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Sample records for renal disease chronic

  1. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  2. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  3. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  4. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  5. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  6. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  7. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  8. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  9. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following...

  10. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following...

  11. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following...

  12. Renal tubular acidosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis of the gradient or classic type, thought to be due to a disorder of the distal tubule, has been found to occur in 32% of 117 patients with chronic liver disease. Whilst the cause of this disorder is probably multifactorial, immunological mechanisms are considered to play a major role. The presence of this disorder might well be a cause, rather than the result of, the various electrolyte abnormalities seen in patients with chronic liver disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 6 PMID:1234340

  13. Preeclampsia or initial diagnosis of chronic renal disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, C; Kalmantis, K; Bozemberg, T; Ntziora, F; Ioakeimidis, A; Paschalinopoulos, D

    2008-01-01

    An unusual case of early nephrotic syndrome without hypertension which slightly resolved after delivery is documented. Renal biopsy was performed postpartum and the diagnosis was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis with moderate chronic renal changes. It is questioned whether the case was due to preeclampsia or was the initial diagnosis of chronic renal disease which was made during pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in such cases is briefly discussed (Tab. 2, Ref. 15). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  15. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  16. Ammonium chloride poisoning in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Donald L.; Knight, Allan

    1974-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a long history of renal stone disease and urinary tract infection presented to the emergency room with exhaustion and air hunger. Laboratory data confirmed profound metabolic acidosis. Unduly large quantities of bicarbonate and potassium were required for correction of the deficits. She had been taking 6 g daily of ammonium chloride as a urine-acidifying agent for a period of six months in addition to agents directed against urinary tract infection. The combination of impaired renal function and effective hydrogen ion loading resulted in profound systemic acidosis. The metabolic derangements associated with the administration of ammonium chloride and its use as a therapeutic agent are discussed. PMID:4850503

  17. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide‑containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases.

  18. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; P<0.05). This association was more pronounced among younger patients and those with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  19. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  20. Hydrocarbon exposure and chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Asal, N R; Cleveland, H L; Kaufman, C; Nsa, W; Nelson, D I; Nelson, R Y; Lee, E T; Kingsley, B

    1996-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate further the potential role of long-term exposure to hydrocarbons (HCs) in the development of idiopathic chronic glomerulopathy (ICG) using a more refined measurement of HC exposure. A total of 321 pairs of cases and controls, matched by age, gender, and geographical area, were assembled. A detailed questionnaire was blindly administered to cases and controls to collect information on occupational and medical history and sociodemographic data. By integrating quantified measurements of HC exposure from a variety of sources with each subject's occupational history, a lifetime HC exposure score could be estimated and expressed in parts per million (ppm). Cases had an hydrocarbon exposure mean score of 165 ppm (median 48 ppm) as compared to 162 ppm (median 43 ppm) for controls (P = 0.757). When using hydrocarbon exposure as a dichotomous variable with a cutoff point at 100 ppm, cases had a higher proportion of exposed than controls, but the difference was not statistically significant at the 0.05 level, even after controlling for possible confounders through logistic regression. Subgroup analyses showed mixed results. In most subgroups differences between cases and controls tended to become significant when hydrocarbon was used as a dichotomous variable. Results from this study do not sufficiently support the hypothesized association of HC exposure and ICG in general. Subgroup analyses need further investigations. Efforts to generate accurate estimates of lifetime HC exposure should be emphasized for future investigations.

  1. Evaluation of chronic kidney disease in chronic heart failure: From biomarkers to arterial renal resistances

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Leone, Marta; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and its worsening are recurring conditions in chronic heart failure (CHF) which are independently associated with poor patient outcome. The heart and kidney share many pathophysiological mechanisms which can determine dysfunction in each organ. Cardiorenal syndrome is the condition in which these two organs negatively affect each other, therefore an accurate evaluation of renal function in the clinical setting of CHF is essential. This review aims to revise the parameters currently used to evaluate renal dysfunction in CHF with particular reference to the usefulness and the limitations of biomarkers in evaluating glomerular dysfunction and tubular damage. Moreover, it is reported the possible utility of renal arterial resistance index (a parameter associated with abnormalities in renal vascular bed) for a better assesment of kidney disfunction. PMID:25610846

  2. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  3. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy.

  4. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  5. Encephalopathy in infants and children with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, C M; Polinsky, M S; Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Grover, W D

    1981-10-01

    The examination of five pediatric patients with encephalopathy secondary to chronic renal failure has indicated a stereotyped sequence of neurologic signs and symptoms including ataxia, loss of motor abilities, myoclonus, seizures, dementia, and bulbar dysfunction. Both the patients with CNS dysfunction and a control group selected for a similar degree of renal failure had increased levels of serum phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone. Serial EEGs in the affected group revealed progressive slowing and an increase in paroxysmal features. No specific neuropathologic findings were noted in one patient.

  6. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Secondary Hyperparathyroidism: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that significant associations exist between oral disease and diseases involving non-oral tissues. Occasionally, the roles may be reversed and the oral cavity can be severely affected by systemic disease originating in another part of the body. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrinopathy that occurs as a consequence of chronic azotemic kidney disease. Renal osteodystrophy, the most dramatic clinical consequence of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is uncommon, but can result in demineralization of maxillofacial bones, loosening of teeth, and pathological jaw fractures. The purpose of this report is to update the current understanding of the pathophysiology of this endocrine disease and to compare the oral manifestations of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in humans and companion animals. A 50-year review of the veterinary literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation of renal osteodystrophy in dogs, and to determine what clinical consequences of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism have been reported in domestic cats.

  7. The role of dietary phosphorus restriction in the conservative management of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barsotti, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2005-01-01

    Evidence exists that phosphate retention plays a major role in causing secondary hyperparathyroidism, cardiovascular morbidity, and loss of residual renal function in chronic renal disease patients, and that a subtle elevation in serum phosphate occurs at early stages in the course of renal insufficiency. The implementation of a low-phosphorus, low-protein dietary regimen plays a special role in the conservative management of chronic renal disease patients, for the prevention and correction of secondary hyperparathyroidism and for the renal and cardiovascular protection. However, the success and safety of dietary phosphate restriction largely depends on good compliance with dietary recommendations, which must represent a major goal to be regularly pursued in the clinical practice. To this aim, it is crucial that dietitians expert in renal nutrition give education and personalized dietary advice, with the aim of enhancing the patient's adherence to nutritional prescriptions.

  8. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23802624

  9. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  10. Retinopathy and Chronic Kidney Disease in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC)

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Alexander, Judith; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; McWilliams, Kathleen; Lo, Joan C.; Go, Alan; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Lash, James P.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Xie, Dawei; Jaar, Bernard G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Retinal vascular and anatomic abnormalities caused by diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions can be observed directly in the ocular fundus and may reflect severity of chronic renal insufficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between retinopathy and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods In this observational, cross-sectional study, 2605 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a multi-center study of CKD, were offered participation. Non-mydriatic fundus photographs of the disc and macula in both eyes were obtained in 1936 of these subjects. Photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center using standard protocols. Presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed by trained graders and a retinal specialist using protocols developed for large epidemiologic studies. Kidney function measurements and information on traditional and non-traditional risk factors for decreased kidney function were obtained from the CRIC study. Results Greater severity of retinopathy was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after adjustment for traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with lower eGFR. We found no strong direct relationship between eGFR and average arteriolar or venular calibers. Conclusions Our findings show a strong association between severity of retinopathy and its features and level of kidney function after adjustment for traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CKD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology reflects renal disease. PMID:22965589

  11. [Treatment of bone disease in chronic kidney disease and in renal transplant recipients under K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Tadahiko; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi; Akiba, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    The National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) provides evidence based clinical practice guidelines developed for all phases of kidney disease and related complications, from diagnosis to monitoring and management. Bone disease sets in during the early stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Bone disease is observed in almost patients with chronic renal failure and after renal transplantation. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease in patients with chronic renal failure is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turn over bone disease, and osteomalasia. Ninety to one hundred percent of kidney transplant patients have histological evidence of osteodystrophy and osteopenia (reduction of bone mass) following renal transplantation. Furthermore, osteoporosis is also appeared in many renal transplant recipients. After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but bone mineral density (BMD) often worsens. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and carefully effective therapies might be reduced the morbidity associated with these common problems.

  12. Association Between Retinopathy and Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort [CRIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Pistilli, Maxwell; Daniel, Ebenezer; Alexander, Judith; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Chia-Mei Lo, Joan; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John Walter; Xie, Dawei; Coleman, Martha; Keane, Martin Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience co-morbid illneses including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between retinopathy and self reported CVD in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this observational, ancillary investigation, 2605 CRIC participants were invited to participate in this study, and non-mydriatic fundus photographs in both eyes were obtained in 1936 subjects. Photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center. Presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed using standard protocols by trained graders masked to information about study participants. History of self-reported cardiovascular disease was obtained using a medical history questionnaire. Kidney function measurements, traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CVD were obtained from the CRIC study. Greater severity of retinopathy was associated with higher prevalence of any cardiovascular disease and this association persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. Presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with increased prevalence of CVD. We found a direct relationship between CVD prevalence and mean venular caliber. In conclusion, presence of retinopathy was associated with CVD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. This would make assessment of retinal morphology a valuable tool in chronic kidney disease studies of CVD outcomes. PMID:22516527

  13. Association between retinopathy and cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort [CRIC] Study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Pistilli, Maxwell; Daniel, Ebenezer; Alexander, Judith; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan Chia-Mei; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John Walter; Xie, Dawei; Coleman, Martha; Keane, Martin Gerard

    2012-07-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease experience co-morbid illnesses, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of the present study was to assess the association between retinopathy and self-reported CVD in a subgroup of the participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study. For this observational, ancillary investigation, 2,605 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants were invited to participate in the present study, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs in both eyes were obtained for 1,936 subjects. The photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center. The presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed using standard protocols by trained graders who were masked to the information about the study participants. A history of self-reported CVD was obtained using a medical history questionnaire. Kidney function measurements and traditional and nontraditional risk factors for CVD were obtained from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study. A greater severity of retinopathy was associated with a greater prevalence of any CVD, and this association persisted after adjustment for the traditional risk factors for CVD. The presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with increased prevalence of CVD. We found a direct relation between CVD prevalence and mean venular caliber. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with CVD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology might indicate macrovascular disease, even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. This would make the assessment of retinal morphology a valuable tool in CKD studies of CVD outcomes.

  14. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, p<0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for traditional, but not novel, AVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

  15. A possible mechanism for the progression of chronic renal disease and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Re, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as various forms of chronic renal disease and systolic congestive heart failure, are among the most common progressive degenerative disorders encountered in medicine. Each disease follows a nearly relentless course, albeit at varying rates, driven by progressive cell dysfunction and drop-out. The neurologic diseases are characterized by the progressive spread of disease-causing proteins (prion-like proteins) from cell to cell. Recent evidence indicates that cell autonomous renin angiotensin systems operate in heart and kidney, and it is known that functional intracrine proteins can also spread between cells. This then suggests that certain progressive degenerative cardiovascular disorders such as forms of chronic renal insufficiency and systolic congestive heart failure result from dysfunctional renin angiotensin system intracrine action spreading in kidney or myocardium.

  16. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities.

  17. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters.

  18. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species.

  19. Treatment of osteoporosis in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul D

    2005-03-01

    As glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines from age-related bone loss or disease that specifically induces a decline in GFR, there are a number of metabolic bone conditions that may accompany the decline in GFR. These metabolic bone conditions span a spectrum from mild-to-severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to the development of additional heterogeneous forms of bone diseases each with its distinctly quantitative bone histomorphometric characteristics. Osteoporosis can also develop in patients with CKD and ESRD for many reasons beyond age-related bone loss and postmenopausal bone loss. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with severe CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not as easy to do as it is in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)--neither fragility fractures nor The World Health Organization bone mineral density criteria can be used to diagnose osteoporosis in this population since all forms of renal bone disease may fracture or have low "T scores". The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with CKD/ESRD must be done by first the exclusion of the other forms of renal osteodystrophy, by biochemical profiling or by double tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy; and the finding of low trabecular bone volume. In such patients, preliminary data would suggest that oral bisphosphonates seem to be safe and effective down to GFR levels of 15 mL/min. In patients with stage 5 CKD who are fracturing because of osteoporosis or who are on chronic glucocorticoids, reducing the oral bisphosphonate dosage to half of its usual prescribed dosing for PMO seems reasonable from known bisphosphonate pharmacokinetics, though we do need better scientific data to fully understand bisphosphonate usage in this population.

  20. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  1. Failure of renal dopamine response to salt loading in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casson, I F; Lee, M R; Brownjohn, A M; Parsons, F M; Davison, A M; Will, E J; Clayden, A D

    1983-01-01

    Eight patients with chronic glomerulonephritis and five age-matched normal volunteers were given additional sodium chloride by mouth under conditions of metabolic balance. Whereas in the normal volunteers plasma renin activity was suppressed and urinary excretion of free dopamine increased, in the patients dopamine was not mobilised and plasma renin activity was not completely suppressed. Abnormal retention of sodium and water in glomerulonephritis may be due partly to a failure to mobilise dopamine in the kidney. Specific renal dopamine agonists may be natriuretic and hypotensive in chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:6402127

  2. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease. PMID:26097778

  3. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease.

  4. End-stage renal disease and chronic kidney disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lugon, Jocemir R

    2009-01-01

    The world is facing an epidemic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report discusses the present state of chronic kidney disease care in Brazil. We report frequency of dialysis treatment and prevalence of kidney transplantation throughout Brazil. We estimated the number of CKD patients in the country through a mathematical extrapolation based on data generated by the NHANES. On January 2007, 73,605 patients were on dialysis, which corresponds to 390 patients per million of population (pmp); the majority of these patients (approximately 90%) were funded by the Brazilian Public Health System. If we aggregate patients with a functioning kidney graft, unofficially estimated by ABTO as 27,500 (approximately 150 pmp), the whole adjusted prevalence of end-stage renal disease patients in Brazil by January 2007 is approximately 540 pmp. We estimate that the number of patients with glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 of body surface approximates 15 million people in Brazil, many of whom are not in treatment.

  5. Renal hypertension and cardiovascular disorder in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antić, Amira; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Renal hypertension is one of the earliest and the most prevalent complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Among renal patients, hypertension is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. For casual blood pressure measurement, the best method is auscultatory, while for ambulatory blood pressure measurement, oscillometric method is the most commonly used. Both casual and ambulatory blood pressure measurement provide more powerful means of diagnosing hypertension. Masked hypertension is a condition in which casual blood pressure is normal but ambulatory blood pressure is elevated. The risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is higher with masked hypertension as compared to the controls. Children and adolescents with CKD are at high risk of cardiovascular disease that has been established as the leading cause of death in patients with end stage renal disease. Left ventricular hypertrophy remains the most thoroughly documented form of end-organ damage caused by hypertension in children and adolescents with CKD. Based on clear evidence on the correlation between blood pressure and cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and renal function, renal hypertension must be aggressively treated. Target blood pressure for patients with renal hypertension should be at low normal values: < 75 percentile for patients without proteinuria and <50 percentile for patients with proteinuria. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists are considered the first choice pharmacological option in hypertensive CKD 2-4 patients while the management of volume overload is the most important in dialysis patients. Successful transplantation can eliminate or significantly improve uremia-related cardiovascular risk factors and increase predicted life expectancy.

  6. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD.

  7. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended.

  8. Increased Blood Pressure Variability Prior to Chronic Kidney Disease Exacerbates Renal Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Frederico F. C. T.; Araujo, Gilberto; Porto, Marcella L.; Freitas, Flavia P. S.; Graceli, Jones B.; Balarini, Camille M.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Gava, Agata L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased blood pressure variability (BPV), which can be experimentally induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD), has emerged as a new marker of the prognosis of cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Considering that increased BPV can lead to organ-damage, the goal of the present study was to evaluate the effects of SAD on renal function in an experimental model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). SAD was performed in male Wistar rats 2 weeks before 5/6 nephrectomy and the animals were evaluated 4 weeks after the induction of CKD. Our data demonstrated that BPV was increased in SAD and CKD animals and that the combination of both conditions (SAD+CKD) exacerbated BPV. The baroreflex sensitivity index was diminished in the SAD and CKD groups; this reduction was more pronounced when SAD and CKD were performed together. 5/6 nephrectomy led to hypertension, which was higher in SAD+CKD animals. Regarding renal function, the combination of SAD and CKD resulted in reduced renal plasma and blood flow, increased renal vascular resistance and augmented uraemia when compared to CKD animals. Glomerular filtration rate and BPV were negatively correlated in SAD, CKD, and SAD+CKD animals. Moreover, SAD+CKD animals presented a higher level of glomerulosclerosis when compared to all other groups. Cardiac and renal hypertrophy, as well as oxidative stress, was also further increased when SAD and CKD were combined. These results show that SAD prior to 5/6 nephrectomy exacerbates renal dysfunction, suggesting that previous augmented BPV should be considered as an important factor to the progression of renal diseases. PMID:27721797

  9. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kei; Fukuda, Masamichi; Matsui, Yoshio; Kario, Kazuomi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-05-01

    The authors previously reported that the visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure is correlated with renal function decline in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease. Little is known about the association between visit-to-visit variability and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease. The authors retrospectively studied 69 patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease stage 3a, 3b, or 4. The standard deviation and coefficient of variation of blood pressure in 12 consecutive visits were defined as visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure. The median observation period was 32 months. In univariate correlation, the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of blood pressure were not significantly associated with the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate. There was no significant association between the visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease, in contrast with our previous study of nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease.

  10. Kyrle's disease in a patient of diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.; Jivani, Nidhi B.; Diwan, Nilofar G.

    2015-01-01

    Kyrle's disease (KD) is an acquired perforating dermatosis associated with an underlying disorder such as diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure. It presents as multiple discrete, eruptive papules with a central crust or plug, often on the lower extremities. A keratotic plug is seen histologically in an atrophic epidermis and may penetrate the papillary dermis with transepidermal elimination of keratotic debris without collagen or elastic fibers. Various therapies have been reported that include cryotherapy, laser therapy, narrow-band ultraviolet B and use of topical or systemic retinoids. Hereby a case of 64-year-old male, a known case of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic renal failure who developed KD is presented. PMID:25949985

  11. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias.

  12. Con: Nutritional vitamin D replacement in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Georgianos, Panagiotis I

    2016-05-01

    Insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is highly prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is a critical component in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Accordingly, current National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend the correction of hypovitaminosis D through nutritional vitamin D replacement as a first-step therapeutic approach targeting secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this Polar Views debate, we summarize the existing evidence, aiming to defend the position that nutritional vitamin D replacement is not evidence-based and should not be applied to patients with CKD. This position is supported by the following: (i) our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials shows that whereas nutritional vitamin D significantly increases serum 25(OH)D levels relative to placebo, there is no evidence either in predialysis CKD or in ESRD that parathyroid hormone (PTH) is lowered; (ii) on the other hand, in randomized head-to-head comparisons, nutritional vitamin D is shown to be inferior to activated vitamin D analogs in reducing PTH levels; (iii) nutritional vitamin D is reported to exert minimal to no beneficial actions in a series of surrogate risk factors, including aortic stiffness, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), epoetin utilization and immune function among others; and (iv) there is no evidence to support a benefit of nutritional vitamin D on survival and other 'hard' clinical outcomes. Whereas nutritional vitamin D replacement may restore 25(OH)D concentration to near normal, the real target of treating vitamin D insufficiency is to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, which is untouched by nutritional vitamin D. Furthermore, the pleotropic benefits of nutritional vitamin D remain to be proven. Thus, there is little, if any, benefit of nutritional vitamin D replacement in CKD.

  13. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted.

  14. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  15. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression. PMID:27819022

  16. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M.; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S.; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  17. Dietary mobile apps and their effect on nutritional indicators in chronic renal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lai, Janice; Porter, Judi

    2015-05-10

    Dietary apps for mobile technology are becoming increasingly available and can assist in recording food and fluid intake for nutrition assessment or monitoring. Patients with chronic renal disease, particularly those on dialysis, are required to make significant dietary changes. This study systematically reviews the current literature to assess whether dietary mobile apps improve dietary intake and clinical outcomes in the renal population, specifically those with Chronic Kidney Disease levels 3-5, including dialysis. A systematic search of Medline Complete, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library was performed and supplemented by manual searches of citation and reference lists. Of the 712 studies considered, five were eligible for inclusion in this review. The quality of each included study was assessed using a Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Among five studies (two RCTs and three case studies/reports), none found significant changes in nutrient intake, biochemical markers or intradialytic weight gain, through the use of dietary mobile apps. The included studies show potential for clinical benefits of mobile app interventions in a renal population. However there is a need for additional rigorous trials to demonstrate if there is a clinical benefit to mobile phone app interventions in this population.

  18. Total renal denervation reduces sympathoexcitation to different target organs in a model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Glaucia L; Nishi, Erika E; Estrela, Heder F; Lincevicius, Gisele S; Gomes, Guiomar N; Simões Sato, Alex Y; Campos, Ruy R; Bergamaschi, Cássia T

    2017-05-01

    It is known that increased sympathetic nerve activity in chronic kidney disease (CKD) progressively worsens kidney function and hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that total renal denervation contributes to reduce sympathetic activation to different beds and improves renal function in 5/6 nephrectomy model of CKD in male Wistar rats. After eight weeks of 5/6 nephrectomy surgery there was an increase in mean arterial pressure (CKD 179±22mmHg, n=6 vs. control animals 108±9; p<0.05, n=6) with no changes in heart rate (HR). Sympathetic nerve activity was increased at different levels to the remaining kidney, splanchnic and lumbar beds compared to control (CTL) group (CKD rSNA: 150±50, n=9 vs. CTL 96±15, n=9; CKD sSNA: 129±51, n=5 vs. CTL 34±14, n=6; CKD lSNA: 203±35, n=8 vs. CTL 146±21, spikes/s, n=7, p<0.05). Three weeks after total renal denervation (DNX) MAP was normalized in the CKD rats (124±19mmHg, n=5, p<0.05), with no change in HR. The lSNA was normalized (151±40, n=5, vs. CKD 203±35 spikes/s, n=8) and sSNA was decreased in 49% (64±34, n=5 vs. CKD 129±51 spikes/s, n=5, p<0.05). Renal function, assessed by creatinine plasma levels was improved after renal denervation (CKD 1.50±0.64, n=8; vs. CKD+DNX 0.82±0.22mg/mL, n=8, p<0.05). These findings demonstrate that renal nerves contribute to the maintenance of hypertension in CKD by increasing sympathoexcitation to other beds.

  19. Iron-restricted pair-feeding affects renal damage in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yoshiro; Senchi, Aya; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Horimatsu, Tetsuo; Okuno, Keisuke; Yasumura, Seiki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that dietary iron restriction prevents the development of renal damage in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, iron deficiency is associated with appetite loss. In addition, calorie restriction is reported to prevent the development of end-stage renal pathology in CKD rats. Thus, the beneficial effect of iron restriction on renal damage may depend on calorie restriction. Here, we investigate the effect of pair-feeding iron restriction on renal damage in a rat model of CKD. Methods First, to determine the amount of food intake, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly given an ad libitum normal diet or an iron-restricted diet, and the food intake was measured. Second, CKD was induced by a 5/6 nephrectomy in SD rats, and CKD rats were given either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet. Results Food intake was reduced in the iron-restricted diet group compared to the normal diet group of SD rats for 16 weeks (mean food intake; normal diet group and iron-restricted diet group: 25 and 20 g/day, respectively). Based on the initial experiments, CKD rats received either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet (20 g/day) for 16 weeks. Importantly, pair-feeding iron restriction prevented the development of proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial damage in CKD rats. Interestingly, pair-feeding iron restriction attenuated renal expression of nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor in CKD rats. Conclusions Pair-feeding iron restriction affected renal damage in a rat model of CKD. PMID:28196143

  20. The interaction between fluid status and angiopoietin-2 in adverse renal outcomes of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Hung-Tien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Lee, Su-Chu; Chen, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Ming-Yen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Background Fluid overload is not only the characteristic but also an important complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) disturbs endothelium and vessel permeability, which may induce fluid overload. The aim of this study is to examine the interaction between fluid status and Angpt2 in adverse renal outcomes of CKD. Methods This cohort study enrolled 290 patients with CKD stages 3–5 from January 2011 to December 2011 and followed up until December 2015. Fluid status was presented as overhydration (OH) value measured by body composition monitor, while OH>1.1L was defined as fluid overload. Renal outcomes were defined as commencing dialysis and rapid renal function decline (the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate < -5 ml/min/1.73 m2/y). Results During a mean follow-up of 38.6±18.3 months, 125 (43.1%) patients progressed to commencing dialysis and 99(34.7%) patients presented rapid renal function decline. All patients were stratified by OH of 1.1L and the median of circulating Angpt2. These patients with both OH>1.1L and high circulating Angpt2 were more likely to reach commencing dialysis compared to other groups. The risks for commencing dialysis and rapid renal function decline were significantly higher in patients with OH>1.1L and high circulating Angpt2 level compared to those with OH≦1.1L and low circulating Angpt2 (2.14, 1.21–3.78, P = 0.009; 4.96, 1.45–16.97, P = 0.01). There was a significant interaction between OH level and circulating Angpt2 in entering dialysis (P-interaction = 0.02). Conclusions Fluid overload and Angpt2 might have a synergistic effect on adverse renal outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:28333979

  1. Inhibition of G0/G1 Switch 2 Ameliorates Renal Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miyako; Shindo, Naoya; Tsuruta, Akito; Ikeyama, Hisako; Hamamura, Kengo; Higashi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Ogino, Takashi; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Nakao, Takaharu; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ojida, Akio; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem, and novel therapies to treat CKD are urgently needed. Here, we show that inhibition of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0s2) ameliorates renal inflammation in a mouse model of CKD. Renal expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) was increased in response to p65 activation in the kidneys of wild-type 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. Moreover, 5/6Nx Clk/Clk mice, which carry homozygous mutations in the gene encoding circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), did not exhibit aggravation of apoptosis or induction of F4/80-positive cells. The renal expression of G0s2 in wild-type 5/6Nx mice was important for the transactivation of Ccl2 by p65. These pathologies were ameliorated by G0s2 knockdown. Furthermore, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of G0s2 expression was identified by high-throughput chemical screening, and the inhibitor suppressed renal inflammation in 5/6Nx mice. These findings indicated that G0s2 inhibitors may have applications in the treatment of CKD.

  2. Renal Denervation Improves the Baroreflex and GABA System in Chronic Kidney Disease-induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Ho, Wen-Yu; Lu, Pei-Jung; Lai, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Yang-Ming; Fang, Hua-Chang; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Hsiao, Michael; Liu, Chun-Peng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive rats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit enhanced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor function and regulation within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). For CKD with hypertension, renal denervation (RD) interrupts the afferent renal sympathetic nerves, which are connecting to the NTS. The objective of the present study was to investigate how RD improves CKD-induced hypertension. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy for 8 weeks, which induced CKD and hypertension. RD was induced by applying phenol to surround the renal artery in CKD. RD improved blood pressure (BP) by lowering sympathetic nerve activity and markedly restored the baroreflex response in CKD. The GABAB receptor expression was increased in the NTS of CKD; moreover, the central GABA levels were reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid, and the peripheral GABA levels were increased in the serum. RD restored the glutamic acid decarboxylase activity in the NTS in CKD, similar to the effect observed for central treatment with baclofen, and the systemic administration of gabapentin reduced BP. RD slightly improved renal function and cardiac load in CKD. RD may improve CKD-induced hypertension by modulating the baroreflex response, improving GABA system dysfunction and preventing the development and reducing the severity of cardiorenal syndrome type 4 in CKD rats. PMID:27917928

  3. Glycosuria and Renal Outcomes in Patients with Nondiabetic Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Chih; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Lim, Lee Moay; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chiang, Heng-Pin; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors have shown a potential for renoprotection beyond blood glucose lowering. Glycosuria in nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is sometimes noted. Whether glycosuria in CKD implies a channelopathy or proximal tubulopathy is not known. The consequence of glycosuria in CKD is also not studied. We performed a cross-sectional study for the association between glycosuria and urine electrolyte excretion in 208 nondiabetic patients. Fractional excretion (FE) of glucose >4% was 3.4%, 6.3% and 62.5% in CKD stage 3, 4 and 5, respectively. These patients with glycosuria had higher FE sodium, FE potassium, FE uric acid, UPCR, and urine NGAL-creatinine ratio. We conducted a longitudinal study for the consequence of glycosuria, defined by dipstick, in 769 nondiabetic patients with stage 4–5 CKD. Glycosuria was associated with a decreased risk for end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.77; CI = 0.62–0.97; p = 0.024) and for rapid renal function decline (adjusted odds ratio: 0.63; CI = 0.43–0.95; p = 0.032); but glycosuria was not associated with all-cause mortality or cardiovascular events. The results were consistent in the propensity-score matched cohort. Glycosuria is associated with increased fractional excretion of electrolytes and is related to favorable renal outcomes in nondiabetic patients with stage 5 CKD. PMID:28008953

  4. [Amyloidosis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a patient with a renal transplant and recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Ablanedo, P; Seco, M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a group of syndromes which share a defect in a component of the phagocyte NADPH-oxidase complex. Without this enzyme activity, phagocytic cells cannot produce superoxide, peroxide, and other potent microbicidal radicals, and are less able to kill ingested pathogens. The clinical picture is characterised by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and abnormal tissue granuloma formation. On the other hand, amyloidosis is a systemic disease with renal involvement occurring in the majority of cases. Recurrent amyloidosis is a rare but well documented event in renal transplant recipients. However, graft loss secondary to amyloidosis has been noted infrequently. In addition, de novo amyloidosis has not been previously associated with graft loss. We report here a renal transplant recipient with chronic granulomatous disease and history of recurrent urinary tract infections, who developed nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal insufficiency secondary to de novo AA amyloidosis leading to graft loss 66 months after transplantation.

  5. Marked increase of asymmetric dimethylarginine in patients with incipient primary chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Böger, Rainer H; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Frölich, Jürgen C; Haller, Hermann; Ritz, Eberhard; Fliser, Danilo

    2002-01-01

    In patients with uremia, increased blood concentrations of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) have been linked to the severity of atherosclerosis and to excess cardiovascular mortality. The ADMA levels and several traditional cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 44 untreated nonsmoking patients with confirmed primary chronic renal disease at different stages of renal disease. True GFR was assessed by means of the inulin-clearance technique. For comparison, nonsmoking subjects matched with respect to age, gender, and body-mass index were examined. Mean plasma ADMA concentration was markedly higher (P < 0.0001) in all patients combined (4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) than in control subjects (n = 16; age 45 +/- 10 yr; serum creatinine 1.0 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; ADMA 1.4 +/- 0.7 micromol/L). However, mean ADMA levels were similar in patients with normal renal function (n = 16; age 41 +/- 9 yr; serum creatinine 1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; GFR 120 +/- 14 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; ADMA 4.0 +/- 0.7 micromol/L), in patients with moderate renal failure (n = 15; 47 +/- 7 yr; 1.8 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; 65 +/- 10 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 3.8 +/- 0.6 micromol/L) and in patients with advanced renal failure (n = 13; 46 +/- 9 yr; 4.2 +/- 0.9 mg/dl; 25 +/- 4 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 4.7 +/- 1.2 micromol/L). Furthermore, ADMA levels were increased to the same extent in normotensive (n = 17; 4.0 +/- 0.8 micromol/L) and in hypertensive (n = 27; 4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) patients. In contrast to ADMA, mean total plasma homocysteine concentration were similar in control subjects (10.6 +/- 2.9 micromol/L) and in patients with normal GFR (11.0 +/- 2.9 micromol/L), but were significantly higher in patients with moderate renal failure (17.7 +/- 4.1 micromol/L) and particularly in patients with advanced renal failure (28.2 +/- 10.6 micromol/L). Finally, mean total serum cholesterol concentrations were comparable in the control group and in the three groups of patients with

  6. Renal sympathetic denervation in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease: does improvement in renal function follow blood pressure control?

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Chen, Shaojie; Andrea, Bruno Rustum; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhães de Queiroz; Graciano, Miguel Luis; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2014-11-01

    Twenty-seven patients with resistant hypertension and chronic kidney disease were treated by renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) and followed for 12 months. Patients were retrospectively divided into controlled and uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) groups. Increases in mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were found at months 1, 3, 6, and 12 in the controlled group (P < .0001, for every time point). The mean change in eGFR after 12 months was 18.54 ± 8.15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) higher in the controlled group (P=.0318). In patients in the controlled group with baseline eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), responders (with an increase in eGFR > 6.2%) corresponded to 50% at 6 months and 83% at 12 months. In the patients with baseline eGFR ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), all patients were labeled as responders at months 6 and 12. Median albumin:creatinine ratio after 12 months was lower than baseline only in the controlled group (P = .0003). Our results suggest that patients with this profile who reached BP control by RSD also experienced a significant improvement in renal function.

  7. Grape seed powder improves renal failure of chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Turki, Khaoula; Charradi, Kamel; Boukhalfa, Habib; Belhaj, Monia; Limam, Ferid; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a syndrome characterized by progressive and irreversible deterioration of renal function linked to slow destruction of renal parenchyma, eventually terminating in death when sufficient number of nephrons are damaged. Oxidative stress is commonly observed in CKD patients resulting from an imbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and impairment of defence mechanisms. Grape seed extract (GSE) is a polyphenolic mixture exhibiting antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We conducted an interventional pilot study of supplementation with GSE capsules (GSE group, n = 23) or placebo (control group, n = 10) on CKD patients. Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline and after a six-month-long supplementation period to determine some renal function biomarkers, as well as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and haematological parameters. GSE improved glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria, increased the anti-oxidant status as assessed by high plasma catalase and superoxide dismutase and also lowered lipoperoxidation and carbonylation. GSE ameliorated inflammation by decreasing CRP, triglyceridemia and counteracted anemia and thrombocytopenia. Supplementation with 2 g GSE/day for six months improved some kidney function parameters of CKD patients and this beneficial effect of GSE seems to be mediated at least partly by its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27822171

  8. Effect of chronic antioxidant therapy with superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, tempol, on progression of renal disease in rats with renal mass reduction.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Yasmir; Ferrebuz, Atilio; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role in the progression of renal damage and antioxidants are potentially useful therapeutic options in chronic renal disease. We investigated if treatment with tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic that has beneficial effects in several experimental models of hypertension and acute kidney injury, ameliorates the chronic renal damage resulting in renal mass reduction. Rats with surgical 5/6 nephrectomy were randomly assigned to receive no treatment (CRF group, n = 10) or tempol, 1 mmol/l in the drinking water (CRF-tempol group, n = 10). Sham-operated rats (n = 10) served as controls. All rats were followed for 12 weeks post-nephrectomy. Tempol treatment reduced plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and halved the number of superoxide-positive cells in the remnant kidney; however, the number of hydrogen peroxide-positive cells increased and the overall renal oxidative stress (MDA and nitrotyrosine abundance) and inflammation (interstitial p65 NF-kappaB, macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration) were unchanged. Proteinuria, renal function and glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage in the remnant kidney were similar in the CRF and CRF-tempol groups. In conclusion, tempol administration, at the dose used in these studies, decreased plasma MDA and heightened superoxide dismutation in the kidney, but was incapable of reducing renal oxidative stress or improving renal function or structure in the remnant kidney model.

  9. Serum aldosterone and death, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events in blacks and whites: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rajat; Yang, Wei; Khan, Abigail M; Bansal, Nisha; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leonard, Mary B; Keane, Martin G; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond R; Shlipak, Michael G; Feldman, Harold I

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that elevated aldosterone concentrations are an independent risk factor for death in patients with cardiovascular disease. Limited studies, however, have evaluated systematically the association between serum aldosterone and adverse events in the setting of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the association between serum aldosterone and death and end-stage renal disease in 3866 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. We also evaluated the association between aldosterone and incident congestive heart failure and atherosclerotic events in participants without baseline cardiovascular disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate independent associations between elevated aldosterone concentrations and each outcome. Interactions were hypothesized and explored between aldosterone and sex, race, and the use of loop diuretics and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors. During a median follow-up period of 5.4 years, 587 participants died, 743 developed end-stage renal disease, 187 developed congestive heart failure, and 177 experienced an atherosclerotic event. Aldosterone concentrations (per SD of the log-transformed aldosterone) were not an independent risk factor for death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.12), end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.17), or atherosclerotic events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.18). Aldosterone was associated with congestive heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.35). Among participants with chronic kidney disease, higher aldosterone concentrations were independently associated with the development of congestive heart failure but not for death, end-stage renal disease, or atherosclerotic events. Further studies should evaluate whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may reduce adverse events in individuals with

  10. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 increases renal fibrosis by accelerating transforming growth factor-β signaling in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Jun; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Endo, Motoyoshi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Tian, Zhe; Sugizaki, Taichi; Tanigawa, Hiroki; Zhao, Jiabin; Zhu, Shunshun; Sato, Michio; Araki, Kimi; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Mukoyama, Masashi; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common pathological consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with tissue fibrosis closely associated with chronic inflammation in numerous pathologies. However, molecular mechanisms underlying that association, particularly in the kidney, remain unclear. Here, we determine whether there is a molecular link between chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis in CKD progression. Histological analysis of human kidneys indicated abundant expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) in renal tubule epithelial cells during progression of renal fibrosis. Numerous ANGPTL2-positive renal tubule epithelial cells colocalized with cells positive for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a critical mediator of tissue fibrosis. Analysis of M1 collecting duct cells in culture showed that TGF-β1 increases ANGPTL2 expression by attenuating its repression through microRNA-221. Conversely, ANGPTL2 increased TGF-β1 expression through α5β1 integrin-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, ANGPTL2 deficiency in a mouse unilateral ureteral obstruction model significantly reduced renal fibrosis by decreasing TGF-β1 signal amplification in kidney. Thus, ANGPTL2 and TGF-β1 positively regulate each other as renal fibrosis progresses. Our study provides insight into molecular mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis and identifies potential therapeutic targets for CKD treatment.

  11. Role of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology: focus on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Feigerlová, Eva; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents an important public health problem. Its progression to end-stage renal disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The determinants of renal function decline are not fully understood. Recent progress in the understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability has helped the identification of both the trans- and cis-acting elements of mRNA as potential markers and therapeutic targets for difficult-to-diagnose and -treat diseases, including CKDs such as diabetic nephropathy. Human antigen R (HuR), a trans-acting element of mRNA, is an RNA binding factor (RBF) best known for its ability to stabilize AU-rich-element-containing mRNAs. Deregulated HuR subcellular localization or expression occurs in a wide range of renal diseases, such as metabolic acidosis, ischemia, and fibrosis. Besides RBFs, recent evidence revealed that noncoding RNA, such as microRNA and long noncoding RNA, participates in regulating mRNA stability and that aberrant noncoding RNA expression accounts for many pathologic renal conditions. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of our current understanding of the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology and to offer perspectives for this class of diseases. We use examples of diverse renal diseases to illustrate different mRNA stability pathways in specific cellular compartments and discuss the roles and impacts of both the cis- and trans-activating factors on the regulation of mRNA stability in these diseases.-Feigerlová, E., Battaglia-Hsu, S.-F. Role of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology: focus on chronic kidney disease.

  12. CD39 overexpression does not attenuate renal fibrosis in the unilateral ureteric obstructive model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Veena; Lu, B; Chia, J; Cowan, P J; Dwyer, K M

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease has multiple etiologies, but its single, hallmark lesion is renal fibrosis. CD39 is a key purinergic enzyme in the hydrolysis of ATP and increased CD39 activity on regulatory T cells (Treg) is protective in adriamycin-induced renal fibrosis. We examined the effect of overexpression of human CD39 on the development of renal fibrosis in the unilateral ureteric obstructive (UUO) model, a model widely used to study the molecular and cellular factors involved in renal fibrosis. Mice overexpressing human CD39 (CD39Tg) and their wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to UUO; renal histology and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of adenosine receptors and markers of renal fibrosis were examined up to 14 days after UUO. There were no differences between CD39Tg mice and WT mice in the development of renal fibrosis at days 3, 7, and 14 of UUO. Relative mRNA expression of the adenosine A2A receptor and endothelin-1 were higher in CD39Tg than WT mice at day 7 post UUO, but there were no differences in markers of fibrosis. We conclude that human CD39 overexpression does not attenuate the development of renal fibrosis in the UUO model. The lack of protection by CD39 overexpression in the UUO model is multifactorial due to the different effects of adenosinergic receptors on the development of renal fibrosis.

  13. Mode of renal replacement therapy determines endotoxemia and neutrophil dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemesch, Sandra; Ribitsch, Werner; Schilcher, Gernot; Spindelböck, Walter; Hafner-Gießauf, Hildegard; Marsche, Gunther; Pasterk, Lisa; Payerl, Doris; Schmerböck, Bianca; Tawdrous, Monika; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Stiegler, Philipp; Kager, Gerd; Hallström, Seth; Oettl, Karl; Eberhard, Katharina; Horvath, Angela; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection and sepsis are common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A vicious cycle of increased gut permeability, endotoxemia, inadequate activation of the innate immune system and resulting innate immune dysfunction is hypothesized. We assessed endotoxemia, neutrophil function and its relation to oxidative stress, inflammation and gut permeability in patients with CKD grade 3–5 without renal replacement therapy (CKD group, n = 57), patients with CKD stage 5 undergoing haemodialysis (HD, n = 32) or peritoneal dialysis (PD, n = 28) and patients after kidney transplantation (KT, n = 67) in a cross-sectional observational study. In HD patients, endotoxin serum levels were elevated and neutrophil phagocytic capacity was decreased compared to all other groups. Patients on HD had a significantly higher mortality, due to infections during follow up, compared to PD (p = 0.022). Oxidative stress, neutrophil energy charge, systemic inflammation and gut permeability could not completely explain these differences. Our findings suggest that dialysis modality and not renal function per se determine the development of neutrophil dysfunction and endotoxemia in CKD-patients. HD patients are particularly prone to neutrophil dysfunction and endotoxemia whereas neutrophil function seems to improve after KT. Multi-target approaches are therefore warranted to improve neutrophil function and potentially reduce the rate of infections with patients undergoing haemodialysis. PMID:27698480

  14. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed.

  15. Effect of bicarbonate supplementation on renal function and nutritional indices in predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m(2)) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m(2)) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m(2), p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m(2)).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition.

  16. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  17. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L.; Robinson, Bruce M.; Massy, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. Methods A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60–90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. Conclusions The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and

  18. Association of Renal Elasticity and Renal Function Progression in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Evaluated by Real-Time Ultrasound Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Lee, Yu-Li; Lin, Kun-Der; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun; Hung, Chi-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis are associated with lower renal parenchymal elasticity. This study was designed to evaluate the predictive ability of renal elasticity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). 148 non-CKD patients and 227 patients with CKD were recruited. 145 (38.7%) were female, 166 (73.1%) had diabetes, the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 33.9 ± 15.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 and the median urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPCR) 502 (122–1491) mg/g. Patients with later stages of CKD had lower renal elasticity values, indicating stiffer kidneys (p < 0.001), and smaller kidney (p < 0.001). Renal elasticity correlated with log-transformed UPCR (β = −7.544, P < 0.001). Renal length correlated with age (β = −0.231, P < 0.001), sex (β = −3.730, P < 0.001), serum albumin level (β = −3.024, P = 0.001), body mass index (β = 0.390, P = 0.009) and eGFR (β = 0.146, P < 0.001). In fully-adjusted logistic regression model, the odds ratio (OR) per 10 unit change in renal elasticity for rapid renal deterioration was 0.928 (95% CI, 0.864–0.997; P = 0.042). The OR per 1 mm change in renal length for rapid renal deterioration was 1.022 (95% CI, 0.994–1.050; P = 0.125). Renal elasticity is associated with proteinuria and rapid renal deterioration in patients with CKD. PMID:28240304

  19. Metabolism in immunoreactive parathyroid hormone in the dog. The role of the kidney and the effects of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, K A; Kopelman, R; Rutherford, W E; Klahr, S; Slatopolsky, E; Greenwalt, A; Bascom, T; Markham, J

    1975-01-01

    The role of the kidney in the metabolism of parathyroid hormone (PTH) was examined in the dog. Studies were performed in awake normal and uremic dogs after administration of bovine parathyroid hormone (b-PTH) or synthetic amino terminal tetratricontapeptide of b-PTH (syn b-PTH 1-34). The renal clearance of immunoreactive PTH was determined from the product of renal plasma flow and the percent extraction of PTH immunoreactivity by the kidney. Blood levels of circulating immunoreactive PTH were determined by radioimmunoassay. The normal dog kidney extracted 20 plus or minus 1% of the immunoreactive b-PTH delivered to it, and renal clearance (RC) of immunoreactivity was 60 ml/min. When RC was compared to an estimate of total metabolic clearance (MCR) of immunoreactivity, it accounted for 61% of the total. Both MCR and RC were markedly decreased in dogs with chronic renal disease. However, the percent extraction of immunoreactive PTH was unchanged in chronic renal disease, and the observed decrease in RC was due to changes in renal plasma flow. The largest portion of the reduction in total MCR was accounted for by the decrease in RC, and there was no compensation for the decrease in RC by extrarenal sites of PTH metabolism. PMID:1141439

  20. Serum protease activity in chronic kidney disease patients: The GANI_MED renal cohort.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Carmen; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Endlich, Nicole; Rettig, Rainer; Stracke, Sylvia; Fiene, Beate; Aymanns, Simone; Felix, Stephan B; Hannemann, Anke; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Serum or plasma proteases have been associated with various diseases including cancer, inflammation, or reno-cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate whether the enzymatic activities of serum proteases are associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study population comprised 268 participants of the "Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine" (GANI_MED) cohort. Enzymatic activity of aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B, alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leucine aminopeptidase 3, prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), angiotensin I-converting enzyme, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) proteases was measured in serum. Linear regression of the respective protease was performed on kidney function adjusted for age and sex. Kidney function was modeled either by the continuous Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-based eGFR or dichotomized by eGFR < 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. Results with a false discovery rate below 0.05 were deemed statistically significant. Among the 10 proteases investigated, only the activities of ACE2 and DPP4 were correlated with eGFR. Patients with lowest eGFR exhibited highest DPP4 and ACE2 activities. DPP4 and PEP were correlated with age, but all other serum protease activities showed no associations with age or sex. Our data indicate that ACE2 and DPP4 enzymatic activity are associated with the eGFR in patients with CKD. This finding distinguishes ACE2 and DPP4 from other serum peptidases analyzed and clearly indicates that further analyses are warranted to identify the precise role of these serum ectopeptidases in the pathogenesis of CKD and to fully elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms. Impact statement • Renal and cardiac diseases are very common and often occur concomitantly

  1. The effect of treatment of acidosis on calcium balance in patients with chronic azotemic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Litzow, J R; Lemann, J; Lennon, E J

    1967-02-01

    Small but statistically significant negative calcium balances were found in each of eight studies in seven patients with chronic azotemic renal disease when stable metabolic acidosis was present. Only small quantities of calcium were excreted in the urine, but fecal calcium excretion equaled or exceeded dietary intake. Complete and continuous correction of acidosis by NaHCO(3) therapy reduced both urinary and fecal calcium excretion and produced a daily calcium balance indistinguishable from zero. Apparent acid retention was found throughout the studies during acidosis, despite no further reduction of the serum bicarbonate concentration. The negative calcium balances that accompanied acid retention support the suggestion that slow titration of alkaline bone salts provides an additional buffer reservoir in chronic metabolic acidosis. The treatment of metabolic acidosis prevented further calcium losses but did not induce net calcium retention. It is suggested that the normal homeostatic responses of the body to the alterations in ionized calcium and calcium distribution produced by raising the serum bicarbonate might paradoxically retard the repair of skeletal calcium deficits.

  2. Retinopathy and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study [CRIC])

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Xie, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2605 CRIC participants were invited to participate and non-mydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant’s information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relationship between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relationship was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings. PMID:26409637

  3. Cardiovascular Disease Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Lora, Claudia M.; Budoff, Matthew; Keane, Martin G.; Kusek, John W.; Martinez, Monica; Nessel, Lisa; Stamos, Thomas; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States. The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about its prevalence among Hispanics with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted cross-sectional analyses of prevalent self-reported clinical and subclinical measures of CVD among 497 Hispanics, 1638 non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 1650 non-Hispanic African Americans, aged 21 to 74 years, with mild-to-moderate CKD at enrollment in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic CRIC (HCRIC) studies. Measures of subclinical CVD included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and ankle-brachial index. Results Self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) was lower in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (18% versus 23%, P = 0.02). Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of CAC >100 (41% versus 34%, P = 0.03) and CAC >400 (26% versus 19%, P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, these differences were no longer significant. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics had a higher odds of LVH compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.17, P = 0.005), and a higher odds of CAC >400 compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (odds ratio, 2.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 5.58, P = 0.03). Hispanic ethnicity was not independently associated with any other CVD measures. Conclusions Prevalent LVH was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Caucasians, and elevated CAC score was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic African Americans. Understanding reasons for these racial/ethnic differences and their association with long-term clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:21896829

  4. Sexual dysfunction in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Soffer, O

    1980-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction in end-stage renal disease is a troublesome, multifactorial disorder. Abnormality of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is but one of the causes leading to the impotence and infertility commonly encountered in chronic renal failure. Short of kidney transplantation, no therapy is available. Though infertility is the rule in end-stage renal disease, successful fatherhood and deliveries have occurred on rare occasions.

  5. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Al Suleimani, Y M; Al Mahruqi, A S; Al Za'abi, M; Shalaby, A; Ashique, M; Nemmar, A; Ali, B H

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 541-549, 2017.

  6. Effects of Cardiovascular Events on End-Stage Renal Disease and Mortality in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Before Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Michio; Takehara, Eriko; Sasaki, Yasunori; Azetsu, Haruna; Kusaka, Keita; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular events (CVEs) are major complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have investigated the effects of CVEs on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality of pre-dialysis patients. We followed 377 CKD patients who were at stage ≥G3 at first clinic visit in the Shuuwa General Hospital between April 2005 and July 2014. After taking baseline patient data, we evaluated renal survival rates and all-cause and CVE-related mortality in patients with CVEs [(+)CVEs] and without CVEs [(-)CVEs]. A total of 99 CVEs occurred in 93 study patients (57.0% cardiac events, 43.0% cerebrovascular events, and 6.5% peripheral artery disease events). During the study period, 127 patients reached ESRD over a median of 4.51 years' follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis found longer renal survival rates in the (-)CVEs group compared with the (+)CVEs group. Forty patients died during the study period over a median of 5.43 years' follow-up. Survival rates for all-cause and CVE-related mortality of (-)CVEs patients were higher than in (+)CVEs patients. After adjustment for sex, age, current smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, left ventricular hypertrophy, body mass index, albumin, hemoglobin, calcium, phosphate, C-reactive protein, and spot urine protein, the occurrence of CVEs was still a significant risk factor for ESRD (HR 1.516, P = 0.017) and all-cause mortality (HR 7.871, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the occurrence of CVEs is a potent risk factor for ESRD and mortality in CKD patients before dialysis.

  7. End-Stage Renal Disease after Liver Transplantation in Patients with Pre-Transplant Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahirwani, Ranjeeta; Forde, Kimberly A.; Mu, Yifei; Lin, Fred; Reese, Peter; Goldberg, David; Abt, Peter; Reddy, K Rajender; Levine, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction prior to liver transplantation has a marked impact on post-transplant kidney outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess post-transplant renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone. METHODS Retrospective review of 40 OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD (serum creatinine ≥ 2 mg/dl for at least 3 months) at the University of Pennsylvania from February 2002 to July 2010. Primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) up to 3 years post-transplant. Secondary outcomes included incidence of stage 4 CKD (eGFR < 30 ml/min), need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), meeting criteria for kidney transplant listing (eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min), and mortality. RESULTS Median patient age was 56.5 years and 48% patients had pre-transplant diabetes. Median serum creatinine at transplant was 2.7 mg/dl (eGFR 24 ml/min). Median eGFR at 1, 2, and 3 years post-transplant was 35, 34, and 37 ml/min respectively. Twelve patients (30%) required RRT at a median of 1.21 years posttransplant and 16 (40%) achieved an eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min at 1.09 years post-transplant. Mortality was 35% at a median of 1.60 years post-transplant. CONCLUSIONS OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD have a substantial burden of post-transplant renal dysfunction and high short-term mortality, questioning the rationale for OLT alone in this population. PMID:24382253

  8. Delusional infestation in a patient with renal failure, metabolic syndrome, and chronic cerebrovascular disease treated with aripiprazole: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease.

  9. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22174718

  10. Tubular Peroxiredoxin 3 as a Predictor of Renal Recovery from Acute Tubular Necrosis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Lin; Su, Tzu-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chang, Chung-Ho; Yang, Tao-Hsiang; Chiu, Ping-Fang; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2017-02-27

    Peroxiredoxin 3 (PRX3) is a mitochondrial antioxidant that regulates apoptosis in various cancers. However, whether tubular PRX3 predicts recovery of renal function following acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. This retrospective cohort study included 54 hospitalized patients who had AKI with biopsy-proven acute tubular necrosis (ATN). The study endpoint was renal function recovery within 6 months. Of the 54 enrolled patients, 25 (46.3%) had pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 33 (61%) recovered renal function. Tubular PRX3 expression was higher in patients with ATN than in those without renal function recovery. The level of tubular but not glomerular PRX3 expression predicted renal function recovery from AKI (AUROC = 0.76). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, high PRX3 expression was independently associated with a higher probability of renal function recovery (adjusted hazard ratio = 8.99; 95% CI 1.13-71.52, P = 0.04). Furthermore, the discriminative ability of the clinical model for AKI recovery was improved by adding tubular PRX3. High tubular PRX3 expression was associated with a higher probability of renal function recovery from ATN. Therefore, tubular PRX3 in combination with conventional predictors can further improve recovery prediction and may help with risk stratification in AKI patients with pre-existing CKD.

  11. Tubular Peroxiredoxin 3 as a Predictor of Renal Recovery from Acute Tubular Necrosis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Lin; Su, Tzu-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chang, Chung-Ho; Yang, Tao-Hsiang; Chiu, Ping-Fang; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2017-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 3 (PRX3) is a mitochondrial antioxidant that regulates apoptosis in various cancers. However, whether tubular PRX3 predicts recovery of renal function following acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. This retrospective cohort study included 54 hospitalized patients who had AKI with biopsy-proven acute tubular necrosis (ATN). The study endpoint was renal function recovery within 6 months. Of the 54 enrolled patients, 25 (46.3%) had pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 33 (61%) recovered renal function. Tubular PRX3 expression was higher in patients with ATN than in those without renal function recovery. The level of tubular but not glomerular PRX3 expression predicted renal function recovery from AKI (AUROC = 0.76). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, high PRX3 expression was independently associated with a higher probability of renal function recovery (adjusted hazard ratio = 8.99; 95% CI 1.13–71.52, P = 0.04). Furthermore, the discriminative ability of the clinical model for AKI recovery was improved by adding tubular PRX3. High tubular PRX3 expression was associated with a higher probability of renal function recovery from ATN. Therefore, tubular PRX3 in combination with conventional predictors can further improve recovery prediction and may help with risk stratification in AKI patients with pre-existing CKD. PMID:28240739

  12. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  13. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  14. CHRONIOUS: an open, ubiquitous and adaptive chronic disease management platform for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosso, R; Munaro, G; Salvetti, O; Colantonio, S; Ciancitto, F

    2010-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an highly innovative Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) research Initiative that aspires to implement its vision for ubiquitous health and lifestyle monitoring. The 17 European project partners are strictly working together since February 2008 to realize and open platform to manage and monitor elderly patients with chronic diseases and many difficulties to reach hospital centers for routine controls. The testing activities will be done in Italy and Spain involving COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) patients, these being widespread and highly expensive in terms of social and economic costs. Patients, equipped by wearable technologies and sensors and interacting with lifestyle interfaces, will be assisted by healthcare personnel able to check the health record and critical conditions through the Chronious platform data analysis and decision support system. Additionally, the new ontology based literature search engine will help the clinicians in the standardization of care delivery process. This paper is to present the main project objectives and its principal components from the intelligent system point of view.

  15. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD.

  16. [Antiatherogenic and nephroprotective efficacy of atorvastatin in patients with chronic renal disease of non-diabetic origin].

    PubMed

    Salomenchuk, T N; Semegen-Bodak, K V; Slaba, n A; Chngrian, G V; Mysyshin, M B; Slabyĭ, O M

    2014-01-01

    This study designed to elucidate dynamics of lipid metabolism and HbA(1c) level, uricemia, and renal function in 54 patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) of non-diabetic genesis treated by standard cardioprotective therapy in combination with atorvastatin. The patients were divided in two groups with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 ml/min (n = 31) and = > 60 ml/min. The former were given 20 mg atorvastatin/day. Arterial pressure (AP): systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and pulse (PAP) pressure, plasma lipid profile, uricemia, HbA(1c) and GFR were measured at admission and 6 months after the onset of therapy. The use of atorvastatin in combined therapy of CRD of non-diabetic genesis resulted in a significant decrease of the levels of atherogenic lipids, HbA(1c), uricemia, lipid peroxidation, SAP and PAP (by 4-5 mm Hg) while the initially low GFR (< 60 ml/min) increased. It is concluded that therapy of chronic renal disease of non-diabetic genesis with atorvastatin not only improves lipid metabolism but also decreases HbA(1c) level and uricemia, normalizes AP and renal function.

  17. RIPK3-Mediated Necroptosis and Apoptosis Contributes to Renal Tubular Cell Progressive Loss and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjun; Cui, Hongwang; Xia, Yunfeng; Gan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is caused by the progressive loss of renal tubular cells and the consequent replacement of the extracellular matrix. The progressive depletion of renal tubular cells results from apoptosis and necroptosis; however, the relative significance of each of these cell death mechanisms at different stages during the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We sought to explore the mechanisms of renal tubular cell death during the early and intermediate stages of chronic renal damage of subtotal nephrectomied (SNx) rats. The results of tissue histological assays indicated that the numbers of necrotic dying cells and apoptotic cells were significantly higher in kidney tissues derived from a rat model of CKD. In addition, there was a significant increase in necroptosis observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues from SNx rats compared with control rats, and necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) could inhibit necroptosis and reduce the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells. More importantly, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of necroptosis compared with apoptosis by TEM in vivo and in vitro and a significant increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive tubular epithelial cells that did not express caspase-3 compared with those expressing cleaved caspase-3 in vitro. Furthermore, treatment with Nec-1 and zVAD strongly reduced necroptosis- and apoptosis-mediated renal tubular cell death and decreased the levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and tubular damage scores of SNx rats. These results suggest that necroptotic cell death plays a more significant role than apoptosis in mediating the loss of renal tubular cells in SNx rats and that effectively blocking both necroptosis and apoptosis improves renal function and tubular damage at early and intermediate stages of CKD. PMID:27281190

  18. Pattern of renal diseases among elderly Egyptians patients with acute or chronic renal diseases in Ain Shams University and Nasser Institute Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Adel M; Mady, Gamal E; Ahmad, Ahmad A; el-Shar-Kawy, Magdy E; Aly, Ahmad R; Khalil, Hazem H M

    2005-12-01

    This study among elderly renal Egyptian patients (n=220) with only 20 of them were subjected to renal biopsy. Results showed: diabetic nephropathy in 28.2%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis 25.5%, UTI, cystitis and pyelonephritis in 6.8%, renal stones in 5.9%, obstructive uropathy in 7.6%, simple cysts in 4.5%, CRF of unknown origin in 13.1%, and others in 26.4%. DM and HTN were S related to kidney function tests and increase in elderly. Other cardiovascular risk factors and smoking are reported by previous workers to be HS related to renal diseases. Age was significantly related to GFR, BUN and Cr. but sex difference was not significantly related to renal diseases. Multiple myeloma, lupus nephritis, vasculitis and hepatitis B were all recorded in few numbers of elderly Egyptians. HCV was more common and more likely to cause renal diseases. Abdomino-pelvic ultrasound was confirmatory to clinical renal diseases diagnosis. Among patients (n=20) biopsies showed focal necrotizing GN in 20%, membranous nephropathy in 50% and renal amyloidosis in 30%. CTIN was associated in some cases due to NSAID intake. Analgesic nephropathy was a common problem that might lead to ARF in some cases especially in the elderly. Ultrasound results among the biopsy group were confirmatory to clinical diagnosis.

  19. Iniquities in the access to renal transplant for patients with end-stage chronic renal disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Elaine Leandro; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; César, Cibele Comini; Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Acúrcio, Francisco de Assis; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this present study is to analyze individual and contextual factors associated with access to renal transplant in Brazil. An observational, prospective and non-concurrent study was carried out, based on data from the National Database on renal replacement therapies in Brazil. Patients undergoing dialysis between 01/Jan/2000 and 31/Dec/2000 were included and monitored up to the point of transplant, death or until the end of the study period. Variables that were analyzed included: individual variables (age, sex, region of residence, primary renal disease, hospitalizations); and context variables concerning both the dialysis unit (level of complexity, juridical nature, hemodialysis machines and location) and the city (geographic region, location and HDI). Proportional hazard models were adjusted with hierarchical entry to identify factors associated with the risk of transplant. The results point to differentials in access according to socio-demographic, clinical, geographic and social factors, indicating that the organ allocation system has not eliminated avoidable disparities for those who compete for an organ in the nationwide waiting list.

  20. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease.

  1. The relationships between visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and renal and endothelial function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Chikara; Morimoto, Satoshi; Nakahigashi, Mitsutaka; Kusabe, Makiko; Ueda, Hiroko; Someya, Kazunori; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Shiojima, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. High visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and endothelial dysfunction are observed in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is therefore assumed that high variability in visit-to-visit blood pressure measurements may be associated with endothelial dysfunction in these patients. The present study investigated the associations between visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and renal and endothelial function in patients with chronic kidney disease. We analyzed 150 consecutive patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease who visited our outpatient clinic from January 2006 to December 2010. The study examined the relationships between variability in visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure levels or mean systolic blood pressure (M SBP) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and flow-mediated dilation, an index of endothelial function. Variability in visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure showed a significant negative association with eGFR, independent of age, hemoglobin A1c, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and uric acid, whereas M SBP did not. Similarly, variability in SBP showed a significant negative association with flow-mediated dilation, independent of age, eGFR, HbA1c, LDL cholesterol and M SBP. These data indicate that variability in visit-to-visit blood pressure measurements is associated with impaired renal and endothelial function in patients with chronic kidney disease. This finding suggests that reducing blood pressure fluctuations might have beneficial effects in patients with chronic kidney disease, although this point needs to be addressed by future studies.

  2. Chronic kidney disease-epidemiology formula and model for end-stage liver disease score in the assessment of renal function in candidates for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tinti, F; Lai, S; Umbro, I; Mordenti, M; Barile, M; Ginanni Corradini, S; Rossi, M; Poli, L; Nofroni, I; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of renal function in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting liver transplantation (OLT) is critical. Various conditions may cause renal damage in ESLD. Renal and liver functions are intertwined due to splanchnic hemodynamic relationships; renal failure rarely occurs in patients without advanced decompensated cirrhosis. The recent literature suggests that evaluation of renal function should include an assessment of liver function. The aim of this study was to evaluate different methods to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patient among ESLD candidates for OLT over 1 year. We also correlated renal and hepatic functions. Fifty-two cirrhotic patients Model for End-Stage Liver Disease [MELD] > 10) were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated at baseline and every 4 months (T1-T4) thereafter for 1 year. The GFR was calculated by creatinine clearance, and estimated by Cockroft and Gault, Modified Diet Renal Disease (MDRD) 4 and 6 variable and Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) formulae. Hepatic functions were evaluated by MELD score, albumin, bilirubin, and International Normalized Ratio (INR). We observed not statistically significant increase mean value of MELD score, bilirubin, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen and a reduced serum sodium. There were no significant differences among various methods to evaluate GFR at each time over 1 year. We did not observe any association between renal and hepatic function, except at T4 for MELD and GFR estimated with MDRD 4 (P = .009) and 6 (P = .008) parameters or CKD-EPI (P = .036), and MELD and sodium (P = .001). Our results showed that evaluation of renal function in cirrhosis should include an evaluation of hepatic function. In our case, MDRD and CKD-EPI seemed to be the more accurate formulae to evaluate renal function in relation to hepatic function.

  3. Effect of pentoxifylline on renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leporini, Christian; Pisano, Anna; Russo, Emilio; D'Arrigo, Graziella; de Sarro, Giovambattista; Coppolino, Giuseppe; Bolignano, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents an important health problem worldwide and the search for new therapeutic approaches for retarding CKD progression is a timely issue. Recent evidence suggest that the anti-inflammatory and hemorrheologic drug Pentoxifylline (PTX), may produce favorable effects on kidney function. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to ascertain whether PTX derivatives, alone or in combination to other treatments, may be useful in slowing down disease progression in patients with diabetic or non-diabetic CKD. We found 26 studies (1518 subjects) matching our search criteria. Information on the effects of PTX on hard renal outcomes (doubling of serum creatinine or need for chronic dialysis) were lacking in all the reviewed trials. Conversely, PTX was effective in reducing proteinuria compared to control, a benefit that was more evident in patients with type-1 diabetes mellitus, higher proteinuria at baseline and early renal impairment. An improvement in renal function (eGFR/creatinine clearance) was observed particularly in patients with more advanced CKD stage and in studies with longer follow-up. Conversely, cumulative analyses did not reveal any evident reduction in urinary albumin excretion, even in diabetic patients. The use of PTX was relatively safe as most trials recorded only minor gastrointestinal adverse effects. Although these findings point at some reno-protective effects of PTX, there is no conclusive evidence proving the usefulness of this agent for improving renal outcomes in subjects with chronic kidney disease of various etiology. Future trials adequately powered and designed on hard clinical end-points are needed.

  4. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  5. Proteomics and glomerulonephritis: A complementary approach in renal pathology for the identification of chronic kidney disease related markers.

    PubMed

    L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Smith, Andrew; Chinello, Clizia; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most common origins of chronic kidney disease and its careful evaluation is crucial for prognostic and therapeutic purposes, with the renal biopsy still playing a central role for the diagnosis. However, due to its invasiveness, it is not devoid of complications and many investigations have focused on identifying biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases using less-invasive and easy-to-collect samples, such as urine and blood. In this context, proteomics has played a crucial role in determining the molecular changes related to disease progression and early pathological glomerular modifications. Here, we report a review of selected literature for each GN, based on selected works published in the last 10 years, showing how these approaches have generated clinically relevant findings in the study of glomerulonephritis. We also describe several proteomic strategies, highlighting their technical advantages and limitations, future perspectives for proteomic applications in the study of GNs, and their possible application in routine practice.

  6. The effect of renal diet in association with enalapril or benazepril on proteinuria in dogs with proteinuric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zatelli, A.; Roura, X.; D’Ippolito, P.; Berlanda, M.; Zini, E.

    2016-01-01

    Treating proteinuria in dogs reduces the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD); renal diets and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors are cornerstones of treatment. Whether different ACE-inhibitors have distinct kidney protective effects is unknown; it is therefore hypothesized that renal diets and enalapril or benazepril have different beneficial effects in proteinuric CKD dogs. Forty-four dogs with proteinuric CKD (IRIS stages 1-4) were enrolled in the study and were fed renal diet for 30 days. Thereafter, they were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups. Dogs in group A (n=22) received enalapril (0.5 mg/kg, q12h) and in group B (n=22) benazepril (0.5 mg/kg, q24h); in both groups, dogs were fed the same renal diet. After randomization, dogs were monitored for 120 days. Body weight and body condition score (BCS), serum concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), albumin and total proteins, and urine protein-to-creatinine (UPC) ratio were compared at different time-points. After 30 days of renal diet, creatinine, BUN and UPC ratio decreased significantly (p<0.0001). Compared to randomization, body weight, BCS, albumin, total proteins, creatinine and BUN did not vary during follow-up in the 44 dogs and differences between group A and B were not observed. However, the UPC ratio of group A at day 60, 90 and 150 was significantly lower than in group B and compared to randomization (p<0.05). In group B it did not vary overtime. It is concluded that the renal diet is beneficial to decrease creatinine, BUN and UPC ratio in proteinuric CKD dogs. Enalapril further ameliorates proteinuria if administered along with renal diet. PMID:27540513

  7. The NLRP3 inflammasome is a potential target of ozone therapy aiming to ease chronic renal inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Bai, Zhiming; Chen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hui; Wang, Guoren; Wang, Gang; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2017-02-01

    Ozone therapy is an effective medical treatment for various diseases. A previous study has demonstrated its reno-protective effect in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanism involved is not completely known. This study produced the 5/6 nephrectomized CKD rat model and investigated whether the reno-protective effect of ozone therapy was achieved by its anti-inflammatory property through the modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The results showed that ozone therapy at a low concentration improved renal function and ameliorated renal morphological injury in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. The expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1-p10 in the kidney of these rats was simultaneously lowered by ozone therapy. Moreover, renal inflammation caused by IL-1β was significantly alleviated by ozone therapy. The Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the protein level of IL-1β was positively correlated with renal injury scores. Taken together, these results indicated that ozone therapy might reduce sterile renal inflammation and slow down CKD progression through the modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

  8. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Renal Failure Complicating a Systemic Genetic Disease: Diagnostic Dilemma. Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Leila; Renoux, Marion; Radoï, Loredana

    2015-11-01

    Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, owing mainly to secondary hyperparathyroidism complicating this disease. However, any systemic disease responsible for kidney failure can produce oral manifestations, which can be misdiagnosed. This report describes the case of a 40-year-old male patient referred for oral assessment before kidney and liver transplantation. He had primary hyperoxaluria complicated by end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Panoramic radiography indicated not only external root resorption, but also maxillary and mandibular radiolucencies consistent with brown tumors. Unexpectedly, histologic study of the bone biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of jaws oxalosis. Primary hyperoxaluria is a systemic genetic disease. The affected genes are involved in glyoxylate metabolism and their deficiency results in overproduction of oxalates. Inability of the kidney to excrete oxalates leads to deposition of these crystals in almost all tissues (oxalosis) and to multiple-organ failure. Several oral findings have been described in patients with oxalosis, such as periodontal disease and root resorptions, but radiolucencies in the jaws have rarely been described. This case report is of particular interest because of the unusual location of oxalate crystal deposition in the jaws, which could be misdiagnosed in a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  9. BMP-7 Signaling and its Critical Roles in Kidney Development, the Responses to Renal Injury, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Manson, Scott R; Austin, Paul F; Guo, Qiusha; Moore, Katelynn H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant health problem that most commonly results from congenital abnormalities in children and chronic renal injury in adults. The therapeutic potential of BMP-7 was first recognized nearly two decades ago with studies demonstrating its requirement for kidney development and ability to inhibit the pathogenesis of renal injury in models of CKD. Since this time, our understanding of CKD has advanced considerably and treatment strategies have evolved with the identification of many additional signaling pathways, cell types, and pathologic processes that contribute to disease progression. The purpose of this review is to revisit the seminal studies that initially established the importance of BMP-7, highlight recent advances in BMP-7 research, and then integrate this knowledge with current research paradigms. We will provide an overview of the evolutionarily conserved roles of BMP proteins and the features that allow BMP signaling pathways to function as critical signaling nodes for controlling biological processes, including those related to CKD. We will discuss the multifaceted functions of BMP-7 during kidney development and the potential for alterations in BMP-7 signaling to result in congenital abnormalities and pediatric kidney disease. We will summarize the renal protective effects of recombinant BMP-7 in experimental models of CKD and then propose a model to describe the potential physiological role of endogenous BMP-7 in the innate repair mechanisms of the kidneys that respond to renal injury. Finally, we will highlight emerging clinical approaches for applying our knowledge of BMP-7 toward improving the treatment of patients with CKD.

  10. Chronic Spontaneous Nephrocutaneous Fistula Associated With Renal Replacement Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Khallouk, A; Tazi, M. F; Elfassi, M. J; Farih, M. H

    2010-01-01

    Chronic spontaneous nephrocutaneous fistula is a rare renal disease. Renal replacement lipomatosis (RRL) is the result of the atrophy and destruction of renal parenchyma with massive increases in the amount of fat in the sinus and perirenal space. The 2 conditions can be associated because they may have the same etiology. Indeed, urolithiasis is the most common cause of these diseases. We report a case of chronic nephrocutaneous fistula associated with RRL due to both urolithiasis and renal tuberculosis. PMID:21234262

  11. Chronic spontaneous nephrocutaneous fistula associated with renal replacement lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Khallouk, A; Tazi, M F; Elfassi, M J; Farih, M H

    2010-01-01

    Chronic spontaneous nephrocutaneous fistula is a rare renal disease. Renal replacement lipomatosis (RRL) is the result of the atrophy and destruction of renal parenchyma with massive increases in the amount of fat in the sinus and perirenal space. The 2 conditions can be associated because they may have the same etiology. Indeed, urolithiasis is the most common cause of these diseases. We report a case of chronic nephrocutaneous fistula associated with RRL due to both urolithiasis and renal tuberculosis.

  12. Can total knee arthroplasty be safely performed in patients with chronic renal disease?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The prevalence of chronic renal disease (CRD) is rising worldwide. Patients with CRD are more likely to have associated medical problems and are at greater risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality. We evaluated patient characteristics and risk of early revision, surgical site infection (SSI), thromboembolic events, mortality, and re-admission of patients with CRD undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized that this patient population would have higher rates of complications. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of data that had been prospectively collected by a Total Joint Replacement Registry. All primary TKAs performed from 2005 through 2010 were included. 41,852 primary TKA cases were evaluated, of which 2,686 (6.4%) TKA procedures had been performed in CRD patients. Patient characteristics, comorbidities, and general health status were evaluated. Cox proportional hazard regressions and logistic regressions were used to evaluate the association of CRD with outcomes while adjusting for confounding variables. Results The mean age of the CRD cohort was 67 years and approximately two-thirds of the patients were female. The median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Compared to TKA patients without CRD the CRD patients were older, had poorer general health, and had a higher prevalence of comorbidities. They had a higher incidence of deep SSI (0.9% vs. 0.7%), superficial SSI (0.5% vs. 0.3%), deep vein thrombosis (0.6% vs. 0.4%), any-time mortality (4.7% vs. 2.4%), 90-day mortality (0.4% vs. 0.2%), and 90-day re-admission (10% vs. 6.0%) than patients without CRD. However, after adjustment for confounding variables, CRD patients were at 1.9 times (95% CI: 1.1–3.5) increased risk of superficial SSI, 1.3 times (CI: 1.1–1.6) increased risk of re-admission within 90 days, and 1.5 times (CI: 1.2–1.8) increased risk of mortality at any point after the procedure. The risks of all other complications were not

  13. Implementation of an agency to improve chronic kidney disease care in Ontario: lessons learned by the Ontario Renal Network.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Graham L; Iverson, Alex; Harvey, Rebecca; Blake, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care initiated the transfer of oversight and coordination of chronic kidney disease (CKD) care to the Ontario Renal Network (ORN) under the auspices of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). The aim was to replicate the quality improvement and change management practices used for cancer control within CKD. Much of the ORN's first three years were dedicated to building the infrastructure necessary to bridge the gap between provincial policy and clinical practice. This article explores the accomplishments, challenges and lessons learned over that period. The results, which are applicable to the management of chronic diseases in Ontario, Canada, and internationally, confirm that sustainable change takes time and requires strong leadership, transparency, accountability and communication, supported by a solid foundation of data and evidence.

  14. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  15. Blood pressure and risk of all-cause mortality in advanced chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis: the chronic renal insufficiency cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; McCulloch, Charles E; Rahman, Mahboob; Kusek, John W; Anderson, Amanda H; Xie, Dawei; Townsend, Raymond R; Lora, Claudia M; Wright, Jackson; Go, Alan S; Ojo, Akinlolu; Alper, Arnold; Lustigova, Eva; Cuevas, Magda; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of hemodialysis patients have shown a U-shaped association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mortality. These studies have largely relied on dialysis-unit SBP measures and have not evaluated whether this U-shape also exists in advanced chronic kidney disease, before starting hemodialysis. We determined the association between SBP and mortality at advanced chronic kidney disease and again after initiation of hemodialysis. This was a prospective study of Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants with advanced chronic kidney disease followed through initiation of hemodialysis. We studied the association between SBP and mortality when participants (1) had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 (n=1705), (2) initiated hemodialysis and had dialysis-unit SBP measures (n=403), and (3) initiated hemodialysis and had out-of-dialysis-unit SBP measured at a Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study visit (n=326). Cox models were adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and dialysis parameters. A quadratic term for SBP was included to test for a U-shaped association. At advanced chronic kidney disease, there was no association between SBP and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.02 [95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.07] per every 10 mm Hg increase). Among participants who started hemodialysis, a U-shaped association between dialysis-unit SBP and mortality was observed. In contrast, there was a linear association between out-of-dialysis-unit SBP and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.26 [95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.40] per every 10 mm Hg increase). In conclusion, more efforts should be made to obtain out-of-dialysis-unit SBP, which may merit more consideration as a target for clinical management and in interventional trials.

  16. Reassessment of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Improves Renal Risk Stratification in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-Term Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Minutolo, Roberto; Gabbai, Francis B; Chiodini, Paolo; Garofalo, Carlo; Stanzione, Giovanna; Liberti, Maria Elena; Pacilio, Mario; Borrelli, Silvio; Provenzano, Michele; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2015-09-01

    In nondialysis chronic kidney disease, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) performs better than clinic BP in predicting outcome, but whether repeated assessment of ABP further refines prognosis remains ill-defined. We recruited 182 consecutive hypertensive patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease who underwent 2 ABPs 12 months apart to evaluate the enhancement in risk stratification provided by a second ABP obtained 1 year after baseline on the risk (hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval) of composite renal end point (death, chronic dialysis, and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline ≥40%). The difference in daytime and nighttime systolic BP between the 2 ABPs (daytime and nighttime bias) was added to a survival model including baseline ABP. Net reclassification improvement was also calculated. Age was 65.6±13.4 years; 36% had diabetes mellitus and 36% had previous cardiovascular event; estimated glomerular filtration rate was 42.2±19.6 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), and clinic BP was 145±18/80±11 mm Hg. Baseline ABP (daytime, 131±16/75±10 and nighttime, 122±18/66±10 mm Hg) and daytime/nighttime BP goals (58.2% and 43.4%) did not change at month 12. Besides baseline ABP values, bias for daytime and nighttime systolic BP linearly associated with renal outcome (1.12, 1.04-1.21 and 1.18, 1.08-1.29 for every 5-mm Hg increase, respectively). Classification of patients at risk improved when considering nighttime systolic level at second ABP (net reclassification improvement, 0.224; 95% confidence interval, 0.005-0.435). Patients with first and second ABPs above target showed greater renal risk (2.15, 1.29-3.59 and 1.71, 1.07-2.72, for daytime and nighttime, respectively). In nondialysis chronic kidney disease, reassessment of ABP at 1 year further refines renal prognosis; such reassessment should specifically be considered in patients with uncontrolled BP at baseline.

  17. [Urinary tract infections and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Sobotová, D

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes issues related to urinary tract infections in adults: predispositions and risk factors, classification, assessment of pathogenicity of bacterial agents, the role of bacteriuria and leucocyturia, interpretation of findings, treatment principles and an association with chronic renal failure. Urinary tract infections are the second most frequent infectious disease in the population. They most often affect women of childbearing potential and then seniors of both sexes who have multiple risk factors. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are the most pathogenic towards urinary tract; they are responsible for 85% and 10-15% of cases of acute uncomplicated urinary infections, respectively. Chronic pyelonephritis, a chronic interstitial nephritis, is the fourth most frequent cause of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure is a risk factor for the development of urinary infections due to metabolic disorders resulting in secondary immunodeficiencywith a disorder of all components of immunity. In patients with chronic renal failure, urinary tract infections occur most frequently after kidney transplantation when graft pyelonephritis is a life-threatening complication. Therefore, urinary tract infection prevention with co-trimoxazole once daily over at least 6 months is recommended in renal allograft recipients.

  18. An association between uric acid levels and renal arteriolopathy in chronic kidney disease: a biopsy-based study.

    PubMed

    Kohagura, Kentaro; Kochi, Masako; Miyagi, Tsuyoshi; Kinjyo, Takanori; Maehara, Yuichi; Nagahama, Kazufumi; Sakima, Atsushi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) can induce renal arteriolopathy in animal models. Whether there is an association between UA and renal arteriolopathy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Here, we examined the cross-sectional association of serum UA levels with renal arteriolar hyalinosis and wall thickening. Arteriolar parameters were assessed by semiquantitative grading (max: grade 3) of arterioles in 167 patients with CKD (mean age, 42.4 years; 86 men and 81 women) who underwent renal biopsy. The mean serum UA level was 6.4 mg dl(-1). We observed hyalinosis in 94 patients (56%) and wall thickening in 119 patients (71%). As the UA level tertile increased, the proportion of higher-grade (grade 2 and 3) hyalinosis and wall thickening increased (hyalinosis, P<0.0001 and wall thickening, P=0.0002, for trend). Multiple logistic analysis adjusted for age ≥40 years, sex, hypertension status, diabetes mellitus status and estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m(2) showed that hyperuricemia (UA ≥7 mg dl(-1)) was significantly associated with a higher risk of hyalinosis (adjusted odds ratio: 3.13; 95% confidence interval: 1.23-7.94; P=0.02) and higher-grade (equal to or higher than the mean value) wall thickening (adjusted odds ratio: 2.66; 95% confidence interval: 1.11-6.38; P=0.03). Hence, these results suggest that hyperuricemia may be related to renal arteriolar damage in patients with CKD.

  19. Uric Acid and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The interrelationship between uric acid and renal disease is reviewed in a historical context. Four phases can be distinguished--the descriptions of uric acid stones and gravel in the eighteenth century, of chronically scarred kidneys containing urate crystals in the nineteenth, the appearance of the syndrome of acute urate nephropathy following tumour lysis in the mid twentieth century, and finally the realization that soluble urate affects both systemic and glomerular blood vessels, and may play a role in both hypertension and chronic renal damage.

  20. Serum Trimethylamine-N-Oxide Is Strongly Related to Renal Function and Predicts Outcome in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Missailidis, Catharina; Hällqvist, Jenny; Qureshi, Abdel Rashid; Barany, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Lindholm, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background The microbial metabolite Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcome and mortality in the general population. Objective To assess the contribution of TMAO to inflammation and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients ranging from mild-moderate to end-stage disease and 1) associations with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 2) effect of dialysis and renal transplantation (Rtx) 3) association with inflammatory biomarkers and 4) its predictive value for all-cause mortality. Methods Levels of metabolites were quantified by a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based method in fasting plasma samples from 80 controls and 179 CKD 3–5 patients. Comorbidities, nutritional status, biomarkers of inflammation and GFR were assessed. Results GFR was the dominant variable affecting TMAO (β = -0.41; p<0.001), choline (β = -0.38; p<0.001), and betaine (β = 0.45; p<0.001) levels. A longitudinal study of 74 CKD 5 patients starting renal replacement therapy demonstrated that whereas dialysis treatment did not affect TMAO, Rtx reduced levels of TMAO to that of controls (p<0.001). Following Rtx choline and betaine levels continued to increase. In CKD 3–5, TMAO levels were associated with IL-6 (Rho = 0.42; p<0.0001), fibrinogen (Rho = 0.43; p<0.0001) and hsCRP (Rho = 0.17; p = 0.022). Higher TMAO levels were associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality that remained significant after multivariate adjustment (HR 4.32, 95% CI 1.32–14.2; p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated TMAO levels are strongly associated with degree of renal function in CKD and normalize after renal transplantation. TMAO levels correlates with increased systemic inflammation and is an independent predictor of mortality in CKD 3–5 patients. PMID:26751065

  1. Parenteral iron compounds: potent oxidants but mainstays of anemia management in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A

    2006-09-01

    Ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are widely used for treating Fe deficiency in patients who are unable to meet their Fe requirements with oral supplements. Intravenous Fe generally is well tolerated and effective in correcting Fe-deficient states. However, the complexing of Fe to carbohydrate polymers does not block its potent pro-oxidant effects; systemic free radical generation and, possibly, tissue damage may result. The purpose of this review is to (1) underscore the capacity of currently used parenteral Fe formulations to induce oxidative stress, (2) compare the severity of these oxidant reactions with those that result from unshielded Fe salts and with each other, and (3) speculate as to the potential of these agents to induce acute renal cell injury and augment systemic inflammatory responses. The experimental data that are reviewed should not be extrapolated to the clinical setting or be used for clinical decision making. Rather, it is hoped that the information provided herein may have utility for clinical hypothesis generation and, hence, future clinical studies. By so doing, a better understanding of Fe's potential protean effects on patients with renal disease may result.

  2. Relationship of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic function with cardiovascular and renal outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gail E; de Backer, Tine; Contreras, Gabriel; Wang, Xuelei; Kendrick, Cynthia; Greene, Tom; Appel, Lawrence J; Randall, Otelio S; Lea, Janice; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Phillips, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    African Americans with hypertension are at high risk for adverse outcomes from cardiovascular and renal disease. Patients with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease have a high prevalence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Our goal was to study prospectively the relationships of LV mass and diastolic function with subsequent cardiovascular and renal outcomes in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort study. Of 691 patients enrolled in the cohort, 578 had interpretable echocardiograms and complete relevant clinical data. Exposures were LV hypertrophy and diastolic parameters. Outcomes were cardiovascular events requiring hospitalization or causing death; a renal composite outcome of doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (censoring death); and heart failure. We found strong independent relationships between LV hypertrophy and subsequent cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.27) events, but not renal outcomes. After adjustment for LV mass and clinical variables, lower systolic tissue Doppler velocities and diastolic parameters reflecting a less compliant LV (shorter deceleration time and abnormal E/A ratio) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with future heart failure events. This is the first study to show a strong relationship among LV hypertrophy, diastolic parameters, and adverse cardiac outcomes in African Americans with hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These echocardiographic risk factors may help identify high-risk patients with chronic kidney disease for aggressive therapeutic intervention.

  3. Renal function, calcium regulation, and time to hospitalization of patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is associated with disruption of the endocrine system that distorts the balance between calcitriol, calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone in the calcium regulation system. This can lead to calcification of the arterial tree and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. In this study we develop a health metric, based on biomarkers involved in the calcium regulation system, for use in identifying patients at high risk for future high-cost complications. Methods This study is a retrospective observational study involving a secondary analysis of data from the kidney disease registry of a regional managed care organization. Chronic kidney disease patients in the registry from November 2007 through November 2011 with a complete set of observations of estimated glomerular filtration rate, calcitriol, albumin, free calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone were included in the study (n = 284). Weibull regression model was used to identify the most significant lab tests in predicting “waiting time to hospitalization”. A multivariate linear path model was then constructed to investigate direct and indirect effects of the biomarkers on this outcome. Results The results showed negative significant direct effects of phosphate and parathyroid hormone on “waiting time to hospitalization”. Base on this result, the risk of hospitalization increases 16.8% for each 0.55 mg/dl increase in phosphate level and 13.5% for each 0.467 increase in the natural logarithm of parathyroid hormone. Positive indirect effects of calcitriol surrogate (calcidiol), free calcium, albumin and estimated glomerular filtration rate were observed but were relatively small in magnitude. Conclusion Variables involved in the calcium regulation system should be included in future efforts to develop a quality of care index for Chronic Kidney disease patients. PMID:23865435

  4. [Regulatory mechanism of p38MAPK signaling pathway on renal tissue inflammation in chronic kidney disease and interventional effect of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Wan, Yigang; Wang, Chaojun; Wei, Qingxue; Chen, Haoli; Meng, Xianjie; Yao, Jian

    2012-06-01

    The inflammatory reaction of renal tissues and its relevant tissue damages (such as glomerulosclerosis and renal interstitial fibrosis) are important factors for the development of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) to end-state renal diseases. Of them, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating expression and bioactivity of multiple nuclear transcription factors, impacting synthesis of downstream inflammatory mediators and activating inflammatory cells. Some monomer traditional Chinese medicines and their extracts (such as emodin and berberine) and some traditional Chinese medicine compound prescriptions (such as Yishen Huoxue decoction) can affect inflammatory reaction of renal tissues by regulating p38MAPK signaling pathway, thas improving reduce glomerulus and renal interstitial inflammatory injury.

  5. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  6. Relative risks of chronic kidney disease for mortality and end-stage renal disease across races are similar.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chi Pang; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Islam, Muhammad; Katz, Ronit; McClellan, William; Peralta, Carmen A; Wang, HaiYan; de Zeeuw, Dick; Astor, Brad C; Gansevoort, Ron T; Levey, Andrew S; Levin, Adeera

    2014-10-01

    Some suggest race-specific cutpoints for kidney measures to define and stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), but evidence for race-specific clinical impact is limited. To address this issue, we compared hazard ratios of estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and albuminuria across races using meta-regression in 1.1 million adults (75% Asians, 21% Whites, and 4% Blacks) from 45 cohorts. Results came mainly from 25 general population cohorts comprising 0.9 million individuals. The associations of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were largely similar across races. For example, in Asians, Whites, and Blacks, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for eGFR 45-59 versus 90-104 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) were 1.3 (1.2-1.3), 1.1 (1.0-1.2), and 1.3 (1.1-1.7) for all-cause mortality, 1.6 (1.5-1.7), 1.4 (1.2-1.7), and 1.4 (0.7-2.9) for cardiovascular mortality, and 27.6 (11.1-68.7), 11.2 (6.0-20.9), and 4.1 (2.2-7.5) for ESRD, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio 30-299 mg/g or dipstick 1+ versus an albumin-to-creatinine ratio under 10 or dipstick negative were 1.6 (1.4-1.8), 1.7 (1.5-1.9), and 1.8 (1.7-2.1) for all-cause mortality, 1.7 (1.4-2.0), 1.8 (1.5-2.1), and 2.8 (2.2-3.6) for cardiovascular mortality, and 7.4 (2.0-27.6), 4.0 (2.8-5.9), and 5.6 (3.4-9.2) for ESRD, respectively. Thus, the relative mortality or ESRD risks of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria were largely similar among three major races, supporting similar clinical approach to CKD definition and staging, across races.

  7. Independent Role of Underlying Kidney Disease on Renal Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease under Nephrology Care.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Garofalo, Carlo; Pacilio, Mario; Liberti, Maria Elena; Sagliocca, Adelia; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Primary kidney disease is suggested to affect renal prognosis of CKD patients; however, whether nephrology care modifies this association is unknown. We studied patients with CKD stage I-IV treated in a renal clinic and with established diagnosis of CKD cause to evaluate whether the risk of renal event (composite of end-stage renal disease and eGFR decline ≥ 40%) linked to the specific diagnosis is modified by the achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of therapeutic goals for hypertension (BP ≤ 130/80 mmHg in patients with proteinuria ≥ 1 50 mg/24h and/or diabetes and ≤ 140/90 in those with proteinuria <150 mg/24h and without diabetes) anemia (hemoglobin, Hb ≥ 11 g/dL), and proteinuria (≤ 0.5 g/24h). Survival analysis started after first year of nephrology care. We studied 729 patients (age 64 ± 15 y; males 59.1%; diabetes 34.7%; cardiovascular disease (CVD) 44.9%; hypertensive nephropathy, HTN 53.8%; glomerulonephritis, GN 17.3%; diabetic nephropathy, DN 15.9%; tubule-interstitial nephropathy, TIN 9.5%; polycystic kidney disease, PKD 3.6%). During first year of Nephrology care, therapy was overall intensified in most patients and prevalence of main therapeutic goals generally improved. During subsequent follow up (median 3.3 years, IQR 1.9-5.1), 163 renal events occurred. Cox analysis disclosed a higher risk for PKD (Hazard Ratio 5.46, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.28-10.6) and DN (1.28,2.99-3.05), versus HTN (reference), independently of age, gender, CVD, BMI, eGFR or CKD stage, use of RAS inhibitors and achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of each of the three main therapeutic goals. No interaction was found on the risk of CKD progression between diagnostic categories and month-12 eGFR (P=0.737), as with control of BP (P=0.374), Hb (P=0.248) or proteinuria (P=0.590). Therefore, in CKD patients under nephrology care, diagnosis of kidney disease should be considered in conjunction with the main risk

  8. Genetic loci associated with renal function measures and chronic kidney disease in children: the Pediatric Investigation for Genetic Factors Linked with Renal Progression Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Matthias; Wong, Craig S.; Wühl, Elke; Epting, Daniel; Luo, Li; Hoppmann, Anselm; Doyon, Anke; Li, Yong; Sözeri, Betül; Thurn, Daniela; Helmstädter, Martin; Huber, Tobias B.; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D.; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Mehls, Otto; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Furth, Susan L.; Warady, Bradley A.; Schaefer, Franz; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is characterized by rapid progression and a high incidence of end-stage renal disease and therefore constitutes an important health problem. While unbiased genetic screens have identified common risk variants influencing renal function and CKD in adults, the presence and identity of such variants in pediatric CKD are unknown. Methods The international Pediatric Investigation for Genetic Factors Linked with Renal Progression (PediGFR) Consortium comprises three pediatric CKD cohorts: Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD), Effect of Strict Blood Pressure Control and ACE Inhibition on the Progression of CRF in Pediatric Patients (ESCAPE) and Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Children with CKD (4C). Clean genotype data from >10 million genotyped or imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were available for 1136 patients with measurements of serum creatinine at study enrolment. Genome-wide association studies were conducted to relate the SNPs to creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcrea) and proteinuria (urinary albumin- or protein-to-creatinine ratio ≥300 and ≥500 mg/g, respectively). In addition, European-ancestry PediGFR patients (cases) were compared with 1347 European-ancestry children without kidney disease (controls) to identify genetic variants associated with the presence of CKD. Results SNPs with suggestive association P-values <1×10−5 were identified in 10 regions for eGFRcrea, four regions for proteinuria and six regions for CKD including some plausible biological candidates. No SNP was associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5×10−8). Investigation of the candidate genes for proteinuria in adults from the general population provided support for a region on chromosome 15 near RSL24D1/UNC13C/RAB27A. Conversely, targeted investigation of genes harboring GFR-associated variants in adults from the general population did not reveal significantly associated SNPs in

  9. Long-Term Effects of Renal Sympathetic Denervation on Hypertensive Patients With Mild to Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Graciano, Miguel Luis; Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhães de Queiroz; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; Chen, Shaojie; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2016-03-01

    Thirty patients who underwent percutaneous renal denervation, which was performed by a single operator following the standard technique, were enrolled in this study. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 2 (n=19), 3 (n=6), and 4 (n=5) were included. Data were obtained at baseline and at monthly intervals for the first 6 months. At 7 months, follow-up data were collected bimonthly until month 12, after which data were collected on a quarterly basis. Baseline blood pressure values (mean±standard deviation) were 185±18/107±13 mm Hg in the office and 152±17/93±11 mm Hg through 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Three patients with stage 4 CKD required chronic renal replacement therapy (one at the 13-month follow-up and two at the 14-month follow-up) after episodes of acute renal injury; their follow-up was subsequently discontinued. The office blood pressure values at the 24-month follow-up were 131±15/87±9 mm Hg (P<.0001, for both comparisons); the corresponding ABPM values were 132±14/84±12 mm Hg (P<.0001, for both comparisons). The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate increased from 61.9±23.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2) to 88.0±39.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (P<.0001). The urine albumin:creatinine ratio decreased from 99.8 mg/g (interquartile range, 38.0-192.1) to 11.0 mg/g (interquartile range, 4.1-28.1; P<.0001 mg/g). At the end of the follow-up period, 21 patients (70% of the initial sample) were no longer classified as having CKD.

  10. Alterations of Hepatic Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease via D-box-binding Protein Aggravate the Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kengo; Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kondo, Hideaki; Ikeyama, Hisako; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Irino, Yasuhiro; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-03-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increase in serum retinol; however, the underlying mechanisms of this disorder are poorly characterized. Here, we found that the alteration of hepatic metabolism induced the accumulation of serum retinol in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. The liver is the major organ responsible for retinol metabolism; accordingly, microarray analysis revealed that the hepatic expression of most CYP genes was changed in 5/6Nx mice. In addition, D-box-binding protein (DBP), which controls the expression of several CYP genes, was significantly decreased in these mice. Cyp3a11 and Cyp26a1, encoding key proteins in retinol metabolism, showed the greatest decrease in expression in 5/6Nx mice, a process mediated by the decreased expression of DBP. Furthermore, an increase of plasma transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in 5/6Nx mice led to the decreased expression of the Dbp gene. Consistent with these findings, the alterations of retinol metabolism and renal dysfunction in 5/6Nx mice were ameliorated by administration of an anti-TGF-β1 antibody. We also show that the accumulation of serum retinol induced renal apoptosis in 5/6Nx mice fed a normal diet, whereas renal dysfunction was reduced in mice fed a retinol-free diet. These findings indicate that constitutive Dbp expression plays an important role in mediating hepatic dysfunction under CKD. Thus, the aggravation of renal dysfunction in patients with CKD might be prevented by a recovery of hepatic function, potentially through therapies targeting DBP and retinol.

  11. Pregnancy and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Davison, John M; Lindheimer, Marshall D

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the association of chronic renal disease and pregnancy. Included are discussions of guidelines for counseling pregnant women with underlying chronic renal disease who are considering conceiving as well as management of those already pregnant. Specifically highlighted are recent studies that question the validity of using estimated glomerular filtration rate and other formulae and questions of whether we should strive to replace the classic counseling approaches based primarily on serum creatinine levels with guidelines based on chronic kidney disease classification. The article concludes with a review as well as a critique of recent research on the prevalence of preeclampsia in women with underlying chronic renal disease, as well as if women with preeclampsia and underlying kidney disease have accelerated courses toward end-stage renal disease.

  12. Inflammatory Markers and Procoagulants in Chronic Renal Disease Stages 1-4

    PubMed Central

    Muslimovic, Alma; Rasic, Senija; Tulumovic, Denijal; Hasanspahic, Senad; Rebic, Damir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Starting from the point that the chronic kidney disease (CKD) is chronic, inflammatory and hypercoagulable state characterized by an increase in procoagulant and inflammatory markers high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients could be explained. Aim: The aim of the research was to monitor inflammatory markers and procoagulants in various stages of kidney disease (stage 1-4). Materials and Methods: The research included 120 subjects older than 18 years with CKD stages 1-4 examined and monitored in Clinic of Nephrology, University Clinical Centre Sarajevo over a period of 24 months. The research included determining the following laboratory parameters: serum creatinine, serum albumin, C-reactive protein, leukocytes in the blood, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer, antithrombin III, coagulation factors VII (FC VII) and coagulation factor VIII (FC VIII). Results: With the progression of kidney disease (CKD stages 1-4), there was a significant increase of inflammatory and procoagulant markers: CRP, fibrinogen and coagulation factor VIII, and an increase in the average values of leukocytes and a reduction in the value of antithrombin III, but without statistical significance. Also, there were no significant differences in the values of D-dimer and coagulation factor VII. Conclusion: The progression of kidney disease is significantly associated with inflammation, which could in the future be useful in prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Connection of CKD with inflammation and proven connection of inflammation with cardiovascular risk indicates the potential value of some biomarkers, which could in the future identify as predictors of outcome and could have the benefit in the early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in CKD. PMID:26622082

  13. Malignancy and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Certain malignant diseases, such as lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus, show an enhanced prevalence compared with the general population. In particular, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) shows an excess incidence in ESRD patients. A multitude of factors, directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens, may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) are prone to develop acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may subsequently lead to the development of RCC. In pre-dialysis patients with coexistent renal disease, as in dialysis and transplant patients, the presence of ACKD may predispose to RCC. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse, are additional risk factors for malignancy. Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the follow-up. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Finally, previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and post-malignancy screening.

  14. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  15. Effects of 6 months yoga program on renal functions and quality of life in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rajendra Kumar; Arya, Tung Vir Singh; Kumar, Amit; Yadav, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of 6 months yoga program in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Materials and Methods: Fifty-four patients with CKD were studied and divided into two groups (yoga group and control group) to see the effect of yoga in CKD. Patients in the yoga group were offered yoga therapy along with other conventional treatment modalities, while the control group was only on conventional treatment. Subjects in yoga group were trained to perform specific yogic asanas for at least 5 days a week for 40–60 min a day. Regular monitoring of blood pressure, renal function, requirement of a number of dialysis, and quality of life (QOL) indicators were done. Fifty patients (yoga – 25; control-25) completed 6 months follow-up. Results: In yoga group, a significant reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, significant reduction in blood urea and serum creatinine levels, and significant improvement in physical and psychological domain of the World Health Organization QOL (as assessed by BREF QOL scores) were seen after 6 months. In control group, rise of blood pressure, deterioration of renal function, and QOL were observed. Poststudy comparison between the two groups showed a statistically significant reduction of blood pressure, nonsignificant reduction in blood urea and serum creatinine, and significant improvement in physical and psychological domain of QOL in yoga group as compared to control group. For subjects in yoga group, the need for dialysis was less when compared to control group although this difference was statistically insignificant. Except for inability of some patients to perform certain yogic asanas no adverse effect was found in the study. Conclusion: Six months yoga program is safe and effective as an adjuvant therapy in improving renal functions and QOL of CKD patients. PMID:28149061

  16. The rehabilitation role in chronic kidney and end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Intiso, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide is rising markedly becoming a priority public health problem. The progression of CKD cause functional limitation and severe disability with poor quality of life. The aim of present review was to highlight the effect of rehabilitation in CKD and ESRD subjects. The rehabilitative process is unique in treating disabled people according to a holistic approach with the aim of supporting a person's independent living and autonomy. CKD are associated with an increased risk of functional impairment, independent of age, gender, and co-morbidities. Clinicians should counsel patients with CKD including frail elder people to increase physical activity levels and target that regular physical activity including aerobic or endurance exercises training benefits health. In old subjects with CKD and multiple functional impairments, the traditional disease based model should be changed to individualized patient-centered approach that prioritizes patient preferences. Patients receiving haemodialysis have a considerably lower exercise tolerance, functional capacity, and more muscle wasting than healthy subjects or patients with less severe CKD. Exercise training or comprehensive multi-dimensional strategy and goal-oriented intervention should be also provided in ESRD older subjects. Structured prevention programs based on reducing the risk factors for CKD and rehabilitative strategies could reduce disability occurrence.

  17. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  18. Impact of pregnancy on underlying renal disease.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves marked renal vasodilation and large increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Studies in rats reveal that the gestational renal vasodilation is achieved by parallel reductions in tone in afferent and efferent arterioles so GFR rises without a change in glomerular blood pressure. There is some evidence from animal studies that increased renal generation of nitric oxide (NO) may be involved. Although chronic renal vasodilation has been implicated in causing progression of renal disease in nonpregnant states by glomerular hypertension, there are no long-term deleterious effects of pregnancies on the kidney when maternal renal function is normal because glomerular blood pressure remains normal. When maternal renal function is compromised before conception, there are no long-term adverse effects on renal function in most types of renal disease, providing that the GFR is well maintained before conception. When serum creatinine exceeds approximately 1.4 mg/dL, pregnancy may accelerate the renal disease increases and when serum creatinine >2 mg/dL, the chances are greater than 1 in 3 that pregnancy will hasten the progression of the renal disease. The available animal studies suggest that glomerular hypertension does not occur despite diverse injuries. Thus, the mechanisms of the adverse interaction between pregnancy and underlying renal disease remain unknown.

  19. Relation of aortic valve and coronary artery calcium in patients with chronic kidney disease to the stage and etiology of the renal disease.

    PubMed

    Piers, Lieuwe H; Touw, Hugo R W; Gansevoort, Ron; Franssen, Casper F M; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Zijlstra, Felix; Tio, René A

    2009-05-15

    Patients with chronic renal failure have increased cardiac calcium loads. Previous studies have investigated the prevalence and quantitative extent of aortic valve calcium (AVC) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the impact of preexisting atherosclerosis on the calcification burden has not been clarified. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the effect of CKD stage as well as the primary cause of renal failure (atherosclerotic vs nonatherosclerotic) on AVC and CAC. Twenty-two, 13, and 28 patients with stage 3, 4, and 5 CKD, respectively, were included, of whom 24 had atherosclerotic CKD. Patients underwent electron-beam computed tomography to assess AVC and CAC. AVC was present in 27% of patients with stage 3 CKD, in 38% of patients with stage 4 CKD, and in 43% of patients with stage 5 CKD. CAC was present in 77% of patients with stage 3 CKD, in 54% of patients with stage 4 CKD, and in 64% of patients with stage 5 CKD. There was no correlation between CKD stage and the quantitative extent of AVC and CAC. AVC was more frequent (58% vs 23%, p <0.01) and more extensive (median score 43 [range 0 to 494] vs 0 [range 0 to 8], p <0.01) in patients with CKD caused by atherosclerotic renal disease than in patients with nonatherosclerotic causes of CKD. CAC was more frequent (83% vs 56%, p <0.05) and more extensive (median score 437 [range 61 to 1,565] vs 31 [range 0 to 155], p <0.001) in patients with atherosclerotic causes of CKD than in patients with CKD caused by nonatherosclerotic renal disease. In conclusion, the prevalence as well as the severity of AVC and CAC did not vary between patients with stage 3, 4, and 5 CKD. Cardiac calcification, both AVC and CAC, were more frequent and more severe in patients with atherosclerotic causes of renal failure. These results suggest that cardiac calcium is related to atherosclerotic burden rather than to the severity of CKD.

  20. Geographic Variation of Chronic Kidney Disease Prevalence: Correlation with the Incidence of Renal Cell Carcinoma or Urothelial Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Chuang, Kai-Wen; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) exist and are associated with incidence rates of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), or lower tract urothelial carcinoma (LTUC). Methods. Prevalence rates of late-stage CKD for 366 townships (n > 30) in Taiwan were calculated for 1,518,241 and 1,645,151 subjects aged 40 years or older in years 2010 and 2009, respectively. Late-stage CKD prevalence in year 2010 was used as a training set and its age-adjusted standardized morbidity rates (ASMR) were divided into three groups as defined <1.76%, 1.76% ≤ ASMR < 2.64%, and ≥2.64%, respectively. Year 2009, defined as the validation set, was used to validate the results. Results. The ASMR of late-stage CKD in years 2010 and 2009 were 1.76%, and 2.09%, respectively. Geographic variations were observed, with notably higher rates of disease in areas of the central, southwestern mountainside, and southeastern seaboard. There were no significant differences among different combined risk groups of RCC, UTUC, and LTUC incidence. Conclusion. The substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage CKD exist, but are not correlated with RCC, UTUC, or LTUC incidence. PMID:26605329

  1. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats.

  2. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines on anaemia management in chronic kidney disease: a European Renal Best Practice position statement.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Bárány, Peter; Covic, Adrian; De Francisco, Angel; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Goldsmith, David; Hörl, Walter; London, Gerard; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group has produced comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for the management of anaemia in CKD patients. These guidelines addressed all of the important points related to anaemia management in CKD patients, including therapy with erythropoieis stimulating agents (ESA), iron therapy, ESA resistance and blood transfusion use. Because most guidelines were 'soft' rather than 'strong', and because global guidelines need to be adapted and implemented into the regional context where they are used, on behalf of the European Renal Best Practice Advisory Board some of its members, and other external experts in this field, who were not participants in the KDIGO guidelines group, were invited to participate in this anaemia working group to examine and comment on the KDIGO documents in this position paper. In this article, the group concentrated only on those guidelines which we considered worth amending or adapting. All guidelines not specifically mentioned are fully endorsed.

  3. Compromised Diet Quality is Associated with Decreased Renal Function in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyerang; Lim, Hyunjung; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-07-01

    Nutritional status of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is important since it affects growth and development. This study was to investigate overall diet quality measured by nutrient intake adequacy, nutrient density, and several dietary habits in children with CKD and its relationship with clinical parameters according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Assessment of nutritional status and diet quality was conducted in nineteen children with CKD. Average Z-scores of height, weight and body mass index (BMI) in the participants were less than standard growth rate. Nutritional status, such as Z-scores of height (p < 0.05) and serum total protein (p < 0.05), were significantly lower in the children with GFR < 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) compared to those with GFR ≥ 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Nutrition adequacy ratio of energy, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, and zinc and overall diet quality were significantly poorer in the children with GFR < 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Poorer appetite and avoidance of food were observed in the children with higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Intakes of iron, zinc, thiamin, niacin, and vitamin B6 were positively correlated with GFR. Intakes of calcium, potassium and folate were positively correlated with BUN, while protein intakes were negatively correlated. Overall nutrient intakes were inadequate and diet quality was decreased as kidney function was decreased. Dietary habit and appetite were also related with kidney function in this study subjects. Systemic efforts of nutritional intervention are imperative to prevent deteriorating growth and development and improve the nutritional status in children with CKD.

  4. Sex Differences in the Incidence of Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Grace J.; Shaw, Pamela A.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Anderson, Amanda H.; Xie, Dawei; Wang, Xue; Nessel, Lisa C.; Mohler, Emile R.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Chen, Jing; Wright, Jackson; Taliercio, Jonathan J.; Ojo, Akinlolu; C.Ricardo, Ana; Lustigova, Eva; Fairman, Ronald M.; Feldman, Harold I.; Ky, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Background To define how the incidence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) differs according to sex and age. Methods and Results The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) is a multi-center, prospective cohort study of CKD participants. Fine and Gray methods were used to determine the cumulative incidence of PAD, defined by an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 0.90 or a confirmed PAD event, with death as a competing event. Adjusted subdistribution hazard ratios from the Fine and Gray model determined the risk of PAD according to sex. A priori, we hypothesized that the relationship between sex and cumulative incidence of PAD differed according to age. The mean age of the 3,174 participants in this study was 56.6 years and consisted of 55% males. Over a median follow-up of 5.9 years, 17.8% developed PAD, 13.0% were lost to followup and 11.1% died. Females had a 1.53-fold greater adjusted PAD risk compared to men (95% CI 1.27-1.84, p<0.001). These sex-related differences in PAD risk also differed by age (p=0.013). Women, compared to men, were at a markedly increased risk for PAD at younger ages; however, at ages greater than 70 years, the risk was similar across both sexes. Older men had a substantially greater PAD risk compared to younger men. In women, PAD risk did not vary with age. Conclusions Females with CKD have a higher PAD risk compared to males at younger ages. There is an important need to improve our understanding of the biological and clinical basis for these differences. PMID:26908866

  5. Cross sectional longitudinal study of spot morning urine protein:creatinine ratio, 24 hour urine protein excretion rate, glomerular filtration rate, and end stage renal failure in chronic renal disease in patients without diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, P.; Gaspari, F.; Perna, A.; Remuzzi, G.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a reliable indicator of 24 hour urinary protein excretion and predicts the rate of decline of glomerular filtration rate and progression to end stage renal failure in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cross sectional correlation between the ratio and urinary protein excretion rate. Univariate and multivariate analysis of baseline predictors, including the ratio and 24 hour urinary protein, of decline in glomerular filtration rate and end stage renal failure in the long term. SETTING: Research centre in Italy. SUBJECTS: 177 non-diabetic outpatients with chronic renal disease screened for participation in the ramipril efficacy in nephropathy study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of decline in filtration rate evaluated by repeated measurements of unlabelled iohexol plasma clearance and rate of progression to renal failure. RESULTS: Protein:creatinine ratio was significantly correlated with absolute and log transformed 24 hour urinary protein values (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively.) Ratios also had high predictive value for rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate (univariate P = 0.0003, multivariate P = 0.004) and end stage renal failure (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04). Baseline protein:creatinine ratios and rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate were also significantly correlated (P < 0.0005). In the lowest third of the protein:creatinine ratio (< 1.7) there was 3% renal failure compared with 21.2% in the highest third (> 2.7) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a precise indicator of proteinuria and a reliable predictor of progression of disease in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathies and represents a simple and inexpensive procedure in establishing severity of renal disease and prognosis. PMID:9501711

  6. Peritoneal Dialysis in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Edelbaum, David N.; Sokol, Albert; Gaynor, Sanford; Rubini, Milton E.

    1968-01-01

    The long-term results of intermittent peritoneal dialysis in long-term treatment of renal disease have yet to equal those of intermittent hemodialysis. However, further exploration and refinement of this technique is justified. Performed in acute stages of disease, both peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis relieve the symptoms of uremia and specifically “buy time” for the patient so that proper medical or surgical therapy may be instituted. In acute situations, peritoneal dialysis is the procedure of choice, and is an important adjunct to more conventional treatment for chronic renal disease. It may be useful sometimes even in chronically hemodialyzed patients—for example, when the hemodialysis cannula for one reason or another is inaccessible because of clots, replacement, or infection. It is especially valuable when the hemorrhagic complications of uremia contraindicate hemodialysis treatment. Its use in chronic uremia remains sharply limited in time, but for brief periods chronic peritoneal dialysis appears to be a reasonably satisfactory means of prolonging life while awaiting homotransplant or decision for maintenance hemodialysis therapy. PMID:5639945

  7. Aerobic Exercise Improves Signs of Restless Leg Syndrome in End Stage Renal Disease Patients Suffering Chronic Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Mojgan; Vahdatpour, Babak; Ghasempour, Aida; Taheri, Diana; Shahidi, Shahrzad; Moeinzadeh, Firouzeh; Dolatkhah, Bahareh; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is one of the prevalent complaints of patients with end stage renal diseases suffering chronic hemodialysis. Although there are some known pharmacological managements for this syndrome, the adverse effect of drugs causes a limitation for using them. In this randomized clinical trial we aimed to find a nonpharmacological way to improve signs of restless leg syndrome and patients' quality of life. Material and Methods. Twenty-six patients were included in the study and divided into 2 groups of control and exercise. The exercise group used aerobic exercise during their hemodialysis for 16 weeks. The quality of life and severity of restless leg syndrome were assessed at the first week of study and final week. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results. The difference of means of RLS signs at the first week of study and final week was −5.5 ± 4.96 in exercise group and −0.53 ± 2.3 in control group. There was not any statistical difference between control group and exercise group in quality of life at the first week of study and final week. Conclusions. We suggest using aerobic exercise for improving signs of restless leg syndrome, but no evidence was found for its efficacy on patient's quality of life. PMID:24307876

  8. Prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent hemodialysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brkovic, Tonci; Burilovic, Eliana; Puljak, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the epidemiology of pain in patients on hemodialysis (HD) is crucial for further improvement in managing pain. The aim of this study was to systematically review available evidence on the prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent HD. Materials and methods We carried out a systematic review of the literature and developed a comprehensive search strategy based on search terms on pain and HD. We searched the databases MEDLINE, Scopus, PsycINFO, and CINAHL from the earliest date of each database to July 24, 2014. Manuscripts in all languages were taken into consideration. Two authors performed each step independently, and all disagreements were resolved after discussion with the third author. The quality of studies was estimated using the STROBE checklist and Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Results We included 52 studies with 6,917 participants. The prevalence of acute and chronic pain in HD patients was up to 82% and 92%, respectively. A considerable number of patients suffered from severe pain. Various locations and causes of pain were described, with most of the studies reporting pain in general, pain related to arteriovenous access, headache, and musculoskeletal pain. Conclusion The findings of this systematic review indicate high prevalence of pain in HD patients and considerable gaps and limitations in the available evidence. Pain in this population should be recognized as a considerable health concern, and the nephrology community should promote pain management in HD patients as a clinical and research priority to improve patients’ quality of life and pain-related disability. PMID:27382261

  9. Short-term renal hemodynamic effects of tolvaptan in subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease at various stages of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Boertien, Wendy E; Meijer, Esther; de Jong, Paul E; Bakker, Stephan J L; Czerwiec, Frank S; Struck, Joachim; Oberdhan, Dorothee; Shoaf, Susan E; Krasa, Holly B; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2013-12-01

    Vasopressin V2-receptor antagonists may delay disease progression in ADPKD. Trials with V2-receptor antagonists have been performed predominantly in patients with an estimated creatinine clearance of 60 ml/min or more. Here we determined renal hemodynamic effects of the V2-receptor antagonist tolvaptan in 27 patients with ADPKD at various stages of chronic kidney disease: group A: >60, group B: 30-60, and group C: <30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Measurements were performed before, after 3 weeks of tolvaptan (up titration to 90/30 mg/day, split dose), and 3 weeks after the last dose of tolvaptan. With tolvaptan, a minor, reversible decrease in GFR ((125)I-iothalamate clearance) was found that reached significance in groups A and B: -7.8 (interquartile range -13.7 to -1.3) and -4.3 (-9.7 to -0.9) ml/min per 1.73 m(2), respectively, but not in group C (GFR decrease -0.7 (-1.1 to 1.5) ml/min/1.73 m(2)). The percentage change in GFR, ERPF ((131)I-hippuran clearance), and filtration fraction with tolvaptan did not differ between the three study groups. No differences between the three study groups were found in other main efficacy variables, besides smaller increases in urine volume in group C during tolvaptan treatment. Tolvaptan was well tolerated, with only two patients withdrawing. Thus, doses of tolvaptan typically used in patients with ADPKD do not produce a difference in renal hemodynamic profile in chronic kidney disease stages 1 through 4, but minor GFR drops may be observed in individual patients.

  10. Prognostic study of cardiac and renal events in Japanese patients with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk using myocardial perfusion SPECT: J-ACCESS 3 study design.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Satoko; Kawano, Yuhei; Hase, Hiroki; Hatta, Tsuguru; Nishimura, Shigeyuki; Moroi, Masao; Nakagawa, Susumu; Kasai, Tokuo; Kusuoka, Hideo; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Nakajima, Kenichi; Momose, Mitsuru; Takehana, Kazuya; Nanasato, Mamoru; Yoda, Syunichi; Nishina, Hidetaka; Matsumoto, Naoya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Recent studies have indicated that the incidence of cardiovascular disease increases inversely with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Although coronary angiography is considered the gold standard for detecting coronary artery disease, contrast-induced nephropathy or cholesterol microembolization remain serious problems; therefore, a method of detecting coronary artery disease without renal deterioration is desirable. From this viewpoint, stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) might be useful for patients with chronic kidney disease. We recently performed the Japanese Assessment of Cardiac Events and Survival Study by Quantitative Gated SPECT (J-ACCESS) investigating patients with suspected or extant coronary artery disease and the J-ACCESS 2 study of patients with diabetes. The findings from these studies showed that SPECT can detect coronary artery disease and help to predict future cardiac events. Thus, we proposed a multicenter, prospective cohort study called "J-ACCESS 3" in patients with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk. The study aimed at predicting cardiovascular and renal events based on myocardial perfusion imaging and clinical backgrounds. We began enrolling patients in J-ACCESS 3 at 74 facilities from April 2009 and will continue to do so until 31 March 2010, with the aim of having a cohort of 800 patients. These will be followed up for three years. The primary endpoints will be cardiac death and sudden death. The secondary endpoints will comprise any cardiovascular or renal events. This study will be completed in 2013. Here, we describe the design of the J-ACCESS 3 study.

  11. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  12. Amphibian renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Amphibians by nature have an intimate connection with the aquatic environment at some stage of development and fight an osmotic battle due to the influx of water. Many amphibians have acquired a more terrestrial existence at later stages of development and consequently have physiologic adaptations to conserve moisture. Renal adaptations have allowed amphibians successfully to bridge the gap between aqueous and terrestrial habitats. The kidneys, skin,and, in many amphibian species, the urinary bladder play key roles in fluid homeostasis. Renal impairment may be responsible for the clinical manifestation of disease, morbidity, and mortality.

  13. Renal failure occurs in chronic lithium treatment but is uncommon.

    PubMed

    Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias

    2010-02-01

    We sought to establish the prevalence of lithium-induced end-stage renal disease in two regions of Sweden with 2.7 million inhabitants corresponding to about 30% of the Swedish population. Eighteen patients with lithium-induced end-stage renal disease were identified among the 3369 patients in the general lithium-treated population, representing a sixfold increase in prevalence compared with the general population for renal replacement therapy. All lithium-treated patients were older than 46 years at end-stage renal disease with a mean lithium treatment time of 23 years with ten patients having discontinued lithium treatment an average of 10 years before the start of renal replacement therapy. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (defined as plasma creatinine over 150 micromol/l) in the general lithium-treated population was about 1.2% (excluding patients on renal replacement therapy). Compared with lithium-treated patients without renal failure, those with chronic kidney disease were older and most were men but, as groups, their mean serum lithium levels and psychiatric diagnoses did not differ. We found that end-stage renal disease is an uncommon but not rare consequence of long-term lithium treatment and is more prevalent than previously thought. Time on lithium was the only identified risk factor in this study, suggesting that regular monitoring of renal function in these patients is mandatory.

  14. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  15. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  16. [Anaemia and chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Chassagne, Philippe; Amalou, Laetitia; Thillard, Anne-Lyse; Gbaguidi, Xavier; Roca, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of anemia in old patients is 20%. Anemia is mostly multifactorial associated with multiple comorbidities that are frequently observed in people of 65 years or older. Chronic renal failure, inflammatory diseases, nutrient deficiencies and especially iron deficiency are the most associated conditions with anemia. Anemia represents a prognosis marker of general health in old people. Thus anemia is associated with higher rates of morbidities (such as unplanned hospitalizations) and greatest mortality. Therefore anemia could be considered either as a consequence of chronic diseases or a prognosis marker of their severity. The prognosis of chronic cardiac failure is for example worst in anemic patients. Finally anemia is listed as a component of the frailty.

  17. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in women compared with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanjue; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Dong, Xue; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Wang, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a strong risk factor for chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Whether sex differences in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease incidence exist among diabetic patients remains unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative effect of diabetes on chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease risk in women compared with men. We systematically searched Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for both cohort and case-control studies until October 2015. Studies were selected if they reported a sex-specific relationship between diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. We generated pooled estimates across studies using random-effects meta-analysis after log transformation with inverse variance weighting. Ten studies with data from more than 5 million participants were included. The pooled adjusted risk ratio of chronic kidney disease associated with diabetes mellitus was 3.34 (95 % CI 2.27, 4.93) in women and 2.84 (95 % CI 1.73, 4.68) in men. The data showed no difference in diabetes-related chronic kidney disease risk between the sexes (pooled adjusted women-to-men relative risk ratio was 1.14 [95 % CI 0.97, 1.34]) except for end-stage renal disease-the pooled adjusted women-to men relative risk ratio was 1.38 (95 % CI 1.22, 1.55; p = 0.114, I² = 38.1 %). The study found no evidence of a sex difference in the association between diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. However, the excess risk for end-stage renal disease was higher in women with diabetes than in men with the same condition, from which we assume that the female gender could accelerate the disease progression. Further studies are needed to support this notion and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  18. Identification of human nephron progenitors capable of generation of kidney structures and functional repair of chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Metsuyanim, Sally; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Gershon, Rotem; Pri-Chen, Sara; Ozdemir, Derya D; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Noiman, Tzahi; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Vaknin, Zvi; Schneider, David F; Aronow, Bruce J; Goldstein, Ronald S; Hohenstein, Peter; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of tissue-specific renal stem/progenitor cells with nephrogenic potential is a critical step in developing cell-based therapies for renal disease. In the human kidney, stem/progenitor cells are induced into the nephrogenic pathway to form nephrons until the 34 week of gestation, and no equivalent cell types can be traced in the adult kidney. Human nephron progenitor cells (hNPCs) have yet to be isolated. Here we show that growth of human foetal kidneys in serum-free defined conditions and prospective isolation of NCAM1+ cells selects for nephron lineage that includes the SIX2-positive cap mesenchyme cells identifying a mitotically active population with in vitro clonogenic and stem/progenitor properties. After transplantation in the chick embryo, these cells—but not differentiated counterparts—efficiently formed various nephron tubule types. hNPCs engrafted and integrated in diseased murine kidneys and treatment of renal failure in the 5/6 nephrectomy kidney injury model had beneficial effects on renal function halting disease progression. These findings constitute the first definition of an intrinsic nephron precursor population, with major potential for cell-based therapeutic strategies and modelling of kidney disease. PMID:23996934

  19. Assessment of Metabolomic and Proteomic Biomarkers in Detection and Prognosis of Progression of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Duranton, Flore; Gayrard, Nathalie; Argilés, Àngel; Lundin, Ulrika; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Dakna, Mohammed; Delles, Christian; Mullen, William; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Koeck, Thomas; Zürbig, Petra; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is part of a number of systemic and renal diseases and may reach epidemic proportions over the next decade. Efforts have been made to improve diagnosis and management of CKD. We hypothesised that combining metabolomic and proteomic approaches could generate a more systemic and complete view of the disease mechanisms. To test this approach, we examined samples from a cohort of 49 patients representing different stages of CKD. Urine samples were analysed for proteomic changes using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and urine and plasma samples for metabolomic changes using different mass spectrometry-based techniques. The training set included 20 CKD patients selected according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at mild (59.9±16.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) or advanced (8.9±4.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) CKD and the remaining 29 patients left for the test set. We identified a panel of 76 statistically significant metabolites and peptides that correlated with CKD in the training set. We combined these biomarkers in different classifiers and then performed correlation analyses with eGFR at baseline and follow-up after 2.8±0.8 years in the test set. A solely plasma metabolite biomarker-based classifier significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function in the test set at baseline and follow-up (ρ = −0.8031; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.6009; p = 0.0019, respectively). Similarly, a urinary metabolite biomarker-based classifier did reveal significant association to kidney function (ρ = −0.6557; p = 0.0001 and ρ = −0.6574; p = 0.0005). A classifier utilising 46 identified urinary peptide biomarkers performed statistically equivalent to the urinary and plasma metabolite classifier (ρ = −0.7752; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.8400; p<0.0001). The combination of both urinary proteomic and urinary and plasma metabolic biomarkers did not improve the correlation with eGFR. In

  20. [Pregnancy in patients with underlying renal disease].

    PubMed

    Golshayan, D; Mathieu, C; Burnier, M

    2007-03-07

    Pregnancy has generally been regarded as very high risk in women with chronic renal insufficiency. In this review, we describe the physiologic changes in systemic and renal haemodynamics during pregnancy, as well as the nature and severity of possible maternal and foetal complications in the setting of underlying renal disease. The risks are proportional to the degree of functional renal impairment, the presence or not of proteinuria and/or arterial hypertension at the time of conception, and are related to the type of underlying nephropathy or systemic disease in the mother. Furthermore, if the renal disease has been diagnosed before pregnancy, a better planning of the moment of conception, as well as a tight follow-up, allow for a better maternal and obstetrical outcome.

  1. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  2. Diuretic use in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2011-12-20

    Diuretics are agents commonly used in diseases characterized by excess extracellular fluid, including chronic kidney disease, the nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis and heart failure. Multiple diuretic classes, including thiazide-type diuretics, loop diuretics and K(+)-sparing diuretics, are used to treat patients with these diseases, either individually or as combination therapies. An understanding of what determines a patient's response to a diuretic is a prerequisite to the correct use of these drugs. The response of patients with these diseases to diuretics, which is related to the dose, is best described by a sigmoid curve whose contour can become distorted by any of the several sodium-retaining states that are directly or indirectly associated with renal disease. Diuretic actions are of considerable importance to patients who have renal disease, as their effective use assists in extracellular fluid volume control, reducing excretion of protein in urine and lessening the risk of developing hyperkalemia. Diuretic-related adverse events that involve the uric acid, Na(+) and K(+) axes are not uncommon; therefore the clinician must be vigilant in looking for biochemical disturbances. As a result of diuretic-related adverse events, clinicians must be resourceful in the dose amount and frequency of dosing.

  3. Renal disease and hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Reis, Ines; Vais, Alina; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Banerjee, Anita

    2013-02-01

    Because women are becoming pregnant at a later age, hypertension is more commonly encountered in pregnancy. In addition, with increasing numbers of young women living with renal transplants and kidney disease, it is important for physicians to be aware of the effects of pregnancy on these diseases. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to assess and care for pregnant women with kidney disease. Pre-pregnancy counselling should be offered to all women with chronic kidney disease. A review of medication to avoid teratogenicity and optimise the disease prior to conception is the ideal. Pregnancy may be the first medical review for a young woman, who may present with a previously undiagnosed renal problem.

  4. Seeking an optimal renal replacement therapy for the chronic kidney disease epidemic: the case for on-line hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Emanuele; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be expected to increase dramatically in the foreseeable future, with suggestions that it has already reached epidemic proportions. The inadequate supply of donor organs, aggravated by an aging patient population, necessitates provision of sustainable dialysis treatment modalities. These treatment modalities must not only be of established clinical efficacy and effectiveness, but must simultaneously circumvent any potential treatment disparities due to geographical, social or other concurring factors. Home therapies might represent a partial solution to the complex issue of seeking optimal strategies to cope with the CKD epidemic. However, self-care renal replacement therapy (RRT), such as peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home therapies, can only be applied to a limited portion of the CKD population. Consequently, in preparation for coping with this CKD epidemic, specific large-scale plans need to be made that involve optimization of treatments already in use for the majority of the population requiring RRT, e.g. hemodialysis (HD). Extracorporeal chronic HD relies heavily on technology for its clinical success. Like the choice of the treatment modality and the complete medical approach to CKD patient care, the particular selection of the various components of the extracorporeal circuit has a significant impact on the well-being and survival of the patients. We present a medical-technological assessment of how best to treat vast numbers of dialysis patients under the financial restraints that are predicted to become even more severe as CKD entrenches itself as a more 'permanent epidemic'. A treatment modality is proposed that optimally addresses--and resolves--the debilitating effects of uremia, as well as of key clinical conditions closely linked to it. This treatment modality successfully tackles the issues of patient well-being, efficacy, effectiveness, safety and patient-nursing staff convenience--all in relation to

  5. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction.The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant.This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients.

  6. [Carcinoembryonic antigen as a marker of proliferative diseases of the lymphatic system in patients with chronic renal failure--case report].

    PubMed

    Janas, Marzena; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Mazur, Stanisław

    2014-10-01

    In patients with CKD, anaemia mainly develops due to a decreased renal synthesis of erythropoietin. The anaemia, both normochromic and normocytic, becomes more severe as the glomerular filtration rate progressively decreases. Tumor markers are used to detect or monitor proliferative diseases. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is usually produced in the gastrointestinal tract, but its production is terminated before birth. The main application of this indicator is to monitor the treatment and the presence of metastases of colorectal cancer. We present a case of 86-year-old woman who was diagnosed with renal anaemia in stage 4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD), treated by periodic blood transfusions. This paper presents the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of anemia with complex and different than renal origin anemia in patients with CKD. Patients require the detailed haematological diagnosis. Pointed out the usefulness of CEA in the diagnosis of lymphoma with co-existing renal failure. The use of erythropoietin in doses of nephrology allowed to avoid further blood transfusion.

  7. Lupus nephritis and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Germain, S; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2006-01-01

    Management of pregnant women with renal disease involves awareness of, and allowance for, physiological changes including decreased serum creatinine and increased proteinuria. For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), pregnancy increases likelihood of flare. These can occur at any stage, and are more difficult to diagnose, as symptoms overlap those of normal pregnancy. Renal involvement is no more common in pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria may be lupus flare but differential includes pre-eclampsia. In women with chronic renal disease, pregnancy may accelerate decline in renal function and worsen hypertension and proteinuria, with increased risk of maternal (eg, pre-eclampsia) and fetal (eg, IUGR, IUD) complications, strongly correlating with degree of renal impairment peri-conception. Pregnancy success rate varies from 20% to 95% depending on base-line creatinine. Best outcome is obtained if disease was quiescent for >6 months pre-conception. Women on dialysis or with renal transplants can achieve successful pregnancy but have higher maternal and fetal complication rates. Acute on chronic renal failure can develop secondary to complications such as HELLP and AFLP. Management needs to be by a multidisciplinary team involving physicians and obstetricians, ideally beginning with pre-pregnancy counselling. Treatment of flares includes corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, azothioprine, NSAIDs and MME Blood pressure is controlled with methyldopa, nifedipine or hydralazine.

  8. Higher plasma CXCL12 levels predict incident myocardial infarction and death in chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nehal N.; Matthews, Gregory J.; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shah, Rhia; McLaughlin, Catherine; Patel, Parth; Budoff, Matthew; Chen, Jing; Wolman, Melanie; Go, Alan; He, Jiang; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Master, Stephen R.; Rader, Daniel J.; Raj, Dominic; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Shah, Rachana; Schreiber, Marty; Fischer, Michael J.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Kusek, John; Feldman, Harold I.; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Genome-wide association studies revealed an association between a locus at 10q11, downstream from CXCL12, and myocardial infarction (MI). However, the relationship among plasma CXCL12, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, incident MI, and death is unknown. Methods and results We analysed study-entry plasma CXCL12 levels in 3687 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study, a prospective study of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Mean follow-up was 6 years for incident MI or death. Plasma CXCL12 levels were positively associated with several cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia), lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and higher inflammatory cytokine levels (P < 0.05). In fully adjusted models, higher study-entry CXCL12 was associated with increased odds of prevalent CVD (OR 1.23; 95% confidence interval 1.14, 1.33, P < 0.001) for one standard deviation (SD) increase in CXCL12. Similarly, one SD higher CXCL12 increased the hazard of incident MI (1.26; 1.09,1.45, P < 0.001), death (1.20; 1.09,1.33, P < 0.001), and combined MI/death (1.23; 1.13–1.34, P < 0.001) adjusting for demographic factors, known CVD risk factors, and inflammatory markers and remained significant for MI (1.19; 1.03,1.39, P = 0.01) and the combined MI/death (1.13; 1.03,1.24, P = 0.01) after further controlling for eGFR and urinary albumin:creatinine ratio. Conclusions In CKD, higher plasma CXCL12 was associated with CVD risk factors and prevalent CVD as well as the hazard of incident MI and death. Further studies are required to establish if plasma CXCL12 reflect causal actions at the vessel wall and is a tool for genomic and therapeutic trials. PMID:24306482

  9. Managing progressive renal disease before dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To enhance awareness of issues affecting patients with chronic renal failure and to provide guidance for primary care practitioners managing such patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Randomized trials establish the efficacy of blood pressure control and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in slowing the progression of chronic renal disease. Some randomized trials and many prospective studies address management of anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and multidisciplinary predialysis care. The benefits of lipid lowering are suggested by randomized trials among patients without renal disease. MAIN MESSAGE: Progression of renal failure, particularly in patients with proteinuria, can be slowed by lowering blood pressure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are more beneficial than other antihypertensives in this situation. Partial correction of anemia with iron, erythropoietin, or androgens can improve quality of life and potentially prevent cardiac disease. Renal bone disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism can be prevented in part by early dietary phosphate restriction, use of calcium-containing phosphate binders, and activated vitamin D. Correction of acidosis could improve protein metabolism and bone and cardiovascular health. Treatment of hyperlipidemia might reduce cardiovascular disease. Early involvement of a nephrology-based multidisciplinary team has the potential to reduce morbidity and costs, enhance patients' knowledge of their condition, and prolong the period before dialysis is required. CONCLUSIONS: Care of patients with progressive renal failure is complex and requires attention to detail. Family doctors play a vital role in these efforts and should be involved in all aspects of care. PMID:10216796

  10. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life Impacts Mortality but Not Progression to End-Stage Renal Disease in Pre-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Jesky, Mark D.; Dutton, Mary; Dasgupta, Indranil; Yadav, Punit; Ng, Khai Ping; Fenton, Anthony; Kyte, Derek; Ferro, Charles J.; Calvert, Melanie; Cockwell, Paul; Stringer, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL). However, the relationship between pre-dialysis CKD, HRQL and clinical outcomes, including mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unclear. Methods All 745 participants recruited into the Renal Impairment In Secondary Care study to end March 2014 were included. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline including an assessment of HRQL using the Euroqol EQ-5D-3L. Health states were converted into an EQ-5Dindex score using a set of weighted preferences specific to the UK population. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association of HRQL with progression to ESRD or all-cause mortality. Regression analyses were then performed to identify variables associated with the significant HRQL components. Results Median eGFR was 25.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 (IQR 19.6–33.7ml/min) and median ACR was 33 mg/mmol (IQR 6.6–130.3 mg/mmol). Five hundred and fifty five participants (75.7%) reported problems with one or more EQ-5D domains. When adjusted for age, gender, comorbidity, eGFR and ACR, both reported problems with self-care [hazard ratio 2.542, 95% confidence interval 1.222–5.286, p = 0.013] and reduced EQ-5Dindex score [hazard ratio 0.283, 95% confidence interval 0.099–0.810, p = 0.019] were significantly associated with an increase in all-cause mortality. Similar findings were observed for competing risk analyses. Reduced HRQL was not a risk factor for progression to ESRD in multivariable analyses. Conclusions Impaired HRQL is common in the pre-dialysis CKD population. Reduced HRQL, as demonstrated by problems with self-care or a lower EQ-5Dindex score, is associated with a higher risk for death but not ESRD. Multiple factors influence these aspects of HRQL but renal function, as measured by eGFR and ACR, are not among them. PMID:27832126

  12. Hypertensive pregnancy disorders and future renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steven; Craici, Iasmina

    2014-10-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect approximately 6 to 8 % of otherwise normal pregnancies. A growing body of evidence links these disorders with the future development of hypertension, coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Larger studies associating hypertensive pregnancy to future development of renal disease have been lacking until recently, with publication of several compelling studies in the last 5 years. In this review, we will focus on the recent evidence associating hypertensive pregnancy disorders with the future development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), as well as the development of microalbuminuria. We will also attempt to answer whether these renal risks are due to direct effects of hypertension during pregnancy, or whether they are due to shared environmental and genetic risk factors.

  13. The prodromal phase of obesity-related chronic kidney disease: early alterations in cardiovascular and renal function in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Anke; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-11-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity is a relevant health condition with multi-organ involvement. Obesity shows significant tracking into adult life and is associated with an increased risk of serious adverse health outcomes both during childhood and later adulthood. The classical sequelae of obesity such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome and inflammation do develop at a paediatric age. Cardiovascular consequences, such as increased carotid intima-media thickness, and left ventricular hypertrophy, as well as functional alterations of the heart and arteries, are commonly traceable at an early age. Renal involvement can occur at a young age and is associated with a high probability of progressive chronic kidney disease. There is solid evidence suggesting that consequent treatment including both lifestyle changes and pharmacological therapy can reduce cardiovascular, metabolic and renal risks in obese children and adolescents.

  14. Risk Factors for Development of Chronic Kidney Disease following Renal Infarction: Retrospective Evaluation of Emergency Room Patients from a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Ling; Seak, Chen-June; Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Weng, Yi-Ming; Chen, Hang-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have analyzed factors associated with renal infarction so that patients can be provided with earlier diagnosis and treatment. However, the factors associated with development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) following renal infarction are unknown. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with a diagnosis of renal infarction based on enhanced computed tomography. All patients were admitted to a single emergency department in Taiwan from 1999 to 2008. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the effect of different factors on development of CKD based on estimates of the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at admission and at 3–12 months after discharge. Results Univariate analysis indicated significantly increased risk of CKD in patients older than 50 years, with symptoms for 24 h or less before admission, lower eGFR at admission, APACHE II score greater than 7, SOFA score greater than 1, ASA score greater than 2, and SAPS II score greater than 15. Multivariate analysis indicated that only SOFA score greater than 1 was significantly and independently associated with CKD at follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions A total of 32.5% of patients admitted for renal infarction over a ten-year period developed CKD at 3–12 months after discharge. A SOFA score greater than 1 was significantly and independently associated with development of CKD in these patients. PMID:24911965

  15. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  16. Efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparin compared to unfractionated heparin for chronic outpatient hemodialysis in end stage renal disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Sethi, Mansha; Khanna, Rohit C.; Pancholy, Samir Bipin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an effective anti-coagulant for thrombotic events. However, due to its predominant renal clearance, there are concerns that it might be associated with increased bleeding in patients with renal disease. Objectives. We systematically evaluated the efficacy and safety of LMWH compared to unfractionated heparin (UH) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Search Methods. Pubmed, Embase and cochrane central were searched for eligible citations. Selection Criteria. Randomized controlled trials, comparing LMWH and UH, involving adult (age > 18 years), ESRD patients receiving outpatient, chronic, intermittent hemodialysis were included. Data Collection and Analysis. Two independent reviewers performed independent data abstraction. I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. Random effects model was used for meta-analysis. Results. Nineteen studies were included for systematic review and 4 were included for meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between LMWH and UFH for extracorporeal circuit thrombosis [risk ratio: 1 (95% CI [0.62–1.62])] and bleeding complications [risk ratio: 1.16 (95% CI [0.62–2.15])]. Conclusions. LMWH is as safe and effective as UFH. Considering the poor quality of studies included for the review, larger well conducted RCTs are required before conclusions can be drawn. PMID:25780780

  17. [Chronic renal failure secondary to uterine prolapse].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Canora, J; Venegas, J L

    2005-01-01

    Acute and chronic renal failure secondary to bilateral severe hydroureteronephrosis is a rare sequela of uterine prolapse. We report a case of neglected complete uterine prolapse in a 72-year-old patient resulting in bilateral hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and chronic renal failure. In an attempt to diminish the ureteral obstruction a vaginal pessary was used to reduce the uterine prolapse. Finally, surgical repair of prolapse by means of a vaginal hysterectomy was performed. In conclusion, all patients presenting with complete uterine prolapse should be screened to exclude urinary tract obstruction. If present, obstructive uropathy should be relieved by the reduction or repair of the prolapse before irreversible renal damage occurs.

  18. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  19. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. The Impact of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade on Renal Outcomes and Mortality in Pre-Dialysis Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yun Jung; Kim, Sun Moon; Shin, Byung Chul; Kim, Hyun Lee; Chung, Jong Hoon; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Chungsik

    2017-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) blockade is thought to slow renal progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it remains uncertain if the habitual use of RAS inhibitors affects renal progression and outcomes in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD. In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we identified 2,076 pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD (stage 4 or 5) from a total of 33,722 CKD patients. RAS blockade users were paired with non-users for analyses using inverse probability of treatment-weighted (IPTW) and propensity score (PS) matching. The outcomes were renal death, all-cause mortality, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, and interactive factors as composite outcomes. RAS blockade users showed an increased risk of renal death in PS-matched analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.381; 95% CI, 1.071–1.781; P = 0.013), which was in agreement with the results of IPTW analysis (HR, 1.298; 95% CI, 1.123–1.500; P < 0.001). The risk of composite outcomes was higher in RAS blockade users in IPTW (HR, 1.154; 95% CI, 1.016–1.310; P = 0.027), but was marginal significance in PS matched analysis (HR, 1.243; 95% CI, 0.996–1.550; P = 0.054). The habitual use of RAS blockades in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD may have a detrimental effect on renal outcome without improving all-cause mortality. Further studies are warranted to determine whether withholding RAS blockade may lead to better outcomes in these patients. PMID:28122064

  1. No independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to end-stage renal disease in a large screen for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Peralta, Carmen A; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Li, Suying; Sachs, Michael; Shah, Anuja; Norris, Keith; Saab, Georges; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; McCullough, Peter A

    2013-11-01

    Whether higher serum phosphorus levels are associated with a higher risk for death and/or progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not well established, and whether the association is confounded by access and barriers to care is unknown. To answer these questions, data of 10,672 individuals identified to have CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) from those participating in a community-based screening program were analyzed. Over a median follow-up of 2.3 years, there was no association between quartiles of serum phosphorus and all-cause mortality (adjusted hazards ratio for serum phosphorus over 3.3 to 3.7, over 3.7 to 4.1, and over 4.1 mg/dl, respectively: 1.22 (0.95-1.56), 1.00 (0.76-1.32), and 1.00 (0.75-1.33); reference, serum phosphorus of 3.3 mg/dl and below). Individuals in the highest quartile for serum phosphorus had a significantly higher risk for progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (unadjusted hazards ratio, 6.72 (4.16-10.85)); however, the risk became nonsignificant on adjustment for potential confounders. There was no appreciable change in hazards ratio with inclusion of variables related to access and barriers to care. Additional analyses in subgroups based on 12 different variables yielded similar negative associations. Thus, in the largest cohort of individuals with early-stage CKD to date, we could not validate an independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to ESRD.

  2. [Sympathetic nerve activity in chronic renal failure - what are the therapeutic options?].

    PubMed

    Hausberg, M; Tokmak, F

    2013-11-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are characterized by a tonic elevation of sympathetic tone. This factor largely contributes to their increased cardiovascular risk. The increased sympathetic drive is caused by activiation of renal afferent fibers in the diseased kidneys. Therapeutic options for hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure with respect to their sympathetic overactivity are inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-system and central sympatholytic drugs. The role of catheter-based renal denervation in these patients is currently under investigation.

  3. The Relationship between Renal Function and Plasma Concentration of the Cachectic Factor Zinc-Alpha2-Glycoprotein (ZAG) in Adult Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalbacher, Emilie; Croze, Marine L.; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Fouque, Denis; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Soulage, Christophe O.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG), a potent cachectic factor, is increased in patients undergoing maintenance dialysis. However, there is no data for patients before initiation of renal replacement therapy. The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between plasma ZAG concentration and renal function in patients with a large range of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Plasma ZAG concentration and its relationship to GFR were investigated in 71 patients with a chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 1 to 5, 17 chronic hemodialysis (HD), 8 peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 18 non-CKD patients. Plasma ZAG concentration was 2.3-fold higher in CKD stage 5 patients and 3-fold higher in HD and PD patients compared to non-CKD controls (P<0.01). The hemodialysis session further increased plasma ZAG concentration (+39%, P<0.01). An inverse relationship was found between ZAG levels and plasma protein (rs = −0.284; P<0.01), albumin (rs = −0.282, P<0.05), hemoglobin (rs = −0.267, P<0.05) and HDL-cholesterol (rs = −0.264, P<0.05) and a positive correlation were seen with plasma urea (rs = 0.283; P<0.01). In multiple regression analyses, plasma urea and HDL-cholesterol were the only variables associated with plasma ZAG (r2 = 0.406, P<0.001). In CKD-5 patients, plasma accumulation of ZAG was not correlated with protein energy wasting. Further prospective studies are however needed to better elucidate the potential role of ZAG in end-stage renal disease. PMID:25076420

  4. NLRP3 Deficiency Attenuates Renal Fibrosis and Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Mouse Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Bi, Xiao; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Shijian

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing PYD-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, its exact role in glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis is still undefined. The present study was performed to identify the function of NLRP3 in modulating renal injury and fibrosis and the potential involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model of CKD. Methods. Employing wild-type (WT) and NLRP3−/− mice with or without UUO, we evaluated renal structure, tissue injury, and mitochondrial ultrastructure, as well as expression of some vital molecules involved in the progression of fibrosis, apoptosis, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Results. The severe glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced in WT mice by UUO was markedly attenuated in NLRP3−/− mice as evidenced by blockade of extracellular matrix deposition, decreased cell apoptosis, and phenotypic alterations. Moreover, NLRP3 deletion reversed UUO-induced impairment of mitochondrial morphology and function. Conclusions. NLRP3 deletion ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction and alleviates renal fibrosis in a murine UUO model of CKD. PMID:28348462

  5. Epigenetics of Renal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Sylvia A.; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of epigenetics is indispensable to our understanding of gene regulation under normal and pathological states. This knowledge will help with designing better therapeutic approaches in regenerative tissue medicine. Epigenetics allows us to parse out the mechanisms by which transcriptional regulators gain access to specific gene loci thereby imprinting epigenetic information affecting chromatin function. This epigenetic memory forms the basis of cell lineage specification in multicellular organisms. Post-translational modifications to DNA and histones in the nucleosome core form characteristic epigenetic codes which are distinct for self-renewing and primed progenitor cell populations. Studies of chromatin modifiers and modifications in renal development and disease have been gaining momentum. Both congenital and adult renal diseases have a gene-environment component, which involves alterations to the epigenetic information imprinted during development. This epigenetic memory must be characterized to establish optimal treatment of both acute and chronic renal diseases. PMID:28018145

  6. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-09-22

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight / body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions.

  7. Increased tubulointerstitial recruitment of human CD141(hi) CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) myeloid dendritic cell subsets in renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kassianos, Andrew J; Wang, Xiangju; Sampangi, Sandeep; Muczynski, Kimberly; Healy, Helen; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play critical roles in immune-mediated kidney diseases. Little is known, however, about DC subsets in human chronic kidney disease, with previous studies restricted to a limited set of pathologies and to using immunohistochemical methods. In this study, we developed novel protocols for extracting renal DC subsets from diseased human kidneys and identified, enumerated, and phenotyped them by multicolor flow cytometry. We detected significantly greater numbers of total DCs as well as CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) myeloid DC (mDCs) subsets in diseased biopsies with interstitial fibrosis than diseased biopsies without fibrosis or healthy kidney tissue. In contrast, plasmacytoid DC numbers were significantly higher in the fibrotic group compared with healthy tissue only. Numbers of all DC subsets correlated with loss of kidney function, recorded as estimated glomerular filtration rate. CD141(hi) DCs expressed C-type lectin domain family 9 member A (CLEC9A), whereas the majority of CD1c(+) DCs lacked the expression of CD1a and DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), suggesting these mDC subsets may be circulating CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) blood DCs infiltrating kidney tissue. Our analysis revealed CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) cells were restricted to the tubulointerstitium. Notably, DC expression of the costimulatory and maturation molecule CD86 was significantly increased in both diseased cohorts compared with healthy tissue. Transforming growth factor-β levels in dissociated tissue supernatants were significantly elevated in diseased biopsies with fibrosis compared with nonfibrotic biopsies, with mDCs identified as a major source of this profibrotic cytokine. Collectively, our data indicate that activated mDC subsets, likely recruited into the tubulointerstitium, are positioned to play a role in the development of fibrosis and, thus, progression to chronic kidney disease.

  8. Urinary Retinol-Binding Protein: Relationship to Renal Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Maria Alice Muniz; Moreira, Silvia Regina; Gomez, Luz; Goulart, Alessandra; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Benseñor, Isabela; Titan, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The role of urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) as a biomarker of CKD in proximal tubular diseases, glomerulopathies and in transplantation is well established. However, whether urinary RBP is also a biomarker of renal damage and CKD progression in general CKD is not known. In this study, we evaluated the association of urinary RBP with renal function and cardiovascular risk factors in the baseline data of the Progredir Study, a CKD cohort in Sao Paulo, Brazil, comprising 454 participants with stages 3 and 4 CKD. In univariate analysis, urinary RBP was inversely related to estimated glomerular filtration rate (CKD-EPI eGFR) and several cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustments, however, only CKD-EPI eGFR, albuminuria, systolic blood pressure, anemia, acidosis, and left atrium diameter remained significantly related to urinary RBP. The inverse relationship of eGFR to urinary RBP (β-0.02 ± 95CI -0.02; -0.01, p<0.0001 for adjusted model) remained in all strata of albuminuria, even after adjustments: in normoalbuminuria (β-0.008 ± 95CI (-0.02; -0.001, p = 0.03), in microalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.02, p<0,0001) and in macroalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.01, p<0,0001). Lastly, urinary RBP was able to significantly increase the accuracy of a logistic regression model (adjusted for sex, age, SBP, diabetes and albuminuria) in diagnosing eGFR<35 ml/min/1.73m2 (AUC 0,77, 95%CI 0,72–0,81 versus AUC 0,71, 95%CI 0,65–0,75, respectively; p = 0,05). Our results suggest that urinary RBP is significantly associated to renal function in CKD in general, a finding that expands the interest in this biomarker beyond the context of proximal tubulopathies, glomerulopathies or transplantation. Urinary RBP should be further explored as a predictive marker of CKD progression. PMID:27655369

  9. Antioxidants in the prevention of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wardle, E N

    1999-11-01

    In view of the role of oxidative processes in inflicting damage that leads to glomerulosclerosis and renal medullary interstitial fibrosis, more attention could be paid to the use of antioxidant food constituents and the usage of drugs with recognized antioxidant potential. In any case atherosclerosis is an important component of chronic renal diseases. There is a wide choice of foods and drugs that could confer benefit. Supplementation with vitamins E and C, use of soy protein diets and drinking green tea could be sufficient to confer remarkable improvements.

  10. [Mechanisms of phosphorus and calcium homeostatic disorders in the development of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal diseases. The role of fibroblast growth factor 23 and Klotho].

    PubMed

    Milovanova, L Iu; Kozlovskaia, L V; Milovanov, Iu S; Bobkova, I N; Dobrosmyslov, I A

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of studies of the role of the bone morphogenetic proteins fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) and Klothno in the development of vascular wall calcification in chronic renal disease (CRD). FGF-23 is shown to be an important phosphaturic hormone that inhibits hypercalcemic and hyperphosphatemic effects of elevated serum vitamin D concentrations. There is evidence that there is an association between high serum FGF-23 levels and vascular wall calcification irrespective of the content of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone. Most authors regard FGF-23 as a potential uremic toxin in patients with end-stage CRD. There are data that support the renoprotective value of the morphogenetic protein Klotho whose expression in CRD is decreased.

  11. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  12. Relationship of dietary phosphate intake with risk of end-stage renal disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5: The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Selamet, Umut; Tighiouart, Hocine; Sarnak, Mark J; Beck, Gerald; Levey, Andrew S; Block, Geoffrey; Ix, Joachim H

    2016-01-01

    KDIGO guidelines recommend dietary phosphate restriction to lower serum phosphate levels in CKD stages 3-5. Recent studies suggest that dietary phosphate intake is only weakly linked to its serum concentration, and the relationship of phosphate intake with adverse outcomes is uncertain. To evaluate this, we used Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of baseline 24-h urine phosphate excretion with risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, and mortality subtypes (cardiovascular disease [CVD] and non-CVD) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease data. Models were adjusted for demographics, CVD risk factors, iothalamate GFR, and urine protein and nitrogen excretion. Phosphate excretion was modestly inversely correlated with serum phosphate concentrations. There was no association of 24-h urinary phosphate excretion with risk of ESRD, CVD, non-CVD, or all-cause mortality. For comparison, higher serum phosphate concentrations were associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 0.7 mg/dl higher, 1.15 [95% CI 1.01, 1.30]). Thus, phosphate intake is not tightly linked with serum phosphate concentrations in CKD stages 3-5, and there was no evidence that greater phosphate intake, assessed by 24-h phosphate excretion, is associated with ESRD, CVD, non-CVD, or all-cause mortality in CKD stages 3-5. Hence, factors other than dietary intake may be key determinants of serum phosphate concentrations and require additional investigation.

  13. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  14. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases A ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  15. MicroRNA 193b-3p as a predictive biomarker of chronic kidney disease in patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Trevisani, Francesco; Ghidini, Michele; Larcher, Alessandro; Lampis, Andrea; Lote, Hazel; Manunta, Paolo; Alibrandi, Maria Teresa Sciarrone; Zagato, Laura; Citterio, Lorena; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Carenzi, Cristina; Capasso, Giovambattista; Rugge, Massimo; Rigotti, Paolo; Bertini, Roberto; Cascione, Luciano; Briganti, Alberto; Salonia, Andrea; Benigni, Fabio; Braconi, Chiara; Fassan, Matteo; Hahne, Jens Claus; Montorsi, Francesco; Valeri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Background: A significant proportion of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy (RN) for clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) develop chronic kidney disease (CKD) within a few years following surgery. Chronic kidney disease has important health, social and economic impact and no predictive biomarkers are currently available. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs implicated in several pathological processes. Methods: Primary objective of our study was to define miRs whose deregulation is predictive of CKD in patients treated with RN. Ribonucleic acid from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla isolated separately) situated >3 cm from the matching RCC was tested for miR expression using nCounter NanoString technology in 71 consecutive patients treated with RN for RCC. Validation was performed by RT–PCR and in situ hybridisation. End point was post-RN CKD measured 12 months post-operatively. Multivariable logistic regression and decision curve analysis were used to test the statistical and clinical impact of predictors of CKD. Results: The overexpression of miR-193b-3p was associated with high risk of developing CKD in patients undergoing RN for RCC and emerged as an independent predictor of CKD. The addition of miR-193b-3p to a predictive model based on clinical variables (including sex and estimated glomerular filtration rate) increased the sensitivity of the predictive model from 81 to 88%. In situ hybridisation showed that miR-193b-3p overexpression was associated with tubule-interstitial inflammation and fibrosis in patients with no clinical or biochemical evidence of pre-RN nephropathy. Conclusions: miR-193b-3p might represent a useful biomarker to tailor and implement surveillance strategies for patients at high risk of developing CKD following RN. PMID:27802451

  16. Abnormal Carbohydrate Metabolism in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rubenfeld, Sheldon; Garber, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    To delineate the potential role of disordered glucose and glucose-precursor kinetics in the abnormal carbohydrate metabolism of chronic renal failure, alanine and glucose production and utilization and gluconeogenesis from alanine were studied in patients with chronic compensated renal insufficiency and in normal volunteers. With simultaneous primed injection-continuous infusions of radiolabeled alanine and glucose, rates of metabolite turnover and precursor-product interrelationships were calculated from the plateau portion of the appropriate specific activity curves. All subjects were studied in the postabsorption state. In 13 patients with chronic renal failure (creatinine = 10.7±1.2 mg/100 ml; mean±SEM), glucose turnover was found to be 1,035±99.3 μmol/min. This rate was increased 56% (P = 0.003) over that observed in control subjects (664±33.5 μmol/min). Alanine turnover was 474±96.0 μmol/min in azotemic patients. This rate was 191% greater (P = 0.007) than the rate determined in control subjects (163±19.4 μmol/min). Gluconeogenesis from alanine and the percent of glucose production contributed by gluconeogenesis from alanine were increased in patients with chronic renal failure (192% and 169%, respectively) as compared to controls (P < 0.05 for each). Alanine utilization for gluconeogenesis was increased from 40.2±3.86 μmol/min in control subjects to 143±39.0 μmol/min in azotemic patients (P < 0.05). The percent of alanine utilization accounted for by gluconeogenesis was not altered in chronic renal insufficiency. In nondiabetic azotemic subjects, mean fasting glucose and immunoreactive insulin levels were increased 24.3% (P = 0.005) and 130% (P = 0.046), respectively. These results in patients with chronic renal failure demonstrate (a) increased glucose production and utilization, (b) increased gluconeogenesis from alanine, (c) increased alanine production and utilization, and (d) a relative impairment to glucose disposal. We conclude that

  17. Encephalopathy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A B; Hiner, L B; Foley, C M; Grover, W D

    1977-01-01

    The progressive encephalopathy observed in 5 children with chronic renal failure was clinically similar to the so-called dialysis encephalopathy of adults, except that it was not related to dialysis therapy. Renal osteodystrophy is more prevalent in children than in adults and often more severe. The attempt to control the crippling deformities of renal osteodystrophy in growing children with renal insufficiency has led to the use of large quantities of aluminum containing antacids. The encephalopathy observed in children with chronic renal failure may be related to the oral ingestion of aluminum containing compounds in the presence of persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism. We suggest that alternative methods for the adequate control of serum phosphorus levels should be sought and indications for parathyroidectomy in children reevaluated. During the past 18 mos we have lowered the dose of aluminum containing compounds to 50 to 100 mg/Kg/day in our patients with progressive renal failure and recommend parathyroidectomy. No new cases of the encephalopathy have occurred.

  18. Ankyrin is the major oxidised protein in erythrocyte membranes from end-stage renal disease patients on chronic haemodialysis and oxidation is decreased by dialysis and vitamin C supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ruskovska, T; Bennett, S J; Brown, C R; Dimitrov, S; Kamcev, N; Griffiths, H R

    2015-02-01

    Chronically haemodialysed end-stage renal disease patients are at high risk of morbidity arising from complications of dialysis, the underlying pathology that has led to renal disease and the complex pathology of chronic kidney disease. Anaemia is commonplace and its origins are multifactorial, involving reduced renal erythropoietin production, accumulation of uremic toxins and an increase in erythrocyte fragility. Oxidative damage is a common risk factor in renal disease and its co-morbidities and is known to cause erythrocyte fragility. Therefore, we have investigated the hypothesis that specific erythrocyte membrane proteins are more oxidised in end-stage renal disease patients and that vitamin C supplementation can ameliorate membrane protein oxidation. Eleven patients and 15 control subjects were recruited to the study. Patients were supplemented with 2 × 500 mg vitamin C per day for 4 weeks. Erythrocyte membrane proteins were prepared pre- and post-vitamin C supplementation for determination of protein oxidation. Total protein carbonyls were reduced by vitamin C supplementation but not by dialysis when investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Using a western blot to detect oxidised proteins, one protein band, later identified as containing ankyrin, was found to be oxidised in patients but not controls and was reduced significantly by 60% in all patients after dialysis and by 20% after vitamin C treatment pre-dialysis. Ankyrin oxidation analysis may be useful in a stratified medicines approach as a possible marker to identify requirements for intervention in dialysis patients.

  19. Increased urine semaphorin-3A is associated with renal damage in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Ganesan; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Leoncini, Giovanna; Garneri, Debora; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Semaphorins are guidance proteins implicated in several processes such as angiogenesis, organogenesis, cell migration, and cytokine release. Experimental studies showed that semaphorin-3a (SEMA3A) administration induces transient massive proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement and endothelial cell damage in healthy animals. While SEMA3A signaling has been demonstrated to be mechanistically involved in experimental diabetic glomerulopathy and in acute kidney injury, to date its role in human chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been investigated. Methods To test the hypothesis that SEMA3A may play a role in human CKD, we performed a cross-sectional, nested, case–control study on 151 matched hypertensive patients with and without CKD. SEMA3A was quantified in the urine (USEMA) by ELISA. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) by the CKD-EPI formula and albuminuria was measured as albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). Results USEMA levels were positively correlated with urine ACR (p = 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). USEMA was higher in patients with both components of renal damage as compared to those with only one and those with normal renal function (p < 0.007 and <0.001, respectively). The presence of increased USEMA levels (i.e. top quartile) entailed a fourfold higher risk of combined renal damage (p < 0.001) and an almost twofold higher risk of macroalbuminuria (p = 0.005) or of reduced eGFR, even adjusting for confounding factors (p = 0.002). Conclusions USEMA is independently associated with CKD in both diabetic and non diabetic hypertensive patients. Further studies may help clarify the mechanisms underlying this association and possibly the pathogenic changes leading to the development of CKD. PMID:24756974

  20. Growth, chronic kidney disease and pediatric kidney transplantation: is it useful to use recombinant growth hormone in Colombian children with renal transplant?

    PubMed

    Castañeda, D A; López, L F; Ovalle, D F; Buitrago, J; Rodríguez, D; Lozano, E

    2011-11-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the best treatment for children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In recent times, knowledge concerning the effect of CKD and kidney transplantation over the normal growth rate has increased; now it is known that 40% of children with CKD do not reach the expected height for age. Growth retardation has been associated with the type of nephropathy, metabolic and endocrine disorders that are secondary to kidney disease, immunosuppressive therapy with glucocorticoids, and suboptimal function of renal allograft. Nowadays, we know better the role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in growth retardation we can see it in children with CKD or recipients of renal allograft. Several studies have shown that administration of recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) has a positive effect on the longitudinal growth of children and teenagers who have received a kidney transplant. On the other hand, there have been reported side effects associated with using rhGH; however, these are not statistically significant. In this article, we show a small review about growth in children with CKD and/or recipients of renal allografts the growth pattern of three children who were known by the Transplant Group of National University of Colombia, and the results obtained with the use of rhGH in one of these cases. We want to show the possibility of achieving a secure use of rhGH in children with CKD and its use as a therapeutic option for treating the growth retardation in children with kidney transplantation, and set out the need of typifying the growth pattern of Colombian children with CKD and/or who are recipients of renal allografts through multicenter studies to propose and analyze the inclusion of rhGH in the therapeutic scheme of Colombian children with these two medical conditions. rhGH could be a useful tool for treating children with CKD or kidney transplantation who have not reached the expected longitudinal growth for age. However

  1. Hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, J D; Filip, D J; Watts, J C

    1975-05-01

    The syndrome of hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease was manifest in at least eight members in three generations of a family. They had a lifelong history of bleeding, usually as epistaxis, bilateral sensorineural deafness starting in late childhood or the teenage years, and persistent proteinuria with varying degrees of renal dysfunction. Two members died at a young age, one from central nervous system hemorrhage, the other from chronic renal failure. Splenectomy and steroid therapy have been of transient benefit. There was dominant inheritance of the syndrome. Hematologic studies showed thrombocytopenia, large platelets, and megakaryocytic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. In contrast to a previous report, our studies showed that affected members had normal in-vitro platelet function and normal ultrastructural platelet morphology. At autopsy, histologic changes in the kidney of one affected family member were indistinguishable from those reported in classic hereditary nephritis with nerve deafness (Alport's syndrome).

  2. Nitric oxide, malnutrition and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Tatiana M C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana A S; Santos, Sérgio F F; Lugon, Jocemir R; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2007-04-01

    The conditionally essential amino acid L-arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, a key second messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. Extracellular L-arginine transport seems to be essential for the production of NO by the action of NO synthases (NOS), even when the intracellular levels of L-arginine are available in excess (L-arginine paradox). Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. Various studies document that markers of malnutrition and inflammation, such as low body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There is considerable literature demonstrating that a disturbance in the nitric oxide control mechanism plays a role in mediating the haemodynamic and haemostatic disorders present in CRF. Endogenous analogues of L-arginine, ADMA and L-NMMA, which can inhibit NO synthesis and L-arginine transport, are increased whilst L-arginine is reduced in plasma from all stages of CRF patients. In this context, the uptake of L-arginine in blood cells is increased in undialysed CRF patients and in patients treated by CAPD and haemodialysis. In platelets obtained from haemodialysis patients, the activation of L-arginine transport and NO production was limited to well-nourished patients. Impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity, coupled with malnutrition and inflammation, may contribute to increased incidence of atherothrombotic events in CRF. This article summarizes the current knowledge of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and malnutrition in CRF and briefly describes possible therapeutic interventions.

  3. Interferon-γ production by tubulointerstitial human CD56(bright) natural killer cells contributes to renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Law, Becker M P; Wilkinson, Ray; Wang, Xiangju; Kildey, Katrina; Lindner, Mae; Rist, Melissa J; Beagley, Kenneth; Healy, Helen; Kassianos, Andrew J

    2017-04-08

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphoid cells that play a significant role in mediating innate immune responses. Studies in mice suggest a pathological role for NK cells in models of kidney disease. In this study, we characterized the NK cell subsets present in native kidneys of patients with tubulointerstitial fibrosis, the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease. Significantly higher numbers of total NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)) were detected in renal biopsies with tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with diseased biopsies without fibrosis and healthy kidney tissue using multi-color flow cytometry. At a subset level, both the CD56(dim) NK cell subset and particularly the CD56(bright) NK cell subset were elevated in fibrotic kidney tissue. However, only CD56(bright) NK cells significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function. Expression of the tissue-retention and -activation molecule CD69 on CD56(bright) NK cells was significantly increased in fibrotic biopsy specimens compared with non-fibrotic kidney tissue, indicative of a pathogenic phenotype. Further flow cytometric phenotyping revealed selective co-expression of activating receptor CD335 (NKp46) and differentiation marker CD117 (c-kit) on CD56(bright) NK cells. Multi-color immunofluorescent staining of fibrotic kidney tissue localized the accumulation of NK cells within the tubulointerstitium, with CD56(bright) NK cells (NKp46(+) CD117(+)) identified as the source of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ within the NK cell compartment. Thus, activated interferon-γ-producing CD56(bright) NK cells are positioned to play a key role in the fibrotic process and progression to chronic kidney disease.

  4. Chronic partial obstructive urolithiasis causing hydronephrosis and chronic renal failure in a steer.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, B M; Garry, F B

    1992-07-01

    A 13-month-old Angus steer was examined with a 6-week history of lethargy, malaise and dribbling urine. Laboratory exam revealed crystalluria and poor renal function. Ultrasound revealed hydronephrosis and hydroureter. Euthanasia was chosen because of a poor prognosis for economic recovery. Necropsy demonstrated numerous calculi causing partial urethral obstruction approximately 25 cm from the end of the penis. Secondary renal changes were confirmed. Urolithiasis occurs commonly in ruminants. Secondary obstruction is usually complete with severe consequences. This is the first report of chronic partial obstructive urolithiasis resulting in endstage renal disease.

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen: assay following heat compared with perchloric acid extraction in patients with colon cancer, non-neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases, or chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, L R; Shuler, S E; Alyea, K; Husserl, F E

    1983-10-01

    Heat inactivation has been proposed as an alternative to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitation for the extraction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from human plasma. We examined a commercial RIA kit using heat inactivation, and compared results with those obtained with PCA precipitation. Adequate sensitivity (1.5 micrograms CEA/l plasma), satisfactory analytical recovery of CEA added to plasma, and dilutional linearity of samples found to have elevated CEA concentrations, were demonstrated for the heat-inactivation assay. Between-assay precision was better with the heat inactivation than with the PCA assay. Although the absolute concentration of CEA estimated after heat inactivation was consistently lower than that estimated after PCA extraction of plasma specimens, there was excellent correlation between results obtained with the two methods in colon cancer patients free of disease, colon cancer patients with residual or recurrent disease, patients with benign gastrointestinal disease, and in patients with chronic renal failure. We conclude that the heat-inactivation assay is an excellent alternative to the PCA assay.

  6. Lower Blood Glucose and Variability Are Associated with Earlier Recovery from Renal Injury Caused by Episodic Urinary Tract Infection in Advanced Type 2 Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ping-Fang; Wu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Ching-Hui; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Chang, Chirn-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In our previous study, type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with glomerular filtration rates of <30 mL/min upon hospitalization for urinary tract infection (UTI) were at a risk for acute kidney injury. This study aimed to clarify the effect of glucose and its variability on renal outcomes during admission for the treatment of UTI. Materials and Methods Based on the date of renal recovery (RIFLE criteria: acute kidney injury occurred within 1–7 days and was sustained over 1 day), we divided these patients into early- (≤9 days, Group A) and late-recovery (>9 days, Group B) groups. The differences in the continuous and categorical variables of the two groups were assessed separately. The mean glucose levels and their variability (using the standard deviation and the coefficient of standard deviation) were compared at the fasting, midday pre-meal, evening pre-meal, and evening post-meal time points during hospitalization. We have organized the manuscript in a manner compliant with the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement. Results Acute kidney injury occurred within the two groups (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001, respectively). The early-morning blood glucose levels (149.7±44.0 mg/dL) and average blood glucose levels (185.6±52.0 mg/dL) were better in Group A (p = 0.01, p = 0.02). Group A patients also had lower glucose variability than Group B at the different time points (p<0.05). Group A also had earlier renal recovery. More relevant pathogens were identified from blood in Group B (p = 0.038). Conclusions Early-morning fasting and mean blood glucose levels and their variability can be good indicators of severe infection and predictors of renal outcome in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD and UTI. PMID:25259806

  7. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sung; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Yoon, Kun Ho

    2015-06-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

  8. Renal Nitric Oxide Deficiency and Chronic Kidney Disease in Young Sheep Born with a Solitary Functioning Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Reetu R.; Easton, Lawrence K.; Booth, Lindsea C.; Schlaich, Markus P.; Head, Geoffrey A.; Moritz, Karen M.; Denton, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that renal hemodynamic responses to nitric oxide (NO) inhibition were attenuated in aged, hypertensive sheep born with a solitary functioning kidney (SFK). NO is an important regulator of renal function, particularly, in the postnatal period. We hypothesized that the onset of renal dysfunction and hypertension in individuals with a SFK is associated with NO deficiency early in life. In this study, renal and cardiovascular responses to L-NAME infusion (Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) were examined in 6-month old lambs born with a SFK, induced by fetal unilateral nephrectomy (uni-x). Renal responses to L-NAME were attenuated in uni-x sheep with the fall in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) being less in the uni-x compared to sham lambs (%ΔGFR; −41 ± 3 vs −54 ± 4: P = 0.03, %ΔUNaV; −48 ± 5 vs −76 ± 3, P = 0.0008). 24 hour-basal urinary nitrate and nitrite (NOx) excretion was less in the uni-x animals compared to the sham (NOx excretion μM/min/kg; sham: 57 ± 7; uni-x: 38 ± 4, P = 0.02). L-NAME treatment reduced urinary NOx to undetectable levels in both groups. A reduction in NO bioavailability in early life may contribute to the initiation of glomerular and tubular dysfunction that promotes development and progression of hypertension in offspring with a congenital nephron deficit, including those with a SFK. PMID:27226113

  9. Comparison of High vs. Normal/Low Protein Diets on Renal Function in Subjects without Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Hoffmann, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background It was the aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effects of high protein (HP) versus normal/low protein (LP/NP) diets on parameters of renal function in subjects without chronic kidney disease. Methods Queries of literature were performed using the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Trial Register until 27th February 2014. Study specific weighted mean differences (MD) were pooled using a random effect model by the Cochrane software package Review Manager 5.1. Findings 30 studies including 2160 subjects met the objectives and were included in the meta-analyses. HP regimens resulted in a significantly more pronounced increase in glomerular filtration rate [MD: 7.18 ml/min/1.73 m2, 95% CI 4.45 to 9.91, p<0.001], serum urea [MD: 1.75 mmol/l, 95% CI 1.13 to 237, p<0.001], and urinary calcium excretion [MD: 25.43 mg/24h, 95% CI 13.62 to 37.24, p<0.001] when compared to the respective LP/NP protocol. Conclusion HP diets were associated with increased GFR, serum urea, urinary calcium excretion, and serum concentrations of uric acid. In the light of the high risk of kidney disease among obese, weight reduction programs recommending HP diets especially from animal sources should be handled with caution. PMID:24852037

  10. Foxp3-transduced polyclonal regulatory T cells protect against chronic renal injury from adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Min; Wu, Huiling; Watson, Debbie; Hori, Shohei; Alexander, Ian E; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2006-03-01

    Chronic proteinuric renal injury is a major cause of ESRD. Adriamycin nephropathy is a murine model of chronic proteinuric renal disease whereby chemical injury is followed by immune and structural changes that mimic human disease. Foxp3 is a gene that induces a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype. It was hypothesized that Foxp3-transduced Treg could protect against renal injury in Adriamycin nephropathy. CD4+ T cells were transduced with either a Foxp3-containing retrovirus or a control retrovirus. Foxp3-transduced T cells had a regulatory phenotype by functional and phenotypic assays. Adoptive transfer of Foxp3-transduced T cells protected against renal injury. Urinary protein excretion and serum creatinine were reduced (P<0.05), and there was significantly less glomerulosclerosis, tubular damage, and interstitial infiltrates (P<0.01). It is concluded that Foxp3-transduced Treg cells may have a therapeutic role in protecting against immune injury and disease progression in chronic proteinuric renal disease.

  11. Hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2014-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major problem associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and is often a major barrier to achieving optimal glycemic control. Chronic kidney disease not only is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia but also augments the risk of hypoglycemia that is already present in people with diabetes. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic considerations in this situation. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for literature published in English from January 1989 to May 2014 for diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and chronic renal insufficiency.

  12. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stegall, Mark D.; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:26284070

  13. [Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: prognosis of chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Razukeviciene, Loreta; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Bumblyte, Inga Arūne

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed 19 patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS): 11 males and 8 females (mean age 38.3 yrs. (SD 16.4), who were under observation for 39.4 months (SD 17.2). At the moment of renal biopsy 73.7% of patients had arterial hypertension, 52.6%--nephrotic proteinuria, 36.9%--chronic renal failure. Global glomerulosclerosis was present in 14 biopsies (73.7%), and intersticial fibrosis--in 13 biopsies (68.4%). The results of analysis showed multiple risk factors for progression of renal failure: initial renal failure (p=0.005), proteinuria (> or =3 g/l) (p=0.005), expressed glomerulosclerosis (p=0.005) and expressed interstitial fibrosis (p=0.034). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis were found to have a relatively bad long-term prognosis--the renal survival rate in 5 years was 77.8%. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that expressed glomerulosclerosis was risk factor (logrank p=0.016, Breslov p=0.043) associated with end-stage renal disease in 5 years.

  14. A re-appraisal of volume status and renal function impairment in chronic heart failure: combined effects of pre-renal failure and venous congestion on renal function.

    PubMed

    Sinkeler, Steef J; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-03-01

    The association between cardiac failure and renal function impairment has gained wide recognition over the last decade. Both structural damage in the form of systemic atherosclerosis and (patho) physiological hemodynamic changes may explain this association. As regards hemodynamic factors, renal impairment in chronic heart failure is traditionally assumed to be mainly due to a decrease in cardiac output and a subsequent decrease in renal perfusion. This will lead to a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and a compensatory increase in tubular sodium retention. The latter is a physiological renal response aimed at retaining fluids in order to increase cardiac filling pressure and thus renal perfusion. In heart failure, however, larger increases in cardiac filling pressure are needed to restore renal perfusion and thus more volume retention. In this concept, in chronic heart failure, an equilibrium exists where a certain degree of congestion is the price to be paid to maintain adequate renal perfusion and function. Recently, this hypothesis was challenged by new studies, wherein it was found that the association between right-sided cardiac filling pressures and renal function is bimodal, with worse renal function at the highest filling pressures, reflecting a severely congested state. Renal hemodynamic studies suggest that congestion negatively affects renal function in particular in patients in whom renal perfusion is also compromised. Thus, an interplay between cardiac forward failure and backward failure is involved in the renal function impairment in the congestive state, presumably along with other factors. Only few data are available on the impact of intervention in volume status on the cardio-renal interaction. Sparse data in cardiac patients as well as evidence from cohorts with primary renal disease suggest that specific targeting of volume overload may be beneficial for long-term outcome, in spite of a certain further decrease in renal function, at least

  15. Prognostic Significance of Left Ventricular Mass Index and Renal Function Decline Rate in Chronic Kidney Disease G3 and G4

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiun-Chi; Chen, Szu-Chia; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kuo, I-Ching; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2017-01-01

    The effect of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline rate on outcome prediction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We included 306 CKD G3 and G4 patients with LVMI assessed through echocardiography. Rapid decline in renal function was defined as the eGFR slope <−3 mL/min/1.73 m2/year. Patients were stratified into four groups using sex-specific median values of LVMI and rapid eGFR decline. The composite outcome was progression to maintenance dialysis or death. 32 patients had the composite outcome during a median follow-up of 2.7 years. In multivariate Cox analysis, compared with patients with non-rapid eGFR decline and lower LVMI, those with non-rapid eGFR decline and higher LVMI (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.908, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.304–26.780), rapid eGFR decline and lower LVMI (HR: 12.737, 95% CI = 2.297–70.636), and rapid eGFR decline and higher LVMI (HR: 15.249, 95% CI = 3.365–69.097) had an increased risk of progression to adverse outcomes. LVMI and eGFR decline synergistically effect the prognostic implications in CKD G3 and G4 patients. PMID:28195182

  16. Cardiovascular and renal effects of chronic exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Abdias; Escudero, Elizabeth; Pando, Jackeline; Sharma, Shailendra; Johnson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Over 140 million people live at high altitude, defined as living at an altitude of 2400 m or more above sea level. Subjects living under these conditions are continuously living under hypoxic conditions and, depending on the population, various adaptations have developed. Interestingly, subjects living chronically at high altitude appear to have a decreased frequency of obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, these benefits on health are balanced by the frequent development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, it has been recognized that subjects living at high altitude are at risk for developing high-altitude renal syndrome (HARS), which is a syndrome consisting of polycythemia, hyperuricemia, systemic hypertension and microalbuminuria, but with preserved glomerular filtration rate. More studies should be performed to characterize the mechanisms and etiology of HARS; as such studies may be of benefit not only to the high-altitude population, but also to better understanding of the renal consequences of acute and chronic hypoxia.

  17. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  18. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  19. Association of Hypothyroidism with Body Mass Index, Systolic Blood Pressure and Proteinuria in Diabetic Patients: Does treated Hypothyroidism with Thyroxine Replacement Therapy Prevent Nephropathy/Chronic Renal Disease?

    PubMed

    Aziz, Kamran M A

    2016-01-01

    Untreated or sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, adverse effects on cardiovascular system, hypertension and in turn risk of nephropathy. However, these changes are reversible with thyroxine replacement therapy (TRT). Current research studied 4235 diabetic patients, divided into two groups, those with clinical hypothyroidism /on TRT, compared to those without thyroid disease or undiagnosed. BMI, blood pressure, creatinine, urine microalbumin and spot urine protein levels were compared between these two groups. Study finding demonstrated that for hypothyroid cases, BMI was higher (32.2 ± 7.44 versus 29.4 ± 5.7; p < 0.0001), serum creatinine was on lower levels (0.75 ± 0.27 versus 1.0 ± 0.74; p = 0.001), systolic BP was on lower side (123.7 ± 15.9 versus 128.13 ± 16.8; p= 0.015); spot urine microalbumin was on lower side (52.58 ± 71.65; versus 87.77 ± 140.86; p=0.010) and spot urine protein had lower levels (25.3 ± 38.3 versus 44.28 ± 123.58; p < 0.0001). Current research also demonstrated that Pearson`s x2 and odds/protective odds for hypothyroidism (on TRT) was strongly associated with obesity (p <0.0001; odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.56). However, they were protected from HTN (p= 0.272; protective odds ratio 1.28, 95%CI 0.824 to 1.98), nephropathy (p=0.386; protective odds 1.36, 95% CI 0.861 to 2.14) and chronic renal disease (p= 0.112; protective odds 3.42, 95% CI 0.83 to 14.13). In conclusion, TRT itself has protective effects on cardiovascular and renal system. Hence, thyroid screening is essential among diabetics to detect sub clinical or clinical hypothyroidism.

  20. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  1. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  2. The association between chronic renal failure and renal cell carcinoma may differ between black and white Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Schwartz, Kendra; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Shuch, Brian M; Karami, Sara; Rothman, Nathaniel; Wacholder, Sholom; Graubard, Barry I; Colt, Joanne S; Purdue, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In the United States, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence is higher among blacks than among whites. Risk of RCC is elevated among end-stage renal disease patients, although no studies have looked at differences by race in the relationship between chronic renal failure and RCC. Methods We investigated RCC risk in relation to chronic renal failure in a population-based case-control study of blacks and whites in Chicago and Detroit. Data, including information on kidney disease, were collected from interviews with 1,217 RCC cases (361 blacks, 856 whites) and 1,235 controls (523 blacks, 712 whites). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results Risk of RCC was increased in relation to chronic renal failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.2–10.1) and dialysis (OR 18.0, 95% CI 3.6–91). The association remained after defining exposure as those who had chronic renal failure ≥10 years prior to RCC diagnosis. Chronic renal failure was more strongly associated with RCC among blacks than among whites (OR 8.7, 95% CI 3.3–22.9 and 2.0, 0.7–5.6 respectively; Pinteraction=0.03) and among those without a history of diabetes relative to diabetic subjects (OR 8.3, 95% CI 3.1–22.7 and 1.9, 0.6–5.9 respectively; Pinteraction=0.03). Conclusions These results suggest that chronic renal failure is a strong risk factor for RCC, particularly among black and non-diabetic subjects. Our findings of differences in risk estimates by race, to our knowledge the first such report, require replication. PMID:23179659

  3. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm.

  4. Sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans in the progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Masola, Valentina; Zaza, Gianluigi; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Experimental data in cell cultures and animal models suggest that sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans are potentially effective drugs to treat chronic kidney diseases and prevent progression to renal failure. However, no conclusive evidence support the use of them in human renal disease. In acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, only few studies have been performed. Sulodexide has been more intensely investigated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) where the body of data supports its effectiveness as an antialbuminuric agent in early stages. Unfortunately, there is no study in DN patients on the effect of sulodexide on clinical end points.

  5. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  7. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... The condition is often discovered very early in childhood. Milder forms may be diagnosed during the teenage ...

  8. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  9. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable.

  10. Smoking status and urine cadmium above levels associated with subclinical renal effects in U.S. adults without chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Mary Ellen; Wong, Lee-Yang; Osterloh, John D

    2011-07-01

    Tobacco smoke is a major source of adult exposure to cadmium (Cd). Urine Cd levels (CdU) above 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 μgCd/g creatinine have been associated with increased rates of microproteinuria and reduction in glomerular filtration rate. The two study objectives were to determine the prevalence and relative risk (RR) by smoking status for CdU above 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 μgCd/g creatinine in U.S. adults; and to describe geometric mean CdU by smoking status, age, and sex. NHANES 1999-2006 data for adults without chronic kidney disease were used to compute prevalence rates above the three CdU in current and former cigarette smokers, and non-smokers. RRs for smokers adjusted for age and sex were computed by logistic regression. Analysis of covariance was used to calculate geometric means of CdU adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, log urine creatinine, and interaction terms: age-smoking status and sex-smoking status. At selected ages, adjusted RR for exceeding each risk-associated CdU was highest for current smokers (3-13 times), followed by former smokers (2-3 times), compared to non-smokers. Adjusted RR for smokers increased with age and was higher in females than males. Adjusted geometric means of CdUs increased with age, were higher in females than in males regardless of smoking status, and were higher in current smokers than former smokers, who had higher levels than non-smokers at any age. Cigarette smoking greatly increases RR of exceeding renal risk-associated CdU. Former smokers retain significant risk of exceeding these levels compared to non-smokers. CdU increased with age, particularly in current smokers.

  11. Adropin and irisin levels in relation to nutrition, body composition, and insulin resistance in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Małgorzata; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Ibrahim, Aisha Y; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-07-25

    INTRODUCTION    Newly discovered myokines, adropin, and irisin, are regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism in humans. In end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the significance and role of irisin and adropin as metabolism regulators are still unclear. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum adropin and irisin levels and establish their relation to insulin resistance, nutritional status, and hydration status in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) and on peritoneal dialysis (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study consisted of 71 subjects, including 48 patients (18 women, 30 men; median age, 56.5 years; range, 26-84 years) either on HD (n = 41) or PD (n = 7) and 36 healthy controls matched for age and sex. We measured the serum levels of adropin, irisin, creatinine, albumin, glucose, and insulin, as well as the plasma levels of lipids. The bioimpedance method was used to evaluate the body composition and overhydration in patients with ESRD. RESULTS    Irisin levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD compared with controls, but there were no differences in adropin levels between both study groups. Adropin levels were inversely correlated with body mass, lean tissue mass, total, intracellular, and extracellular water, and albumin concentrations in patients with ESRD. Irisin levels were positively correlated with glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. No significant correlations were observed between adropin and irisin concentrations and overhydration. CONCLUSIONS    Adropin may be considered as a new marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD. The significance and cause of low irisin levels characteristic for these patients are still unclear. Adropin and irisin should be further investigated as possible markers of cachexia and insulin resistance in patients with ESRD.

  12. Acquired perforating dermatosis in a patient with chronic renal failure*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Karen de Almeida Pinto; Lima, Lourenço de Azevedo; Guedes, Juliana Chaves Ruiz; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; D'Acri, Antônio Macedo; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Perforating dermatoses are a group of skin diseases characterized by transepidermal elimination of dermal material. The disease is divided into two groups: the primary group and the secondary group. The classical or primary perforating dermatoses are subdivided into four types according to the eliminated dermal materials: Kyrle disease, perforating reactive collagenosis, elastosis perforans serpiginosa, and perforating folliculitis. The secondary form is known as acquired perforating dermatosis. The term was proposed in 1989 by Rapini to designate the perforating dermatoses affecting adult patients with systemic disease, regardless of the dermal materials eliminated. This report describes a case of the disease with elimination of collagen and elastic fibers in a patient with chronic renal failure. PMID:28300880

  13. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor use and progression of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease: a single-center retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kaewput, Wisit; Disorn, Preedee; Satirapoj, Bancha

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of selective COX-2 (sCOX-2) inhibitors with acute kidney injury, salt water retention, and cardiovascular events have been correlated in subjects with normal kidney function, but sCOX-2 inhibitor use concerning the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains uncertain. Objectives To determine the progression of renal function and electrolyte abnormalities among CKD patients after using sCOX-2 inhibitors during short- and long-term periods. Methods The study employed a retrospective cohort design comprising all types of CKD patients with and without sCOX-2 inhibitors (celecoxib and etoricoxib). Data collected included medical data, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and serum electrolytes at 3 and 6 months between January 2009 and January 2014. Subjects attended the outpatient clinic and were then followed up until discontinuation of the drugs at years 1 and 2 until May 2016. Results Ninety-two CKD patients on sCOX-2 inhibitors and 92 CKD patients without sCOX-2 inhibitors were included. The sCOX-2 inhibitor group showed more decline in eGFR than the control group at 3 and 6 months of follow-up (–8.27±9.75 vs –1.64±6.05 mL/min/1.73 m2, P<0.001 and –12.36±6.48 vs –4.31±5.11 mL/min/1.73 m2, P=0.001, respectively) and at 1 and 2 years of follow-up after subjects discontinued sCOX-2 (–6.84±10.34 vs –1.61±8.93 mL/min/1.73 m2, P=0.004 and –10.26±10.19 vs –5.12±8.61 mL/min/1.73 m2, P=0.005, respectively). In addition, the sCOX-2 inhibitor group had significantly more increased serum potassium during the study follow-up than the control group. Conclusion The sCOX-2 inhibitors are associated with an increased risk for rapid eGFR decline and hyperkalemia in both the short term and in the long term after sCOX-2 inhibitors were terminated in the setting of a community-based CKD population. For CKD patients, these results suggest that sCOX-2 inhibitors should be closely monitored and chronic exposure to any sCOX-2

  14. [Chronic disease and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, U

    1992-01-25

    Chronic disease is not a strictly defined term and includes a large number of illnesses ranging from physical to mental impairment. It is estimated that between 10% and 20% of adolescents have a chronic disease. Independence and new relations, acceptance of a new body image and sexuality, career plans and cognitive maturation are core topics in development to adulthood. Chronic disease may interfere with these developmental tasks. Most often there is no specific psychopathology, but the type of impairment, its influence on family life and functioning, age at onset, gender, and other factors will interact with psychosocial maturation. Because of the important role of the family, not only the adolescent patient him/herself, but also parents and siblings need to be included in all major decisions. As hospitalizations may be disruptive they must be planned, taking in account the patient's plans and opinions. Chronic disease may lead to death during the period of adolescence. It is believed that the concept of one's own mortality develops at age 14 to 17 years, a fact that will influence care during the terminal stage of a disease. Whatever the problems and questions raised by the family, the developmental stage of the adolescent has always to be considered when dealing with specific issues of chronic disease. Periodic reassessment of psychosocial development is therefore one of the main tasks of the primary care physician. Counselling will address not only the disease but also the developmental tasks of any teenager.

  15. Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar bristles. In Brazil, most reports of erucism provoked by Lonomia caterpillars are from the southern region. Most manifestations of erucism are local and include burning pain, itching, local hyperthermia and, rarely, blisters (benign symptoms with spontaneous regression in a few hours). General symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, headache, fever, myalgia, abdominal pain and conjunctivitis may also occur. Uncommon symptoms include arthritis, coagulation disorders (manifested as bruising and bleeding), intracerebral hemorrhage and acute renal failure, which comprise serious complications. The present study reports the case of 60-year-old patient from Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, who came into contact with a caterpillar and developed, a few days later, chronic renal disease. PMID:23849585

  16. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease.

  17. Adiponectin and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Anastasia; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Spyridaki, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipokine with significant anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties, which is generally associated with a beneficial cardiometabolic profile. Paradoxically, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by markedly increased plasma ADPN levels and increased cardiovascular risk. In spite of the cardioprotective properties attributed to adiponectin, cardiovascular complications remain the main cause of mortality in the ESRD population. Furthermore, these patients have enhanced chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and persistent protein-energy wasting. Studies of the impact of ADPN on clinical outcomes among ESRD patients have so far yielded contradictory results. This review article summarizes the current knowledge on ADPN functions and explores the role of ADPN in ESRD patients, with specific focus on inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and wasting.

  18. Renal diseases as targets of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett; Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    A number of renal pathologies exist that have seen little or no improvement in treatment methods over the past 20 years. These pathologies include acute and chronic kidney diseases as well as posttransplant kidney survival and host rejection. A novel approach to treatment methodology may provide new insight to further progress our understanding of the disease and overall patient outcome. Recent advances in human genomics and gene delivery systems have opened the door to possible cures through the direct modulation of cellular genes. These techniques of gene therapy have not been extensively applied to renal pathologies, but clinical trials on other organ systems and kidney research in animal models hold promise. Techniques have employed viral and nonviral vectors to deliver gene modulating compounds directly into the cell. These vectors have the capability to replace defective alleles, express novel genes, or suppress the expression of pathogenic genes in a wide variety of kidney cell types. Focus has also been placed on ex vivo modification of kidney tissue to promote allograft survival and limit the resulting immune response to the transplanted organ. This could prove a valuable alternative to current immunosuppressive drugs and their deleterious effects on patients. While continued research and clinical trials are needed to identify a robust system of gene delivery, gene therapy techniques have great potential to treat kidney disease at the cellular level and improve patient quality of life.

  19. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  20. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  1. Cardiovascular complications of chronic renal failure - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Roy, G C; Sutradhar, S R; Barua, U K; Datta, N C; Debnath, C R; Hoque, M M; Hossain, A S; Haider, M S; Das, M

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is frequently associated with CKD, which is important because individuals with CKD are more likely to die from CVD than to develop kidney failure. CVD in CKD is treatable and potentially preventable and CKD appears to be a risk factor for CVD. In order of incidence and frequency systemic hypertension, left ventricular failure, congestive cardiac failure, ischemic heart disease, anaemic heart failure, rhythm disturbances, pericarditis with or without effusion, cardiac tamponade, uraemic cardiomyopathy are various cardiovascular complications encountered in patients with chronic renal failure. A patient may present with one or more complications of cardiovascular system. The survival rate and prognosis to a great extent depends on proper management of these complications. Use of regular dialysis and renal transplant has changed the death pattern in developed countries but it is still a major problem in developing country. The aim of this article is early detection of CKD and proper management of it thereby preventing the major cardiovascular complications.

  2. An investigation of renal function in chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, P.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation has been made into various parameters of renal function in patients with chronic bronchitis and in a group of hypoxic controls. Abnormalities of glomerular filtration rate and of water handling have been demostrated in chronic bronchitic patients but not in hypoxic controls. The abnormalities are related to the arterial Pco2. A hypothesis is presented as to the role of CO2 in causing abnormalities of renal function in chronic bronchitis. PMID:17853

  3. Myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD stages II-V (end stage renal disease)]. Plasma MPO was assayed by a spectrophotometric method. Serum urea and creatinine were estimated on a clinical chemistry analyzer using standard laboratory procedures. The mean plasma MPO levels were significantly lower with advancing stages of renal failure (P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between MPO and GFR (r = +0.89, P < 0.001) and a negative correlation with urea (r = -0.85, P < 0.001) and creatinine (r = -0.82, P < 0.001). While an inverse association was observed between plasma MPO and urea in CKD patients, such an association was not observed in control subjects (P = 0.43). In conclusion, the decline in plasma MPO levels may be due to the inhibitory effect of uraemic toxins on the enzyme.

  4. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  5. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  6. [Atheroembolic renal disease: a diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Turina, Silvia; Venturelli, Chiara; Dallera, Nadia; Valerio, Francesca; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Faberi, Elena; Sottini, Laura; Kenou, Rosyane

    2008-01-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease is a part of a multisystem disease and can be defined as renal failure secondary to the occlusion of renal arterioles and glomerular capillaries with cholesterol crystal emboli deriving from the aorta and other major arteries. The kidney is usually involved because of the proximity of the renal arteries to abdominal aorta (where the erosion of atheromatous plaque is most likely to occur), and the high renal blood flow. Cholesterol crystal embolism can also occur in other visceral organs, as well as in the upper and lower extremities. Embolization may occur spontaneously or after angiographic and surgical procedures, and anticoagulation. Atheroembolic renal disease is an important yet underdiagnosed component of the spectrum of kidney diseases associated with atherosclerosis and remains an unexplored field of nephrology research.

  7. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  8. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  9. A Case of Primary Aldosteronism with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun Hee; Park, Kyung Jun; Kim, Sun Young

    2006-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to chronic renal failure with a 10-year history of hypertension. We found polycystic kidney disease, pulmonary tuberculosis and an aldosterone-producing adrenocortical mass. At this time, her serum potassium level and blood pressure were within the normal range. She refused hemodialysis and then was hospitalized because of uremic encephalopathy. On admission, her serum potassium level was normal without treatment and plasma aldosterone concentration highly elevated. She received hemodialysis, and thereafter hypokalemia developed. We then administered spironolactone, whereupon serum potassium level returned to the normal range. In this case, we thought that normokalemia was balanced hypokalemia of primary aldosteronism with hyperkalemia of chronic renal failure, and that hypokalemia developed after hemodialysis was due to an imbalanced primary aldosteronism with end stage renal disease. PMID:24459492

  10. [Chronic kidney disease in the source documentation of the outpatient clinic Department of Nephrology. Part I. Causes of renal failure and characteristics of the studied population].

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Januszek, Rafał; Wieczorek-Surdacka, Ewa; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    During the last years the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is permanently increasing and has become a global social and economical problem in the world as well as in Poland. The aim of the study was the retrospective analysis of medical records of patients with renal failure under supervision at the outpatient clinic, Department of Nephrology, University Hospital in Cracow. The study population enclosed 1183 patients (640 men and 543 women) aged between 17 and 98 years (mean 64.7) with creatinine concentration >120 micromol/l and/or creatinine clearance <90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Hemoglobin, iron, creatinine, urea, sodium, potasium, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, PTH, uric acid, albumin, total protein, bilirubin, glucose, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, triglicerydes concentration and values of hematocrite, MCV, HbA1, as well as alkaline phosphatase, AspAT, AIAT activity were estimated based on standard laboratory methods. Creatinine clearances were evaluated based on 3 different methods: simplified MDRD formula, Cockcroft-Gault formula and 24-h urine collection. Mean creatinine concentration in the studied population was 172.8 micromol/l (1.95 mg/dl). Hypertension was diagnosed in 65% of patients. In spite of treatment, more than half of the patients (51.9%) have increased systolic blood pressure and above 1/3 (35%) increased diastolic blood pressure. Mean hemoglobin concentration was 13.02 g/dl; more than 12% of patients had decreased hemoglobin below 11 g/dl. Mean values of parameters discovering calcium-phosphate metabolism were: calcium--2.33 mmol/l, phosphate--1.23 mmol/l and parathormon--169.3 pg/ml. Increased value of total serum cholesterol level was noted more than half of the patients (56.5%). Significant positive correlations were found between GFR calculated based on Cockcroft-Gault formula and BMI, hemoglobin, hematocrite, serum iron, diastolic blood pressure, total and LDL serum cholesterol, triglicerydes level, as well as AIAT activity

  11. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The “Nutritional Light Signal” of the Renal Acid Load

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p < 0.0001), DBP (p < 0.001), plasma urea (p < 0.0001) protein intake (p < 0.0001), calcemia (p < 0.0001), phosphatemia (p < 0.0001), phosphate intake (p < 0.0001), urinary sodium (p < 0.0001), urinary potassium (p < 0.002), and urinary phosphate (p < 0.0001). NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. Conclusion: VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks

  12. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF.

  13. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  14. Analysis of renal diseases detected in renal biopsies of adult patients: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Salman; Drohlia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Salman, Beena; Ahmad, Aasim

    2017-01-01

    Renal biopsy is crucial while evaluating for the diagnosis of glomerular, vascular, tubulointerstitial, and genetic diseases. It gives vital information which helps in estimating the disease prognosis, progression, and management. This is the retrospective analysis of all adult patients aged above 18 years, who underwent percutaneous renal biopsy at The Kidney Center Post Graduate Training Institute, Karachi, over a duration of 18 years, i.e., January 1, 1996, to December 2013. Renal graft biopsies and those which were inadequate were excluded from analysis. Of the1962 biopsies performed, we included 1521 biopsies in our assessment. The mean age of the population was 38 ± 15.26 years (range 18-88 years). There were 920 (60.5%) males and 601 (39.5%) females. The most common clinical indication of kidney biopsy was nephrotic syndrome, i.e., 741 (45.7%), followed by chronic kidney disease, 253 (16.6%); acute renal failure, 184; (12.1%) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN), 124 (8.2%). Primary GN was found in the majority of the patients, 984 (64.7%), followed by secondary GN in 249 (16.4%), tubulointerstitial disease in 224 (14.7%), and vascular disease in 64 (4.2%). In primary GN, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common histopathological diagnosis in 297 (19.5%) patients, followed by MGN in 224 (14.7%), chronic GN in 98 (6.4%), crescentic GN in 93 (6.1%), minimal change disease in 87 (5.7%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in 58 (3.8%), and postinfection glomerulonephritis in 53 (3.5%) patients. This study shows that focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is the most common lesion in renal biopsy in the young age group followed by membranous nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy and chronic interstitial nephritis were dominant secondary pathological lesions in older age group, whereas lupus nephritis was the most common secondary disease in young age females.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  16. Spectrum of renal disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jessie; Dwyer, Karen M; Hill, Prue; See, Emily; Ekinci, Elif I; Jerums, George; MacIsaac, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    The spectrum of renal disease in patients with diabetes encompasses both diabetic kidney disease (including albuminuric and non-albuminuric phenotypes) and non-diabetic kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease can manifest as varying degrees of renal insufficiency and albuminuria, with heterogeneity in histology reported on renal biopsy. For patients with diabetes and proteinuria, the finding of non-diabetic kidney disease alone or superimposed on the changes of diabetic nephropathy is increasingly reported. It is important to identify non-diabetic kidney disease as some forms are treatable, sometimes leading to remission. Clinical indications for a heightened suspicion of non-diabetic kidney disease and hence consideration for renal biopsy in patients with diabetes and nephropathy include absence of diabetic retinopathy, short duration of diabetes, atypical chronology, presence of haematuria or other systemic disease, and the nephrotic syndrome.

  17. Novel application of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy using CyberKnife(®) for early-stage renal cell carcinoma in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease: Initial clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Jen, Yee-Min

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires particular care in order to preserve the remaining renal function. The present study aimed to investigate the potential of a novel nephron-sparing treatment, which is capable of targeting tumors embedded deep within tissues. The present study analyzed three patients, with pre-existing CKD and multiple comorbidities, who were successfully treated for stage I RCC using the CyberKnife(®) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) system. The total prescribed dose was 40 Gy in five fractions administered over five consecutive days. Treatment efficiency was determined using computed tomography scans of the tumors and periodic measurements of the glomerular filtration rate over a period of 12-40 months. Local control, defined as a radiologically stable condition, was achieved in all patients. Lung metastasis was observed in one patient nine months after SABR; however, the side-effects were generally mild and self-limiting. One patient developed renal failure 26 months after SABR, while the severity of CKD was only marginally altered in the other two patients and renal failure did not occur. In conclusion, in the present study, SABR with CyberKnife(®) was observed to be well tolerated in the patients, with an acceptable acute toxicity effect. Therefore, it may represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with early-stage RCC who have previously been diagnosed with CKD, but for whom other nephron-sparing treatments are contraindicated.

  18. Impact of creatinine production on the agreement between glomerular filtration rate estimates using cystatin C-derived, and 4- and 6-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations

    PubMed Central

    Hermida-Cadahia, Esperanza F.; Lampon, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Background. It has recently been reported that patient selection has a strong impact on the agreement between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates from serum cystatin C and creatinine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of creatinine production rate (CPR) on this subject. Material and methods. GFR was estimated from serum cystatin C and from creatinine using the 4- and 6-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations in 50 healthy subjects, 43 patients with renal failure, 794 kidney and 104 liver transplant recipients, 61 patients with heart failure, 59 patients with biliary obstruction, and 113 critically ill patients. Results. In the 295 patients with impaired CPR (< 900 mg/24 h/1.73 m2), discordances of more than 40% between GFRMDRD4 and GFRcystatinC were observed in 38% of cases, between GFRMDRD6 and GFRcystatinC in 22%, and between GFRCKD-EPI and GFRcystatinC in 27% (in all cases due to GFR overestimation from creatinine). In the 929 patients with maintained CPR (> 900 mg/24 h/1.73 m2), greater discordances than 40% between GFRMDRD4 and GFRcystatinC were observed in 8% of cases, between GFRMDRD6 and GFRcystatinC in 9%, and between GFRCKD-EPI and GFRcystatinC in 7% (in the major part of cases due to GFR overestimation from cystatin C). Conclusion. The main source of differences of more than 40% between GFR estimates from serum creatinine and cystatin C is a GFR overestimation in patients with low CPR and GFR underestimation in patients with high CPR by the creatinine-derived equations. PMID:22746300

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. It is important to diagnose CKD early. Diagnosis & TestsHow can my doctor tell if I have CKD?There are three simple tests that your doctor might do if he or she suspects you might have chronic kidney disease:Blood pressure testUrine albumin (a test to see ...

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) COPD is a long-term (chronic) illness. The disease will get worse more quickly if you do not stop smoking. If you have severe COPD, you will be short of breath with most activities. You may be ...

  1. [CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND PREGNANCY--A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Amaliev, G M; Uchikova, E; Malinova, M

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic renal failure is a complex therapeutic problem requiring a multidisciplinary approach. It is associated with a higher risk of many perinatal complications. The most common abnormalities are related to: progression of renal failure, development of preeclampsia development of nephrotic syndrome, anemic syndrome, IUGR and fetal death. The prognosis depends on the values of serum creatinine prior to pregnancy, the degree of deterioration of renal function, development of additional obstetric complications and the specific etiological reasons that have led to the occurrence of renal failure. Determining the optimum time for authorization birth depends on the condition of the mother, the condition of the fetus and the rate of progression of renal failure, and the deadline the pregnancy should be terminated is 35 weeks. We present a case of a patient with chronic renal failure, with favorable perinatal outcome.

  2. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  3. Valuing Lives: The Policy Debate on Patient Care Financing for Victims of End-Stage Renal Disease,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    In Public Law 92-603, the Social Security Amendments of 1972, Medicare health insurance coverage for end-stage renal disease was effectively extended... disease . A substantial number of potential end-stage renal disease patients, approximately 60 percent of the total, however, could not qualify for...Act and included those who were medically determined to have chronic renal disease and to require hemodialysis or renal transplantation. What is the

  4. [Problems with immunosuppressive agents in nephropathies with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Savoldi, S; Mesiano, P; Rocchietti, M

    2008-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment is widely used in transplant patients, who often have chronic renal failure, while its use in nephropathies of native kidneys with chronic renal insufficiency is still limited. In recent years a number of papers have reported advantages of its use also in this setting. A prerequisite for immunosuppression in this condition is accurate renal histology, in order to define the etiology, activity/chronicity index and prognosis. Although clinicians agree on the use of aggressive treatment for secondary nephropathies, the approach to primary forms in the presence of chronic renal failure remains controversial, as does the definition of a ''point of no return'' beyond which treatment could be ineffective or unsafe. Nonrandomized studies found that immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide can be useful in membranous nephropathy with renal insufficiency. The use of immunosuppressive drugs in IgA nephropathy in the presence of established renal insufficiency seems to improve renal survival with a limited occurrence of side effects. Since the pharmacokinetics of the current immunosuppressive agents (steroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, mycophenolate mofetil) is modified by renal insufficiency, attention should be paid to reducing drug doses and monitoring toxicity. Immunosuppressive treatment is a critical procedure in patients with chronic renal failure, in whom an increased risk of infection is already present. In conclusion, on the basis of the data of the literature, we can hypothesize that the ''point of no return'' exceeds the threshold generally considered safe by clinicians. Nevertheless, a strict definition of a cutoff value for renal function to establish whether or not a certain treatment should be given is not applicable in clinical practice, where the choice of an immunosuppressive approach must be tailored to the individual patient based on a global evaluation including renal histology, clinical conditions

  5. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  6. Chronic renal failure in a patient with bilateral ureterocele.

    PubMed

    Dada, Samuel A; Rafiu, Mojeed O; Olanrewaju, Timothy O

    2015-07-01

    Ureterocele is a congenital anomaly, in which there is mal-development of the caudal segments of the ureter. There is a female preponderance with most cases seen in Caucasians. Among the reported complications of this condition, chronic renal failure occurring in the setting of ureterocele has not been well documented. We report a case of a young girl with bilateral ureterocele presenting with chronic renal failure, whose management presented a diagnostic failure and inadequate treatment.

  7. Effects of chronic and acute protein administration on renal function in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bilo, H J; Schaap, G H; Blaak, E; Gans, R O; Oe, P L; Donker, A J

    1989-01-01

    In 6 volunteers with normal renal function, we investigated the effects of various kinds of protein (soy, lactoprotein and beef) and various amounts of an intravenously administered amino acid solution on glomerular filtration (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). As for the protein-induced changes in renal function, rises in GFR and ERPF were lowest with soy protein, and highest with beef (baseline GFR, 110 +/- 5; soy, 122 +/- 5; beef, 131 +/- 5 ml/min/1.73 m2; mean +/- SEM). High doses of intravenous amino acids induced a rise in GFR comparable to that after beef (132 +/- 5 ml/min/1.73 m2). In a combined test a liquid mixed meal together with intravenously administered amino acids induced a comparable increase of the GFR (baseline 114 +/- 5 versus 129 +/- 5 ml/min/1.73 m2). When investigating 9 patients with chronic renal insufficiency after 4 weeks of low protein intake (LP) and after 4 weeks of high protein intake (HP), GFR and ERPF rose significantly under baseline conditions (GFR-LP41 +/- 9 versus GFR-HP 45 +/- 9 ml/min/1.73 m2, p less than 0.02; ERPF-LP 169 +/- 39 versus ERPF-HP 180 +/- 40 ml/min/1.73 m2, p less than 0.02; paired Wilcoxon). At the end of both dietary periods a comparable rise in renal function could be induced through acute stimulation (GFR-LP 20 +/- 5, GFR-HP 16 +/- 4; ERPF-LP 23 +/- 7, ERPF-HP 22 +/- 3%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Future options for the management of chronic kidney disease in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chidi; Kankam, Charity

    2012-02-01

    The lack of health care infrastructure and prevalence of infectious disease in Nigeria exacerbate the growing problem of diagnosing and treating chronic kidney disease. Nigeria should place more emphasis on chronic kidney disease education, screening, and prevention; propagation of acceptance of peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis; subsidization of renal replacement costs; and advancement of the national renal transplantation program.

  9. Pregnancy management and outcome in women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bili, E; Tsolakidis, D; Stangou, S; Tarlatzis, B

    2013-04-01

    An increasing number of pregnancies occur in the presence of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), mainly including chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), and lupus nephritis (LN). The most important factor affecting fetal and maternal prognosis is the degree of renal function at conception. In the majority of patients with mild renal function impairment, and well-controlled blood pressure, pregnancy is usually successful and does not alter the natural course of maternal renal disease. Conversely, fetal outcome and long-term maternal renal function might be seriously threatened by pregnancy in women with moderate or severe renal function impairment. The last few years, advances in our knowledge about the interaction of pregnancy and renal function resulted in the improvement of fetal outcome in patients with chronic renal failure and also in the management of pregnant women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) maintained on dialysis. However, women with impaired renal function and those on dialysis should be carefully counseled about the risks of pregnancy.

  10. The impact of sex hormone changes on bone mineral deficit in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Doumouchtsis, Konstantinos K; Perrea, Despoina N; Doumouchtsis, Stergios K

    2009-01-01

    In chronic renal failure several factors affect bone homeostasis leading to the development of renal osteodystrophy. Common calcitropic hormone derangements in renal failure play a central role in bone structure and mineral defects, which in turn accompany osteodystrophy frequently resulting in low bone mineral density (BMD) values. However, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from several comorbidities, which may partly account for renal bone disease lesions. Hypogonadism in particular accompanies chronic renal failure frequently and exerts an additive effect on bone loss potential. Sex hormones contribute to the equilibrium of osteotropic hormones and cytokines, exerting a protective action on bone tissue. Estrogens have a regulatory effect on bone metabolism in women with renal failure as well. Hypogonadal ESRD women experience a higher bone turnover and more significant bone mass decrements than ESRD women with relatively normal hormone profile and menstrual habits. Female hemodialysis patients have lower BMD values than male patients on average, probably because of menstrual cycle irregularities. However, hypogonadal ESRD men may also experience bone mineral deficits and the severity of hypogonadism may correlate to their bone mineral status. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to reverse bone mineral loss to some extent in both sexes. In conclusion hypogonadism in renal failure contributes to the bone structure and mineral defects as well as the low-energy fracture risk, reflected in BMD measurements. HRT in ESRD patients should therefore not be overlooked in these patients in the face of their significant comorbidities.

  11. [Reflux and obstructive nephropathy as a cause of renal failure in chronic dialysis children].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Anna; Jander, Anna; Puczko-Nogal, Barbara; Nowicki, Michał

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of medical files to evaluate causes of chronic renal failure in 80 children (M--49, F--31), age 1 month to 20 years) who started renal replacement therapy in the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis of the Polish Mothers Memorial Hospital in the years 1990-2007. In 28 children (35%) reflux and obstructive nephropathy was a cause of renal failure. In 5 children the disease was secondary to the neurogenic bladder. The incidence of these nephropathies in our population was constant in the analyzed years. In our group there were 2 neonates and 7 adolescent who were diagnosed with nephropathy as late as in the endstage phase. Boys with posterior urethral valve required renal replacement therapy earlier (146 +/- 55 months). We conclude that obstructive and reflux nephropathy are still the essential cause of end stage renal disease in children.

  12. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lange, Peter

    2013-04-15

    The new version of the GOLD document on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), introduces a profound change in the stratification of the patients. In addition to the level of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the new stratification also includes the level of daily symptoms, in particular dyspnoea, and the history of exacerbations. This review describes this stratification and the treatment of stable COPD according to the GOLD document. It focuses on early diagnosis, smoking cessation, rehabilitation and medical treatment.

  13. Renal disease pathophysiology and treatment: contributions from the rat

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Bryan R.; Menzies, Robert I.; Denby, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rat has classically been the species of choice for pharmacological studies and disease modeling, providing a source of high-quality physiological data on cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology over many decades. Recent developments in genome engineering now allow us to capitalize on the wealth of knowledge acquired over the last century. Here, we review rat models of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and acute and chronic kidney disease. These models have made important contributions to our understanding of renal diseases and have revealed key genes, such as Ace and P2rx7, involved in renal pathogenic processes. By targeting these genes of interest, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the etiology of renal pathologies, with the promised potential of slowing disease progression or even reversing the damage caused. Some, but not all, of these target genes have proved to be of clinical relevance. However, it is now possible to generate more sophisticated and appropriate disease models in the rat, which can recapitulate key aspects of human renal pathology. These advances will ultimately be used to identify new treatments and therapeutic targets of much greater clinical relevance. PMID:27935823

  14. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part I: general principles.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to improve the basis upon which advice on pregnancy is given to women with renal disease and to address issues of obstetric management by drawing upon the accumulated world experience. To ensure the proper rapport between the respect for patient's autonomy and the ethical principle of beneficence, the review attempts to impart up-to-date, evidence-based information on the predictable outcomes and hazards of pregnancy in women with chronic renal disease. The physiology of pregnancy from the perspective of the affected kidney will be discussed as well as the principal predictors of maternal and fetal outcomes and general recommendations of management. The available evidence supports the implication that the degree of renal function impairment is the major determinant for pregnancy outcome. In addition, the presence of hypertension further compounds the risks. On the contrary, the degree of proteinuria does not demonstrate a linear correlation with obstetric outcomes. Management and outcome of pregnancies occurring in women on dialysis and after renal transplant are also discussed. Although the outcome of pregnancies under chronic dialysis has markedly improved in the past decade, the chances of achieving a viable pregnancy are much higher after transplantation. But even in renal transplant recipients, the rate of maternal and fetal complications remains high, in addition to concerns regarding possible adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs on the developing embryo and fetus.

  15. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  16. Incidence, mortality, and prevalence of end-stage chronic renal disease in the Bajo Lempa region of El Salvador: A ten-year community registry.

    PubMed

    García-Trabanino, Ramón; Hernández, Carolina; Rosa, Adrián; Domínguez Alonso, Jesús

    The Bajo Lempa is an impoverished rural coastal region of El Salvador affected by the chronic kidney disease (CKD) epidemic known as Mesoamerican nephropathy. The local community organisation Fondo Social de Emergencia para la Salud (FSES) (Emergency social fund for health) is helping to fight the epidemic in 42 communities of the region (19,223 inhabitants; average age 26.7 years; 48.5% male; 40.2% <18 years).

  17. Successful pregnancy in an end-stage renal disease patient on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Inal, Salih; Reis, Kadriye Altok; Armağan, Berkan; Oneç, Küşrad; Biri, Aydan

    2012-01-01

    Among women with chronic kidney disease, successful pregnancy with a surviving infant is rather rare. Although these pregnancies carry higher risk, with the possibility of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, they can be managed with close monitoring and intense renal replacement therapy. Given the hemodynamic advantages of peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis in pregnancy, peritoneal dialysis therapy is thought to be a favorable renal replacement option in pregnant patients with chronic kidney disease.

  18. Soluble biglycan as a biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Louise Tzung-Harn; Nastase, Madalina-Viviana; Zeng-Brouwers, Jinyang; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Chronic renal inflammation is often associated with a progressive accumulation of various extracellular matrix constituents, including several members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) gene family. It is becoming increasingly evident that the matrix-unbound SLRPs strongly regulate the progression of inflammation and fibrosis. Soluble SLRPs are generated either via partial proteolytic processing of collagenous matrices or by de novo synthesis evoked by stress or injury. Liberated SLRPs can then bind to and activate Toll-like receptors, thus modulating downstream inflammatory signaling. Preclinical animal models and human studies have recently identified soluble biglycan as a key initiator and regulator of various inflammatory renal diseases. Biglycan, generated by activated macrophages, can enter the circulation and its elevated levels in plasma and renal parenchyma correlate with unfavorable renal function and outcome. In this review, we will focus on the critical role of soluble biglycan in inflammatory signaling in various renal disorders. Moreover, we will provide new data implicating proinflammatory effects of soluble decorin in unilateral ureteral obstruction. Finally, we will critically evaluate the potential application of soluble biglycan vis-à-vis other SLRPs (decorin, lumican and fibromodulin) as a promising target and novel biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases. PMID:25091702

  19. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  20. Biologics for the treatment of autoimmune renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Stephen R; Gan, Poh-Yi; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-04-01

    Biological therapeutics (biologics) that target autoimmune responses and inflammatory injury pathways have a marked beneficial impact on the management of many chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and ankylosing spondylitis. Accumulating data suggest that a growing number of renal diseases result from autoimmune injury - including lupus nephritis, IgA nephropathy, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis, autoimmune (formerly idiopathic) membranous nephropathy, anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis, and C3 nephropathy - and one can speculate that biologics might also be applicable to these diseases. As many autoimmune renal diseases are relatively uncommon, with long natural histories and diverse outcomes, clinical trials that aim to validate potentially useful biologics are difficult to design and/or perform. Some excellent consortia are undertaking cohort studies and clinical trials, but more multicentre international collaborations are needed to advance the introduction of new biologics to patients with autoimmune renal disorders. This Review discusses the key molecules that direct injurious inflammation and the biologics that are available to modulate them. The opportunities and challenges for the introduction of relevant biologics into treatment protocols for autoimmune renal diseases are also discussed.

  1. [Chronic kidney diseases, metformin and lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus represent a worldwide public health problem. The incidence of these diseases is gradually growing into epidemic proportions. In many cases they occur simultaneously, what leads to increased morbidity and mortality among the affected patients. The majority of the patients treated for diabetes mellitus are unaware of the presence of renal insufficiency. Vascular hypertrophy and diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of kidney failure in countries with advanced healthcare systems. Metformin is a basic drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is excreted in an unchanged form by the kidneys. When administered to patients with renal insufficiency, sepsis, dehydration or after the parenteral administration of iodinated contrast agents, metformin can cause lactic acidosis, which is also associated with an increased mortality rate.

  2. Cardiometabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Guido; Manrique, Camila; McFarlane, Samy I; Sowers, James R

    2006-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular (CV) disease, and CV-related premature death. More than 8 million people in the United States have CKD; therefore, preventive stratiegies should be directed at identifying risk factors for this condition. There is growing evidence implicating the cardiometabolic syndrome, a clustering of CV risk factors that include obesity, insulin resistance, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, dysglycemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Factors mediating this relationship include increased glomerular filtration, increased vascular permeability, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, and inappropriate secretion of growth factors. The consequences are microalbuminuria, a marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, renal vascular proliferation, extracellular matrix expansion, and CKD. Prevention of CKD should be directed at controlling all components of the cardiometabolic syndrome, with the ultimate goal of reducing the burden imposed by ESRD.

  3. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  4. Amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism with EPO-resistant anemia in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peter M S; Ng, Yee-Yung

    2008-11-01

    The overall incidence of amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction ranges from 2% to 24%. One third to half of patients with hypothyroidism have anemia due to some decrease in normal red blood cell mass and erythropoietin (EPO) resistance. Therefore, for patients with chronic renal disease under medication with amiodarone, early regular thyroid function test should be checked in order to avoid amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism and EPO-resistant anemia. If amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism and EPO-resistant anemia occur in patients with chronic renal failure, early thyroxine should be given instead of waiting for spontaneous recovery by amiodarone discontinuation only. Here, we report a patient with chronic renal failure who developed EPO-resistant anemia after amiodarone treatment for arrhythmia. The hemoglobin level responded to EPO therapy rapidly after thyroxine administration and amiodarone discontinuation.

  5. Salt-induced changes in cardiac phosphoproteome in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed.

  6. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  7. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  8. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  9. [Diagnosis and management of chronic renal failure in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Segalen, Isabelle; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in the elderly is rising due to the ageing of the general population. Its management, and notably nephroprotective therapies, must be adapted to the elderly person who is often frail and with multiple pathologies. The decision to start extra-renal purification does not depend on the patient's chronological age but on their physiological age and requires dialogue between the patient and their family, the geriatrician and the nephrologist.

  10. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  11. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  12. Intravenous renal cell transplantation with SAA1-positive cells prevents the progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic-diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2013-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common cause of progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease, has now reached global proportions. The only means to rescue diabetic patients on dialysis is renal transplantation, a very effective therapy but severely limited by the availability of donor kidneys. Hence, we tested the role of intravenous renal cell transplantation (IRCT) on obese/diabetic Zucker/SHHF F1 hybrid (ZS) female rats with severe ischemic and diabetic nephropathy. Renal ischemia was produced by bilateral renal clamping of the renal arteries at 10 wk of age, and IRCT with genetically modified normal ZS male tubular cells was given intravenously at 15 and 20 wk of age. Rats were euthanized at 34 wk of age. IRCT with cells expressing serum amyloid A had strong and long-lasting beneficial effects on renal function and structure, including tubules and glomeruli. However, donor cells were found engrafted only in renal tubules 14 wk after the second infusion. The results indicate that IRCT with serum amyloid A-positive cells is effective in preventing the progression of chronic kidney disease in rats with diabetic and ischemic nephropathy.

  13. Successful pregnancy outcome among women with end-stage renal disease requiring haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Arora, Nalini; Mahajan, Kirti; Jana, Narayan; Maiti, Tapan Kumar; Mandal, Debasmita; Pandey, Rajendra

    2009-04-01

    Pregnancy is rare in women with end-stage renal disease, and perinatal outcome remains suboptimal because of prematurity and foetal growth restriction. Successful obstetrical outcome in two women presented with chronic renal failure requiring serial haemodialysis and multiple blood transfusions during pregnancy is reported. Both women had vaginal delivery of low birth weight neonates--2100 g and 1540 g at 33 and 37 weeks' gestations respectively. With specialised neonatal care, both neonates survived, and the mothers were counselled for renal replacement therapy.

  14. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chinnappa, V; Ankichetty, S; Angle, P; Halpern, S H

    2013-07-01

    Parturients with renal insufficiency or failure present a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist. Impaired renal function compromises fertility and increases both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Close communication amongst medical specialists, including nephrologists, obstetricians, neonatologists and anesthesiologists is required to ensure the safety of mother and child. Pre-existing diseases should be optimized and close surveillance of maternal and fetal condition is required. Kidney function may deteriorate during pregnancy, necessitating early intervention. The goal is to maintain hemodynamic and physiologic stability while the demands of the pregnancy change. Drugs that may adversely affect the fetus, are nephrotoxic or are dependent on renal elimination should be avoided.

  15. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

  16. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  17. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  18. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery.

    PubMed

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì', Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well.

  19. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  20. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  1. Inflammation and cachexia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wai W; Paik, Kyung Hoon; Mak, Robert H

    2010-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with cachexia and increased mortality risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Inflammation suppresses appetite and causes the loss of protein stores. In CKD patients, increased serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines may be caused by reduced renal function, volume overload, oxidative or carbonyl stress, decreased levels of antioxidants, increased susceptibility to infection in uremia, and the presence of comorbid conditions. Cachexia is brought about by the synergistic combination of a dramatic decrease in appetite and an increase in the catabolism of fat and lean body mass. Pro-inflammatory cytokines act on the central nervous system to alter appetite and energy metabolism and to provide a signal-through the nuclear factor-kappaB and ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathways-that causes muscle wasting. Further research into the molecular pathways leading to inflammation and cachexia may lead to novel therapeutic therapies for this devastating and potentially fatal complication of chronic disease.

  2. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    improves renal function and structure in other models of renal failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol...cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal. 305:F1804- F1812 6. Mason SB...successful long-term kidney cell engraftment and renal regeneration in diabetic nephropathy and also cell auto-transplants (9). We used adult

  3. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD.

  4. Nutritional treatment in chronic kidney disease: the concept of nephroprotection.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Eleonora; Di Nuzzi, Antonella; Pisani, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Low-protein diets have been advocated for many decades as the cornerstone in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. Initially, the low intake of protein was used to reduce uremic symptoms; thereafter, albeit controversial, evidences suggested that dietary protein restriction can also slow the rate of progression of renal failure and the time until end-stage renal disease. This reviews focuses on the dietary factors and their influence on the loss of renal function and on the evidences in the literature supporting a nephroprotective role of the low-protein diet.

  5. MicroRNA biomarkers in clinical renal disease: from diabetic nephropathy renal transplantation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Raj, Dominic; Townsend, Raymond; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a common health problem affecting 1 in 12 Americans. It is associated with elevated risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and high costs for the treatment of renal failure with dialysis or transplantation. Advances in CKD care are impeded by the lack of biomarkers for early diagnosis, assessment of the extent of tissue injury, estimation of disease progression, and evaluation of response to therapy. Such biomarkers should improve the performance of existing measures of renal functional impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) or kidney damage (proteinuria). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional repressors are gaining momentum as biomarkers in a number of disease areas. In this review, we examine the potential utility of miRNAs as promising biomarkers for renal disease. We explore the performance of miRNAs as biomarkers in two clinically important forms of CKD, diabetes and the nephropathy developing in kidney transplant recipients. Finally, we highlight the pitfalls and opportunities of miRNAs and provide a broad perspective for the future clinical development of miRNAs as biomarkers in CKD beyond the current gold standards of eGFR and albuminuria.

  6. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  7. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-11-06

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it.

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of ginger, Arabic gum, and Boswellia in acute and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mona Fouad; Diaai, Abdalla Ahmed; Ahmed, Fahmy

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Ginger), Arabic gum (AG), and Boswellia on both acute and chronic renal failure (CRF) and the mechanisms underlying their effects. Acute renal failure was induced by 30 min ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion, while CRF was induced by adenine feeding for 8 weeks. Prophylactic oral administration of ginger, AG, Boswellia, or vehicle (in control groups) was started 3 days before and along with adenine feeding in different groups or 7 days before ischemia-reperfusion. Ginger and AG showed renoprotective effects in both models of renal failure. These protective effects may be attributed at least in part to their anti-inflammatory properties as evident by attenuating serum C-reactive protein levels and antioxidant effects as evident by attenuating lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde levels, and increasing renal superoxide dismutase activity. Ginger was more potent than AG in both models of renal failure. However, Boswellia showed only partial protective effect against both acute renal failure and CRF and it had no antioxidant effects. Finally, we can say that ginger and AG could be beneficial adjuvant therapy in patients with acute renal failure and CRF to prevent disease progression and delay the need for renal replacement therapy.

  9. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  10. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2), or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  12. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  13. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population.

  14. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  15. Frailty in elderly people with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Portilla Franco, Maria Eugenia; Tornero Molina, Fernando; Gil Gregorio, Pedro

    In recent years, the concept of frailty as a "state of pre-disability" has been widely accepted by those involved in the care of the elderly. Its importance lies not only in its high prevalence - more than 25% in people over 85 years of age - but it is also considered an independent risk factor of disability, institutionalisation and mortality amongst the elderly. The study of renal function is relevant in patients with major comorbidities. Studies have shown a significant association between chronic kidney disease and the development of adverse clinical outcomes such as heart disease, heart failure, end-stage renal disease, increased susceptibility to infections and greater functional impairment. Frailty can be reversed, which is why a study of frailty in patients with chronic kidney disease is of particular interest. This article aims to describe the association between ageing, frailty and chronic kidney disease in light of the most recent and relevant scientific publications.

  16. Children and End-State Renal Disease (ERSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I'm outside the U.S. Children & End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) How to tell if your child ... Social Security card CMS Form 2728 ("End-Stage Renal Disease Medical Evidence Report Medicare Entitlement and/or ...

  17. MicroRNAs 223-3p and 93-5p in patients with chronic kidney disease before and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ulbing, M; Kirsch, A H; Leber, B; Lemesch, S; Münzker, J; Schweighofer, N; Hofer, D; Trummer, O; Rosenkranz, A R; Müller, H; Eller, K; Stadlbauer, V; Obermayer-Pietsch, B

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a multifactorial dysregulation of bone and vascular calcification and closely linked to increased cardiovascular mortality and concomitant bone disease. We aimed to investigate specific microRNA (miRNA) signatures in CKD patients to find indicators for vascular calcification and/or bone mineralization changes during CKD and after kidney transplantation (KT). A miRNA array was used to investigate serum miRNA profiles in CKD patients, then selected miRNAs were quantified in a validation cohort comprising 73 patients in CKD stages 3 to 5, 67 CKD patients after KT, and 36 healthy controls. A spectrum of biochemical parameters including markers for kidney function, inflammation, glucose, and mineral metabolism was determined. The relative expression of miR-223-3p and miR-93-5p was down-regulated in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5 compared to healthy controls. This down-regulation disappeared after kidney transplantation even when lower glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) persisted. MiR-223-3p and miR-93-5p were associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and eGFR levels, and by trend with interleukin-8 (IL-8), C-peptide, hematocrit, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). This study contributes new knowledge of serum miRNA expression profiles in CKD, potentially reflecting pathophysiological changes of bone and calcification pathways associated with inflammation, vascular calcification, mineral and glucose metabolism. Identified miRNA signatures can contribute to future risk markers or future therapeutic targets in bone and kidney disease.

  18. Chronic kidney disease - different role for HDL?

    PubMed

    Jacek, Rysz; Anna, Gluba; Danilo, Fliser; Timo, Speer; Andrzej, Wiecek

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging health hazard, connected to very high cardiovascular mortality due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Increased cardiovascular risk cannot be explained only by traditional risk factors. Patients with renal dysfunction have significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism and HDL in these patients becomes dysfunctional. It has been documented that in patients with CKD lower plasma level of HDL cholesterol and reduced ability of HDL to bind to ABCA1 are seen, which result in slowing down the reverse cholesterol transport and disturbances in HDL maturation due to decreased lecithin cholesterol ester transfer protein. Studies demonstrated that HDL of CKD patients loses its vasoprotective, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and turns into a noxious particle which promotes endothelial dysfunction via stimulating superoxide production and limiting NO bioavailability. Alterations of HDL at the 'molecular and functional level' are also seen in renal transplant recipients even in those with excellent graft function.

  19. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  20. [Chronic granulomatous disease].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cardona, Aristóteles; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2009-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency, a phagocyte defect that appears in 1:200,000 live births and is produced by mutations in the genes that codify for the enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). The inheritance form is X linked (> 60%) or autosomic recesive (30-40%). The NADPH oxidase is responsible for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the activated phagocyte ("respiratory burst"). When present, mutations on the NAPDH oxidase genes do not allow the ROS production, making the neutrophils of these patients incapable to destroy pathogens. These patients are especially susceptible to infections by staphylococcus, fungi and some gram-negative bacteria. The main clinical manifestations include recurrent life-threatening episodes of lymphadenitis, abscess, pneumonias, osteomyelitis, granuloma formation and sepsis. The diagnosis is suggested by a history of recurrent infections, familiar cases, fail to grow and confirmed with an altered test of ROS production and the specific mutation. Allogenic stem cells transplant is the curative treatment. The early diagnosis and the treatment with prophylactic antibiotics and interferon-gamma have modified favorably the morbidity and mortality of these patients.

  1. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant.

  2. Undetected gynaecological disorders in women with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, R; Regan, L

    1997-04-01

    Women with chronic renal disease (CRD) who are on dialysis or have a functioning renal transplant are typically stoical in their attitude towards other health problems. We undertook a prospective study of 100 women with CRD to assess the prevalence of gynaecological disorders in this group of patients. Assessment included the measurement of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin and oestradiol concentrations, cervical cytology and a pelvic ultrasound scan. We found that gynaecological problems are highly prevalent and frequently unrecognized. Of these women, 58% had a menstrual disorder, with uncontrolled menorrhagia being a significant problem when it aggravated the chronic anaemia of renal disease, and 35% were menopausal, including seven women under the age of 40 years. Menopausal symptoms were undertreated. We identified a 14-fold increase in premature ovarian failure secondary to CRD and the use of cyclophosphamide therapy. In all, 22% of the women were subfertile and 10% had an abnormal smear, with cervical dyskariosis being significantly increased because of long-term immunosuppression. Contraceptive advice had often been absent or inappropriate. We conclude that formal gynaecological review should be routinely available for women with CRD.

  3. Early Phase Mast Cell Activation Determines the Chronic Outcome of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Danelli, Luca; Madjene, Lydia Celia; Madera-Salcedo, Iris; Gautier, Gregory; Pacreau, Emeline; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2017-03-15

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is an important cause of acute kidney injury that can lead to end-stage renal failure. Although the ensuing inflammatory response can restore homeostasis, a consecutive maladaptive repair and persistent inflammation represent important risk factors for postischemic chronic kidney disease development. In this study, we investigated the role of mast cells in both the early and late phases of the inflammatory response in experimental models of acute and chronic renal IRI using our recently developed mouse model that allows conditional ablation of mast cells. Depletion of mast cells prior to IRI resulted in improved renal function due to diminished local inflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels and neutrophil recruitment to the kidneys after the acute injury phase (48 h post-IRI). Furthermore, although not completely protected, mast cell-depleted mice displayed less organ atrophy and fibrosis than did wild-type mice during the chronic phases (2 and 6 wk post-IRI) of disease development. Conversely, mast cell ablation after the acute phase of IRI had no impact on organ atrophy, tubular necrosis, or fibrosis. Thus, our results suggest a deleterious role of mast cells during the acute inflammatory phase of IRI promoting subsequent fibrosis development, but not during the chronic phase of the disease.

  4. End-stage renal disease in Brazil: epidemiology, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marília Bahiense; Romão, João Egídio; Zatz, Roberto

    2005-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest and most populous nations in the world, ranking among the 5 largest economies in the Americas and among the 15 largest economies in the world. However, Brazil is still plagued by social problems such as the persistence of poverty and immense deficiencies in its health system. Currently, there are approximately 390 patients on chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT) per million population, about one third the US prevalence, which suggests that end-stage renal disease is either underdiagnosed or undertreated. The epidemiology of renal disease in the small remaining native Brazilian population is largely unknown. However, it is likely that the prevalence of renal disease is low among at least 2 tribes: the Yanomamis in northern Brazil and the Xingu Indians in central Brazil. Sodium intake is very low, physical activity is intense, and the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease is negligible among these people, which stresses the potential pathogenic importance of so-called civilized habits. There is currently no conclusive evidence that African descendants or any other Brazilian ethnic minorities are especially vulnerable to renal disease. Access to RRT in Brazil is universal. However, because both the end-stage renal disease population and operational RRT costs are steadily increasing, the system may face severe limitations in the near future. Much effort is needed to limit the prevalence of renal disease, to detain or retard the progression of chronic nephropathies, and to ensure that high-quality RRT will remain available to all those who need it.

  5. Acute and chronic servo-control of renal perfusion pressure.

    PubMed

    Hester, R L; Granger, J P; Williams, J; Hall, J E

    1983-04-01

    We describe a servo-control system for acute and chronic regulation of renal perfusion pressure or pressures in other parts of the circulation. The system employs a Dacron-reinforced inflatable silastic occluder of sufficient strength and durability to produce large pressure gradients for long periods of time (at least 10 days) in the abdominal aortas of large dogs. The occluder is inflated with an inexpensive, bidirectional DC motor syringe pump that is controlled by a comparator feedback circuit connected to the output of a driver amplifier of a Grass polygraph or any other suitable recorder. The system has a rapid response time for precise control and has been used to maintain a constant renal perfusion pressure in experiments lasting as long as 10 days. The system has diverse applications in studies of acute or chronic regulation of renal hemodynamics as well as the hemodynamics of other organ systems. The main advantages of this system, besides its durability and precision of control, are that it is very inexpensive (total cost including the syringe pump is less than $150), easy to construct, and can be used in chronic studies for servo-controlling renal perfusion pressure or pressures in other parts of the circulation.

  6. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  7. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  8. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  9. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  10. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  11. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  12. Effect of renal function on prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Adrián Ignacio; Cappola, Thomas P; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in patients with chronic HF. A total of 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1 ± 1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal functions were tested with multivariate models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. Although 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (hazard ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 2.81, p = 0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p = 0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome.

  13. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  14. Revascularisation of patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic haemodialysis: bypass surgery versus PCI—analysis of routine statutory health insurance data

    PubMed Central

    Möckel, Martin; Searle, Julia; Baberg, Henning Thomas; Dirschedl, Peter; Levenson, Benny; Malzahn, Jürgen; Mansky, Thomas; Günster, Christian; Jeschke, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to analyse the short-term and long-term outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing percutaneous intervention (PCI) as compared to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) to evaluate the optimal coronary revascularisation strategy. Design Retrospective analysis of routine statutory health insurance data between 2010 and 2012. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was adjusted all-cause mortality after 30 days and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were repeat revascularisation at 30 days and 1 year and bleeding events within 7 days. Results The total number of cases was n=4123 (PCI; n=3417), median age was 71 (IQR 62–77), 30.4% were women. The adjusted OR for death within 30 days was 0.59 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.81) for patients undergoing PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was 1.58 (1.32 to 1.89) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.23 to 1.75) for all-cause death. In the subgroup of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), adjusted all-cause mortality at 30 days did not differ significantly between both groups (OR 0.75 (0.47 to 1.20)), whereas in patients without AMI the OR for 30-day mortality was 0.44 (0.28 to 0.68) for PCI versus CABG. At 1 year, the adjusted OR for MACCE in patients with AMI was 1.40 (1.06 to 1.85) for PCI versus CABG and 1.47 (1.08 to 1.99) for mortality. Conclusions In this cohort of unselected patients with ESRD undergoing revascularisation, the 1-year outcome was better for CABG in patients with and without AMI. The 30-day mortality was higher in non-AMI patients with CABG reflecting an early hazard with surgery. In cases where the patient's characteristics and risk profile make it difficult to decide on a revascularisation strategy, CABG could be the preferred option. PMID:27752331

  15. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  16. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-γ, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  17. Pathological Renal Findings of Chronic Renal Failure in a Patient with the E66Q Mutation in the α-galactosidase A Gene.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Eiichi; Hamada, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with interstitial nephritis on a renal biopsy at 45 years of age and began to receive hemodialysis at 65 years of age. He was suspected of having Fabry disease as a result of a screening study for Fabry disease performed in hemodialysis patients. He had an E66Q mutation in the α-galactosidase A gene. We conducted an electron microscopic examination of a renal biopsy specimen obtained when the patient was diagnosed with chronic renal failure at 45 years of age in order to elucidate the pathogenicity of the E66Q mutation. Interestingly, an electron microscopic examination of the renal biopsy specimen indicated no characteristic findings of Fabry disease.

  18. Extra-renal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): considerations for routine screening and management.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Dahl, Neera K

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic disease, marked by progressive increase of bilateral renal cysts, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and often leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Apart from renal cysts, patients often have extra-renal disease, involving the liver, heart and vasculature. Other less common but equally important extra-renal manifestations of ADPKD include diverticular disease, hernias, male infertility and pain. Extra-renal disease burden is often asymptomatic, but may result in increased morbidity and mortality. If the disease burden is significant, screening may prove beneficial. We review the rationale for current screening recommendations and propose some guidelines for screening and management of ADPKD patients.

  19. Wasting in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mak, Robert H; Ikizler, Alp T; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Raj, Dominic S; Stenvinkel, Peter; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-03-01

    Wasting/cachexia is prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is to be distinguished from malnutrition, which is defined as the consequence of insufficient food intake or an improper diet. Malnutrition is characterized by hunger, which is an adaptive response, whereas anorexia is prevalent in patients with wasting/cachexia. Energy expenditure decreases as a protective mechanism in malnutrition whereas it remains inappropriately high in cachexia/wasting. In malnutrition, fat mass is preferentially lost and lean body mass and muscle mass is preserved. In cachexia/wasting, muscle is wasted and fat is relatively underutilized. Restoring adequate food intake or altering the composition of the diet reverses malnutrition. Nutrition supplementation does not totally reverse cachexia/wasting. The diagnostic criteria of cachexia/protein-energy wasting in CKD are considered. The association of wasting surrogates, such as serum albumin and prealbumin, with mortality is strong making them robust outcome predictors. At the patient level, longevity has consistently been observed in patients with CKD who have more muscle and/or fat, who report better appetite and who eat more. Although inadequate nutritional intake may contribute to wasting or cachexia, recent evidence indicates that other factors, including systemic inflammation, perturbations of appetite-controlling hormones from reduced renal clearance, aberrant neuropeptide signaling, insulin and insulin-like growth factor resistance, and metabolic acidosis, may be important in the pathogenesis of CKD-associated wasting. A number of novel therapeutic approaches, such as ghrelin agonists and melanocortin receptor antagonists are currently at the experimental level and await confirmation by randomized controlled clinical trials in patients with CKD-associated cachexia/wasting syndrome.

  20. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  1. [Chronic renal failure: what is the optimal diet?].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yimin; Vakilzadeh, Nima; Teta, Daniel

    2015-03-25

    The optimal diet for chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an issue frequently brought up by patients and/or their relatives during outpatient visits. For patients without malnutrition who are motivated and supported by an experienced multidisciplinary team, the optimal protein intake of 0,6 g/kg of ideal body weight/day is recommended to halt the progression of CKD. A calorie intake of 30 to 35 kcal/kg of ideal body weight/day is necessary to reduce the risk of malnutrition from a low protein diet and to maintain a neutral nitrogen balance. A low-salt diet, namely 5 to 6 g/d, is useful to optimize the treatment of hypertension associated with CKD and to limit fluid overload. At the advanced stage of CKD, it is also necessary to restrict the intake of phosphorus and sometimes potassium. Given the complexity of optimal renal diet, coordination between general practitioners, nephrologists and dietitians is essential to foster optimal care.

  2. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  3. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol. Renal in press) and in PKD (figure 1). 6    Figure 3...with SAA1 positive cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal, in press 6...survival and kidney function in diverse models of renal 5    Figure 2. The power of cytotherapy: When compared to no cell (C) groups, treatment of

  4. Impact of chronic renal failure on nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Maroni, B J

    1998-01-01

    Evidence indicates that both nephrotic and nonnephrotic chronic renal failure (CRF) patients can activate normal compensatory responses when dietary protein intake is restricted and that their protein and energy requirements are similar to normal subjects. When properly implemented, low-protein diets are safe and the benefits include the amelioration of uremic symptoms and some of their metabolic complications and possibly a reduction in the rate of progression of renal failure. To ensure dietary adequacy and compliance, patients should be monitored when treated with low-protein diets. Recent evidence that the protein intake of patients with progressive CRF declines when they consume unrestricted diets should not be considered as an argument against the use of low-protein diets. Rather, it is a persuasive argument in favor of restricting dietary protein intake to minimize the complications of renal failure.

  5. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , hepatitis B or hepatitis ... disease Crohn disease Erythropoietin test Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Osteomyelitis Rheumatic fever Ulcerative colitis Review Date 2/1/ ...

  6. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part II: specific underlying renal conditions.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The obstetric outcome in women with kidney disease has improved in recent years due to continuous progress in obstetrics and neonatology, as well as better medical management of hypertension and renal disease. However, every pregnancy in these women remains a high-risk pregnancy. When considering the interaction between renal disease and pregnancy, maternal outcomes are related to the initial level of renal dysfunction more than to the specific underlying disease. With regards to fetal outcomes, though, a distinction may exist between renal dysfunction resulting from primary renal disease and that in which renal involvement is part of a systemic disease. In part II of this review, some specific causes of renal failure affecting pregnancy are considered.

  7. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  8. Phosphorus management in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Finn, William F

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is an important public health problem, with an increasing number of patients worldwide. One important outcome of renal failure is disordered mineral metabolism, most notably involving calcium and phosphorus balance. Of importance is that increased serum phosphorus levels are associated with increased mortality rates. Despite dietary restrictions, patients receiving dialysis invariably experience hyperphosphatemia and require treatment with phosphate binders. Existing phosphate binders are effective in reducing serum phosphorus levels, but are associated with a number of important disadvantages. Lanthanum carbonate, a new noncalcium, nonaluminum phosphate binder, represents a promising treatment for hyperphosphatemia.

  9. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  10. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  11. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  12. The Primavera study protocol design: evaluating the effect of continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator (C.E.R.A.) on renal function in non-anemic patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fliser, D; Dellanna, F; Koch, M; Seufert, J; Witzke, O; Hauser, I A

    2011-11-01

    Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA) are widely used for hemoglobin correction in patients suffering from renal anemia. However, their beneficial non-hematopoietic effects on renal deterioration have not been adequately assessed. The Primavera study is the first prospective, controlled trial to assess whether ESA treatment could ameliorate progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in non-anemic patients. Primavera is a single-blind, 24-month trial in which patients are randomized to placebo or to C.E.R.A., a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator. Patients with type 2 diabetes or who have undergone kidney transplantation are eligible to enter the study if they have CKD stage III (estimated GFR [eGFR] 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥ 50 g/g and ≤ 1500 g/g, or total urine protein ≥ 50mg/24h and ≤ 1500mg/24h, and hemoglobin 11-14 g/dL. The primary efficacy endpoint is the change in eGFR from baseline to month 24. Secondary efficacy endpoints are the changes in UACR, serum cystatin C and serum creatinine from baseline. Safety endpoints include adverse events and discontinuation due to pre-specified adverse events. An interim analysis will be performed after all patients have completed the first year. The planned sample size is 400 patients (200 type 2 diabetics, 200 transplant recipients) conferring 90% power to detect a prespecified significant difference of 1.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in the annual reduction in eGFR between treatment groups. The results of Primavera are expected in 2013.

  13. Hypertension in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Skrzypczyk, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This review summarizes current data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of hypertension (HTN) in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Worldwide prevalence of ESRD ranges from 5.0 to 84.4 per million age-related population. HTN is present in 27-79% of children with ESRD, depending on the modality of renal replacement therapy and the exact definition of hypertension. Ambulatory BP monitoring has been recommended for the detection of HTN and evaluation of treatment effectiveness. HTN in dialyzed patients is mostly related to hypervolemia, sodium overload, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis, reduced vitamin D levels, and effects of microRNA. In children undergoing chronic dialysis therapy, important factors include optimization of renal replacement therapy and preservation of residual renal function, allowing reduction of volume- and sodium-overload, along with appropriate drug treatment, particularly with calcium channel blockers, RAAS inhibitors, and loop diuretics.

  14. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  15. Depressive Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Renal Insufficiency Undergoing Chronic Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Edith G.; Loza, Reyner; Vargas, Horacio; Jara, Mercedes F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive study, using the Birleson Scale to determine the frequency of depressive symptomatology in children and adolescents with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD). There were 67 patients (40 female and 27 male) with a mean age of 14.76 ± 2.71 years, duration of illness ≥3 months, 43 (64.18%) patients with CPD and 24 (35.82%) undergoing HD. The frequency of high occurrence, low occurrence, and absence of depressive symptomatology was 10.45% (n = 7), 43.28% (n = 29), and 46.27% (n = 31), respectively; all of the seven (100%) patients with high occurrence of depressive symptomatology were female (P = 0.04), and none of these (0%) had a friend to confide in (P = 0.03). Depressive symptomatology in patients with CPD was associated with a lower weekly Kt/V compared to those without depressive symptomatology (2.15 ± 0.68 versus 2.52 ± 0.65; P = 0.01). There was no association with patient age, caregiver, time and dialysis type, anemia, bone disease, nutritional or financial status, origin, schooling, or employment. PMID:21941654

  16. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  17. [Chronic kidney disease : What is currently available for treatment?

    PubMed

    Fleig, S; Patecki, M; Schmitt, R

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in the general population with an estimated prevalence of roughly 2 million in Germany. Typically, chronic kidney disease is progressive and in the terminal stage the patients require dialysis or kidney transplantation. In many cases the disease remains silent for a long time but early stages are already associated with increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore early detection is very important. In recent years several new concepts have been introduced that might help to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease or improve the accompanying risks. Here, we want to provide a nephrologist's perspective on the current guidelines for the treatment and prevention of chronic kidney disease. We summarize which diagnostic approaches are useful for general practitioners and we take a pragmatic look at the existing opportunities for combating renal functional decline. We also shed light on established measures to minimize the risk of comorbidities.

  18. Diagnosing and treating renal disease in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is mostly related to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), precipitated by either an acute disturbance of hemodynamics, or acute structural damage to the kidneys. The incidence of chronic renal failure is rising, due to increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, viral hepatitis, which can be associated with renal damage. AKI is defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dL in <48 hours or by 50% from baseline within the past 3 months without setting a threshold for the final serum creatinine. Stages 1, 2, and 3 of AKI are defined as 150%, 200% and 300% of baseline serum creatinine respectively, which allows for assessment of AKI progression. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min for >3 months. Treatment of AKI consists of removal of precipitating factors and replenishment of the intravascular volume using colloids such as albumin. Frequently, AKI can be reversed using these measures alone. Non-responders to removal of precipitating factors and volume challenge can receive vasoconstrictors such as terlipressin or norepinephrine together with albumin. Midodrine is inferior in efficacy as a vasoconstrictor when compared to terlipressin. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome with liver failure. Delay in receiving a liver transplant can result in non-recovery of renal function post transplant. Treatment of CKD in cirrhosis is unsatisfactory, mostly aimed at optimizing management of comorbid conditions, or treating the underlying refractory ascites in patients with type 2 hepatorenal syndrome.

  19. Coping strategies utilized by adolescents with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Snethen, Julia A; Broome, Marion E; Kelber, Sheryl; Warady, Bradley A

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents with end stage renal disease (ESRD) require life-long treatment. The purpose of this descriptive investigation was to identify coping strategies that adolescents with ESRD use to manage their chronic illness. Participants for this investigation were 35 adolescents, 13-18 years of age, with ESRD. The A-COPE survey instrument was used in a clinical and camp setting to measure the coping strategies used by adolescents with ESRD. Analyses revealed that adolescents with ESRD utilized a variety of coping strategies to manage the stresses of living with their chronic condition. Personal characteristics of gender, transplant status, age, and religious views were significantly related to the coping strategies the adolescents reported using.

  20. Pregnancy in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle; Hercz, Adam Engel; Keunen, Johannes; Chan, Christopher; Pierratos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The ovulatory menstrual cycle is known to be affected on multiple levels in women with advanced renal disease. Menstrual irregularities, sexual dysfunction, and infertility worsen in parallel with the renal disease. Pregnancy in women with ESRD on dialysis is therefore uncommon. Furthermore, when pregnancy does occur, it can prove hazardous to both mother and baby owing to a multitude of potential complications including accelerated hypertension and preeclampsia, poor fetal growth, anemia, and polyhydramnios. Data are emerging, however, to suggest that pregnancy while on intensified renal replacement regimens may result in better pregnancy outcomes, and emerging trends include the decreased rate of therapeutic abortions probably reflecting a change in counseling practices over time. Nevertheless, a pregnant woman on intensive dialysis requires meticulous follow-up by a dedicated team including nephrology, obstetrics, and a full multidisciplinary staff. In this article, we will address fertility issues in young women with ESRD, review pregnancy outcomes in women on both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and provide suggestions for the management of the pregnant women on intensive hemodialysis.

  1. Angiogenic factors and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Julie S; Young, Brett C; Rana, Sarosh

    2011-01-01

    Background. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in patients with underlying renal disease and proteinuria. Prior studies show that there is an angiogenic factor imbalance with elevated levels of antiangiogenic proteins soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and soluble endoglin (sEng) and reduced levels of the proangiogenic protein, placental growth factor (PlGF) in women with preeclampsia. These angiogenic biomarkers may be useful in distinguishing preeclampsia from other conditions of pregnancy, which may present with overlapping clinical characteristics. Cases. Case 1: A multiparous woman at 18 weeks gestation with nephrotic syndrome presented with hypertensive emergency and worsening renal insufficiency. She underwent induction of labor for severe preeclampsia. Her sFlt1 and sEng levels were at the 97 percentile while her PlGF level was undetectable (less than the 1st percentile). Case 2: A nulliparous woman with lupus nephritis at 22 weeks gestation presented with fetal demise and heart failure. Three weeks previously, the patient had developed thrombocytopenia and hypertensive urgency. She underwent dilation and evacuation. Her angiogenic profile was consistent with severe preeclampsia. Conclusion. Angiogenic factors may provide evidence to support a diagnosis of preeclampsia in patients with preexisting renal disease and proteinuria, conditions in which the classical definition of hypertension and proteinuria cannot be used.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, D; Tiwari, S C

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is fast becoming a bane for the present civilization, as a result of sedentary lifestyle, atherogenic diet, and a susceptible thrifty genotype. The concept of metabolic syndrome, which is a constellation of metabolic disturbances, has crystallized over the last 80 years with the aim of identifying those at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These patients have visceral obesity and insulin resistance characterized by hypertyriglyceridemia. Recently, it has been realized that they are also at an increased risk of chronic renal disease. Release of adipocytokines leads to endothelial dysfunction. There is also activation of systemic and local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress, and impaired fibrinolysis. This leads to glomerular hyperfiltration, proteinuria, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and ultimately end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Treatment consists of lifestyle modifications along with optimal control of blood pressure, blood sugar and lipids. Metformin and thiazolidenidiones reduce insulin resistance; while angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers reduce proteinuria and have a renoprotective effect. Exciting new medical therapies on the horizon include rimonabant a cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, soy proteins, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity has also been shown to be effective in treating metabolic syndrome.

  3. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-03-22

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD.

  4. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  5. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-10

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease causes a slow loss of kidney function over time and can even- tually lead to End Stage Renal Disease, where a patient must...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chronic kidney disease causes a slow...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 1 Introduction It is estimated that 31 million Americans have chronic kidney disease ( CKD

  6. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progresses, specific histologic disturbances in the bone develop, which may or may not be predictable from the biochemical and hormonal changes that are associated with chronic kidney disease. In addition, patients may have had underlying bone disease before developing kidney failure or may have been treated with agents that will alter the classical pathologic findings of the bones in chronic kidney disease and their relation to parathyroid hormone. Thus, in stage 5 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy with quantitative histomorphometric analysis is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. In contrast to stage 5 chronic kidney disease, there are very few data on the histologic changes in bone in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. There also is no adequate information on the etiopathogenesis of bone disease in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. Thus, because biochemical data cannot predict bone pathology in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy should be used to define these bone changes and to allow appropriate therapeutic approaches. PMID:18988703

  7. Treatment of chronic periodontitis decreases serum prohepcidin levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Eduardo Machado; Bastos, Jessica Amaral; Fernandes, Natalia; Ferreira, Ana Paula; Chaoubah, Alfredo; Bastos, Marcus Gomes

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of periodontal treatment on serum levels of prohepcidin (the prohormone of hepcidin) and systemic inflammation markers, as well as correlations among these markers, in patients with chronic periodontitis and chronic kidney disease who were not undergoing dialysis. METHODS: We included 56 chronic periodontitis patients, 36 with chronic kidney disease and 20 without systemic diseases and with normal renal function (control group). Chronic kidney disease was defined as suggested by the clinical practice guidelines in the National Kidney Foundation. Chronic periodontitis was defined through clinical attachment level and by probing pocket depth, according to the American Association of Periodontology. The inflammatory markers ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and prohepcidin were evaluated before and 3 months after periodontal treatment. RESULTS: The efficacy of periodontal treatment was confirmed by the improvement in clinical parameters of chronic periodontitis in the control and chronic kidney disease groups. Periodontal treatment resulted in significant reductions in ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and serum prohepcidin levels in both groups. Moreover, in multivariate linear regression, the reduction in prohepcidin after periodontal treatment was significantly and independently associated with interleukin-6 levels in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: By inducing a decline in the systemic inflammatory response and a decrease in serum prohepcidin, successful periodontal treatment may represent an important means of ameliorating the inflammatory burden seen in patients with chronic kidney disease. Trial registration: ISRCTN59866656. PMID:21655762

  8. [Renal artery stenosis : atheromatous disease and fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    Renal artery stenosis may be due to atheromatous disease or renal fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). Management of both diseases requires treatment of hypertension usually observed in such patients; however, clinical presentation, mechanism and treatment of these 2 diseases are usually different. Renal FMD is now considered as a systemic disease, the cause of which may be genetic (although the exact cause is still elusive). Renal arteries are the most frequent localizations of FMD, but extra renal arteries may also be involved (usually carotid arteries). Risk factors of hypertension-induced renal FMD include estrogen treatment and smoking. Renal FMD are mostly found in young women and in children who present with recent severe and/or refractory symptomatic hypertension. Diagnosis is usually easy (Doppler, CT-scan), and treatment of renal FMD is angioplasty in most cases. Atheromatous renal artery stenosis is usually found in patients with other atheromatous disease (peripheral artery disease, carotid, coronary artery disease...). Clinical presentation include severe or refractory hypertension, recurrent flash pulmonary edema in a patient with hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction spontaneously or after medical treatment with converting-enzyme inhibition or angiotensin II blockade, hypertension in a patient (usually smoker or ex-smoker) with diffuse atheromatous vascular disease. Management of atheromatous renal artery disease is medical treatment in all patients (aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, control of arterial pressure); revascularization is required in some patients only since it rarely cures hypertension: the goal of revascularization is mostly renal function protection, which may be observed in selected patients. Revascularization must be decided by physicians or teams involved in the care of such patients. Patients with atheromatous renal artery disease are at very high renal and cardiovascular risk : aggressive management of

  9. Plasmapheresis as preconditioning protocol in an extremely high titer ABO incompatible renal transplant (ABOiRTx) case: A new prospect for chronic kidney disease patients in India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prashant; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Dixit, Surbhi; Raina, Vimarsh

    2013-08-01

    The biggest hurdle in renal transplantation is the ABO blood group system. But recently ABO incompatible renal transplants have been performed using plasmapheresis (PP) as a part of the preconditioning protocol. In the present study, the objective of PP along with immunosuppression was to bring down the antibody titer of the patient to ≤ 16 during the transplant and keep it low, around 32, until post-operative 4-14 weeks. The patient (O Negative) had his mother (B Positive) as the ABO non-identical donor. The PP was performed with an apheresis equipment Com.Tec (Fresenius Kabi, Germany) to lower the anti-B antibody titer in the recipient. An Antihuman globulin (AHG) titer was performed for anti-B antibody following the departmental standard operating procedure. A total of 11 plasmapheresis procedures was performed preoperatively and four procedures were performed post-operatively to maintain the titer of the anti-B antibody at or below the desired level. The baseline anti-B antibody titer in the recipient was 512. The baseline titer came down to 8 after the end of the 11th procedure. Post-operatively we performed four plasmapheresis procedures to keep the titer at 32. During the post-operative follow up the titer has been maintained at 32 and the serum creatinine level has been maintained at approximately 1.0mg/dl and other parameters relevant to graft function were within normal limits. Our case could be the first reported case from India in which we used a plasmapheresis procedure as a part of preconditioning protocol instead of using an immunoadsorption column. Furthermore, it could be one of the few ABOiRTx cases, which has been performed at an isoagglutinin titer of 512 using plasma exchange as part of a preconditioning regime.

  10. [Immunological features of renal lesion in chronic alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, N S; Beloborodova, E I

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and sixty males whose mean age was 42 years were examined. Of them there were 122 patients with stage II chronic alcoholism (CA), 92 with renal lesion following the type of chronic glomerulonephritis (CG) (Group 1); 30 patients with CA without renal lesion (Group 2), and 42 patients had CG alone (Group 3). Methods that characterize humoral immunity were used. These included detection of circulating immune complexes (CIC) by polyethylene glycol precipitation, measurement of the concentrations of IgA, IgM, and IgG by the Mancini radial immunodiffusion assay, detection DNA antibodies by the Farre test modified by V. V. Koshelev, that of serum anticomplement activity, measurement of the levels of complement by its hemolytic activity, determination of the activity of the lysosomal enzymes acid RNAase, acid DNAase, and cathepsin by the procedure of A. A. Pokrovsky et al. Complex estimation of the content of CIC, immunoglobulins, DNA antibodies and the activity of the lysosomal enzymes in patients with renal lesion makes it possible to evaluate the severity of a pathological process and to make its prognosis.

  11. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  12. The chronic enteropathogenic disease schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Olveda, David U; Olveda, Remigio M; McManus, Donald P; Cai, Pengfei; Chau, Thao N P; Lam, Alfred K; Li, Yuesheng; Harn, Donald A; Vinluan, Marilyn L; Ross, Allen G P

    2014-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic enteropathogenic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. The disease afflicts approximately 240 million individuals globally, causing approximately 70 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Chronic infections with morbidity and mortality occur as a result of granuloma formation in the intestine, liver, or in the case of Schistosoma haematobium, the bladder. Various methods are utilized to diagnose and evaluate liver fibrosis due to schistosomiasis. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard, but it is invasive. Diagnostic imaging has proven to be an invaluable method in assessing hepatic morbidity in the hospital setting, but has practical limitations in the field. The potential of non-invasive biological markers, serum antibodies, cytokines, and circulating host microRNAs to diagnose hepatic fibrosis is presently undergoing evaluation. This review provides an update on the recent advances made with respect to gastrointestinal disease associated with chronic schistosomiasis.

  13. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  14. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of the following ...

  15. Risk Factors for Renal Functional Decline in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Receiving Oral Antiviral Agents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Kwon, Hee Jin; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Lee, Jung Eun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Huh, Wooseong; Jung, Sin-Ho; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Oh, Ha Young

    2016-01-01

    Renal functional decline that is frequently seen during chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatment can exert adverse effects on overall prognosis. It, however, is difficult to distinguish vulnerable patients who may experience renal dysfunction because most previous CHB studies were conducted in relatively healthy individuals. In this retrospective observational study, renal functional decline in CHB patients receiving oral antiviral agents for more than 6 months was analyzed and risk factors of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression were determined. Renal functional decline was defined when the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased by more than 25% from baseline and rapid CKD progression was defined as eGFR decreased by more than 5 mL/min/1.73 m2/y among patients who experienced renal functional decline. A total of 4178 patients were followed up for a median 23 months. Antiviral agents included lamivudine (17.0%), adefovir (3.7%), entecavir (70.4%), telbivudine (0.6%), tenofovir (4.0%), or clevudine (4.3%). Renal functional decline occurred in 706 (16.9%) patients. Based on multivariate Cox regression analysis, age, hypertension, diabetes, history of liver or kidney transplantation, underlying underlying CKD, and simultaneous administration of diuretics increased the hazard ratio for renal functional decline; however, clevudine reduced risk. The eGFR significantly increased over time in patients receiving telbivudine or clevudine compared with lamivudine. Among the 3175 patients followed up for more than 1 year, 407 (12.8%) patients experienced rapid CKD progression. Patients with rapid CKD progression showed lower serum albumin, higher total bilirubin, and prolonged prothrombin time compared with patients with stable renal function, but hepatitis B envelope antigen positivity and hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid level did not differ between the control and rapid CKD progression groups. Age, diabetes, kidney transplantation, underlying CKD, and

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process. PMID:22829845

  17. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  18. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure.

  19. Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida ) modulates hyperphosphatemia in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Katai, Kanako; Iwamoto, Aya; Kimura, Yuka; Oshima, Yuki; Arioka, Saori; Morimi, Yuki; Omuro, Ayaka; Nakasa, Teruko

    2015-01-01

    In chronic renal failure, inorganic phosphate (Pi) retention speeds up the progression to end-stage renal disease. The current therapy for hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic renal failure consists of dietary Pi restriction combined with administration of Pi binders, but each therapy has practical problems. Thus, the discovery of foods or nutrients that inhibit Pi absorption may be useful for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. In the present study, we investigated whether wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) is a useful food for the prevention of hyperphosphatemia in a rat model of renal failure. Feeding a diet containing 5% wakame significantly decreased plasma and urinary Pi levels and increased the amount of fecal Pi. In addition, wakame significantly reduced plasma blood urea nitrogen and plasma Pi levels in 5/6 nephrectomized rats fed a high-Pi diet. Biochemical analyses showed that the reduction of intestinal Pi absorption is the main reason for the decrease in plasma Pi levels in rats fed a diet containing wakame. In addition, feeding alginic acid and fucoidan, major components of wakame fiber, was effective in reducing plasma Pi levels in normal rats. Finally, we concluded that wakame may be a useful food for the prevention of hyperphosphatemia in rodents.

  20. [Lithium and chronic kidney disease: a pathology which remains relevant].

    PubMed

    Félix, Paula; Stoermann-Chopard, Catherine; Martin, Pierre-Yves

    2010-03-03

    Lithium continues to be the standard for acute and maintenance treatment of bipolar mood disorders despite the availability of alternative agents. Lithium has a narrow therapeutic index and can result in considerable toxicity. Acute renal intoxication is well-known but chronic kidney disease should be in each doctor's mind. The main manifestations are nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and tubulointerstitial nephritis. For NDI, the potassium sparing diuretic amiloride or a thiazide diuretic can improve polyuria. Lithium-induced ESRD in chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis is not uncommon and more prevalent (> 1% among long-term lithium patients) than previously thought. The risk of renal failure may persist even after lithium discontinuation. Additional kidney manifestations of lithium exposure include renal tubular acidosis and hypercalcemia.

  1. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  2. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  3. Analysis of data from the ERA-EDTA Registry indicates that conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease do not reduce the need for renal replacement therapy in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther; Orskov, Bjarne; Wanner, Christoph; Caskey, Fergus; Collart, Frederic; Finne, Patrik; Fogarty, Damian G; Groothoff, Jaap W; Hoitsma, Andries; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Postorino, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Zurriaga, Oscar; Jager, Kitty J; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a major cause of end-stage kidney failure, but is often identified early and therefore amenable to timely treatment. Interventions known to postpone the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in non-ADPKD patients have also been tested in ADPKD patients, but with inconclusive results. To help resolve this we determined changes in RRT incidence rates as an indicator for increasing effective renoprotection over time in ADPKD. We analyzed data from the European Renal Association-European Dialyses and Transplant Association Registry on 315,444 patients starting RRT in 12 European countries between 1991 and 2010, grouped into four 5-year periods. Of them, 20,596 were due to ADPKD. Between the first and last period the mean age at onset of RRT increased from 56.6 to 58.0 years. The age- and gender-adjusted incidence rate of RRT for ADPKD increased slightly over the four periods from 7.6 to 8.3 per million population. No change over time was found in the incidence of RRT for ADPKD up to age 50, whereas in recent time periods the incidence in patients above the age of 70 clearly increased. Among countries there was a significant positive association between RRT take-on rates for non-ADPKD kidney disease and ADPKD. Thus, the increased age at onset of RRT is most likely due to an increased access for elderly ADPKD patients or lower competing risk prior to the start of RRT rather than the consequence of effective emerging renoprotective treatments for ADPKD.

  4. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  5. Effect of 2'-phosphophloretin on renal function in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Peerce, B E; Weaver, L; Clarke, R D

    2004-07-01

    Hyperhosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism are common and severe complications of chronic renal failure. Therapies to reduce serum phosphate have been shown to reduce serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and slow the progression of renal failure. The effect of the inhibitor of intestinal phosphate absorption, 2'-phosphophloretin (2'-PP), on serum and urine chemistry, renal histology, and cardiac structure in the uremic rat model of renal failure, 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 NX), was examined. The effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate, serum PTH, serum total Ca(2+), and ionized Ca(2+), Ca(2+) x P(i) product, urine protein, urine osmolality, and creatinine clearance in 5/6 NX rats was examined. Uremic rats in chronic renal failure were gavaged daily with 25 microM 2'-PP. Over the course of a 5-wk experiment, serum chemistry in untreated uremic rats, 2'-PP-treated uremic rats, and age-matched control rats with normal renal function was determined twice a week. Urine creatinine, urine osmolality, urine phosphate, and urine protein were determined once a week from 24-h collections. 2'-PP reduced serum phosphate 40 +/- 3% compared with a 17% increase in untreated uremic control rats. 2'-PP did not alter total serum Ca(2+). During 5-wk experiments, serum PTH increased 65 +/- 25% in untreated uremic rats and decreased 70 +/- 7% in uremic rats treated with 25 microM 2'-PP. Creatinine clearance decreased 20% in untreated uremic rats compared with a 100% increase in 2'-PP-treated uremic rats. Urine protein decreased and urine osmolality increased in uremic rats treated with 2'-PP. The mechanism of the effect of 2'-PP on serum phosphate was inhibition of intestinal phosphate absorption. 2-PP inhibited intestinal phosphate absorption 50% without altering dietary protein absorption or intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Over the course of the 5-wk treatment with 2'-PP, uremic animals treated with 2'-PP had a 2-4% weight gain/wk, similar to the weight gain seen in age-matched control rats

  6. [ADPKD: predictors of Renal Disease progression].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Dallera, Nadia; Saletti, Arianna; Terlizzi, Vincenzo; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Factors predicting rapid progression of kidney disease in ADPKD can be divided into genetic (non-modifiable) and clinical (modifiable) risk factors. Patients harbouring PKD1 mutations, in particular if truncating, have a more severe form of ADPKD. Clinical risk factors include decrease in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow at a young age; high total kidney volume; hypertension and urological complications <35 years; albuminuria/proteinuria. The renal disease is also more severe in males and in subjects with family history of ESRD <55 years. In recent years, two models for predicting progression in ADPKD have been published: the Mayo model, based on height-adjusted TKV, age and eGFR, and the Brest model, based on PKD gene mutation type, gender, and early onset of hypertension and urological complications. With the emergence of new disease-modifying therapies, prediction tools are essential. However, the high variability in ADPKD makes the predicting models difficult to apply on an individual patient basis. Thus, the above-mentioned predicting models should be viewed as complimentary to clinical evaluation and follow-up. In the future, an individual risk score linking genetic, imaging and clinical data might prove the most accurate way of predicting long-term outcome.

  7. The association of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Eddington, Helen; Kalra, Philip A

    2010-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a multifaceted definition used to help describe the systemic derangement of mineral bone metabolism in renal disease. This was previously referred to, rather simplistically, as 'renal osteodystrophy' or 'renal bone disease'. In this review, we will try to show the evidence relating these factors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and give some evidence as to the mechanisms for this. The treatments used for this condition are also integral to the increased cardiovascular mortality seen in renal patients and a summary of these effects will also be covered.

  8. The large spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Sheila; Pascual, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) among diabetic patients seems to be overestimated. Recent studies with renal biopsies show that the incidence of non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) among diabetic patients is higher than expected. Renal impairment of diabetic patients is frequently attributed to DN without meeting the KDOQI criteria or performing renal biopsy to exclude NDN. In this editorial, we update the spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients and the impact on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

  9. QTc interval in children with chronic renal failure and with renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Berg, Gerre; Makker, Sudesh P

    2002-01-01

    Prolongation of the QTc interval, a risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias, has been observed in adult hemodialysis patients; there are few data on the QTc interval in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) and following renal transplantation (Tx). The purpose of our study was to determine the QTc interval in children with CRF and post renal Tx. Twenty children with CRF and 16 children with renal Tx who were followed at the University of California, Davis, underwent prospective EKG monitoring. The mean QTc interval in the CRF and post-Tx cohorts was normal at 407.9 ms and 408.2 ms, respectively. None of the children with CRF had QTc prolongation. Two Tx recipients had QTc prolongation; both had cardiac dilatation on echocardiography (ECHO). There was no correlation between the QTc interval and the creatinine clearance in either group. However, a significant correlation was noted between QTc prolongation and cardiac dilatation on ECHO in the Tx group (P=0.02, Fisher's exact test). In conclusion, QTc prolongation is uncommon in children with CRF and following Tx, in the absence of cardiac dilatation. However, caution is still needed before prescribing medications known to cause QTc prolongation.

  10. Etiology and outcome of chronic renal failure in hospitalized children in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Mong Hiep, Tran Thi; Janssen, Françoise; Ismaili, Khalid; Khai Minh, Dang; Vuong Kiet, Doan; Robert, Annie

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and treatment modalities and to determine mortality risks in hospitalized children with chronic renal failure (CRF) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We reviewed the records of 310 children with CRF hospitalized in Ho Chi Minh City from January 2001 to December 2005. The average annual number cases was 4.8 per million child population native to Ho Chi Minh City. Median age was 14 years; 85% of patients were in end-stage renal failure. Associated illnesses were anemia (96%), hypertension (74%), and cardiopulmonary diseases (39%). Causes of included glomerulonephritis (30%) and congenital/hereditary anomalies (20%), but in 50% of children, the etiology was unavailable. Seventy-three percent of cases with end-stage renal failure did not benefit from renal replacement therapy. During hospitalization, 47 patients (15%) died. Mortality risks were higher in young children (1-4 years), in boys, and in patients with acquired pathologies. Severe metabolic acidosis was the main predictive factor of mortality by multivariate regression analysis. Our data shows a poor outcome due to late referral and limited facilities for renal replacement therapy in children with CRF hospitalized in Ho Chi Minh City.

  11. Therapeutic camping for children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Warady, B A

    1994-06-01

    Therapeutic camping experiences for children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have proliferated in the United States and abroad. This report is based on the results of a survey designed to accumulate data on the development and implementation of 20 such camps. Children attending camp ranged in age from 1 year to 19 years. Single disease-specific camps were most common, while camps for children with a variety of chronic illnesses, including ESRD, and mainstream camps were also conducted. Facilities were available for hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, but not automated peritoneal dialysis, in the majority of surveyed camps. Dialysis nurses, pediatric nephrologists, dietitians and social workers were the medical personnel that most frequently participated in the camps. On average, 32 dialysis/transplant patient campers (range 6-100) attended camp for a 1-week session. Therapeutic camping experiences for children with ESRD are extremely successful and attempts to increase the availability of similar camps should be encouraged.

  12. Effects of chronic lithium administration on renal acid excretion in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Leader, John P.; Bedford, Jennifer J.; Verlander, Jill W.; Ellis, Gaye; Kalita, Priyakshi; Vos, Frederiek; de Jong, Sylvia; Walker, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lithium therapy's most common side effects affecting the kidney are nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and chronic kidney disease. Lithium may also induce a distal renal tubular acidosis. This study investigated the effect of chronic lithium exposure on renal acid–base homeostasis, with emphasis on ammonia and citrate excretion. We compared 11 individuals on long‐term lithium therapy with six healthy individuals. Under basal conditions, lithium‐treated individuals excreted significantly more urinary ammonia than did control subjects. Following an acute acid load, urinary ammonia excretion increased approximately twofold above basal rates in both lithium‐treated and control humans. There were no significant differences between lithium‐treated and control subjects in urinary pH or urinary citrate excretion. To elucidate possible mechanisms, rats were randomized to diets containing lithium or regular diet for 6 months. Similar to humans, basal ammonia excretion was significantly higher in lithium‐treated rats; in addition, urinary citrate excretion was also significantly greater. There were no differences in urinary pH. Expression of the critical ammonia transporter, Rhesus C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), was substantially greater in lithium‐treated rats than in control rats. We conclude that chronic lithium exposure increases renal ammonia excretion through mechanisms independent of urinary pH and likely to involve increased collecting duct ammonia secretion via the ammonia transporter, Rhcg. PMID:25501430

  13. Low expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in chronic kidney disease in young dogs.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akira; Miyazaki, Akiko; Ichii, Osamu; Kohyama, Moeko; Sawa, Mariko; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) often results in end-stage renal failure in young dogs; however, the pathogenesis of this disease is not established. This study investigated renal expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 proteins in three dogs with chronic kidney disease by immunohistochemistry. Histopathology showed asynchronous differentiation of renal tissues, including immature glomeruli. COX-1 signals were not detected in diseased or normal kidneys. COX-2 signals were low or undetectable in diseased kidneys, while normal kidneys showed clear positive signals in the macula densa (MD). Quantitative scores of COX-2 in diseased kidneys were significantly lower than those in normal kidneys. These findings demonstrate low renal COX-2 expression in CKD in young dogs, but whether this is correlated with disease pathogenesis remains unclear.

  14. Epidemiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L; Evans, C; Fowkes, F G R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic venous disease of the legs occurs commonly in the general population in the Western world. Estimates of the prevalence of varicose veins vary widely from 2-56% in men and from 1-60% in women. These variations reflect differences in variability of study populations including age, race and gender, methods of measurement and disease definition. Definitions of chronic venous disease may rely on reports of varicose veins by study participants, based on self-diagnosis or recall of a diagnosis, or on a standardized physical examination. Venous ulceration is less common, affecting approximately 0.3% of the adult population. Age and pregnancy have been established as risk factors for developing varicose veins. Evidence on other risk factors for venous disease is inconclusive. Prolonged standing has been proposed, but results of studies should be interpreted with caution given the difficulty in measuring levels of posture. Obesity has been suggested as a risk factor in women, but appears to be an aggravating factor rather than a primary cause. Other postulated risk factors include dietary intake and smoking, but evidence is lacking. Longitudinal studies using standardized methods of evaluation are required before the true incidence of chronic venous disease and associated risk factors can be determined.

  15. Chronic renal failure with gout: a marker of chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Craswell, P.W.; Price, J.; Boyle, P.D.; Heazlewood, V.J.; Baddeley, H.; Lloyd, H.M.; Thomas, B.J.; Thomas, B.W.

    1984-09-01

    EDTA (calcium disodium edetate) lead mobilization and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) finger bone lead tests were done in 42 patients with chronic renal failure and without persisting lead intoxication. Nineteen of 23 patients with gout and 8 of 19 without gout had positive EDTA lead mobilization tests. Those patients with gout excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than those without gout. In the gout group 17 patients denied any childhood or industrial exposure to lead. They had a greater number of positive tests and excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than 14 patients with neither gout nor lead exposure. These results confirm that gout in the presence of chronic renal failure is a useful marker of chronic lead poisoning. Of 27 patients with positive lead mobilization tests, only 13 had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (sensitivity 48%). Three of 15 patients with negative lead mobilization tests had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (specificity 80%). Although the XRF finger bone lead test is a convenient noninvasive addition to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with chronic renal failure and gout, its application is limited due to the lack of sensitivity of the method.

  16. Renal Toxicogenomic Response to Chronic Uranyl Nitrate Insult in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taulan, Magali; Paquet, François; Maubert, Christophe; Delissen, Olivia; Demaille, Jacques; Romey, Marie-Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Although the nephrotoxicity of uranium has been established through numerous animal studies, relatively little is known about the effects of long-term environmental uranium exposure. Using a combination of conventional biochemical studies and serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), we examined the renal responses to uranyl nitrate (UN) chronic exposure. Renal uranium levels were significantly increased 4 months after ingestion of uranium in drinking water. Creatinine levels in serum were slightly but significantly increased compared with those in controls. Although no further significant differences in other parameters were noted, substantial molecular changes were observed in toxicogenomic profiles. UN induced dramatic alterations in expression levels of more than 200 genes, mainly up-regulated, including oxidative-response–related genes, genes encoding for cellular metabolism, ribosomal proteins, signal transduction, and solute transporters. Seven differentially expressed transcripts were confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, significantly increased peroxide levels support the implication of oxidative stress in UN toxicant response. This report highlights the potential of SAGE for the discovery of novel toxicant-induced gene expression alterations. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive view of renal molecular events after uranium long-term exposure. PMID:15598614

  17. CUBN as a Novel Locus for End-Stage Renal Disease: Insights from Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8–9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys – graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  18. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature.

  19. Long-term course and mechanisms of progression of renal disease in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Horatio A

    2005-08-01

    In the classic form of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with toxins of gram-negative enterobacteria, mortality in the acute stage has been lower than 5% since 1978 (data from the Nephrology Committee, Argentine Society of Pediatrics). Children usually die because of severe involvement of the central nervous system, intestine, or myocardium and its complications, or because of intercurrent infection. Treatment in this phase is supportive, and efforts should be put into prevention of infection by Shiga-like toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Of the 95% who survive, approximately one third is at risk for having chronic sequelae. Motor, sensory, or intellectual deficits, intestinal strictures, myocardial infarctions, or diabetes are infrequent. The more-frequent chronic renal lesion is characterized by the hyperfunction of nephrons remaining after the acute necrotizing lesion, which leads to progressive scarring, and not by persistence or recurrence of the microangiopathic process. Three courses of progression to end-stage renal failure have been described. Children with most severe forms do not recover from acute renal failure and enter directly into a dialysis and transplantation program. A second group recovers renal function partially, with persistent proteinuria and frequently hypertension; progression to end-stage renal failure occurs in 2 to 5 years. The third group may recover normal serum creatinine and creatinine clearance, with persistent proteinuria. They are at risk of progressing to chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease after more than 5 years, and sometimes as late as 20 years, after the acute disease. Treatment should aim at preventing the mechanisms associated with progressive renal scarring. Transplantation is indicated in this form of hemolytic uremic syndrome, because there is little, if any, risk of recurrence, and the prognosis is similar to that of transplantation for other diseases.

  20. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described.

  1. Applications of urinary proteomics in renal disease research using animal models.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of renal disease are essential tools in research on kidney disease and have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis. Use of animal models minimises inter-individual differences, allows specific pathological changes to be examined, and facilitates collection of tissue samples. Thus, mechanistic research and identification of biomarkers are possible. Various animal models manifesting specific pathological lesions can be used to investigate acute or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urine, a terminal metabolic product, is produced via glomerular filtration, reabsorption, and excretion in the tubular and collecting ducts, reflecting the functions of glomeruli or tubular tissue stimulated in various ways or subject to disease. Almost 70 % of urinary proteins originate from the kidney (the other 30 % come from plasma), and urinary sampling is important to noninvasively detect renal disease. Proteomics is powerful when used to screen urine components. Increasingly, urine proteomics is used to explore the pathogenesis of kidney disease in animals and to identify novel biomarkers of renal disease. In this section, we will introduce the field of urinary proteomics as applied in different models of animal renal disease and the valuable role played by proteomics in noninvasive diagnosis and rational treatment of human renal disease.

  2. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD) is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients. PMID:28251162

  3. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  4. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  5. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  6. Chronic kidney disease and its prevention in India.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjay K

    2005-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important, chronic, noncommunicable disease epidemic that affects the world, including India. Because of the absence of a renal registry in India, the true magnitude of CKD/end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Two community-based studies, although methodologically different, have shown a prevalence of chronic renal failure of 0.16% and 0.79%. The cost of maintenance hemodialysis for a single session varies between 10 US dollars to 40 between government-run and private hospitals. The average cost of erythropoetin is approximately 150 US dollars to 200 per month. The cost of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis with "Y" set at 3 exchanges per week, which most patients in India do, is US 400 US dollars per month. The cost of a renal transplant (RT) procedure is approximately US 700 US dollars to 800 in the government sector and 6000 US dollars in the private sector. The cost of immunosuppression with basic triple immunosuppression drugs (cyclosporine, steroid, and azathioprin) is US 250 US dollars per month. There are hardly any state-funded medical treatment and medical insurance facilities for CKD and ESRD patients in India. India has nearly 700 nephrologists and approximately 400 dialysis units with 1000 dialysis stations, with the majority being in the private sector. A maximum of 2% of patients can be subjected to maintenance hemodialysis. Until now, approximately 3000 patients have been initiated on chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. India has approximately 100 RT centers, mostly in private setup, and not more than 3000 to 4000 RTs are performed annually. Thus, only 3% to 5% of all patients with ESRD in India get some form of renal replacement therapy. Thus, planning for prevention of CKD on a long-term basis is the only practical solution for India. It appears that even in India, diabetes and hypertension are responsible for 40% to 50% of all cases of chronic renal failure. Screening for these 2 diseases and CKD

  7. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  8. Vouchers for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer J; Segal, Leonie

    2008-08-01

    This paper explores the economic implications of vouchers for chronic disease management with respect to achieving objectives of equity and efficiency. Vouchers as a payment policy instrument for health care services have a set of properties that suggest they may address both demand-side and supply-side issues, and contribute to equity and efficiency. They provide a means whereby health care services can be targeted at selected groups, enabling consumer choice of provider, and encouraging competition in the supply of health services. This analysis suggests that, when structured appropriately, vouchers can support consumers to choose services that will meet their health care needs and encourage competition among providers. Although they may not be appropriate across the entire health care system, there are features of vouchers that make them a potentially attractive option, especially for the management of chronic disease.

  9. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-04-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation ( r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease ( r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients.

  10. GSPE Inhibits HMGB1 Release, Attenuating Renal IR-Induced Acute Renal Injury and Chronic Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Juan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Conghui; Zhang, Chunxiu; Li, Yueqiang; Zhang, Ying; Chang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Qiaodan; Yao, Ying; Liu, Yanyan; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanindin extract (GSPE) is a polyphenolic bioflavonoid derived from grape seeds and has been widely studied for its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. HMGB1 is a newly discovered danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) that has potent proinflammatory effects once released by necrotic cells. However, the effect of GSPE on the HMGB1, and the relationship of those two with acute kidney injury and chronic kidney fibrosis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the impact of GSPE on acute kidney injury and chronic fibrosis. C57bl/6 mice were subjected to bilateral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and unilateral I/R with or without GSPE administration. After bilateral I/R, mice administered GSPE had a marked improvement in renal function (BUN and Cr), decreased pathological damage and reduced inflammation. In unilateral I/R, mice subjected GSPE showed reduced tubulointerstitial fibrosis and decreased inflammatory reaction. The renoprotection of GSPE on both models was associated with the inhibition of HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and release, which can amplify the inflammation through binding to its downstream receptor TLR4 and facilitated P65 transcription. Thus, we have reason to believe that GSPE could be a good alternative therapy for the prevention and treatment of IR-induced renal injury and fibrosis in clinical practice. PMID:27690015

  11. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns. PMID:27210744

  12. Peritoneal Dialysis by Indwelling Catheter for Chronic Renal Failure, 1963-1968

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Russell A.

    1971-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with end-stage chronic renal failure have been treated by prolonged peritoneal dialysis employing an in-lying silicone rubber catheter of original design. The mean duration of treatment was 13.8 months and the longest was over four years. Biochemical and symptomatic results were satisfactory. Rehabilitation was only fairly good, but this was largely determined by the extent of the pre-existing extra-renal disease. Thirteen of the patients were able to manage a major portion of their therapy at home. The main complication was infection which occurred in 85% of cases, but at a mean interval of 10.6 months. There are seven survivors, but only one death was attributed to failure of the system. It is a method that can be used in community hospitals and requires a minimum amount of equipment and experience. PMID:5128710

  13. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  14. Associations between proteinuria, systemic hypertension and glomerular filtration rate in dogs with renal and non-renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wehner, A; Hartmann, K; Hirschberger, J

    2008-02-02

    Proteinuria and systemic hypertension are well recognised risk factors in chronic renal failure (CRF). They are consequences of renal disease but also lead to a further loss of functional kidney tissue. The objectives of this study were to investigate the associations between proteinuria, systemic hypertension and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in dogs with naturally occurring renal and non-renal diseases, and to determine whether proteinuria and hypertension were associated with shorter survival times in dogs with CRF. Measurements of exogenous creatinine plasma clearance (ECPC), urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC), and Doppler sonographic measurements of systolic blood pressure (SBP) were made in 60 dogs with various diseases. There was a weak but significant inverse correlation between UPC and ECPC, a significant inverse correlation between SBP and ECPC and a weak but significant positive correlation between UPC and SBP. Some of the dogs with CRF were proteinuric and almost all were hypertensive. Neoplasia was commonly associated with proteinuria in the dogs with a normal ECPC. CRF was the most common cause leading to hypertension. In the dogs with CRF, hypertension and marked proteinuria were associated with significantly shorter survival times.

  15. A European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) position statement on the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) clinical practice guideline for the management of blood pressure in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: an endorsement with some caveats for real-life application.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Francis; Lindley, Elisabeth; Van Bortel, Luc; Vanholder, Raymond; London, Gérard; Cochat, Pierre; Wiecek, Andrzej; Fouque, Denis; Van Biesen, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Developing guidelines on a subject as broad as hypertension is difficult, especially when the guidance relates to hypertension in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Guideline Development Group has applied a rigorous methodology in reviewing all available evidence, and their recommendations are consistent with the evidence-based approach. As a result, the European Renal Best Practice endorses most of its recommendations. However, the Work Group feels that some additional advice could help clinicians in daily practice: (i) individualization of treatment should be taken into account, especially (cardiovascular) co-morbidities, age, gender and race; (ii) side-effects, such as postural dizziness should be monitored closely, particularly in elderly, diabetics and patients with arterial stiffness; (iii) the importance of salt restriction should not be neglected; (iv) although angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARBs) remain a cornerstone in the management of hypertension, and especially cardiovascular protection, in some particular situations such as in advanced CKD and in patients without proteinuria, their role is less well defined; (v) as most CKD patients need more than one antihypertensive drug to achieve blood pressure control, the specific (renal) (dis)advantages of other classes than ACE-I or ARB should be taken into account.

  16. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques.

  17. Ultrastructural changes of corpora cavernosa in men with erectile dysfunction and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellinghieri, Guido; Santoro, Giuseppe; Santoro, Domenico; Lo Forti, Bruno; Savica, Vincenzo; Favazzi, Pietro; Magaudda, Ludovico; Cohen, Arthur H

    2004-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common and often distressing side effect of renal failure. Uremic men of different ages report a high variety of sexual problems, including sexual hormonal pattern alterations, reduced or loss of libido, infertility, and impotence, thereby influencing their well-being. The pathogenic mechanisms include physiologic, psychologic, and organic causes. To determine the contribution of morphologic factors to impotence we studied the ultrastructure of the corpora cavernosa in 20 patients with end-stage renal disease who were treated with chronic dialysis and compared the findings with 6 individuals with no clinical history of impotence. Our results indicated that in male uremic patients with sexual disturbances there were major changes in smooth muscle cells. This was characterized by reduction of dense bodies in the cytoplasm, thick basement membranes, and increased interstitial collagen fibers with resultant reduction of cell-to-cell contact. In addition, there was thickening and lamination of basement membranes of endothelial cells and increased accumulation of collagen between nerve fibers. These alterations were more evident in patients with longer time on dialysis and were independent of type of primary renal disease. We hypothesize that ED in dialysis patients is not related to the primary disease but to the uremic state.

  18. Chronic lower limb ischemia and advanced renal failure. Do we possess sufficient therapeutic knowledge?

    PubMed

    Gacka, M; Adamiec, R

    2013-08-01

    Chronic lower limb ischemia diminishes the quality of life and is associated with a higher risk of limb amputation and cardiovascular mortality. Coexisting chronic renal disease can modulate the response to pharmacotherapy and revascularization, and thus influence prognosis. This paper reviews current literary evidence regarding therapeutic problems observed in patients with obliterative atherosclerosis and renal failure. We reviewed articles from peer-reviewed medical journals which were published between 2000 and 2011. The poorer clinical response in the discussed patients is not only connected with the direct failure of surgical and endovascular procedures, but first of all with the high mortality of the patients. There is still a lack of sufficient evidence on the effectiveness of currently used anti-atherosclerotic agents in patients with end-stage renal failure. A certain priority is the search for an effective therapeutic strategy that would reduce mortality associated with cardiovascular conditions in this particular group of patients. Identifying patients who can benefit most from costly endovascular procedures is another vital issue.

  19. [Watermelon stomach: Chronic renal failure and/or imatinib?].

    PubMed

    Montagnac, Richard; Blaison, Dominique; Brahimi, Saïd; Schendel, Adeline; Levasseur, Thomas; Takin, Romulus

    2015-11-01

    Watermelon stomach or gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) syndrome is an uncommon cause of sometimes severe upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Essentially based on a pathognomonic endoscopic appearance, its diagnosis may be unrecognised because mistaken with portal hypertensive gastropathy, while treatment of these two entities is different. Its etiopathogeny remains still unclear, even if it is frequently associated with different systemic illnesses as hepatic cirrhosis, autoimmune disorders and chronic renal failure. The mechanism inducing these vascular ectasia may be linked with mechanical stress on submucosal vessels due to antropyloric peristaltic motility dysfunction modulated by neurohormonal vasoactive alterations. Because medical therapies are not very satisfactory, among the endoscopic modalities, argon plasma coagulation seems to be actually the first-line treatment because the most effective and safe. However, surgical antrectomy may be sometimes necessary. Recently GAVE syndrome appeared as a new adverse reaction of imatinib mesylate, one of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in chronic myeloid leukemia, and we report here the observation of such a pathology in one patient treated at the same time by haemodialysis and by imatinib mesylate for chronic myeloid leukemia.

  20. Family clustering of secondary chronic kidney disease with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Ciambelli, Giuliano Serafino; Bertoco, André Luz; Jurado, Marcelo Mai; Siqueira, Guilherme Vasconcelos; Bernardo, Eder Augusto; Pavan, Maria Valeria; Gianini, Reinaldo José

    2015-02-01

    In Brazil hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus are responsible for 60% of cases of end-stage renal disease in renal replacement therapy. In the United States studies have identified family clustering of chronic kidney disease, predominantly in African-Americans. A single Brazilian study observed family clustering among patients with chronic kidney disease when compared with hospitalized patients with normal renal function. This article aims to assess whether there is family clustering of chronic kidney disease in relatives of individuals in renal replacement therapy caused by hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. A case-control study with 336 patients in renal replacement therapy with diabetes mellitus or hypertension for at least 5 years (cases) and a control matched sample group of individuals with hypertension or diabetes mellitus and normal renal function (n = 389). Individuals in renal replacement therapy (cases) had a ratio of 2.35 (95% CI 1.42-3.89, p < 0.001) versus the control group in having relatives with chronic renal disease, irrespective of race or causative illness. There is family clustering of chronic kidney disease in the sample studied, and this predisposition is irrespective of race and underlying disease (hypertension or diabetes mellitus).

  1. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Belis, J A; Belis, T E; Lai, J C; Goodwin, C A; Gabriele, O F

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The 131iodine orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and 131iodine orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the 131iodine orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  2. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Belis, J.A.; Belis, T.E.; Lai, J.C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on /supb 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  3. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  4. Quantitative digital histochemistry with methenamine silver staining in renal allograft biopsies excluding pure chronic allograft nephropathy cases.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Sis, B; Celik, A; Tekis, D; Kavukcu, S; Bora, S; Camsari, T

    2006-03-01

    Deterioration of renal function is correlated with irreversible damage in chronic diseases. Recently we described a digital quantitative histochemistry method, relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining to determine the chronic renal lesions. This index was strongly correlated with progressive deterioration of renal function in grafts with chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Herein the method has been applied to a cohort of renal allografts which were biopsied for various reasons, we sought to highlight its value to quantify chronic graft damage. Forty-four renal allograft biopsies from 37 patients with elevated serum creatinine values (SCr) underwent light microscopic image analysis (Mediscope, Dokuz Eylül University, Clinical Engineering Department, Izmir, Turkey) of the PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP). SCr was recorded at four intervals to overcome acute effects: the under SCr value before (SCr1) and after a biopsy within 3 months (SCr3), SCr at the time of the biopsy (SCr2), and the latest value (SCr4). The PAMS-SAP scores were strongly associated with increased interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy Banff scores (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = .006 and P = .003, respectively). There was a moderate positive correlation between PAMS and SCr3 (Pearson correlation test, P = .04, r = .312), and a strong positive correlation between time from transplantation to biopsy (Pearson correlation test, P < .000, r = .532). The present results show that PAMS-SAP seems to be of value to quantify renal scarring in allograft biopsies, reflecting four compartments. The strong correlation with time is noteworthy especially as a probable reflection of aging of the renal allograft.

  5. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  6. Osteoporosis in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anitha; Carey, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal complication seen in patients with chronic liver disease. Osteoporosis is usually asymptomatic and, if untreated, can result in fractures and impaired quality of life. For this review, we performed a systematic search of the PubMed database, and all recent peer-reviewed articles regarding the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis in chronic liver disease were included. The prevalence of osteoporosis varies between 11% and 58% in patients with chronic liver disease and in transplant recipients. The etiology of osteoporosis is multifactorial and only partially understood. Various factors linked to the pathogenesis of bone loss are vitamin D, calcium, insulin growth factor-1, receptor activation of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), bilirubin, fibronectin, leptin, proinflammatory cytokines, and genetic polymorphisms. Management of osteoporosis involves early diagnosis, identifying and minimizing risk factors, general supportive care, nutrition therapy, and pharmacotherapy. Osteoporosis is diagnosed based on the bone mineral density (BMD) assessment using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Measurement of BMD should be considered in all patients with advanced liver disease and in transplant recipients. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation is recommended for all patients with osteoporosis. Specific agents used for treatment of osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, hormonal therapy, and raloxifene. Bisphosphonates have become the mainstay of therapy for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Prolonged suppression of bone remodeling resulting in atypical fractures has emerged as a significant complication with long-term use of bisphosphonates. Newer treatment agents and better fracture prevention strategies are necessary to prevent and treat osteoporosis.

  7. [A retrospective study on the incidence of chronic renal failure in the Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology at University Hospital of Antananarivo (the capital city of Madagascar)].

    PubMed

    Ramilitiana, Benja; Ranivoharisoa, Eliane Mikkelsen; Dodo, Mihary; Razafimandimby, Evanirina; Randriamarotia, Willy Franck

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a global public health problem. In developed countries, this disease occurs mainly in the elderly, but in Africa it rather affects active young subjects. This disease need for expensive treatments in a low income country, because of its costs. Our aim is to describe the epidemiology of new cases of chronic renal failure in Madagascar. This is a retrospective, descriptive study of 239 patients with chronic renal failure over a 3 year period, starting from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009, in the Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology at University Hospital of Antananarivo. The incidence was 8.51% among patients hospitalized in the Department. The average age of patients was 45.4 years with extremes of 16 and 82 years and a sex ratio 1,46. The main antecedent was arterial hypertension (59.8%). Chronic renal failure was terminal in 75.31% of the cases (n=180). The causes of chronic renal failure were dominated by chronic glomerulonephritis (40.1%), nephroangiosclerosis (35.5%). Hemodialysis was performed in 3 patients (1.26%), no patient was scheduled for a renal transplantation. Mortality rate in the Department was 28.87%. Chronic renal failure is a debilitating disease with a dreadful prognosis which affects young patients in Madagascar. Its treatment remains inaccessible to the majority of patients. The focus must be mainly on prevention, especially on early effective management of infections, arterial hypertension and diabetes to reduce its negative impacts on the community and public health. The project on renal transplantation: living donor, effective and less expensive treatment compared to hemodialysis could also be a good solution for these Malagasy young subjects.

  8. Chronic kidney disease and albuminuria in arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Giovanna; Viazzi, Francesca; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem worldwide: it is estimated that in the general population, 1 person in 10 has some degree of renal damage. Adequate blood pressure control represents the mainstay of treatment, to delay deterioration of renal function and prevent cardiovascular complications. Current evidence supports a target blood pressure value of 130/80 mm Hg or less (ie, <125/75 mm Hg) when proteinuria exceeds 1 g/L. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers represent the treatment of choice, especially in the presence of proteinuria. More complete blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has been advocated, using a combination of multiple RAAS blocker drugs or supramaximal doses to maximize renal protection. Achieving recommended blood pressure target values usually requires the use of multiple antihypertensive drugs, including diuretics and calcium channel blockers.

  9. Current evidence on treatment of patients with chronic systolic heart failure and renal insufficiency: practical considerations from published data.

    PubMed

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W H Wilson; Felker, G Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J V

    2014-03-11

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients with (severe) renal dysfunction. The benefit of these evidence-based therapies in this high-risk patient group is largely unknown. This paper reviews data from randomized clinical trials in systolic heart failure and the interactions between baseline renal dysfunction and the effect of randomized treatment. It highlights that most evidence-based therapies show consistent outcome benefit in patients with moderate renal insufficiency (stage 3 CKD), whereas there are very scarce data on patients with severe (stage 4 to 5 CKD) renal insufficiency. If any, the outcome benefit might be even greater in stage 3 CKD compared with those with relatively preserved renal function. However, prescription of therapies should be individualized with consideration of possible harm and benefit, especially in those with stage 4 to 5 CKD where limited data are available.

  10. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  11. Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Donita L.

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin and to define the mechanisms which predispose to nephrotoxicity in subclinical renal disease. Subtotally nephrectomized beagle dogs were used as a model for human beings with compromised renal function secondary to a reduced number of functional nephrons. Using ultrastructural morphometry, light microscopy and clinical chemistry data, the model was defined and the nephrotoxic responses of intact dogs administered recommended doses of drug were compared to the response of subtotally nephrectomized dogs administered reduced doses based on each animal's clearance of drug. Lysosomal and mitochondrial morphometric changes suggested mechanisms for increased sensitivity. To determine if increased sensitivity in this model was dependent on altered serum concentrations, variable rate infusions based on individual pharmacokinetic disposition of drug were administered using computer-driven infusion pumps. Identical serum concentration-time profiles were achieved in normal dogs and subtotally nephrectomized dogs, however, toxicity was significantly greater in nephrectomized dogs. The difference in the nephrotoxic response was characterized by administering supratherapeutic doses of drug to dogs. Nephrectomized dogs given a recommended dose of gentamicin became oliguric during the second week of treatment and increasingly uremic after withdrawal of drug. In contrast, intact dogs administered 2 times the recommended dose of gentamicin become only slightly polyuric during week 4 of treatment. The need to individualize dosage regimens based on drug clearance and not serum creatinine nor creatinine clearance alone was substantiated by describing the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin in spontaneously occurring disease states. Four individualized dosage regimens with differing predicted efficacy were then administered to nephrectomized dogs to determine their relative nephrotoxic

  12. [Chronic atrophic polychondritis and renal and cardiopulmonary amylosis: a case report and literature review (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lambrozo, J; Baubion, D; Brodaty, Y; Leclerc, J P

    1981-01-01

    Glomerular lesions with a nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function developed secondary to a chronic atrophic polychondritis confirmed by auricular biopsy. In the absence of renal histology data, the possibility of an iatrogenic complication or a renal lesion specific to the affection itself were successively eliminated. Pos-mortem histological examination demonstrated renal and cardiopulmonary amylosis, the latter being clinically asymptomatic. The probable autoimmune origin of the chronic atrophic polychondritis has to be discussed in parallel with the dysimmunity mechanism responsible for the amyloid lesions, but no relationship between them was demonstrated.

  13. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  14. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Eddington, Helen; Sinha, Smeeta; Kalra, Philip A

    2009-03-01

    Vascular calcification, which is associated with arterial stiffness, is now known to be an important predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with renal disease. This calcification starts developing in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is present in over 50% of patients at the time of dialysis commencement. Once calcification is present it continues to progress, though some medications have been shown to slow this progression. Vascular calcification and bone abnormalities are now both encompassed by the term of CKD-mineral bone disorder and are thought to be part of the same disease process in CKD. Vascular calcification and arterial stiffness have been extensively researched in the renal population and many factors are known to be associated with their presence and progression. This calcification is an important factor to be considered in the management of the renal patient but there are different methods available for its measurement. These details will be discussed further in this review along with evidence available for management of this important complication of renal disease.

  15. Community Health Worker Intervention for Patients With Complex Chronic Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM); Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD); Stroke; Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD); Coronary Artery Disease (CAD); Heart Failure (HF); Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD); Asthma

  16. [Light chain deposition disease as a cause of renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wohl, P; Chadimová, M; Englis, M; Táborský, P; Rossmann, P; Matl, I

    1998-11-30

    The objective of the paper is to draw attention to a rare cause of rapidly progressing renal failure which developed in the course of four months as a result of light chain deposition disease. The authors submit two case-histories of the disease assessed by renal biopsy after previous clinical and laboratory suspicion of monoclonal gammapathy. In one patient in the sternal punctate plasmacytoma was diagnosed and in the second case it was not possible to detect any type of monoclonal gammapathy or another possible cause of disease. Renal failure was in both cases irreversible and both patients were enlisted in regular haemodialyzation treatment.

  17. Impact of feline AIM on the susceptibility of cats to renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Hiramoto, Emiri; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Iwai, Satomi; Takai, Ryosuke; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Mori, Nobuko; Okada, Yuki; Takeda, Naoki; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Arai, Toshiro; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure is one of the most important social problems for its incurability and high costs for patients’ health care. Through clarification of the underlying mechanism for the high susceptibility of cats to renal disease, we here demonstrates that the effective dissociation of serum AIM protein from IgM is necessary for the recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). In cats, the AIM-IgM binding affinity is 1000-fold higher than that in mice, which is caused by the unique positively-charged amino-acid cluster present in feline AIM. Hence, feline AIM does not dissociate from IgM during AKI, abolishing its translocation into urine. This results in inefficient clearance of lumen-obstructing necrotic cell debris at proximal tubules, thereby impairing AKI recovery. Accordingly, mice whose AIM is replaced by feline AIM exhibit higher mortality by AKI than in wild-type mice. Recombinant AIM administration into the mice improves their renal function and survival. As insufficient recovery from AKI predisposes patients to chronic, end-stage renal disease, feline AIM may be involved crucially in the high mortality of cats due to renal disease. Our findings could be the basis of the development of novel AKI therapies targeting AIM-IgM dissociation, and may support renal function in cats and prolong their lives. PMID:27731392

  18. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ria; Issar, Tushar; Krishnan, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages. PMID:27867500

  19. Chronic recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake exacerbates hypertension and promotes renal damage in male spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Lucinda M.; Colafella, Katrina M. Mirabito; Bulmer, Louise L.; Puelles, Victor G.; Singh, Reetu R.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Gaspari, Tracey; Drummond, Grant R.; Evans, Roger G.; Vinh, Antony; Denton, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence links recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, minimal attention has been paid to the long-term impact of periodic water intake on the progression of CKD and underlying mechanisms involved. Therefore we investigated the chronic effects of recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water restriction on arterial pressure and kidney function and morphology in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arterial pressure increased and glomerular filtration rate decreased in water-restricted SHR. This was observed in association with cyclic changes in urine osmolarity, indicative of recurrent dehydration. Additionally, water-restricted SHR demonstrated greater renal fibrosis and an imbalance in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing renal T cells compared to their control counterparts. Furthermore, urinary NGAL levels were greater in water-restricted than control SHR. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that recurrent dehydration associated with chronic periodic drinking hastens the progression of CKD and hypertension, and suggest a potential role for repetitive bouts of acute renal injury driving renal inflammatory processes in this setting. Further studies are required to elucidate the specific pathways that drive the progression of recurrent dehydration-induced kidney disease. PMID:27653548

  20. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  1. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  2. [The effect of low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Molnár, Márta; Szekeresné Izsák, Margit; Nagy, Judit; Figler, Mária

    2009-02-01

    It is known that dietary protein restriction slows the progression of chronic renal disease. If daily protein intake is less than 0.5-0.6 g/kgbw, the diet has to be supplemented with essential aminoacids/ketoacids. In this study the authors evaluate the long-term effect of low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids on the progression of chronic renal failure, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, nutritional status, the compliance of patients and the permanent dietary education for the compliance. 51 predialysis patients have been treated with ketoacids supplemented low-protein diet during 12-57 months (mean treatment period: 26 months). Serum creatinine raised from 349.72+/-78.04 micromol/l to 460.66+/-206.66 micromol/l (27 micromol/l/year or 2.3 micromol/l/month), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased from 21.52+/-7.84 ml/min to 18.22+/-7.76 ml/min (0.83 ml/min/year or 0.07 ml/min/month). The slope of 1/serum creatinine versus time was 0.0018 by linear regression analysis. Serum parathormon decreased significantly, but serum calcium and phosphorus did not change. Nutritional status of patients did not change significantly during the follow-up period. Protein intake decreased significantly and remained at this lower level during the treatment period. According to results: low-protein diet supplemented with ketoacids was effective in slowing progression of chronic renal failure, decreased PTH, did not change nutritional status. With permanently and good education it was possible to keep patients on low-protein diet for a long period.

  3. Transforming Growth Factor Beta, Bioenergetics and Mitochondria in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gabriella, Casalena; Ilse, Daehn; Erwin, Bottinger

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β ) family is comprised of over 30 family members that are structurally related secreted dimeric cytokines, including TGF-β, activins, and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs)/growth and differentiation factors (GDFs). TGF-β are pluripotent regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and adhesion of many different cell types. TGF-β pathways are highly evolutionarily conserved and control embryogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue homeostasis in invertebrates and vertebrates. Aberrations in TGF-β activity and signaling underlie a broad spectrum of developmental disorders and major pathologies in humans, including cancer, fibrosis and autoimmune diseases. Recent observations indicate an emerging role for TGF-β in regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress responses characteristic of chronic degenerative diseases and ageing. Conversely, energy and metabolic sensory pathways cross-regulate mediators of TGF-β signaling. Here we review TGF-β and regulation of bioenergetic and mitochondrial functions, including energy and oxidant metabolism and apoptotic cell death, as well as their emerging relevance in renal biology and disease. PMID:22835461

  4. Assessment of renal vascular resistance and blood pressure in dogs and cats with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Novellas, R; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Espada, Y

    2010-05-15

    This study investigated the possible relationships between renal resistive index (RI) or pulsatility index (PI) and systolic blood pressure and biochemical and haematological parameters in dogs and cats with renal disease. The study included 50 dogs and 20 cats with renal disease. RI and PI were significantly higher in both dogs and cats with renal disease than in 27 healthy dogs and 10 healthy cats. In dogs, a significant negative correlation was found between RI and red blood cell count, and a positive correlation was found between PI and serum creatinine. In cats, a positive correlation was found between RI and serum urea, between PI and serum creatinine, and between PI and serum urea. No relationship could be found between either RI or PI and systolic blood pressure.

  5. The double challenge of resistant hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Patrick; Massy, Ziad A; Azizi, Michel; Bakris, George; Ritz, Eberhard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Heine, Gunnar H; Jager, Kitty J; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Ortiz, Alberto; Vanholder, Raymond; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel; Stengel, Bénédicte; Fouque, Denis

    2015-10-17

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above goal despite adherence to a combination of at least three optimally dosed antihypertensive medications, one of which is a diuretic. Chronic kidney disease is the most frequent of several patient factors or comorbidities associated with resistant hypertension. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease, while chronic kidney disease is associated with an impaired prognosis in patients with resistant hypertension. Recommended low-salt diet and triple antihypertensive drug regimens that include a diuretic, should be complemented by the sequential addition of other antihypertensive drugs. New therapeutic innovations for resistant hypertension, such as renal denervation and carotid barostimulation, are under investigation especially in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. We discuss resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5 (ie, patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) and not on dialysis), in terms of worldwide epidemiology, outcomes, causes and pathophysiology, evidence-based treatment, and a call for action.

  6. Kidney Transplantation as Primary Therapy for End-Stage Renal Disease: A National Kidney Foundation/Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF/KDOQI™) Conference

    PubMed Central

    Abecassis, Michael; Bartlett, Stephen T.; Collins, Allan J.; Davis, Connie L.; Delmonico, Francis L.; Friedewald, John J.; Hays, Rebecca; Howard, Andrew; Jones, Edward; Leichtman, Alan B.; Merion, Robert M.; Metzger, Robert A.; Pradel, Francoise; Schweitzer, Eugene J.; Velez, Ruben L.; Gaston, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney transplantation is the most desired and cost-effective modality of renal replacement therapy for patients with irreversible chronic kidney failure (end-stage renal disease, stage 5 chronic kidney disease). Despite emerging evidence that the best outcomes accrue to patients who receive a transplant early in the course of renal replacement therapy, only 2.5% of incident patients with end-stage renal disease undergo transplantation as their initial modality of treatment, a figure largely unchanged for at least a decade. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The National Kidney Foundation convened a Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) conference in Washington, DC, March 19 through 20, 2007, to examine the issue. Fifty-two participants representing transplant centers, dialysis providers, and payers were divided into three work groups to address the impact of early transplantation on the chronic kidney disease paradigm, educational needs of patients and professionals, and finances of renal replacement therapy. Results: Participants explored the benefits of early transplantation on costs and outcomes, identified current barriers (at multiple levels) that impede access to early transplantation, and recommended specific interventions to overcome those barriers. Conclusions: With implementation of early education, referral to a transplant center coincident with creation of vascular access, timely transplant evaluation, and identification of potential living donors, early transplantation can be an option for substantially more patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:18256371

  7. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  8. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  9. The role of oxygen free radicals in the development of chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Trachtman, H.; Wilson, D.; Rao, P.S. )

    1992-01-01

    This study examined whether there is increased production of oxygen free radicals during chronic renal failure. Rats subjected to 3/4 nephrectomy and sham operated controls were killed after 3 weeks. Lipid extracts of plasma and renal tissue were examined by HPLC and kidney specimens were also analyzed by EPR spectroscopy. The redox capacity of blood was assessed using nitroblue tetrazolium and plasma ascorbate levels were measured with HPLC. There was no detectable renal production of oxygen free radicals in rats with chronic renal failure. Kidney parenchymal content of other oxidants and the oxidant: reductant ratio were similar in control and uremic animals. The plasma redox capacity and ascorbate levels were elevated in uremic rats. The authors conclude that early in the course of chronic renal failure, there is not excessive production of oxygen free radicals. There is accumulation of reductants, primarily ascorbate, in the plasma of uremic animals.

  10. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  11. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS.

  12. Neurological Manifestations of Renal Diseases in Children in Qazvin/ Iran

    PubMed Central

    DALIRANI, Reza; MAHYAR, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; AHMADI, Ghazaleh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Renal diseases are one of the most common causes of referrals and admissions of children, hence it is important to know their neurological presentations. This study aimed to determine neurological presentations of renal diseases in children. Material & Methods A total of 634 children with renal diseases, admitted to Qazvin Pediatric Hospital, Qazvin, central Iran from 2011 to 2013 were studied. Neurological presentations of patients were established and the results were analyzed using statistical tests. Results Neurological presentations were found in 18 (2.8%) out of 634 patients, of whom 15 had febrile seizures, two thromboembolism, and one encephalopathy. Among patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), 2.6% had febrile seizures, 11.1% of those with glomerulonephritis had encephalopathy, and 3.7% of those with nephrotic syndrome had cerebral thromboembolism. Conclusion Results showed neurological presentations in 2.8% of children with renal diseases, and febrile seizure as the most common presentation. PMID:27375752

  13. Chronic kidney disease and the involvement of estrogen hormones in its pathogenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Gh; Gluhovschi, A; Anastasiu, D; Petrica, Ligia; Gluhovschi, Cristina; Velciov, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The kidney is under the influence of sexual hormones. Estrogens have a favourable role in the progression of some chronic renal diseases. Estrogen hormones act upon the nephron component cells, regulating several processes going on at this level. One of the most important actions of the estrogens is represented by the protective effect on the kidneys, estrogens attenuating glomerulosclerosis and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Thus, estrogens have nephroprotective effects. Phosphorus-calcium metabolism disturbances during chronic kidney disease are influenced by numerous regulatory factors: parathormone, vitamin D fibroblast growth factor, 23. Estrogens play an important part in disturbances of the phosphorus-calcium metabolism, co-operating with these factors. They exert favourable effects on renal osteodystrophy, the main consequence of phosphorus-calcium disturbances. Hormonal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is clinically accompanied by sexual dysfunction that influences the life quality of these patients. In advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, especially in dialysed patients, these sexual dysfunctions can be more evident. Hormonal replacement therapy and estrogen therapy- receptor modulating therapy have an important role in correcting hormonal dysfunctions manifest in chronic kidney disease. Caution is necessary in case of a would-be pregnancy in patients with chronic kidney disease, given its risks and the complexity of the problem. Renal transplantation corrects to a great extent hormonal dysfunctions in chronic kidney disease.

  14. Cardiovascular disease relates to intestinal uptake of p-cresol in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) associates with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. PCS concentrations are determined by intestinal uptake of p-cresol, human metabolism to PCS and renal clearance. Whether intestinal uptake of p-cresol itself is directly associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with renal dysfunction has not been studied to date. Methods We performed a prospective study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1 – 5 (NCT00441623). Intestinal uptake of p-cresol, under steady state conditions, was estimated from 24 h urinary excretion of PCS. Primary endpoint was time to first cardiovascular event, i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction/ischemia, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiovascular surgery, ischemic stroke or symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Statistical analysis was done using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard analyses. Results In a cohort of 200 patients, median 24 h urinary excretion of PCS amounted to 457.47 μmol (IQR 252.68 – 697.17). After a median follow-up of 52 months, 25 patients reached the primary endpoint (tertile 1/2/3: 5/6/14 events, log rank P 0.037). Higher urinary excretion of PCS was directly associated with cardiovascular events (univariate hazard ratio per 100 μmol increase: 1.112, P 0.002). In multivariate analysis, urinary excretion of PCS remained a predictor of cardiovascular events, independent of eGFR (hazard ratio 1.120, P 0.002). Conclusions In patients with chronic kidney disease, intestinal uptake of p-cresol associates with cardiovascular disease independent of renal function. The intestinal generation and absorption of p-cresol may be therapeutic targets to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in patients with renal dysfunction. PMID:24912660

  15. Neurodegeneration and chronic renal failure in methylmalonic aciduria--a pathophysiological approach.

    PubMed

    Morath, M A; Okun, J G; Müller, I B; Sauer, S W; Hörster, F; Hoffmann, G F; Kölker, S

    2008-02-01

    In the last decades the survival of patients with methylmalonic aciduria has been improved. However, the overall outcome of affected patients remains disappointing. The disease course is often complicated by acute life-threatening metabolic crises, which can result in multiple organ failure or even death, resembling primary defects of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Biochemical abnormalities during metabolic derangement, such as metabolic acidosis, ketonaemia/ketonuria, lactic acidosis, hypoglycaemia and hyperammonaemia, suggest mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, long-term complications such as chronic renal failure and neurological disease are frequently found. Neuropathophysiological studies have focused on various effects caused by accumulation of putatively toxic organic acids, the so-called 'toxic metabolite' hypothesis. In previous studies, methylmalonate (MMA) has been considered as the major neurotoxin in methylmalonic aciduria, whereas more recent studies have highlighted a synergistic inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, mitochondrial salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)) induced by propionyl-CoA, 2-methylcitrate and MMA as the key pathomechanism of inherited disorders of propionate metabolism. Intracerebral accumulation of toxic metabolites ('trapping' hypothesis') is considered a biochemical risk factor for neurodegeneration. Secondary effects of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as oxidative stress and impaired mtDNA homeostasis, contribute to pathogenesis of these disorders. The underlying pathomechanisms of chronic renal insufficiency in methylmalonic acidurias are not yet understood. We hypothesize that renal and cerebral pathomechanisms share some similarities, such as an involvement of dicarboxylic acid transport. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on recent pathomechanistic concepts for methylmalonic acidurias.

  16. Pre-pregnancy counseling for women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bramham, Kate; Lightstone, Liz

    2012-01-01

    Pre-pregnancy counseling should be available for all women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) so that conception occurs at the right time in the course of their disease and while they are on the right medications, with the aims of minimizing risks for both mother and fetus. Key areas to consider are the factors which are associated with worse prognosis and the influence of underlying kidney conditions and their treatment, in particular lupus nephritis, advanced renal impairment and transplantation. This experience-based review provides a guide to clinicians managing women with CKD, before and during their pregnancy.

  17. 74 FR 49921 - Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2009-09-29

    ... Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System; Town Hall Meeting on End-Stage Renal Disease... & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 410, 413 and 414 RIN 0938-AP57 Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease...) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1,...

  18. [Alterations of teeth and jaws in children with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Scheutzel, P; Ritter, W

    1989-02-01

    Dental examination of 50 children with chronic renal failure revealed enamel hypoplasia in 26 (52%), retardation of dental age in 18 (36%) and delay of dental eruption in 16 (32%) cases. In comparison to normal children the prevalence of caries was significantly lower. Half of the children showed radiologic changes in the jaw-bones already during preterminal stage of renal insufficiency. The possible role of the dentist concerning early diagnosis of renal failure is discussed.

  19. Acquired Factor V Inhibitors in a Patient with End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Atsushi; Misawa, Hideo; Nagahori, Katsuhiro; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Kawamoto, Shinya; Takeda, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acquired factor V inhibitors (AFVIs) in a patient with end-stage renal disease receiving warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. A 72-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of tarry stools and abdominal pain. The laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia (52.1%), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (98 s), PT (84 s), a factor V (FV) activity of <3%, and an FV inhibitor level of 6 Bethesda units/mL. After administration of prednisolone was started, his coagulation findings improved. However, his renal failure progressed, and he ultimately required chronic hemodialysis. This is the first case of AFVIs in a patient starting hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease. PMID:27904118

  20. Acquired Factor V Inhibitors in a Patient with End-stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Atsushi; Misawa, Hideo; Nagahori, Katsuhiro; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Kawamoto, Shinya; Takeda, Tetsuro

    We report a case of acquired factor V inhibitors (AFVIs) in a patient with end-stage renal disease receiving warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. A 72-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of tarry stools and abdominal pain. The laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia (52.1%), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (98 s), PT (84 s), a factor V (FV) activity of <3%, and an FV inhibitor level of 6 Bethesda units/mL. After administration of prednisolone was started, his coagulation findings improved. However, his renal failure progressed, and he ultimately required chronic hemodialysis. This is the first case of AFVIs in a patient starting hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease.

  1. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    HAMIDI MADANI, Ali; ENSHAEI, Ahmad; POURREZA, Farshid; ESMAEILI, Samaneh; HAMIDI MADANI, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  2. Role of ubiquitin-like protein FAT10 in epithelial apoptosis in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael J; Wosnitzer, Matthew S; Ross, Michael D; Granelli, Benedetta; Gusella, G Luca; Husain, Mohammad; Kaufman, Lewis; Vasievich, Matthew; D'Agati, Vivette D; Wilson, Patricia D; Klotman, Mary E; Klotman, Paul E

    2006-04-01

    Dysregulated apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) is an important component of the pathogenesis of several renal diseases, including HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), the most common cause of chronic kidney failure in HIV-infected patients. In HIVAN, RTEC become infected by HIV-1 in a focal distribution, and HIV-1 infection has been shown to induce apoptosis in vitro. In microarray studies that used a novel renal tubular epithelial cell line from a patient with HIVAN, it was found that the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10 is one of the most upregulated genes in HIV-infected cells. Previously, FAT10 was shown to induce apoptosis in murine fibroblasts. The expression of FAT10 in HIVAN and the ability of FAT10 to induce apoptosis in human RTEC therefore were studied. This study revealed that FAT10 expression is induced after infection of RTEC by HIV-1 and that expression of FAT10 induces apoptosis in RTEC in vitro. Moreover, it was found that inhibition of endogenous FAT10 expression abrogated HIV-induced apoptosis of RTEC. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated increased FAT10 expression in a murine model of HIVAN, in HIVAN biopsy samples, and in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, another renal disease that is characterized by cystic tubular enlargement and epithelial apoptosis. These results suggest a novel role for FAT10 in epithelial apoptosis, which is an important component of the pathogenesis of many renal diseases.

  3. SORCS1 contributes to the development of renal disease in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jozef; O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Sarkis, Allison B.; Prisco, Sasha Z.; Xu, Haiyan; Fox, Caroline S.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Broeckel, Ulrich; Arnett, Donna K.; Moreno, Carol; Provoost, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    Many lines of evidence demonstrate that genetic variability contributes to chronic kidney disease susceptibility in humans as well as rodent models. Little progress has been made in discovering causal kidney disease genes in humans mainly due to genetic complexity. Here, we use a minimal congenic mapping strategy in the FHH (fawn hooded hypertensive) rat to identify Sorcs1 as a novel renal disease candidate gene. We investigated the hypothesis that genetic variation in Sorcs1 influences renal disease susceptibility in both rat and human. Sorcs1 is expressed in the kidney, and knocking out this gene in a rat strain with a sensitized genome background produced increased proteinuria. In vitro knockdown of Sorcs1 in proximal tubule cells impaired protein trafficking, suggesting a mechanism for the observed proteinuria in the FHH rat. Since Sorcs1 influences renal function in the rat, we went on to test this gene in humans. We identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in SORCS1 and renal function in large cohorts of European and African ancestry. The experimental data from the rat combined with association results from different ethnic groups indicates a role for SORCS1 in maintaining proper renal function. PMID:23780848

  4. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  5. Emphysematous renal tract disease due to Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2004-06-01

    Emphysematous renal tract disease (ERTD) is a rare necrotizing infection of renal parenchyma and/or urinary tract caused by gas producing organisms. A case of acute emphysematous renal tract disease (ERTD) (emphysematous pyelonephritis along with emphysematous cystitis) caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in a non-diabetic patient, who did not apparently have any risk factor for fungal infection, is presented. Patient had refused for any surgical intervention. He was treated successfully with liposomal amphotericin B and 5-flucytosin and achieved complete recovery. Various causes of ERTD and available therapeutic options are discussed.

  6. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    prevalence of RRT continues to increase, particularly in countries with 100% public health or insurance coverage for RRT, where it approaches rates comparable to those displayed by developed countries with a better GNI. The incidence also continues to increase in both countries that have not yet extended its coverage to 100% of the population as well as in those that have an adequate program for timely detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its associated risk factors. PD is still an underutilized st