.000). And the similar result was also obtained for SCr (p=0.000). Besides, our results indicated that the level of BUN correlated significantly with SCr in both the CHF patients without renal diseases (r=0.4533, p<0.0001) and volunteers (r=0.2489, p<0.0001). Furthermore, we found that the AGXT2 rs37369 polymorphism could significantly affect the level of BUN in CHF patients without history of renal diseases (p=0.036, AA+AG vs GG). Patients with rs37369 GG genotype showed a significantly reduced level of BUN compared to those with the AA genotype (p=0.024), and the significant difference was still observed in the smokers of CHF patients without renal diseases (p=0.023). In conclusion, we found that CHF might induce the impairment of kidney and cause deterioration of renal function. AGXT2 rs37369 polymorphism might affect the renal function of CHF patients free from renal diseases, especially in patients with cigarette smoking. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Urinary Angiostatin - A Novel Putative Marker of Renal Pathology Chronicity in Lupus Nephritis*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianfu; Du, Yong; Han, Jie; Singh, Sandeep; Xie, Chun; Guo, Yuyuan; Zhou, Xin J.; Ahn, Chul; Saxena, Ramesh; Mohan, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need to identify biomarkers for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) which has a high prevalence of renal failure. When urine from patients with lupus nephritis was recently screened for the levels of ∼280 molecules using an exploratory array-based proteomic platform, elevated angiostatin levels were noted. Angiostatin is a bioactive fragment of plasminogen, and has been known to have modulatory function in angiogenesis and inflammation. The significant elevation in urinary angiostatin was next validated in an independent cohort of SLE patients (n = 100) using ELISA. Among patients with SLE, urine angiostatin was significantly increased in active SLE compared with inactive SLE, correlating well with the SLEDAI disease activity index and SLICC renal activity score (r = 0.66, p < 0.0001). ROC curve analysis further confirmed that urinary angiostatin had the capacity to discriminate patients with active SLE from those with inactive disease. Patients with Class IV lupus nephritis exhibited the highest levels of urinary angiostatin. Immunohistochemistry staining localized angiostatin expression to the renal tubular cells in these patients. Finally, when paired urine-kidney samples procured concurrently from patients with LN were next examined, urine angiostatin levels correlated strongly with the renal pathology chronicity index, but not with the activity index. Given that Class IV lupus nephritis and renal pathology chronicity changes forebode poor renal and patient survival, urinary angiostatin emerges as a novel noninvasive marker of renal disease in SLE. Longitudinal studies are in progress to further assess the disease-predictive potential of urinary angiostatin. PMID:23345539

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... If My Kidneys Fail? Clinical Trials Managing Chronic Kidney Disease If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), ... hard, but it’s worthwhile. Ten ways to manage kidney disease Control your blood pressure Meet your blood ...

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  1. [Chronic renal failure in sickle cell disease: A retrospective analysis of 100 adults sickle cell patients from black Africa].

    PubMed

    Ackoundou-N'Guessan, Clément; Guei, Cyr Monley; Lagou, Delphine Amélie; Gbekedi, Serges; Tia, Mélanie Weu; Coulibaly, Pessa Albert; Nzoue, Sita; Konan, Serges; Koffi, Gustave; Gnionsahe, Daze Apollinaire

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of chronic renal failure (CRF) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients could vary from one country to another depending on the modalities of management. The aim of the present study was to appreciate the epidemiology of CRF in SCD patients from black Africa in order to search for promoting factors. One hundred SCD adult patients have been considered for the study. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has been estimated according to the CKD-EPI formula. Three groups of patients have been identified according to the value of their GFR. The mean age of the patients was 30.84±8.26 years. Male gender has represented 51% of the study population. The mean GFR value was 175.4±86.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2). The prevalence of CRF was 11%. About 3% of them had severe CRF. Subjects with normal GFR were 20%. Subjects with glomerular hyperfiltration (HF) were 69%. By univariate analysis, when subjects with HF were compared with those presenting normal GFR, the following factors have appeared to be significantly associated: female gender (female 60.9% versus male 39.1%; P<0.01), weight <60 kg (weight <60 kg; 53.67±9.45 kg versus weight >60 kg; 59.9±9.41 kg; P<0.008), age <30 years (younger age 29.36±7.9 years versus older age 35.14±8.02 years; P<0.001), lower hemoglobin value (9.38±2,3 g/dL versus 10.33±2.61 g/dL; P<0.04). By logistic regression analysis, age <30 years (age >30 years; OR=0.12 [CI95% 0.03-04]; P<0.001), female gender (male gender; OR=0.17 [0.04-0.64]; P<0.01), weight <60 kg (weight >60 kg; OR=0.19 [CI95% 0.05-0.72]; P<0.01) were associated with HF. By univariate analysis, when subjects with CRF were compared with those presenting normal GFR, a lower hemoglobin value was significantly associated with CRF (7.92±2.7 g/dL versus 10.43±2.5 g/dL; P<0.009). There was a trend for subjects not being under maintenance therapy to more experience CRF (36.4% versus 70%; P<0.07). By logistic regression analysis, only a low hemoglobin value was

  2. Hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2014-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major problem associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and is often a major barrier to achieving optimal glycemic control. Chronic kidney disease not only is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia but also augments the risk of hypoglycemia that is already present in people with diabetes. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic considerations in this situation. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for literature published in English from January 1989 to May 2014 for diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and chronic renal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetic nephropathy. Is end-stage renal disease inevitable?

    PubMed

    Bogusky, R T

    1983-10-01

    The appearance of proteinuria in an insulin-dependent diabetic patient is an ominous sign. Proteinuria heralds the presence of diabetic nephropathy and early death, or chronic renal failure requiring dialysis or transplantation, in 50% of patients. The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is unknown. Adequate insulin administration is the most important preventive measure. Hypertension, if present, should be aggressively treated to delay progression of renal disease. Good nutrition, prompt treatment of urinary tract infections, and caution in the use of radiocontrast agents are other important preventive measures. Hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and transplantation are options for patients with end-stage renal disease. No matter which is selected, the patient may still have multiple amputations, blindness, congestive heart failure, infections, and uncontrolled glycemia. Advancements are being made, however, that promise a better future for insulin-dependent diabetics.

  4. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  5. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  6. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  7. SECRETED KLOTHO AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming Chang; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble Klotho (sKl) in the circulation can be generated directly by alterative splicing of the Klotho transcript or the extracellular domain of membrane Klotho can be released from membrane-anchored Klotho on the cell surface. Unlike membrane Klotho which functions as a coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), sKl, acts as hormonal factor and plays important roles in anti-aging, anti-oxidation, modulation of ion transport, and Wnt signaling. Emerging evidence reveals that Klotho deficiency is an early biomarker for chronic kidney diseases as well as a pathogenic factor. Klotho deficiency is associated with progression and chronic complications in chronic kidney disease including vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In multiple experimental models, replacement of sKl, or manipulated up-regulation of endogenous Klotho protect the kidney from renal insults, preserve kidney function, and suppress renal fibrosis, in chronic kidney disease. Klotho is a highly promising candidate on the horizon as an early biomarker, and as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease. PMID:22396167

  8. Chinese herbal medicine Shenqi Detoxification Granule inhibits fibrosis in adenine induced chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min; Cai, Pingping; Ma, Hongbo; Meng, Hongyan; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Si, Guomin

    2014-01-01

    Progressive fibrosis accompanies all chronic renal disease, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF,) and platelet-derived growth factor-B, (PDGF-B,) play important roles in extra-cellular matrix abnormal accumulation, while endothelin-1 (ET-1) nitric oxide (NO,) are related to endothelial dysfunction, which mediates the progression of renal fibrosis. Shenqi Detoxification Granule (SDG), a traditional Chinese herbal formula, has been used for treatment of chronic renal failure in clinic for many years. In order to evaluate the efficacy, and explore the mechanism of SDG to inhibit the progression of renal fibrosis, study was carried out using the adenine-induced Wister rats as the CRF model, and losartan as postive control drug. Levels of serum creatinine [Scr], and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), albumin (ALB), 24hrs, urine protein (24hUP), triacylglycerol (TG), and cholesterol (CHO), together with ET-1, and NO were detected. Pathological changes of renal tissues were observed by HE, staining. In addition, CTGF and PDGF-B expression were analyzed by immuno-histo-chemistry. The results indicated that SDG can effectively reduce Scr, BUN, 24hUP, TG, and CHO levels, increase ALB levels, inhibit renal tissue damage in CRF rats, and the mechanism maybe reduce PDGF-B, CTGF expression and ET-1/NO. Shenqi Detoxification Granule is a beneficial treatment for chronic renal failure.

  9. Serum Lipase as Clinical Laboratory Index for Chronic Renal Failure Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Dong, Jing; Wang, Ping; Huang, Huifang; Jin, Xiaohua; Zhou, Jingou; Shi, Jingfang; Gu, Guohao; Chen, Jun; Xu, Jun; Song, Yanhui

    2016-07-01

    Measuring the level of serum lipase has been used for the clinical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Reports showed that the serum lipase level increased in patients of clinical renal failure. In this study, we aimed to measure the change of serum lipase levels in chronic kidney diseases and determine whether it could serve as a clinical laboratory index for clinical renal failure diagnosis. Materials: The OLYMPUS AU5400 automatic biochemical analyzer was used to determine the serum levels of lipase and creatinine. The study included 120 cases in the clinical renal failure group, 76 cases in the nephrotic syndrome group, 81 cases in the chronic nephritis group, and 80 healthy controls from our hospital volunteers in the same period. We then compared the lipase levels and conducted statistical analyses among these groups. The serum lipase levels were 15.3 U/L, 79.8 U/L, 45.1 U/L, and 51.0 U/L in the normal control, clinical renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, and chronic nephritis groups, respectively. The lipase levels in the groups with diseases were significantly different compared with that of the normal control group (p < 0.01). The lipase level of the clinical renal failure group was significantly higher than that of the nephrotic syndrome group and chronic nephritis group (p < 0.01). However, no statistically significant difference between the nephrotic syndrome and chronic nephritis group (p > 0.05) was observed. Moreover, an association of the serum lipase with disease progression was observed in the study. Serum lipase is an effective serological index which can reflect the clinical changes in the clinical renal failure and tends to increase through the progression of renal dysfunction.

  10. The Renal Histopathology Spectrum of Elderly Patients with Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Fu-de; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population has significantly increased in China. However, data regarding renal histopathology in this population is lacking. The present study retrospectively analyzed renal disease spectrum of 430 elderly patients who had received renal biopsy at Peking University First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2012. Among 6049 patients receiving renal biopsies during the same period, 430 (7.10%) were elderly (≥65 years). The ratio of male (263 patients) to female (167 patients) was 1.57:1, with an age of 70.29 ± 3.99 (range 65–82) years at the time of biopsy. The most common indication for renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (59.53%), followed by acute kidney injury (AKI, 19.53%) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN, 16.05%). The most common renal histopathology in primary glomerular disease was idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN, 61.02%), followed by IgA nephropathy (18.22%), minimal change disease (MCD, 9.32%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (6.78%). ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV, 43.95%) was the leading secondary glomerular disease, followed by HBV-related glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN, 24.2%), and amyloidosis (14.01%). In patients with nephrotic syndrome, iMN (50%) was the leading cause, followed by HBV-GN (16.02%), MCD (7.81%), and amyloidosis (7.81%). In patients with iMN, 89.5% presented as nephrotic syndrome, 8.39% as CGN. In patients with AKI, the leading cause was AAV (48.12%), followed by acute interstitial nephritis (20.48%) and acute tubular necrosis (8.43%). In conclusion, in elderly Chinese patients, the most common renal histopathology pattern was iMN in patients with nephrotic syndrome, and AAV in patients with AKI. PMID:25526441

  11. Diarrheal Diseases - Acute and Chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic / Diarrheal Diseases – Acute and Chronic Diarrheal Diseases – Acute and Chronic Basics Resources Overview Acute diarrhea is ... bulky, greasy or very bad smelling stools. Causes – Acute Diarrhea Most cases of acute, watery diarrhea are ...

  12. Baseline characteristics in the Bardoxolone methyl EvAluation in patients with Chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Occurrence of renal eveNts (BEACON) trial.

    PubMed

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Chertow, Glenn M; Akizawa, Tadao; Audhya, Paul; Bakris, George L; Goldsberry, Angie; Krauth, Melissa; Linde, Peter; McMurray, John J; Meyer, Colin J; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Christ-Schmidt, Heidi; Toto, Robert D; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wanner, Christoph; Wittes, Janet; Wrolstad, Danielle; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most important contributing cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Bardoxolone methyl, a nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 activator, augments estimated glomerular filtration. The Bardoxolone methyl EvAluation in patients with Chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Occurrence of renal eveNts (BEACON) trial was designed to establish whether bardoxolone methyl slows or prevents progression to ESRD. Herein, we describe baseline characteristics of the BEACON population. BEACON is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in 2185 patients with T2DM and chronic kidney disease stage 4 (eGFR between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) designed to test the hypothesis that bardoxolone methyl added to guideline-recommended treatment including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system slows or prevents progression to ESRD or cardiovascular death compared with placebo. Baseline characteristics (mean or percentage) of the population include age 68.5 years, female 43%, Caucasian 78%, eGFR 22.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and systolic/diastolic blood pressure 140/70 mmHg. The median urinary albumin:creatinine ratio was 320 mg/g and the frequency of micro- and macroalbuminuria was 30 and 51%, respectively. Anemia, abnormalities in markers of bone metabolism and elevations in cardiovascular biomarkers were frequently observed. A history of cardiovascular disease was present in 56%, neuropathy in 47% and retinopathy in 41% of patients. The BEACON trial enrolled a population heretofore unstudied in an international randomized controlled trial. Enrolled patients suffered with numerous co-morbid conditions and exhibited multiple laboratory abnormalities, highlighting the critical need for new therapies to optimize management of these conditions.

  13. What happens to the heart in chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, E; Mark, P B

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The increased risk of cardiovascular disease seen in this population is attributable to both traditional and novel vascular risk factors. Risk of sudden cardiac or arrhythmogenic death is greatly exaggerated in chronic kidney disease, particularly in patients with end stage renal disease where the risk is roughly 20 times that of the general population. The reasons for this increased risk are not entirely understood and while atherosclerosis is accelerated in the presence of chronic kidney disease, premature myocardial infarction does not solely account for the excess risk. Recent work demonstrates that the structure and function of the heart starts to alter early in chronic kidney disease, independent of other risk factors. The implications of cardiac remodelling and hypertrophy may predispose chronic kidney disease patients to heart failure, arrhythmia and myocardial ischaemia. Further research is needed to minimise cardiovascular risk associated with structural and functional heart disease associated with chronic kidney disease.

  14. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Weight management strategies for those with chronic kidney disease - a consensus report from the Asia Pacific Society of Nephrology and Australia and New Zealand Society of Nephrology 2016 renal dietitians meeting.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kelly; Beer, Jo; Dumont, Ruth; Hewitt, Katie; Manley, Karen; Meade, Anthony; Salamon, Karen; Campbell, Katrina

    2017-07-25

    Develop a consensus report to guide dietetic management of overweight or obese individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Six statements relating weight management in CKD guided a comprehensive review of the literature. A summary of the evidence was then presented at the renal nutrition meeting of the 2016 Asia Pacific Society of Nephrology and Australia and New Zealand Society of Nephrology. Majority agreement was defined as group agreement on a statement of between 50-74%, and consensus was considered ≥ 75% agreement. The recommendations were developed via a mini Delphi process. Two statements achieved group consensus: the current guidelines used by dietitians to estimate energy requirements for overweight and obese people with CKD are not relevant and weight loss medications may be unsafe or ineffective in isolation for those with CKD. One statement achieved group agreement: Meal replacement formulas are safe and efficacious in those with CKD. No agreement was achieved on the statements of whether there is strong evidence of benefit for weight loss prior to kidney transplantation; whether traditional weight loss strategies can be used in those with CKD and if bariatric surgery in those with end stage kidney disease is feasible and effective. There is a limited evidence base to guide the dietetic management of overweight and obese individuals with CKD. Medical or surgical strategies to facilitate weight loss are not recommended in isolation and require a multidisciplinary approach with the involvement of a skilled renal dietitian. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of febuxostat to prevent a further reduction in renal function of patients with hyperuricemia who have never had gout and are complicated by chronic kidney disease stage 3: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for the onset of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is significantly associated with the progression of CKD. However, there is no sufficient evidence by interventional research supporting a cause-effect relationship. Hyperuricemic patients without gouty arthritis, whose serum urate (SUA) concentration is ≥8.0 mg/dL and who have a complication, are treated by pharmacotherapy in addition to lifestyle guidance. Nevertheless, there is no evidence that rationalizes pharmacotherapy for patients with hyperuricemia who have no complication and whose SUA concentration is below 9.0 mg/dL. Methods/Design The FEATHER (FEbuxostat versus placebo rAndomized controlled Trial regarding reduced renal function in patients with Hyperuricemia complicated by chRonic kidney disease stage 3) study is a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of febuxostat—a novel, nonpurine, selective, xanthine oxidase inhibitor. The present study will enroll, at 64 medical institutions in Japan, 400 Japanese patients aged 20 years or older who have hyperuricemia without gouty arthritis, who present CKD stage 3, and whose SUA concentration is 7.1-10.0 mg/dL. Patients are randomly assigned to either the febuxostat or the control group, in which febuxostat tablets and placebo are administered orally, respectively. The dosage of the study drugs should be one 10-mg tablet/day at weeks 1 to 4 after study initiation, increased to one 20-mg tablet/day at weeks 5 to 8, and elevated to one 40-mg tablet/day at week 9 and then maintained until week 108. The primary endpoint is estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. The secondary endpoints include the amount and percent rate of change in eGFR from baseline to week 108, the amount and percent rate of change in SUA concentration from baseline to week 108, the proportion of patients who achieved an SUA concentration ≤6.0 mg/dL, and the incidence of renal function

  17. Coexistent findings of renal glomerular disease with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Koçak, Gülay; Huddam, Bülent; Azak, Alper; Ortabozkoyun, Levent; Duranay, Murat

    2012-05-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is a common autoimmune thyroid disease with a female preponderance. Renal involvement in HT is not uncommon. In the present study, we aimed to define the frequency and characteristics of the glomerular diseases associated with HT and further the understanding of any common pathogenesis between HT and glomerular disease. We reviewed retrospectively 28 patients with HT who were referred to our Department because of unexplained haematuria, proteinuria or renal impairment from 2007 to 2011. Routine laboratory investigations including blood count, serum biochemistry, urinalysis and 24-h urinary protein excretion were performed on all patients. Renal biopsy was performed in 20 patients with HT, and the specimens were examined by light microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. We detected four cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), four membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), two minimal-change disease (MCD), three immunoglobulin A nephritis (IgAN), three chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) and one amyloidosis. In three patients, the renal biopsy findings were nonspecific. Daily urinary protein excretion and glomerular filtration rates were found to be independent of the level of thyroid hormone and thyroid-specific autoantibodies. Glomerular pathologies associated with HT are similar to those in the general population, the most common lesions being MGN, FSGS and IgA nephritis. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan ® Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  19. [Atheroembolism renal disease: diagnosis and etiologic factors].

    PubMed

    Granata, A; Insalaco, M; Di Pietro, F; Di Rosa, S; Romano, G; Scuderi, R

    2012-07-01

    Atheromatous renal disease is the major cause of renal insufficiency in the elderly, and cholesterol embolism is a manifestation of this disease. Cholesterol embolism occurs in patients suffering from diffuse erosive atherosclerosis, usually after triggering causes, such as aortic surgery, arterial invasive procedures (angiography, left heart catheterization and coronary angioplasty) and anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy. It is characterized by occlusion of small arteries with cholesterol emboli deriving from eroded atheromatous plaques of the aorta or large feeder arteries. The proximity of the kidneys to the abdominal aorta and the large renal blood supply make the kidney a frequent target organ for cholesterol atheroembolism. The exact incidence of atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is not known. The reported incidence AERD varied in the literature because of the differences in study design and the different criteria used for making the diagnosis. Retrospective data derived from autopsy or biopsy studies may exaggerate the frequency by including many subclinical cases. Clinical observations that are based on a short duration of follow-up after an invasive vascular procedure and the infrequency of the confirmatory renal biopsies can lead to an underestimation of the true incidence of AERD. The initial signs and symptoms in patients diagnosed with cholesterol embolism were blue toes syndrome, livedo reticularis, gangrene, leg, toe or foot pain, abdominal pain and flank or back pain, gross haematuria, accelerated hypertension and renal failure. Cholesterol embolism may also be associated with fever, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and eosinophilia. Thus, in the cases of spontaneous cholesterol embolism, differential diagnosis includes, polyarteritis nodosa, allergic vasculitis and subacute bacterial endocarditis. Skin and renal biopsy specimens are the best sample for histologic diagnosis. There is, at present, no pharmacological treatments shown to be

  20. Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with renal and cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Ragusa, Angela; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Buccheri, Maria Antonietta; Di Nora, Concetta; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T gene polymorphism and hyperhomocysteinemia for the development of renal failure and cardiovascular events, which are controversial. METHODS: We challenged the relationship, if any, of MTHFR 677C>T and MTHFR 1298A>C polymorphisms with renal and heart function. The present article is a reappraisal of these concepts, investigating within a larger population, and including a subgroup of dialysis patients, if the two most common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C, as homozygous, heterozygous or with a compound heterozygous state, show different association with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. MTHFR polymorphism could be a favorable evolutionary factor, i.e., a protective factor for many ominous conditions, like cancer and renal failure. A similar finding was reported in fatty liver disease in which it is suggested that MTHFR polymorphisms could have maintained and maintain their persistence by an heterozygosis advantage mechanism. We studied a total of 630 Italian Caucasian subject aged 54.60 ± 16.35 years, addressing to the increased hazard of hemodialysis, if any, according to the studied MTHFR genetic polymorphisms. RESULTS: A favorable association with normal renal function of MTHFR polymorphisms, and notably of MTHFR C677T is present independently of the negative effects of left ventricular hypertrophy, increased Intra-Renal arterial Resistance and hyperparathyroidism. CONCLUSION: MTHFR gene polymorphisms could have a protective role on renal function as suggested by their lower frequency among our dialysis patients in end-stage renal failure; differently, the association with left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced left ventricular relaxation suggest some type of indirect, or concurrent mechanism. PMID:25664255

  1. Effect of calcium channels blockers and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system on renal outcomes and mortality in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Jin; Li, Yan; Liu, Shan-Mei; Sun, Xiang-Guo; Li, Min; Hao, Yan; Cui, Lian-Qun; Wang, Ai-Hong

    2016-07-01

    The renoprotective effect of inhibitors of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been identified through placebo-controlled trials. However, the effect of calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) on renal system is still controversial. Our current meta-analysis includes available evidences to compare the effect of dihydropyridine CCBs and ACEIs or ARBs on renal outcomes and mortality. We also further investigate whether CCBs can be used in combination with inhibitors of RAS to improve the prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Electronic databases were searched up to July 2012, for clinical randomized controlled trials, assessing the effect of dihydropyridine CCBs on the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and all-cause mortality in contrast to ACEIs or ARBs. Eight clinical trials were included containing 25,647 participants. ESRD showed significantly higher frequency with CCBs therapy compared with ACEIs or ARBs therapy, though blood pressure was decreased similarly in both groups in every trial (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.48; p = 0.01). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the incidence of all-cause mortality between these two groups, though ACEIs or ARBs exhibited better renoprotective effect compared to CCBs (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.89-1.03; p = 0.24). CCBs did not increase all-cause mortality incidence in patients with CKD though they displayed weaker renoprotective, compared to ACEIs or ARBs therapy. Our results suggest the combination of a CCB and an ACEI or ARB should be a preferable antihypertensive therapy in patients with CKD, considering their higher effect in decreasing blood pressure and fewer adverse metabolic problems caused.

  2. Exit site and tunnel infections in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis: findings from the Standardizing Care to Improve Outcomes in Pediatric End Stage Renal Disease (SCOPE) Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Sarah J; Neu, Alicia; Skversky Mason, Amy; Richardson, Troy; Rodean, Jonathan; Lawlor, John; Warady, Bradley; Somers, Michael J G

    2018-06-01

    The Standardizing Care to Improve Outcomes in Pediatric End Stage Renal Disease (SCOPE) Collaborative is a quality improvement initiative to reduce dialysis-associated infections. The frequency of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter exit site infection (ESI) and variables influencing its development and end result are unclear. We sought to determine ESI rates, to elucidate the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes for ESI, and to assess for association between provider compliance with care bundles and ESI risk. We reviewed demographic, dialysis and ESI data, and care bundle adherence and outcomes for SCOPE enrollees from October 2011 to September 2014. ESI involved only the exit site, only the subcutaneous catheter tunnel, or both. A total of 857 catheter insertions occurred in 734 children over 10,110 cumulative months of PD provided to these children. During this period 207 ESIs arose in 124 children or 0.25 ESIs per dialysis year. Median time to ESI was 392 days, with 69% of ESIs involving exit site only, 23% involving the tunnel only, and 8% involving both sites. Peritonitis developed in 6%. ESI incidence was associated with age (p = 0.003), being the lowest in children aged < 2 years and highest in those aged 6-12 years, and with no documented review of site care or an exit site score  of > 0 at prior month's visit (p < 0.001). Gender, race, end stage renal disease etiology, exit site orientation, catheter cuff number or mobilization, and presence of G-tube, stoma, or vesicostomy were unassociated with ESI incidence. Of the ESIs reported, 71% resolved with treatment, 24% required hospitalization, and 9% required catheter removal, generally secondary to tunnel infection. Exit site infections occur at an annualized rate of 0.25, typically well into the dialysis course. Younger patient age and documented review of site care are associated with lower ESI rates. Although most ESIs resolve, hospitalization is frequent, and tunnel involvement

  3. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy.

  4. [Chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Thuret, R; Timsit, M O; Kleinclauss, F

    2016-11-01

    To report epidemiology and characteristics of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and renal transplant candidates, and to evaluate access to waiting list and results of renal transplantation. An exhaustive systematic review of the scientific literature was performed in the Medline database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Embase (http://www.embase.com) using different associations of the following keywords: "chronic kidney disease, epidemiology, kidney transplantation, cost, survival, graft, brain death, cardiac arrest, access, allocation". French legal documents have been reviewed using the government portal (http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr). Articles were selected according to methods, language of publication and relevance. The reference lists were used to identify additional historical studies of interest. Both prospective and retrospective series, in French and English, as well as review articles and recommendations were selected. In addition, French national transplant and health agencies (http://www.agence-biomedecine.fr and http://www.has-sante.fr) databases were screened using identical keywords. A total of 3234 articles, 6 official reports and 3 newspaper articles were identified; after careful selection 99 publications were eligible for our review. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to worsen organ shortage. Renal transplantation remains the best treatment option for ESRD, providing recipients with an increased survival and quality of life, at lower costs than other renal replacement therapies. The never-ending lengthening of the waiting list raises issues regarding treatment strategies and candidates' selection, and underlines the limits of organ sharing without additional source of kidneys available for transplantation. Allocation policies aim to reduce medical or geographical disparities regarding enrollment on a waiting list or access to an allotransplant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Perinatal complications in patients with chronic renal insufficiency on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rodríguez, Juan Gustavo; del Angel-García, Guadalupe

    2010-09-01

    Pregnant patients with chronic renal insufficiency treated with hemodialysis experience adverse perinatal results. To compare perinatal complications of patients with chronic renal insufficiency undergoing hemodialysis who become pregnant vs. the complications of women with chronic renal insufficiency not undergoing dialysis but who then require dialysis during gestation. Transversal and retrospective study that included three patients with chronic renal insufficiency on chronic hemodialysis who became pregnant (group A) and three patients with chronic renal insufficiency without hemodialysis at the time of conception but who required dialysis during gestation (group B). Perinatal results were compared. Statistical analysis was performed with measures of central tendency and dispersion and Student t-test. Group A had 25 sessions vs. group B with 29 hemodialysis sessions (p = 0.88). Maternal complications were anemia 100% (six cases), Cesarean delivery 83.3% (group A 2 cases vs. group B 2 cases), preeclampsia 50% (group A 2 cases vs. group B 1 case), uncontrolled hypertension 50% (group A 2 cases vs. group B 1 case), preterm delivery 50% (group A 2 cases vs. group B 1 case), transfusion 33.3% (group A 2 cases), polyhydramnios 33.3% (group A 1 case vs. group B 1 case) and abortion 16.6% (group A 1 case). Fetal complications included fetal loss 16.6% (group A 1 case), neonatal mortality 33.3% (group A 1 cases vs. group B 1 case), prematurity 50% (group A2 cases vs. group B 1 case), fetal distress 50% (group A 1 case vs. group B 2 cases), respiratory failure 33.3% (group A 2 cases) and fetal growth restriction 16.6% (group A 1 case). Frequency of perinatal complications is elevated in both groups.

  6. Comparative evaluation of technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal dynamic imaging versus the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation for the estimation of GFR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi; Chen, Yunshuang; Zhang, Min; Wang, Sihe; Zhang, Weiguang; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei; Sun, Xuefeng

    2018-04-01

    We compared the performance of technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) renal dynamic imaging (RDI), the MDRD equation, and the CKD EPI equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A total of 551 subjects, including CKD patients and healthy individuals, were enrolled in this study. Dual plasma sample clearance method of 99m Tc-DTPA was used as the true value for GFR (tGFR). RDI and the MDRD and CKD EPI equations for estimating GFR were compared and evaluated. Data indicate that RDI and the MDRD equation underestimated GFR and CKD EPI overestimated GFR. RDI was associated with significantly higher bias than the MDRD and CKD EPI equations. The regression coefficient, diagnostic precision, and consistency of RDI were significantly lower than either equation. RDI and the MDRD equation underestimated GFR to a greater degree in subjects with tGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m 2 compared with the results obtained from all subjects. In the tGFR60-89 ml/min/1.73 m 2 group, the precision of RDI was significantly lower than that of both equations. In the tGFR30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 group, RDI had the least bias, the most precision, and significantly higher accuracy compared with either equation. In tGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , the three methods had similar performance and were not significantly different. RDI significantly underestimates GFR and performs no better than MDRD and CKD EPI equations for GFR estimation; thus, it should not be recommended as a reference standard against which other GFR measurement methods are assessed. However, RDI better estimates GFR than either equation for individuals in the tGFR30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 group and thus may be helpful to distinguish stage 3a and 3b CKD.

  7. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... not gotten this vaccine or do not have immunity to these diseases Varicella vaccine to protect against ... doses of this vaccine or do not have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and ...

  8. Endothelin-A receptor blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental renovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kelsen, Silvia; Hall, John E; Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-07-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent renal vasoconstrictor with mitogenic properties, is upregulated by ischemia and has been shown to induce renal injury via the ET-A receptor. The potential role of ET-A blockade in chronic renovascular disease (RVD) has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. We hypothesized that chronic ET-A receptor blockade would preserve renal hemodynamics and slow the progression of injury of the stenotic kidney in experimental RVD. Renal artery stenosis, a major cause of chronic RVD, was induced in 14 pigs and observed for 6 wk. In half of the pigs, chronic ET-A blockade was initiated (RVD+ET-A, 0.75 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) at the onset of RVD. Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and perfusion were quantified in vivo after 6 wk using multidetector computer tomography. Renal microvascular density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional microcomputer tomography, and growth factors, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis were determined in renal tissue. The degree of stenosis and increase in blood pressure were similar in RVD and RVD+ET-A pigs. Renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density were decreased in the stenotic kidney but preserved by ET-A blockade, accompanied by increased renal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and downstream mediators such as phosphorilated-Akt, angiopoietins, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ET-A blockade also reduced renal apoptosis, inflammation, and glomerulosclerosis. This study shows that ET-A blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental RVD and preserves renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density in the stenotic kidney. These results support a role for ET-1/ET-A as a potential therapeutic target in chronic RVD.

  9. Endothelin-A receptor blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental renovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelsen, Silvia; Hall, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent renal vasoconstrictor with mitogenic properties, is upregulated by ischemia and has been shown to induce renal injury via the ET-A receptor. The potential role of ET-A blockade in chronic renovascular disease (RVD) has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. We hypothesized that chronic ET-A receptor blockade would preserve renal hemodynamics and slow the progression of injury of the stenotic kidney in experimental RVD. Renal artery stenosis, a major cause of chronic RVD, was induced in 14 pigs and observed for 6 wk. In half of the pigs, chronic ET-A blockade was initiated (RVD+ET-A, 0.75 mg·kg−1·day−1) at the onset of RVD. Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and perfusion were quantified in vivo after 6 wk using multidetector computer tomography. Renal microvascular density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional microcomputer tomography, and growth factors, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis were determined in renal tissue. The degree of stenosis and increase in blood pressure were similar in RVD and RVD+ET-A pigs. Renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density were decreased in the stenotic kidney but preserved by ET-A blockade, accompanied by increased renal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and downstream mediators such as phosphorilated-Akt, angiopoietins, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ET-A blockade also reduced renal apoptosis, inflammation, and glomerulosclerosis. This study shows that ET-A blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental RVD and preserves renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density in the stenotic kidney. These results support a role for ET-1/ET-A as a potential therapeutic target in chronic RVD. PMID:21478482

  10. PA21, a novel phosphate binder, improves renal osteodystrophy in rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Takeda, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The effects of PA21, a novel iron-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binder, on hyperphosphatemia and its accompanying bone abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) were evaluated. Rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF) were prepared by feeding them an adenine-containing diet for four weeks. They were also freely fed a diet that contained PA21 (0.5, 1.5, and 5%), sevelamer hydrochloride (0.6 and 2%) or lanthanum carbonate hydrate (0.6 and 2%) for four weeks. Blood biochemical parameters were measured and bone histomorphometry was performed for femurs, which were isolated after drug treatment. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were higher in the CRF rats. Administration of phosphate binders for four weeks decreased serum phosphorus and PTH levels in a dose-dependent manner and there were significant decreases in the AUC0-28 day of these parameters in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups compared with that in the CRF control group. Moreover, osteoid volume improved significantly in 5% of the PA21 group, and fibrosis volume and cortical porosity were ameliorated in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups. These results suggest that PA21 is effective against hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and bone abnormalities in CKD-MBD as sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate hydrate are, and that PA21 is a new potential alternative to phosphate binders.

  11. Comparison of the effects of tolvaptan and furosemide on renal water and sodium excretion in patients with heart failure and advanced chronic kidney disease: a subanalysis of the K-STAR study.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Naoto; Kida, Keisuke; Inomata, Takayuki; Sato, Naoki; Izumi, Tohru; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2018-06-22

    Tolvaptan (TLV) is known to increase electrolyte-free water clearance. However, TLV actions on renal electrolytes including urine sodium (uNa) excretion and its consequences are less well understood. This subanalysis investigated the effect of add-on TLV compared to increased furosemide (FUR) on both electrolyte-free water and electrolyte clearance in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) complicated by advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Kanagawa Aquaresis Investigators Trial of TLV on HF Patients with Renal Impairment (K-STAR) was a multicenter, open-labeled, randomized, and controlled prospective clinical study. Eighty-one Japanese patients with CHF and residual signs of congestion despite oral FUR treatment (≥ 40 mg/day) were recruited and randomly assigned to a 7-day add-on treatment with either ≤ 40 mg/day FUR or ≤ 15 mg/day TLV. Electrolyte-free water clearance, electrolyte osmolar clearance and electrolyte excretion were compared between the two groups before and after therapy. The change (Δ) in electrolyte-free water clearance was significantly higher in the add-on TLV group than in the add-on FUR group. However, Δelectrolyte osmolar clearance was also higher in the add-on TLV group than in the increased FUR group. This was primarily because ΔuNa excretion was significantly higher in the add-on TLV group than in the increased FUR group, since Δurine potassium excretion was significantly lower in the add-on TLV group than in the increased FUR group. Add-on TLV may increase both renal water and Na excretion in CHF patients with advanced CKD to a greater degree than increased FUR.

  12. Impact of sex and glucose-lowering treatments on hypoglycaemic symptoms in people with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. The French Chronic Kidney Disease - Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) Study.

    PubMed

    Balkau, B; Metzger, M; Andreelli, F; Frimat, L; Speyer, E; Combe, C; Laville, M; Jacquelinet, C; Briançon, S; Ayav, C; Massy, Z; Pisoni, R L; Stengel, B; Fouque, D

    2018-04-06

    To describe current practices of glucose-lowering treatments in people with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the associated glucose control and hypoglycaemic symptoms, with an emphasis on sex differences. Among the 3033 patients with CKD stages 3-5 recruited into the French CKD-REIN study, 645 men and 288 women had type 2 diabetes and were treated by glucose-lowering drugs. Overall, 31% were treated only with insulin, 28% with combinations of insulin and another drug, 42% with non-insulin glucose-lowering drugs. In CKD stage 3, 40% of patients used metformin, 12% at stages 4&5, similar for men and women; in CKD stage 3, 53% used insulin, similar for men and women, but at stages 4&5, 59% of men and 77% of women used insulin. Patients were reasonably well controlled, with a median HbA1c of 7.1% (54mmol/mol) in men, 7.4% (57mmol/mol) in women (P=0.0003). Hypoglycaemic symptoms were reported by 40% of men and 59% of women; they were not associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, nor with albuminuria or with HbA1c in multivariable analyses, but they were more frequent in people treated with insulin, particularly with fast-acting and pre-mixed insulins. Glucose-lowering treatment, HbA1c and hypoglycaemic symptoms were sex dependent. Metformin use was similar in men and women, but unexpectedly low in CKD stage 3; its use could be encouraged rather than resorting to insulin. Hypoglycaemic symptoms were frequent and need to be more closely monitored, with appropriate patient-education, especially in women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. ROLE OF THE RENAL MICROCIRCULATION IN PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY INJURY IN OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Chade, Alejandro R.; Hall, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is largely responsible for the growing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular, and renal disease. Current strategies to prevent and treat obesity and its consequences have been insufficient to reverse the ongoing trends. Lifestyle modification or pharmacological therapies often produce modest weight loss which is not sustained and recurrence of obesity is frequently observed, leading to progression of target organ damage in many obese subjects. Therefore, research efforts have focused not only on the factors that regulate energy balance, but also on understanding mechanisms of target organ injury in obesity. Summary and Key message Microvascular disease plays a pivotal role in progressive kidney injury from different etiologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, which are all important consequences of chronic obesity. The microvascular networks are anatomical units that are closely adapted to specific functions of nutrition and removal of waste in every organ. Damage of the small vessels in several tissues and organs has been reported in obesity and may increase cardio-renal risk. However, the mechanisms by which obesity and its attendant cardiovascular and metabolic consequences interact to cause renal microvascular injury and chronic kidney disease are still unclear, although substantial progress has been made in recent years. This review addresses potential mechanisms and consequences of obesity-induced renal microvascular injury as well as current treatments that may provide protection of the renal microcirculation and slow progressive kidney injury in obesity. PMID:27771702

  14. Feline chronic renal failure: clinical findings in 80 cases diagnosed between 1992 and 1995.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J; Barber, P J

    1998-02-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings at the time of first diagnosis in 80 cats with chronic renal failure (CRF) were examined in a prospective study to determine the survival time of these animals and identify possible factors contributing to the progression of feline CRF. On the basis of clinical presentation, animals were assigned to one of three groups; compensated (n = 15), uraemic (n = 39) and end-stage (n = 26) CRF. Loss of renal concentrating ability was a common finding, even before clinical signs of renal disease were evident. The plasma creatinine concentration at initial presentation was a poor predictor of survival time and the presence of significant anaemia was indicative of a poor prognosis. The study demonstrated the highly variable degree of renal impairment present at the time of diagnosis and the potentially long survival time of many compensated and uraemic cases.

  15. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  16. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  17. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  18. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  19. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  20. Management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and anatomy of renal innervation.

    PubMed

    Tellman, Matthew W; Bahler, Clinton D; Shumate, Ashley M; Bacallao, Robert L; Sundaram, Chandru P

    2015-05-01

    Chronic pain is a prominent feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease that is difficult to treat and manage, often resulting in a decrease in quality of life. Understanding the underlying anatomy of renal innervation and the various etiologies of pain that occur in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can help guide proper treatments to manage pain. Reviewing previously studied treatments for pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can help characterize treatment in a stepwise fashion. We performed a literature search of the etiology and management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and the anatomy of renal innervation using PubMed® and Embase® from January 1985 to April 2014 with limitations to human studies and English language. Pain occurs in the majority of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease due to renal, hepatic and mechanical origins. Patients may experience different types of pain which can make it difficult to clinically confirm its etiology. An anatomical and histological evaluation of the complex renal innervation helps in understanding the mechanisms that can lead to renal pain. Understanding the complex nature of renal innervation is essential for surgeons to perform renal denervation. The management of pain in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease should be approached in a stepwise fashion. Acute causes of renal pain must first be ruled out due to the high incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. For chronic pain, nonopioid analgesics and conservative interventions can be used first, before opioid analgesics are considered. If pain continues there are surgical interventions such as renal cyst decortication, renal denervation and nephrectomy that can target pain produced by renal or hepatic cysts. Chronic pain in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is often refractory to conservative, medical and other noninvasive treatments

  1. Risk factors for end stage renal disease in non-WT1-syndromic Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jane; Peterson, Susan M; Takashima, Janice R; Grigoriev, Yevgeny; Ritchey, Michael L; Shamberger, Robert C; Beckwith, J Bruce; Perlman, Elizabeth; Green, Daniel M; Breslow, Norman E

    2011-08-01

    We assessed risk factors for end stage renal disease in patients with Wilms tumor without known WT1 related syndromes. We hypothesized that patients with characteristics suggestive of a WT1 etiology (early onset, stromal predominant histology, intralobar nephrogenic rests) would have a higher risk of end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure. We predicted a high risk of end stage renal disease due to progressive bilateral Wilms tumor in patients with metachronous bilateral disease. End stage renal disease was ascertained in 100 of 7,950 nonsyndromic patients enrolled in a National Wilms Tumor Study during 1969 to 2002. Risk factors were evaluated with cumulative incidence curves and proportional hazard regressions. The cumulative incidence of end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure 20 years after Wilms tumor diagnosis was 0.7%. For end stage renal disease due to progressive bilateral Wilms tumor the incidence was 4.0% at 3 years after diagnosis in patients with synchronous bilateral Wilms tumor and 19.3% in those with metachronous bilateral Wilms tumor. For end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure stromal predominant histology had a HR of 6.4 relative to mixed (95% CI 3.4, 11.9; p<0.001), intralobar rests had a HR of 5.9 relative to no rests (95% CI 2.0, 17.3; p=0.001), and Wilms tumor diagnosis at less than 24 months had a HR of 1.7 relative to 24 to 48 months and 2.8 relative to greater than 48 months (p=0.003 for trend). Metachronous bilateral Wilms tumor is associated with high rates of end stage renal disease due to surgery for progressive Wilms tumor. Characteristics associated with a WT1 etiology markedly increased the risk of end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure despite the low risk in non-WT1 syndromic cases overall. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  3. MicroRNAs 223-3p and 93-5p in patients with chronic kidney disease before and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ulbing, M; Kirsch, A H; Leber, B; Lemesch, S; Münzker, J; Schweighofer, N; Hofer, D; Trummer, O; Rosenkranz, A R; Müller, H; Eller, K; Stadlbauer, V; Obermayer-Pietsch, B

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a multifactorial dysregulation of bone and vascular calcification and closely linked to increased cardiovascular mortality and concomitant bone disease. We aimed to investigate specific microRNA (miRNA) signatures in CKD patients to find indicators for vascular calcification and/or bone mineralization changes during CKD and after kidney transplantation (KT). A miRNA array was used to investigate serum miRNA profiles in CKD patients, then selected miRNAs were quantified in a validation cohort comprising 73 patients in CKD stages 3 to 5, 67 CKD patients after KT, and 36 healthy controls. A spectrum of biochemical parameters including markers for kidney function, inflammation, glucose, and mineral metabolism was determined. The relative expression of miR-223-3p and miR-93-5p was down-regulated in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5 compared to healthy controls. This down-regulation disappeared after kidney transplantation even when lower glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) persisted. MiR-223-3p and miR-93-5p were associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and eGFR levels, and by trend with interleukin-8 (IL-8), C-peptide, hematocrit, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). This study contributes new knowledge of serum miRNA expression profiles in CKD, potentially reflecting pathophysiological changes of bone and calcification pathways associated with inflammation, vascular calcification, mineral and glucose metabolism. Identified miRNA signatures can contribute to future risk markers or future therapeutic targets in bone and kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypercalcaemia Secondary to Hypervitaminosis A in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, D; El Haddad, B; Abdallah, J

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A toxicity is a well-described medical condition with a multitude of potential presenting signs and symptoms. It can be divided into acute and chronic toxicity. Serum vitamin A concentrations are raised in chronic renal failure even with ingestion of less than the usual toxic doses. Hypercalcaemia can occasionally be associated with high levels of vitamin A but it is rare. In this report, we describe a 67- year old female patient with chronic kidney disease who was taking vitamin A supplements for approximately 10 years. The patient had worsening of her chronic kidney disease over the last years and developed chronic hypercalcaemia. Her vitamin A level was elevated with a daily intake of 7000 IU. The vitamin A supplement was stopped. A few months later, vitamin A level diminished substantially and serum calcium levels returned to normal. PMID:25303202

  5. Hypercalcaemia secondary to hypervitaminosis a in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, D; El Haddad, B; Abdallah, J

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A toxicity is a well-described medical condition with a multitude of potential presenting signs and symptoms. It can be divided into acute and chronic toxicity. Serum vitamin A concentrations are raised in chronic renal failure even with ingestion of less than the usual toxic doses. Hypercalcaemia can occasionally be associated with high levels of vitamin A but it is rare. In this report, we describe a 67- year old female patient with chronic kidney disease who was taking vitamin A supplements for approximately 10 years. The patient had worsening of her chronic kidney disease over the last years and developed chronic hypercalcaemia. Her vitamin A level was elevated with a daily intake of 7000 IU. The vitamin A supplement was stopped. A few months later, vitamin A level diminished substantially and serum calcium levels returned to normal.

  6. Advanced chronic kidney disease in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: extending the utility of R2CHADS2 to patients with advanced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Josef; Bella, Archie; Chaudhari, Ashok; Pekler, Gerald; Sapra, Katherine J; Carbajal, Roger; Baumstein, Donald

    2015-04-01

    The R2CHADS2 is a new prediction rule for stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients wherein R stands for renal risk. However, it was created from a cohort that excluded patients with advanced renal failure (defined as glomerular filtration rate of <30 mL/min). Our study extends the use of R2CHADS2 to patients with advanced renal failure and aims to compare its predictive power against the currently used CHADS and CHA2DS2VaSc. This retrospective cohort study analyzed the 1-year risk for stroke of the 524 patients with AF at Metropolitan Hospital Center. AUC and C statistics were calculated using three groups: (i) the entire cohort including patients with advanced renal failure, (ii) a cohort excluding patients with advanced renal failure and (iii) all patients with GFR < 30 mL/min only. R2CHADS2, as a predictor for stroke risk, consistently performs better than CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VsC in groups 1 and 2. The C-statistic was highest in R2CHADS compared with CHADS or CHADSVASC in group 1 (0.718 versus 0.605 versus 0.602) and in group 2 (0.724 versus 0.584 versus 0.579). However, there was no statistically significant difference in group 3 (0.631 versus 0.629 versus 0.623). Our study supports the utility of R2CHADS2 as a clinical prediction rule for stroke risk in patients with advanced renal failure.

  7. The effects of lowering LDL cholesterol with simvastatin plus ezetimibe in patients with chronic kidney disease (Study of Heart and Renal Protection): a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Wheeler, David C; Tomson, Charles; Wanner, Christoph; Krane, Vera; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Lixin; Hooi, Lai Seong; Levin, Adeera; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gaziano, Mike; Kasiske, Bertram; Walker, Robert; Massy, Ziad A; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Krairittichai, Udom; Ophascharoensuk, Vuddidhej; Fellström, Bengt; Holdaas, Hallvard; Tesar, Vladimir; Wiecek, Andrzej; Grobbee, Diederick; de Zeeuw, Dick; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Dasgupta, Tanaji; Lewis, David; Herrington, William; Mafham, Marion; Majoni, William; Wallendszus, Karl; Grimm, Richard; Pedersen, Terje; Tobert, Jonathan; Armitage, Jane; Baxter, Alex; Bray, Christopher; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Zhengming; Hill, Michael; Knott, Carol; Parish, Sarah; Simpson, David; Sleight, Peter; Young, Alan; Collins, Rory

    2011-06-25

    Lowering LDL cholesterol with statin regimens reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, and the need for coronary revascularisation in people without kidney disease, but its effects in people with moderate-to-severe kidney disease are uncertain. The SHARP trial aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the combination of simvastatin plus ezetimibe in such patients. This randomised double-blind trial included 9270 patients with chronic kidney disease (3023 on dialysis and 6247 not) with no known history of myocardial infarction or coronary revascularisation. Patients were randomly assigned to simvastatin 20 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg daily versus matching placebo. The key prespecified outcome was first major atherosclerotic event (non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death, non-haemorrhagic stroke, or any arterial revascularisation procedure). All analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00125593, and ISRCTN54137607. 4650 patients were assigned to receive simvastatin plus ezetimibe and 4620 to placebo. Allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe yielded an average LDL cholesterol difference of 0·85 mmol/L (SE 0·02; with about two-thirds compliance) during a median follow-up of 4·9 years and produced a 17% proportional reduction in major atherosclerotic events (526 [11·3%] simvastatin plus ezetimibe vs 619 [13·4%] placebo; rate ratio [RR] 0·83, 95% CI 0·74-0·94; log-rank p=0·0021). Non-significantly fewer patients allocated to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had a non-fatal myocardial infarction or died from coronary heart disease (213 [4·6%] vs 230 [5·0%]; RR 0·92, 95% CI 0·76-1·11; p=0·37) and there were significant reductions in non-haemorrhagic stroke (131 [2·8%] vs 174 [3·8%]; RR 0·75, 95% CI 0·60-0·94; p=0·01) and arterial revascularisation procedures (284 [6·1%] vs 352 [7·6%]; RR 0·79, 95% CI 0·68-0·93; p=0·0036). After weighting for subgroup-specific reductions in LDL

  8. [Diagnosis and management of chronic renal failure in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Segalen, Isabelle; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in the elderly is rising due to the ageing of the general population. Its management, and notably nephroprotective therapies, must be adapted to the elderly person who is often frail and with multiple pathologies. The decision to start extra-renal purification does not depend on the patient's chronological age but on their physiological age and requires dialogue between the patient and their family, the geriatrician and the nephrologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Randomized multicentre pilot study of sacubitril/valsartan versus irbesartan in patients with chronic kidney disease: United Kingdom Heart and Renal Protection (HARP)- III-rationale, trial design and baseline data.

    PubMed

    2017-12-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Data from other populations and animal experiments suggest that neprilysin inhibition (which augments the natriuretic peptide system) may reduce these risks, but clinical trials among patients with CKD are required to test this hypothesis. UK Heart and Renal Protection III (HARP-III) is a multicentre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial comparing sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg two times daily (an angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor) with irbesartan 300 mg one time daily among 414 patients with CKD. Patients ≥18 years of age with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥45 but <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (uACR) >20 mg/mmol or eGFR ≥20 but <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 (regardless of uACR) were invited to be screened. Following a 4- to 7-week pre-randomization single-blind placebo run-in phase (during which any current renin-angiotensin system inhibitors were stopped), willing and eligible participants were randomly assigned either sacubitril/valsartan or irbesartan and followed-up for 12 months. The primary aim was to compare the effects of sacubitril/valsartan and irbesartan on measured GFR after 12 months of therapy. Important secondary outcomes include effects on albuminuria, change in eGFR over time and the safety and tolerability of sacubitril/valsartan in CKD. Between November 2014 and January 2016, 620 patients attended a screening visit and 566 (91%) entered the pre-randomization run-in phase. Of these, 414 (73%) participants were randomized (mean age 63 years; 72% male). The mean eGFR was 34.0 mL/min/1.73 m2 and the median uACR was 58.5 mg/mmol. UK HARP-III will provide important information on the short-term effects of sacubitril/valsartan on renal function, tolerability and safety among patients with CKD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  10. Randomized multicentre pilot study of sacubitril/valsartan versus irbesartan in patients with chronic kidney disease: United Kingdom Heart and Renal Protection (HARP)- III—rationale, trial design and baseline data

    PubMed Central

    Judge, PK; Haynes, R; Herrington, WG; Storey, BC; Staplin, N; Bethel, A; Bowman, L; Brunskill, N; Cockwell, P; Dayanandan, R; Hill, M; Kalra, PA; McMurray, JJ; Taal, M; Wheeler, DC; Landray, MJ; Baigent, C; Baigent, C; Haynes, R; Landray, MJ; Dayanandan, R; Baxter, A; Staplin, N; Bethel, A; Bowman, L; Brunskill, N; Cockwell, P; Herrington, WG; Hill, M; Judge, PK; Kalra, PA; Knott, C; McMurray, JJ; Murphy, K; Taal, M; Wheeler, DC; Wheatley, K; Emberson, J; Tomson, C; Roderick, P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Data from other populations and animal experiments suggest that neprilysin inhibition (which augments the natriuretic peptide system) may reduce these risks, but clinical trials among patients with CKD are required to test this hypothesis. Methods UK Heart and Renal Protection III (HARP-III) is a multicentre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial comparing sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg two times daily (an angiotensin receptor–neprilysin inhibitor) with irbesartan 300 mg one time daily among 414 patients with CKD. Patients ≥18 years of age with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥45 but <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (uACR) >20 mg/mmol or eGFR ≥20 but <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 (regardless of uACR) were invited to be screened. Following a 4- to 7-week pre-randomization single-blind placebo run-in phase (during which any current renin–angiotensin system inhibitors were stopped), willing and eligible participants were randomly assigned either sacubitril/valsartan or irbesartan and followed-up for 12 months. The primary aim was to compare the effects of sacubitril/valsartan and irbesartan on measured GFR after 12 months of therapy. Important secondary outcomes include effects on albuminuria, change in eGFR over time and the safety and tolerability of sacubitril/valsartan in CKD. Results Between November 2014 and January 2016, 620 patients attended a screening visit and 566 (91%) entered the pre-randomization run-in phase. Of these, 414 (73%) participants were randomized (mean age 63 years; 72% male). The mean eGFR was 34.0 mL/min/1.73 m2 and the median uACR was 58.5 mg/mmol. Conclusions UK HARP-III will provide important information on the short-term effects of sacubitril/valsartan on renal function, tolerability and safety among patients with CKD. PMID:27646835

  11. Pathological Renal Findings of Chronic Renal Failure in a Patient with the E66Q Mutation in the α-galactosidase A Gene.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Eiichi; Hamada, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with interstitial nephritis on a renal biopsy at 45 years of age and began to receive hemodialysis at 65 years of age. He was suspected of having Fabry disease as a result of a screening study for Fabry disease performed in hemodialysis patients. He had an E66Q mutation in the α-galactosidase A gene. We conducted an electron microscopic examination of a renal biopsy specimen obtained when the patient was diagnosed with chronic renal failure at 45 years of age in order to elucidate the pathogenicity of the E66Q mutation. Interestingly, an electron microscopic examination of the renal biopsy specimen indicated no characteristic findings of Fabry disease.

  12. Revascularisation of patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis: bypass surgery versus PCI-analysis of routine statutory health insurance data.

    PubMed

    Möckel, Martin; Searle, Julia; Baberg, Henning Thomas; Dirschedl, Peter; Levenson, Benny; Malzahn, Jürgen; Mansky, Thomas; Günster, Christian; Jeschke, Elke

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to analyse the short-term and long-term outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing percutaneous intervention (PCI) as compared to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) to evaluate the optimal coronary revascularisation strategy. Retrospective analysis of routine statutory health insurance data between 2010 and 2012. Primary outcome was adjusted all-cause mortality after 30 days and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were repeat revascularisation at 30 days and 1 year and bleeding events within 7 days. The total number of cases was n=4123 (PCI; n=3417), median age was 71 (IQR 62-77), 30.4% were women. The adjusted OR for death within 30 days was 0.59 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.81) for patients undergoing PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was 1.58 (1.32 to 1.89) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.23 to 1.75) for all-cause death. In the subgroup of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), adjusted all-cause mortality at 30 days did not differ significantly between both groups (OR 0.75 (0.47 to 1.20)), whereas in patients without AMI the OR for 30-day mortality was 0.44 (0.28 to 0.68) for PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for MACCE in patients with AMI was 1.40 (1.06 to 1.85) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.08 to 1.99) for mortality. In this cohort of unselected patients with ESRD undergoing revascularisation, the 1-year outcome was better for CABG in patients with and without AMI. The 30-day mortality was higher in non-AMI patients with CABG reflecting an early hazard with surgery. In cases where the patient's characteristics and risk profile make it difficult to decide on a revascularisation strategy, CABG could be the preferred option.

  13. The role of keto acids in the supportive treatment of children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sevgi; Ozkayin, Nese; Akgun, Aysegul

    2005-07-01

    According to the hyperfiltration theory of renal diseases characterized by a decrease in the number of functional nephrons, increased arterial blood pressure, excessive protein intake in the diet, high levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), secondary hyperparathyroidism, hypertriglyceridemia and/or hypercholesterolemia, proteinuria and metabolic acidosis are some factors that impair the prognosis of the disease. The amount of protein in the diet is the most important of these factors. A protein-restricted diet administered to patients with chronic renal failure results in the risk of inadequate amino acid intake. To overcome this problem, the use of dysaminated alpha-keto analogues has been considered to reduce the risk of nitrogenemia resulting from the continuous intake of essential amino acids. Currently, the necessity of essential amino acids even in adult patients with chronic renal failure is controversial; besides, trials on the use of these amino acids in pediatric patients are scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy and applicability of conservative therapy with a protein-restricted diet supplemented with keto acids in the management of chronic renal insufficiency or failure.

  14. Prevention and treatment of protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease patients: a consensus statement by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikizler, T Alp; Cano, Noel J; Franch, Harold; Fouque, Denis; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kuhlmann, Martin K; Stenvinkel, Peter; TerWee, Pieter; Teta, Daniel; Wang, Angela Yee-Moon; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, especially in individuals receiving maintenance dialysis therapy. A multitude of factors can affect the nutritional and metabolic status of CKD patients requiring a combination of therapeutic maneuvers to prevent or reverse protein and energy depletion. These include optimizing dietary nutrient intake, appropriate treatment of metabolic disturbances such as metabolic acidosis, systemic inflammation, and hormonal deficiencies, and prescribing optimized dialytic regimens. In patients where oral dietary intake from regular meals cannot maintain adequate nutritional status, nutritional supplementation, administered orally, enterally, or parenterally, is shown to be effective in replenishing protein and energy stores. In clinical practice, the advantages of oral nutritional supplements include proven efficacy, safety, and compliance. Anabolic strategies such as anabolic steroids, growth hormone, and exercise, in combination with nutritional supplementation or alone, have been shown to improve protein stores and represent potential additional approaches for the treatment of PEW. Appetite stimulants, anti-inflammatory interventions, and newer anabolic agents are emerging as novel therapies. While numerous epidemiological data suggest that an improvement in biomarkers of nutritional status is associated with improved survival, there are no large randomized clinical trials that have tested the effectiveness of nutritional interventions on mortality and morbidity.

  15. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m 2 , or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  17. Technical aspects of renal denervation in end-stage renal disease patients with challenging anatomy.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Alessio; Da Ros, Valerio; Morosetti, Daniele; Onofrio, Silvia D; Rovella, Valentina; Di Daniele, Nicola; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We describe our preliminary experience with percutaneous renal denervation in end-stage renal disease patients with resistant hypertension and challenging anatomy, in terms of the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this procedure. Four patients with end-stage renal disease patients with resistant hypertension (mean hemodialysis time, 2.3 years) who had been taking at least four antihypertensive medications underwent percutaneous renal denervation. Renal artery eligibility included the absence of prior renal artery interventions, vessel stenosis <70%, or extended calcifications (more than 30% of the vessel circumference). No cut off values of vessel diameter were used. All patients were successfully treated with no intra- or postprocedural complications, and all showed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure reduction at the 12-month follow-up. Percutaneous renal denervation is a feasible approach for end-stage renal disease patients with resistant hypertension with encouraging short-term preliminary results in terms of procedural efficacy and safety.

  18. Exploring the pathways leading from disadvantage to end-stage renal disease for indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Cass, Alan; Cunningham, Joan; Snelling, Paul; Wang, Zhiqiang; Hoy, Wendy

    2004-02-01

    Indigenous Australians are disadvantaged, relative to other Australians, over a range of socio-economic and health measures. The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD)--the irreversible preterminal phase of chronic renal failure--is almost nine times higher amongst Indigenous than it is amongst non-indigenous Australians. A striking gradient exists from urban to remote regions, where the standardised ESRD incidence is from 20 to more than 30 times the national incidence. We discuss the profound impact of renal disease on Indigenous Australians and their communities. We explore the linkages between disadvantage, often accompanied by geographic isolation, and both the initiation of renal disease, and its progression to ESRD. Purported explanations for the excess burden of renal disease in indigenous populations can be categorised as: primary renal disease explanations;genetic explanations;early development explanations; and socio-economic explanations. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these explanations and suggest a new hypothesis which integrates the existing evidence. We use this hypothesis to illuminate the pathways between disadvantage and the human biological processes which culminate in ESRD, and to propose prevention strategies across the life-course of Indigenous Australians to reduce their ESRD risk. Our hypothesis is likely to be relevant to an understanding of patterns of renal disease in other high-risk populations, particularly indigenous people in the developed world and people in developing countries. Furthermore, analogous pathways might be relevant to other chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. If we are able to confirm the various pathways from disadvantage to human biology, we will be better placed to advocate evidence-based interventions, both within and beyond the scope of the health-care system, to address the excess burden of renal and other chronic diseases among affected

  19. Drug dosing in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gabardi, Steven; Abramson, Stuart

    2005-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions. Drug dosing in these patients often proves to be a difficult task. Renal dysfunction-induced changes in human pathophysiology regularly results may alter medication pharmacodynamics and handling. Several pharmacokinetic parameters are adversely affected by CKD, secondary to a reduced oral absorption and glomerular filtration; altered tubular secretion; and reabsorption and changes in intestinal, hepatic, and renal metabolism. In general, drug dosing can be accomplished by multiple methods; however, the most common recommendations are often to reduce the dose or expand the dosing interval, or use both methods simultaneously. Some medications need to be avoided all together in CKD either because of lack of efficacy or increased risk of toxicity. Nevertheless, specific recommendations are available for dosing of certain medications and are an important resource, because most are based on clinical or pharmacokinetic trials.

  20. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Emerging Burden in Cardiometabolic and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Lee, Yong Ho

    2017-12-01

    As the number of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased, the influence of NAFLD on other metabolic diseases has been highlighted. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence indicates that NAFLD not only affects the liver but also increases the risk of extra-hepatic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, an advanced type of NAFLD, can aggravate these inter-organ relationships and lead to poorer outcomes. NAFLD induces insulin resistance and exacerbates systemic chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which leads to organ dysfunction in extra-hepatic tissues. Although more research is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms and causal relationship between NAFLD and cardiometabolic and renal diseases, screening for heart, brain, and kidney diseases, risk assessment for diabetes, and a multidisciplinary approach for managing these patients should be highly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association.

  1. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  2. The impact of daily temperature on renal disease incidence: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Borg, Matthew; Bi, Peng; Nitschke, Monika; Williams, Susan; McDonald, Stephen

    2017-10-27

    Extremely high temperatures over many consecutive days have been linked to an increase in renal disease in several cities. This is becoming increasingly relevant with heatwaves becoming longer, more intense, and more frequent with climate change. This study aimed to extend the known relationship between daily temperature and kidney disease to include the incidence of eight temperature-prone specific renal disease categories - total renal disease, urolithiasis, renal failure, acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD), urinary tract infections (UTIs), lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs) and pyelonephritis. Daily data was acquired for maximum, minimum and average temperature over the period of 1 July 2003 to 31 March 2014 during the warm season (October to March) in Adelaide, South Australia. Data for daily admissions to all metropolitan hospitals for renal disease, including 83,519 emergency department admissions and 42,957 inpatient admissions, was also obtained. Renal outcomes were analyzed using time-stratified negative binomial regression models, with the results aggregated by day. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for associations between the number of admissions and daily temperature. Increases in daily temperature per 1 °C were associated with an increased incidence for all renal disease categories except for pyelonephritis. Minimum temperature was associated with the greatest increase in renal disease followed by average temperature and then maximum temperature. A 1°C increase in daily minimum temperature was associated with an increase in daily emergency department admissions for AKI (IRR 1.037, 95% CI: 1.026-1.048), renal failure (IRR 1.030, 95% CI: 1.022-1.039), CKD (IRR 1.017, 95% CI: 1.001-1.033) urolithiasis (IRR 1.015, 95% CI: 1.010-1.020), total renal disease (IRR 1.009, 95% CI: 1.006-1.011), UTIs (IRR 1.004, 95% CI: 1.000-1.007) and LUTIs (IRR 1.003, 95% CI: 1.000-1.006). An increased

  3. Effect of diacerein on renal function and inflammatory cytokines in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Fabiana; Tres, Glaucia S.; Moreira, Leila B.; Andrades, Michael E.; Lisboa, Hugo K.

    2017-01-01

    Diacerein seems to improve metabolic control and reduce inflammatory marker levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM), but for participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD) its effect is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of diacerein vs. placebo on urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and inflammatory cytokines in type 2 DM participants with CKD. Blood pressure (BP) and metabolic control were secondary outcomes. This randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel trial of adjuvant treatment of type 2 DM with diacerein enrolled seventy-two participants with CKD, aged 30–80 years, with glycated hemoglobin levels from 53–97 mmol/mol (7.0–11.0%), receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and antidiabetic agents. Participants randomized to diacerein or placebo were followed-up up to 90 days. Both groups had a marked reduction in ACR, but there was no effect on glomerular filtration rate. While the diacerein group had reduced TNF-α levels at the 75th percentile with a borderline significance (P = 0.05), there were no changes in the IL levels at the 75th percentile. Diacerein prevented the increase in blood glucose to the level observed in the placebo group (P = 0.04), improving metabolic control by 74%, reducing 24-hour diastolic BP, nighttime systolic and diastolic BP compared to the placebo group. In conclusion, among patients with type 2 DM and CKD, diacerein does not have an effect on ACR or GFR, but slows metabolic control deterioration and is associated with lower nighttime systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Trial registration: Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clinicos; ReBeC) U1111-1156-0255 PMID:29049415

  4. Effect of diacerein on renal function and inflammatory cytokines in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Fabiana; Tres, Glaucia S; Moreira, Leila B; Andrades, Michael E; Lisboa, Hugo K; Fuchs, Sandra C

    2017-01-01

    Diacerein seems to improve metabolic control and reduce inflammatory marker levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM), but for participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD) its effect is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of diacerein vs. placebo on urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and inflammatory cytokines in type 2 DM participants with CKD. Blood pressure (BP) and metabolic control were secondary outcomes. This randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel trial of adjuvant treatment of type 2 DM with diacerein enrolled seventy-two participants with CKD, aged 30-80 years, with glycated hemoglobin levels from 53-97 mmol/mol (7.0-11.0%), receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and antidiabetic agents. Participants randomized to diacerein or placebo were followed-up up to 90 days. Both groups had a marked reduction in ACR, but there was no effect on glomerular filtration rate. While the diacerein group had reduced TNF-α levels at the 75th percentile with a borderline significance (P = 0.05), there were no changes in the IL levels at the 75th percentile. Diacerein prevented the increase in blood glucose to the level observed in the placebo group (P = 0.04), improving metabolic control by 74%, reducing 24-hour diastolic BP, nighttime systolic and diastolic BP compared to the placebo group. In conclusion, among patients with type 2 DM and CKD, diacerein does not have an effect on ACR or GFR, but slows metabolic control deterioration and is associated with lower nighttime systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clinicos; ReBeC) U1111-1156-0255.

  5. Effects of atorvastatin on renal function in patients with dyslipidemia and chronic kidney disease: assessment of clinical usefulness in CKD patients with atorvastatin (ASUCA) trial.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Genjiro; Kasahara, Masato; Ueshima, Kenji; Tanaka, Sachiko; Yasuno, Shinji; Fujimoto, Akira; Sato, Toshiya; Imamoto, Miyuki; Kosugi, Shinji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2017-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While conventional lipid lowering therapy provides a benefit to CKD management, the effect of statins on eGFR remains unclear. A prospective, multi-center, open-labeled, randomized trial. Total of 349 CKD patients with hyperlipidemia were randomized into 2 groups, and followed for 2 years. Group A included patients who were treated with atorvastatin. Group C were treated with conventional lipid lowering drugs other than statin. Primary endpoint was changes in eGFR. Secondary endpoints included changes in urinary albumin excretion, serum LDL-C, serum triglyceride, cardio-vascular events and all-cause mortality. As the primary endpoint, eGFR decreased by 2.3 ml/min/1.73 m 2 in Group A and by 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 in Group C, indicating that there was no difference in change of eGFR between the two groups. As secondary endpoints, atorvastatin succeeded to reduce serum LDL-C level significantly and rapidly, but conventional therapy did not. In fact, mean LDL-C level did not reach the target level of 100 mg/dl in Group C. Serum triglyceride was lowered only by atorvastatin, but not conventional drugs. The number of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality did not differ between in two groups. The ASUCA (Assessment of Clinical Usefulness in CKD Patients with Atorvastatin) trial demonstrated that atorvastatin failed to exhibit reno-protections compared to conventional therapy in Japanese patients with dyslipidemia and CKD. It would be due in part to the ability of atorvastatin to more potently reduce serum LDL and triglycerides compared to conventional therapy.

  6. [Hemodialysis in patients with chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Canaud, Bernard; Leray-Moragués, Hélène; Chenine-Koualef, Leila; Patrier, Laure

    2012-01-01

    Hemodialysis is the most advanced form of artificial renal support. It ensures the survival of almost 2 million patients wordwide. Considerable progress has been made in recent years thanks to a better understanding of uremia, optimization of treatment modalities and more personalized treatment schedules. Increase of uremic toxins removal, improvement of hemodynamic tolerance of the sessions, reduction of proinflammatory reactions due to the bioincompatibility system are major advances that may explain the reduction of morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. New technologies (nanotechnology, biotechnology, microelectronics) are now expected to introduce further progresses by miniaturizing devices and providing them with an "artificial intelligence" capable of interacting with the patient. The main obstacle remains ageing of uremic patients, increasing prevalence of comorbidities and shortage of social resources that are not conducive to innovation. By promoting a more physiological, longer and more effective hemodialysis performed at home with help of teledialysis monitoring that would probably be an interesting option to evaluate on a medico-economical point of view.

  7. Effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Calcium Antagonist Combination Therapy on Renal Function in Hypertensive Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Chikushi Anti-Hypertension Trial - Benidipine and Perindopril.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsu; Okamura, Keisuke; Shirai, Kazuyuki; Urata, Hidenori

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate blood pressure control suppresses progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). If an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is ineffective, adding a calcium antagonist is recommended. We compared the long-term effect of two ACE inhibitor/calcium antagonist combinations on renal function in hypertensive patients with CKD. Patients who failed to achieve the target blood pressure (systolic/diastolic: < 130/80 mm Hg) with perindopril monotherapy were randomized to either combined therapy with perindopril and the L-type calcium antagonist amlodipine (group A) or perindopril and the T/L type calcium antagonist benidipine (group B). The primary endpoint was the change of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after 2 years. Eligible patients had a systolic pressure ≥ 130 mm Hg and/or diastolic pressure ≥ 80 mm Hg and CKD (urine protein (+) or higher, eGFR < 60 min/mL/1.73 m 2 ). After excluding 38 patients achieving the target blood pressure with perindopril monotherapy, 121 patients were analyzed (62 in group A and 59 in group B). Blood pressure decreased significantly in both groups, but there was no significant change of the eGFR. However, among patients with diabetes, eGFR unchanged in group B (n = 37, 59.1 ± 15.1 vs. 61.2 ± 27.9, P = 0.273), whereas decreased significantly in group A (n = 31, 57.3 ± 16.0 vs. 53.7 ± 16.7, P = 0.005). In hypertensive patients with diabetic nephropathy, combined therapy with an ACE inhibitor and T/L type calcium antagonist may prevent deterioration of renal function more effectively than an ACE inhibitor/L type calcium antagonist combination.

  8. Unusual course of infective endocarditis: acute renal failure progressing to chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sevinc, Alper; Davutoglu, Vedat; Barutcu, Irfan; Kocoglu, M Esra

    2006-04-01

    Infective endocarditis is an infection of the endocardium that usually involves the valves and adjacent structures. The classical fever of unknown origin presentation represents a minority of infective endocarditis. The presented case was a 21-yearold young lady presenting with acute renal failure and fever to the emergency room. Cardiac auscultation revealed a soft S1 and 4/6 apical holosystolic murmur extended to axilla. Echocardiography showed mobile fresh vegetation under the mitral posterior leaflet. She was diagnosed as having infective endocarditis. Hemodialysis was started with antimicrobial therapy. However, because of the presence of severe mitral regurgitation with left ventricle dilatation and large mobile vegetation, mitral prosthetic mechanical valve replacement was performed. Although treated with antibiotics combined with surgery, renal functions were deteriorated and progressed to chronic renal failure.

  9. [Decline in renal function in old age : Part of physiological aging versus age-related disease].

    PubMed

    Braun, F; Brinkkötter, P T

    2016-08-01

    The incidence and prevalence of chronic renal disease (CKD) in elderly patients are continuously increasing worldwide. Loss of renal function is not only considered to be part of the aging process itself but also reflects the multimorbidity of many geriatric patients. Calculating the glomerular filtration rate using specific algorithms validated for the elderly population and measuring the amount of proteinuria allow an estimation of renal function in elderly patients with high accuracy. Chronic renal failure has many clinical consequences and not only results in a delayed excretion of toxins cleared by the kidneys but also affects hematogenesis, water and electrolyte balance as well as mineral bone metabolism. Furthermore, CKD directly leads to and aggravates geriatric syndromes and in particular the onset of frailty. Therapeutic strategies to halt progression of CKD not only comprise treatment of the underlying disease but also efficient blood pressure and diabetic control and the avoidance of nephrotoxic medications.

  10. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation.

  11. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  12. Incident chronic kidney disease and newly developed complications related to renal dysfunction in an elderly population during 5 years: a community-based elderly population cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Shin Young; Ryu, Jiwon; Baek, Seon Ha; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Kim, Ki Woong; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the association between incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and related complications, especially in elderly population. We attempted to verify the association between GFR and concurrent CKD complications and elucidate the temporal relationship between incident CKD and new CKD complications in a community-based prospective elderly cohort. We analyzed the available data from 984 participants in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging. Participants were categorized into 6 groups according to eGFR at baseline examination (≥90, 75-89, 60-74, 45-59, 30-44, and <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). The mean age of study population was 76 ± 9.1 years and mean eGFR was 72.3 ± 17.0 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Compared to eGFR group 1, the odds ratio (OR) for hypertension was 2.363 (95% CI, 1.299-4.298) in group 4, 5.191 (2.074-12.995) in group 5, and 13.675 (1.611-115.806) in group 6; for anemia, 7.842 (2.265-27.153) in group 5 and 13.019 (2.920-58.047) in group 6; for acidosis, 69.580 (6.770-715.147) in group 6; and for hyperkalemia, 19.177 (1.798-204.474) in group 6. Over a 5-year observational period, CKD developed in 34 (9.6%) among 354 participants with GFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) at basal examination. The estimated mean number of new complications according to analysis of co-variance was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.35-0.68) in subjects with incident CKD and 0.24 (0.19-0.29) in subjects without CKD (p = 0.002). Subjects with incident CKD had a 2.792-fold higher risk of developing new CKD complications. A GFR level of 52.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.032) predicted the development of a new CKD complication with a 90% sensitivity. In an elderly prospective cohort, CKD diagnosed by current criteria is related to an increase in the number of concurrent CKD complications and the development of new CKD complications.

  13. [Factors related to the QT prolongation in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Kurosu, M; Ando, Y; Akimoto, T; Ono, S; Kusano, E; Asano, Y

    1999-04-01

    QT prolongation, a risk factor for arrhythmia and cardiac death, is observed in uremic patients. Though hypocalcemia, autonomic nerve dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy are assumed to cause the uremic QT prolongation, the exact mechanism remains unspecified. We therefore examined factors related to the QT interval in chronic renal failure (CRF). Corrected QT interval (QTc) was significantly prolonged in CRF just before the induction of dialysis therapy (group A) compared with nephrotic syndrome with the intact or mildly impaired renal function (group B). QTc was also prolonged in acute renal failure (group C). Cardio-thoracic ratio, serum albumin and Ca correlated with QTc in group A, but not in B or C. A single HD session in group A failed to shorten QTc, despite a significant increase in serum Ca++. Autonomic dysfunction did not appear to be a major determinant of QT prolongation, since QTc was not different between diabetics and non-diabetics in group A and in chronic HD patients (group D). In group D, QTc did not correlate with SV1 + RV5 on ECG or left ventricular wall thickness (LVWT) on echocardiography. In another group of chronic HD patients (group E), there was no significant correlation between QTc and the parameters of left ventricular mass, plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). However, in the patients subjected to repeated echocardiography in group D, QTc and LVWT changed in parallel. In a retrospective analysis of QTc in group D, QTc was maximally prolonged at the time of starting HD therapy, and gradually improved in the following 1-5 years in both diabetics and non-diabetics. In contrast, chronic CAPD patients (group F) revealed no improvement of QTc. Thus, uremic QT prolongation cannot be explained simply by any of the previously assumed factors, but appears to be affected by multiple factors, which are partially correctable by chronic HD therapy.

  14. Investigated the safety of intra-renal arterial transfusion of autologous CD34+ cells and time courses of creatinine levels, endothelial dysfunction biomarkers and micro-RNAs in chronic kidney disease patients-phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mel S; Lee, Fan-Yen; Chen, Yung-Lung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chiang, John Y; Yin, Tsung-Cheng; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2017-03-14

    This was a phase I clinical trial to investigate the safety of autologous peripheral-blood-derived CD34+ cell therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD-treatment) (i.e., at Stages III and IV). Between November 2014 and October 2015, a total of 10 study patients were prospectively enrolled into this phase I trial. Patients who failed to enroll into the trial in the initial state of eligibility assessment were served as CKD-control group (n = 9). The health-control group was composed of 10 volunteers for the purposes of comparing (1) circulation level of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), (2) angiogenesis ability, and (3) anti-apoptotic miRNAs between healthy subjects and CKD patients. CD34+ cells (5.0 x 107) were transfused into right-renal artery after subcutaneous G-CSF injection (5μg/kg/twice a day for 4 days). Circulating EPC number, angiogenesis capacity (i.e., Matrigel assay) and anti-apoptotic miRNAs (miR-374a-5p/miR-19a-3p/ miR-106b-5p/miR-26b-5p/ miR-20a-5p) were significantly lower in CKD patients than in healthy subjects (all p < 0.001). Flow-cytometric analysis of renal-vein blood samplings (i.e., at 0/5/10/30 mins after cell transfusion) showed the EPC level was significantly progressively increased (p < 0.001). Procedural safety was 100% with all patients uneventfully discharged and one-year survival rate was 100%. The paired-t test showed serum creatinine maintained the same level between the baseline and at the end of one-year follow-up (all p > 0.4), whereas the net increase between initial and final creatinine level was higher in CKD-control than in CKD-treatment. In conclusion, CD34+ cell therapy was safe and maintained the renal function in stationary state at the end of study period.

  15. Investigated the safety of intra-renal arterial transfusion of autologous CD34+ cells and time courses of creatinine levels, endothelial dysfunction biomarkers and micro-RNAs in chronic kidney disease patients-phase I clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chiang, John Y.; Yin, Tsung-Cheng; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2017-01-01

    This was a phase I clinical trial to investigate the safety of autologous peripheral-blood-derived CD34+ cell therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD-treatment) (i.e., at Stages III and IV). Between November 2014 and October 2015, a total of 10 study patients were prospectively enrolled into this phase I trial. Patients who failed to enroll into the trial in the initial state of eligibility assessment were served as CKD-control group (n = 9). The health-control group was composed of 10 volunteers for the purposes of comparing (1) circulation level of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), (2) angiogenesis ability, and (3) anti-apoptotic miRNAs between healthy subjects and CKD patients. CD34+ cells (5.0 × 107) were transfused into right-renal artery after subcutaneous G-CSF injection (5μg/kg/twice a day for 4 days). Circulating EPC number, angiogenesis capacity (i.e., Matrigel assay) and anti-apoptotic miRNAs (miR-374a-5p/miR-19a-3p/ miR-106b-5p/miR-26b-5p/ miR-20a-5p) were significantly lower in CKD patients than in healthy subjects (all p < 0.001). Flow-cytometric analysis of renal-vein blood samplings (i.e., at 0/5/10/30 mins after cell transfusion) showed the EPC level was significantly progressively increased (p < 0.001). Procedural safety was 100% with all patients uneventfully discharged and one-year survival rate was 100%. The paired-t test showed serum creatinine maintained the same level between the baseline and at the end of one-year follow-up (all p > 0.4), whereas the net increase between initial and final creatinine level was higher in CKD-control than in CKD-treatment. In conclusion, CD34+ cell therapy was safe and maintained the renal function in stationary state at the end of study period. PMID:28148896

  16. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy--repercussion on cardiovascular and renal functioning of male offspring.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ingrid L B; Rodrigues, Aline F A C; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Campos, Ruy R; Hirata, Aparecida E; Tufik, Sergio; Xylaras, Beatriz D P; Visniauskas, Bruna; Chagas, Jair R; Gomes, Guiomar N

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the maternal environment can induce fetal adaptations that result in the progression of chronic diseases in the offspring. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of maternal chronic sleep restriction on blood pressure, renal function and cardiac baroreflex response on male offspring at adult age. Female 3-month-old Wistar rats were divided in two experimental groups: control (C) and chronic sleep restricted (CSR). Pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal smear. Chronic sleep restricted females were subjected to sleep restriction by the multiple platform technique for 20 h daily, between the 1st and 20th day of pregnancy. After birth, the litters were reduced to 6 rats per mother, and were designated as offspring from control (OC) and offspring from chronic sleep restricted (OCSR). Indirect blood pressure (BPi - tail cuff) was measured by plethysmography in male offspring at 3 months old. Following, the renal function and cardiac baroreflex response were analyzed. Values of BPi in OCSR were significantly higher compared to OC [OC: 127 ± 2.6 (19); OCSR: 144 ± 2.5 (17) mmHg]. The baroreflex sensitivity to the increase of blood pressure was reduced in OCSR [Slope: OC: -2.6 ± 0.15 (9); OCRS: -1.6 ± 0.13 (9)]. Hypothalamic activity of ACE2 was significantly reduced in OCSR compared to OC [OC: 97.4 ± 15 (18); OSR: 60.2 ± 3.6 (16) UAF/min/protein mg]. Renal function alteration was noticed by the increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) observed in OCSR [OC: 6.4 ± 0.2 (10); OCSR: 7.4 ± 0.3 (7)]. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy caused in the offspring hypertension, altered cardiac baroreflex response, reduced ACE-2 activity in the hypothalamus and renal alterations. Our data suggest that the reduction of sleeping time along the pregnancy is able to modify maternal homeostasis leading to functional alterations in offspring.

  17. The Renal Arterial Resistance Index Predicts Worsening Renal Function in Chronic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Monitillo, Francesco; Leone, Marta; Citarelli, Gaetano; Doronzo, Annalisa; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Puzzovivo, Agata; Rizzo, Caterina; Lattarulo, Maria Silvia; Massari, Francesco; Caldarola, Pasquale; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim The renal arterial resistance index (RRI) is a Doppler measure, which reflects abnormalities in the renal blood flow. The aim of this study was to verify the value of RRI as a predictor of worsening renal function (WRF) in a group of chronic heart failure (CHF) outpatients. Methods We enrolled 266 patients in stable clinical conditions and on conventional therapy. Peak systolic velocity and end diastolic velocity of a segmental renal artery were obtained by pulsed Doppler flow, and RRI was calculated. Creatinine serum levels were evaluated at baseline and at 1 year, and the changes were used to assess WRF occurrence. Results During follow-up, 34 (13%) patients showed WRF. RRI was associated with WRF at univariate (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.07–1.20) as well as at a forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.03–1.16; p = 0.005) including the other univariate predictors. Conclusions Quantification of arterial renal perfusion provides a new parameter that independently predicts the WRF in CHF outpatients. Its possible role in current clinical practice to better define the risk of cardiorenal syndrome progression is strengthened. PMID:27994601

  18. Comparative effects of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in distinct stages of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Heloisa Cristina; de Paula Couto, Thaís Amarante Peres; Fernandes, Ida Maria Maximina; Baptista, Maria Alice Sperto Ferreira; Kawasaki-Oyama, Rosa Sayoko; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; Braile, Domingo Marcolino; Abbud-Filho, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic potential of adult stem cells in the treatment of chronic diseases is becoming increasingly evident. In the present study, we sought to assess whether treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) efficiently retards progression of chronic renal failure (CRF) when administered to experimental models of less severe CRF. We used two renal mass reduction models to simulate different stages of CRF (5/6 or 2/3 mass renal reduction). Renal functional parameters measured were serum creatinine (SCr), creatinine clearance (CCr), rate of decline in CCr (RCCr), and 24-h proteinuria (PT24h). We also evaluated renal morphology by histology and immunohistochemistry. MSCs were obtained from bone marrow aspirates and injected into the renal parenchyma of the remnant kidneys of both groups of rats with CRF (MSC5/6 or MSC2/3). Animals from groups MSC5/6 and CRF2/3 seemed to benefit from MSC therapy because they showed significantly reduction in SCr and PT24h, increase in CCr and slowed the RCCr after 90 days. Treatment reduced glomerulosclerosis but significant improvement did occur in the tubulointerstitial compartment with much less fibrosis and atrophy. MSC therapy reduced inflammation by decreasing macrophage accumulation proliferative activity (PCNA-positive cells) and fibrosis (α-SM-actin). Comparisons of renal functional and morphological parameters responses between the two groups showed that rats MSC2/3 were more responsive to MSC therapy than MSC5/6. This study showed that MSC therapy is efficient to retard CRF progression and might be more effective when administered during less severe stages of CRF.

  19. Disease management improves end-stage renal disease outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence-based guidelines, and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total healthcare costs, including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out of pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present current data suggest that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in end-stage renal disease. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Iohexol clearance is superior to creatinine-based renal function estimating equations in detecting short-term renal function decline in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cvan Trobec, Katja; Kerec Kos, Mojca; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D; Macdougall, Iain C; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lainscak, Mitja

    2015-12-01

    To compare the performance of iohexol plasma clearance and creatinine-based renal function estimating equations in monitoring longitudinal renal function changes in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, and to assess the effects of body composition on the equation performance. Iohexol plasma clearance was measured in 43 CHF patients at baseline and after at least 6 months. Simultaneously, renal function was estimated with five creatinine-based equations (four- and six-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, Cockcroft-Gault, Cockcroft-Gault adjusted for lean body mass, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation) and body composition was assessed using bioimpedance and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Over a median follow-up of 7.5 months (range 6-17 months), iohexol clearance significantly declined (52.8 vs 44.4 mL/[min ×1.73 m2], P=0.001). This decline was significantly higher in patients receiving mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists at baseline (mean decline -22% of baseline value vs -3%, P=0.037). Mean serum creatinine concentration did not change significantly during follow-up and no creatinine-based renal function estimating equation was able to detect the significant longitudinal decline of renal function determined by iohexol clearance. After accounting for body composition, the accuracy of the equations improved, but not their ability to detect renal function decline. Renal function measured with iohexol plasma clearance showed relevant decline in CHF patients, particularly in those treated with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. None of the equations for renal function estimation was able to detect these changes. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT01829880.

  1. Iohexol clearance is superior to creatinine-based renal function estimating equations in detecting short-term renal function decline in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cvan Trobec, Katja; Kerec Kos, Mojca; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D.; Macdougall, Iain C.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lainscak, Mitja

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the performance of iohexol plasma clearance and creatinine-based renal function estimating equations in monitoring longitudinal renal function changes in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, and to assess the effects of body composition on the equation performance. Methods Iohexol plasma clearance was measured in 43 CHF patients at baseline and after at least 6 months. Simultaneously, renal function was estimated with five creatinine-based equations (four- and six-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, Cockcroft-Gault, Cockcroft-Gault adjusted for lean body mass, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation) and body composition was assessed using bioimpedance and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Over a median follow-up of 7.5 months (range 6-17 months), iohexol clearance significantly declined (52.8 vs 44.4 mL/[min ×1.73 m2], P = 0.001). This decline was significantly higher in patients receiving mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists at baseline (mean decline -22% of baseline value vs -3%, P = 0.037). Mean serum creatinine concentration did not change significantly during follow-up and no creatinine-based renal function estimating equation was able to detect the significant longitudinal decline of renal function determined by iohexol clearance. After accounting for body composition, the accuracy of the equations improved, but not their ability to detect renal function decline. Conclusions Renal function measured with iohexol plasma clearance showed relevant decline in CHF patients, particularly in those treated with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. None of the equations for renal function estimation was able to detect these changes. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT01829880 PMID:26718759

  2. Depressive Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Renal Insufficiency Undergoing Chronic Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Edith G.; Loza, Reyner; Vargas, Horacio; Jara, Mercedes F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive study, using the Birleson Scale to determine the frequency of depressive symptomatology in children and adolescents with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD). There were 67 patients (40 female and 27 male) with a mean age of 14.76 ± 2.71 years, duration of illness ≥3 months, 43 (64.18%) patients with CPD and 24 (35.82%) undergoing HD. The frequency of high occurrence, low occurrence, and absence of depressive symptomatology was 10.45% (n = 7), 43.28% (n = 29), and 46.27% (n = 31), respectively; all of the seven (100%) patients with high occurrence of depressive symptomatology were female (P = 0.04), and none of these (0%) had a friend to confide in (P = 0.03). Depressive symptomatology in patients with CPD was associated with a lower weekly K t/V compared to those without depressive symptomatology (2.15 ± 0.68 versus 2.52 ± 0.65; P = 0.01). There was no association with patient age, caregiver, time and dialysis type, anemia, bone disease, nutritional or financial status, origin, schooling, or employment. PMID:21941654

  3. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... control in persons with Type 2 diabetes. 1 Cardiovascular Disease Persons with sleep apnea have been found to be at increased risk for a number of cardiovascular diseases. Notably, hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease and irregular ...

  4. Rationale and design of the Helping Ease Renal failure with Bupi Yishen compared with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan (HERBAAL) trial: a randomized controlled trial in non-diabetes stage 4 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Zou, Chuan; Li, Chuang; Wu, Yifan; Su, Guobin; Guo, Xinfeng; Wu, Yuchi; Lu, Fuhua; Lin, Qizhan; Wang, Lixin; Bao, Kun; Xu, Peng; Zhao, Daixin; Peng, Yu; Liang, Hui; Lu, Zhaoyu; Gao, Yanxiang; Jie, Xina; Zhang, La; Wen, Zehuai; Liu, Xusheng

    2015-09-08

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health problem. Currently, as for advanced CKD populations, medication options limited in angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), which were partially effective. A Chinese herbal compound, Bupi Yishen formula, has showed renal protective potential in experiments and retrospective studies. This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of Bupi Yishen formula (BYF) in patients with CKD stage 4. In this double blind, double dummy, randomized controlled trial (RCT), there will be 554 non-diabetes stage 4 CKD patients from 16 hospitals included and randomized into two groups: Chinese medicine (CM) group or losartan group. All patients will receive basic conventional therapy. Patients in CM group will be treated with BYF daily while patients in control group will receive losartan 100 mg daily for one year. The primary outcome is the change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 12 months. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of endpoint events, liver and kidney function, urinary protein creatinine ratio, cardiovascular function and quality of life. This study will be the first multi-center, double blind RCT to assess whether BYF, compared with losartan, will have beneficial effects on eGFR for non-diabetes stage 4 CKD patients. The results will help to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry Number: ChiCTR-TRC-10001518 .

  5. Caregivers' experience in patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Grapsa, Eirini; Pantelias, Kostantinos; Ntenta, Edmond; Pipili, Chrysoula; Kiousi, Eva; Samartzi, Maria; Karagiannis, Stylianos; Heras, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of caregivers of patients with chronic diseases, assess their perceived burden, and investigate factors influencing this burden. Seventy-three patient-attendants (43 men and 30 women) participated in the pilot-research conducted by two clinics. Of them, 68% attended patients with a malignant disease and 32% attended patients in the end stage of renal disease. Based on questionnaire data, the influence of the social support was studied, in particular that of family members or through state programmers. Family members are the primary caregivers (spouses 51%, children 29%, and others 20%). Psychological support is the main important help that they need and there are a small number of caregivers who have access to a network of medical and social support. It is found that the family still remains the main supporting mechanism for attendants and patients in our population.

  6. Chronic kidney disease among children in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Cerón, Alejandro; Fort, Meredith P; Morine, Chris M; Lou-Meda, Randall

    2014-12-01

    To describe the distribution of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Guatemala, estimate incidence and prevalence of pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and estimate time to progress to ESRD. This study analyzed the registry of the only pediatric nephrology center in Guatemala, from 2004-2013. Incidence and prevalence were calculated for annual periods. Moran's index for spatial autocorrelation was used to determine significance of geographic distribution of incidence. Time to progress to ESRD and associated risk factors were calculated with multivariate Cox regression. Of 1 545 patients from birth to less than 20 years of age, 432 had chronic renal failure (CRF). Prevalence and incidence of ESRD were 4.9 and 4.6 per million age-related population, respectively. Incidence was higher for the Pacific coast and Guatemala City. The cause of CRF was undetermined in 43% of patients. Average time to progress to ESRD was 21.9 months; factors associated with progression were: older age, diagnosis of glomerulopathies, and advanced-stage CKD at consultation. Prevalence and incidence of ESRD in Guatemala are lower than in other countries. This may reflect poor access to diagnosis. Areas with higher incidence and large proportion of CKD of undetermined cause are compatible with other studies from the geographic subregion. Findings on progression to ESRD may reflect delayed referral.

  7. Use of prazosin in management of hypertension in patients with chronic renal failure and in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, J R; Bateman, F J

    1975-01-01

    Prazosin was used in combination with other antihypertensive drugs in the successful management of hypertension in seven patients with chronic renal failure and six renal transplant recipients, also with chronic renal failure. The addition of small doses of prazosin (mean 3 mg/day) to the antihypertensive regimen produced significant falls in systolic and diastolic blood pressures in both the lying and standing positions. The standing blood pressures were significantly lower than the lying blood pressures during prazosin treatment. Neither the mean blood urea concentrations nor the mean plasma creatinine concentrations changed significantly during prazosin administration. Chromium-51 edetic acid clearances did not change significantly during prazosin treatment in the seven patients in whom it was measured. Severe symptomatic postural hypotension occurred in one patient a week after starting prazosin 3 mg/day. This hypotensive episode was associated with a transient and reversible deterioration in renal function. Another patient developed a rash while on prazosin but it was probably related to propranolol rather than prazosin. Prazosin is thus an effective antihypertensive drug in patients with chronic renal failure, and it may be used with a variety of other drugs. It should be used cautiously, however, since patients with chronic renal failure may respond to small doses, and significant postural falls in blood pressure may result. There was no evidence that the use of prazosin resulted in progressive deterioration in the residual renal function of the patients with chronic renal failure. PMID:811312

  8. Use of prazosin in management of hypertension in patients with chronic renal failure and in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J R; Bateman, F J

    1975-11-22

    Prazosin was used in combination with other antihypertensive drugs in the successful management of hypertension in seven patients with chronic renal failure and six renal transplant recipients, also with chronic renal failure. The addition of small doses of prazosin (mean 3 mg/day) to the antihypertensive regimen produced significant falls in systolic and diastolic blood pressures in both the lying and standing positions. The standing blood pressures were significantly lower than the lying blood pressures during prazosin treatment. Neither the mean blood urea concentrations nor the mean plasma creatinine concentrations changed significantly during prazosin administration. Chromium-51 edetic acid clearances did not change significantly during prazosin treatment in the seven patients in whom it was measured. Severe symptomatic postural hypotension occurred in one patient a week after starting prazosin 3 mg/day. This hypotensive episode was associated with a transient and reversible deterioration in renal function. Another patient developed a rash while on prazosin but it was probably related to propranolol rather than prazosin. Prazosin is thus an effective antihypertensive drug in patients with chronic renal failure, and it may be used with a variety of other drugs. It should be used cautiously, however, since patients with chronic renal failure may respond to small doses, and significant postural falls in blood pressure may result. There was no evidence that the use of prazosin resulted in progressive deterioration in the residual renal function of the patients with chronic renal failure.

  9. Panniculectomy Outcomes in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease in Preparation for Renal Transplant.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Leela S; Rubio, Gustavo A; AlQattan, Husain T; Thaller, Seth R

    2018-06-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk factors, electrolyte imbalances, and iron deficiency anemia. These factors may increase the risk of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing panniculectomy. There is a paucity of data regarding outcomes in patients with ESRD undergoing panniculectomy. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether ESRD is associated with increased rate of complications following a panniculectomy. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample database (2006-2011) was used to identify patients who underwent a panniculectomy. Among this cohort, patients diagnosed with end-stage renal disease were identified. Patients excluded from the study were emergency admissions, pregnant women, patients less than 18 years old, and patients with concurrent nephrectomy or kidney transplants. Demographic factors, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were evaluated. Chi-squared and risk-adjusted multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine whether end-stage renal disease was associated with increased rate of postoperative complications. A total of 34,779 panniculectomies were performed during the study period. Of these, 613 (1.8%) were diagnosed with ESRD. Patients with ESRD were older (mean age 58.9 vs. 49.3, p < 0.01) and more likely to have Medicare (63.5 vs. 18.4%, p < 0.01). They had higher rates of comorbidities, including diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, chronic anemia, liver disease, peripheral artery disease, obesity, and coagulopathies (p < 0.01). The procedure was more likely to occur at a large, teaching hospital (p < 0.01). Postoperatively, patients with ESRD had a higher rate of death (3.3 vs. 0.2%, p < 0.01), wound complications (10.6 vs. 6.2%, p < 0.01), venous thromboembolism (4.9 vs. 0.8%, p < 0.01), blood transfusions (25.3% vs. 7.0%, p < 0.01), non-renal major medical complications (40.0% vs. 8.4%), and longer hospital

  10. The large spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Sheila; Pascual, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) among diabetic patients seems to be overestimated. Recent studies with renal biopsies show that the incidence of non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) among diabetic patients is higher than expected. Renal impairment of diabetic patients is frequently attributed to DN without meeting the KDOQI criteria or performing renal biopsy to exclude NDN. In this editorial, we update the spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients and the impact on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:28396743

  11. Homocystein as a Risk Factor for Developing Complications in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Biljana; Gasic, Branislav; Kovacevic, Pedja; Rajkovaca, Zvezdana; Kovacevic, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Cardiovascular diseases are leading cause of death in patients with chronic renal failure. The aim of our study was to establish connection between levels of homocysteine and traditional and nontraditional risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases in dialysis and pre dialysis patients. Methods: We included 33 pre dialysis (23 in stage three and 10 in stage four of chronic kidney disease) and 43 patients receiving hemodialysis longer than six months. Besides standard laboratory parameters, levels of homocysteine and blood pressure were measured in all patients. Glomerular filtration rate was measured in pre dialysis patients and dialysis quality parameters in dialysis patients. Results: Homocysteine levels were elevated in all patients (19±5.42mmol/l). The connection between homocysteine levels and other cardiovascular diseases risk factors was not established in pre dialysis patients. In patients treated with hemodialysis we found negative correlation between homocysteine levels and patients’ age (p<0.05) and positive correlation between homocysteine levels and length of dialysis (p<0.01) as well as between homocysteine and anemia parameters (erythrocytes, hemoglobin), (p<0.01). Homocysteine and LDL (and total cholesterol) were in negative correlation (p<0.01). Conclusion: Homocysteine, as one of nontraditional cardiovascular diseases risk factors, is elevated in all patients with chronic renal failure and it’s positive correlation with some other risk factors was found. PMID:26005384

  12. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p < 0.05), higher ADCs (2.46 ± 0.20 vs. 2.18 ± 0.10 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s, p < 0.05), lower R2*s (14.9 ± 1.7 vs. 18.1 ± 1.6 s -1 , p < 0.05), and lower tissue stiffness (3.2 ± 0.3 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5 kPa, p < 0.05). Excellent reproducibility of the quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal

  13. Renal function in juvenile rats subjected to prenatal malnutrition and chronic salt overload.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, João Carlos G; da Silveira, Alex B; Mota, Diogenes L; Paixão, Ana Durce O

    2006-05-01

    Dietary sodium may contribute to hypertension and to cardiovascular and renal disease if a primary deficiency of the kidney to excrete sodium exists. In order to investigate whether chronic 1% NaCl in the drinking water changes blood pressure and renal haemodynamics in juvenile Wistar rats subjected to prenatal malnutrition, an evaluation of plasma volume, oxidative stress in the kidney, proteinuria and renal haemodynamics was carried out. Malnutrition was induced by a multideficient diet. Mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured using a blood pressure transducer, a flow probe and inulin clearance, respectively. Plasma volume and oxidative stress were measured by means of the Evans Blue method and by monitoring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the kidneys, respectively. Urinary protein was measured by precipitation with 3% sulphosalicylic acid. It was observed that prenatally malnourished rats presented higher values of plasma volume (26%, P < 0.05), kidney TBARS (43%, P < 0.01) and blood pressure (10%, P < 0.01) when compared with the control group. However, they showed no change in renal haemodynamics or proteinuria. Neither prenatally malnourished nor control rats treated with sodium overload presented plasma volume or blood pressure values different from their respective control groups, but both groups presented elevated proteinuria (P < 0.01). The prenatally malnourished group treated with sodium overload presented higher values of kidney TBARS, GFR and filtration fraction (58, 87 and 72% higher, respectively, P < 0.01) than its respective control group. In summary, sodium overload did not exacerbate the hypertension in juvenile prenatally malnourished rats, but induced renal haemodynamic adjustments compatible with the development of renal disease.

  14. [Colonic angiodysplasia in a chronic renal failure patient].

    PubMed

    Tudor, S; Dima, B; Herlea, V; Chiriac-Babei, Gh; Vasilescu, C

    2006-01-01

    An important cause of intestinal bleeding in patients with chronic renal failure is angiodysplasia. In retrospective reports up to 19-32% of patients had bleeding from angiodysplastic lesions. These are usually multiple, have a high tendency of rebleeding (25-47%) and are often located in the stomach and duodenum, but can affect the colon and the jejunum as well. Bleeding from angiodysplastic lesions is usually low grade and stops spontaneously in more than 90% of patients, but some times may be life threatening necessitate therapeutic interventions to achieve hemostasis. We report a case of an 18-year old female with renal failure on CAPD who presented a massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding and imposed emergency surgery.

  15. MRI appearance of massive renal replacement lipomatosis in the absence of renal calculus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, E; Melamed, J; Taneja, S S; Rosenkrantz, A B

    2011-01-01

    Renal replacement lipomatosis is a rare benign entity in which extensive fibrofatty proliferation of the renal sinus is associated with marked renal atrophy. In this report, we present a case of massive renal replacement lipomatosis demonstrated on MRI. The presentation was atypical given an absence of associated renal calculus disease, and an initial CT scan was interpreted as suspicious for a liposarcoma. The differential diagnosis and key MRI findings that served to establish this specific diagnosis are reviewed. Histopathological correlation is also presented, as the patient underwent nephroureterectomy. PMID:21257835

  16. Role of L-arginine in the pathogenesis and treatment of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cherla, Gautam; Jaimes, Edgar A

    2004-10-01

    L-arginine is a semi essential amino acid and also a substrate for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), polyamines, and agmatine. These L-arginine metabolites may participate in the pathogenesis of renal disease and constitute the rationale for manipulating L-arginine metabolism as a strategy to ameliorate kidney disease. Modification of dietary L-arginine intake in experimental models of kidney diseases has been shown to have both beneficial as well as deleterious effects depending on the specific model studied. L-arginine supplementation in animal models of glomerulonephritis has been shown to be detrimental, probably by increasing the production of NO from increased local expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). L-arginine supplementation does not modify the course of renal disease in humans with chronic glomerular diseases. However, beneficial effects of L-arginine supplementation have been reported in several models of chronic kidney disease including renal ablation, ureteral obstruction, nephropathy secondary to diabetes, and salt-sensitive hypertension. L-arginine is reduced in preeclampsia and recent experimental studies indicate that L-arginine supplementation may be beneficial in attenuating the symptoms of preeclampsia. Administration of exogenous L-arginine has been shown to be protective in ischemic acute renal failure. In summary, the role of L-arginine in the pathogenesis and treatment of renal disease is not completely understood and remains to be established.

  17. Renovascular disease, microcirculation, and the progression of renal injury: role of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports the pivotal role of renal microvascular disease as a determinant of tubulo-interstitial and glomerular fibrosis in chronic kidney disease. An intact microcirculation is vital to restore blood flow to the injured tissues, which is a crucial step to achieve a successful repair response. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact and mechanisms of the functional and structural changes of the renal microvascular network, as well as the role of these changes in the progression and irreversibility of renal injury. Damage of the renal microcirculation and deterioration of the angiogenic response may constitute early steps in the complex pathways involved in progressive renal injury. There is limited but provocative evidence that stimulation of vascular proliferation and repair may stabilize renal function and slow the progression of renal disease. The feasibility of novel potential therapeutic interventions for stabilizing the renal microvasculature is also discussed. Targeted interventions to enhance endogenous renoprotective mechanisms focused on the microcirculation, such as cell-based therapy or the use of angiogenic cytokines have shown promising results in some experimental and clinical settings. PMID:21307362

  18. Urea-induced ROS generation causes insulin resistance in mice with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    D’Apolito, Maria; Du, Xueliang; Zong, Haihong; Catucci, Alessandra; Maiuri, Luigi; Trivisano, Tiziana; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo; Raia, Valeria; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Brownlee, Michael; Giardino, Ida

    2009-01-01

    Although supraphysiological concentrations of urea are known to increase oxidative stress in cultured cells, it is generally thought that the elevated levels of urea in chronic renal failure patients have negligible toxicity. We previously demonstrated that ROS increase intracellular protein modification by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), and others showed that increased modification of insulin signaling molecules by O-GlcNAc reduces insulin signal transduction. Because both oxidative stress and insulin resistance have been observed in patients with end-stage renal disease, we sought to determine the role of urea in these phenotypes. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with urea at disease-relevant concentrations induced ROS production, caused insulin resistance, increased expression of adipokines retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and resistin, and increased O-GlcNAc–modified insulin signaling molecules. Investigation of a mouse model of surgically induced renal failure (uremic mice) revealed increased ROS production, modification of insulin signaling molecules by O-GlcNAc, and increased expression of RBP4 and resistin in visceral adipose tissue. Uremic mice also displayed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, and treatment with an antioxidant SOD/catalase mimetic normalized these defects. The SOD/catalase mimetic treatment also prevented the development of insulin resistance in normal mice after urea infusion. These data suggest that therapeutic targeting of urea-induced ROS may help reduce the high morbidity and mortality caused by end-stage renal disease. PMID:19955654

  19. End-stage renal disease and its treatment in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Milanés, Carmen Luisa; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2002-09-01

    In Venezuela there are 3234 new cases (132 per million population [pmp]) requiring renal replacement therapy each year, and only 40% of these are admitted to the different modalities of dialysis. In the year 2000, there were 195 patients pmp in chronic hemodialysis (4700 patients). Diabetes, glomerular diseases, and hypertension account for more than 60% of the patients in chronic dialysis. Gross mortality in hemodialysis is around 20%, and cardiovascular causes are the primary cause of death (39.5%). Hospital admission in the dialysis patients amounts to 4.6 days/patient/year. Rehabilitation is inadequate. Only 45% of the dialysis patients report normal home or work activities. Transplantation in Venezuela has a general graft survival rate of 83% at 1 year (90% for living related grafts) and 50% (64% for living related grafts) at 10 years. Future tendencies include emphasis in preventive strategies, including early detection and treatment of diabetes and hypertension, as well as efforts to increase the rate of renal transplantation.

  20. Opportunities for improving management of advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Meenal B; Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Haley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Evidence suggests that management of advanced chronic kidney disease affects patient outcomes. To identify clinical areas that demand attention from a quality improvement perspective, we sought to examine the extent of conformance to an advanced chronic kidney disease guideline in a range of practices. A total of 237 patient medical records were abstracted from 4 primary care providers and 4 nephrology private practices across the country. In the practices studied, management of advanced chronic kidney disease patients was suboptimal for patients managed by primary care providers as well as those managed by nephrologists (overall conformance 27% and 42%, respectively), specifically for anemia, bone disease, and timing for renal replacement therapy. The current exercise (in conjunction with a literature search and focused and individual interviews with providers and patients) offered valuable information that was used to develop a toolkit for optimizing management of advanced chronic kidney disease.

  1. Uric acid and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Donald J

    2018-06-21

    The association between serum uric acid levels and human disease has garnered intense interest over the last decade including chronic kidney disease. Animal studies have provided evidence for a potential mechanistic role of uric acid in promoting progression of chronic kidney disease. Epidemiologic studies have also suggested an association between elevated serum uric acid levels and worsening renal function in the general population as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend the use of uric acid-lowering therapy to delay progression of chronic kidney disease in this patient population. Adequately powered, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are required to more precisely evaluate the risk and benefits of uric acid-lowering therapy in pediatric patients.

  2. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  3. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. Salt, hypertension and renal disease: comparative medicine, models and real diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Michell, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Dogs are well established as experimental animals for the study of both renal disease and hypertension, but most work is based on surgical or pharmacological models and relatively little on spontaneous diseases. This review argues for the latter as an underexploited aspect of comparative medicine. The most important feature of canine hypertension may not be the ease with which models can be produced but the fact that dogs are actually rather resistant to hypertension, and perhaps to its effects, even when they have chronic renal failure. The importance of natural models of chronic renal failure is strengthened by the evidence that self-sustaining progression is a consequence of extreme nephron loss, that is, a late event, rather than the dominant feature of the course of the disease. The role of salt in hypertension is discussed and emphasis given to the importance of understanding the physiological basis of nutritional requirement and recognizing that it is unlikely to exceed 0.6 mmol/kg/day for most healthy adult mammals except during pregnancy or lactation. Such a perspective is essential to the evaluation of experiments, whether in animals or humans, in order to avoid arbitrary definitions of 'high' or 'low' sodium intake, and the serious misinterpretations of data which result. An age-related rise in arterial pressure may well be a warning of excess salt intake, rather than a normal occurrence. Problems of defining hypertension in the face of variability of arterial pressure are also discussed. PMID:7831161

  5. Advanced glycation end products in children with chronic renal failure and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Joachim; Franke, Sybille; Kauf, Eberhard; John, Ulrike; Stein, Günter

    2002-05-01

    Serum levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are markedly elevated in adults with chronic renal failure (CRF) and diabetes mellitus. Accumulation of AGEs in tissues contributes to the development of long-term complications. Up to now little has been known about the formation of AGEs in childhood. We determined serum levels of the well known AGEs pentosidine and Nvarepsilon-carboxymethyllysine (CML) in children with CRF (n=12), end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (n=9), renal transplantation (n=12), and type 1 diabetes mellitus (n=42) and in healthy children (n=20). Pentosidine was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), CML by a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system. Serum levels of pentosidine and CML were significantly higher in the children with CRF and ESRD than in controls (P< 0.001), but nearly within the normal range after transplantation. Both AGEs showed a significant negative correlation with creatinine clearance (P< 0.001). During a single session of low-flux hemodialysis, total pentosidine and CML levels did not change. Free pentosidine, however, was reduced by 78% (P=0.04). Diabetic children showed significantly elevated pentosidine levels (P< 0.001) despite normal renal function. We conclude that, similar to adults, increased formation and accumulation of AGEs also exist in children with CRF and type 1 diabetes mellitus. At present the best prevention of AGE-related complications is an early renal transplantation in children with ESRD, as well as a careful metabolic monitoring of diabetics.

  6. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and acute renal failure in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Response to obinutuzumab.

    PubMed

    Jain, Punit; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Wierda, William; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Jain, Nitin

    2017-09-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) is a common extramedullary renal presentation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and can present with either a frank renal failure or proteinuria. One of its etiologies has been attributed to a paraneoplastic, immune complex phenomenon occurring in CLL. Although there is no standard of care in such patients, use of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies like rituximab have been used before in such patients with variable responses. Obinutuzumab is a novel, type II, immunoglobulin-G1 monoclonal antibody with a higher efficacy than rituximab and has an established safely profile in patients with comorbidities and poor renal functions. There are no such reported cases of MPGN in CLL being treated with obinutuzumab. We used the standard doses of obinutuzumab in our elderly patient (78-year-old woman) with high-risk CLL due to an underlying TP53 mutation, along with a MPGN-related acute renal failure. The patient achieved complete remission after six cycles of obinutuzumab; however, she remained positive for minimal residual disease on flow cytometry. Her renal function improved completely, suggesting a complete response of her underlying MPGN. Obinutuzumab has an established safety profile in patients with CLL, but our case is the first reported case of a paraneoplastic, immune complex-mediated MPGN in CLL being treated with obinutuzumab. Obinutuzumab should be explored as a potential option in patients with CLL and MPGN. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging drugs for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stefoni, Sergio; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; Baraldi, Olga; Iorio, Mario; Angelini, Maria Laura

    2014-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide health problem. Despite remarkable headway in slowing the progression of kidney diseases, the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing in all countries with a severe impact on patients and society. The high incidence of diabetes and hypertension, along with the aging population, may partially explain this growth. Currently, the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for CKD, aiming to slow progression to ESRD are ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for their hemodynamic/antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory/antifibrotic action. However, novel drugs would be highly desirable to effectively slow the progressive renal function loss. Through the search engines, PubMed and ClinicalTrial.gov, the scientific literature was reviewed in search of emerging drugs in Phase II or III trials, which appear to be the most promising for CKD treatment. The great expectations for new drugs for the management of CKD over the last decade have unfortunately not been met. Encouraging results from preliminary studies with specific agents need to be tempered with caution, given the absence of consistent and adequate data. To date, several agents that showed great promise in animal studies have been less effective in humans.

  8. Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    González-Parra, Emilio; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency. PMID:22701173

  9. Elevated plasma TGF-beta1 in renal diseases: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Junker, U; Haufe, C C; Nuske, K; Rebstock, K; Steiner, T; Wunderlich, H; Junker, K; Reinhold, D

    2000-07-01

    We previously reported elevated levels of TGF-beta1 in patients with renal carcinoma. Certain aspects led us to ask whether they might be caused by chronic damage to the kidney(s). Here we report on an extended set of patients with various renal diseases, lung cancer, humoral immunodeficiency and controls. For latent TGF-beta1 in plasma, we find that the control, immunodeficiency, lung cancer and kidney transplant groups do not differ significantly (means, 7.0-8.8 ng/ml). Also, acute short-term renal stress (extracorporal lithotrypsy) does not lead to an increase of TGF-beta1. However, the pyelonephritis patients present with levels of 19.0 ng/ml, chronic extracorporal dialysis patients with 15.5 ng/ml, and renal cell carcinoma patients with 22.8 ng/ml. For active TGF-beta1 these findings are exactly recovered. For serum levels, only the renal carcinoma group presents with significantly elevated levels of TGF-beta1. Kidney transplantation seems to normalize TGF-beta1 levels, while in the kidney cancer patients surgery has an effect only in part of the group. We conclude that elevated plasma TGF-beta1 levels are common in at least two chronic renal disease conditions, and that it normalizes with restoration of renal function. It is tempting to speculate that chronic elevation of TGF-beta1 in these patients may be critically involved in these conditions predisposing to renal cancer. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Effects of chronic lithium administration on renal acid excretion in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Leader, John P.; Bedford, Jennifer J.; Verlander, Jill W.; Ellis, Gaye; Kalita, Priyakshi; Vos, Frederiek; de Jong, Sylvia; Walker, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lithium therapy's most common side effects affecting the kidney are nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and chronic kidney disease. Lithium may also induce a distal renal tubular acidosis. This study investigated the effect of chronic lithium exposure on renal acid–base homeostasis, with emphasis on ammonia and citrate excretion. We compared 11 individuals on long‐term lithium therapy with six healthy individuals. Under basal conditions, lithium‐treated individuals excreted significantly more urinary ammonia than did control subjects. Following an acute acid load, urinary ammonia excretion increased approximately twofold above basal rates in both lithium‐treated and control humans. There were no significant differences between lithium‐treated and control subjects in urinary pH or urinary citrate excretion. To elucidate possible mechanisms, rats were randomized to diets containing lithium or regular diet for 6 months. Similar to humans, basal ammonia excretion was significantly higher in lithium‐treated rats; in addition, urinary citrate excretion was also significantly greater. There were no differences in urinary pH. Expression of the critical ammonia transporter, Rhesus C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), was substantially greater in lithium‐treated rats than in control rats. We conclude that chronic lithium exposure increases renal ammonia excretion through mechanisms independent of urinary pH and likely to involve increased collecting duct ammonia secretion via the ammonia transporter, Rhcg. PMID:25501430

  11. CT imaging spectrum of infiltrative renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; De Alba, Luis; Migliaro, Matias; Previgliano, Carlos H; Sangster, Guillermo P

    2017-11-01

    Most renal lesions replace the renal parenchyma as a focal space-occupying mass with borders distinguishing the mass from normal parenchyma. However, some renal lesions exhibit interstitial infiltration-a process that permeates the renal parenchyma by using the normal renal architecture for growth. These infiltrative lesions frequently show nonspecific patterns that lead to little or no contour deformity and have ill-defined borders on CT, making detection and diagnosis challenging. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe the CT imaging findings of various conditions that may manifest as infiltrative renal lesions.

  12. Validation of an Experimental Model to Study Less Severe Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Charpiot, Ida Mária Maximina; Caldas, Heloisa Cristina; Mendes, Glória Elisa Florido; Gomes de Sá Neto, Luiz; Oliveira, Henrique Lacativa; Baptista, Maria Alice Sperto Ferreira; Abbud-Filho, Mario

    2016-10-01

    The 5/6 nephrectomy, mimics the stages of human chronic renal failure (CRF), but the procedure causes severe renal functional and morphological damage that could interfere with the evaluation of therapies for slowing the progression of the disease. This study summarizes the results of renal function, histology, and immunohistochemical findings in rats undergoing a 2/3 nephrectomy. The rats were distributed in groups according to the type of nephrectomy: CRF5/6: induced by a 5/6 renal mass reduction and CRF2/3: less severe CRF. The body weight and blood pressure were monitored, and the serum creatinine (SCr), creatinine clearance (CCr), urine osmolality, and 24-h proteinuria (PT24h) were measured. CRF progression was evaluated by the rate of decline of CCr (RCCr). Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed in the remnant kidneys. Statistical analysis was done by unpaired t-test, and a P-value < 0.05 was taken as a statistical significance. Compared to the CRF5/6 group, the CRF2/3 model had a lower SCr, PT24h, CCr, and variations of the SCr from baseline. The disease progression was also significantly slower. The renal histopathological findings revealed fewer chronic lesions in rats with CRF2/3. Similarly, we observed less macrophage accumulation as well as lower proliferative activity and expression of fibronectin and a-smooth muscle-actin in the CRF2/3 model. The CRF2/3 model presented with a pattern of less severe CRF, functionally and morphologically, compared to the classical CRF5/6 model, and the CRF2/3 model may be useful for evaluating therapeutic interventions that target the early stages of CRF.

  13. Nosogogy: when the learner is a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, L; Paris, V

    2006-11-01

    Patient education approaches are currently derived from a biomedical 'acute' model characterized by the sequence of health, disease, and recovery resulting from our professional intervention. Unfortunately, this model proves to be totally inadequate when applied to a chronic disease such as kidney failure. Our patients never fully regain their health and may continue to worsen under our care, even after many state-of-the-art treatments. The solution is represented in acquiring a new professional identity, shifting from the 'biomedical' acute model to a 'bio-psycho-social-educational model'. Within this model, a Therapeutic Education approach in predialysis has been proven to provide both short- and long-term positive results for renal patients. There is a tremendous difference between the learning processes in children and adults and two different sciences have already been described. 'Pedagogy' deals with child learning and 'Andragogy' with adult learning. Nevertheless, when the learner is a patient with a chronic disease, we believe that new considerations must be taken into account. We propose to create a novel science and to call it 'Nosogogy', derived from the ancient Greek word (see text), meaning 'disease'. Nosogogy could be defined as the science of teaching adults affected by chronic disease. The new educator is someone deeply involved in renal care who knows and understands the characteristic conflicts and dynamics that arise in the renal patient, and possesses adequate communication skills to deal with him. In our experience, we prefer to have educational sessions run by nephrologists and nurses who have great experience in the field.

  14. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACD include: Autoimmune disorders , such as Crohn disease , systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , ... AOCD; ACD Images Blood cells References Bunn HF. Approach to the anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  15. Elevated serum concentrations of HE4 as a novel biomarker of disease severity and renal fibrosis in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jianbo; Yue, Caifeng; Wang, Fen; Song, Junli; Wang, Jianfeng; Liu, Min; Luo, Jinmei; Li, Laisheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), has recently been reported as a mediator of renal fibrosis. However, serum HE4 levels appear in a large number of patient samples with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the relationship of these levels to disease severity and renal fibrosis is unknown. Methods In 427 patients at different stages of CKD excluding gynecologic cancer and 173 healthy subjects, serum HE4 concentrations were tested by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Renal biopsy was performed on 259 of 427 subjects. Histological findings were evaluated using standard immunohistochemistry. Results The levels of serum HE4 were higher in CKD patients than in healthy subjects, and higher levels were associated with more severe CKD stages. Patients with more severe renal fibrosis tended to have higher HE4 levels, and correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between HE4 and degree of renal fibrosis (r = 0.938, P < 0.0001). HE4 can be a predictor of renal fibrosis in CKD patients; the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) was 0.99, higher than the AUC-ROC of serum creatinine (0.89). Conclusion Elevated levels of serum HE4 are associated with decreased kidney function, and also with an advanced stage of renal fibrosis, suggesting that HE4 may serve as a valuable clinical biomarker for renal fibrosis of CKD. PMID:27589683

  16. Albumin modification and fragmentation in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Carlo; Tognotti, Danika; Donadio, Elena

    2012-02-18

    Albumin is the most important antioxidant substance in plasma and performs many physiological functions. Furthermore, albumin is the major carrier of endogenous molecules and exogenous ligands. This paper reviews the importance of post-translational modifications of albumin and fragments thereof in patients with renal disease. First, current views and controversies on renal handling of proteins, mainly albumin, will be discussed. Post-translational modifications, namely the fragmentation of albumin found with proteomic techniques in nephrotic patients, diabetics, and ESRD patients will be presented and discussed. It is reasonable to hypothesize that proteolytic fragmentation of serum albumin is due to a higher susceptibility to proteases, induced by oxidative stress. The clinical relevance of the fragmentation of albumin has not yet been established. These modifications could affect some physiological functions of albumin and have a patho-physiological role in uremic syndrome. Proteomic analysis of serum allows the identification of over-expressed proteins and can detect post-translational modifications of serum proteins, hitherto hidden, using standard laboratory techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  18. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  19. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  20. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  1. Dietary protein intake and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Gang Jee; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Tortorici, Amanda R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-01-01

    High-protein intake may lead to increased intraglomerular pressure and glomerular hyperfiltration. This can cause damage to glomerular structure leading to or aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hence, a low-protein diet (LPD) of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day is often recommended for the management of CKD. We reviewed the effect of protein intake on incidence and progression of CKD and the role of LPD in the CKD management. Actual dietary protein consumption in CKD patients remains substantially higher than the recommendations for LPD. Notwithstanding the inconclusive results of the 'Modification of Diet in Renal Disease' (MDRD) study, the largest randomized controlled trial to examine protein restriction in CKD, several prior and subsequent studies and meta-analyses appear to support the role of LPD on retarding progression of CKD and delaying initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy. LPD can also be used to control metabolic derangements in CKD. Supplemented LPD with essential amino acids or their ketoanalogs may be used for incremental transition to dialysis especially on nondialysis days. The LPD management in lieu of dialysis therapy can reduce costs, enhance psychological adaptation, and preserve residual renal function upon transition to dialysis. Adherence and adequate protein and energy intake should be ensured to avoid protein-energy wasting. A balanced and individualized dietary approach based on LPD should be elaborated with periodic dietitian counseling and surveillance to optimize management of CKD, to assure adequate protein and energy intake, and to avoid or correct protein-energy wasting.

  2. Role of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 renal activity in potassium homeostasis in rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yeyati, N L; Altuna, M E; Damasco, M C; Mac Laughlin, M A

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone concentrations vary in advanced chronic renal failure (CRF). The isozyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11beta-HSD2), which confers aldosterone specificity for mineralocorticoid receptors in distal tubules and collecting ducts, has been reported to be decreased or normal in patients with renal diseases. Our objective was to determine the role of aldosterone and 11beta-HSD2 renal microsome activity, normalized for glomerular filtration rate (GFR), in maintaining K+ homeostasis in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. Male Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g at the beginning of the study were used. Rats with experimental CRF obtained by 5/6 nephrectomy (N = 9) and sham rats (N = 10) were maintained for 4 months. Systolic blood pressure and plasma creatinine (Pcr) concentration were measured at the end of the experiment. Sodium and potassium excretion and GFR were evaluated before and after spironolactone administration (10 mg.kg-1.day-1 for 7 days) and 11beta-HSD2 activity on renal microsomes was determined. Systolic blood pressure (means +/- SEM; Sham = 105 +/- 8 and CRF = 149 +/- 10 mmHg) and Pcr (Sham = 0.42 +/- 0.03 and CRF = 2.53 +/- 0.26 mg/dL) were higher (P < 0.05) while GFR (Sham = 1.46 +/- 0.26 and CRF = 0.61 +/- 0.06 mL/min) was lower (P < 0.05) in CRF, and plasma aldosterone (Pald) was the same in the two groups. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion was similar in the two groups under basal conditions but, after spironolactone treatment, only potassium excretion was decreased in CRF rats (sham = 0.95 +/- 0.090 (before) vs 0.89 +/- 0.09 microEq/min (after) and CRF = 1.05 +/- 0.05 (before) vs 0.37 +/- 0.07 microEq/min (after); P < 0.05). 11beta-HSD2 activity on renal microsomes was lower in CRF rats (sham = 0.807 +/- 0.09 and CRF = 0.217 +/- 0.07 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1; P < 0.05), although when normalized for mL GFR it was similar in both groups. We conclude that K+ homeostasis is maintained during CRF development despite normal Pald levels. This

  3. Energy expenditure in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Monteon, F J; Laidlaw, S A; Shaib, J K; Kopple, J D

    1986-11-01

    Although nondialyzed, chronically uremic patients and patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis often show evidence for wasting and calorie malnutrition and have low dietary energy intakes, their energy expenditure has never been systematically evaluated. It is possible that low energy intakes are an adaptive response to reduced energy needs; alternatively, energy expenditure could be normal or high and the low energy intakes would be inappropriate. Energy expenditure was therefore measured by indirect calorimetry in 12 normal individuals, 10 nondialyzed patients with chronic renal failure, and 16 patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Energy expenditure was measured in the resting state, during quiet sitting, during controlled exercise on an exercise bicycle, and for four hours after ingestion of a test meal. Resting energy expenditure (kcal/min/1.73 m2) in the normal subjects, chronically uremic patients and hemodialysis patients was, respectively, 0.94 +/- 0.24 (SD), 0.91 +/- 0.20, and 0.97 +/- 0.10. There was also no difference among the three groups in energy expenditure during sitting, exercise, or the postprandial state. Within each group, energy expenditure during resting and sitting was directly correlated. During bicycling, energy expenditure was directly correlated with work performed, and the regression equation for this relationship was similar in each of the three groups. These findings suggest that for a given physical activity, energy expenditure in nondialyzed, chronically uremic patients and maintenance hemodialysis patients is not different from normal. The low energy intakes of many of these patients may be inadequate for their needs.

  4. Plasma pentosidine levels measured by a newly developed method using ELISA in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sanaka, Tsutomu; Funaki, Takenori; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Hoshi, Sayako; Niwayama, Jyun; Taitoh, Takashi; Nishimura, Hideki; Higuchi, Chieko

    2002-05-01

    The plasma pentosidine levels in patients with renal disease were measured by a simple method which was established for plasma and urinary pentosidine determinations. The method, which can be completed within a few hours, involves pretreating plasma with proteolytic enzyme (pronase) and measuring the concentration of pentosidine in the sample by ELISA using antipentosidine antibodies. The prepared antibodies showed no cross-reaction with the raw materials for pentosidine synthesis or with compounds having similar structures. SDS-PAGE indicated that the antibodies had a high purity. The reaction of the antibodies and keyhole limpet hemocyanin-pentosidine in the competitive ELISA system was inhibited by free pentosidine. Excellent standard curves for pentosidine determination were obtained. In actual measurements of clinical samples from patients, a good correlation (r = 0.9356) was obtained between the values measured by ELISA and HPLC. The plasma pentosidine level in patients with renal disease correlated significantly with plasma creatinine, urea nitrogen, beta2-microglobulin, and creatinine clearance, indicating its usefulness in evaluating the severity of renal disease. A significant elevation in plasma pentosidine levels was observed in mild renal dysfunction, whereas no significant increases in creatinine and urea nitrogen levels were detected, suggesting that the plasma pentosidine level is useful in the early diagnosis of beginning renal failure. In patients with chronic renal failure, no difference in plasma pentosidine levels was observed between diabetic nephropathy and chronic glomerulonephritis, while a significant correlation was observed with phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide, suggesting the possibility that the plasma pentosidine level reflects injury due to oxidation. From these results, the quantitative measurement method developed by us is judged to be a superior innovation for measuring pentosidine in body fluids. The plasma pentosidine level may

  5. Therapeutical relevance of MAP-kinase inhibitors in renal diseases: current knowledge and future clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grande, M Teresa; López-Novoa, José M

    2008-01-01

    Renal failure, both acute and chronic, represents an important health problem by its social, sanitary and economic aspects. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are a family of mediators involved in the transduction of extracellular stimuli to intracellular responses. The best studied members of this family are extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and ERK2), Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 kinase and extracellular signal regulated kinases 5 (ERK5) also known as big MAP Kinase 1 (BMK1). MAPKs plays a role in regulating renal function and all these pathways have been demonstrated to be activated in many "in vivo" and cellular models or renal failure. As MAP kinases are key regulators in the control of cell proliferation and cell death, many more or less specific inhibitors of these pathways are being developed for the treatment of tumors. The purpose of this review is to examine the data available on the role of MAPKs activation in "in vivo" models of renal failure, as well as in different renal cell types (especially in mesangial cells, podocytes, tubular epithelial cells and fibroblasts) subjected to stress or damage. We have also reviewed the effect of MAPKs inhibition on renal damage, both "in vivo" and "in vitro". Data collected allow to suggest that therapy of chronic and acute renal disease with MAPKs inhibitors is a promising therapeutic area, although much more basic and clinical studies are necessary before this kind of therapy can be used in the everyday clinic.

  6. [Chronic kidney disease - The relevant information for an occupational physician].

    PubMed

    Renke, Marcin; Parszuto, Jacek; Rybacki, Marcin; Wołyniec, Wojciech; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2018-01-01

    For a number of years chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been listed in the group of lifestyle diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hypertension. It is estimated that in Poland more than 4 million people may suffer from various stages of CKD. Chronic kidney disease may also be a consequence of all the other civilization diseases. At the same time it is worth noting that nephrological problems are increasingly being taken into account in modern medical certification. The aim of this work is, among other things, to improve safe access to the labor for patients with kidney diseases. In the legislation existing in our country since 2014 it is stated that chronic renal failure is a potential health contraindication to driving. Also in the annex to the Regulation of the Minister of Health dated 9 December 2015 on health conditions required for seafarers to work on a seagoing ship, it is said that ICD-10 codes (International Classification of Diseases) corresponding to acute and chronic renal failure (N17-N19) should be taken into account when qualifying employees to work at sea. Med Pr 2018;69(1):67-75. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. Allopurinol Against Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Sima; Almasi, Afshin; Manouchehri, M; Omrani, Hamid Reza; Zandkarimi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in approximately 50% of patients with kidney failure due to decreased uric acid excretion, and it has been recently known as an independent factor in the progression of renal insufficiency. Allopurinol inhibits the production of uric acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of allopurinol on chronic kidney disease progression. In a clinical trial, patients with stages 3 and 4 of chronic kidney disease were divided into two groups to receive allopurinol, 100 mg, daily and placebo for 12 months. Patients' kidney function and serum uric acid levels were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after initial administration. Subgroups of patients with severe and mild glomerular filtration rate (GFR) impairment (GFR, 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively), were compared between the groups. Serum uric acid levels decreased significantly during after 12 months of allopurinol administration (P = .004). In patients with severe GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels did not decrease significantly and there was no significant increase in GFR, but in those with mild GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels decreased and GFR increase significantly (P < .001) after administration of allopurinol. These effects were not observed in the control subgroups. Allopurinol may slow down stage 3 chronic kidney disease progression and could be administered with other effective medications for controlling the kidney disease.

  8. Chronic periodontitis, inflammatory cytokines, and interrelationship with other chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Elsa Maria; Reis, Cátia; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as chronic periodontitis, share common inflammatory risk factors with other systemic and chronic inflammatory disorders. Mucosal tissues, such as oral epithelia, are exposed to environmental stressors, such as tobacco and oral bacteria, that might be involved in promoting a systemic inflammatory state. Conversely, chronic disorders can also affect oral health. This review will summarize recent evidence for the interrelationship between chronic periodontitis and other prevalent chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases. The association with pregnancy is also included due to possible obstetric complications. We will focus on inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6, because they have been shown to be increased in patients with chronic periodontitis, in patients with chronic systemic diseases, and in patients with both chronic periodontitis and other chronic diseases. Therefore, an imbalance towards a proinflammatory immune response could underline a bidirectional link between chronic periodontitis and other chronic diseases. Finally, we highlight that a close coordination between dental and other health professionals could promote oral health and prevent or ameliorate other chronic diseases.

  9. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns. PMID:27210744

  10. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  11. Renal autotransplantation--a possibility in the treatment of complex renal vascular diseases and ureteric injuries.

    PubMed

    Hau, Hans Michael; Bartels, Michael; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Morgul, Mehmet Haluk; Fellmer, Peter; Ho-Thi, Phuc; Benckert, Christoph; Uhlmann, Dirk; Moche, Michael; Thelen, Armin; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven

    2012-12-31

    We report our contemporary experiences with renal autotransplantation in patients with complicated renal vascular diseases and/or complex ureteral injuries. Since its first performance, renal autotransplantation has been steadily improved and become a safe and effective procedure. Between 1998 and 2006, 6 renal autotransplantations in 6 patients were performed at the University Medical Center of Leipzig. After nephrectomy and renal perfusion ex vivo, the kidney was implanted standardized in the fossa iliaca. The vessels were anastomized to the iliac vessels, the ureter was reimplanted in an extravesical tunneled ureteroneocystostomy technique according to Lich-Gregoir. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of the patients were collected and analyzed for pre-, intra-, and postoperative period. Indications for renal autotransplantation were complex renovascular diseases in 2 patients (1 with fibromuscular dysplasia and 1 with Takayasu's arteritis) and in 4 patients with complex ureteral injuries. The median duration of follow-up was 9.7 years (range: 5.6-13.3). The laboratory values of our 6 patients showed improvements of creatinine, urea and blood pressure levels in comparison to the preoperative status at the end of follow-up period. The present study reports excellent results of renal autotransplantation in patients with renovascular disease or complex ureteric injuries. After a median follow-up of 9.7 years all 6 patients present with stable renal function as well as normal blood pressure values. Postoperative complications were observed with a rate comparable to other studies.

  12. [Watermelon stomach: Chronic renal failure and/or imatinib?].

    PubMed

    Montagnac, Richard; Blaison, Dominique; Brahimi, Saïd; Schendel, Adeline; Levasseur, Thomas; Takin, Romulus

    2015-11-01

    Watermelon stomach or gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) syndrome is an uncommon cause of sometimes severe