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Sample records for renal disease diagnosis

  1. Preeclampsia or initial diagnosis of chronic renal disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, C; Kalmantis, K; Bozemberg, T; Ntziora, F; Ioakeimidis, A; Paschalinopoulos, D

    2008-01-01

    An unusual case of early nephrotic syndrome without hypertension which slightly resolved after delivery is documented. Renal biopsy was performed postpartum and the diagnosis was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis with moderate chronic renal changes. It is questioned whether the case was due to preeclampsia or was the initial diagnosis of chronic renal disease which was made during pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in such cases is briefly discussed (Tab. 2, Ref. 15). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  2. Invasive versus non-invasive diagnosis of renal bone disease.

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Oprisiu, R; Said, S; Sechet, A; Ghazali, A; Marié, A; el Esper, I; Brazier, M; Achard, J M; Morinière, P

    1997-07-01

    At present, bone histomorphometry remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of the various types of renal bone disease. In the search for a non-invasive method of diagnosis, biochemical serum markers of bone remodelling, in addition to serum intact parathyroid hormone and aluminium determinations, have been proposed as the most reliable tools and are at present widely used in clinical practice. Their respective diagnostic values, as separate items and in combined analysis, are thoroughly discussed in the present review.

  3. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  4. A Case of Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome Leading to the Diagnosis of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabani, Erasmia; Kouloukourgiotou, Theodora; Stylianou, Konstantinos; Pantzaki, Afroditi; Efstratiadis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian man referred at our department due to acute renal failure (ARF) complicating respiratory failure during hospitalization in a regional hospital. The patient was previously started on steroids due to the suspicion of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) in the context of Goodpasture syndrome. However, clinical and laboratory findings did not support this diagnosis; instead a careful evaluation limited differential diagnosis of the renal insult to acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) following respiratory infection. With lung function fully improved but renal function not recovering, a renal biopsy revealed AIN, a finding leading to further diagnostic testing and finally to the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease as a cause of this patient's pulmonary-renal syndrome. The management consisted of progressive tapering of oral steroids associated with full recovery of the patient's renal function. This is a rare case of Legionnaires' disease causing immune-mediated AIN and highlights the possibility of Legionella infection as a cause of pulmonary-renal syndrome. PMID:27999694

  5. A Case of Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome Leading to the Diagnosis of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Sabani, Erasmia; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Lazaridis, Antonios; Kouloukourgiotou, Theodora; Stylianou, Konstantinos; Pantzaki, Afroditi; Papagianni, Aikaterini; Efstratiadis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian man referred at our department due to acute renal failure (ARF) complicating respiratory failure during hospitalization in a regional hospital. The patient was previously started on steroids due to the suspicion of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) in the context of Goodpasture syndrome. However, clinical and laboratory findings did not support this diagnosis; instead a careful evaluation limited differential diagnosis of the renal insult to acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) following respiratory infection. With lung function fully improved but renal function not recovering, a renal biopsy revealed AIN, a finding leading to further diagnostic testing and finally to the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease as a cause of this patient's pulmonary-renal syndrome. The management consisted of progressive tapering of oral steroids associated with full recovery of the patient's renal function. This is a rare case of Legionnaires' disease causing immune-mediated AIN and highlights the possibility of Legionella infection as a cause of pulmonary-renal syndrome.

  6. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Giorgio; Calabria, Santo; Lai, Silvia; Moscaritolo, Eleonora; Nofroni, Italo; Ronga, Giuseppe; Rossi, Michele; Ventroni, Guido; Sardella, Daniela; Ferrannini, Michele; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Cianci, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238) or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224), and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS), were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and/or Selective Angiography (SA). An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA). Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis. PMID:12622875

  7. End-stage renal disease due to delayed diagnosis of renal tuberculosis: a fatal case report.

    PubMed

    Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; Silva Júnior, Geraldo Bezerra da; Damasceno, Renata Trindade; Santos, Gustavo Martins Dos; Corsino, Germana Alves; Silva, Sônia Leite da; Gutiérrez-Adrianzén, Oswaldo Augusto

    2007-02-01

    Renal TB is difficult to diagnose, because many patients present themselves with lower urinary symptoms which are typical of bacterial cystitis. We report a case of a young woman with renal TB and ESRD. She was admitted with complaints of adynamia, anorexia, fever, weight loss, dysuria and generalized edema for 10 months. At physical examination she was febrile (39 degrees C), and her abdomen had increased volume and was painful at palpation. Laboratorial tests showed serum urea = 220 mg/dL, creatinine = 6.6 mg/dL, hemoglobin = 7.9 g/dL, hematocrit = 24.3%, leukocytes = 33,600/mm(3) and platelets = 664,000/mm(3). Urinalysis showed an acid urine (pH = 5.0), leukocyturia (2+/4+) and mild proteinuria (1+/4+). She was also oliguric (urinary volume < 400 mL/day). Abdominal echography showed thick and contracted bladder walls and heterogeneous liquid collection in the left pelvic region. Two laparotomies were performed, in which abscess in pelvic region was found. Anti-peritoneal tuberculosis treatment with rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide was started. During the follow-up, the urine culture was found to be positive for M. tuberculosis. Six months later the patient had complaints of abdominal pain and dysuria. New laboratorial tests showed serum urea = 187 mg/dL, creatinine = 8.0 mg/dL, potassium = 6.5 mEq/L. Hemodialysis was then started. The CT scan showed signs of chronic nephropathy, dilated calyces and thinning of renal cortex in both kidneys and severe dilation of ureter. The patient developed neurologic symptoms, suggesting tuberculous meningoencephalitis, and died despite of support measures adopted. The patient had ESRD due to secondary uropathy to prolonged tuberculosis of urinary tract that was caused by delayed clinical and laboratorial diagnosis, and probably also due to inadequate antituberculous drugs administration.

  8. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  9. Renal papillary necrosis in patients with sickle cell disease: How to recognize this 'forgotten' diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Henderickx, Michaël M E L; Brits, Tim; De Baets, Karen; Seghers, Mattias; Maes, Philip; Trouet, Dominique; De Wachter, Stefan; De Win, Gunter

    2017-06-01

    Renal papillary necrosis is not commonly seen in daily practice, but can have severe consequences when it is not diagnosed in time. It is known to be associated with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies; however a wide range of etiologies are possible, and it is therefore not the first diagnosis clinicians consider in patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. A literature search was performed to summarize the current knowledge about renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease. These findings are illustrated with a case of a 9-year old girl with sickle cell disease who was referred with painless gross hematuria. Typical radiologic signs for renal papillary necrosis are necrotic cavities that fill with contrast, small collections of contrast peripheral to the calyces in the papillary region (ball-on-tee sign), calcification of the papillary defect, filling defects, hydronephrosis, blunted papillary tip, clefts in the renal medulla filled with contrast, hyperattenuated medullary calcifications, non-enhanced lesions surrounded by rings of excreted contrast, and clubbed calyces. This study focuses on the pathophysiology of renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease, the possible symptoms, as well as the diagnostic steps, with a special interest in particular presentation on old (retrograde pyelography) and new (computed tomography) gold standard in radiologic imaging, and the management for this pathology. This study aims to remind clinicians of this "forgotten" diagnosis and what signs to look for in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. In pediatric cases radiation protection is important, therefore knowing what radiologic signs can be found on retrograde pyelography can lead to early identification of this pathology without having to proceed to computed tomography. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  11. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Testosterone among patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yeran; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of low testosterone level is particularly high among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been associated with mortality. In populations without ESRD, low testosterone level has also been associated with a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, low muscle mass, low bone mass, low physical performance, and frailty. However, there is controversy regarding what constitutes low testosterone level in the aging population and at what level replacement therapy with testosterone is indicated. There are no randomized controlled trials investigating long-term outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in populations with or without ESRD. Available trial results suggest equivocal improvements in sexual function. Muscle mass and bone mineral density appear to improve but results in physical function and performance are mixed and there are no data on fracture prevention. Some recent data suggest harm when testosterone was given to men with limited mobility. Finally, there is little evidence that testosterone adds to existing erythropoietin agents in the treatment of anemia in ESRD. Due to lack of evidence supporting long-term use of testosterone, the authors recommend against the routine use of testosterone in ESRD patients with low testosterone levels. Testosterone treatment can be considered in those with low bone mass and total testosterone level less than 200 ng/dL, or in younger patients with sexual complaints with total testosterone level lower than the reference range. It is important to engage patients in discussion of risks and benefits before initiating testosterone therapy; testosterone therapy should be discontinued if the intended treatment effect is not observed after short-term use. PMID:25376701

  13. Renal diagnosis without renal biopsy. Nephritis and sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D; Shires, M; Davison, A M

    2001-06-01

    Two examples of hereditary nephropathy within the context of clinical syndromes are described. Emphasis is put on the ability to make a renal diagnosis without renal biopsy and the benefits of screening relatives once a diagnosis is achieved. A variant of Alport's syndrome with associated macrothrombocytic thrombocytopenia, known as Epstein's syndrome, is reported. In addition siblings with Alström's syndrome characterized by pigmentary retinal degeneration (causing blindness in early childhood), progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive renal failure are reported. Both cases had previously presented for non-renal pathology in advance of the onset of symptomatic renal failure and may have benefited from appropriate screening.

  14. Cryoglobulinemia and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Charles E; Smith, Kelly D

    2008-05-01

    Cryoglobulinemia occurs in a variety of clinical settings including lymphoproliferative disorders, infection and autoimmune disease. The worldwide pandemic of hepatitis C virus infection has resulted in a significant increase in its extrahepatic complications including cryoglobulinemia and renal disease. Here we review the types of cryoglobulins, mechanisms of cryoglobulin formation, links between hepatitis C virus and renal disease, and current approaches to therapy. The prevalence of cryoglobulinemia in hepatitis C virus-infected individuals is surprisingly large and may be found in more than 50% of some infected subpopulations. Most of these patients will not have overt renal disease, but there is a population of unknown size of patients with subclinical glomerular disease that has the potential to become clinically significant. In cases of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemia, treatment remains focused on eradication of viremia, but interventions directed at B lymphocytes are increasingly utilized. The mechanisms of cryoglobulin formation and renal injury remain largely obscure, but recent evidence implicates the innate immune system in the initiation of disease. The most common renal injury associated with hepatitis C virus infection, in patients both with and without evidence of cryoglobulinemia, is membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. There has been increasing focus on defining the mechanisms that link these processes and the evolution of renal injury in all clinical settings of cryoglobulinemia.

  15. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Frank; Leung, Nelson; Hutchison, Colin A; Touchard, Guy; Sethi, Sanjeev; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Picken, Maria M; Herrera, Guillermo A; Kastritis, Efstathios; Merlini, Giampaolo; Roussel, Murielle; Fervenza, Fernando C; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-04-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) regroups all renal disorders caused by a monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) secreted by a nonmalignant B-cell clone. By definition, patients with MGRS do not meet the criteria for overt multiple myeloma/B-cell proliferation, and the hematologic disorder is generally consistent with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, MGRS is associated with high morbidity due to the severity of renal and sometimes systemic lesions induced by the MIg. Early recognition is crucial, as suppression of MIg secretion by chemotherapy often improves outcomes. The spectrum of renal diseases in MGRS is wide, including old entities such as AL amyloidosis and newly described lesions, particularly proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal Ig deposits and C3 glomerulopathy with monoclonal gammopathy. Kidney biopsy is indicated in most cases to determine the exact lesion associated with MGRS and evaluate its severity. Diagnosis requires integration of morphologic alterations by light microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy, and in some cases by IF staining for Ig isotypes, immunoelectron microscopy, and proteomic analysis. Complete hematologic workup with serum and urine protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, and serum-free light-chain assay is required. This review addresses the pathologic and clinical features of MGRS lesions, indications of renal biopsy, and a proposed algorithm for the hematologic workup.

  16. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  17. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  18. Amphibian renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Amphibians by nature have an intimate connection with the aquatic environment at some stage of development and fight an osmotic battle due to the influx of water. Many amphibians have acquired a more terrestrial existence at later stages of development and consequently have physiologic adaptations to conserve moisture. Renal adaptations have allowed amphibians successfully to bridge the gap between aqueous and terrestrial habitats. The kidneys, skin,and, in many amphibian species, the urinary bladder play key roles in fluid homeostasis. Renal impairment may be responsible for the clinical manifestation of disease, morbidity, and mortality.

  19. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  20. [Milk of calcium renal stone: echographic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Virgili, G; Rosi, P; Tamburro, F; Valitutti, M; Torelli, F; Vespasiani, G; Porena, M

    1996-12-01

    "Milk of calcium renal stone" (liquid renal calculosis) is a quite uncommon lithiasis distinguished by the presence of a semiliquid suspension of calcium salts or a "seed-like" sediment in a caliceal diverticulum or an ectasia segment of the collecting system. We reviewed 5 patients (1 male and 4 females, mean age 48.6 years), with a history of urinary tract infection, renal pain or haematuria. All patients underwent renal ultrasonographic assessment in both clinostatic and orthostatic position. Three patients underwent intravenous pyelography before ultrasound. Ultrasonography showed a sonolucent "levelled" image with a posterior acoustic shadow inside a hydro-caliceal dilation (2 pts.) or caliceal diverticulum (3 pts.); the persistence of the "level" in both clinostatic and orthostatic position allowed an immediate diagnosis in all patients. Intravenous pyelography performed before renal ultrasound showed no abnormality in 1 patient and was misleading in two; it otherwise confirmed the diagnosis when performed after renal ultrasonography. Three patients underwent surgery, two patients refused therapy; sonographic follow-up showed no evolution of the morphologic picture. Once considered as exceptional, liquid renal calculosis still remains rare pathology and accounts for 0.6% of all the urinary lithiasis diagnosed by ultrasound in our series. An accurate sonographic assessment allows a reliable diagnosis of this particular lithiasis and an easy discrimination from solid lithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, medullary sponge kidney and hydropyonephrosis. Hence, a correct diagnosis of this rare condition lets uneffective and improper treatments be avoided.

  1. Determination of the optimal case definition for the diagnosis of end-stage renal disease from administrative claims data in Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed

    Komenda, Paul; Yu, Nancy; Leung, Stella; Bernstein, Keevin; Blanchard, James; Sood, Manish; Rigatto, Claudio; Tangri, Navdeep

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a major public health problem with increasing prevalence and costs. An understanding of the long-term trends in dialysis rates and outcomes can help inform health policy. We determined the optimal case definition for the diagnosis of ESRD using administrative claims data in the province of Manitoba over a 7-year period. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and overall accuracy of 4 administrative case definitions for the diagnosis of ESRD requiring chronic dialysis over different time horizons from Jan. 1, 2004, to Mar. 31, 2011. The Manitoba Renal Program Database served as the gold standard for confirming dialysis status. During the study period, 2562 patients were registered as recipients of chronic dialysis in the Manitoba Renal Program Database. Over a 1-year period (2010), the optimal case definition was any 2 claims for outpatient dialysis, and it was 74.6% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 72.3%-76.9%) and 94.4% specific (95% CI 93.6%-95.2%) for the diagnosis of ESRD. In contrast, a case definition of at least 2 claims for dialysis treatment more than 90 days apart was 64.8% sensitive (95% CI 62.2%-67.3%) and 97.1% specific (95% CI 96.5%-97.7%). Extending the period to 5 years greatly improved sensitivity for all case definitions, with minimal change to specificity; for example, for the optimal case definition of any 2 claims for dialysis treatment, sensitivity increased to 86.0% (95% CI 84.7%-87.4%) at 5 years. Accurate case definitions for the diagnosis of ESRD requiring dialysis can be derived from administrative claims data. The optimal definition required any 2 claims for outpatient dialysis. Extending the claims period to 5 years greatly improved sensitivity with minimal effects on specificity for all case definitions.

  2. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  3. Renal injury due to hepatic hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Altay, Mustafa; Unverdi, Selman; Altay, Fatma Aybala; Ceri, Mevlüt; Akay, Hatice; Ozer, Hüseyin; Kiraç, Halil; Denizli, Nazim; Yilmaz, Bilal; Güvence, Necmettin; Duranay, Murat

    2010-08-01

    Many studies on renal hydatid disease have been reported in the literature, and the disease process appears to be well defined. However, renal injury without direct renal invasion remains poorly understood. The present study aims to define the frequency and the property of the renal involvement in hydatid disease. Eighty patients older than 18 years and diagnosed with liver echinococcosis were included in the study. The echinococcosis was diagnosed by the haemagglutination test and abdominal ultrasonography. Twenty-four-hour protein excretion was measured for patients who had elevated serum creatinine levels or whose urinalyses were positive for haematuria or proteinuria. Subsequently, renal biopsy was performed, and the specimens were examined by light microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. Haematuria was detected in 11 patients (13.75%), and proteinuria was detected in nine patients (11.25%). Percutaneous renal biopsy was applied to nine patients who gave signed consents to undergo the test. We detected four immunoglobulin A nephritis (together with tubulointerstitial nephritis in one patient), one membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, one immunoglobulin M nephritis together with mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis, one membranous glomerulonephritis, one amyloidosis and one tubulointerstitial nephritis. Renal hydatid cyst was detected only in four patients (5%). Hydatid disease, which affects the kidney, is not rare, and we suggest that urinalysis and, if indicated, renal biopsy should be performed for hepatic hydatid disease diagnosis.

  4. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  5. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  6. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Sourianarayanane, Achuthan; Thandassery, Ragesh B

    2016-06-01

    The development of decompensation in patients with cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality. Renal function gradually deteriorates with significant hemodynamic changes associated with decompensated liver disease, but may also rapidly decrease in response to precipitating events. Newer definitions of renal dysfunction may result in early diagnosis, this along with the use of sensitive markers helps in accurate determination of renal function in cirrhosis. Although renal dysfunction progresses slowly in cirrhotic patients, it is associated with increased mortality. Prompt intervention with appropriate management reduces the risk of renal dysfunction, as well as improving survival and quality of life. Appropriate management may include the removal of precipitating causes and use of pharmacological agents supporting circulatory dysfunction. Outcomes following treatment of this condition remain a major concern, especially in patients who develop hepatorenal syndrome. Transplantation of the liver or kidney and liver may be the only option when other modalities of treatment fail. Early transplantation may benefit these patients.

  7. Cystic Renal Disease in the Domestic Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Courtnye N; Rogers, Arlin B; Maurer, Kirk J; Lofgren, Jennifer LS; Fox, James G; Marini, Robert P

    2008-01-01

    Cystic renal diseases in domestic ferrets are a common anecdotal finding but have received scant systematic assessment. We performed a 17-y, case-control retrospective analysis of the medical records of 97 ferrets housed at our institution between 1987 and 2004, to determine the prevalence and morphotypes of cystic renal diseases in this species. Histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson trichrome, or periodic acid–Schiff were evaluated by a comparative pathologist, and statistical analysis of hematologic and serum chemistry values was correlated with morphologic diagnosis. Of the 97 available records, 43 were eliminated due to lack of accompanying tissues. Of the 54 remaining cases, 37 (69% prevalence) had documented renal cysts, and 14 of the 54 ferrets (26%) had primary polycystic disease consisting of either polycystic kidney disease affecting renal tubules or, more commonly, glomerulocystic kidney disease. Secondary polycystic lesions were identified in 11 ferrets (20%), and 12 ferrets (22%) exhibited focal or isolated tubular cysts only as an incidental necropsy finding. Ferrets with secondary renal cysts associated with other developmental anomalies, mesangial glomerulopathy, or end-stage kidney disease had hyperphosphatemia and elevated BUN in comparison with those with primary cystic disease and elevated BUN compared with those without renal lesions. Although reflecting institutional bias, these results implicate primary and secondary cystic renal diseases as highly prevalent and underreported in the domestic ferret. In addition to the clinical implications for ferrets as research subjects and pets, these findings suggest a potential value for ferrets as a model of human cystic renal diseases. PMID:18524174

  8. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

  9. Renal Complications of Fabry Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children. PMID:22898981

  10. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  11. The large spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Sheila; Pascual, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) among diabetic patients seems to be overestimated. Recent studies with renal biopsies show that the incidence of non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) among diabetic patients is higher than expected. Renal impairment of diabetic patients is frequently attributed to DN without meeting the KDOQI criteria or performing renal biopsy to exclude NDN. In this editorial, we update the spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients and the impact on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

  12. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital renal malformations using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, K P; Merchant, R H; Gondhalekar, A; Lulla, C P; Mehta, A A; Mehta, K P

    1998-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine the accuracy of antenatal sonography for the detection of congenital renal malformations and to characterize the type of malformations, seen in a 3-year prospective study at a university-affiliated maternity hospital. Participants were 31,217 pregnant women, during the study period, and subjects were 65 fetuses in whom renal malformations were detected on antenatal ultrasound. Pelvic ultrasound scans were performed at least once between 20 and 37 weeks' gestation on all pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the hospital for the detection of renal malformations. Fetal urinary sampling, diversion procedures, or termination of pregnancy were carried out as required in those detected to have renal anomalies. Postnatal diagnosis was confirmed by sonography or autopsy. Diagnostic procedures and renal surgery were performed postnatally if indicated. Sixty-five fetuses (0.2 per cent) were diagnosed to have congenital renal malformation antenatally at a mean gestational age of 28.4 weeks. A dilated urinary system was seen in 39, cystic renal disease in 15, agenesis/hypoplasia in six, combined lesions in four, and a horseshoe kidney in one. Oligohydramnios was noted in 20 (31 per cent) pregnancies. Multiple congenital malformations associated with renal anomalies were detected in 12 pregnancies. Termination was carried out at 20 weeks in two pregnancies for lethal malformations; fetal urinary sampling was done in two fetuses with obstructed uropathy, and a vesicoamniotic shunt inserted in one. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed a dilated urinary system in 32, cystic renal dysplasia in 15, renal aplasia/hypoplasia in five, combined lesions in six, and a horseshoe and an ectopic kidney in one each. Five infants were found to be normal. There were seven stillbirths and seven neonatal deaths. Radionuclide scans showed obstruction in nine, decreased renal function in six, and absent renal functions in 10 infants. Micturating

  13. Ultrasound diagnosis of fetal renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tiran; Sairam, Shanthi; Kumarasiri, Shanya

    2014-04-01

    Development of the urogenital system in humans is a complex process; consequently, renal anomalies are among the most common congenital anomalies. The fetal urinary tract can be visualised ultrasonically from 11 weeks onwards, allowing recognition of megacystis at 11-14 weeks, which warrants comprehensive risk assessment of possible underlying chromosomal aneuploidy or obstructive uropathy. A mid-trimester anomaly scan enables detection of most renal anomalies with higher sensitivity. Bilateral renal agenesis can be confirmed ultrasonically, with empty renal fossae and absent bladder filling, along with severe oligohydramnios or anhydramnios. Dysplastic kidneys are recognised as they appear large, hyperechoic, and with or without cystic spaces, which occurs within the renal cortex. Presence of dilated ureters without obvious dilatation of the collecting system needs careful examination of the upper urinary tract to exclude duplex kidney system. Sonographically, it is also possible to differentiate between infantile type and adult type of polycystic kidney diseases, which are usually single gene disorders. Upper urinary tract dilatation is one of the most common abnormalities diagnosed prenatally. It is usually caused by transient urine flow impairment at the level of the pelvi-ureteric junction and vesico-ureteric junction, which improves with time in most cases. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction is mainly caused by posterior urethral valves and urethral atresia. Thick bladder walls and a dilated posterior urethra (keyhole sign) are suggestive of posterior urethral valves. Prenatal ultrasounds cannot be used confidently to assess renal function. Liquor volume and echogenicity of renal parenchyma, however, can be used as a guide to indirectly assess the underlying renal reserve. Renal tract anomalies may be isolated but can also be associated with other congenital anomalies. Therefore, a thorough examination of the other systems is mandatory to exclude possible

  14. Bone disease after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Herberth, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In light of greatly improved long-term patient and graft survival after renal transplantation, improving other clinical outcomes such as risk of fracture and cardiovascular disease is of paramount importance. After renal transplantation, a large percentage of patients lose bone. This loss of bone results from a combination of factors that include pre-existing renal osteodystrophy, immunosuppressive therapy, and the effects of chronically reduced renal function after transplantation. In addition to low bone volume, histological abnormalities include decreased bone turnover and defective mineralization. Low bone volume and low bone turnover were recently shown to be associated with cardiovascular calcifications, highlighting specific challenges for medical therapy and the need to prevent low bone turnover in the pretransplant patient. This Review discusses changes in bone histology and mineral metabolism that are associated with renal transplantation and the effects of these changes on clinical outcomes such as fractures and cardiovascular calcifications. Therapeutic modalities are evaluated based on our understanding of bone histology. PMID:19918255

  15. Aluminum-related bone disease in mild and advanced renal failure: evidence for high prevalence and morbidity and studies on etiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Faugère, M C; Abreo, K; Fanti, P; Julian, B; Malluche, H H

    1986-01-01

    To study aluminum-related bone disease, bone biopsies and serum biochemical measurements were done in 97 patients on maintenance dialysis and in 100 patients with mild to moderate renal failure. Bone histology, histochemical staining for aluminum and determination of bone aluminum content were done. Stainable bone aluminum was found in 50% of dialyzed patients and in 5% of nondialyzed patients. The finding of stainable bone aluminum in dialyzed patients was associated with high morbidity and mortality; it was not only seen in most patients with low turnover osteomalacia, but also in 47% of patients with mixed uremic osteodystrophy and in 1 patient with predominant hyperparathyroid bone disease. Patients with stainable aluminum had lower bone mass and decreased activity of bone-forming and -resorbing cells. Cumulative doses of aluminum-containing phosphate binders were a major risk factor. Aluminum in drinking water represents an additional risk factor. Neither serum biochemical tests nor single infusion of deferoxamine could be employed as diagnostic tools. Bone biopsies were the only means for diagnosis.

  16. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed.

  17. [Renal artery stenosis : atheromatous disease and fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    Renal artery stenosis may be due to atheromatous disease or renal fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). Management of both diseases requires treatment of hypertension usually observed in such patients; however, clinical presentation, mechanism and treatment of these 2 diseases are usually different. Renal FMD is now considered as a systemic disease, the cause of which may be genetic (although the exact cause is still elusive). Renal arteries are the most frequent localizations of FMD, but extra renal arteries may also be involved (usually carotid arteries). Risk factors of hypertension-induced renal FMD include estrogen treatment and smoking. Renal FMD are mostly found in young women and in children who present with recent severe and/or refractory symptomatic hypertension. Diagnosis is usually easy (Doppler, CT-scan), and treatment of renal FMD is angioplasty in most cases. Atheromatous renal artery stenosis is usually found in patients with other atheromatous disease (peripheral artery disease, carotid, coronary artery disease...). Clinical presentation include severe or refractory hypertension, recurrent flash pulmonary edema in a patient with hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction spontaneously or after medical treatment with converting-enzyme inhibition or angiotensin II blockade, hypertension in a patient (usually smoker or ex-smoker) with diffuse atheromatous vascular disease. Management of atheromatous renal artery disease is medical treatment in all patients (aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, control of arterial pressure); revascularization is required in some patients only since it rarely cures hypertension: the goal of revascularization is mostly renal function protection, which may be observed in selected patients. Revascularization must be decided by physicians or teams involved in the care of such patients. Patients with atheromatous renal artery disease are at very high renal and cardiovascular risk : aggressive management of

  18. [Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of renal diseases in HIV infected patients. Recommendations of the Spanish AIDS Study Group/National AIDS Plan].

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of opportunistic infections and tumours in HIV-infected patients has sharply declined in the HAART era. At the same time there has been a growing increase of other diseases not directly linked to immunodeficiency. Renal diseases are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In the general population, chronic renal failure has considerable multiorgan repercussions that have particular implications in patients with HIV infection. The detection of occult or subclinical chronic kidney disease is crucial since effective measures for delaying progression exist. Furthermore, the deterioration in glomerular filtration should prompt clinicians to adjust doses of some antiretroviral agents and other drugs used for treating associated comorbidities. Suppression of viral replication, strict control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, and avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs in certain patients are fundamental components of programs aimed to prevent renal damage and delaying progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV. Renal transplantation and dialysis have also special implications in HIV-infected patients. In this article, we summarise the updated clinical practice guidelines for the evaluation, management and prevention of renal diseases in HIV-infected patients from a panel of experts in HIV and nephrologists on behalf of the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan.

  19. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  20. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  1. [Difficult diagnosis in a case of hematuria (Berger's disease)].

    PubMed

    Cambié, M; D'Agrosa, F; Di Pietro, C; Dotti, G; Liotta, M; Merli, B; Olivieri, M; Tamburini, G; Gaboardi, F

    1986-01-01

    A seven years old boy presented with gross hematuria associated with clots and transitory renal insufficiency. The urinary sediment showed only monomorphic red blood cells. Subsequently urinary sediment completely modified: namely only dysmorphic red blood cells and hyaline granular casts were found and within a week renal function become normal. The clinical diagnosis of Berger's disease was possible only with renal biopsy.

  2. [Acute renal failure: a rare presentation of Addison's disease].

    PubMed

    Salhi, Houda

    2016-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare condition. Its onset of symptoms most often is nonspecific contributing to a diagnostic and therapeutic delay. Acute renal failure can be the first manifestation of this disease. We report the case of a patient with Addison's disease who was initially treated for acute renal failure due to multiple myeloma and whose diagnosis was adjusted thereafter. Patient's condition dramatically improved after treatment with intravenous rehydration; injectable hydrocortisone.

  3. [Renal artery stenosis. Pathophysiology--diagnosis--therapy].

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Konorza, Thomas Friedrich Michael; Eggebrecht, Holger; Naber, Christoph Kurt; Philipp, Sebastian; Philipp, Thomas; Kribben, Andreas; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-05-15

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is both a common and progressive disease and its prevalence in patients > 65 years is 6.8%. In patients with known or suspected atherosclerosis undergoing coronary angiography, a frequency of even 11-23% is reported in the literature. Despite this high prevalence, there is an ongoing discussion about the indications for revascularization and it is currently unclear, whether renal artery revascularization reduces adverse cardiovascular and renal events. Nevertheless, the number of interventions for RAS is rising steadily, although up to 40% of patients do not profit from this intervention. This fact underlines the necessity of a thorough diagnostic work-up before intervention, integrating morphological and functional tests. For morphological evaluation, multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance tomography or digital subtraction angiography can be done. In experienced centers, Doppler ultrasound can serve as an excellent functional tool, to assess the physiological relevance of an RAS, but also invasive measurements of pressure and flow provide valuable information about the significance of stenoses; however, these methods will have to be assessed with respect to their value to predict long-term outcome. Although percutaneous intervention of RAS is associated with a substantially lower risk of major adverse events as compared to surgery, by using contrast media this procedure holds the risk of deterioration of renal function and of a small number of procedure-dependent complications as well. Thus, a careful consideration of pros and cons of this procedure is mandatory.

  4. Asymptomatic inferior vena cava abnormalities in three children with end-stage renal disease: risk factors and screening guidelines for pretransplant diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S E; Hickman, R O; Tapper, D; Shaw, D W; Fouser, L S; McDonald, R A

    2000-02-01

    We report two children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) found to have inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis at the time of renal transplantation. The children suffered from renal diseases that included congenital hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension as part of their pathophysiology. Neither child had evidence of hypercoaguability or clinical symptoms of IVC thrombosis. Prior to transplantation, the renal replacement therapy consisted primarily of peritoneal dialysis. During their hospital courses, these children had central venous catheters placed for temporary hemodialysis, episodes of peritonitis and numerous abdominal surgeries. The medical literature to date has not identified a link between IVC thrombosis and portal hypertension, nor has an association between the patients' primary renal disease and IVC thrombosis been found. We also report the finding of asymptomatic IVC narrowing in a third patient with obstructive uropathy, colonic dysmotility and numerous abdominal surgeries. IVC narrowing was diagnosed by CT scan during his pretransplant evaluation. In this paper, we consider similarities between these three patients that may have predisposed each of them to asymptomatic IVC pathology, including large-bore central venous access as young children and/or recurrent scarring abdominal processes. A discussion regarding appropriate screening of the 'high-risk patient' for IVC pathology prior to kidney transplantation and surgical options for children with this rare complication are presented.

  5. Application of radiation grafted media for lectin affinity separation and urease immobilization: A novel approach to tumor therapy and renal disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Schulte, D.; Daschek, W.

    1995-09-01

    Carriers modified by synergistic radiation grafting are used as affinity media for the separation of a lectin from a mistletoe extract. The grafted supports show distinctly superior properties when compared to conventional affinity media. The application of these carriers as urease immobilization support incorporated in a conductimetric bioreactor for urea analysis as potential diagnostic device in renal diseases is also described.

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus-accompanied renal calculi complicated with renal tumor: 5 case reports].

    PubMed

    He, Chong-jun; Qin, Cai-peng; Li, Jian-xing; Xiong, Liu-lin; Xu, Qing-quan; Yang, Bo; Xu, Tao; Huang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2014-08-18

    To investigate the diagnosis and treatment of renal pelvic tumor combined with renal urinary calculi and hydronephrosis. Five patients with renal pelvic tumor who underwent relief of the upper urinary obstruction were reviewed. One of the cases lost the opportunity of surgical therapy when pelvic tumor was detected at the advanced stage, and the other 4 cases had received surgery and were followed up. As pelvic tumor progresses rapidly after the renal blood flow is improved, and renal urinary calculi with hydronephrosis relieved; the patients with renal pelvic tumor need early diagnosis, aggressive treatment and close follow-up.

  7. Bone biopsy in the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce B

    2004-01-01

    When renal disease develops, mineral and vitamin D homeostasis is disrupted, resulting in diverse manifestations in bone cells and structure as well as the rate of bone turnover. In ESRF when patients require chronic maintenance dialysis, nearly all of them have abnormal bone histology named renal osteodystrophy (ROD). On the other hand, survival rates of patients on dialysis have increased with improved dialytic therapy and the resultant increased duration of dialysis has led to a rise in renal osteodystrophy. Because this metabolic bone disease can produce fractures, bone pain, and deformities late in the course of the disease, prevention and early treatment are essential. Serum PTH levels are commonly used to assess bone turnover in dialyzed patients. However, it is found that serum PTH levels between 65 and 450 pg/ml seen in the majority of dialysis patients are not predictive of the underlying bone disease. To date, bone biopsy is the most powerful and informative diagnostic tool to provide important information on precisely the type of renal osteodystrophy affecting patients, the degree of severity of the lesions, and the presence and amount of aluminum and strontium deposition in bone. Bone biopsy is not only useful in clinical settings but also in research to assess the effects of therapies on bone. Although considered as an invasive procedure, bone biopsy has been proven as safe and free from major complications besides pain, haematoma or wound infections, but the operator's experience and skill is important in minimizing morbidity. Alternatives to bone biopsy continue to be pursued, but the non-invasive bone markers have not been proven to hold sufficient diagnostic performance related to the bone turnover, mineralization process and bone cell abnormality. At present however, the transiliac bone biopsy remains the golden standard in the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy.

  8. Uric Acid and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The interrelationship between uric acid and renal disease is reviewed in a historical context. Four phases can be distinguished--the descriptions of uric acid stones and gravel in the eighteenth century, of chronically scarred kidneys containing urate crystals in the nineteenth, the appearance of the syndrome of acute urate nephropathy following tumour lysis in the mid twentieth century, and finally the realization that soluble urate affects both systemic and glomerular blood vessels, and may play a role in both hypertension and chronic renal damage.

  9. [Radionuclide diagnosis of the ureteral motor function and urodynamics in renal tuberculosis and other diseases of the urinary system].

    PubMed

    Savin, I B

    1994-01-01

    Radionuclide methods (a new technique of infusion dynamic ureteroscintigraphy and standard techniques of dynamic and static scintigraphy of the kidneys, radionuclide renography) were used to examine 134 patients with nephrophthisis, 61 patients with other urological diseases and 51 controls. It is shown that nephrophthisis brings urodynamic disorders and impairment of ureteral contractility. Three types of the contractile disorders are distinguished. A decline in motor function and urodynamic defects occurred also in other urological affections. Sensitive radionuclide techniques are thought valuable in examination of the urinary system and objective evaluation of urodynamic disorders.

  10. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    HAMIDI MADANI, Ali; ENSHAEI, Ahmad; POURREZA, Farshid; ESMAEILI, Samaneh; HAMIDI MADANI, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  11. Diagnosis of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Clinical presentation of Wilson disease can vary widely; therefore diagnosis is not always straightforward. Wilson disease is not just a disease of children and young adults, but may present at any age. The key features of Wilson disease are liver disease and cirrhosis, neuropsychiatric disturbances, Kayser-Fleischer rings, and acute episodes of hemolysis, often in association with acute liver failure. Diagnosis is particularly difficult in children and in adults presenting with active liver disease. None of the available laboratory tests is perfect and may not be specific for Wilson disease. A detailed neurologic examination is required for all cases. Neuroimaging and electrophysiologic methods are helpful. To overcome the diagnostic challenge, several clinical signs (Kayser-Fleischer rings, neurologic symptoms) and laboratory features (copper in serum, urine, liver; serum ceruloplasmin; genetic testing) are scored 0 (absent) to 2 (present) and the Leipzig score is calculated. If the score is ≥4, the diagnosis of Wilson disease is very likely. For asymptomatic siblings of index patients, mutation analysis is the most reliable approach. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. New primary renal diagnosis codes for the ERA-EDTA

    PubMed Central

    Venkat-Raman, Gopalakrishnan; Tomson, Charles R.V.; Gao, Yongsheng; Cornet, Ronald; Stengel, Benedicte; Gronhagen-Riska, Carola; Reid, Chris; Jacquelinet, Christian; Schaeffner, Elke; Boeschoten, Els; Casino, Francesco; Collart, Frederic; De Meester, Johan; Zurriaga, Oscar; Kramar, Reinhard; Jager, Kitty J.; Simpson, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Registry has produced a new set of primary renal diagnosis (PRD) codes that are intended for use by affiliated registries. It is designed specifically for use in renal centres and registries but is aligned with international coding standards supported by the WHO (International Classification of Diseases) and the International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization (SNOMED Clinical Terms). It is available as supplementary material to this paper and free on the internet for non-commercial, clinical, quality improvement and research use, and by agreement with the ERA-EDTA Registry for use by commercial organizations. Conversion between the old and the new PRD codes is possible. The new codes are very flexible and will be actively managed to keep them up-to-date and to ensure that renal medicine can remain at the forefront of the electronic revolution in medicine, epidemiology research and the use of decision support systems to improve the care of patients. PMID:23175621

  13. Recent advances in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Moorthi, Ranjani N; Moe, Sharon M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is the term used to describe a constellation of biochemical abnormalities, bone disturbances that may lead to fractures, and extraskeletal calcification in soft tissues and arteries seen in CKD. This review focuses on the noninvasive diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy, the term used exclusively to define the bone pathology associated with CKD. Transiliac bone biopsy and histomorphometry with double-labeled tetracycline or its derivatives remains the gold standard for diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. However, histomorphometry provides a 'window' into bone only at a single point in time, and is not clinically practical for studying continuous changes in bone morphology. Furthermore, the etiology of fractures in CKD is multifactorial and not fully explained by histomorphometry findings alone. The propensity of a bone to fracture is determined by bone strength, which is affected by bone mass and bone quality; the latter is a term used to describe the structure and composition of bone. Bone quantity is traditionally assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and CT-based methods. Bone quality is more difficult to assess noninvasively, but newer techniques are emerging and are described in this review. Ultimately, the optimal diagnostic strategy for renal osteodystrophy may be a combination of multiple imaging techniques and biomarkers that are specific to each gender and race in CKD, with a goal of predicting fracture risk and optimizing therapy.

  14. HIV-associated renal disease - an overview.

    PubMed

    Wearne, Nicola; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    The cause of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in South Africa (SA) was worsened by the denial by key political players that HIV causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). South Africa continues to have the highest rate of HIV world-wide, which has had a huge impact on the development of both chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury. Fortunately, there is now an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) roll-out program. SA is also dealing with a collision of epidemics of HIV, tuberculosis, and non-communicable disease, particularly hypertension and diabetes. This has been evidenced by recent data seen in the reinstated SA renal registry. There is also an unacceptably high rate of tuberculosis in regions of SA, this has led to high rates of granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) and case reports of TB-GIN immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) remains common in SA and responds well to ART. The definitive diagnosis requires a renal biopsy, which is often not possible in many regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Unfortunately, there is still a high rate of HIVAN in SA due to late presentation and lack of effective screening for renal disease in HIV-positive patients. Transplantation for HIV-positive donors to positive recipients offers a unique and encouraging way forward for these patients.

  15. Women, renal disease and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Andrew; Radovic, Milan; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2013-01-01

    A number of glomerular diseases may occur in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in such patients should be planned when the disease has been in remission for a minimum of six months in order to minimize maternal and fetal complications. Immunosuppressive agents should be optimized prior to conception to include those that are safe for pregnancy. The complexity of medical management when caring for these patients calls for a multidisciplinary team approach, consisting of a nephrologist, rheumatologist, obstetrician and a pharmacist. This review will address the physiological changes of pregnancy that may affect glomerular disease presentation, activity, and diagnosis; specific glomerular diseases, both primary and secondary to systemic diseases, in the context of pregnancy; fetal and maternal complications, and long-term effects; diagnosis and differential diagnosis; and treatment strategies that are considered relatively safe with respect to fetal intrauterine exposure. PMID:23978545

  16. Diuretic use in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2011-12-20

    Diuretics are agents commonly used in diseases characterized by excess extracellular fluid, including chronic kidney disease, the nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis and heart failure. Multiple diuretic classes, including thiazide-type diuretics, loop diuretics and K(+)-sparing diuretics, are used to treat patients with these diseases, either individually or as combination therapies. An understanding of what determines a patient's response to a diuretic is a prerequisite to the correct use of these drugs. The response of patients with these diseases to diuretics, which is related to the dose, is best described by a sigmoid curve whose contour can become distorted by any of the several sodium-retaining states that are directly or indirectly associated with renal disease. Diuretic actions are of considerable importance to patients who have renal disease, as their effective use assists in extracellular fluid volume control, reducing excretion of protein in urine and lessening the risk of developing hyperkalemia. Diuretic-related adverse events that involve the uric acid, Na(+) and K(+) axes are not uncommon; therefore the clinician must be vigilant in looking for biochemical disturbances. As a result of diuretic-related adverse events, clinicians must be resourceful in the dose amount and frequency of dosing.

  17. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  18. Angiogenic factors and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Julie S; Young, Brett C; Rana, Sarosh

    2011-01-01

    Background. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in patients with underlying renal disease and proteinuria. Prior studies show that there is an angiogenic factor imbalance with elevated levels of antiangiogenic proteins soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and soluble endoglin (sEng) and reduced levels of the proangiogenic protein, placental growth factor (PlGF) in women with preeclampsia. These angiogenic biomarkers may be useful in distinguishing preeclampsia from other conditions of pregnancy, which may present with overlapping clinical characteristics. Cases. Case 1: A multiparous woman at 18 weeks gestation with nephrotic syndrome presented with hypertensive emergency and worsening renal insufficiency. She underwent induction of labor for severe preeclampsia. Her sFlt1 and sEng levels were at the 97 percentile while her PlGF level was undetectable (less than the 1st percentile). Case 2: A nulliparous woman with lupus nephritis at 22 weeks gestation presented with fetal demise and heart failure. Three weeks previously, the patient had developed thrombocytopenia and hypertensive urgency. She underwent dilation and evacuation. Her angiogenic profile was consistent with severe preeclampsia. Conclusion. Angiogenic factors may provide evidence to support a diagnosis of preeclampsia in patients with preexisting renal disease and proteinuria, conditions in which the classical definition of hypertension and proteinuria cannot be used.

  19. Impact of pregnancy on underlying renal disease.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves marked renal vasodilation and large increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Studies in rats reveal that the gestational renal vasodilation is achieved by parallel reductions in tone in afferent and efferent arterioles so GFR rises without a change in glomerular blood pressure. There is some evidence from animal studies that increased renal generation of nitric oxide (NO) may be involved. Although chronic renal vasodilation has been implicated in causing progression of renal disease in nonpregnant states by glomerular hypertension, there are no long-term deleterious effects of pregnancies on the kidney when maternal renal function is normal because glomerular blood pressure remains normal. When maternal renal function is compromised before conception, there are no long-term adverse effects on renal function in most types of renal disease, providing that the GFR is well maintained before conception. When serum creatinine exceeds approximately 1.4 mg/dL, pregnancy may accelerate the renal disease increases and when serum creatinine >2 mg/dL, the chances are greater than 1 in 3 that pregnancy will hasten the progression of the renal disease. The available animal studies suggest that glomerular hypertension does not occur despite diverse injuries. Thus, the mechanisms of the adverse interaction between pregnancy and underlying renal disease remain unknown.

  20. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease.

  1. Replicative senescence in kidney aging, renal disease, and renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Naesens, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Cellular or replicative senescence is classically seen as the key element of aging. In renal disease and after kidney transplantation, there is increasing evidence that replicative senescence pathways (p53 and p16) play a central role in disease progression and graft outcome, independent of chronological age. In this review, we summarize the current concepts in the molecular mechanisms of cellular senescence, and correlate these theories with the available literature on aging of native kidneys, kidney diseases, and outcome of renal allografts. Recent data illustrate the complex biology of senescence in vivo, and disprove the concept that senescence is an intrinsic injury process with immanent deleterious consequences. Senescence acts as a homeostatic mechanism that can even limit renal fibrosis, at least in animal studies. In a human setting, it remains to be investigated whether cellular senescence plays an active or a bystander role in fibrogenesis and atrophy of renal tissue.

  2. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  3. [Atheroembolic renal disease: a diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Turina, Silvia; Venturelli, Chiara; Dallera, Nadia; Valerio, Francesca; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Faberi, Elena; Sottini, Laura; Kenou, Rosyane

    2008-01-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease is a part of a multisystem disease and can be defined as renal failure secondary to the occlusion of renal arterioles and glomerular capillaries with cholesterol crystal emboli deriving from the aorta and other major arteries. The kidney is usually involved because of the proximity of the renal arteries to abdominal aorta (where the erosion of atheromatous plaque is most likely to occur), and the high renal blood flow. Cholesterol crystal embolism can also occur in other visceral organs, as well as in the upper and lower extremities. Embolization may occur spontaneously or after angiographic and surgical procedures, and anticoagulation. Atheroembolic renal disease is an important yet underdiagnosed component of the spectrum of kidney diseases associated with atherosclerosis and remains an unexplored field of nephrology research.

  4. Diagnosis of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Eric; Oesch, Bruno; Raeber, Alex J

    2003-01-01

    Prion diseases are usually diagnosed clinically and confirmed by post-mortem histopathological examination of brain tissue. The only reliable molecular marker for prion diseases is PrP(Sc), the pathological conformer of the prion protein that accumulates in the central nervous system and, to a lesser extent, in lymphoreticular tissues. For BSE, several commercial diagnostic kits based on the post-mortem immunochemical detection of PrP(Sc) in brain tissue are now available. These rapid screening tests have been used in active surveillance of BSE and have greatly improved the detection of infected cattle before their entry into the human food chain. At present, no diagnostic test exists for the detection of prion diseases in live animals or humans. New diagnostic techniques aimed at increasing sensitivity and specificity of PrP(Sc) detection in body fluids and at identifying novel surrogate markers are under development. In this report, we review the classical diagnostic methods as well as present and future tools for the diagnosis of prion diseases.

  5. Spectrum of renal disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jessie; Dwyer, Karen M; Hill, Prue; See, Emily; Ekinci, Elif I; Jerums, George; MacIsaac, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    The spectrum of renal disease in patients with diabetes encompasses both diabetic kidney disease (including albuminuric and non-albuminuric phenotypes) and non-diabetic kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease can manifest as varying degrees of renal insufficiency and albuminuria, with heterogeneity in histology reported on renal biopsy. For patients with diabetes and proteinuria, the finding of non-diabetic kidney disease alone or superimposed on the changes of diabetic nephropathy is increasingly reported. It is important to identify non-diabetic kidney disease as some forms are treatable, sometimes leading to remission. Clinical indications for a heightened suspicion of non-diabetic kidney disease and hence consideration for renal biopsy in patients with diabetes and nephropathy include absence of diabetic retinopathy, short duration of diabetes, atypical chronology, presence of haematuria or other systemic disease, and the nephrotic syndrome.

  6. [Genetic kidney diseases: new perspectives on diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bouatou, Yassine; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Parvex, Paloma; De Seigneux, Sophie

    2016-02-24

    Suspected renal inherited disorders are regularly evaluated in nephrology consultations both in adults and children. A positive family history and/or a typical phenotype should lead to genetic investigations. A confirmatory diagnosis integrated in a multidisciplinary genetic counseling approach gives patient guidance for further pregnancy. It also allows physician to better stratify disease risk and indicates treatment in some cases. The time to diagnosis and costs have been dramatically reduced thanks to next generation sequencing in several cases of complex inherited nephrologic syndromes.

  7. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  8. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  9. Renal vascular disease in neurofibromatosis type 2: association or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Gardner, Kate R; Huson, Susan M; Stewart, Helen; Elston, John S; Howard, Emma L; Tullus, Kjell O; Pike, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) remains a challenging diagnosis in childhood where there may be no neurological involvement. A 12-month-old male in whom NF2 was suspected because of characteristic ophthalmological and cutaneous lesions is reported. Cranial MRI showed no tumours. A pathogenic mutation was identified on NF2 gene analysis. The child developed hypertension due to renal vascular disease. Although renal vascular disease is a recognized complication of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), it has not been reported in NF2.

  10. Renal involvement in cystic fibrosis: diseases spectrum and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Yasmina; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hubert, Dominique; Mosnier-Pudar, Helen; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Stern, Marc; Grenet, Dominique; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Fakhouri, Fadi

    2009-05-01

    Clinically relevant kidney involvement is uncommonly described in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We sought to report on a series of patients with CF and kidney biopsy-documented renal involvement. A retrospective study was undertaken in two referral centers for adult patients with CF in Paris, France. Patients who had undergone a biopsy of native kidneys between 1992 and 2008 were identified, and their medical records were reviewed. We identified 13 adult patients with CF and renal disease. Proteinuria was present in all but two cases and was associated with progressive renal impairment in four patients (median serum creatinine 85 micromol/L; range 53 to 144 micromol/L). Renal biopsy disclosed a heterogeneous spectrum of nephropathies including AA amyloidosis (n = 3), diabetic glomerulopathy (n = 3), FSGS (n = 2), minimal-change disease (n = 1), postinfectious glomerulonephritis (n = 1), IgA nephropathy related to Henoch-Schönlein purpura (n = 1), membranous nephropathy (n = 1), and chronic interstitial nephropathy (n = 1). Chronic renal failure occurred in five patients, and one patient reached ESRD. Although rare, clinically significant renal disease may arise in young adult patients with CF. Given the wide spectrum of diseases that may be encountered, definite diagnosis by kidney biopsy is mandatory to optimize clinical treatment of these complex patients, particularly in the perspective of organ transplantation.

  11. [Diagnosis of Hansen's disease].

    PubMed

    Yotsu, Rie Roselyne; Suzuki, Koichi; Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2011-02-01

    The Leprosy Mailing List (LML) is an e-mailing list open to whoever interested in the field from all over the world. It acts as a forum for exchanging information related to Hansen's disease. It was established in February 2001 in Italy, and the present moderator of the LML is Dr. Salvatore Noto. He and his colleague have recently introduced an atlas for diagnosing Hansen's disease which they brought together information and photos collected through the LML. The atlas is divided into three sections, (1) Introduction, (2) Cardinal signs, and (3) Diagnosis and the clinical spectrum of leprosy, and they are all accompanied with relevant photos. This time, Dr. Noto kindly permitted us to translate the atlas into Japanese to be published in the Japanese Journal of Leprosy and posted in the Japanese Leprosy Association homepage. This article includes the translation and some of the most informative photos. For more information, please refer to the homepage where you will find all photos in the atlas.

  12. Interventional ultrasound in detection and treatment of renal inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Kuligowska, E; Newman, B; White, S J; Caldarone, A

    1983-05-01

    Fifty-one patients with acute inflammatory renal disease were examined with ultrasound. The spectrum of findings seen in acute pyelonephritis is described, with emphasis on the evolution of the disease from acute focal inflammation to perinephric extension. There were 26 cases of acute bacterial nephritis, 15 cases of abscess formation, and 10 cases of pyohydronephrosis. Pathologic correlation was obtained. The impact of percutaneous needle puncture on the diagnosis and treatment of all stages of renal disease is discussed. Prompt diagnosis can be made, and specific antibiotic therapy can be instituted on the basis of information obtained by ultrasound examination and percutaneous aspiration. If necessary, treatment may be aided by ultrasonically guided placement of drainage catheters. Serial examination will show resolution of the disease, and it avoids exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and intravenous contrast agents.

  13. [Pregnancy in patients with underlying renal disease].

    PubMed

    Golshayan, D; Mathieu, C; Burnier, M

    2007-03-07

    Pregnancy has generally been regarded as very high risk in women with chronic renal insufficiency. In this review, we describe the physiologic changes in systemic and renal haemodynamics during pregnancy, as well as the nature and severity of possible maternal and foetal complications in the setting of underlying renal disease. The risks are proportional to the degree of functional renal impairment, the presence or not of proteinuria and/or arterial hypertension at the time of conception, and are related to the type of underlying nephropathy or systemic disease in the mother. Furthermore, if the renal disease has been diagnosed before pregnancy, a better planning of the moment of conception, as well as a tight follow-up, allow for a better maternal and obstetrical outcome.

  14. Multiple Renal and Splenic Lesions in Cat Scratch Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Matsunaga, Manaka; Kodama, Yuichi; Miyazono, Akinori; Seki, Shunji; Ikeda, Naohiro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-21

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an infectious disease caused by Bartonella henselae. Atypical clinical presentations of CSD include prolonged fever and multiple hepatosplenic lesions. Furthermore, multiple renal lesions are extremely rare in CSD. An 11-year-old Japanese girl presented at our hospital with a prolonged fever of unknown cause after being scratched and bitten by a kitten. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple small, round hypodense lesions in both kidneys and the spleen. Based on her history and the CT results, her diagnosis was CSD. The diagnosis was confirmed by serological tests, which indicated antibodies against B. henselae. After treatment with azithromycin, her fever immediately improved. Careful history taking and imaging are essential for the diagnosis of atypical CSD. In CT images, not only hepatosplenic lesions but also renal lesions are important features indicative of a diagnosis of atypical CSD. Subsequently, a diagnosis of CSD can be confirmed by specific serological tests. This is the first reported Japanese case of multiple renal and splenic lesions in a patient with CSD. Although difficult to diagnose, an early diagnosis atypical CSD and appropriate treatment are important to prevent complications and the need for invasive examinations.

  15. [Indinavir-associated tubulointerstitial renal disease].

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Raymonde F; Mehio, Amira; Iqbal, Sameena; Tsoukas, Christos M

    2007-12-01

    Indinavir, used for the treatment of HIV disease, forms distinctive crystals in the urine. The crystalluria has been associated principally with several urinary tract abnormalities which may require discontinuation of the drug. We present a case of progressive leucocyturia and renal impairment occurring during indinavir treatment which illustrates vividly the impact of the crystalluria on the tubulointerstitial renal compartment.

  16. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Parikh, Samir M; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as key players in genetic and acquired renal diseases. Most mitochondrial cytopathies that cause renal symptoms are characterized by tubular defects, but glomerular, tubulointerstitial and cystic diseases have also been described. For example, defects in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis and the mitochondrial DNA 3243 A>G mutation are important causes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in children and in adults, respectively. Although they sometimes present with isolated renal findings, mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with symptoms related to central nervous system and neuromuscular involvement. They can result from mutations in nuclear genes that are inherited according to classic Mendelian rules or from mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which are transmitted according to more complex rules of mitochondrial genetics. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders involves clinical characterization of patients in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses. In particular, prompt diagnosis of CoQ10 biosynthesis defects is imperative because of their potentially reversible nature. In acute kidney injury (AKI), mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the physiopathology of tissue injury, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis has an important role in the recovery of renal function. Potential therapies that target mitochondrial dysfunction or promote mitochondrial regeneration are being developed to limit renal damage during AKI and promote repair of injured tissue.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Parikh, Samir M.; Salviati, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as key players in genetic and acquired renal diseases. Most mitochondrial cytopathies that cause renal symptoms are characterized by tubular defects, but glomerular, tubulointerstitial and cystic diseases have also been described. For example, defects in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis and the mitochondrial DNA 3243 A>G mutation are important causes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in children and in adults, respectively. Although they sometimes present with isolated renal findings, mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with symptoms related to central nervous system and neuromuscular involvement. They can result from mutations in nuclear genes that are inherited according to classic Mendelian rules or from mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which are transmitted according to more complex rules of mitochondrial genetics. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders involves clinical characterization of patients in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses. In particular, prompt diagnosis of CoQ10 biosynthesis defects is imperative because of their potentially reversible nature. In acute kidney injury (AKI), mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the physiopathology of tissue injury, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis has an important role in the recovery of renal function. Potential therapies that target mitochondrial dysfunction or promote mitochondrial regeneration are being developed to limit renal damage during AKI and promote repair of injured tissue. PMID:26804019

  19. Analysis of renal diseases detected in renal biopsies of adult patients: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Salman; Drohlia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Salman, Beena; Ahmad, Aasim

    2017-01-01

    Renal biopsy is crucial while evaluating for the diagnosis of glomerular, vascular, tubulointerstitial, and genetic diseases. It gives vital information which helps in estimating the disease prognosis, progression, and management. This is the retrospective analysis of all adult patients aged above 18 years, who underwent percutaneous renal biopsy at The Kidney Center Post Graduate Training Institute, Karachi, over a duration of 18 years, i.e., January 1, 1996, to December 2013. Renal graft biopsies and those which were inadequate were excluded from analysis. Of the1962 biopsies performed, we included 1521 biopsies in our assessment. The mean age of the population was 38 ± 15.26 years (range 18-88 years). There were 920 (60.5%) males and 601 (39.5%) females. The most common clinical indication of kidney biopsy was nephrotic syndrome, i.e., 741 (45.7%), followed by chronic kidney disease, 253 (16.6%); acute renal failure, 184; (12.1%) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN), 124 (8.2%). Primary GN was found in the majority of the patients, 984 (64.7%), followed by secondary GN in 249 (16.4%), tubulointerstitial disease in 224 (14.7%), and vascular disease in 64 (4.2%). In primary GN, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common histopathological diagnosis in 297 (19.5%) patients, followed by MGN in 224 (14.7%), chronic GN in 98 (6.4%), crescentic GN in 93 (6.1%), minimal change disease in 87 (5.7%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in 58 (3.8%), and postinfection glomerulonephritis in 53 (3.5%) patients. This study shows that focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is the most common lesion in renal biopsy in the young age group followed by membranous nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy and chronic interstitial nephritis were dominant secondary pathological lesions in older age group, whereas lupus nephritis was the most common secondary disease in young age females.

  20. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  1. [Childhood genetic renal diseases in southern Israel].

    PubMed

    Landau, Daniel; Shalev, Hanna

    2010-03-01

    Genetic kidney diseases (GKDs) are an important and well-known entity in pediatric nephrology. Advances in genetic and molecular approaches in the last 15 years have enabled elucidation of the underlying molecular defects in many of these disorders. Herein, the authors summarize the progress that has been made over this period in disclosing the molecular basis of several novel GKDs which were characterized in this area and include Bartter syndrome type IV, type II Bartter syndrome and transient neonatal hyperkalemia, cystinuria and mental retardation, familial hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile nephronophthisis and familial hemolytic uremic syndrome with factor H deficiency. Retrospective analysis of the authors' data reveals that GKDs are over-represented among the pediatric population in southern Israel. GKD are seen 4 times more often than end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and comprise 38% of all cases of ESRD in our area. This high rate of GKD is mainly due to the high frequency of consanguineous marriages that prevails in this area. Understanding of the genetic and molecular background of these diseases is a result of a fruitful collaboration between the pediatric nephrologists and scientists, and has a direct implication on the diagnosis and treatment of the affected families.

  2. [The value of serum free light chain in differential diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance].

    PubMed

    Li, C; Wen, Y B; Li, H; Su, W; Li, J; Cai, J F; Chen, L M; Li, X M; Li, X W

    2017-08-08

    Objective: To investigate the value of serum free light chain (FLC) in differential diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS). Methods: Forty-nine hospitalized patients who underwent renal biopsy in Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2013 and December 2015 were included. Monoclonal gammopathy was detected by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), serum immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), urine IFE and serum FLC. All patients were classified as MGRS (n=32) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n=17). Results: Renal lesions in MGRS subgroup included light chain amyloidosis (n=24, 75.0%), light chain deposition disease (n=7, 21.9%), and fibrillary glomerulopathy (n=1, 3.1%). Renal diseases in MGUS subgroup included membranous nephropathy (n=10), focal segmental glomerulosclerosi (FSGS) (n=3), diabetic glomerulopathy (n=1), Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (n=1), anti-GBM disease concurrent with membranous nephropathy (n=1) and glomerulomegaly (n=1). Positive number of SPE, serum IFE, urine IFE and abnormal number of serum FLC ratio in MGRS subgroup were 12, 16, 23 and 30, respectively. Positive number of SPE, serum IFE, urine IFE and abnormal number of serum FLC ratio in MGUS subgroup were 11, 17, 6 and 3, respectively. MGRS and MGUS subgroups differed significantly in positive rate of serum IFE (P<0.001), as well as positive rate of urine IFE (P=0.02) and abnormal rate of serum FLC ratio (P<0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, total consistent rate of serum FLC ratio for diagnosis of MGRS were 93.8%, 82.4%, and 89.8% respectively. The sensitivity for diagnosing MGRS could be increased to 100% by combining serum FLC ratio and urine IFE. Conclusions: The significance of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with renal disease should be evaluated by renal pathology.On the premise of excluding lymphoplasmacytic malignancy, serum FLC ratio had promising diagnostic value for MGRS, which was helpful for

  3. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  4. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  5. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  6. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  7. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  8. Renal disease and hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Reis, Ines; Vais, Alina; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Banerjee, Anita

    2013-02-01

    Because women are becoming pregnant at a later age, hypertension is more commonly encountered in pregnancy. In addition, with increasing numbers of young women living with renal transplants and kidney disease, it is important for physicians to be aware of the effects of pregnancy on these diseases. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to assess and care for pregnant women with kidney disease. Pre-pregnancy counselling should be offered to all women with chronic kidney disease. A review of medication to avoid teratogenicity and optimise the disease prior to conception is the ideal. Pregnancy may be the first medical review for a young woman, who may present with a previously undiagnosed renal problem.

  9. The diagnosis of bilateral primary renal paragangliomas in a cat.

    PubMed

    Friedlein, Ryan B; Carter, Alain J; Last, Robert D; Clift, Sarah

    2017-01-24

    A 9-year-old sterilised female domestic short-hair cat was referred with a history of vomiting and anorexia of 3 months' duration. Biochemistry, full-blood counts, thoracic radiographs, feline pancreatic-specific lipase, abdominal ultrasonography and feline immunodeficiency virus/feline leukaemia virus (FIV/FeLV) SNAP tests had been performed. Mild hypochloraemia and moderate hypokalaemia were evident on initial presentation. Abdominal ultrasonography initially revealed unilateral renal nodules on the left side. These were subjected to fine-needle aspiration and cytological evaluation. A neuroendocrine tumour was suspected, and biopsies via midline coeliotomy were taken to confirm the diagnosis. Initial histopathology diagnosed primary renal carcinomas or neuroendocrine neoplasia; however, the definitive diagnosis became renal paragangliomas after immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy were performed. The cat was regularly monitored with serum biochemistry parameters, blood pressure determinations, thoracic radiographs and subsequent abdominal ultrasonography. Biochemistry, radiography and blood pressures remained normal over a 24-week follow-up period, while subsequent ultrasonography revealed tumour progression in both number and size in both kidneys. Primary neuroendocrine tumours of the kidney are frequently incorrectly diagnosed as other renal tumours such as renal cell carcinoma, mesonephric tumours or undifferentiated carcinomas. This case report highlights the importance of additional testing, including immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy, to obtain a definitive diagnosis of paragangliomas.

  10. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  11. Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis—Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lao, David; Parasher, Punit S.; Cho, Kerry C.; Yeghiazarians, Yerem

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is characterized by a heterogeneous group of pathophysiologic entities, of which fibromuscular dysplasia and atherosclerotic RAS (ARAS) are the most common. Whether and which patients should undergo revascularization for ARAS is controversial. The general consensus is that all patients with ARAS should receive intensive medical treatment. The latest randomized clinical trials have increased confusion regarding recommendations for revascularization for ARAS. Although revascularization is not indicated in all patients with ARAS, experts agree that it should be considered in some patients, especially those with unstable angina, unexplained pulmonary edema, and hemodynamically significant ARAS with either worsening renal function or with difficult to control hypertension. A search of the literature was performed using PubMed and entering the search terms renal artery stenosis, atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, and renal artery stenosis AND hypertension to retrieve the most recent publications on diagnosis and treatment of ARAS. In this review, we analyze the pathways related to hypertension in ARAS, the optimal invasive and noninvasive modalities for evaluating the renal arteries, and the available therapies for ARAS and assess future tools and algorithms that may prove useful in evaluating patients for renal revascularization therapy. PMID:21719621

  12. Hypertensive pregnancy disorders and future renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steven; Craici, Iasmina

    2014-10-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect approximately 6 to 8 % of otherwise normal pregnancies. A growing body of evidence links these disorders with the future development of hypertension, coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Larger studies associating hypertensive pregnancy to future development of renal disease have been lacking until recently, with publication of several compelling studies in the last 5 years. In this review, we will focus on the recent evidence associating hypertensive pregnancy disorders with the future development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), as well as the development of microalbuminuria. We will also attempt to answer whether these renal risks are due to direct effects of hypertension during pregnancy, or whether they are due to shared environmental and genetic risk factors.

  13. Occasional diagnosis of synchronous renal cell carcinoma during staging of other primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, L; Luppi, G; Zoboli, A; Torricelli, P

    1996-01-01

    Synchronous renal cell cancer (RCC) associated with primary neoplasms of other organs or tissues represents a rare diagnostic report during life. Recently, the widespread use of new diagnostic techniques (echography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) has permitted diagnosis of clinically silent RCC. We report 6 RCC cases occasionally diagnosed during initial staging of a primary cancer of other organs: 1 rhinopharyngeal carcinoma, 1 gastric cancer, 1 Waldenström's disease, 1 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 2 breast cancer, RCC was clinically silent in all patients. The diagnostic problems related to a report of a renal mass in patients with neoplastic disease at other sites and the consequent therapeutic implications are discussed.

  14. Lupus nephritis and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Germain, S; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2006-01-01

    Management of pregnant women with renal disease involves awareness of, and allowance for, physiological changes including decreased serum creatinine and increased proteinuria. For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), pregnancy increases likelihood of flare. These can occur at any stage, and are more difficult to diagnose, as symptoms overlap those of normal pregnancy. Renal involvement is no more common in pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria may be lupus flare but differential includes pre-eclampsia. In women with chronic renal disease, pregnancy may accelerate decline in renal function and worsen hypertension and proteinuria, with increased risk of maternal (eg, pre-eclampsia) and fetal (eg, IUGR, IUD) complications, strongly correlating with degree of renal impairment peri-conception. Pregnancy success rate varies from 20% to 95% depending on base-line creatinine. Best outcome is obtained if disease was quiescent for >6 months pre-conception. Women on dialysis or with renal transplants can achieve successful pregnancy but have higher maternal and fetal complication rates. Acute on chronic renal failure can develop secondary to complications such as HELLP and AFLP. Management needs to be by a multidisciplinary team involving physicians and obstetricians, ideally beginning with pre-pregnancy counselling. Treatment of flares includes corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, azothioprine, NSAIDs and MME Blood pressure is controlled with methyldopa, nifedipine or hydralazine.

  15. Managing progressive renal disease before dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To enhance awareness of issues affecting patients with chronic renal failure and to provide guidance for primary care practitioners managing such patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Randomized trials establish the efficacy of blood pressure control and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in slowing the progression of chronic renal disease. Some randomized trials and many prospective studies address management of anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and multidisciplinary predialysis care. The benefits of lipid lowering are suggested by randomized trials among patients without renal disease. MAIN MESSAGE: Progression of renal failure, particularly in patients with proteinuria, can be slowed by lowering blood pressure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are more beneficial than other antihypertensives in this situation. Partial correction of anemia with iron, erythropoietin, or androgens can improve quality of life and potentially prevent cardiac disease. Renal bone disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism can be prevented in part by early dietary phosphate restriction, use of calcium-containing phosphate binders, and activated vitamin D. Correction of acidosis could improve protein metabolism and bone and cardiovascular health. Treatment of hyperlipidemia might reduce cardiovascular disease. Early involvement of a nephrology-based multidisciplinary team has the potential to reduce morbidity and costs, enhance patients' knowledge of their condition, and prolong the period before dialysis is required. CONCLUSIONS: Care of patients with progressive renal failure is complex and requires attention to detail. Family doctors play a vital role in these efforts and should be involved in all aspects of care. PMID:10216796

  16. [Laboratory diagnosis of renal changes caused by occupational chemical factors].

    PubMed

    Hanke, J; Lutz, W

    1990-06-15

    The problem of early detection of the consequences of toxic action of chemical substances on the kidneys at the working place is becoming one of more important problems in the prophylaxis of renal diseases. The introduction of new sensitive diagnostic methods such as enzyme activity determination or low-molecular-weight proteins measurement in urine has made possible detection of renal damage in the reversible stage. As yet the observations demonstrate that workers exposed in their occupation to heavy metals (cadmium, lead, metalic mercury) and organic solvents should be subjected to special control for detection of renal changes.

  17. Preliminary report on digitalization of renal microangiograms used in analysing renal parenchymal diseases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Kaneko, M

    1983-01-01

    Glomerulography is a useful method for the angiographic diagnosis of various renal parenchymal diseases. A new system for digitalization of the glomerulogram has been developed using a high resolution television camera and a CT computer. We describe the fundamental procedures involved in the clinical application of digital glomerulography by applying this method to a renal microangiogram of a cow. This new method aids a clearer understanding of the detailed microvasculatures by providing better magnification and storage and allowing for further processing of the original analogue images. With a computer printout of any part of the glomerulogram also possible, an estimation of the glomerular counts and their distribution can now be given for any unit of cross-sectional area of the renal cortex.

  18. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  19. Pathways to renal biopsy and diagnosis among patients with ANCA small-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Caroline J.; Nachman, Patrick H.; Hu, Yichun; McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Jennette, J. Charles; Falk, Ronald J.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody small-vessel vasculitis (ANCA-SVV) is an autoimmune systemic process increasingly recognised since the advent of antibody testing for the disease. Prompt diagnosis and institution of immunosuppressive therapy has been shown to improve patient outcome. The goal of this study was to better understand how patients navigate the health care system from symptom presentation to biopsy diagnosis, and to study the effects of prompt versus delayed diagnosis. Methods Disease symptoms and number of physicians seen prior to renal biopsy were assessed for 127 ANCA-SVV patients. Direct, delayed, and quest pathways to diagnosis and treatment of vasculitis were defined for both patients and providers. Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests were used to evaluate continual measures and compare categorical variables across pathways. Results Among patients who sought direct care, physician delay in referral to a nephrologist was common (49/127, 71%, p=0.0023). Patients who delayed seeking care also experienced a delayed diagnosis 57% of the time (p=0.0023). Patients presenting with prodromal flu or upper respiratory involvement were more likely to have a delay/quest patient pathway (56% and 55%, respectively) than a direct patient pathway (44%, p=0.033 and 45%, p=0.019, respectively). There was a trend for patients with more severe loss of renal function to have a more direct referral to a nephrologist. Conclusion Delay in diagnosis of ANCA SVV may be due to lack of or non-specific symptoms, especially in patients who present with non-renal manifestations of disease. Better algorithms are needed to identify extra-renal manifestations, expedite diagnosis and improve patient outcomes. PMID:23343774

  20. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  1. Renal masses in children. An integrated imaging approach to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, B.J.; Gainey, M.A.; Faerber, E.N.; Capitanio, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    In view of the continuing technologic advancements in the development and availability of diagnostic imaging modalities, it is appropriate to assess periodically the currently accepted approaches to the evaluation of renal masses in children. The roles, advantages, and disadvantages of plain film, intravenous urography, ultrasonography, radionuclide scintigraphy, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the approach to the evaluation of renal masses in children are discussed. An integrated imaging approach that provides the most accurate and necessary information for diagnosis and treatment is recommended. 70 references.

  2. Pneumococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors Diagnosis & Management Prevention For Laboratorians Drug Resistance Surveillance & Reporting Global Pneumococcal Disease and Vaccine Resources Audio/Video Products Digital Materials Print Materials Publications Programs Related Links Global Pneumococcal ...

  3. Non-Diabetic renal disease in Diabetes Mellitus: clinical features and renal biopsy findings

    PubMed Central

    Yenigun, E C; Dede, F; Ozturk, R; Turgut, D; Koc, E; Piskinpasa, S V; Ozkayar, N; Odabas, A R

    2015-01-01

    Aim Renal diseases in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, include diabetic nephropathies (DN) and non-diabetic renal diseases (NDRD). The clinical differentiation among them is usually not so clear and effective. Aim of this study which examined renal biopsies in patients with type-2 DM was to identify the prevalence and the nature of NDRD. Materials and Methods We recorded the clinical and laboratory finding alongside with the histopathological examination of the renal biopsies obtained from 71 type-2 DM patients who underwent renal biopsy in our center. Based on the renal biopsy findings patients were classified into two groups (DN and NDRD) and data was compared between the two groups. Results There were 42 women and 29 men; aged 55 ± 12 years. In patients with DN (n: 34), diabetic retinopathy was more common [16 (47.1 %) vs. 6 (16.2 %) respectively, p =0.01], duration of DM was longer (108.8 ± 58.8 months vs 57.8 ± 55.9 months respectively, p <0.001) and the degree of proteinuria was more severe (6 ± 4.3 g/day vs. 4.5 ± 4.6 g/day respectively, p =0.04) compared to the patients with NDRD. Regression analysis revealed that diabetes duration >60 months, presence of diabetic retinopathy and proteinuria >3.5 g/day were independent predictors of DN with 79.4 % sensitivity and 86.5% specificity. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most frequent diagnosis in patients with NDRD. Conclusions The prevalence of NDRD is remarkably frequent in DM patients in whom nephrologists consider renal biopsy an appropriate measure. Short duration of DM, degree of proteinuria and absence of retinopathy were predictors of NDRD. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):148-152. PMID:27418764

  4. A questionnaire survey of radiological diagnosis and management of renal dysplasia in children.

    PubMed

    Montini, Giovanni; Busutti, Marco; Yalcinkaya, Fatos; Woolf, Adrian S; Weber, Stefanie

    2017-06-24

    The condition called renal dysplasia is considered to be a frequent cause of chronic kidney disease in children. Formally, it is defined by histological parameters. In current nephrology practice, however, the appearance of the kidneys on ultrasound scanning is often used as a basis for the diagnosis. The European Society for Pediatric Nephrology Working Group on Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract hypothesized that the current diagnostic approach with regard to renal dysplasia was not homogeneous. Accordingly, we here report the results of a survey targeting pediatric nephrologists with 12 questions regarding their perceptions of the ultrasonographic characteristics of renal dysplasia and further tests that they might undertake. Of almost 1200 physicians who successfully received the invitation, 248 from 54 countries completed the survey. There was a notable lack of homogeneity regarding the ultrasonographic diagnosis of renal dysplasia and also of follow-up tests, including genetic testing and further radiology. Based on the responses to this large survey, a picture emerges of nephrologists' current clinical practice with regard to renal dysplasia. The Working Group considers that these results serve as an important sounding board which can provide the basis for more definitive recommendations regarding the challenges to clinical diagnosis and diagnostic follow-up of this important condition.

  5. [Value of the assay of 4 urinary enzyme activities in the diagnosis of the infectious or toxic (aminoglycosides) origin of a renal disease. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Roche, G; Brugerolle, B; Straczek, J; Bertrand, F; Hurault de Ligny, B; Gérard, A; Presles, O; Canton, P; Dureux, J B

    1983-12-01

    Occurrence of a renal failure in an infected patient may be referred to various causes: infection, renal toxicity of drugs (for instance aminoglycosides), shock . . . Determination of some urinary enzymatic activities might be helpful in unravelling the mechanism involved in such cases. Therefore a prospective study of the specificity of some urinary enzymatic activities was performed. The whole LDH activity, the LDH isoenzyme 5 (LDH 5), and two lysosomal enzymes, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and beta-glucuronidase (beta-GLU) were dosed systematically, in several groups of patients: I (n = 34): healthy control, with normal renal function; II (n = 24): renal impairment, without recent upper urinary-tract infection (UTI) or aminoglycoside treatment; III (n = 27): upper UTI without aminoglycoside treatment, IV (n = 22): patients treated with aminoglycosides (without upper UTI); V (n = 16): upper UTI treated with aminoglycosides. Results showed a rather good specificity of whole LDH and LDH 5 for infectious kidney damage, and of NAG for tubular injury due to aminoglycoside treatments. Values of urinary beta-glucuronidase varied over a wide range; they were little increased in group III, without a great discriminative value. No significant difference was noted between group I and group II, for any enzyme whatever.

  6. 2,8-Dihydroxyadenine Nephropathy Identified as Cause of End-Stage Renal Disease After Renal Transplant.

    PubMed

    George, Smiley Annie; Al-Rushaidan, Sulaiman; Francis, Issam; Soonowala, Darius; Nampoory, M R Narayanan

    2016-07-22

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of uric acid metabolism that leads to formation and excretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine into urine. The low solubility of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine results in precipitation and formation of urinary crystals and renal stones. Patients with this disorder usually have recurrent nephrolithiasis and can develop nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation in the renal parenchyma. The disease is most often underdiagnosed and can recur in renal transplant, causing graft failure. Lack of specific clinical manifestations, chemical and radiologic features identical to those shown with uric acid stones, and lack of awareness among clinicians are among the causes for the underdiagnoses of this treatable disease. Allopurinol, a xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor, is the mainstay of treatment, supported by high fluid intake and dietary modifications. The possibility of adenine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency should be considered in all cases of urolithiasis in children, patients with recurrent urolithiasis, and patients with urolithiasis associated with renal failure of unknown cause, including patients with end-stage renal disease and renal transplant recipients. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female patient who had a late diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine nephropathy-induced end-stage renal disease, made on the native nephrectomy that accompanied the renal transplant, and who had a timely intervention that prevented recurrence in the graft.

  7. Classification, disease, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Classification shapes medicine and guides its practice. Understanding classification must be part of the quest to better understand the social context and implications of diagnosis. Classifications are part of the human work that provides a foundation for the recognition and study of illness: deciding how the vast expanse of nature can be partitioned into meaningful chunks, stabilizing and structuring what is otherwise disordered. This article explores the aims of classification, their embodiment in medical diagnosis, and the historical traditions of medical classification. It provides a brief overview of the aims and principles of classification and their relevance to contemporary medicine. It also demonstrates how classifications operate as social framing devices that enable and disable communication, assert and refute authority, and are important items for sociological study.

  8. Pattern of renal diseases among elderly Egyptians patients with acute or chronic renal diseases in Ain Shams University and Nasser Institute Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Adel M; Mady, Gamal E; Ahmad, Ahmad A; el-Shar-Kawy, Magdy E; Aly, Ahmad R; Khalil, Hazem H M

    2005-12-01

    This study among elderly renal Egyptian patients (n=220) with only 20 of them were subjected to renal biopsy. Results showed: diabetic nephropathy in 28.2%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis 25.5%, UTI, cystitis and pyelonephritis in 6.8%, renal stones in 5.9%, obstructive uropathy in 7.6%, simple cysts in 4.5%, CRF of unknown origin in 13.1%, and others in 26.4%. DM and HTN were S related to kidney function tests and increase in elderly. Other cardiovascular risk factors and smoking are reported by previous workers to be HS related to renal diseases. Age was significantly related to GFR, BUN and Cr. but sex difference was not significantly related to renal diseases. Multiple myeloma, lupus nephritis, vasculitis and hepatitis B were all recorded in few numbers of elderly Egyptians. HCV was more common and more likely to cause renal diseases. Abdomino-pelvic ultrasound was confirmatory to clinical renal diseases diagnosis. Among patients (n=20) biopsies showed focal necrotizing GN in 20%, membranous nephropathy in 50% and renal amyloidosis in 30%. CTIN was associated in some cases due to NSAID intake. Analgesic nephropathy was a common problem that might lead to ARF in some cases especially in the elderly. Ultrasound results among the biopsy group were confirmatory to clinical diagnosis.

  9. Differential diagnosis of fetal hyperechogenic cystic kidneys unrelated to renal tract anomalies: A multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Chaumoitre, K; Brun, M; Cassart, M; Maugey-Laulom, B; Eurin, D; Didier, F; Avni, E F

    2006-12-01

    To identify important factors in the differential diagnosis of renal cysts associated with hyperechogenic kidneys. This was a retrospective multicenter study. We identified 93 fetuses presenting between 1990 and 2002 with hyperechogenic kidneys and which had a diagnosis of nephropathy confirmed later. We analyzed retrospectively the prenatal ultrasound findings of those fetuses which were found sonographically to have renal cysts. Of the 93 fetuses presenting with hyperechogenic kidneys and with a later diagnosis of nephropathy, there were 28 with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), 31 with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), 11 with Bardet-Biedl syndrome, nine with Meckel-Gruber syndrome, six with Ivemark II syndrome, one with Jarcho-Levin syndrome, one with Beemer syndrome and one with Meckel-like syndrome. One third of the fetuses (30/93) had renal cysts. Cystic characteristics (size, location, number) were not very useful for diagnosis; more useful was diagnosis of an associated malformation. Three (11%) of the fetuses with ADPKD had cysts, as did nine (29%) of those with ARPKD, three (27%) of those with Bardet-Biedl syndrome, all (100%) of those with Meckel-Gruber syndrome, three (50%) of those with Ivemark II syndrome, and each of the three cases with other syndromes (Jarcho-Levin, Beemer and Meckel-like syndromes). None of the cases with trisomy 13 had cysts. There were no associated malformations in the 12 cases with renal cysts and polycystic kidney disease; the other 18 cases with renal cysts were associated with malformations that were often specific, such as polydactyly in Bardet-Biedl and Beemer syndromes, occipital defect and Dandy-Walker malformation in Meckel-Gruber or Meckel-Gruber-like syndromes, and thoracic and/or vertebral abnormalities in Jarcho-Levin and Beemer syndromes. Renal cysts associated with hyperechogenic kidneys are not rare. The clue to diagnosis is the demonstration of an associated

  10. Epigenetics of Renal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Sylvia A.; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of epigenetics is indispensable to our understanding of gene regulation under normal and pathological states. This knowledge will help with designing better therapeutic approaches in regenerative tissue medicine. Epigenetics allows us to parse out the mechanisms by which transcriptional regulators gain access to specific gene loci thereby imprinting epigenetic information affecting chromatin function. This epigenetic memory forms the basis of cell lineage specification in multicellular organisms. Post-translational modifications to DNA and histones in the nucleosome core form characteristic epigenetic codes which are distinct for self-renewing and primed progenitor cell populations. Studies of chromatin modifiers and modifications in renal development and disease have been gaining momentum. Both congenital and adult renal diseases have a gene-environment component, which involves alterations to the epigenetic information imprinted during development. This epigenetic memory must be characterized to establish optimal treatment of both acute and chronic renal diseases. PMID:28018145

  11. Transplant renal artery stenosis: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Kayler, Liise K; Zand, Martin S; Muttana, Renu; Chernyak, Victoria; DeBoccardo, Graciela O

    2015-02-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a well-recognized vascular complication after kidney transplant. It occurs most frequently in the first 6 months after kidney transplant, and is one of the major causes of graft loss and premature death in transplant recipients. Renal hypoperfusion occurring in TRAS results in activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; patients usually present with worsening or refractory hypertension, fluid retention and often allograft dysfunction. Flash pulmonary edema can develop in patients with critical bilateral renal artery stenosis or renal artery stenosis in a solitary kidney, and this unique clinical entity has been named Pickering Syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of TRAS can prevent allograft damage and systemic sequelae. Duplex sonography is the most commonly used screening tool, whereas angiography provides the definitive diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement can be performed during angiography if a lesion is identified, and it is generally the first-line therapy for TRAS. However, there is no randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty compared with medical therapy alone or surgical intervention.

  12. Defining Kidney Biology to Understand Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, Melissa H.; Brown, Dennis; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Sands, Jeff M.; Weisz, Ora A.; Mullins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Research National Dialogue represents a novel effort by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to solicit and prioritize research objectives from the renal research and clinical communities. The present commentary highlights selected scientific opportunities specific to the study of renal development, physiology, and cell biology. Describing such fundamental kidney biology serves as a necessary foundation for translational and clinical studies that will advance disease care and prevention. It is intended that these objectives foster and focus scientific efforts in these areas in the coming decade and beyond. PMID:24370769

  13. Renal vein thrombosis mimicking urinary calculus: a dilemma of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Chen, Shanwen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jianyong; Jin, Baiye

    2015-07-02

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) with flank pain, and hematuria, is often mistaken with renal colic originating from ureteric or renal calculus. Especially in young and otherwise healthy patients, clinicians are easily misled by clinical presentation and calcified RVT. A 38-year-old woman presented with flank pain and hematuria suggestive of renal calculus on ultrasound. She underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy that failed, leading to the recommendation that percutaneous lithotomy was necessary to remove the renal calculus. In preoperative view of the unusual shape of the calculus without hydronephrosis, noncontrast computed tomography was taken and demonstrated left ureteric calculus. However computed tomography angiography revealed, to our surprise, a calcified RVT that was initially thought to be a urinary calculus. This case shows that a calcified RVT might mimic a urinary calculus on conventional ultrasonography and ureteric calculus on noncontrast computed tomography. Subsequent computed tomography angiography disclosed that a calcified RVT caused the imaging findings, thus creating a potentially dangerous clinical pitfall. Hence, it is suggested that the possibility of a RVT needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever one detects an uncommon shape for a urinary calculus.

  14. Disease, diagnosis or syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2011-04-01

    The advance of medical semantics is, in general, towards causation. As knowledge increases, the common consequence is the re-definition of disease. This starts with symptoms then a disorder of structure or function, abnormalities of images, genetics or biochemistry, the ultimate aim being a specific aetiological mechanism which replaces broader descriptions. But medical terminology of diseases, diagnoses and syndromes is inherently imprecise. Careless nomenclature causes confused dialogue and communication. Symptoms of uncertain cause are commonly lumped together and given a new 'diagnostic' label which also may confuse and produce false concepts that stultify further thought and research. Such medicalisation of non-specific aggregations of symptoms should be avoided. The defining characteristics of diseases and diagnoses should be validated and agreed. The pragmatic diagnoses of 'symptom of unknown cause' or 'non-disease' are preferable to falsely labelling patients with obscure or non-existent diseases. "I tried to unveil the stillness of existence through a counteracting murmur of words, and, above all, I confused things with their names: that is belief." Jean-Paul Sartre (The Words, 1964).

  15. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  16. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  17. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  18. Lyme Disease Diagnosis: Serology.

    PubMed

    Schriefer, Martin E

    2015-12-01

    Serology is the mainstay of confirmation of Lyme borreliosis; direct detection has limited application. Because standardized 2-tier testing (STTT) has been commonly used since the mid 1990s, standardization and performance have improved. STTT detection of early, localized infection is poor; that of late disease is good. The best indicator of stage 1 infection, erythema migrans, is presented in the majority of US cases and should prompt treatment without testing. Clinical and epidemiologic correlates should be carefully assessed before ordering STTT. STTT has great value in confirming extracutaneous infection. Recent developments promise to improve performance, particularly in early disease detection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. MicroRNA biomarkers in clinical renal disease: from diabetic nephropathy renal transplantation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Raj, Dominic; Townsend, Raymond; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a common health problem affecting 1 in 12 Americans. It is associated with elevated risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and high costs for the treatment of renal failure with dialysis or transplantation. Advances in CKD care are impeded by the lack of biomarkers for early diagnosis, assessment of the extent of tissue injury, estimation of disease progression, and evaluation of response to therapy. Such biomarkers should improve the performance of existing measures of renal functional impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) or kidney damage (proteinuria). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional repressors are gaining momentum as biomarkers in a number of disease areas. In this review, we examine the potential utility of miRNAs as promising biomarkers for renal disease. We explore the performance of miRNAs as biomarkers in two clinically important forms of CKD, diabetes and the nephropathy developing in kidney transplant recipients. Finally, we highlight the pitfalls and opportunities of miRNAs and provide a broad perspective for the future clinical development of miRNAs as biomarkers in CKD beyond the current gold standards of eGFR and albuminuria.

  20. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  1. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  2. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  3. Mayo Clinic/Renal Pathology Society Consensus Report on Pathologic Classification, Diagnosis, and Reporting of GN.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Haas, Mark; Markowitz, Glen S; D'Agati, Vivette D; Rennke, Helmut G; Jennette, J Charles; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Alpers, Charles E; Chang, Anthony; Cornell, Lynn D; Cosio, Fernando G; Fogo, Agnes B; Glassock, Richard J; Hariharan, Sundaram; Kambham, Neeraja; Lager, Donna J; Leung, Nelson; Mengel, Michael; Nath, Karl A; Roberts, Ian S; Rovin, Brad H; Seshan, Surya V; Smith, Richard J H; Walker, Patrick D; Winearls, Christopher G; Appel, Gerald B; Alexander, Mariam P; Cattran, Daniel C; Casado, Carmen Avila; Cook, H Terence; De Vriese, An S; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Racusen, Lorraine C; Ronco, Pierre; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2016-05-01

    Renal pathologists and nephrologists met on February 20, 2015 to establish an etiology/pathogenesis-based system for classification and diagnosis of GN, with a major aim of standardizing the kidney biopsy report of GN. On the basis of etiology/pathogenesis, GN is classified into the following five pathogenic types, each with specific disease entities: immune-complex GN, pauci-immune GN, antiglomerular basement membrane GN, monoclonal Ig GN, and C3 glomerulopathy. The pathogenesis-based classification forms the basis of the kidney biopsy report. To standardize the report, the diagnosis consists of a primary diagnosis and a secondary diagnosis. The primary diagnosis should include the disease entity/pathogenic type (if disease entity is not known) followed in order by pattern of injury (mixed patterns may be present); score/grade/class for disease entities, such as IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and ANCA GN; and additional features as detailed herein. A pattern diagnosis as the sole primary diagnosis is not recommended. Secondary diagnoses should be reported separately and include coexisting lesions that do not form the primary diagnosis. Guidelines for the report format, light microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, and ancillary studies are also provided. In summary, this consensus report emphasizes a pathogenesis-based classification of GN and provides guidelines for the standardized reporting of GN.

  4. Good results of surgery for renal cell carcinoma depend on early diagnosis. The need for an extensive screening program.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Enrico; De Cesare, Alessandro; Crocetti, Daniele; Ferraro, Daniele; Barmann, Cecilia; V Sterpetti, Antonio; De Toma, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the value of several prognostic factors for patients with clear cell renal carcinoma without distant metastases (M0) who underwent surgery in our Department from 1980 to 2010. We analyzed131 consecutive patients with clear cell renal carcinoma who had nephrectomy and extended lymph node dissection from 1980 to 2010 were reviewed. Free from cancer survivals were correlated to several prognostic factors including preoperative blood cell count, tumour cellular differentiation and stage of the disease. In our study we confirmed the importance of the stage of the tumour, in particular of the T, as prognostic factor. Survival was strictly correlated to the stage of the disease: 10 year cancer free survival was 100% in patients with T1, 83% in patients with T2 N0 and 34% for patients with T3N0. No improvement of results was noted in the last years, due to unchanged proportion of early diagnosis. Long term survival after surgery for clear cell renal carcinoma depends mainly on the histology type of the tumour and on the stage of the disease. Renal carcinoma does not respond to radio and standard chemotherapy and surgery represents the only effective cure. Surgery at earlier stages is essential to improve results in patients with renal carcinoma. Earlier diagnosis at the present time is the best possibility to improve results, with the need for extensive use of screening ultrasound test. Lymph node dissection in renal carcinoma, Renal carcinoma, Results of surgery for renal carcinoma.

  5. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  6. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  7. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant.

  8. Children and End-State Renal Disease (ERSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I'm outside the U.S. Children & End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) How to tell if your child ... Social Security card CMS Form 2728 ("End-Stage Renal Disease Medical Evidence Report Medicare Entitlement and/or ...

  9. [BK virus nephropathy after renal transplantation. Diagnosis and prognosis by real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Echavarría, Marcela; Basilotta, Natalia; Aguiar, Ana; Davalos, Mario; Ricarte, Carmen; Iotti, Alejandro; Carballal, Guadalupe

    2007-01-01

    BK virus nephropathy may lead to kidney transplant failure. BK infection and acute rejection are clinically undistinguishable, therefore diagnosis of these entities is critical to establish the correct treatment. The new molecular methods using PCR and real time PCR have significantly contributed to the rapid and sensitive diagnosis of BK virus. Furthermore, viral load determination in-plasma has significantly been associated with BK virus nephropathy. Definite diagnosis of nephropathy requires renal biopsy, although due to the multifocal nature of the disease sensitivity may be less than 100%. BK detection in blood and urine by PCR has contributed to the diagnosis of nephropathy in a more standardized and less invasive way. Recently, quantification of BK virus in plasma has been used for the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. In the present study, we describe the validation of a real time PCR method for BK virus detection in plasma and urine and its application for diagnosis and monitoring in a renal transplant patient with nephropathy.

  10. Renal Anemia - Risk Factor for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cană-Ruiu, Daniela; Moţa, E.; Istrate, Natalia; Văduva, Cristina; Trican, Eliza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the influence of anemia on renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease. Were monitored for 12 months 165 patients with chronic kidney disease, 96 patients had anemia and a control group of 69 patients had no anemia. A value of hemoglobin under 120 g/L in women and under 130 g/L in men on admission defined anemia. Anemia was associated with a more severe renal damage, a lower residual diuresis, especially in the presence of other risk factors such as diabetes, inflammation or secondary hyperparathyroidism, so early diagnosis and correction of anemia is important for prognosis and evolution of these patients. PMID:24778860

  11. Chronic kidney disease in children with unilateral renal tumor.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Denis A; Ceccanti, Silvia; Frediani, Simone; Schiavetti, Amalia; Cozzi, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    In patients who have undergone nephrectomy lower stage chronic kidney disease may develop, which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. We investigated whether the prevalence of lower stage chronic kidney disease is related to the amount of renal parenchyma excised in children with unilateral renal tumor. A total of 15 patients treated with nephrectomy and 10 treated with nephron sparing surgery were enrolled at a single academic center. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines were used to classify patients by chronic kidney disease stage based on estimated glomerular filtration rate values. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation and Schwartz equation were used in patients older and younger than 17 years, respectively. At a mean followup of more than 12 years 8 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and 1 treated with bilateral nephron sparing surgery presented with stage II chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate 60 to 89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Sequential measurements from diagnosis to 12 to 17 years postoperatively showed that stage II chronic kidney disease in patients who had undergone nephrectomy manifested as a negligible postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (75.7 ± 25.5 vs 79.4 ± 3.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.6). Five of the 8 patients presented with stage II chronic kidney disease even before nephrectomy. The other 7 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and those treated with nephron sparing surgery presented with a significant postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (81.1 ± 24 vs 102.3 ± 3 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.02, and 88.7 ± 2 vs 107.4 ± 14 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.005, respectively). A subset of children with unilateral renal tumor presents before and/or after nephrectomy, and not after nephron sparing surgery, with stage II chronic kidney disease, probably due to a reduced renal

  12. Antioxidants in the prevention of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wardle, E N

    1999-11-01

    In view of the role of oxidative processes in inflicting damage that leads to glomerulosclerosis and renal medullary interstitial fibrosis, more attention could be paid to the use of antioxidant food constituents and the usage of drugs with recognized antioxidant potential. In any case atherosclerosis is an important component of chronic renal diseases. There is a wide choice of foods and drugs that could confer benefit. Supplementation with vitamins E and C, use of soy protein diets and drinking green tea could be sufficient to confer remarkable improvements.

  13. Unilateral renal cell carcinoma with coexistent renal disease: a rare cause of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Alvarez-Navascués, R

    2001-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disorder encompassing a wide spectrum of pathological renal lesions. Coexistence of unilateral RCC and associated pathology in the contralateral kidney is an unusual and challenging therapeutic dilemma that can result in renal failure. So far, data on unilateral RCC with chronic renal failure necessitating renal replacement therapy have not been published. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from unilateral RCC, and to assess the associated pathology and possible pathogenic factors. In 1999, a survey of the 350 patients treated by chronic dialysis in Asturias, Spain, was carried out to identify and collect clinical information on patients with primary unilateral RCC whilst on their renal replacement programme. Seven patients were identified as having ESRD and unilateral RCC, giving an incidence of 2% of patients treated by dialysis. There was a wide spectrum of associated disease and clinical presentation. All patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy and were free of recurrence 6--64 months after surgery. Six patients were alive and free of malignancy recurrence for 6--30 months after the onset of haemodialysis. ESRD is rare in association with unilateral RCC, but does contribute to significant morbidity. However, the data presented here are encouraging and suggest that cancer-free survival with renal replacement therapy can be achieved in such patients.

  14. Crossed fused renal ectopia: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Gupta, Arun K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Crossed fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital malformation, which is reported to be usually asymptomatic but may have varied presentations. This survey was conducted to study the clinical profile and the challenges posed in the management of this entity. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 6 patients diagnosed to have crossed fused renal ectopia during 1997-2010. The diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in one patient. In one patient it was detected on antenatal ultrasonography and in the other 4 patients it was detected during investigations for abdominal pain, abdominal mass, anorectal malformation and urinary tract infection. Results: The left moiety was crossed and fused with the right moiety in 4 cases. Ultrasonography was found to be a good screening investigation with useful diagnostic contributions from CT scans, radionuclide scintigraphy and magnetic resonance urography. Micturating cystourethrography revealed presence of VUR in 4 cases, 3 of whom have undergone ureteric reimplantation. Two patients required pyeloplasty for pelviureteric junction obstruction; in one of these patients the upper ureter was entrapped in the isthmus. In one patient, a non-functioning moiety resulted in nephrectomy. All children were asymptomatic at last follow-up with stable renal functions. Conclusions: Crossed fused renal ectopia was detected in most patients during investigation for other problems. It was found more commonly in boys. The left moiety was crossed to the right in the majority of cases. Associated urological problems were found in most cases and required the appropriate surgical management. PMID:23599575

  15. Blunt renal artery injury: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Bruce, L M; Croce, M A; Santaniello, J M; Miller, P R; Lyden, S P; Fabian, T C

    2001-06-01

    Renal artery injury is a rare complication of blunt abdominal trauma. Increasing use of CT scans to evaluate blunt abdominal trauma identifies more blunt renal artery injuries (BRAIs) that may have otherwise been missed. We identified patients with BRAI to examine the incidence and to evaluate the current diagnosis and management strategies. Patients admitted from 1986 to 2000 at a regional Level I trauma center sustaining BRAI were evaluated. Patients undergoing revascularization or nonoperative management were followed for renovascular hypertension. Twenty-eight patients with BRAI were identified out of 36,938 blunt trauma admissions between 1986 and 2000 (incidence 0.08%). Most renal artery injuries were diagnosed by CT scans (93%) with seven confirmatory angiograms. Nine patients had nephrectomy (one bilateral), and three patients with unilateral injuries were revascularized. Sixteen were managed nonoperatively including one patient who had endovascular stent placement. Three patients died from shock and sepsis. Follow-up for all patients ranged from one month to 8 years. Two patients developed hypertension: one who was revascularized (33%) and one was managed nonoperatively (6%). The frequency of diagnosis of BRAI is increasing because of the increased use of CT. Nonoperative management of unilateral injuries can be successful with a 6 per cent risk for developing renovascular hypertension. The role of endovascular stenting is promising, and further study is necessary.

  16. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  17. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  18. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  19. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  20. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  1. Hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, J D; Filip, D J; Watts, J C

    1975-05-01

    The syndrome of hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease was manifest in at least eight members in three generations of a family. They had a lifelong history of bleeding, usually as epistaxis, bilateral sensorineural deafness starting in late childhood or the teenage years, and persistent proteinuria with varying degrees of renal dysfunction. Two members died at a young age, one from central nervous system hemorrhage, the other from chronic renal failure. Splenectomy and steroid therapy have been of transient benefit. There was dominant inheritance of the syndrome. Hematologic studies showed thrombocytopenia, large platelets, and megakaryocytic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. In contrast to a previous report, our studies showed that affected members had normal in-vitro platelet function and normal ultrastructural platelet morphology. At autopsy, histologic changes in the kidney of one affected family member were indistinguishable from those reported in classic hereditary nephritis with nerve deafness (Alport's syndrome).

  2. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  3. Celiac disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pelkowski, Timothy D; Viera, Anthony J

    2014-01-15

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. It is triggered by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Gluten is a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley, which are staples in many American diets. Celiac disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, which leads to atrophy of the small intestinal villi and subsequent malabsorption. The condition may develop at any age. Intestinal manifestations include diarrhea and weight loss. Common extraintestinal manifestations include iron deficiency anemia, decreased bone mineral density, and neuropathy. Most cases of celiac disease are diagnosed in persons with extraintestinal manifestations. The presence of dermatitis herpetiformis is pathognomonic for celiac disease. Diagnosis is supported by a positive tissue transglutaminase serologic test but, in general, should be confirmed by a small bowel biopsy showing the characteristic histology associated with celiac disease. The presence of human leukocyte antigen alleles DQ2, DQ8, or both is essential for the development of celiac disease, and can be a useful genetic test in select instances. Treatment of celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Dietary education should focus on identifying hidden sources of gluten, planning balanced meals, reading labels, food shopping, dining out, and dining during travel. About 5% of patients with celiac disease are refractory to a gluten-free diet. These patients should be referred to a gastroenterologist for reconsideration of the diagnosis or for aggressive treatment of refractory celiac disease, which may involve corticosteroids and immunomodulators.

  4. [Renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders].

    PubMed

    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in MYH9 gene encoding the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) are related to a number of rare autosomal-dominant disorders which has been known as May-Hegglin disease, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome and Epstein syndrome. Their common clinical features are congenital macrothrombocytopaenia and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies, in addition to a variable risk of developing proteinuria, chronic kidney disease progressing toward end stage, sensorineural deafness and presenile cataracts. The term MYH9 related disease (MYH9-RD) describes the variable expression of a single illness encompassing all previously mentioned hereditary disorders. Renal involvement in MYH9- RD has been observed in 30% of patients. Mutant MYH9 protein, expressed in podocytes, mesangial and tubular cells, plays a main role in foot process effacement and in development of nephropathy. Interestingly, the MYH9 gene is currently under investigation also for his possible contribution to many other non-hereditary glomerulopathies such as focal global glomerulosclerosis (hypertensive nephrosclerosis), idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, C1q nephropathy and HIV-associated nephropathy. In this review we are aimed to describe renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders, from the hereditary disease to the acquired disorders, in which MYH9-gene acts as a "renal failure susceptibility gene". Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  5. [Treatment of bone disease in chronic kidney disease and in renal transplant recipients under K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Tadahiko; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi; Akiba, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    The National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) provides evidence based clinical practice guidelines developed for all phases of kidney disease and related complications, from diagnosis to monitoring and management. Bone disease sets in during the early stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Bone disease is observed in almost patients with chronic renal failure and after renal transplantation. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease in patients with chronic renal failure is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turn over bone disease, and osteomalasia. Ninety to one hundred percent of kidney transplant patients have histological evidence of osteodystrophy and osteopenia (reduction of bone mass) following renal transplantation. Furthermore, osteoporosis is also appeared in many renal transplant recipients. After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but bone mineral density (BMD) often worsens. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and carefully effective therapies might be reduced the morbidity associated with these common problems.

  6. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outbreaks (URDO) European Legionnaires’ Disease Surveillance Network (ELDSNet) Diagnosis, Treatment, and Complications Language: English (US) Español ( ... similar tests, but are treated differently. Legionnaires’ Disease Diagnosis People with Legionnaires’ disease have pneumonia (lung infection), ...

  7. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  8. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part II: specific underlying renal conditions.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The obstetric outcome in women with kidney disease has improved in recent years due to continuous progress in obstetrics and neonatology, as well as better medical management of hypertension and renal disease. However, every pregnancy in these women remains a high-risk pregnancy. When considering the interaction between renal disease and pregnancy, maternal outcomes are related to the initial level of renal dysfunction more than to the specific underlying disease. With regards to fetal outcomes, though, a distinction may exist between renal dysfunction resulting from primary renal disease and that in which renal involvement is part of a systemic disease. In part II of this review, some specific causes of renal failure affecting pregnancy are considered.

  9. Molecular diagnosis in lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Fiorella; Lunardi, Francesca; Popper, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The development of different molecular biology techniques in the past decade has led to an explosion of new research in molecular pathology with consequent important applications to diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics, as well as a clearer concept of the disease pathogenesis. Many methods used in molecular pathology are now validated and used in several areas of pathological diagnosis, particularly on infectious and neoplastic diseases. The spectrum of infectious diseases, especially lung infective diseases, is now broadening and modifying, thus the pathologist is increasingly involved in the diagnosis of these pathologies. The precise tissue characterization of lung infections has an important impact on specific therapeutic treatment. Increased knowledge of significant alterations in lung cancer has led today to a better understanding of the pathogenic substrate underlying the development, progression and metastasis of neoplastic processes. Molecular tests are now routinely performed in different lung tumors allowing a more precise patient stratification in terms of prognosis and therapy. This review focuses on molecular pathology of the principal infective lung diseases and tumors.

  10. Bartonellosis in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Unrecognized and Unsuspected Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi Amiri, Fateme

    2017-10-01

    Systemic cat scratch disease or bartonellosis is a clinical entity caused by Bartonella henselae, which manifests with necrotizing granulomas in visceral organs. The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is the vector responsible for horizontal transmission of the disease from cat to cat, and its bite can also infect humans. In immunocompromised patients including chronic kidney disease and renal transplant recipients, it can cause persistent and disseminated cat scratch disease. The aim of this paper is to perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the diagnostic methods of cat scratch disease in chronic kidney disease and renal transplant recipients. This review was searched via electronic PubMed and Google scholar databases. Few qualitative full-text original articles in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplant were extracted. At this paper, 19 articles identified including six articles in chronic kidney disease and 13 articles in renal transplant recipients. Of these six identified case reports in chronic kidney disease, serology via immunofluorescence antibody test was led to diagnosis of cat scratch disease in five patients and a one patient showed nonreactive serologic test. Polymerase chain reaction usage to detect deoxyribonucleic acid in tissue biopsy and bone marrow biopsy was led to diagnosis. Cat scratch disease diagnosis in 13 renal transplant recipients was attained more by combining serology and polymerase chain reaction to detect deoxyribonucleic acid in tissue specimens. These selected studies demonstrate that serology and polymerase chain reaction via deoxyribonucleic acid extraction of tissue specimens yield the best outcome in diagnostic field of bartonellosis. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  11. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Brian B; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul; Wolin, Michael S

    2016-07-20

    A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119-146.

  12. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  13. Pulmonary cystic disease associated with integumentary and renal manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Cayetano, Katherine S.; Albertson, Timothy E.; Chan, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with multiple skin lesions on his face, neck and upper torso, which first appeared in the 3rd decade of his life, was admitted to our hospital. He had cystic changes in his lungs noted on chest computed tomography (CT) scanning, as well as a left kidney mass. This patient exhibited a rare complex of renal, cutaneous and pulmonary manifestations, eponymously named Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, with characteristic skin features (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas and acrochordons). This syndrome is due to an autosomal dominant germ-line mutation of the folliculin (FLCN) gene located at chromosome 17p11.2. Diagnosis and differentiation from other disease complexes including the skin, kidneys and lungs are important in prognostication and management of potentially life-threatening complications such as renal cell carcinoma and pneumothoraces. PMID:24285950

  14. Pulmonary cystic disease associated with integumentary and renal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Cayetano, Katherine S; Albertson, Timothy E; Chan, Andrew L

    2013-11-01

    A 69-year-old man with multiple skin lesions on his face, neck and upper torso, which first appeared in the 3rd decade of his life, was admitted to our hospital. He had cystic changes in his lungs noted on chest computed tomography (CT) scanning, as well as a left kidney mass. This patient exhibited a rare complex of renal, cutaneous and pulmonary manifestations, eponymously named Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, with characteristic skin features (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas and acrochordons). This syndrome is due to an autosomal dominant germ-line mutation of the folliculin (FLCN) gene located at chromosome 17p11.2. Diagnosis and differentiation from other disease complexes including the skin, kidneys and lungs are important in prognostication and management of potentially life-threatening complications such as renal cell carcinoma and pneumothoraces.

  15. Renal osteodystrophy in children: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Markus J; van Husen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Disturbances in calcium-phosphate homeostasis play an important role in children with chronic kidney disease, and not only cause renal osteodystrophy but also result in increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review outlines the current aspects in the pathogenesis, diagnostic approach and treatment of renal osteodystrophy. The pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy is under strong influence of the fibroblast growth factor 23/Klotho system, which is able to enhance phosphate excretion and reduce calcitriol synthesis in the kidney. Fibroblast growth factor 23 increases tissue calcinosis and is cardiotoxic, and is independently associated with mortality. Despite improvement in diagnostic imaging (bone density measurements), determination of biomarkers, mainly parathyroid hormone, still plays a central role. New treatment options resulted in improved bone health and also a reduction in mortality was achieved in adults with calcium-free phosphate binders. Substitution of active and inactive vitamin D is important and also has a beneficial effect on proteinuria. Knowledge about the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of renal osteodystrophy is increasing dramatically and has an impact not only to bone health but also overall morbidity and mortality. This will ultimately translate into further improved diagnostic approaches and novel treatment options.

  16. Psychosocial impact of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Killingworth, A

    Renal dysfunction has a profound physical, psychological, social and sexual impact. The impact of end-stage renal disease can be interpreted in terms of crisis theory and interventions planned. Factors predicting non-adherence to therapy can be isolated and managed in order to promote adherence. The challenge of renal disease can be met by a collaborative multidisciplinary approach.

  17. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed.

  18. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  19. Diagnosis of acute renal failure in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Choker, G; Gouyon, J B

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to improve the definition of acute renal failure (ARF) in very preterm infants. Twenty-eight newborn infants with gestational age < or =32 weeks were prospectively studied in the first 5 days of life and made up a control group as they did not present risk factors for vasomotor renal insufficiency. Renal insufficiency was defined as an increase in daily serum creatinine concentration above the 99th interval limit obtained in this control group, i.e., 43 micromol/l on day 1 and/or 21 micromol/l on day 2 and/or 14 micromol/l/day on day 3 and/or 22 micromol/l/day on day 4. According to this definition, 20 very preterm infants with ARF were identified. As compared with the control group, the ARF group showed more prolonged oliguric episodes, lower diuresis, insufficient weight loss (in spite of a reduction in water intake) and also more episodes with natremia <130 mEq/l (35 vs. 0%; p <0.05) and/or kalemia >6 mEq/l (40 vs. 11%; p <0.05). Therefore, assessment of daily changes in serum creatinine concentration in very preterm infants allows the diagnosis of clinically significant reduction in glomerular filtration rate.

  20. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-09-07

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential.

  1. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  2. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  4. [Laser microdissection and mass spectrometry based proteomics in the diagnosis of kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Li, Mingxi; Wen, Yubing; Li, Xuemei; Sun, Jian; Sun, Wei

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, laser microdissection followed by mass spectrometry (LMD/MS) has been successfully applied to the proteomic studies of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) renal tissues. This new technique improves the diagnosis of kidney diseases and has a better potential for future clinical application. The review focuses on the use of this methodology for exploring the mechanisms, diagnosis and classification of kidney diseases including renal amyloidosis and membrane proliferative glomerulonephritis.

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  6. Expression of histone methyltransferases as novel biomarkers for renal cell tumor diagnosis and prognostication

    PubMed Central

    Pires-Luís, Ana Sílvia; Vieira-Coimbra, Márcia; Vieira, Filipa Quintela; Costa-Pinheiro, Pedro; Silva-Santos, Rui; Dias, Paula C; Antunes, Luís; Lobo, Francisco; Oliveira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Céline S; Costa, Bruno M; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell tumors (RCTs) are the most lethal of the common urological cancers. The widespread use of imaging entailed an increased detection of small renal masses, emphasizing the need for accurate distinction between benign and malignant RCTs, which is critical for adequate therapeutic management. Histone methylation has been implicated in renal tumorigenesis, but its potential clinical value as RCT biomarker remains mostly unexplored. Hence, the main goal of this study was to identify differentially expressed histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs) that might prove useful for RCT diagnosis and prognostication, emphasizing the discrimination between oncocytoma (a benign tumor) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), especially the chromophobe subtype (chRCC). We found that the expression levels of 3 genes—SMYD2, SETD3, and NO66—was significantly altered in a set of RCTs, which was further validated in a large independent cohort. Higher expression levels were found in RCTs compared to normal renal tissues (RNTs) and in chRCCs comparatively to oncocytomas. SMYD2 and SETD3 mRNA levels correlated with protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry. SMYD2 transcript levels discriminated RCTs from RNT, with 82.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity [area under curve (AUC) = 0.959], and distinguished chRCCs from oncocytomas, with 71.0% sensitivity and 73.3% specificity (AUC = 0.784). Low expression levels of SMYD2, SETD3, and NO66 were significantly associated with shorter disease-specific and disease-free survival, especially in patients with non-organ confined tumors. We conclude that expression of selected HMTs and HDMs might constitute novel biomarkers to assist in RCT diagnosis and assessment of tumor aggressiveness. PMID:26488939

  7. Renal tubular acidosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis of the gradient or classic type, thought to be due to a disorder of the distal tubule, has been found to occur in 32% of 117 patients with chronic liver disease. Whilst the cause of this disorder is probably multifactorial, immunological mechanisms are considered to play a major role. The presence of this disorder might well be a cause, rather than the result of, the various electrolyte abnormalities seen in patients with chronic liver disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 6 PMID:1234340

  8. Perioperative anticoagulation and renal disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suparna; Jaffer, Amir K; Slawski, Barbara A; Pfeifer, Kurt J; Smetana, Gerald W; Cohn, Steven L

    2014-12-01

    As our surgical population becomes older and increasingly medically complex, knowledge of the most recent perioperative literature can provide guidance for physicians across multiple specialties caring for the surgical patient. Common issues many clinicians encounter in the perioperative period relate to anticoagulation and renal disease. This article identifies gaps in knowledge for the fields of perioperative anticoagulation, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease and highlights recently published studies on these topics that attempt to fill these gaps and help clinicians provide excellent care for their patients.

  9. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  10. Pregnancy in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle; Hercz, Adam Engel; Keunen, Johannes; Chan, Christopher; Pierratos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The ovulatory menstrual cycle is known to be affected on multiple levels in women with advanced renal disease. Menstrual irregularities, sexual dysfunction, and infertility worsen in parallel with the renal disease. Pregnancy in women with ESRD on dialysis is therefore uncommon. Furthermore, when pregnancy does occur, it can prove hazardous to both mother and baby owing to a multitude of potential complications including accelerated hypertension and preeclampsia, poor fetal growth, anemia, and polyhydramnios. Data are emerging, however, to suggest that pregnancy while on intensified renal replacement regimens may result in better pregnancy outcomes, and emerging trends include the decreased rate of therapeutic abortions probably reflecting a change in counseling practices over time. Nevertheless, a pregnant woman on intensive dialysis requires meticulous follow-up by a dedicated team including nephrology, obstetrics, and a full multidisciplinary staff. In this article, we will address fertility issues in young women with ESRD, review pregnancy outcomes in women on both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and provide suggestions for the management of the pregnant women on intensive hemodialysis.

  11. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  12. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-03-22

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD.

  13. Value of electron microscopy in the diagnosis of glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym Louzir; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Moussa, Fatma Ben; Zekri, Semy; Maiz, Hédi Ben

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the contribution of electron microscopy to the final diagnosis of glomerulopathies, the authors established a prospective study during the first semester of 2006. A total of 52 kidney biopsies were performed with 3 samples for light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. Among these renal biopsies, only 20 were examined with electron microscopy because the diagnosis made on the basis of conventional methods had remained unclear or doubtful. In 18 cases, electron microscopy was undertaken for the investigation of primary kidney disease. The 2 remaining cases were transplant biopsies. In this series of 20 patients, there were 3 children with an average age of 9 years and 17 adults with an average age of 35.5 years. Fifteen patients (75%) were nephrotic. The study revealed that electron microscopy was essential for diagnosis in 8 cases (40%) and was helpful in 12 cases (60%). In conclusion, the results showed that the ultrastructural study provides essential or helpful information in many cases of glomerular diseases, and therefore electron microscopy should be considered an important tool of diagnostic renal pathology. As was recommended, it is important to reserve renal tissue for ultrastructural study unless electron microscopy can be routinely used in all biopsies. Thus, this technique could be performed wherever a renal biopsy has to be ultrastructurally evaluated.

  14. Molecular differential diagnosis of renal carcinoma: from microscopes to microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Steiner, G; Sidransky, D

    1996-12-01

    In the last decade, specific chromosomal alterations have been associated with different tumor types. These aberrations were originally detected by karyotyping and then by more sophisticated cytogenetic analysis. A few karyotypic alterations can be directly linked to distinct malignancies, such as the Philadelphia chromosome in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, loss of distal chromosome 3p 14 in small-cell lung cancer, the loss of distal chromosome 11p13 in Wilms' tumor, and loss or rearrangement of the short arm of chromosome 3 in clear and chromophobe RCC. The relative specificity of the latter findings enabled investigators to diagnose an occult renal clear-cell carcinoma from a supraclavicular lymph node metastasis by analysis of G-banded metaphase chromosomes obtained from this mass. A similar report based also on cytogenetic findings was published earlier. Karyotypic changes, however, detect only gross alterations visible to an observer. With more refined diagnostic tools, such as microsatellite analysis, other, even smaller, well defined lesions can be analyzed. A summary of the known frequencies of chromosomal losses is given in Table 1. The combination of certain LOH patterns has shown great promise in the differential diagnosis of renal tumors. The transfer of molecular genetics from the laboratory to surgical pathology and other clinical departments is a meaningful event and a challenging task. Molecular pathology is certain to become important in the diagnosis of tumors with unclear histology. Diagnosis based widely upon staining techniques and determination of a patient's prognosis by staging and grading alone will be increasingly accompanied by molecular genetic methods. Pathology may be on the verge of the greatest change since the introduction of the microscope.

  15. Pathogenesis of growth failure in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T M; Yi, Z W; Chan, J C

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of growth failure in chronic renal disease. The neuro-endocrine control of growth hormone secretion and insulin-like growth factor gene expression subject to use of corticosteroids, uremia, and metabolic acidosis are presented. It has been shown in other non-growth hormone deficient conditions such as Turner's syndrome that the use of exogenous growth hormone increases linear growth but also accelerates closure of the growth plate with no significant difference in the final height of such children. An understanding of growth factors is especially important and timely because of the tendency these days to use growth hormone to overcome the growth impairment of children with chronic renal failure.

  16. Ammonium chloride poisoning in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Donald L.; Knight, Allan

    1974-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a long history of renal stone disease and urinary tract infection presented to the emergency room with exhaustion and air hunger. Laboratory data confirmed profound metabolic acidosis. Unduly large quantities of bicarbonate and potassium were required for correction of the deficits. She had been taking 6 g daily of ammonium chloride as a urine-acidifying agent for a period of six months in addition to agents directed against urinary tract infection. The combination of impaired renal function and effective hydrogen ion loading resulted in profound systemic acidosis. The metabolic derangements associated with the administration of ammonium chloride and its use as a therapeutic agent are discussed. PMID:4850503

  17. [The bilateral renal lymphoma: an incurable disease? Case report].

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marcello; Montinaro, A M; D'Ambrosio, E; Di Renzo, N; Ambrosino, C; Lefons, M; Pati, C; Sozzo, E

    2014-01-01

    The bilateral primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare disease with a high mortality rate (75% within the first year). We report the case of a fifty-three years old women observed in January 2011 for renal colic. Ultrasonography showed hypoechoic lobular formations in the kidney. Blood tests showed: creatinine 1.8 mg/dl, urea 75 mg/dl , Creatinine Clerance 35 ml/m, hemoglobinemia 11 g/dl, with blood cells 8.500/mcL, Albumin 2.8 g/dl, Beta -2 micro - 27.3/mL. Proteinuria was 0.3 g/24 hours. The CT scan showed kidneys with larger dimensions and multiple hypodense areas infiltrating the renal parenchyma with contrast-enhanced low in which kidneys had lesions similar to "leopard skin". The CT scan showed no enlarged lymph nodes. Renal biopsy showed: renal parenchyma largely occupied by infiltration of lymphoid elements, small and medium-sized, densely packed with compression of the tubular structures . Immunofluorescence for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, C1q, fibrinogen, kappa and lambda were negative. The bone marrow biopsy excluded lymphomatous infiltration. The histological diagnosis was "non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma"; the clinical diagnosis was LRBP. The patient was treated by 6 cycles of R-CHOP-21 protocol (rituximab - endoxan, adriblastina , vincristine, prendnisone), the latter of which practiced in August 2011. The pt is currently in follow-up hematology and nephrology . The first TAC control , in October 2011, showed a complete regression of the lesions infiltrating . This finding was confirmed by two other CT scan performed in February and October 2012. The last blood tests of February 2013 showed : creatinine 1.1 mg / dl , Urea 40 mg/dl, proteinuria absent. Currently, the pt is asymptomatic and is being treated by low dose of ACE inhibitor. The bilateral PRL is considered a severe disease with one-year mortality of 75% . The successful outcome of the case described can be attributed to haematological therapy and to the early diagnosis.

  18. Validation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Diagnosis as the Primary Cause of Renal Failure in the US Renal Data System.

    PubMed

    Broder, Anna; Mowrey, Wenzhu B; Izmirly, Peter; Costenbader, Karen H

    2017-04-01

    Using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification as gold standards, we determined sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of having SLE denoted as the primary cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the US Renal Data System (USRDS). ESRD patients were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes in electronic medical records of 1 large tertiary care center, Montefiore Hospital, from 2006 to 2012. Clinical data were extracted and reviewed to establish SLE diagnosis. Data were linked by social security number, name, and date of birth to the USRDS, where primary causes of ESRD were ascertained. Of 7,396 ESRD patients at Montefiore, 97 met ACR/SLICC SLE criteria, and 86 had SLE by record only. Among the 97 SLE patients, the attributed causes of ESRD in the USRDS were 77 SLE and 12 with other causes (unspecified glomerulonephritis, hypertension, scleroderma), and 8 missing. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for SLE in the USRDS were 79%, 99.9%, 93%, and 99.7%, respectively. Of the 60 patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, 44 (73%) had SLE as primary ESRD cause in the USRDS. Attribution of the primary ESRD causes among SLE patients with ACR/SLICC criteria differed by race, ethnicity, and transplant status. The diagnosis of SLE as the primary cause of ESRD in the USRDS has good sensitivity, and excellent specificity, PPV, and NPV. Nationwide access to medical records and biopsy reports may significantly improve sensitivity of SLE diagnosis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Disease management improves end-stage renal disease outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence-based guidelines, and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total healthcare costs, including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out of pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present current data suggest that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in end-stage renal disease. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  1. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  2. In vivo bone aluminum measurements in patients with renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Contamination of the dialysis solution with trace amounts of aluminum and long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders have led to increased body burden of aluminum in patients with end-stage renal disease. A significant clinical problem associated with aluminum-overload is the early diagnosis of aluminum-induced dialysis dementia and osteomalacic osteodystrophy. There are few, if any, blood or urine indices that provide an early monitor of this bone disease, especially in the asymptomatic patient. Although a bone biopsy is usually the basis for the final clinical diagnosis, this procedure is not recommended for routine monitoring of patients. The present technique demonstrates the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum levels in patients with renal failure. The interference normally present from activation of bone phosphorus is eliminated by using a thermal/epithermal neutron beam. For the clinical management of the patients, the Al/Ca ratio for the hand may be more useful than an absolute measurement of the total body or skeletal aluminum burden. The relationship between the increased serum Al levels following disferrioxamine infusion and the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum using the Al/Ca ratio are currently under investigation. The neutron activation procedure presented in this pilot study is a promising new technique with an immediate clinical application. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction.The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant.This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients.

  4. [The ultrasonic diagnosis of the changes in the kidneys in renal forms of acute kidney failure].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, V G; Tsvigun, G V; Zaikina, N A

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic investigation of the kidneys in patients with renal forms of acute renal failure (32 and 24 with ethylene glycol poisoning and leptospirosis, respectively) recorded in the oligo-anuric phase a specific ultrasonic picture of renal lesion demonstrable as long as full recovery of impaired functions. The picture was characterized by enlargement of the kidneys with good differentiation of the pyramids in enhanced parenchymal echogenicity. Ethylene glycol poisoning is characterized by limited renal mobility and an echo negative halo around them. These signs may appear helpful in the diagnosis of renal forms of acute renal failure.

  5. Analysis of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Noninvasive Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis of Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Flavio Antonio de Oliveira; Pinto, Ibraim M. F.; Amodeo, Celso; Smanio, Paola E. P.; Kambara, Antonio M.; Petisco, Ana Claudia G.; Moreira, Samuel M.; Paiva, Ricardo Calil; Lopes, Hugo Belotti; Sousa, Amanda G. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and atherosclerosis are related to renovascular hypertension in elderly individuals. Regardless of comorbidities, renal artery stenosis is itself an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective To define the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of noninvasive imaging tests used in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Methods In a group of 61 patients recruited, 122 arteries were analized, thus permitting the definition of sensitivity, specificity, and the relative contribution of each imaging study performed (Doppler, scintigraphy and computed tomographic angiography in comparison to renal arteriography). Results The mean age was 65.43 years (standard deviation: 8.7). Of the variables related to the study population that were compared to arteriography, two correlated with renal artery stenosis, renal dysfunction and triglycerides. The median glomerular filtration rate was 52.8 mL/min/m2. Doppler showed sensitivity of 82.90%, specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 66.70%. For tomography, sensitivity was 66.70%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 87.50% and negative predictive value 55.20%. With these findings, we could identify the imaging tests that best detected stenosis. Conclusion Tomography and Doppler showed good quality and efficacy in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, with Doppler having the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast medium for the assessment of a disease that is common in diabetics and is associated with renal dysfunction and severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24061685

  6. [Molecular diagnosis in Huntington's disease].

    PubMed

    Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2008-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological degenerative disorder, inherited by an autosomal dominant mode, and caused by a CAG triplet expansion coding for a poly-glutamine sequence in the huntingtin protein. HD affects 5-10 in 100,000 individuals from Caucasian population. Clinically patients display motor, cognitive and psychological impairment, and death within 10-15 years. Concrete advances have been achieved in the knowledge of the mutational mechanism, alteration of the protein product and their neuropathological effects. A number of tests such as PCR with or without DNA modification, Southern blot and mixed methods are analyzed. We describe their characteristics and effectiveness for the molecular diagnosis of HD.

  7. Renal Manifestations in Scleroderma: Evidence for Subclinical Renal Disease as a Marker of Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Steen, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Scleroderma is a disease characterized by immune activation, vasculopathy, fibroblast stimulation, and connective tissue fibrosis. End-organ damage occurs due to progressive tissue fibrosis and vasculopathy. Markers of incipient vasculopathy have not been well studied in scleroderma. However, reduced renal functional reserve and proteinuria are common indicators of progressive vasculopathy in diabetic and hypertensive vasculopathy. Recent studies suggest a strong association between renal involvement and outcomes in scleroderma, with a threefold increased risk of mortality from pulmonary hypertension if renal insufficiency is present. We review the types of renal involvement seen in scleroderma and the data to support the use of renal parameters including proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, and renal vascular dynamics measured with Doppler ultrasound to identify subclinical renal insufficiency. Further studies are warranted to investigate the use of renal parameters as prognostic indicators in scleroderma. PMID:20827302

  8. [ADPKD: predictors of Renal Disease progression].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Dallera, Nadia; Saletti, Arianna; Terlizzi, Vincenzo; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Factors predicting rapid progression of kidney disease in ADPKD can be divided into genetic (non-modifiable) and clinical (modifiable) risk factors. Patients harbouring PKD1 mutations, in particular if truncating, have a more severe form of ADPKD. Clinical risk factors include decrease in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow at a young age; high total kidney volume; hypertension and urological complications <35 years; albuminuria/proteinuria. The renal disease is also more severe in males and in subjects with family history of ESRD <55 years. In recent years, two models for predicting progression in ADPKD have been published: the Mayo model, based on height-adjusted TKV, age and eGFR, and the Brest model, based on PKD gene mutation type, gender, and early onset of hypertension and urological complications. With the emergence of new disease-modifying therapies, prediction tools are essential. However, the high variability in ADPKD makes the predicting models difficult to apply on an individual patient basis. Thus, the above-mentioned predicting models should be viewed as complimentary to clinical evaluation and follow-up. In the future, an individual risk score linking genetic, imaging and clinical data might prove the most accurate way of predicting long-term outcome.

  9. Renal diseases as targets of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett; Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    A number of renal pathologies exist that have seen little or no improvement in treatment methods over the past 20 years. These pathologies include acute and chronic kidney diseases as well as posttransplant kidney survival and host rejection. A novel approach to treatment methodology may provide new insight to further progress our understanding of the disease and overall patient outcome. Recent advances in human genomics and gene delivery systems have opened the door to possible cures through the direct modulation of cellular genes. These techniques of gene therapy have not been extensively applied to renal pathologies, but clinical trials on other organ systems and kidney research in animal models hold promise. Techniques have employed viral and nonviral vectors to deliver gene modulating compounds directly into the cell. These vectors have the capability to replace defective alleles, express novel genes, or suppress the expression of pathogenic genes in a wide variety of kidney cell types. Focus has also been placed on ex vivo modification of kidney tissue to promote allograft survival and limit the resulting immune response to the transplanted organ. This could prove a valuable alternative to current immunosuppressive drugs and their deleterious effects on patients. While continued research and clinical trials are needed to identify a robust system of gene delivery, gene therapy techniques have great potential to treat kidney disease at the cellular level and improve patient quality of life.

  10. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of Alport's syndrome in paraffin-embedded renal sections: antigen retrieval with autoclave heating.

    PubMed

    Naito, Ichiro; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi; Nomura, Shinsuke

    2003-03-01

    Alport's syndrome (AS) is a hereditary renal disease caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen type IV. Immunohistochemical analysis of the alpha chains of collagen type IV has been found to be useful for the diagnosis of this disease. The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated by us recognize alpha 1(IV) through alpha 6(IV) chains of collagen type IV on fresh-frozen sections but not on paraffin-embedded sections. Antigen retrieval by autoclave heating has been found to restore the epitopes recognized by the mAbs; however the heating conditions had not been well established. In this study, the heating conditions were carefully examined using renal sections obtained from AS and non-AS patients. The heating was performed in an autoclave, at 105 degrees -127 degrees C for 6-8 min. During the heating, the sections were immersed in 0.2 N HCl solution (pH 0.9). Then, the mAbs were applied for 30 min, and the bound mAbs were detected using the LSAB kit. The optimal temperature for the antigen retrieval varied among specimens, and was dependent on the type of basement membrane examined. Thus, it was considered that heating at two or three different temperatures could be helpful for the precise diagnosis of AS. Adopting the antigen retrieval method could extend the possibility of immunohistochemical diagnosis of AS to cases without using fresh-frozen sections.

  11. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p < 0.05), higher ADCs (2.46 ± 0.20 vs. 2.18 ± 0.10 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, p < 0.05), lower R2*s (14.9 ± 1.7 vs. 18.1 ± 1.6 s(-1), p < 0.05), and lower tissue stiffness (3.2 ± 0.3 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5 kPa, p < 0.05). Excellent reproducibility of the quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal

  12. Renal cystic disease associated with tuberous sclerosis complex: renal failure treated by cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J C; Bernstein, J; Rosenberg, B

    1975-01-01

    Chronic renal failure in patients with tuberous sclerosis may be secondary to diffuse cystic disease, a lesion less common than the better known hamartomatous angiomyolipomas. Uremia, in the case of a nineteen-year old female with end-stage renal disease, was associated with severely atrophic kidneys that contained numerous collapsed and scarred cysts. No hamartomas were present. The patient survived for more than three years following cadaveric renal transplantation.

  13. Nanomedicines for renal disease: current status and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Kamaly, Nazila; He, John C.; Ausiello, Dennis A.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment and management of kidney disease currently presents an enormous global burden, and the application of nanotechnology principles to renal disease therapy, although still at an early stage, has profound transformative potential. The increasing translation of nanomedicines to the clinic, alongside research efforts in tissue regeneration and organ-on-a-chip investigations, are likely to provide novel solutions to treat kidney diseases. Our understanding of renal anatomy and of how the biological and physicochemical properties of nanomedicines (the combination of a nanocarrier and a drug) influence their interactions with renal tissues has improved dramatically. Tailoring of nanomedicines in terms of kidney retention and binding to key membranes and cell populations associated with renal diseases is now possible and greatly enhances their localization, tolerability, and efficacy. This Review outlines nanomedicine characteristics central to improved targeting of renal cells and highlights the prospects, challenges, and opportunities of nanotechnology-mediated therapies for renal diseases. PMID:27795549

  14. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  15. Renal transitional-cell carcinoma in two cats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanzlicek, Andrew S; Ganta, Chanran; Myers, Carl B; Grauer, Gregory F

    2012-04-01

    Two 12-year-old cats were diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) based on physical examination, clinicopathologic data and, in one case, abdominal ultrasound findings. Approximately 1 year after the initial diagnosis of CKD both cats developed renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC)--bilateral in one cat. Based on post-mortem examination, one cat had no evidence of metastasis and the other had metastasis to the large intestine, heart and lungs. This is the first report of de novo bilateral renal TCC in a cat, as well as the first report of renal TCC developing in cats with previous history of confirmed CKD.

  16. Chemerin in renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-02-01

    The potential involvement of chemerin in cardiovascular and renal dysfunction has recently been acknowledged. There are indeed many links between this protein and inflammation, atherosclerosis, and multiple obesity- and diabetes-related parameters such as body mass index, insulin resistance, and blood levels of insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose. In addition, in the last few years, several reports have investigated the circulating chemerin levels and their pathophysiologic significance in chronic kidney disease populations. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of this matter, in particular as to whether elevated chemerin might be the cause behind, or simply mirror, a reduced renal function. The limitations of the present knowledge on chemerin may partly relate to the lack of specific antibodies for assessing the different active isoforms of the protein. Measuring its bioactive serum concentration, and achieving a precise overall pattern of the tissue-specific formation of different isoforms, with the use of suitable technology, will ultimately help define the role of chemerin in disease pathophysiology, or as a diagnostic or therapeutic marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nosocomial Legionnaires' disease following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, H; Kallings, I; Nyström, B; Hoffner, S

    1987-06-01

    A cluster of five cases of Legionnaires' disease in renal transplant patients is described. They were treated with erythromycin and rifampicin, and all five survived. Two of them had rejected their grafts prior to their Legionella pneumonia; two rejected their transplants after reduction of immunosuppressive therapy to combat the infection. L pneumophila was present in the water distribution system of the hospital. Eradication measures included flushing the water pipes to the transplantation ward with hot and hyperchlorinated water, raising the warm water temperature to 60 degrees C, and installing ultraviolet (UV) irradiation units on the warm and cold water pipes to the ward. These measures were successful in that no new cases of legionellosis occurred after wards. L pneumophila could subsequently not be demonstrated by culture in plastic shower hoses supplied with UV-irradiated water. L pneumophila could be demonstrated by direct fluorescent antibody technique, but nonspecific reactions cannot be excluded. A higher prevalence of elevated L pneumophila antibody titers was observed in patients nursed for more than four weeks in the hospital than in patients with a shorter hospital stay, in hospital staff members, or in the general population. It seems that, with appropriate control measures, transplantation activities need not be discontinued in the presence of a minor cluster of Legionnaires' disease in renal transplant patients.

  18. Calciphylaxis in pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imam, Abubakr A; Mattoo, Tej K; Kapur, Gaurav; Bloom, David A; Valentini, Rudolph P

    2005-12-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare, but life-threatening complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that has been reported mostly in adult patients. The exact etiology is unknown, but the disease is commonly associated with a high calcium-phosphorus product and elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). We herein review the published reports on calciphylaxis in ESRD patients less than 18 years old and report the case of a patient with severe calciphylaxis who presented with lower extremity pain, muscle tenderness and difficulty in walking. The serum PTH was low, and the calcium-phosphorus product was normal. The diagnosis of calciphylaxis was confirmed by a muscle biopsy. Treatment with low calcium peritoneal dialysate and substitution of calcium-based phosphorus binders with sevelamer (Renagel) was unsuccessful. The patient's clinical condition progressed to extensive soft tissue calcification and ulcerating skin lesions. Nine months after the onset of symptoms, the patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest.

  19. Adiponectin and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Anastasia; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Spyridaki, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipokine with significant anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties, which is generally associated with a beneficial cardiometabolic profile. Paradoxically, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by markedly increased plasma ADPN levels and increased cardiovascular risk. In spite of the cardioprotective properties attributed to adiponectin, cardiovascular complications remain the main cause of mortality in the ESRD population. Furthermore, these patients have enhanced chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and persistent protein-energy wasting. Studies of the impact of ADPN on clinical outcomes among ESRD patients have so far yielded contradictory results. This review article summarizes the current knowledge on ADPN functions and explores the role of ADPN in ESRD patients, with specific focus on inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and wasting.

  20. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature.

  1. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Pericardial disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Masud H; Espinosa, Raul E; Nishimura, Rick A; Sinak, Lawrence J; Hayes, Sharonne N; Melduni, Rowlens M; Oh, Jae K

    2010-06-01

    Pericardial diseases can present clinically as acute pericarditis, pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, and constrictive pericarditis. Patients can subsequently develop chronic or recurrent pericarditis. Structural abnormalities including congenitally absent pericardium and pericardial cysts are usually asymptomatic and are uncommon. Clinicians are often faced with several diagnostic and management questions relating to the various pericardial syndromes: What are the diagnostic criteria for the vast array of pericardial diseases? Which diagnostic tools should be used? Who requires hospitalization and who can be treated as an outpatient? Which medical management strategies have the best evidence base? When should corticosteroids be used? When should surgical pericardiectomy be considered? To identify relevant literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE using the keywords diagnosis, treatment, management, acute pericarditis, relapsing or recurrent pericarditis, pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. Studies were selected on the basis of clinical relevance and the impact on clinical practice. This review represents the currently available evidence and the experiences from the pericardial clinic at our institution to help guide the clinician in answering difficult diagnostic and management questions on pericardial diseases.

  3. Pericardial Disease: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Masud H.; Espinosa, Raul E.; Nishimura, Rick A.; Sinak, Lawrence J.; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Melduni, Rowlens M.; Oh, Jae K.

    2010-01-01

    Pericardial diseases can present clinically as acute pericarditis, pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, and constrictive pericarditis. Patients can subsequently develop chronic or recurrent pericarditis. Structural abnormalities including congenitally absent pericardium and pericardial cysts are usually asymptomatic and are uncommon. Clinicians are often faced with several diagnostic and management questions relating to the various pericardial syndromes: What are the diagnostic criteria for the vast array of pericardial diseases? Which diagnostic tools should be used? Who requires hospitalization and who can be treated as an outpatient? Which medical management strategies have the best evidence base? When should corticosteroids be used? When should surgical pericardiectomy be considered? To identify relevant literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE using the keywords diagnosis, treatment, management, acute pericarditis, relapsing or recurrent pericarditis, pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. Studies were selected on the basis of clinical relevance and the impact on clinical practice. This review represents the currently available evidence and the experiences from the pericardial clinic at our institution to help guide the clinician in answering difficult diagnostic and management questions on pericardial diseases. PMID:20511488

  4. Computer Aided Diagnosis of Acute Gynaecologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fengling

    1982-01-01

    In this article, the application of electronic computers for diagnosis of ten common gynaecologic diseases is discussed. Verification by 1038 cases shows that the discussed method of diagnosis has an accuracy of 95.57%.

  5. [Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Thomas-Antérion, C; Laurent, B

    1998-11-01

    The diagnosis of dementia of Alzheimer type (DTA) in the early stage of the disease may be possible with the development of specialized memory consultations. After this diagnosis, we can inform family and even the patient in some cases, monitor the progression of disease, give or not treatment, and help family for daily life management (money, car driving, administration papers, etc.). The first step is to analyse the memory complaints of the patient and if possible of his family. The difficulties in everyday life are more informative than an anxious complaint of memory and some IADL deficiency appear early: difficulty to use phone, drugs, transports or checks. The patient examination by a practitioner or a neurologist has to be complete, even if normal in most of the cases. The practitioner has to explore without specific material, the main cognitive domain: the "5 words test" illustrates a useful memory tool, analysing two types of recall. We also must observe writing, digit span, naming and verbal fluency. The examination by a psychologist using standardized batteries of tests must always be driven by this clinical exploration using common scales like MMS or ADAS. In very early DTA, we may observe a cognitive decline limited to some aspects of memory (free long term recall, cued recall, working memory...) with a decline of the most controlled attentional tasks. An isolated memory disorder has to be identified either as onset of DTA or as an aging related cognitive decline (ARCD): the difference is qualitative and may appear only on repeated exams by experimented psychologist.

  6. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  7. Renal gallium accumulation in the absence of renal pathology in patients with severe hepatocellular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Sterkel, B.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Visualization of Ga-67 citrate in the kidneys at 48 hours and 72 hours post injection is usually interpreted as evidence of renal pathology. In reviewing approximately 200 consecutive patients referred for gallium scans, 40 patients who also underwent liver/spleen Tc-99m sulfur colloid (SC) studies within one month of the gallium study were identified. Fourteen of these patients showed advanced hepatocellular dysfunction on the Tc-99m SC liver/spleen images. Of these 14 patients, nine had persistent renal accumulation of gallium at 48 or 72 hours. Five of these nine patients had no evidence of primary renal disease by clinical or postmortem examination and subsequent clinical information indicated that two additional patients probably had no significant renal pathology. Therefore, bilateral symmetrically increased renal uptake of gallium in patients with advanced hepatocellular disease should not necessarily be interpreted as evidence of renal pathology.

  8. Cellular senescence in renal ageing and disease.

    PubMed

    Sturmlechner, Ines; Durik, Matej; Sieben, Cynthia J; Baker, Darren J; van Deursen, Jan M

    2017-02-01

    The senescence programme is implicated in diverse biological processes, including embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and repair, tumorigenesis, and ageing. Although in vivo studies of senescence are in their infancy, evidence suggesting that senescent cells are a heterogeneous cell type is accumulating: senescence can be induced by different stressors, and senescent cells have varying degrees of genomic and epigenomic instability and different cell origins, contributing to their diversity. Two main classes of senescent cells have been identified: acute and chronic senescent cells. Acute senescent cells are generated during coordinated, beneficial biological processes characterized by a defined senescence trigger, transient senescent-cell signalling functions, and eventual senescent-cell clearance. In contrast, chronic senescent cells arise more slowly from cumulative, diverse stresses and are inefficiently eliminated, leading to their accumulation and deleterious effects through a secretory phenotype. Senescent cells have been identified in many tissues and organs, including the kidney. Here, we discuss the emerging roles of senescent cells in renal development, homeostasis, and pathology. We also address how senotherapy, or targeting of senescent cells, might be used to improve renal function with normal ageing, disease, or therapy-induced damage.

  9. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-04-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation ( r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease ( r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients.

  10. Applications of urinary proteomics in renal disease research using animal models.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of renal disease are essential tools in research on kidney disease and have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis. Use of animal models minimises inter-individual differences, allows specific pathological changes to be examined, and facilitates collection of tissue samples. Thus, mechanistic research and identification of biomarkers are possible. Various animal models manifesting specific pathological lesions can be used to investigate acute or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urine, a terminal metabolic product, is produced via glomerular filtration, reabsorption, and excretion in the tubular and collecting ducts, reflecting the functions of glomeruli or tubular tissue stimulated in various ways or subject to disease. Almost 70 % of urinary proteins originate from the kidney (the other 30 % come from plasma), and urinary sampling is important to noninvasively detect renal disease. Proteomics is powerful when used to screen urine components. Increasingly, urine proteomics is used to explore the pathogenesis of kidney disease in animals and to identify novel biomarkers of renal disease. In this section, we will introduce the field of urinary proteomics as applied in different models of animal renal disease and the valuable role played by proteomics in noninvasive diagnosis and rational treatment of human renal disease.

  11. Penile Calciphylaxis in End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Luca; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, better described as “Calcific uremic arteriolopathy” (CUA), involves about 1–4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety. PMID:23841013

  12. Penile calciphylaxis in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Vincenzo; Di Lullo, Luca; Gorini, Antonio; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, better described as "Calcific uremic arteriolopathy" (CUA), involves about 1-4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety.

  13. Predictive factors for stone disease in patients with renal colic.

    PubMed

    Türk, Hakan; Ün, Sıtkı

    2017-06-30

    Many patients present to urology and emergency departments for acute renal colic complaints. There are many different imaging studies that can be used in patients with a pre-diagnosis of acute renal colic. In this study, we would like to assess the efficacy of using clinical and laboratory results in patients with flank pain complaint as a predictive factor of urinary system stone disease. All patients were assessed using spinal non-contrast complete abdominal computerized tomography and urine analysis. Presence of stones and their number and size were recorded. 516 patients who were included in the study were divided into 2 groups according to urinary stone presence. Group 1 (n = 388) consisted of patients with stones meanwhile patients in Group 2 (n = 128) were stone-free. According to these results, male sex, presence of microscopic hematuria, stone history in the family, nausea and emesis in addition to pain and accompanying urinary symptoms were detected as predictive factors in diagnosing urinary stone disease by multivariate analysis. From our study results, we can conclude that uroflowmetry is a very useful tool in monitoring lower urinary system complaints.

  14. Adaptive diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Troncone, Riccardo; Discepolo, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Coeliac disease has for a long time simply been regarded as a gluten-dependent enteropathy and a duodenal biopsy was required in all patients for the diagnosis. It is now accepted that autoimmunity against transglutaminase 2 is an earlier, more universal and more specific feature of coeliac disease than histologic lesions. Moreover, high serum levels of combined anti-transglutaminase 2 and anti-endomysium antibody positivity have excellent predictive value for the presence of enteropathy with villous atrophy. This makes the histology evaluation of the gut no longer necessary in well defined symptomatic paediatric patients with compatible HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8 background. The biopsy-sparing diagnostic route is not yet recommended by gastroenterologists for adults, and certain clinical circumstances (immunodeficiency conditions, extraintestinal manifestations, type-1 diabetes mellitus, age less than 2 years) may require modified diagnostic approaches. Coeliac patients with preserved duodenal villous structure do exist and these need a more extended evaluation by immunologic and molecular biology tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2012-03-01

    Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height) is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH) therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  16. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height) is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3–6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH) therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development. PMID:22470855

  17. [The spectrum of cystic kidney disease in adulthood: differential diagnosis and complications].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Costero, O

    2003-01-01

    Simple renal cysts are the most common renal masses, accounting for roughly 65 to 70% of cases. They most often occur in patients over the age of 50 as determined from post-mortem examination or renal ultrasonography. The major concern with simple renal cysts is differentiating them from more serious disorders, such as polycystic kidney disease and solid masses such as a renal carcinoma or abscess. Renal arteriovenous malformations may present with ultrasound picture mimicking simple parapelvic cyst. Ultrasound, doppler ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively. Arteriography may be useful to characterise vascular lesion. We report here the spectrum of cystic kidney disease in adulthood in a group of patient with different disorders. The differential diagnosis, complications and associated process are discussed.

  18. [Contribution of genetics to knowledge and management of hereditary kidney diseases progressing to renal failure].

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Gubler, M C; Feingold, J

    2001-10-01

    Genes of most of the hereditary renal diseases progressing to renal insufficiency are now identified. In the first part of this paper we describe their multi-faceted genetics. Genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated in many of these diseases, such as Alport's syndrome and nephronophtisis. In some of them an allelic heterogeneity is present as in the X-linked form of Alport's syndrome (more than 300 different mutations have been described along the COL4A5 gene). Besides these classical mendelian diseases, mendelian subentities have been isolated within common diseases such as cortico-resistant nephrosis. Many diseases also demonstrate a variability of their phenotype resulting from allelic and/or genetic heterogeneity, or from modifier genes. In the second part of the paper we discuss the consequences of this explosion of knowledge with respect to epidemiology, genetic diagnosis, prenatal diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Lihong; Zhang, Dongjuan; Huo, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Pu, Dan; Guan, Youfei

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. Three isoforms of PPAR, i.e., PPAR-a, -d, and -?, have been identified and are differentially expressed in various tissues, including the kidney. The target genes of PPARs are involved in diverse biological processes, including adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammatory response, reproduction, and cell growth and differentiation. PPARs have been reported to protect against renal injury through indirect systemic effects and/or direct renal effects in diabetic nephropathy, glomerulonephritis, renal cell carcinoma, acute renal failure and chronic renal disease. In this review, we summarize the role of the three identified PPAR isoforms, PPARa, -d, and -?, in renal physiology and discuss the renoprotective effects of PPAR ligands in various kidney diseases.

  20. [Tumor of upper urinary tract in renal polycystic disease].

    PubMed

    Rabii, Redouane; el Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Querfani, Baderdine; Joual, Abdenbi; el Mrini, Mohamed

    2003-09-01

    Upper urinary tract tumours are exceptional in the context of renal polycystic disease. The authors report the case of Mrs B. F., 56 years old, who presented with left loin pain associated with haematuria. Clinical examination was normal and ultrasound examination revealed bilateral renal polycystic disease with a mass in the left renal sinus. CT urography showed a tumour arising from the renal pelvis suggestive of an upper urinary tract tumour. The laboratory assessment revealed normal renal function and normal urine cytology. Treatment consisted of radical nephroureterectomy with resection of a bladder cuff. Histological examination revealed a urothelial tumour of the renal pelvis with negative surgical margins. In the light of this case, the authors discuss the diagnostic difficulties and specificities, the treatment and the outcome of this unusual clinical association.

  1. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labeling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111-leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  2. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labelled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labelling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111 leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  3. Determinants of renal shape in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Takashi; Ikehira, Hiroo; Imasawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The determinants of renal shape are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the renal shape, as measured by ultrasound, and the clinical characteristics in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The study included 121 CKD patients who had undergone kidney biopsy. The renal shape was defined by: (1) the renal shape index: renal length/(renal width + renal thickness) and (2) the renal width/length. IgA nephritis patients (excluding patients with diabetes), comprised the largest subgroup (n = 49) and were analyzed separately. The correlation analyses and two-sample Student's t test results showed that age, eGFR, BMI, cortex volume fraction measured by MRI (cortex volume/renal volume), percentage of global sclerosis, weight, sex, hypertension and diabetes were significantly correlated with the renal shape in both kidneys. In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, old age and high BMI were independently associated with plump kidney. As for the left renal shape index, low cortex volume fraction was also independently associated with plump kidney. In the IgA nephritis patient subgroup, the cortex volume fraction was the most significant factor contributing to the left renal shape index (r = 0.50, p < 0.01) and the width/length (r = -0.47, p < 0.01). Age and BMI were stronger determinants of renal shape than renal function in CKD patients. The left renal cortex volume fraction was also an independent determinant and a more important factor in IgA nephritis patients.

  4. Review of genitourinary tuberculosis with focus on end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Neiberg A; Vasconcelos, Carol C; Filgueira, Pedro Henrique O; Kretzmann, Meissa; Sindeaux, Ticiano A S; Feitosa Neto, Beni; Silva Junior, Geraldo B; Daher, Elizabeth F

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious disease. Recent studies indicate that genitourinary TB is the third most common form of extra-pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of renal TB can be hypothesized in a non-specific bacterial cystitis associated with a therapeutic failure or a urinalysis with a persistent leukocyturia in the absence of bacteriuria. We report on the case of a 33-year-old man who presented on admission end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to renal TB and a past history of pulmonary TB with important radiologic findings. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings despite all cultures being negative. Empiric treatment with tuberculostatic drugs was started and the patient became stable. He was discharged with no symptom, but without renal function recovery. He is on maintenance hemodialysis three times a week. TB is an important cause of kidney disease and can lead to irreversible renal function loss.

  5. Why and how to measure renal function in patients with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Romano, Antonietta; Di Pascoli, Marco; Angeli, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with advanced liver disease frequently have impaired renal function. Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are quite common in patients with cirrhosis and both are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. A careful assessment of renal function is highly important in these patients to help physicians determine their diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic management and to define transplantation strategies (liver transplantation alone vs simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation). Although they are still widely used in clinical practice, conventional biomarkers of renal function such as serum creatinine have several limitations in these patients. Recent progress has been made in the evaluation of renal function and new diagnostic criteria for AKI have been proposed. However, certain issues such as the noninvasive assessment of the glomerular filtration rate and/or improvement in the differential diagnosis between hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis must still be addressed. The purposes of this paper are: (i) to highlight the importance of the evaluation of renal function in patients with cirrhosis; (ii) to review the state of the art in the assessment of renal function in these patients as well as advances that we expect will be made to improve the accuracy of available tools. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Attitudes in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Toward Prenatal Diagnosis and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Swift, Oscar; Vilar, Enric; Rahman, Belinda; Side, Lucy; Gale, Daniel P

    2016-12-01

    No recommendations currently exist regarding implementation of both prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). This study evaluated attitudes in ADPKD patients with either chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages I-IV or end-stage renal failure (ESRF) toward prenatal diagnosis and PGD. Ninety-six ADPKD patients were recruited from an outpatient clinic, wards, and dialysis units. Thirty-eight patients had ESRF and 58 had CKD stages I-IV. Participants were given an information sheet on prenatal diagnosis and PGD and subsequently completed a questionnaire. The median age of participants was 51.5 years. Seventeen percent of ADPKD patients with CKD and 18% of ADPKD patients with ESRF would consider prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for ADPKD. Fifty percent with CKD would have opted for PGD (or might consider it in the future) were it available and funded by the UK National Health Service, compared to 63% in the ESRF group (p = 0.33). Sixty-nine percent in the CKD group and 68% in the ESRF group believed that PGD should be offered to other patients. There was a spectrum of attitudes among this cohort. A proportion of patients believe that PGD should be made available to prospective parents with this disease. The discrepancy between the low proportion (17% CKD, 18% ESRF) who would consider prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy and the higher number who hypothetically express an intention or wish to access PGD (50% CKD and 63% ESRF) indicates far greater acceptability for diagnostic methods that occur before embryo implantation. It is not known how the development of methods to identify patients whose renal function is likely to decline rapidly and treatments altering the natural history of ADPKD will affect these attitudes.

  7. [Pathophysiology and diagnosis of cardio-renal syndrome: actual picture and future prospectives].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; De Pascalis, Antonio; Marinelli, Annibale; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Malaguti, Moreno; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Rivera, Rodolfo; Gorini, Antonio; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) indicates how close the relationship is between heart and kidney during failure of these organs. At present, the classification of the syndrome includes five types of CRS: types I and II which are strictly related to initial heart failure (both acute and chronic), types III and IV which include initial kidney failure, and type V which includes several systemic diseases. Many pathophysiological pathways have been described illustrating how heart and kidney disease are involved in clinical conditions. The diagnosis of CRS is based on both blood tests and ultrasound imaging. Several biomarkers indicating levels of heart and kidney function have emerged over the last few decades which can be used to predict kidney failure in patients with acute or chronic heart disease. Kidney injury biomarkers have also to be tested, especially those indicating glomerular and tubular damage. Renal ultrasound and trans-thoracic echocardiography can provide further information on heart and kidney failure in patients with cardio-renal syndrome at any stage.

  8. Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Donita L.

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin and to define the mechanisms which predispose to nephrotoxicity in subclinical renal disease. Subtotally nephrectomized beagle dogs were used as a model for human beings with compromised renal function secondary to a reduced number of functional nephrons. Using ultrastructural morphometry, light microscopy and clinical chemistry data, the model was defined and the nephrotoxic responses of intact dogs administered recommended doses of drug were compared to the response of subtotally nephrectomized dogs administered reduced doses based on each animal's clearance of drug. Lysosomal and mitochondrial morphometric changes suggested mechanisms for increased sensitivity. To determine if increased sensitivity in this model was dependent on altered serum concentrations, variable rate infusions based on individual pharmacokinetic disposition of drug were administered using computer-driven infusion pumps. Identical serum concentration-time profiles were achieved in normal dogs and subtotally nephrectomized dogs, however, toxicity was significantly greater in nephrectomized dogs. The difference in the nephrotoxic response was characterized by administering supratherapeutic doses of drug to dogs. Nephrectomized dogs given a recommended dose of gentamicin became oliguric during the second week of treatment and increasingly uremic after withdrawal of drug. In contrast, intact dogs administered 2 times the recommended dose of gentamicin become only slightly polyuric during week 4 of treatment. The need to individualize dosage regimens based on drug clearance and not serum creatinine nor creatinine clearance alone was substantiated by describing the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin in spontaneously occurring disease states. Four individualized dosage regimens with differing predicted efficacy were then administered to nephrectomized dogs to determine their relative nephrotoxic

  9. Ureteritis Cystica: Important Consideration in the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Fernández, B.; Díaz-Alférez, FJ.; Herrero-Polo, M.; Martín-Izquierdo, M.; Silva-Abuín, JM.; Lorenzo-Gómez, MF.

    2012-01-01

    Ureteritis cystica is an uncommon cause of acute renal pain. The aetiology remains unclear and the diagnosis may be difficult to establish. We report the case of a 29 year old woman with a history of repeated urinary tract infections presenting with acute renal colic in the absence of lithiasis. We review the diagnostic tools available to make the diagnosis and the recent pertinent literature. PMID:22474406

  10. Treatment of osteoporosis in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul D

    2005-03-01

    As glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines from age-related bone loss or disease that specifically induces a decline in GFR, there are a number of metabolic bone conditions that may accompany the decline in GFR. These metabolic bone conditions span a spectrum from mild-to-severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to the development of additional heterogeneous forms of bone diseases each with its distinctly quantitative bone histomorphometric characteristics. Osteoporosis can also develop in patients with CKD and ESRD for many reasons beyond age-related bone loss and postmenopausal bone loss. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with severe CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not as easy to do as it is in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)--neither fragility fractures nor The World Health Organization bone mineral density criteria can be used to diagnose osteoporosis in this population since all forms of renal bone disease may fracture or have low "T scores". The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with CKD/ESRD must be done by first the exclusion of the other forms of renal osteodystrophy, by biochemical profiling or by double tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy; and the finding of low trabecular bone volume. In such patients, preliminary data would suggest that oral bisphosphonates seem to be safe and effective down to GFR levels of 15 mL/min. In patients with stage 5 CKD who are fracturing because of osteoporosis or who are on chronic glucocorticoids, reducing the oral bisphosphonate dosage to half of its usual prescribed dosing for PMO seems reasonable from known bisphosphonate pharmacokinetics, though we do need better scientific data to fully understand bisphosphonate usage in this population.

  11. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient.

  12. Kidney dendritic cells in acute and chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hochheiser, Katharina; Tittel, André; Kurts, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Dendritic cells are not only the master regulators of adaptive immunity, but also participate profoundly in innate immune responses. Much has been learned about their basic immunological functions and their roles in various diseases. Comparatively little is still known about their role in renal disease, despite their obvious potential to affect immune responses in the kidney, and immune responses that are directed against renal components. Kidney dendritic cells form an abundant network in the renal tubulointerstitium and constantly survey the environment for signs of injury or infection, in order to alert the immune system to the need to initiate defensive action. Recent studies have identified a role for dendritic cells in several murine models of acute renal injury and chronic nephritis. Here we summarize the current knowledge on the role of kidney dendritic cells that has been obtained from the study of murine models of renal disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  14. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  15. [Light chain deposition disease as a cause of renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wohl, P; Chadimová, M; Englis, M; Táborský, P; Rossmann, P; Matl, I

    1998-11-30

    The objective of the paper is to draw attention to a rare cause of rapidly progressing renal failure which developed in the course of four months as a result of light chain deposition disease. The authors submit two case-histories of the disease assessed by renal biopsy after previous clinical and laboratory suspicion of monoclonal gammapathy. In one patient in the sternal punctate plasmacytoma was diagnosed and in the second case it was not possible to detect any type of monoclonal gammapathy or another possible cause of disease. Renal failure was in both cases irreversible and both patients were enlisted in regular haemodialyzation treatment.

  16. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis presenting with preserved renal function in patients with underlying multisystem autoimmune disease: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Anisha; Randone, Olga; Tam, Frederick W. K.; Tarzi, Ruth M.; Levy, Jeremy B.; Griffith, Megan; Lightstone, Liz; Cook, H. Terence; Cairns, Tom; Pusey, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Necrotizing and crescentic GN usually presents with rapidly declining renal function, often in association with multisystem autoimmune disease, with a poor outcome if left untreated. We aimed to describe the features of patients who have presented with these histopathological findings but minimal disturbance of renal function. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review (1995–2011) of all adult patients with native renal biopsy–proven necrotizing or crescentic GN and normal serum creatinine (<120 μmol/l) at our centre. Results. Thirty-eight patients were identified. The median creatinine at presentation was 84 μmol/l and the median proportion of glomeruli affected by necrosis or crescents was 32%. Clinicopathological diagnoses were ANCA-associated GN (74%), LN (18%), anti-GBM disease (5%) and HScP (3%). Only 18% of cases had pre-existing diagnoses of underlying multisystem autoimmune disease, although the majority (89%) had extra-renal manifestations accompanying the renal diagnosis. All patients received immunosuppression and most had good long-term renal outcomes (median duration of follow-up 50 months), although two progressed to end-stage renal disease within 3 years. We estimate that renal biopsy had an important influence on treatment decisions in 82% of cases. Conclusion. Necrotizing and crescentic GN may present in patients with no or only minor disturbance of renal function. This often occurs in patients with underlying systemic autoimmune disease; early referral for biopsy may affect management and improve long-term outcomes in these cases. PMID:25431483

  17. Misdiagnosis of Addison's disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Hayri Sipahioglu, Murat; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay; Utas, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare disorder in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In patients, the diagnosis of Addison's disease is difficult in clinical practice because most of the clinical findings of this disease are similar to those of the renal failure. We present a 51-year-old male patient, who underwent hemodialysis therapy for 8 years, diagnosed with Addison's disease after having myalgia, skin hyperpigmentation, weight loss, sweating, and nausea for the past few weeks. The physical examination was completely normal except for muscle weakness, hyperpigmentation on labial mucosa and skin in a patient. The laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoglycemia. Serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, and ACTH stimulation test results were consistent with Addison's disease. Adrenal computerized tomography revealed bilateral atrophic glands. Additionally, it was found that elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titer were positive. Our purpose is to emphasize that physicians should be alert to the potential for additional different conditions particularly in terms of adrenal failure in patients with ESRD.

  18. Outcomes of kidney transplantation in Alport syndrome compared with other forms of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Yvelynne P; Patil, Anish; Wallis, Luke; Murray, Susan; Kant, Saumitra; Kaballo, Mohammed A; Casserly, Liam; Doyle, Brendan; Dorman, Anthony; O'Kelly, Patrick; Conlon, Peter J

    2017-11-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited renal disease characterized by hematuria, renal failure, hearing loss and a lamellated glomerular basement membrane. Patients with Alport syndrome who undergo renal transplantation have been shown to have patient and graft survival rates similar to or better than those of patients with other renal diseases. In this national case series, based in Beaumont Hospital Dublin, we studied the cohort of patients who underwent renal transplantation over the past 33 years, recorded prospectively in the Irish Renal Transplant Registry, and categorized them according to the presence or absence of Alport syndrome. The main outcomes assessed were patient and renal allograft survival. Fifty-one patients diagnosed with Alport syndrome in Beaumont Hospital received 62 transplants between 1982 and 2014. The comparison group of non-Alport patients comprised 3430 patients for 3865 transplants. Twenty-year Alport patient survival rate was 70.2%, compared to 44.8% for patients with other renal diseases (p = .01). Factors associated with patient survival included younger age at transplantation as well as differences in recipient sex, donor age, cold ischemia time, and episodes of acute rejection. Twenty-year graft survival was 46.8% for patients with Alport syndrome compared to 30.2% for those with non-Alport disease (p = .11). Adjusting for baseline differences between the groups, patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) due to Alport syndrome have similar patient and graft survival to those with other causes of ESKD. This indicates that early diagnosis and management can lead to favorable outcomes for this patient cohort.

  19. [2011 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery diseases].

    PubMed

    Brogneaux, C; Sprynger, M; Magnée, M; Lancellotti, P

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we present the 2011 guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery diseases. The document covers the diagnostic modalities and therapeutic strategies for the atherosclerotic disease of the extra-cranial carotid, mesenteric, renal, upper and lower extremity arteries indicating the class and level of evidence of the recommendations.

  20. Nutritional assessment of the critically ill patients with cardiac disease under renal replacement therapy: diagnostic difficulty.

    PubMed

    Jardim, Maria das Neves; Costa, Helenice Moreira da; Kopel, Liliane; Lage, Silvia Gelás

    2009-06-01

    Evaluate the nutritional status of patients with cardiac disease and concomitant renal dysfunction requiring renal replacement therapy. Patients with cardiac disease and renal failure receiving renal replacement therapy, admitted to an intensive care unit, were submitted to nutritional evaluation, by use of anthropometric measurements and laboratory data. We studied 43 patients, mean age 64±15 years, 26 were men. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.36±0.16. Analysis of anthropometric measurements, based on body mass index disclosed that, 18 patients were normal, 6 were underweight and 19 were overweight or obese. Based on measurement of triceps skinfold thickness, 16 patients were considered normal and 27 had some degree of depletion. Measurements of midarm circumference and midarm muscular circumference showed 41 patients with some degree of depletion. Laboratory data revealed 28 patients with depletion based on albumin levels and 27 with depletion based on lymphocyte count. Malnutrition is common in critically ill patients with cardiac disease and renal failure receiving renal replacement therapy. Nutritional assessment based on body mass index did not prove to be a good index for diagnosis of nutritional disorders. The nutritional evaluation must be complemented in order to identify malnutrition and introduce early nutritional support.

  1. End-stage renal disease and primary hypogonadism associated with a 46,XX karyotype.

    PubMed

    Bailey, W A; Zwingman, T A; Reznik, V M; Griswold, W R; Mendoza, S A; Jones, K L; Freidenberg, G R

    1992-10-01

    To determine the cause of absent sexual development in a 17-year-old girl with end-stage renal disease. Case study. Seventeen-year-old girl with end-stage renal failure. None. The patient had phenotypically normal external female genitalia, müllerian duct hypoplasia, and no ovaries. Her serum gonadotropin levels were in the castrate range at baseline and after gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation. Her karyotype, in lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts, was 46,XX. Analysis of genomic DNA, following polymerase chain reaction-amplication with oligonucleotide primers corresponding to the Y-encoded zinc finger protein ZFY and the testis-determining SRY gene, showed Y chromosome material in a male control but none in the patient. The results suggest a diagnosis of Frasier syndrome, a disorder characterized by true gonadal dysgenesis and end-stage renal disease occurring in normal phenotypic girls. Although previously reported only in individuals with a 46,XX karyotype, our studies indicate that Frasier syndrome may also occur in 46,XX girls. Delayed puberty is not uncommon in renal failure. This case illustrates the importance of measuring gonadotropin levels in teenage girls with delayed puberty and renal failure, particularly if the origin of the renal disease is obscure.

  2. Assessment of renal vascular resistance and blood pressure in dogs and cats with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Novellas, R; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Espada, Y

    2010-05-15

    This study investigated the possible relationships between renal resistive index (RI) or pulsatility index (PI) and systolic blood pressure and biochemical and haematological parameters in dogs and cats with renal disease. The study included 50 dogs and 20 cats with renal disease. RI and PI were significantly higher in both dogs and cats with renal disease than in 27 healthy dogs and 10 healthy cats. In dogs, a significant negative correlation was found between RI and red blood cell count, and a positive correlation was found between PI and serum creatinine. In cats, a positive correlation was found between RI and serum urea, between PI and serum creatinine, and between PI and serum urea. No relationship could be found between either RI or PI and systolic blood pressure.

  3. [Spectrum of renal manifestations in sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Maud; Koehl, Bérengère; Nochy, Dominique; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Audard, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common hemoglobinopathy, is an increasing cause of chronic kidney disease. In the last decade, we have witnessed a better understanding in the characterization of clinical manifestations and pathogenesis of sickle cell nephropathy. The spectrum of renal diseases during SCD includes various renal manifestations such as impairment of urinary concentrating ability, defect in urine acidification, renal papillary necrosis and proteinuria related to glomerular injury leading to progressive end-stage renal disease. Endothelial dysfunction related to chronic hemolysis and the relative renal hypoxia caused by vaso-occlusive sickle red blood cells are probably two key factors for SCN development. Optimal therapeutic management (including the use of blockers of the renin-angiotensin system) of patients with proteinuria remains to be determined. Renal replacement therapy with dialysis is required in SCD patients with end-stage renal disease but these patients should probably undergo kidney transplantation that requires careful management. Copyright © 2013 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and follow-up of a case of branchio-oto-renal syndrome displays renal growth impairment after the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Emma; Mazza, Vincenzo; Lugli, Licia; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Percesepe, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Branchio-oto-renal syndrome combines branchial arch defects, hearing impairment and renal malformations or hypoplasia. Due to the high phenotypic variability, prenatal diagnosis has a limited prognostic value in mutation-positive cases. We report the first branchio-oto-renal syndrome molecular prenatal diagnosis and ultrasonographic follow-up, showing a normal renal growth until the 24th week of pregnancy, a growth deceleration during the third trimester and a renal volume recovery during the first months of life. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Utility of renal biopsy in the clinical management of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dhaun, Neeraj; Bellamy, Christopher O; Cattran, Daniel C; Kluth, David C

    2014-05-01

    Characterizing chronic kidney disease (CKD) at all stages is an essential part of rational management and the renal biopsy plays a key role in defining the processes involved. There remain no global guidelines available to the renal community on indications for this important diagnostic, prognostic, and relatively safe test. Although most nephrologists recognize several clear indications for a renal biopsy, it is still underutilized. It not only helps the clinician to manage the patient with CKD, but it can also help clarify the epidemiology of CKD, and aid research into the pathobiology of disease with the aim of discovering new therapies. It may be useful for instance in elderly patients with CKD, those with diabetes and presumed 'hypertensive nephropathy', and in some patients with advanced CKD as part of the pretransplant work-up. In some populations (for example, immunoglobulin A nephropathy and ANCA vasculitis), renal biopsy allows disease classification that may predict CKD progression and response to therapy. For the individual, interval renal biopsy may be of use in providing ongoing therapeutic and prognostic information. Molecular advances will change the landscape of renal pathology and add a new dimension to the diagnostic precision of kidney biopsy. Organizing the multiplicity of information available in a renal biopsy to maximize benefits to the patient, as well as to the epidemiologist and researcher, is one of the challenges that face the nephrology community.

  6. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: from diagnosis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, P.; Carmichael, A.

    1999-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension represents a form of correctable hypertension and preventable renal failure. Such patients need to be identified early so that specific therapy can be instigated. Patient identification requires a high index of suspicion in patients with certain clinical features. Subsequent non-invasive imaging may result in angiography which is required for diagnostic purposes and for planning intervention. Correctable therapy takes one of two forms, namely percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty, with or without stenting, or surgical revascularisation, together with modification of underlying risk factors.


Keywords: atherosclerosis; renal artery stenosis; hypertension PMID:10616685

  7. Percutaneous coronary intervention as a bridge to renal transplantation in a patient with end-stage renal disease--a case report.

    PubMed

    Safi, A M; Kwan, T; Rachko, M; Salciccioli, L; Clark, L T

    2000-05-01

    Renal transplantation is one of the preferred modes of replacement therapy in patients with end-stage renal disease. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease and renal transplant recipients. The authors describe a patient with end-stage renal disease who developed unstable angina before renal transplantation. Emergent cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention served as a bridge to his successful renal transplantation without complications.

  8. Neurological Manifestations of Renal Diseases in Children in Qazvin/ Iran

    PubMed Central

    DALIRANI, Reza; MAHYAR, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; AHMADI, Ghazaleh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Renal diseases are one of the most common causes of referrals and admissions of children, hence it is important to know their neurological presentations. This study aimed to determine neurological presentations of renal diseases in children. Material & Methods A total of 634 children with renal diseases, admitted to Qazvin Pediatric Hospital, Qazvin, central Iran from 2011 to 2013 were studied. Neurological presentations of patients were established and the results were analyzed using statistical tests. Results Neurological presentations were found in 18 (2.8%) out of 634 patients, of whom 15 had febrile seizures, two thromboembolism, and one encephalopathy. Among patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), 2.6% had febrile seizures, 11.1% of those with glomerulonephritis had encephalopathy, and 3.7% of those with nephrotic syndrome had cerebral thromboembolism. Conclusion Results showed neurological presentations in 2.8% of children with renal diseases, and febrile seizure as the most common presentation. PMID:27375752

  9. Microbiological diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary disease is by far the most frequent disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). To diagnose NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD), patients should have symptoms and radiologic signs suggestive of NTM-PD, and cultures of multiple respiratory tract samples must grow the same NTM species. Thus, the microbiological laboratory has a central role in the diagnosis of NTM-PD. This review summarizes currently available data on techniques involved in the microbiological diagnosis of NTM-PD, and aims to provide a framework for optimal microbiological diagnosis.

  10. In-111-leukocyte scanning in inflammatory renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, H.D.; Goodwin, D.A.; Lantieri, R.L.

    1981-06-01

    In-111-leukocyte scanning has recently been introduced as a clinically effective method for detecting inflammatory disease and abscesses. The authors present six cases that demonstrate the usefulness of this new technique in suspected inflammatory renal disease. Two patients had renal abscesses, two had acute pyelonephritis, one had acute focal bacterial nephritis (acute lobar nephronia), and one had a transitional cell carcinoma with associated acute and chronic inflammation.

  11. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  12. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  13. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  14. Emphysematous renal tract disease due to Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2004-06-01

    Emphysematous renal tract disease (ERTD) is a rare necrotizing infection of renal parenchyma and/or urinary tract caused by gas producing organisms. A case of acute emphysematous renal tract disease (ERTD) (emphysematous pyelonephritis along with emphysematous cystitis) caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in a non-diabetic patient, who did not apparently have any risk factor for fungal infection, is presented. Patient had refused for any surgical intervention. He was treated successfully with liposomal amphotericin B and 5-flucytosin and achieved complete recovery. Various causes of ERTD and available therapeutic options are discussed.

  15. 74 FR 49921 - Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2009-09-29

    ... Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System; Town Hall Meeting on End-Stage Renal Disease... & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 410, 413 and 414 RIN 0938-AP57 Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease...) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1,...

  16. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of Dent disease in 10 Chinese boys

    PubMed Central

    He, Guohua; Zhang, Hongwen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Xiao, Huijie; Yao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Dent disease is a rare X-linked recessive proximal tubular disorder that affects mostly male patients in childhood or early adult life. Dent disease is clinically characterized by the presence of low molecular weight proteinuria (LMWP), hypercalciuria, medullary nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and progressive renal failure. The clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of Dent disease were examined in 10 Chinese boys. All 10 childhood cases of Dent disease in China presented with tubular proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. The ratio of α1-microglobulinuria to microalbuminuria, if close to or above 1, can be used as a diagnostic criterion for tubuloproteinuria. Lotensin was ineffective at treating proteinuria while dihydrochlorothiazide reduced urine calcium excretion. PMID:28357180

  18. [Histopathological differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Fociani, P; Carsana, L; Zerbi, P; Ferri, A; Sampietro, G M; Vago, G

    2003-01-01

    In front of the suspicious diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the pathologist must have adequate and complete clinical, anamnestic, instrumental informations and, if possible, the previous histopathologic examinations. This is necessary because: the diagnosis of IBD is made with exclusion criteria, different pathologic entities may have similar macroscopic and microscopic findings and the characteristic lesions are often present in little number. The authors consider in this paper the problem of the differential diagnosis of IBD.

  19. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  20. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide‑containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases.

  1. [Genetics and nosological classification of renal cystic diseases].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Sottini, Laura; Dallera, Nadia; Capistrano, Mariano; Foini, Paolo; Scolari, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Renal cystic diseases are the major group of inherited renal disorders in humans and a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Dominant and recessive polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD and ARPKD, respectively) account for most of the clinical conditions. However, nephronophthisis (NPHP), medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD), and dominant glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) still have a relevant clinical impact, particularly in children. The discovery that the proteins that are defective in ADPKD and ARPKD localize to the primary cilium and the recognition of the role of this organelle in cystogenesis have led to the term ''ciliopathies''. In the last decade, the list of ciliopathies has continued to grow. Analysis of the protein products of the nine NPHP genes (NPHP 1-9) evinced a strong relation between ciliary function and pathogenesis of NPHP. The oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD) type I, characterized by congenital malformations and cystic kidney disease, was found to result from mutations in the OFD1 gene, which encodes a protein located to the primary cilium. Parallel to these advances, mutations in UMOD, the gene encoding uromodulin, were identified in pedigrees with MCKD2, familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy, and autosomal dominant GCKD. In all these disorders, uromodulin was found to be accumulating in intracellular aggregates, suggesting a common pathogenesis. Taken together, these findings suggest the need for the separation of renal cystic diseases due to UMOD mutations (uromodulin-associated diseases) from renal cystic diseases related to mutation of genes encoding for proteins expressed in the primary cilium (ciliopathies).

  2. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  3. [Methods of microbiological diagnosis in periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Stîngu, Cătilina Suzana; Turcu, Tatiana; Dimitriu, St

    2004-01-01

    Microbiological findings together with clinical and radiological diagnosis are essential for rationale use of antibiotics in periodontal disease. Methods used for microbiological diagnosis are: microscopy, cultivation, gas liquid chromatography, PCR, immuno-assays (ELISA, immunofluorescence), FISH. Each of them has some advantages and disadvantages related to cost, accessibility, sensitivity, duration. The most used today are cultivation and PCR techniques.

  4. An intelligent model for liver disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Liver disease, the most common disease in Taiwan, is not easily discovered in its initial stage; early diagnosis of this leading cause of mortality is therefore highly important. The design of an effective diagnosis model is therefore an important issue in liver disease treatment. This study accordingly employs classification and regression tree (CART) and case-based reasoning (CBR) techniques to structure an intelligent diagnosis model aiming to provide a comprehensive analytic framework to raise the accuracy of liver disease diagnosis. Based on the advice and assistance of doctors and medical specialists of liver conditions, 510 outpatient visitors using ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision) codes at a medical center in Taiwan from 2005 to 2006 were selected as the cases in the data set for liver disease diagnosis. Data on 340 patients was utilized for the development of the model and on 170 patients utilized to perform comparative analysis of the models. This paper accordingly suggests an intelligent model for the diagnosis of liver diseases which integrates CART and CBR. The major steps in applying the model include: (1) adopting CART to diagnose whether a patient suffers from liver disease; (2) for patients diagnosed with liver disease in the first step, employing CBR to diagnose the types of liver diseases. In the first phase, CART is used to extract rules from health examination data to show whether the patient suffers from liver disease. The results indicate that the CART rate of accuracy is 92.94%. In the second phase, CBR is developed to diagnose the type of liver disease, and the new case triggers the CBR system to retrieve the most similar case from the case base in order to support the treatment of liver disease. The new case is supported by a similarity ratio, and the CBR diagnostic accuracy rate is 90.00%. Actual implementation shows that the intelligent diagnosis model is capable of integrating CART and CBR techniques to

  5. Scleroderma renal crisis in a case of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Vij, Mukul; Agrawal, Vinita; Jain, Manoj

    2014-07-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is an overlap syndrome first defined in 1972 by Sharp et al. In this original study, the portrait emerged of a connective tissue disorder sharing features of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) and polymyositis. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is an extremely infrequent but serious complication that can occur in MCTD. The histologic picture of SRC is that of a thrombotic micro-angiopathic process. Renal biopsy plays an important role in confirming the clinical diagnosis, excluding overlapping/superimposed diseases that might lead to acute renal failure in MCTD patients, helping to predict the clinical outcome and optimizing patient management. We herewith report a rare case of SRC in a patient with MCTD and review the relevant literature.

  6. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  8. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously.

  9. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Management of Myeloma-Related Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Leung, Nelson; Merlini, Giampaolo; Ludwig, Heinz; Kastritis, Efstathios; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Joshua, Douglas; Orlowski, Robert Z; Powles, Raymond; Vesole, David H; Garderet, Laurent; Einsele, Hermann; Palumbo, Antonio; Cavo, Michele; Richardson, Paul G; Moreau, Philippe; San Miguel, Jesús; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Durie, Brian G M; Terpos, Evangelos

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practical recommendations for the diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma-related renal impairment (RI). Recommendations were based on published data through December 2015, and were developed using the system developed by the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group. All patients with myeloma at diagnosis and at disease assessment should have serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and electrolytes measurements as well as free light chain, if available, and urine electrophoresis of a sample from a 24-hour urine collection (grade A). The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, preferably, or the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula should be used for the evaluation of estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with stabilized serum creatinine (grade A). International Myeloma Working Group criteria for renal reversibility should be used (grade B). For the management of RI in patients with multiple myeloma, high fluid intake is indicated along with antimyeloma therapy (grade B). The use of high-cutoff hemodialysis membranes in combination with antimyeloma therapy can be considered (grade B). Bortezomib-based regimens remain the cornerstone of the management of myeloma-related RI (grade A). High-dose dexamethasone should be administered at least for the first month of therapy (grade B). Thalidomide is effective in patients with myeloma with RI, and no dose modifications are needed (grade B). Lenalidomide is effective and safe, mainly in patients with mild to moderate RI (grade B); for patients with severe RI or on dialysis, lenalidomide should be given with close monitoring for hematologic toxicity (grade B) with dose reduction as needed. High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (with melphalan 100 mg/m(2) to 140 mg/m(2)) is feasible in patients with RI (grade C). Carfilzomib can be safely

  10. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Small Renal Tumors: Trends in Renal Cancer Diagnosis and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Railton, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common malignancy causing significant mortality. In recent years abdominal imaging, often for alternate symptomatology, has led the trend toward the detection and confirmation of smaller renal tumors. This has permitted the greater use of localized and nephron-sparing techniques including partial nephrectomy and image-guided ablation. This article aims to review the current role of image-guided biopsy and ablation in the management of small renal tumors. The natural history of renal cell carcinoma, the role of renal biopsy, the principles and procedural considerations of thermal energy ablation, and the oncological outcomes of these minimally invasive treatments are discussed and illustrated with cases from the authors' institution. Image-guided ablation, in particular, has changed the treatment paradigm and, by virtue of its increasingly evident efficacy and low morbidity, now favors the treatment of smaller tumors in patients previously unfit for surgery.

  11. Association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with renal stone disease detected on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nam, In Chul

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with renal stone disease detected on computed tomography (CT). A total 1812 patients who underwent abdomen-pelvis CT in July 2015 were included in this study. The inclusion criteria for NAFLD were as follows: (i) lower average Hounsfield unit (HU) of hepatic right lobe, left medial and lateral segment when compared with that of spleen, (ii) patients who having urolithiasis in kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder, and (iii) patients underwent abdomen-pelvis CT including noncontrast image. The statistical significance of the association between NAFLD and renal stone disease was assessed using Chi Square Test. The Odds ratios and 95% CI were calculated to assess the propensity of renal stones disease for NAFLD by using Logistic Regression analysis. The frequency of renal stone disease in patients with NAFLD was higher approximately 19% than those who having renal stone disease without NAFLD. In addition, the presence of NAFLD was linked with renal stone disease showing that detection rate of renal stone disease in patients with NAFLD was markedly high (odds ratio: 5, 95% CI, 3-8.2) (p < 0.05) in multivariate analysis. The presence of significant association between NAFLD with renal stone disease and NAFLD may be considered to be an independent variable as a risk factor for renal stone disease.

  12. Pregnancy outcomes among renal transplant recipients and patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Saliem, Sara; Patenaude, Valerie; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study is to compare pregnancy outcomes between women with a functioning renal transplant and women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted effect of functioning renal transplant vs. ESRD requiring dialysis on pregnancy outcomes. We identified 264 birth records to women with a functional renal transplant and 267 birth records to women with ESRD on dialysis among 5,245,452 births. As compared to women with ESRD on dialysis, renal transplant recipients were less likely to have placental abruption [odds ratio, OR 0.23 (95% confidence interval, CI 0.08-0.70)], to receive blood transfusions [OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.09-0.30)], and to have growth-restricted and small-for-gestational-age babies [OR 0.45 (95% CI 0.23-0.85)]. Renal transplant recipients were more likely to have an instrumental delivery [OR 15.38 (95% CI 1.92-123.3)]. Among renal transplant women, there was a trend towards delivery by cesarean section as compared to patients with ESRD [OR 1.31 (95% CI 0.93-1.85)]. However, these results were not statistically significant. Fetal deaths were less likely to occur in women with a renal transplant [OR 0.41 (95% CI 0.17-0.96)]. There were four maternal deaths among patients with ESRD on dialysis and no maternal deaths among renal transplant patients. Patients with a functional renal graft had an overall lower rate of morbidity and adverse pregnancy complications when compared to patients with ESRD on dialysis.

  13. Heck's disease: diagnosis and susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lindsey K; Hinshaw, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, or Heck's disease, is an uncommon proliferation of oral mucosa that presents primarily in Native Central and South American populations. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. In the majority of cases, human papilloma virus 13 or 32 is detected. Factors that determine disease susceptibility are unclear, but genetics, and having the human lymphocytic antigen-DR4 (DRB1*0404) allele in particular, are thought to play a major role in disease vulnerability. We report another case of focal epithelial hyperplasia, hypothesize on disease susceptibility, and review the current understanding of this uncommon disorder.

  14. Vitreous Diagnosis in Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Vallejo-Garcia, José Luis; Pastora-Salvador, Natalia; Fonseca-Sandomingo, Agustín; Romano, Mario R.

    2012-01-01

    Vitreous body is an intraocular structure, origin of diverse pathologies, but is also the place where cells and inflammatory mediators are released coming from several pathologic processes. These inflammatory reactions can happen in any other ocular location like choroid, retina, optic nerve, or ciliary body and vitreous humor constitutes a stagnant reservoir for these resulting substances and debris. Through the recent techniques of vitreous collecting, handling, and analysis, increasingly more sophisticated and with fewer complications, cellularity and molecules in the vitreous of challenging pathologies for the ophthalmologist can now be studied. The most usefulness for vitreous diagnosis would be the masquerade syndromes, and the best exponent in this group is the primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL), in which cytology and an IL-10/IL-6 ratio more than 1 is fundamental for the diagnosis. PMID:23055575

  15. Molecular Diagnosis of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Caused by Puumala Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Nina; Hagström, Åsa; Lundahl, Malin; Nilsson, Elin; Juremalm, Mikael; Larsson, Inger; Alm, Erik; Bucht, Göran; Ahlm, Clas

    2016-01-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS; also called hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome [HCPS]) in the Americas. Puumala virus (PUUV) is the most common causative agent of HFRS in Europe. Current routine diagnostic methods are based on serological analyses and can yield inconclusive results. Hantavirus-infected patients are viremic during the early phase of disease; therefore, detection of viral RNA genomes can be a valuable complement to existing serological methods. However, the high genomic sequence diversity of PUUV has hampered the development of molecular diagnostics, and currently no real-time reverse transcription-quantitative (RT)-PCR assay is available for routine diagnosis of HFRS. Here, we present a novel PUUV RT-PCR assay. The assay was validated for routine diagnosis of HFRS on samples collected in Sweden during the winter season from 2013 to 2014. The assay allowed detection of PUUV RNA in 98.7% of confirmed clinical HFRS samples collected within 8 days after symptomatic onset. In summary, this study shows that real-time RT-PCR can be a reliable alternative to serological tests during the early phase of HFRS. PMID:26962084

  16. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  17. Wnt and planar cell polarity signaling in cystic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Goggolidou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases can cause end stage renal disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. They may arise early or later in life, are characterized by a spectrum of symptoms and can be caused by diverse genetic defects. The primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle that can serve as a signaling antenna, has been demonstrated to have a significant role in ensuring correct kidney development and function. In the kidney, one of the signaling pathways that requires the cilium for normal development is Wnt signaling. In this review, the roles of primary cilia in relation to canonical and non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling in cystic renal disease are described. The evidence of the associations between cilia, Wnt signaling and cystic renal disease is discussed and the significance of planar cell polarity-related mechanisms in cystic kidney disease is presented. Although defective Wnt signaling is not the only cause of renal disease, research is increasingly highlighting its importance, encouraging the development of Wnt-associated diagnostic and prognostic tools for cystic renal disease.

  18. Raynaud's disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hodges, H

    1995-04-01

    Raynaud's disease is a common vasospastic disorder affecting the digits of both hands. Women are most commonly affected. This disorder occurs in two forms: Raynaud's disease and Raynaud's phenomenon. Raynaud's phenomenon is associated with a secondary etiology, most commonly scleroderma. Symptoms may precede the onset of connective tissue disease by a number of years. The pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, recommendations for referral, and treatment of Raynaud's disease are presented. A protocol for use by the nurse practitioner in the primary care setting is provided.

  19. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease.

    PubMed

    da Silva, D R; Gluz, I C; Kurz, J; Thomé, G G; Zancan, R; Bringhenti, R N; Schaefer, P G; Dos Santos, M; Barros, E J G; Veronese, F V

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥ 200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥ 200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥ 200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up.

  20. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  1. Mortality from diabetic renal disease: a hidden epidemic.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chalapati; Adair, Timothy; Bain, Chris; Doi, Suhail A R

    2012-04-01

    Population-level mortality indicators can be useful outcome measures of diabetes care. Death registration systems serve as the main source of data for such measures. However, standard mortality indicators based on underlying causes do not adequately reflect the burden from diabetic renal disease. This article presents findings from analysis of multiple causes of death available from death registration data for Australia and USA. Both countries use an automated system that applies prescribed rules to select and code the underlying cause for each registered death. Deaths with diabetes as underlying cause were grouped according to their diabetic complications as defined by the International Classification of Diseases. Age-standardized mortality rates were calculated for the underlying cause rubric 'diabetes with renal complications'. These were contrasted with rates calculated using additional deaths where diabetes was the underlying cause and renal failure was listed as a consequence. These analyses identified that current automated programmes code three-fourths of all diabetes deaths to 'diabetes without complications', despite additional factors being listed. Estimated multiple cause death rates from diabetic renal disease are four to nine times higher than underlying cause rates for 'diabetes with renal complications' in both countries; and show a rising trend in contrast to the latter. These findings indicate that routine underlying cause statistics for USA and Australia grossly under estimate mortality from diabetic renal disease. Clear guidelines on the certification, coding and statistical presentation of diabetes mortality are needed for epidemiology and health policy.

  2. [Computer-assisted diagnosis of rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Jerrentrup, A; Schäfer, J R

    2017-03-31

    To establish a comprehensive diagnosis is by far the most challenging task in a physician's daily routine. Especially rare diseases place high demands on differential diagnosis, caused by the high number of around 8000 diseases and their clinical variability. No clinician can be aware of all the different entities and memorizing them all is impossible and inefficient. Specific diagnostic decision-supported systems provide better results than standard search engines in this context. The systems FindZebra, Phenomizer, Orphanet, and Isabel are presented here concisely with their advantages and limitations. An outlook is given to social media usage and big data technologies. Due to the high number of initial misdiagnoses and long periods of time until a confirmatory diagnosis is reached, these tools might be promising in practice to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases.

  3. [Survey on common pediatric drugs for renal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ye, Wen-qian; Liang, Yan; Cui, Yi-min; Ding, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Development and use of better medicine for children is a worldwide problem recently, especially in China. The current situation of drugs for children's renal diseases is far from well-understood now. This survey focused on drugs for pediatric renal diseases including immunosuppressants, corticosteroids, diuretics, anticoagulants, hypotensives and antilipemic agents.Information regarding the dosage, form, precaution, usage and administration in inserts was collected in this study. Drugs for pediatric renal diseases were selected according to the guidelines established by the Chinese Society of Pediatric Nephrology. The detailed information about the dosage, form of drugs was searched on the website of China-State Food and Drug (SFDA). The information of the precaution, usage and administration was obtained from the China Pharmaceutical Reference, the first edition. In this study, there were 5 categories of medicine including immunosuppressants, corticosteroids, diuretics, anticoagulants, hypotensives and antilipemic agents, and 89 kinds of medicine for renal diseases. Among these medicines, 65.2% were found not suitable for children in terms of drug dosage and form, 19.1% did not indicate the precaution, 51.7% did not indicate clearly the safety and effectiveness for children, and 56.2% lacked the detailed information about the usage and administration for children. There were only 4 kinds of these medicines which were studied via clinical trials in children population. There is a lack of drugs for children with renal diseases. Most of the time, the medicines used by doctors are not specially manufactured for children. The safety and efficacy of drugs that are currently used to treat pediatric renal diseases are not clear and definite.In addition, few clinical trials have been conducted for evaluation of drugs for pediatric renal diseases.In clinic, the situation of off-label drug treatment is very serious.

  4. Experimental models of renal disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rebecca C

    2010-11-26

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death among patients with end stage renal failure. Animal models have played a crucial role in teasing apart the complex pathological processes involved. This review discusses the principles of using animal models, the history of their use in the study of renal hypertension, the controversies arising from experimental models of non-hypertensive uraemic cardiomyopathy and the lessons learned from these models, and highlights important areas of future research in this field, including de novo cardiomyopathy secondary to renal transplantation.

  5. Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mantzavinosa, Vasileios; Alexiou, Athanasios; Greig, Nigel H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2017-02-03

    The dramatic increase in the population with dementia expected in the next decades is accompanied by the establishment of novel and innovated methods that will offer accurate and efficient detection of the disease in its early stages. While Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, by the time is typically diagnosed substantial neuronal loss and neuropathological lesions can damaged many brain regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the main risk factors that affect and increase Alzheimer's disease progression over time even in cases with no significant memory impairment present. Several potential markers are discussed such as oxidative stress, metal ions, vascular disorders, protein dysfunctions and alterations in the mitochondrial populations. A multiparametric model of Alzheimer's biomarkers is presented according to the latest classification of the disease.

  6. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  7. Genetic spectrum of Saudi Arabian patients with antenatal cystic kidney disease and ciliopathy phenotypes using a targeted renal gene panel

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; Kurdi, Wesam; Alsahan, Nada; Alabdullah, Zainab; Abudraz, Rania; Tulbah, Maha; Alnemer, Maha; Khan, Rubina; Al-Jurayb, Haya; Alahmed, Ahmed; Tahir, Asma I; Khalil, Dania; Edwards, Noel; Al Abdulaziz, Basma; Binhumaid, Faisal S; Majid, Salma; Faquih, Tariq; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Altassan, Nada; Monies, Dorota; Meyer, Brian; Sayer, John A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited cystic kidney disorders are a common cause of end-stage renal disease. Over 50 ciliopathy genes, which encode proteins that influence the structure and function of the primary cilia, are implicated in cystic kidney disease. Methods To define the phenotype and genotype of cystic kidney disease in fetuses and neonates, we correlated antenatal ultrasound examination and postnatal renal ultrasound examination with targeted exon sequencing, using a renal gene panel. A cohort of 44 families in whom antenatal renal ultrasound scanning findings in affected cases included bilateral cystic kidney disease, echogenic kidneys or enlarged kidneys was investigated. Results In this cohort, disease phenotypes were severe with 36 cases of stillbirth or perinatal death. Extra renal malformations, including encephalocele, polydactyly and heart malformations, consistent with ciliopathy phenotypes, were frequently detected. Renal gene panel testing identified causative mutations in 21 out of 34 families (62%), where patient and parental DNA was available. In the remaining 10 families, where only parental DNA was available, 7 inferred causative mutations were found. Together, mutations were found in 12 different genes with a total of 13 novel pathogenic variants, including an inferred novel variant in NEK8. Mutations in CC2D2A were the most common cause of an antenatal cystic kidney disease and a suspected ciliopathy in our cohort. Conclusions In families with ciliopathy phenotypes, mutational analysis using a targeted renal gene panel allows a rapid molecular diagnosis and provides important information for patients, parents and their physicians. PMID:26862157

  8. Deaths from occlusive arterial disease in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Ibels, L S; Stewart, J H; Mahony, J F; Sheil, A G

    1974-08-31

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths.

  9. Biopsy-proven renal disease in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A histopathologic review.

    PubMed

    Onwubuya, I M; Adelusola, K A; Sabageh, D; Ezike, K N; Olaofe, O O

    2016-01-01

    Although various patterns of renal diseases have been reported from different renal biopsy registries worldwide, data from Nigeria remain scanty. A 10-year retrospective review of renal biopsies was conducted in our tertiary health care facility. All cases were reclassified based on their light microscopic features after the application of standard histochemical stains. A total of 165 cases were reviewed with a male:female ratio of 1.8:1 and a mean age of 15.4 ± 12.0 years. About 69.7% of the cases were below the age of 16 years, while only 2.4% were older than 50 years. The most common indications for biopsy were nephrotic syndrome (72.1%) and acute renal failure of unknown etiology (11.5%). Overall, glomerulonephritis (80%) was the most common histologic category and occurred only in individuals younger than 50 years old. Minimal change disease (22.9%) and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (21.9%) were the most common varieties in children, while membranous glomerulonephritis (30.6%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (27.8%) were the commonest among the adult population. The initial histologic diagnosis was revised in 18 cases while a diagnosis was arrived at in seven cases initially adjudged as inadequate for assessment. This study showed that renal biopsy was predominantly performed in children and adolescents. Although glomerulonephritis was the predominant disease, the predominant histologic patterns varied with the patient age. Despite the scarcity of advanced diagnostic tools in resource-poor environments, routine use of histochemical stains is helpful in the evaluation of renal biopsies.

  10. Cytologic diagnosis of diseases of hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Garner, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on neoplastic diseases because they may be the most frequent disease processes in captive hedgehogs according to the literature and authors' case files and the most common cases submitted for cytologic diagnosis in these species, particularly the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

  11. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease: an unrecognized feature of nephropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krolewski, Andrzej S; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter; Warram, James H

    2017-03-30

    A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority, progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from -72 to -3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid progression as rate of eGFR declines > 5 ml/min/year, a value exceeded by 80% of patients in Joslin's type 1 diabetes ESRD cohort. The extraordinary range of slopes within the rapid progression category prompted us to partition it into "very fast," "fast" and "moderate" decline. We showed, for the first time, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk and comment on the need for effective therapeutic interventions. Whether the initiating mechanism of fast renal decline affects glomerulus, tubule, interstitium or vasculature is unknown. Since no animal model mimics progressive renal decline, studies in humans are needed. Prospective studies searching for markers predictive of the rate of renal decline yield findings that may make detection of fast decliners feasible. Identifying such patients will be the foundation for developing effective individualized methods to prevent or delay onset of ESRD in diabetes.

  12. [Application of saliva in disease diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Xingqun, Cheng; Xuedong, Zhou; Xin, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Saliva is secreted by salivary glands and performs a variety of functions, including mouth cleaning and protection, antibacterial activity, and digestion. With the rapid progress in salivaomics, saliva became recognized as a potential pool of biological markers. Being a non-invasive and safe source, saliva is a potential substitute for blood in diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. This review summarizes the latest advancement in saliva-related studies and presents the potential value of saliva in early diagnosis of oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal disease, cancer, diabetes, and other systemic disorders. Saliva biomarkers can reveal changes ranging from changes in biochemical index, DNA, RNA, and proteins to the diversification of microbiota structure. By integrating recent data, this paper discusses the clinical significance and application prospect of saliva in early diagnosis of diseases and in translational and precision medicine.

  13. [Guidelines of diagnosis for peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jae Gyu; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seol, Sang Young

    2009-11-01

    Peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent diseases in gastrointestinal field. Recently, evolution was made for pathophysiology of peptic ulcer from "no acid, no ulcer" to Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is estimated about 10% in Korea, and has declined due to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Peptic ulcer has the cycle of exacerbation and improvement in the clinical course, and has not occasionally any clinical symptom. Helicobacter pylori eradication has made the marked reduction of relapse of peptic ulcer disease. Although nationwide endoscopic screening has enabled accurate diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, general guideline for diagnosis of peptic ulcer has not made in Korea. Herein, we propose a guideline for the diagnosis of peptic ulcer according to domestic, international clinical studies, and experts opinions with level of evidence and grade of recommendation.

  14. Saliva in the diagnosis of diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Zi; Cheng, Xing-Qun; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhang, Ping; Yi, Ping; Xu, Xin; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Saliva is secreted from the salivary glands and has multiple functions, including mouth cleaning and protection, antibacterial effects and digestion. With the rapid advancement in salivaomics, saliva is well recognized as a pool of biological markers. Saliva, as a non-invasive and safe source, could be a substitute for blood in the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. This review summarizes the latest advancements in saliva-related studies and addresses the potential value of saliva in the early diagnosis of oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease, as well as cancer, diabetes and other systemic disorders. Saliva biomarkers range from changes in the biochemical indices of DNA, RNA and proteins to the diversification of microbiota structures. This study integrates data reported in the recent literature and discusses the clinical significance and prospects for the application of saliva in the early diagnosis of diseases, translational medicine and precision medicine. PMID:27585820

  15. Renal monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: a report of 64 patients from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Valeri, Anthony M; Cornell, Lynn D; Fidler, Mary E; Sethi, Sanjeev; D'Agati, Vivette D; Leung, Nelson

    2012-02-01

    To better define the clinical-pathologic spectrum and prognosis of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD), this study reports the largest series. Characteristics of 64 MIDD patients who were seen at Mayo Clinic are provided. Of 64 patients with MIDD, 51 had light chain deposition disease, 7 had heavy chain deposition disease, and 6 had light and heavy chain deposition disease. The mean age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 23 patients (36%) were ≤50 years of age. Clinical evidence of dysproteinemia was present in 62 patients (97%), including multiple myeloma in 38 (59%). M-spike was detected on serum protein electrophoresis in 47 (73%). Serum free light chain ratio was abnormal in all 51 patients tested. Presentation included renal insufficiency, proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension. Nodular mesangial sclerosis was seen in 39 patients (61%). During a median of 25 months of follow-up (range, 1-140) in 56 patients, 32 (57%) had stable/improved renal function, 2 (4%) had worsening renal function, and 22 (39%) progressed to ESRD. The mean renal and patient survivals were 64 and 90 months, respectively. The disease recurred in three of four patients who received a kidney transplant. Patients with MIDD generally present at a younger age than those with light chain amyloidosis or light chain cast nephropathy. Serum free light chain ratio is abnormal in all MIDD patients, whereas only three-quarters have abnormal serum protein electrophoresis. The prognosis for MIDD is improving compared with historical controls, likely reflecting earlier detection and improved therapies.

  16. Diagnosis and classification of Goodpasture's disease (anti-GBM).

    PubMed

    Hellmark, Thomas; Segelmark, Mårten

    2014-01-01

    Goodpasture's disease or anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (anti-GBM-disease) is included among immune complex small vessel vasculitides. The definition of anti-GBM disease is a vasculitis affecting glomerular capillaries, pulmonary capillaries, or both, with GBM deposition of anti-GBM autoantibodies. The disease is a prototype of autoimmune disease, where the patients develop autoantibodies that bind to the basement membranes and activate the classical pathway of the complement system, which start a neutrophil dependent inflammation. The diagnosis of anti-GBM disease relies on the detection of anti-GBM antibodies in conjunction with glomerulonephritis and/or alveolitis. Overt clinical symptoms are most prominent in the glomeruli where the inflammation usually results in a severe rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Despite modern treatment less than one third of the patients survive with a preserved kidney function after 6 months follow-up. Frequencies vary from 0.5 to 1 cases per million inhabitants per year and there is a strong genetic linkage to HLA-DRB1(∗)1501 and DRB1(∗)1502. Essentially, anti-GBM disease is now a preferred term for what was earlier called Goodpasture's syndrome or Goodpasture's disease; anti-GBM disease is now classified as small vessel vasculitis caused by in situ immune complex formation; the diagnosis relies on the detection of anti-GBM in tissues or circulation in conjunction with alveolar or glomerular disease; therapy is effective only when detected at an early stage, making a high degree of awareness necessary to find these rare cases; 20-35% have anti-GBM and MPO-ANCA simultaneously, which necessitates testing for anti-GBM whenever acute test for ANCA is ordered in patients with renal disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Emotional trauma associated with renal disease and natural disasters.

    PubMed

    McClellan, M J

    2001-10-01

    Emotional trauma frequently follows any disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, accidents, war, bombings, and life-threatening disease. One such disease is end stage renal disease (ESRD), an irreversible, progressive loss of renal function (Lancaster, 1995). Since this is a "do or die" situation, it requires artificial methods of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplant, which require learned coping skills. Emotional trauma may occur pre or post-disaster and may include flashbacks when events trigger suppressed memories or unresolved emotions. Aftercare of disasters requires dedicated professionals to guide patients toward essential lifelines.

  18. Sonographic diagnosis of Obstructed Hemivagina and Ipsilateral Renal Anomaly Syndrome: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA) syndrome is a rare urogenital anomaly. Patients typically present at puberty, shortly after menarche with increasing pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea and pelvic mass. There may be a known history of unilateral renal agenesis. Diagnosis can usually be established by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Resection of the vaginal septum is the treatment of choice. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms, prevent complications and preserve fertility. We present two cases of OHVIRA syndrome diagnosed by ultrasound to promote recognition of this rare but important condition. PMID:28191231

  19. Renal disease pathophysiology and treatment: contributions from the rat

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Bryan R.; Menzies, Robert I.; Denby, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rat has classically been the species of choice for pharmacological studies and disease modeling, providing a source of high-quality physiological data on cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology over many decades. Recent developments in genome engineering now allow us to capitalize on the wealth of knowledge acquired over the last century. Here, we review rat models of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and acute and chronic kidney disease. These models have made important contributions to our understanding of renal diseases and have revealed key genes, such as Ace and P2rx7, involved in renal pathogenic processes. By targeting these genes of interest, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the etiology of renal pathologies, with the promised potential of slowing disease progression or even reversing the damage caused. Some, but not all, of these target genes have proved to be of clinical relevance. However, it is now possible to generate more sophisticated and appropriate disease models in the rat, which can recapitulate key aspects of human renal pathology. These advances will ultimately be used to identify new treatments and therapeutic targets of much greater clinical relevance. PMID:27935823

  20. The relationship between renal volume and renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Shino; Muto, Satoru; China, Toshiyuki; Horie, Shigeo

    2011-08-01

    In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), renal cysts grow exponentially. Since remaining renal parenchyma has a capacity to compensate for the loss of glomerular filtration, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) may be sustained until the disease progresses. The purpose of this study was to determine if renal volumetric indices and clinical parameters are associated with renal function in Japanese patients with ADPKD. In 73 ADPKD patients (28 men, 45 women), the associations of mean systolic blood pressure, mean diastolic blood pressure, estimated GFR (eGFR), the amount of proteinuria and albuminuria, body mass index (BMI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), ankle-brachial index, and total kidney volume (TKV) were retrospectively analyzed. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that eGFR was significantly and independently inversely correlated with patients' age and BMI. The median change in eGFR per year (ΔeGFR/y) was -2.8 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that ΔeGFR/y was significantly and independently inversely correlated with the change in TKV per year (ΔTKV/y). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that ΔTKV/y was significantly related to initial TKV and the change in albuminuria per year. This study demonstrated a significant relationship between the change in renal function and the change in renal volume in Japanese ADPKD patients without renal insufficiency. It is possible that the volume measurements can be used as useful markers for disease progression in Japanese ADPKD patients.

  1. Diagnosis of enteric disease in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Van Metre, D C; Tyler, J W; Stehman, S M

    2000-03-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in small ruminants requires integration of information obtained in the signalment, history, physical or necropsy examination, and ancillary diagnostic tests. The purpose of this article is to provide the practitioner with a review of the clinical features of several common gastrointestinal diseases of sheep and goats. Rumen acidosis, enterotoxemia, gastrointestinal parasitism, neonatal diarrhea, and salmonellosis are discussed, and where appropriate, reviews of the pathophysiology, prevention, and control of these diseases are cited for further reading.

  2. Hypogonadism and testosterone replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common problem in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and renal transplant population. It has widespread systemic effects and has been linked with mortality in dialysis patients and at the time of renal transplant. The etiology is likely multifactorial and most patients are afflicted by various comorbidities that can contribute to hypogonadism. Clinical manifestations are mostly nonspecific. We review the approach to the diagnosis of hypogonadism, focusing on both laboratory values and clinical signs and symptoms. We review treatment with testosterone replacement in this population and highlight various studies that tend to have small sample sizes. Though these studies provide insight into testosterone replacement, the need for larger studies is emphasized to better understand the effects and safety of therapy. PMID:28078220

  3. [Growth retardation in children with chronic renal disease].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the management of children with chronic renal disease (CRD), growth retardation remains its most visible comorbid condition. Growth retardation has adverse impact on morbidity and mortality rates, quality of life and education, and in adult patients on job family life, and independent leaving accomodation. Pathophysiology of impaired growth in CRD is complex and still not fully understood. The following complications are: anorexia, malnutrition, inflammation, decreased residual renal function, dialysis frequency and adequacy, renal anemia, metabolic acidosis, fluid/electrolyte imbalance, renal osteodistrophy, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) resistance. Malnutrition is most frequent and most important factor contributing to the degree of growth retardation in infancy. The degree of renal dysfunction is the major determinant of variability in growth from third year of age until puberty onset, while in puberty hypergonadotropic hypogonadism has negative effect. The main factors that influence growth after renal transplantation are the age of the recipient and glucocorticoid drugs dosage with negative effect and allograft function with positive effect. In order to improve growth in children with CRD it is necessary to include: diet with optimal caloric intake, correction of fluid/ electrolyte imbalance, correction of acidosis, renal osteodistrophy and anemia. If growth velocity is insufficient to normalize growth, it is necessary to start recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy at 0.05 mg/kg per day (0.35 mg/kg per week or 28 IU/m2 per week) administered by subcutaneous injection.

  4. Premotor Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2017-08-03

    Typical Parkinsonian symptoms consist of bradykinesia plus rigidity and/or resting tremor. Some time later postural instability occurs. Pre-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, constipation, REM sleep behavior disorder and depression may antecede these motor symptoms for years. It would be ideal, if we had a biomarker which would allow to predict who with one or two of these pre-motor symptoms will develop the movement disorder Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, it is interesting to learn that biopsies of the submandibular gland or colon biopsies may be a means to predict PD, if there is a high amout of abnormally folded alpha-synuclein and phosphorylated alpha-synuclein. This would be of relevance if we would have available means to stop the propagation of abnormal alpha-synuclein which is otherwise one of the reasons of this spreading disease PD.

  5. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  6. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  7. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  8. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J C; Flood, V H

    2015-05-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is considered the most common inherited bleeding disorder and may also be the most difficult to diagnose. Clinical symptoms of VWD include predominantly mild mucosal bleeding; surgical bleeding may occur with specific challenges and joint bleeding can occur in the most severe forms. A family history either of diagnosed VWD or of bleeding symptoms is typically present. Laboratory diagnosis requires a series of assays of von Willebrand factor (VWF) quantity and function, and factor VIII activity, with no single straightforward diagnostic test available to either confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Newer assays of VWF function are becoming more available and useful in determining the laboratory diagnosis of VWD.

  10. Health delivery system for renal disease care in bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ur Rashid, Harun

    2004-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the densely populated countries, a nation of 128 million people, 75% of whom lives in rural areas and the annual per capita gross national product (GNP) is US$ 380.00. The health care budget is 1.2% of GNP and the priority areas are population control, provision of clean drinking water and eradication of communicable diseases. The country has a small number of nephrologists and renal care is available in large cities only. The causes of renal diseases include glomerulonephritis, diabetes, hypertension, nephrolithiasis, obstructive uropathy and interstitial nephropathy. The incidence of end-stage renal disease is not known, but would be much higher than in developed countries because of high incidence of infection and environmental pollution. The treatment of ESRD has low priority in Bangladesh because of the government health policy and high cost of treatment. As a result, less than 10% of ESRD patients are able to maintain dialysis in private hospitals and governmental dialysis centers that are already overcrowded. The vast majority of patients who are started on dialysis die or stop treatment within the first three months. Renal transplantation is not as expensive as dialysis and is less costly in the university hospital than in private hospitals. Cyclosporine is usually replaced by azathioprine after six months of transplantation. Although organ act law is effective since 1998, cadaveric transplant has not picked up due to lack of infrastructure, facility and orientation regarding cadaveric transplantation. Preventive measures of renal disease can not be overemphasized.

  11. Soluble biglycan as a biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Louise Tzung-Harn; Nastase, Madalina-Viviana; Zeng-Brouwers, Jinyang; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Chronic renal inflammation is often associated with a progressive accumulation of various extracellular matrix constituents, including several members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) gene family. It is becoming increasingly evident that the matrix-unbound SLRPs strongly regulate the progression of inflammation and fibrosis. Soluble SLRPs are generated either via partial proteolytic processing of collagenous matrices or by de novo synthesis evoked by stress or injury. Liberated SLRPs can then bind to and activate Toll-like receptors, thus modulating downstream inflammatory signaling. Preclinical animal models and human studies have recently identified soluble biglycan as a key initiator and regulator of various inflammatory renal diseases. Biglycan, generated by activated macrophages, can enter the circulation and its elevated levels in plasma and renal parenchyma correlate with unfavorable renal function and outcome. In this review, we will focus on the critical role of soluble biglycan in inflammatory signaling in various renal disorders. Moreover, we will provide new data implicating proinflammatory effects of soluble decorin in unilateral ureteral obstruction. Finally, we will critically evaluate the potential application of soluble biglycan vis-à-vis other SLRPs (decorin, lumican and fibromodulin) as a promising target and novel biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases. PMID:25091702

  12. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease: the prototype of the hepato-renal fibrocystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe, typically early onset form of renal cystic disease. The care of ARPKD patients has traditionally been the purview of pediatric nephrologists for management of systemic hypertension and progressive renal insufficiency. However, the disease has multisystem manifestations and a comprehensive care strategy frequently requires a multidisciplinary team. In severely affected infants, the diagnosis often is first suspected by obstetricians when enlarged, echogenic kidneys and oligohydramnios are detected on prenatal ultrasounds. Neonatologists are central to the care of these infants, who may have respiratory compromise due to pulmonary hypoplasia and massively enlarged kidneys. Among neonatal survivors, a subset of ARPKD patients has clinically significant congenital hepatic fibrosis, which can lead to portal hypertension, requiring close monitoring by pediatric hepatologists. Surgical consultation may be sought to access pre-emptive nephrectomy to relieve mass effect, placement of dialysis access, surgical shunting procedures, and kidney and/or liver transplantation. Recent data suggest that children with ARPKD may be at risk of neurocognitive dysfunction, and may require neuropsychological referral. In addition to these morbidities, families of patients with ARPKD face decisions regarding genetic testing of affected children, testing of asymptomatic siblings, or consideration of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for future pregnancies. These issues require the input of genetic counselors, geneticists, and reproductive endocrinologists. As a result, the management of ARPKD requires the involvement of multiple subspecialists, as well as the general pediatrician, in a complex care network. In this review, we discuss the genetics of this disorder and provide an overview of the associated pathobiology; outline the spectrum of clinical manifestations of ARPKD and the management of organ-specific complications

  13. [Kimura's disease. Demonstration of the disease and its differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kawada, A

    1976-07-01

    From several own cases and case-reports from the literature the clinical and histopathological picture of Kimura's disease and its etiopathogenesis are reported. The recently reported "subcutaneous angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia" of Wells and Whimsper corresponds to the solitary or localized variant of Kimura's disease. The differential diagnosis of recently described analogous diseases is considered.

  14. Review article: The diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Abdulkarim, A S; Murray, J A

    2003-04-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with small intestinal injury that results in the malabsorption of different nutrients. The damaging factor is gluten present in wheat, barley and rye. The diagnosis relies on the clinical picture of the patient, serological markers for coeliac disease, characteristic findings of small intestinal biopsy and, eventually, clinical improvement on a gluten-free diet. Our strategies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease have changed dramatically within the last 10 years. The advent of serological markers with high sensitivity and specificity is changing our understanding of the disease and its prevalence. Treatment includes a life-long gluten-free diet to prevent the recurrence of symptoms and other potential consequences. Most coeliac disease remains under-diagnosed; the utilization of more accurate serological tests and a greater awareness of its many presentations will aid its identification.

  15. [Diagnosis of occupational chronic pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Maestrelli, P; Guarnieri, G

    2010-01-01

    Occupational risk factors may induce chronic nonmalignant respiratory diseases such as pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Diagnosis is well codified by international guidelines for most of these occupational diseases except for COPD. The study of occupational COPD is complicated by several issues. In fact, COPD is a multifactorial disease and has a long latency between exposure to causative agents and the occurrence of disease. The main confounding factor is smoking. The quantitative estimation of cigarette smoked is easier and more accurate than that of occupational exposure. The diagnosis of COPD is based on the presence of chronic airflow limitation at spirometry; moreover, an accelerated decline in respiratory function may be observed in the longitudinal evaluation of workers. The retrospective assignment of occupational aetiology of COPD remains difficult in individual cases, especially with a significant history of smoking.

  16. Acute renal failure unmasking Lesch-Nyhan disease in a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Thumfart, Julia; Weschke, Bernhard; Ringe, Hannelore; Weinhold, Natalie; Müller, Dominik

    2016-07-01

    We report on a male patient with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), which was prenatally diagnosed. At the age of 3 months the patient developed acute renal failure with excessive hyperuricemia. Kidney function improved after rehydration and application of rasburicase, however without full recovery. Due to the inappropriate high levels of uric acid compared to kidney function, screening of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) related diseases was initiated. Mutation analysis revealed a deletion of exon 2 and 3 of the HPRT gene confirming the diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND). After initiation of allopurinol therapy renal function further improved. In the following months the patient developed clinically a typical neurological phenotype of LND and TSC with seizures, severe dystonia and developmental delay. Acute renal failure is a rare complication of HPRT related diseases. Combination of two inherited diseases may lead to a delayed diagnosis due to a mixed and maybe misleading phenotype. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [RARE DISEASES DTC: DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND CARE].

    PubMed

    Mendlovic, Joseph; Barash, Hila; Yardeni, Hadar; Banet-Levi, Yonit; Yonath, Hagith; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2016-04-01

    Rare diseases are chronic, progressive genetic disorders, which affect around 6-8% of the general population, mainly children. Therefore, in Israel approximately 500,000 people are probably affected by a rare disease. In this article, we review some of the issues pertaining to rare diseases, such as the need for accurate diagnosis which is necessary not only for specific care and treatment but also for informed family planning. In addition, we review the impact of the activities of patients' organizations on the awareness of rare diseases and their involvement in the creation of the Orphan Drug Act, which was the leading point on the way to drug development worldwide. During the last few years networks for reaching leading specialists' opinions on the way to proper diagnosis were created. Thereafter, the next generation genetic technologies, such as exome sequencing, have been a revolution in terms of options and hope for patients with rare undiagnosed diseases. Patients with rare diseases and their families are a challenge to the health care system, not only in terms of diagnosis and therapy, but also in terms of special needs. In addition, deciphering molecular pathways of rare diseases might be the key for understanding molecular events involved in common disorders. We emphasize the duty to ensure appropriate capacity and equal access to follow-up and clinical management of patients with rare diseases in Israel.

  18. Recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a hypertensive patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Tarkan; Lakadamyali, Hatice; Yilmaz, Aynur

    2008-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiologic entity characterized by headache, variable mental status, epilepsy, visual disturbances, and typical transient changes in the posterior cerebral perfusion. Recurrence of PRES is not common, but increasingly in recent years, studies demonstrate recurrence of this syndrome in populations with different diseases. In this report, we describe recurrent PRES in a hypertensive patient with end-stage renal disease, and discuss recurrence as the least-characterized feature of PRES. This condition can cause neurological sequelae such as persistent brain damage and epilepsy, arising from delays in diagnosis and therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating recurrent PRES in a patient on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease.

  19. End-stage renal disease in Tunisian infants: Etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, M; Boussetta, A; Abidi, K; Hammi, Y; Zarrouk, C; Gargah, T

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) in infants has particular features in terms of etiologies and therapeutic modalities. The aim of our study is to describe the etiologies and the ESRD outcomes among Tunisian infants. This retrospective study was conducted over 15 years (from January 1998 to December 31, 2013) in the Pediatric Department at Charles Nicolle Hospital. In total, 157 pediatric patients had ESRD. The mean incidence was 4.25 million children. The study involved 24 infants; the sex ratio was equal to 2. The mean age at diagnosis of ESRD was 8 months (range, 1-21 months). Growth retardation was noticed in 14 patients. The main causes were Congenital Anomalies of the Kidneys and Urinary Tract (9 infants) and hereditary renal disease (9 infants). All patients were treated with peritoneal dialysis; 16 infants presented peritonitis. Mortality rate was about 28%. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular diseases and infections.

  20. A novel LMX1B mutation in a family with end-stage renal disease of 'unknown cause'.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Noel; Rice, Sarah J; Raman, Shreya; Hynes, Ann Marie; Srivastava, Shalabh; Moore, Iain; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Xu, Yaobo; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thwaites, David T; Gale, Daniel P; Sayer, John A

    2015-02-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) presenting in a familial autosomal dominant pattern points to an underlying monogenic cause. Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that may lead to ESRD caused by mutations in the transcription factor LMX1B. Renal-limited forms of this disease, termed nail-patella-like renal disease (NPLRD), and LMX1B nephropathy have recently been described. We report a large family, from the North East of England, with seven affected members with varying phenotypes of renal disease, ranging from ESRD at 28 years of age to microscopic haematuria and proteinuria and relatively preserved renal function. In this family, there were no extra-renal manifestations to suggest NPS. Genome-wide linkage studies and inheritance by descent (IBD) suggested disease loci on Chromosome 1 and 9. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis identified a novel sequence variant (p.R249Q) in the LMX1B gene in each of the three samples submitted, which was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The variant segregated with the disease in all affected individuals. In silico modelling revealed that R249 is putatively located in close proximity to the DNA phosphoskeleton, supporting a role for this residue in the interaction between the LMX1B homeodomain and its target DNA. WES and analysis of potential target genes, including CD2AP, NPHS2, COL4A3, COL4A4 and COL4A5, did not reveal any co-inherited pathogenic variants. In conclusion, we confirm a novel LMX1B mutation in a large family with an autosomal dominant pattern of nephropathy. This report confirms that LMX1B mutations may cause a glomerulopathy without extra-renal manifestations. A molecular genetic diagnosis of LMX1B nephropathy thus provides a definitive diagnosis, prevents the need for renal biopsies and allows at risk family members to be screened.

  1. Gestational diabetes mellitus is a significant risk factor for long-term maternal renal disease.

    PubMed

    Beharier, Ofer; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Pariente, Gali; Sergienko, Ruslan; Kessous, Roy; Baumfeld, Yael; Szaingurten-Solodkin, Irit; Sheiner, Eyal

    2015-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular morbidity, and vascular endothelial dysfunction. However, data on the link between GDM and future risk for long-term maternal renal disease are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether GDM poses a risk for subsequent long-term maternal renal morbidity. A population-based noninterventional study compared the incidence of future renal morbidity in a cohort of women with and without previous GDM. Deliveries occurred during a 25-year period, with a mean follow-up duration of 11.2 years. The study was conducted at the Soroka University Medical Center. The study population was composed of all singleton pregnancies in women who delivered between January 1988 and December 2013. The main outcome was diagnosis of renal morbidities. Of 97,968 women who met the inclusion criteria, 9542 (9.7%) had at least 1 previous pregnancy with GDM. Using a Kaplan-Meier survival curve, we show that women with GDM had higher rates of total renal morbidity (0.1% vs 0.2%, for no GDM and with GDM, respectively; odds ratio, 2.3, 95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.7; P < .001). In addition, we found a significant dose-response association (using the χ(2) test for trends) between the number of pregnancies with GDM and future risk for renal morbidity (0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.4% for no GDM, 1 episode of GDM, and 2 episodes of GDM, respectively; P < .001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, adjusted for confounders, GDM was independently associated with future renal morbidity. GDM is a significant risk factor for future maternal renal morbidity. The risk is more substantial for patients with recurrent episodes of GDM.

  2. [Legionnaires' disease with acute renal failure caused by Legionella pneumophilla serogroup 4].

    PubMed

    Hase, Isano; Chibana, Kazuyuki; Ohara, Tetsuya; Takizawa, Hidenori; Furihata, Tomoe; Yamada, Issei; Fukushima, Yasutugu; Ishii, Yoshiki; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Michio; Saitou, Atsushi

    2005-11-01

    A 77-year-old man who had fever and chest pain was admitted to a neighboring hospital on a diagnosis of pneumonia. Chest X-ray film finding deteriorated despite treatment with 2 g cefotaxime per day. Because of accompanying acute renal failure, he was transferred to our hospital. Hemodialysis with intravenous administration of erythromycin and meropenem resulted in recovery from acute renal failure, and his general condition improved. Because of liver dysfunction, erythromycin was changed to pazufloxacin. Although he was negative for Legionella urinary antigen determined with a rapid assay kit, Binax NOW, his serum titer for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was elevated. Finally, a diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was established.

  3. Biologics for the treatment of autoimmune renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Stephen R; Gan, Poh-Yi; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-04-01

    Biological therapeutics (biologics) that target autoimmune responses and inflammatory injury pathways have a marked beneficial impact on the management of many chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and ankylosing spondylitis. Accumulating data suggest that a growing number of renal diseases result from autoimmune injury - including lupus nephritis, IgA nephropathy, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis, autoimmune (formerly idiopathic) membranous nephropathy, anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis, and C3 nephropathy - and one can speculate that biologics might also be applicable to these diseases. As many autoimmune renal diseases are relatively uncommon, with long natural histories and diverse outcomes, clinical trials that aim to validate potentially useful biologics are difficult to design and/or perform. Some excellent consortia are undertaking cohort studies and clinical trials, but more multicentre international collaborations are needed to advance the introduction of new biologics to patients with autoimmune renal disorders. This Review discusses the key molecules that direct injurious inflammation and the biologics that are available to modulate them. The opportunities and challenges for the introduction of relevant biologics into treatment protocols for autoimmune renal diseases are also discussed.

  4. Sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans in the progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Masola, Valentina; Zaza, Gianluigi; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Experimental data in cell cultures and animal models suggest that sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans are potentially effective drugs to treat chronic kidney diseases and prevent progression to renal failure. However, no conclusive evidence support the use of them in human renal disease. In acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, only few studies have been performed. Sulodexide has been more intensely investigated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) where the body of data supports its effectiveness as an antialbuminuric agent in early stages. Unfortunately, there is no study in DN patients on the effect of sulodexide on clinical end points.

  5. Acute renal failure: definitions, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Wang, Wei; Poole, Brian; Mitra, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF), characterized by sudden loss of the ability of the kidneys to excrete wastes, concentrate urine, conserve electrolytes, and maintain fluid balance, is a frequent clinical problem, particularly in the intensive care unit, where it is associated with a mortality of between 50% and 80%. In this review, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARF are discussed, including the vascular, tubular, and inflammatory perturbations. The clinical evaluation of ARF and implications for potential future therapies to decrease the high mortality are described. PMID:15232604

  6. Diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis in a renal transplant recipient mother.

    PubMed

    Hermann, M; Yéra, H; Villena, I; Cimon, B; Thervet, E; Benachi, A

    2017-08-26

    We report the case of a first trimester toxoplasmosis infection in a renal transplant recipient. Real-time polymerase chain reaction in amniotic fluid at 18 weeks was negative for Toxoplasma gondii but at 26 weeks major fetal hydrocephalus was discovered leading to medical termination of pregnancy. Pathological examination confirmed lesions consistent with congenital toxoplasmosis. The herein case report, as well as data from the French reference centre for congenital Toxoplamosis (1835 cases in the past eight years), suggests that the strategy of management of pregnancy's first trimester Toxoplasmosis infection in patients treated by immunosuppressive therapy needs to be reconsidered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Renal neuroendocrine tumour and synchronous pancreas metastasis: histopathological diagnosis using prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Keishi; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Yoshio; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-11-01

    A woman aged 56 years developed 2 synchronous tumours: one, 1.2 cm in diameter at the head of the pancreas; and the other, 4.0 cm in diameter, at the left side of her horseshoe kidney. Preoperative differential diagnosis of these hypovascular lesions included pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) with renal metastasis, PDC with renal angiomyolipoma, renal cell carcinoma with pancreatic metastasis or PDC and renal cell carcinoma. Following pancreaticoduodenectomy and left nephrectomy, both specimens were diagnosed as grade 2 neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Immunohistochemistry revealed that both were positive for prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), which is specific to hindgut-derived NET, including renal NET. Accordingly, the renal tumour was diagnosed as the primary lesion, and the pancreatic tumour as a metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a renal NET with a synchronous pancreas metastasis. Immunohistochemical staining for PAP was a useful diagnostic marker for synchronous NETs in the kidney and pancreas. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. [Predementia Alzheimer's disease. Benefits of early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Viloria, Aurora

    2011-10-01

    Given population aging and the rise in the number of persons with Alzheimer's disease, measures that aim not only to delay but also to prevent the development of this disease are increasingly required. Advances in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease support the need for a review of current clinical standards for mild cognitive impairment and provide new goals in the early treatment of this disease. The current diagnostic process should be refocussed toward the pathological substrate of this disease rather than symptoms in order to initiate therapeutic measures as soon as possible without waiting for clinical manifestations to appear. Such an approach is essential in patients with greater cognitive reserve, in whom the lesions are usually more severe at diagnosis and treatment is less effective. To identify disease-modifying therapies to delay the onset of the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in cognitively intact persons at high risk, biomarkers for this disease must be validated. A single biomarker is unlikely to provide the required diagnostic accuracy and therefore a multimodal approach, incorporating biochemical, neuropathological and anatomical and metabolic neuroimaging methods, should be employed. To optimize the results of drugs under investigation, a combination of biomarkers should be used to select appropriate participants in the earliest phases of the disease, and disease progression should be followed-up. Early diagnosis might clarify essential questions in the care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, such as the possibility of distinguishing among various subtypes, thus encouraging the development of optimal treatments for each. The ultimate goal is to develop disease-modifying treatments that could be initiated early, while patients are asymptomatic or only minimally symptomatic, to maintain their quality of life.

  9. Meniere's disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, A; Vlastarakos, P V; Maragoudakis, P; Candiloros, D; Nikolopoulos, T P

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere's disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere's disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere's disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere's disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems.

  10. Diagnosis and management of kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Saguil, Aaron; Fargo, Matthew; Grogan, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, systemic vasculitis that predominantly affects patients younger than five years. It represents the most prominent cause of acquired coronary artery disease in childhood. In the United States, 19 per 100,000 children younger than five years are hospitalized with Kawasaki disease annually. According to U.S. and Japanese guidelines, Kawasaki disease is a clinical diagnosis. Classic (typical) Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on the presence of a fever lasting five or more days, accompanied by four out of five findings: bilateral conjunctival injection, oral changes such as cracked and erythematous lips and strawberry tongue, cervical lymphadenopathy, extremity changes such as erythema or palm and sole desquamation, and polymorphous rash. Incomplete (atypical) Kawasaki disease occurs in persons with fever lasting five or more days and with two or three of these findings. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice to screen for coronary aneurysms, although other techniques are being evaluated for diagnosis and management. Treatment for acute disease is intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin. If there is no response to treatment, patients are given a second dose of intravenous immunoglobulin with or without corticosteroids or other adjunctive treatments. The presence and severity of coronary aneurysms and obstruction at diagnosis determine treatment options and the need, periodicity, and intensity of long-term cardiovascular monitoring for potential atherosclerosis.

  11. Determinants of delayed diagnosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Breen, David P; Evans, Jonathan R; Farrell, Krista; Brayne, Carol; Barker, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    The early and accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the first step towards optimal patient management. The aim of this study was to investigate the major determinants of delayed diagnosis in PD. We recruited a population-representative cohort of 239 newly-diagnosed PD patients who underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Non-parametric methods were used to define the factors associated with diagnostic delay. The median time from motor symptom onset to primary care physician (PCP) presentation was considerably longer than the time from PCP presentation to PD diagnosis (11 vs. 1 months). Male sex and presenting motor phenotype were independently associated with delayed PCP presentation on Cox regression analysis. Patients presenting with gait disturbance experienced the longest delay, whilst those presenting with tremor had the shortest. In summary, male sex and presenting motor phenotype are key determinants of delayed diagnosis in PD.

  12. Pediatric prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Killen, Stacy A S; Mouledoux, Jessica H; Kavanaugh-McHugh, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Fetal cardiology is a rapidly evolving field. Imaging technology continues to advance as do approaches to in-utero interventions and care of the critically ill neonate, with even greater demand for improvement in prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) and arrhythmias. Reviewing the advances in prenatal diagnosis of CHD in such a rapidly developing field is a broad topic. Therefore, we have chosen to focus this review of recent literature on challenges in prenatal detection of CHD, challenges in prenatal counseling, advances in fetal arrhythmia diagnosis, and potential benefits to patients with CHD who are identified prenatally. As methods and tools to diagnose and manage CHD and arrhythmias in utero continue to improve, future generations will hopefully see a reduction in both prenatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Prenatal diagnosis can and should be used to optimize location and timing of delivery and postnatal interventions.

  13. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1–SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23075334

  14. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Renal progenitors: Roles in kidney disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Brooke E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is a devastating condition that affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence is predicted to significantly increase. The kidney is a complex organ encompassing many diverse cell types organized in a elaborate tissue architecture, making regeneration a challenging feat. In recent years, there has been a surge in the field of stem cell research to develop regenerative therapies for various organ systems. Here, we review some recent progressions in characterizing the role of renal progenitors in development, regeneration, and kidney disease in mammals. We also discuss how the zebrafish provides a unique experimental animal model that can provide a greater molecular and genetic understanding of renal progenitors, which may contribute to the development of potential regenerative therapies for human renal afflictions. PMID:27928463

  16. A Case of Primary Aldosteronism with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun Hee; Park, Kyung Jun; Kim, Sun Young

    2006-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to chronic renal failure with a 10-year history of hypertension. We found polycystic kidney disease, pulmonary tuberculosis and an aldosterone-producing adrenocortical mass. At this time, her serum potassium level and blood pressure were within the normal range. She refused hemodialysis and then was hospitalized because of uremic encephalopathy. On admission, her serum potassium level was normal without treatment and plasma aldosterone concentration highly elevated. She received hemodialysis, and thereafter hypokalemia developed. We then administered spironolactone, whereupon serum potassium level returned to the normal range. In this case, we thought that normokalemia was balanced hypokalemia of primary aldosteronism with hyperkalemia of chronic renal failure, and that hypokalemia developed after hemodialysis was due to an imbalanced primary aldosteronism with end stage renal disease. PMID:24459492

  17. Salt restriction inhibits renal growth and stabilizes injury in rats with established renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, L D; Benstein, J A; Tolbert, E; Feiner, H D

    1996-03-01

    Salt restriction inhibits renal growth and stabilizes injury in rats with established renal disease. Male Munich-Wistar rats that underwent right nephrectomy and segmental infarction of two thirds of the left kidney were fed standard chow for 4 wk and then randomly assigned to ingest standard or low-salt chow for an additional 4 wk. Four wk after ablation, rats had systemic hypertension, proteinuria, and glomerular sclerosis. The prevalence of sclerosis, protein excretion rate, and glomerular volume increased between the fourth and eighth week in rats that were fed standard chow, however, in rats that were fed low-salt chow, the increase in glomerular volume and development of further glomerular sclerosis was prevented whereas the protein excretion rate actually declined. Micropuncture studies performed 8 wk after ablation revealed that the glomerular hydraulic pressure was elevated in remnant kidneys and was not affected by salt restriction. This study demonstrates that dietary salt restriction can prevent further glomerular injury and reduce proteinuria even when instituted in rats with established renal disease. These findings are also consistent with the hypothesis that glomerular hypertrophy promotes injury in this model of hypertension and progressive renal disease.

  18. Independent Role of Underlying Kidney Disease on Renal Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease under Nephrology Care.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Garofalo, Carlo; Pacilio, Mario; Liberti, Maria Elena; Sagliocca, Adelia; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Primary kidney disease is suggested to affect renal prognosis of CKD patients; however, whether nephrology care modifies this association is unknown. We studied patients with CKD stage I-IV treated in a renal clinic and with established diagnosis of CKD cause to evaluate whether the risk of renal event (composite of end-stage renal disease and eGFR decline ≥ 40%) linked to the specific diagnosis is modified by the achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of therapeutic goals for hypertension (BP ≤ 130/80 mmHg in patients with proteinuria ≥ 1 50 mg/24h and/or diabetes and ≤ 140/90 in those with proteinuria <150 mg/24h and without diabetes) anemia (hemoglobin, Hb ≥ 11 g/dL), and proteinuria (≤ 0.5 g/24h). Survival analysis started after first year of nephrology care. We studied 729 patients (age 64 ± 15 y; males 59.1%; diabetes 34.7%; cardiovascular disease (CVD) 44.9%; hypertensive nephropathy, HTN 53.8%; glomerulonephritis, GN 17.3%; diabetic nephropathy, DN 15.9%; tubule-interstitial nephropathy, TIN 9.5%; polycystic kidney disease, PKD 3.6%). During first year of Nephrology care, therapy was overall intensified in most patients and prevalence of main therapeutic goals generally improved. During subsequent follow up (median 3.3 years, IQR 1.9-5.1), 163 renal events occurred. Cox analysis disclosed a higher risk for PKD (Hazard Ratio 5.46, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.28-10.6) and DN (1.28,2.99-3.05), versus HTN (reference), independently of age, gender, CVD, BMI, eGFR or CKD stage, use of RAS inhibitors and achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of each of the three main therapeutic goals. No interaction was found on the risk of CKD progression between diagnostic categories and month-12 eGFR (P=0.737), as with control of BP (P=0.374), Hb (P=0.248) or proteinuria (P=0.590). Therefore, in CKD patients under nephrology care, diagnosis of kidney disease should be considered in conjunction with the main risk

  19. [Renal involvement in glycogen storage disease type 1: Practical issues].

    PubMed

    Ben Chehida, Amel; Bensmaïl, Takoua; Ben Rehouma, Faten; Ben Abdelaziz, Rim; Azzouz, Hatem; Boudabbous, Hela; Slim Abdelmoula, Mohamed; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kaabachi, Naziha; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Tebib, Néji

    2015-07-01

    To investigate risk factors of renal complications in glycogen storage disease type I, in order to identify practical implications for renal preservation. A retrospective study of 38 patients with glycogen storage disease type I. The patients studied were 8.6 years old in average (1.5 to 22 years) and were followed during 7.4 ± 4.5 years. Hypercalciuria was detected in 23 patients and was related to acidosis (P=0.028), higher lactate levels (5.9 ± 3.5 versus 3.7 ± 1.7 mmol/L; P=0.013) and smaller height (-2.1 ± 1.5 SD versus -0.8 ± 1.5 SD; P=0.026). Urolithiasis was diagnosed in 7 cases. Glomerular disease (19/38) was more frequent in cases with severe hypertriglyceridemia (P=0.042) and occurred at an older age (P=0.007). Microalbuminuria occurred in 15/31 cases; ACE inhibitors were prescribed in only 8 cases. The frequency of renal complications did not differ according to the diet group (continuous enteral feeding or uncooked starch). Logistic regression concluded as risk factors: lactic acidosis for tubular disease and age>10 years for glomerular disease. Renal involvement is common in glycogen storage disease type I patients. Tubular abnormalities are precocious, related to lactic acidosis and may be detected by monitoring of urinary calcium. Glomerular hyperfiltration is the first stage of a progressive glomerular disease and is related to age. Practical implications for renal preservation are discussed based on our results and literature. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Influenza and End-Stage Renal Disease: A Fatal Combination.

    PubMed

    Singla, Montish; Grossman, Amy; Shikha, Deep; Baumstein, Donald; Chaudhari, Ashok; Carbajal, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Influenza epidemics are a major health care problem in the United States causing significant morbidity and mortality. Influenza can occur in all individuals, but immunocompromized hosts and those with chronic diseases such as end-stage renal disease are more susceptible to its fatal complications. Influenza though is largely preventable with the availability of highly efficacious vaccines. Despite the wide array of vaccine types available, the vaccination rates remain dismal, thereby leading to high incidence of the disease. In this report, we discuss a case of an unvaccinated patient with end-stage renal disease who contracted the influenza virus with fatal consequences. This report discusses multiple factors that allowed for a highly preventable disease to cause this negative outcome and provides suggestions to prevent such outcomes in the future.

  1. Organising care for people with diabetes and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dean, John

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two of the commonest long-term conditions. One-fifth of patients with diabetes will have CKD, and diabetes is the commonest cause of advanced kidney disease. For most patients these comorbidities will be managed in primary care with the focus on cardiovascular prevention. Many patients with more advanced disease and complications require joint care from multidisciplinary specialist teams in diabetes and renal disease to ensure that care is consistent and coordinated. Models of joint speciality care, include joint registry management, parallel clinics, shared consulting and case discussion, but require more evaluation than has currently been performed. These underpin more informal interactions between the specialist teams. A local model of care for diabetes and renal disease that incorporates the roles of primary care, members of multidisciplinary teams and speciality care should be agreed, resourced appropriately and its effectiveness monitored.

  2. Coeliac disease: review of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walker, Marjorie M; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Sanders, David S

    2017-08-21

    Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disease triggered by exposure to gluten, and manifested by small intestinal enteropathy and gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Recent guidelines recommend a concerted use of clear definitions of the disease. In Australia, the most recent estimated prevalence is 1.2% in adult men (1:86) and 1.9% in adult women (1:52). Active case finding is appropriate to diagnose coeliac disease in high risk groups. Diagnosis of coeliac disease is important to prevent nutritional deficiency and long term risk of gastrointestinal malignancy. The diagnosis of coeliac disease depends on clinico-pathological correlation: history, presence of antitransglutaminase antibodies, and characteristic histological features on duodenal biopsy (when the patient is on a gluten-containing diet). Human leucocyte antigen class II haplotypes DQ2 or DQ8 are found in nearly all patients with coeliac disease, but are highly prevalent in the general population at large (56% in Australia) and testing can only exclude coeliac disease for individuals with non-permissive haplotypes. Adhering to a gluten free diet allows duodenal mucosal healing and alleviates symptoms. Patients should be followed up with a yearly review of dietary adherence and a health check. Non-coeliac gluten or wheat protein sensitivity is a syndrome characterised by both gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten and possibly other wheat proteins in people who do not have coeliac disease or wheat allergy recognised by diagnostic tests.

  3. Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase in setting of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anuj; Masood, Umair; Khan, Babar; Chawla, Kunal; Manocha, Divey

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level is a rare phenomenon. This is especially true in patient with end-stage renal disease as lipase and amylase are renally excreted. Literature review reveals previous case report of pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level, however, none of them occurred in the setting of end-stage renal disease. Our case is the first such reported case of pancreatitis in such setting. Here we report a 30year old male with past medical history of end-stage renal disease who presented in emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Laboratory work up revealed normal lipase and amylase level. However, radiological work up was consistent with pancreatitis. This case report highlight the importance of taking the overall clinical picture rather than laboratory work up to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Furthermore, this should also serve an important reminder for clinicians to further investigate where clinical suspicion for pancreatitis is high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease.

  5. Addison disease in adults: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Chakera, Ali J; Vaidya, Bijay

    2010-05-01

    Addison disease is a rare but potentially fatal disorder of the adrenal glands. Its manifestations are often confused with many common disorders, and a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis. Optimum steroid replacement and patient education are vital for good quality of life and to prevent acute adrenal crisis in this condition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting the effects of dietary manipulation in chronic renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    El Nahas, A.M.; Brady, S.A.; Masters-Thomas, A.; Wilkinson, V.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Moorhead, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the progressive fall in renal function in some patients with CRF is due to hyperfusion of the remnant nephrons in response to the relatively high protein diet of modern life. The authors attempted to assess this and to see what was the shortest time in which any effect could be demonstrated. In the first phase, 39 patients with CRF had their renal function followed for 6 months on their normal diet and 6 months on a low-protein diet (LPD). The patients on LPD all showed an improvement in the rate of fall of renal function. This was marked in patients with mainly tubular disease, and poor in those with glomerular and vascular disease. In the second phase, 11 of these patients (and 1 other) were started on a high protein diet (HPD) for two weeks, and then switched back to a LPD for 2 weeks. There was no change in GFR during this period, but there were marked changes in ERPF, which correlated well with the changes in renal function in the first phase (r = 0.76, rho < 0.01); 4/4 patients with tubular disease showed a rise in ERPF on HPD and a fall on LPD, while only 4/8 with glomerular or vascular disease responded. In the third phase, they assessed the effect of a single high-protein meal in normal volunteers. This showed that there are major changes in hemodynamics following a meal, such that it is not possible to make any statement about renal function using the single-shot methods. The authors conclude that a 2-week period of HPD followed by LPD allows prediction of the possible beneficial response to diet in CRF; that this is best monitored by ERPF; and that a single meal may invalidate renal function measurement.

  7. Diagnosis of rare inherited glyoxalate metabolic disorders through in-situ analysis of renal stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Grohe, B.; Hoppe, B.; Beck, B. B.; Tessadri, R.

    2012-04-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias type I - III constitute rare autosomal-recessive inherited disorders of the human glyoxylate metabolism. By mechanisms that are ill understood progressive nephrocalcinosis and recurrent urolithiasis (kidney stone formation) often starting in early childhood, along with their secondary complications results in loss of nephron mass which progresses to end-stage renal failure over time. In the most frequent form, end-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the rule and combined liver/kidney transplantation respectively pre-emptive liver transplantation are the only causative treatment today. Hence, this contributes significantly to healthcare costs and early diagnosis is extremely important for a positive outcome for the patient. We are developing a stone-based diagnostic method by in-detail multi-methods investigation of the crystalline moiety in concert with urine and stone proteomics. Stone analysis will allow faster analysis at low-impact for the patients in the early stages of the disease. First results from combined spectroscopic (Raman, FTIR)and geochemical micro-analyses (Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation ICP-MS) are presented here that show significant differences between stones from hyperoxaluria patients and those formed by patients without this disorder (idiopathic stones). Major differences exist in chemistry as well as in morphology and phase composition of the stones. Ca/P ratios and Mg contents differentiate between oxalate-stones from hyperoxaluria patients and idiopathic stones. Results show that also within the different subtypes of primary hyperoxaluria significant differences can be found in stone composition. These imply differences in stone formation which could be exploited for new therapeutic pathways. Furthermore, the results provide important feedback for suspected but yet unconfirmed cases of primary hyperoxaluria when used in concert with the genetic methods routinely applied.

  8. Craniofacial brown tumor as a result of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic renal disease patient: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pradhuman; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Verma, Dinesh; Patwardhan, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Brown tumors are erosive bony lesions caused by rapid osteoclastic activity and peritrabecular fibrosis due to primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism resulting in a local destructive phenomenon. The differential diagnosis based on histological examination is only presumptive. Clinical, radiological and laboratory data are necessary for definitive diagnosis. Here, we report a very rare case of brown tumor involving maxilla and mandible, which is the result of secondary hyperparathyroidism in 30-year-old female patient with chronic renal disease. PMID:25328310

  9. Venlafaxine-associated serotonin syndrome causing severe rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in a patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Abeynaike, Lakshan; Wickramarathne, Thanushi

    2010-10-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease, on dopaminergic therapy, was admitted with confusion and agitation, diaphoresis, and hyperkinesia after the commencement of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine 2 weeks prior for depression. He was found to have severe rhabdomyolysis and developed acute renal failure. The most likely diagnosis was serotonin syndrome induced by venlafaxine, although neuroleptic malignant syndrome was also considered. The differential diagnosis, atypical features in this presentation, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Bone disease in patients with long-term renal transplantation and normal renal function.

    PubMed

    Carlini, R G; Rojas, E; Weisinger, J R; Lopez, M; Martinis, R; Arminio, A; Bellorin-Font, E

    2000-07-01

    Renal osteodystrophy may persist during the early years after renal transplantation. However, information on bone status after a successful long-term renal transplantation is limited. We examined biochemical parameters, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone histomorphometry in 25 asymptomatic men with normal renal function after 7.5 +/- 5.7 years of a renal transplantation. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels and urinary calcium level and cyclic andenosine monophosphate excretion were within normal range in all patients. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level was elevated in 11 subjects (133.6 +/- 78 pg/mL) and normal in the other 14 subjects (47.9 +/- 13.6 pg/mL). Mean BMD at the lumbar spine and femoral neck was low in the entire group. However, it progressively increased as time after transplantation increased, approaching normal values after 10 years. Bone histomorphometric analysis showed bone resorption, osteoid volume, and osteoid surface greater than normal range in the majority of patients. Bone formation rate and mineralization surface were low, and mineralization time was delayed in most patients. These lesions were more severe in patients after 3 to 4 years of transplantation but improved with time and approached normal values after a period of 10 years. PTH values did not correlate with bone histological characteristics or BMD. These results show that the bone alterations observed after long-term renal transplantation consist of a mixed bone disease in which features of high bone turnover coexist with altered bone formation and delayed mineralization. These findings may result from the combined effect of preexisting bone disease and immunosuppressive therapy.

  11. Characteristics and survival of patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in the United States renal data system.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Lijing; Bolen, Julie; Valdez, Rodolfo; Joseph, David; Baum, Michelle A; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-02-01

    We describe the characteristics, treatments and survival of patients with spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed from 2004 through 2008 in the United States Renal Data System. We used ICD-9-CM code 741.* to identify individuals with spina bifida using hospital inpatient data from 1977 to 2010, and physician and facility claims from 2004 to 2008. We constructed a 5:1 comparison group of patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida matched by age at first end stage renal disease service, gender and race/ethnicity. We assessed the risk of mortality and of renal transplantation while on dialysis using multivariate cause specific proportional hazards survival analysis. We also compared survival after the first renal transplant from the first end stage renal disease service to August 2011. We identified 439 patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed at an average younger age than in patients without spina bifida (41 vs 62 years, p <0.001) and in whom urological issues were the most common primary cause of end stage renal disease. Compared to patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida those who had spina bifida showed a similar mortality hazard on dialysis and after transplantation. However, patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida were more likely to undergo renal transplantation than patients with spina bifida (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03). Hospitalizations related to urinary tract infections were positively associated with the risk of death on dialysis in patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida (HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.33-1.53). Spina bifida was not associated with increased mortality in patients with end stage renal disease on dialysis or after renal transplantation. Proper urological and bladder management is imperative in patients with spina bifida, particularly in adults. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and

  12. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part I: general principles.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to improve the basis upon which advice on pregnancy is given to women with renal disease and to address issues of obstetric management by drawing upon the accumulated world experience. To ensure the proper rapport between the respect for patient's autonomy and the ethical principle of beneficence, the review attempts to impart up-to-date, evidence-based information on the predictable outcomes and hazards of pregnancy in women with chronic renal disease. The physiology of pregnancy from the perspective of the affected kidney will be discussed as well as the principal predictors of maternal and fetal outcomes and general recommendations of management. The available evidence supports the implication that the degree of renal function impairment is the major determinant for pregnancy outcome. In addition, the presence of hypertension further compounds the risks. On the contrary, the degree of proteinuria does not demonstrate a linear correlation with obstetric outcomes. Management and outcome of pregnancies occurring in women on dialysis and after renal transplant are also discussed. Although the outcome of pregnancies under chronic dialysis has markedly improved in the past decade, the chances of achieving a viable pregnancy are much higher after transplantation. But even in renal transplant recipients, the rate of maternal and fetal complications remains high, in addition to concerns regarding possible adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs on the developing embryo and fetus.

  13. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of hypertension and renal disease in Oregon.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, W E; Knudsen, J C; Porter, G A

    1975-01-01

    Expecting to find agreement between the geographic distribution of hypertension and renal disease, we developed regional mortality rates for 1950-72 and prevalence rates for a Selective Service cohort born in 1939-41 and examined during 1957-69. For this purpose the State's counties were grouped into eight geographically homogeneous regions. The general decline in hypertension mortality was most pronounced in Portland, Oregon's major urban center. However, the decline halted during 1968-72 in the southern Cascade region which has become an area of relatively higher risk within the State. During these 23 years nephritis mortality fell, kidney infection mortality was stable, and both syndromes showed peak mortality in other, different regions of the State. The geographic pattern of hypertension prevalence among the draftee cohort resembled the 1963-67 hypertension mortality pattern, but more recent morbidity data are needed to confirm the southern Cascade region's recent change to a high-risk area. Of 529 draftees with diagnosed hypertension, only 35 percent of the cases were previously known, only 7 percent has had any previous treatment, and only 7 percent were associated with known renal conditions. Among 521 registrants with a history of renal disorders, the prevalence of hypertension was increased for all categories of renal disease but was significantly high only for those with a history of glomerulonephritis. To date in Oregon we have found no evidence that renal disorders are major determinants of hypertension morbidity or mortality. PMID:803695

  15. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; P<0.05). This association was more pronounced among younger patients and those with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  16. Aging-associated renal disease in mice is fructokinase dependent.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Milagres, Tamara; Hernando, Ana Andres; Jensen, Thomas; Miyazaki, Makoto; Doke, Tomohito; Hayasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Marumaya, Shoichi; Long, David A; Garcia, Gabriela E; Kuwabara, Masanari; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Kang, Duk-Hee; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-10-01

    Aging-associated kidney disease is usually considered a degenerative process associated with aging. Recently, it has been shown that animals can produce fructose endogenously, and that this can be a mechanism for causing kidney damage in diabetic nephropathy and in association with recurrent dehydration. We therefore hypothesized that low-level metabolism of endogenous fructose might play a role in aging-associated kidney disease. Wild-type and fructokinase knockout mice were fed a normal diet for 2 yr that had minimal (<5%) fructose content. At the end of 2 yr, wild-type mice showed elevations in systolic blood pressure, mild albuminuria, and glomerular changes with mesangial matrix expansion, variable mesangiolysis, and segmental thrombi. The renal injury was amplified by provision of high-salt diet for 3 wk, as noted by the presence of glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial matrix expansion, and alpha smooth muscle actin expression, and with segmental thrombi. Fructokinase knockout mice were protected from renal injury both at baseline and after high salt intake (3 wk) compared with wild-type mice. This was associated with higher levels of active (phosphorylated serine 1177) endothelial nitric oxide synthase in their kidneys. These studies suggest that aging-associated renal disease might be due to activation of specific metabolic pathways that could theoretically be targeted therapeutically, and raise the hypothesis that aging-associated renal injury may represent a disease process as opposed to normal age-related degeneration.

  17. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  18. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  19. Association of smoking with phenotype at diagnosis and vascular interventions in patients with renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Savard, Sébastien; Azarine, Arshid; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Azizi, Michel; Plouin, Pierre-François; Steichen, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) remains unclear, but tobacco use is thought to be involved. This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate smoking first as a risk factor for renal artery FMD diagnosis and second as a modifier of the clinical and radiological phenotype of this disease. We retrieved 337 adult patients diagnosed with FMD in a referral center for hypertension management, who were first individually matched to controls with essential hypertension for sex, age, systolic blood pressure, number of antihypertensive drugs, and year of visit. Smoking status and other relevant data were collected at first visit. The proportion of current smokers was higher for patients with FMD than for the controls (30% and 18%, respectively, P<0.001; odds ratio, 2.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.9]). Second, characteristics of FMD were compared between current smokers and other patients. Among patients with multifocal FMD, current smokers experienced an earlier diagnosis of hypertension (36 versus 42 years, respectively; P<0.001) and FMD (43 versus 51 years; P<0.001) than other patients, and a greater likelihood of renal artery interventions (57% versus 31%; P<0.001) and of kidney asymmetry (21% versus 4%; P=0.001). In conclusion, current smoking is associated with a higher likelihood of renal artery FMD diagnosis. Rather than a higher incidence of FMD, this may reflect a more aggressive course in smokers, who have earlier hypertension leading to increased and earlier recognition of the disease. Smoking cessation should be strongly encouraged in patients with FMD.

  20. Diagnosis and Updates in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Sarah; Leffler, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It can result in intraintestinal and extraintestinal manifestations of disease including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, osteoporosis, or lymphoma. Diagnosis of celiac disease is made through initial serologic testing and then confirmed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. Generally celiac disease is a benign disorder with a good prognosis in those who adhere to a gluten-free diet. However, in refractory disease, complications may develop that warrant additional testing with more advanced radiologic and endoscopic methods. This article reviews the current strategy to diagnose celiac disease and the newer modalities to assess for associated complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of orbital inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Sibley, Cailin H; Harrington, Christina A; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Orbital inflammatory diseases include thyroid eye disease (TED), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), sarcoidosis, and nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI). Histopathological diagnosis usually relies on the clinical context and is not always definitive. Gene expression profiling provides diagnostic and therapeutic information in several malignancies, but its role in evaluating nonmalignant disease is relatively untested. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling could provide diagnostic information for NSOI. We collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies from 10 institutions and 83 subjects including 25 with thyroid eye disease, 25 nonspecific orbital inflammation, 20 healthy controls, 6 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 7 with sarcoidosis. Tissues were divided into discovery and validation sets. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. A random forest statistical algorithm based on data from 39 probe sets identified controls, GPA, or TED with an average accuracy of 76% (p=0.02). Random forest analysis indicated that 52% of tissues from patients with nonspecific inflammation were consistent with a diagnosis of GPA. Molecular diagnosis by gene expression profiling will augment clinical data and histopathology in differentiating forms of orbital inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis of periodontal diseases: reaction paper.

    PubMed

    Novak, M J

    1991-12-01

    With the recent description of 12 different forms and sub-forms of periodontitis by the World Workshop in Clinical Periodontics (1989), increased emphasis has been placed on diagnosis. Dr. Ranney's review addressed the specificity and sensitivity of current diagnostic tests with respect to their ability to differentiate between health and disease and between the individual disease states. Although considerable microbiologic and immunologic data have been accumulated in the past decade, very little of this information has proved to be sufficiently sensitive to be of use in differential diagnosis. Clinical measurements provide us with an insensitive, retrospective analysis of what has already occurred but allow us to diagnose disease based on its natural history. Measures of attachment levels, by use of conventional probes, are only sufficiently sensitive indicators of periodontitis when as much as 20-30% of attachment has already been lost. Current technological improvements in probing measurements and radiographic assessment may increase sensitivity in this area. Future improvements in diagnostic techniques will occur with the advent of sensitive biochemical analyses of gingival crevicular fluid. These assays will provide a more objective analysis of inflammation and, in time, will provide sufficient sensitivity to allow for differentiation between and among the various forms of periodontal disease. Future directions in diagnosis will focus on the identification of disease-susceptible individuals and the prediction of future periodontal breakdown.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  5. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sohrab, Mahsa A.; Allikmets, Rando; Guarnaccia, Michael M.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To report the first use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis to achieve an unaffected pregnancy in an autosomal-recessive retinal dystrophy. Design Case report. Methods An affected male with Stargardt disease and his carrier wife underwent IVF. Embryos obtained by intracytoplasmic sperm injection underwent single-cell DNA testing via polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis to detect the presence of ABCA4 mutant alleles. Embryos were diagnosed as being either affected by or carriers for Stargardt disease. A single carrier embryo was implanted. Results Chorionic villus sampling performed during the first trimester verified that the fetus possessed only one mutant paternal allele and one normal maternal allele, thus making her an unaffected carrier of the disease. A healthy, live-born female was delivered. Conclusion IVF and preimplantation genetic diagnosis can assist couples with an affected spouse and a carrier spouse with recessive retinal dystrophies to have an unaffected child. PMID:20149343

  6. Disordered sleep and noncompliance in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, P L; Gavin, C; Miller, G; Mendelson, W B; Wernli, I; Neugarten, J

    1997-01-01

    Sleep disorders are relatively common in patients with end-stage renal disease, but the diagnosis may be difficult to establish because of the similarity of uremic symptoms to those of the sleep apnea syndrome. After excluding anatomic and metabolic disorders associated with excessive sleepiness and disordered breathing in sleep and after ensuring that the patient is receiving adequate dialysis, the sleep disorder should be diagnosed using polysomnography. Continuous positive pressure airway breathing is an effective treatment for hemodialysis patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but the use of this machinery requires patient compliance, as does the delivery of an adequate amount of dialysis. The difficulties adjusting to end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis can be multiplied by the coexistence of a sleep disorder that requires some ventilatory assistance at night; the case presented in this article characterizes precisely that circumstance.

  7. Renal mass biopsy using Raman spectroscopy identifies malignant and benign renal tumors: potential for pre-operative diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yufei; Du, Zhebin; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Haowen

    2017-05-30

    The accuracy of renal mass biopsy to diagnose malignancy can be affected by multiple factors. Here, we investigated the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish malignant and benign renal tumors using biopsy specimens. Samples were collected from 63 patients who received radical or partial nephrectomy, mass suspicious of cancer and distal parenchyma were obtained from resected kidney using an 18-gauge biopsy needle. Four Raman spectra were obtained for each sample, and Discriminant Analysis was applied for data analysis. A total of 383 Raman spectra were eventually gathered and each type of tumor had its characteristic spectrum. Raman could separate tumoral and normal tissues with an accuracy of 82.53%, and distinguish malignant and benign tumors with a sensitivity of 91.79% and specificity of 71.15%. It could classify low-grade and high-grade tumors with an accuracy of 86.98%. Besides, clear cell renal carcinoma was differentiated with oncocytoma and angiomyolipoma with accuracy of 100% and 89.25%, respectively. And histological subtypes of cell carcinoma were distinguished with an accuracy of 93.48%. When compared with final pathology and biopsy, Raman spectroscopy was able to correctly identify 7 of 11 "missed" biopsy diagnoses. These results suggested that Raman may serve as a promising non-invasive approach in the future for pre-operative diagnosis.

  8. Crohn Disease: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Joseph D; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2017-07-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease condition characterized by skip lesions and transmural inflammation that can affect the entire gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. For this review article, we performed a review of articles in PubMed through February 1, 2017, by using the following Medical Subject Heading terms: crohns disease, crohn's disease, crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Presenting symptoms are often variable and may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, and in certain cases fevers or chills. There are 3 main disease phenotypes: inflammatory, structuring, and penetrating. In addition to the underlying disease phenotype, up to a third of patients will develop perianal involvement of their disease. In addition, in some cases, extraintestinal manifestations may develop. The diagnosis is typically made with endoscopic and/or radiologic findings. Disease management is usually with pharmacologic therapy, which is determined on the basis of disease severity and underlying disease phenotype. Although the goal of management is to control the inflammation and induce a clinical remission with pharmacologic therapy, most patients will eventually require surgery for their disease. Unfortunately, surgery is not curative and patients still require ongoing therapy even after surgery for disease recurrence. Importantly, given the risks of complications from both Crohn disease and the medications used to treat the disease process, primary care physicians play an important role in optimizing the preventative care management to reduce the risk of complications. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring Symmetry to Assist Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illán, I. A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; López, M.; Padilla, P.; Chaves, R.; Segovia, F.; Puntonet, C. G.

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioral impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is commonly used to guide the clinician's diagnosis. The essential left-right symmetry of human brains is shown to play a key role in coding and recognition. In the present work we explore the implications of this symmetry in AD diagnosis, showing that recognition may be enhanced when considering this latent symmetry.

  10. Early detection of renal damage and disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Gregory F

    2005-05-01

    Renal damage and disease can be caused by acute or chronic insults to the kidney. Acute renal damage often results from ischemic or toxic insults and usually affects the tubular portion of the nephron. In contrast, chronic renal disease can be caused by diseases and/or disorders that affect any portion of the nephron, including its blood supply and supporting interstitium. Early detection of acute renal disease facilitates appropriate intervention that can arrest or at least attenuate tubular cell damage and the development of established acute renal failure. Similarly,early detection of chronic renal disease, before the onset of renal azotemia and chronic renal failure, should facilitate appropriate intervention that stabilizes renal function or at least slows its progressive decline.

  11. [Von Willebrand disease. Molecular biology and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Zavala-Hernández, Cesar; Quintana-González, Sandra; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease is the most common inherited disorder of the coagulation proteins in humans. There are three types: 1, 2A, 2B, 2N, 2M and 3. It is associated with mutations on chromosome 12 in the region p13.2, encoding the von Willebrand factor (VWF), which is synthesized in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. The VWF gene has been characterised using molecular biology techniques, which have acquired an important role in diagnosis von Willebrand disease, as well as in the investigation of alterations in other genes, which may be involved in regulating the synthesis, processing, and secretion of VWF. However, there are still no strategies to integrate the molecular biology diagnostic tests available. Analysis of VWF multimers is a methodology that meets the characteristics for diagnosis, but it is not easy to standardise. Considering that even in tertiary centres in our country, von Willebrand patients do not have a definitive diagnosis, it is necessary to implement these methodologies to study and improve diagnosis. Von Willebrand disease is highly heterogeneous due to the molecular mechanisms that produce the various clinical and laboratory phenotypes. In Mexico there are few studies related to this disease; therefore it is essential to conduct a comprehensive study including clinical, basic, and special testing laboratory tests, in order to establish a correct diagnosis, develop new therapeutic approaches, and offer the appropriate medical care and genetic counselling. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. IgG4-related kidney disease from the renal pelvis that mimicked urothelial carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Ren, Xinyu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Di; Feng, Ruie

    2015-05-27

    IgG4-related kidney disease is a comprehensive term for renal lesions associated with IgG4-related disease, which mainly manifests as plasma cell-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis with increased IgG4+ plasma cells and fibrosis. IgG4-related kidney disease in the renal pelvis is rare. We describe a 53-year-old Asian woman who was referred to our hospital with a space-occupying renal lesion discovered by medical examination. A physical examination and laboratory evaluation revealed no significant abnormalities. Computed tomography scans showed a soft-tissue mass with an irregular border and mild homogeneous enhancement in the right renal pelvis and calyces. A positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan revealed soft-tissue density shadows with increased radionuclide uptake. To investigate a suspected pelvic carcinoma, a right ureteronephrectomy was performed. A pathologic examination of the renal sections showed a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4+ plasma cells, with fibrosis beneath the urothelial epithelium of the renal pelvis. Postoperatively, the serum IgG4 level was significantly elevated. The patient was diagnosed with IgG4-related kidney disease. We present a case of IgG4-related kidney disease mimicking urothelial carcinoma in the renal pelvis. When a buried and solitary hypovascular tumor is detected in the kidney, we must consider IgG4-related kidney disease as a differential diagnosis. Accordingly, elevated serum IgG4, radiologic findings, and pathologic examination may improve the diagnosis.

  13. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Rajendrakumar; Nairy, Dhananjaya Matapadi

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the rare autosomal recessive disorders that affect multiple organs of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. We present a case of BBS with features of hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient had end stage renal disease and managed with dialysis. This case also exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases. PMID:27853335

  14. Optimizing the diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Michelle Shui Yee; Sanders, David S

    2017-05-01

    The diagnostic approach in celiac disease is continuously evolving as our understanding of its pathophysiology improves. This review aims to provide a summary of contemporary work that supports optimization of the diagnosis of this common yet underdiagnosed condition. The recently updated National Institute of Clinical Excellence and European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines and the contentious biopsy-free diagnostic approach will be discussed. We will review the evidence advocating optimal biopsy techniques such as single bite biopsy and controversial bulb biopsy sampling to increase diagnostic yield. Recent data providing phenotypical characterization and clinical outcomes of celiac subtypes such as potential celiac disease, seronegative celiac disease and ultrashort celiac disease will be covered. We will present emerging evidence on novel case finding strategies with point of care tests. Promising novel markers for celiac disease such as serum intestinal fatty acid binding protein and in-vitro gluten challenge will be included. Recent work has demonstrated the clinical significance of the celiac disease subtypes, emphasizing the importance of careful diagnosis and recognition. There is a move toward a less invasive and perhaps more cost-effective diagnostic approach in celiac disease, but duodenal biopsy remains the gold standard at present for all adults and the majority of pediatric patients.

  15. Imaging in the diagnosis of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A disease is considered rare if it affects no more than 5 in 10,000 people. More than six thousand rare diseases have been detected so far and they affect 6-8% of the population which equals 2.3-3 million people in Poland. Some of the rare diseases are already diagnosed in utero, e.g. skeletal dysplasias on ultrasonography or central nervous system diseases on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many cases are finally diagnosed after radiologist's suggestion in a radiological report. Although diagnostic imaging cannot be considered as a basis for diagnosis of most of rare diseases, these studies represent an important element in the diagnostic chain. The complicated and long process of diagnosis may be significantly shortened by suggestions of the radiologist, based on the observation of these elements of radiological appearance of the lesions that are characteristic for a particular group of diseases, or even for a particular disease entity. However, the absolute condition for success is the close clinical-radiological cooperation, with clinicians providing the radiologists with their knowledge of patient's history, clinical manifestations, and the results of other investigations.

  16. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Thad; Tadkod, Altaf; Hepburn, Iryna; Schade, Robert R

    2013-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (hepatic steatosis). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is characterized by steatosis, liver cell injury, and inflammation. The mechanism of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is unknown but involves the development of insulin resistance, steatosis, inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with physical inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Screening is not recommended in the general population. The diagnosis is usually made after an incidental discovery of unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels or when steatosis is noted on imaging (e.g., ultrasonography). Patients are often asymptomatic and the physical examination is often unremarkable. No single laboratory test is diagnostic, but tests of liver function, tests for metabolic syndrome, and tests to exclude other causes of abnormal liver enzyme levels are routinely performed. Imaging studies, such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, can assess hepatic fat, measure liver and spleen size, and exclude other diseases. Liver biopsy remains the criterion standard for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Noninvasive tests are available and may reduce the need for liver biopsy. A healthy diet, weight loss, and exercise are first-line therapeutic measures to reduce insulin resistance. There is insufficient evidence to support bariatric surgery, metformin, thiazolidinediones, bile acids, or antioxidant supplements for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The long-term prognosis is not associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, cancer, or liver disease.

  17. Delirium in Parkinson’s Disease: A Cocktail Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mental disturbances have been described in patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Of these, the common conditions are delirium and psychosis. Delirium has been attributed to change of environment, especially hospital stay and infections; while psychosis is due to drugs like dopamine agonists. This is a case of a 75-year-old male, on levodopa therapy for PD, who presented with delirium and ended up with a cocktail diagnosis: Cryptococcal meningitis, Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (HE), Urinary tract infection with acute renal failure, Uremic encephalopathy and Levodopa induced psychosis. This case report, therefore, highlights the need to look for other causes of delirium in a patient with PD who is on levodopa therapy. PMID:28208916

  18. Differential diagnosis of acute rejection and chronic cyclosporine nephropathy after rat renal transplantation by detection of endothelial microparticles (EMP).

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiewei; Yang, Jing; Cao, Weike; Sun, Yi

    2010-12-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMP) are small vesicles smaller than 1.0μm, released from endothelial cells (EC) during their activation and (or) apoptosis. The assay of the level of elevated EMP is a new approach to evaluate the dysfunction of endothelial cell. EMP can be classified into several types according to their membrane molecular, and the levels of various types of EMP may be different. As the most cost-effective immunodepressant, cyclosporine A (CsA) has been used widely in organ transplantation. But its dose is hard to control, under-medication may cause the acute rejection (AR) and overdose may cause chronic cyclosporine nephropathy (CCN). The cyclosporine A (CsA) caused CCN and the AR caused renal injury after renal transplantation are both vascular diseases related with endothelial dysfunction, and up to now, there is still no effective method to distinguish the two kinds of diseases. Owing to distinct pathogenesis of the two kinds of vascular diseases, the level of each type of EMP originated from vascular endothelial cells may be different. We hypothesize that maybe we can distinguish them by detecting the different levels of some types of EMP which is also related with vascular disease, and we propose to prove our hypothesis through animal experiment. If our hypothesis is proved, it will be more helpful for clinicians to adjust the dose of CsA promptly according to the differential diagnosis of the two kinds of diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements...

  20. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements...

  1. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements...

  2. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements...

  3. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements...

  4. Biomarkers in rheumatic diseases: how can they facilitate diagnosis and assessment of disease activity?

    PubMed

    Mohan, Chandra; Assassi, Shervin

    2015-11-26

    Serological and proteomic biomarkers can help clinicians diagnose rheumatic diseases earlier and assess disease activity more accurately. These markers have been incorporated into the recently revised classification criteria of several diseases to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment. Furthermore, they also facilitate more accurate subclassification and more focused monitoring for the detection of certain disease manifestations, such as lung and renal involvement. These biomarkers can also make the assessment of disease activity and treatment response more reliable. Simultaneously, several new serological and proteomic biomarkers have become available in the routine clinical setting--for example, a protein biomarker panel for rheumatoid arthritis and a myositis antibody panel for dermatomyositis and polymyositis. This review will focus on commercially available antibody and proteomic biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and axial spondyloarthritis (including ankylosing spondylitis). It will discuss how these markers can facilitate early diagnosis as well as more accurate subclassification and assessment of disease activity in the clinical setting. The ultimate goal of current and future biomarkers in rheumatic diseases is to enable early detection of these diseases and their clinical manifestations, and to provide effective monitoring and treatment regimens that are tailored to each patient's needs and prognosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  5. Legionnaire's Disease and Acute Renal Failure: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Boucree, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    A case report is presented of a young man admitted to a general hospital with leukocytosis, elevated temperature, right lower lobe infiltrate, and confusion. A diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, and Legionnaire's disease was made. The patient subsequently had a respiratory arrest and died on the 29th hospital day. This triad is currently an enigma in the field of internal medicine. The diagnosis of each entity is elusive, and in many cases must be made by the astute clinician. Diagnostic features along with early intervention measures and their expected outcomes are discussed. Recognition of the interrelationship of these diseases, risk factors, and vague clinical presentations might allow further prospective intervention methods and diagnostic procedures to be undertaken to avoid the fatal consequences seen in this disease triad. PMID:3074172

  6. Imbalance in sex hormone levels exacerbates diabetic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Wells, Corinne C; Garman, Joseph H; Asico, Laureano; Escano, Crisanto S; Maric, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Studies suggest that the presence of testosterone exacerbates, whereas the absence of testosterone attenuates, the development of nondiabetic renal disease. However, the effects of the absence of testosterone in diabetic renal disease have not been studied. The study was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nondiabetic, streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and streptozotocin-induced castrated rats (n=10 to 11 per group) for 14 weeks. Diabetes was associated with the following increases: 3.2-fold in urine albumin excretion, 6.3-fold in glomerulosclerosis, 6.0-fold in tubulointerstitial fibrosis, 1.6-fold in collagen type I, 1.2-fold in collagen type IV, 1.3-fold in transforming growth factor-beta protein expression, and 32.7-fold in CD68-positive cell abundance. Diabetes was also associated with a 1.3-fold decrease in matrix metalloproteinase protein expression and activity. Castration further exacerbated all of these parameters. Diabetes was also associated with a 4.7-fold decrease in plasma testosterone, 2.9-fold increase in estradiol, and 2.1-fold decrease in plasma progesterone levels. Castration further decreased plasma testosterone levels but had no additional effects on plasma estradiol and progesterone. These data suggest that diabetes is associated with abnormal sex hormone levels that correlate with the progression of diabetic renal disease. Most importantly, our results suggest an important role for sex hormones in the pathophysiology of diabetic renal complications.

  7. Permanent vascular access in patients with end-stage renal disease, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gisele Macedo da; Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Lima, Eleonora Moreira; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal

    2011-04-01

    To assess factors associated with the establishment of permanent vascular access for patients with end-stage renal disease. Cross-sectional study conducted in a nationally representative sample of Brazilian end-stage renal disease patients in dialysis and transplant centers during 2007. The sample comprised only patients who received hemodialysis as a primary therapy modality and reported the type of vascular access for their primary hemodialysis treatment (N=2,276). Data were from the TRS Project--"Economic and Epidemiologic Evaluation of Modalities of Renal Replacement Therapy in Brazil". Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with the establishment of permanent vascular access in these patients. About 30% of the patients studied had an arteriovenous vascular access. The following factors were associated with a lower likelihood of having an arteriovenous vascular access as a primary type of access: time of hemodialysis start since the diagnosis of chronic renal failure < 1 year; shorter dialysis therapy; having no private health insurance; living in the central-western, northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil; and living in the northern region plus having no private health insurance. In the final model there was found a positive association between the outcome and pre-dialysis care and no were association with socioeconomic and comorbidity variables. The study results showed that the focus should on pre-dialysis care to increase the establishment of an arteriovenous vascular access before starting hemodialysis in Brazil.

  8. [Costs of interventions for patients with chronic renal disease].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A; Rangel, R; de Icaza, E

    1998-06-01

    The results of a study which identified the cost of health interventions in the management of patients with chronic renal disease are presented. The costing method was based on a consensus technique and the instrumentation of case management through the identification of the materials used and functions of production for the demand of each service solicited. The interventions included: peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, and renal transplant. The cost per event in U.S. dollars was $3.71, $57.95, and $8,778.32, respectively. The annual cost of case management was: Peritoneal Dialysis $5,643.07, Hemodialysis $9,631.60 and renal transplant $3,021.67. The information generated from the costs of the events differed considerably from the information that was generated by the annual cost of case management. These differences are significant for the design and evaluation of patterns for allocating resources.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    PubMed

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013<0.05) and presence of hepatitis C virus were particularly correlated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with

  10. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  11. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space.

    PubMed

    Zerwekh, Joseph E

    2002-10-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  12. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  13. Severe renal osteodystrophy in a pediatric patient with end-stage renal disease: Sagliker syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yavascan, Onder; Kose, Engin; Alparslan, Caner; Sirin Kose, Seda; Bal, Alkan; Kanik, Ali; Aksu, Nejat

    2013-07-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a multifactorial disorder of bone metabolism in chronic kidney disease (CKD). As CKD progresses, ensuing abnormalities in vitamin D metabolism and parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion result in distortions in trabecular microarchitecture, thinning of the cortical shell, and increased cortical porosity. The recently described Sagliker syndrome (SS) might be an exaggerated version of ROD and is a very striking and prominent feature of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It includes a distorted facial appearance, short stature, extremely severe maxillary and mandibulary changes, soft tissue tumors in the mouth, teeth/dental abnormalities, fingertip changes, knee and scapula deformities, hearing abnormalities, and neurologic and psychological problems. We herein describe an affected 14-year-old girl with severe ROD resulting from ESRD, who had severe peripheral and central neurologic problems caused by bone deformities, mimicking the features of Sagliker syndrome. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. System for renal movement elimination and renal diagnosis supported by vague knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jens; Hiltner, Jens; Fathi, Madjid; Reusch, Bernd; Stattaus, Joerg; Hacklaender, Thomas

    2000-06-01

    For the analysis of renal function, sequences of 90 magnet resonance images of the abdominal region showing both kidneys are taken in intervals of two seconds after a contrast medium was applied. Respiration of the patients during the acquisition of the images leads to organ movements throughout the series. These displacements are corrected by using an extended cepstral technique. To minimize registration errors caused by inhomogeneous movements of organs and tissues during respiration, the cepstrum-relevant part of the images is limited to small regions of interest around both kidneys. Even organ movements of sub-pixel range can be detected. After correction, the kidneys are the same position throughout the sequence. The regions of interest marked in one image are projected to all other images. To archive diagnostic results, dynamic contrast medium evaluations for different tissues of the kidneys are computed with signal-intensity-time graphs. Using a-priori knowledge about parameters of the SIT-graph for a whole kidney and about organ shape and structure, pixels of the kidney-segment are divided into the three classes renal cortex, medulla and pelvis. As a result, precise graphs can be computed for each tissue. The evaluation of the system is in progress, time save is more than one hour per patient.

  15. Diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and esophageal pHmetry are the most sensitive

  16. Resolution of Graves' disease after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yvonne; Butani, Lavjay; Glaser, Nicole; Nguyen, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of an adolescent boy with Down's syndrome and ESRD on hemodialysis who developed mild Graves' disease that was not amenable to radioablation, surgery, or ATDs. After 14 months of observation without resolution of Graves' disease, he successfully received a DDRT with a steroid minimization protocol. Thymoglobulin and a three-day course of steroids were used for induction and he was started on tacrolimus, MMF, and pravastatin for maintenance transplant immunosuppression. One month after transplantation, all biochemical markers and antibody profiling for Graves' disease had resolved and remain normal one yr later. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mestizos with systemic lupus erythematosus develop renal disease early while antimalarials retard its appearance: data from a Latin American cohort.

    PubMed

    Pons-Estel, G J; Alarcón, G S; Burgos, P I; Hachuel, L; Boggio, G; Wojdyla, D; Nieto, R; Alvarellos, A; Catoggio, L J; Guibert-Toledano, M; Sarano, J; Massardo, L; Vásquez, G M; Iglesias-Gamarra, A; Lavras Costallat, L T; Da Silva, N A; Alfaro, J L; Abadi, I; Segami, M I; Huerta, G; Cardiel, M H; Pons-Estel, B A

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the predictors of time-to-lupus renal disease in Latin American patients. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients (n = 1480) from Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio de Lupus (GLADEL's) longitudinal inception cohort were studied. Endpoint was ACR renal criterion development after SLE diagnosis (prevalent cases excluded). Renal disease predictors were examined by univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Antimalarials were considered time dependent in alternative analyses. Of the entire cohort, 265 patients (17.9%) developed renal disease after entering the cohort. Of them, 88 (33.2%) developed persistent proteinuria, 44 (16.6%) cellular casts and 133 (50.2%) both; 233 patients (87.9%) were women; mean (± SD) age at diagnosis was 28.0 (11.9) years; 12.2% were African-Latin Americans, 42.5% Mestizos, and 45.3% Caucasians (p = 0.0016). Mestizo ethnicity (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.19-2.17), hypertension (HR 3.99, 95% CI 3.02-5.26) and SLEDAI at diagnosis (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.06) were associated with a shorter time-to-renal disease occurrence; antimalarial use (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.43-0.77), older age at onset (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85-0.95, for every five years) and photosensitivity (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.56-0.98) were associated with a longer time. Alternative model results were consistent with the antimalarial protective effect (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.50-0.99). Our data strongly support the fact that Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing renal disease early while antimalarials seem to delay the appearance of this SLE manifestation. These data have important implications for the treatment of these patients regardless of their geographic location.

  18. The emerging role of percutaneous biopsy in diagnosis and management of small renal masses.

    PubMed

    Yap, Stanley A; Stakhovskyi, Oleksandr; Finelli, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Percutaneous biopsy has an emerging role in the diagnosis and management of small renal masses. The increasing importance of percutaneous biopsy is related to both a better understanding of the natural history of these tumors as well as new developments in treatment strategies. We discuss the emerging role of biopsy in the current practice setting. Additionally, we review recent data regarding its diagnostic accuracy, important technical considerations, and possible complications. Finally, we speculate on its future role in managing these patients. The role of percutaneous renal biopsy in the management of small renal masses continues to evolve. It is critically important at this juncture to evaluate the benefits and shortcomings of such an approach.

  19. Accurate diagnosis of renal transplant rejection by indium-111 platelet imaging despite postoperative cyclosporin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Adams, M.B.; Kauffman, H.M.; Trembath, L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Tisdale, P.L.; Rao, S.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T.

    1988-08-01

    Previous reports indicate that In-111 platelet scintigraphy (IPS) is a reliable test for the early diagnosis of acute post-operative renal transplant rejection (TR). However, the recent introduction of cyclosporin for post-transplantation immunosuppression requires that the diagnostic efficacy of IPS once again be established. Therefore, a prospective IPS study of 73 post-operative renal transplant recipients was conducted. Fourty-nine patients received cyclosporin and 24 patients did not receive this drug. Between these two patient groups, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic sensitivities (0.86 vs 0.80) and specificities (0.93 vs 0.84) with which TR was identified. We conclude that during the first two weeks following renal transplantation the cyclosporin treatment regimen used at our institution does not limit the reliability of IPS as a test for TR.

  20. Case for diagnosis. Riga-Fede disease.

    PubMed

    Calistru, Ana Maria; Lisboa, Carmen; Bettencourt, Herberto; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    Riga-Fede disease is a rare, benign disorder characterized by reactive ulceration of the oral mucosa associated with repetitive dental traumatism. It was first described in children with neurologic disorders and is very rare in adults. This case report describes the occurrence of a large ulcer of the tongue, resembling squamous cell carcinoma, in an adult with hemiparesis. The lesion cleared after neurologic recovery. This case highlights the importance of considering this disorder in the differential diagnosis of oral mucosal ulcerations.

  1. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  2. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  3. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  4. End stage renal disease in minorities.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, I. A.; Hosten, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    It is projected that the proportion of black Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans entering the ESRD program will continue to increase. Despite the increase in the average age of the ESRD population, the minorities entering the ESRD program are much younger. The major risk factors of ESRD--hypertension, diabetes, and glomerulonephritis--are affecting these minorities at a higher rate and in varying combinations. High prevalence and severity of hypertension followed by diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors in blacks, especially black women. Heroin and HIV nephropathies, tied to the epidemic of illicit drug abuse, have a major impact on young black men. The high prevalence of diabetes and the epidemic of glomerulonephritis in certain tribes are the major risk factors in American Indians. Hypertension and diabetes are the risk factors for the rapidly increasing Asian American population, especially for the elderly segment of this population. Diabetes predominates as the risk factor for the rapidly growing Hispanic American population, a group that needs to be identified separately within the ESRD program. Diabetes and hypertension are treatable, and adequate control can prevent progression of renal failure. However, with minority groups, it is difficult to fully implement the measures necessary to achieve this control. Outreach programs are necessary not only to provide medical treatment but to include instruction in socioeconomic and educational strategies. Programs that will seek out these patients and treat them should also educate them about their diet, about the detrimental effects of alcohol and smoking, and about the danger of substance abuse. Ultimately, these programs may be much cheaper than supporting a rapidly increasing ESRD program. PMID:1920501

  5. [Part V. Laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jofré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martín V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-10-01

    In this fifth part of Guidelines for Chagas disease, diagnostic techniques for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans are reviewed, the interpretation of laboratory results and an algorithm for laboratory diagnosis in immunocompetent hosts are presented. Chagas disease may be diagnosed by three kinds of techniques: direct, which allow detect the presence of the parasite in different kind of samples; indirect, based on the search of immune specific response against T. cruzi antigens and molecular, which detect parasite genetic material. Direct techniques are utilized mainly in acute phase of disease, as the parasite is present in blood of infected host. These techniques do not require be confirmed by other methods. For chronic undetermined phase and for symptomatic phase it is recommended to use indirect techniques; generally, immunoassay techniques (ELISA) that detect IgG antibodies directed against T. cruzi antigens are performed. As false positive results are possible, a positive or undetermined result must be confirmed by at least another technique (indirect immunofluorescence or indirect hemmaglutination). In Chile, confirmation of infection is performed by the Instituto de Salud Pública National Reference Laboratory or at surrogate centers. Molecular methods may be used to make the diagnosis in acute or chronic phase of infection, with more accuracy in the acute phase, and it is mainly recommended to diagnose vertical transmission of T. cruzi as early diagnosis of congenital infection increases the possibility to cure the sibling and besides it is a good marker to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment.

  6. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Y; Sieradzan, K

    1995-01-01

    Since the introduction of levodopa therapy for idiopathic Parkinson's disease over 20 years ago, there has been an awakening of research interest in this chronic neuro-degenerative disorder. This paper describes current understanding of the role of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and problems associated with both diagnosis and management. It briefly outlines both pharmacological and non-pharmacological options for treatment. Despite an increasing armoury of available treatments, the optimum management for this condition remains controversial. PMID:7619574

  7. Early neuroimaging diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Liu, Songhao

    2002-04-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and its uses are growing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may show the presence of cerebral infarcts and white matter disease. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which visualize such cerebral functions as glucose metabolism and blood flow, may provide positive evidence to support the diagnosis of AD. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed technique which enables the internal impedance of an object to be imaged noninvasively.

  8. Diagnosis and management of polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gevers, Tom J G; Drenth, Joost P H

    2013-02-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is arbitrarily defined as a liver that contains >20 cysts. The condition is associated with two genetically distinct diseases: as a primary phenotype in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and as an extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Processes involved in hepatic cystogenesis include ductal plate malformation with concomitant abnormal fluid secretion, altered cell-matrix interaction and cholangiocyte hyperproliferation. PLD is usually a benign disease, but can cause debilitating abdominal symptoms in some patients. The main risk factors for growth of liver cysts are female sex, exogenous oestrogen use and multiple pregnancies. Ultrasonography is very useful for achieving a correct diagnosis of a polycystic liver and to differentiate between ADPKD and PCLD. Current radiological and surgical therapies for symptomatic patients include aspiration-sclerotherapy, fenestration, segmental hepatic resection and liver transplantation. Medical therapies that interact with regulatory mechanisms controlling expansion and growth of liver cysts are under investigation. Somatostatin analogues are promising; several clinical trials have shown that these drugs can reduce the volume of polycystic livers. The purpose of this Review is to provide an update on the diagnosis and management of PLD with a focus on literature published in the past 4 years.

  9. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and staging of renal and perirenal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Demas, B E; Williams, R D; McNamara, M T; Hedgcock, M W; Amparo, E G; Tanagho, E A

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-one adult patients underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after CT scans had demonstrated findings consistent with renal cell carcinoma. MR images were interpreted prospectively and independently of the CT findings. Because the CT scanning was performed at multiple institutions by many examiners, this study was not a direct comparison of CT versus MR. The preoperative diagnoses and staging of the neoplasms, as judged by MR, were compared with those obtained at laparotomy (n = 28), autopsy (n = 1), or biopsy (n = 2). Correct preoperative diagnoses were rendered in 31 patients (100%) on the basis of MR findings. The anatomic staging of 27 renal cell carcinomas was correctly performed by MR in 26 patients (86%). When compared with results of previous studies of the value of CT in the diagnosis and staging of renal neoplasms, MR appears to have several advantages in determination of the origin of the mass; the evaluation of vascular patency; the detection of perihilar lymph node metastases; and the evaluation of direct tumor invasion of adjacent organs. MR is sensitive in determining the extent of tumor thrombus and in evaluating invasion of the inferior vena caval wall. MR should assume an important role in the diagnosis and staging of renal neoplasms.

  11. Renal biopsy in chronic kidney disease: lessons from a large Italian registry.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Bernich, Patrizia; Lupo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Renal biopsy procedure in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) may represent a valid tool to help clinicians in clinical practice. However, the use of this invasive method in CRF is variable and it reflects the hospital biopsy policy. To better define the CRF-related histological patterns and to assess the clinical utility of this procedure in this extensive group, we analyzed biopsy records of 1,185 CRF patients living in a large area of north-east Italy from 1998 to 2010. Data analysis showed that, although the biopsy incidence rate and the histological features were unchanged, the mean age of our CRF patients increased during the study period (R(2) = 0.42, p < 0.01). Primary and secondary glomerulonephritis (SGNs) were the main histological presentations (53.9 and 23%, respectively). SGNs were over-diagnosed in females. Leading histological types were immunoglobulin A nephropathy (22%), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (12.4%), membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN, 7.5%) and nephroangiosclerosis (7.3%). These forms were also highly frequent in CRF patients with elevated proteinuria and moderate/severe renal damage. Elderly patients were primarily affected by MGN. After biopsy, 49.5% of CRF patients with and 34.1% without nephrotic syndrome received immunosuppression therapy. This study demonstrated that renal biopsy in CRF patients, regardless of age and glomerular filtration rates, is safe and essential to achieve a correct diagnosis and to commence the correct therapy. Additionally, it revealed that, even in patients with severe renal damage, it is possible to perform an accurate histological diagnosis and, interestingly, end-stage kidney disease seems not to be the primary form. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Alzheimer's disease: early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chu, L W

    2012-06-01

    With ageing of populations, the worldwide population of persons with dementia will reach over 81 million by 2040, of which the most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, methods to diagnose it, and treatment. Magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and Pittsburgh compound B and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain can facilitate an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in its early stage, and diagnose the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease. At present, only symptomatic but not disease-modifying drug treatments are available. Donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine are the currently approved cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease. Overall, cholinesterase inhibitors show beneficial effects on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Memantine is another symptomatic treatment for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients. It has a small beneficial effect on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Vitamin E has antioxidant properties, and may be used in some Alzheimer's disease patients without vascular risk factors. Concurrent non-pharmacological and psychosocial management of patients and their caregivers have a very important role. Disease-modifying therapies are still under development, whilst immunotherapy may be a viable option in the near future.

  13. Diagnosis of Periodontal Diseases by Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Jun-Ichi; Hino, Mami; Bando, Mika; Hiroshima, Yuka

    Many middle aged and old persons take periodontal diseases that mainly cause teeth loss and result in some systemic diseases. The prevention of periodontal diseases is very important for oral and systemic health, but the present diagnostic examination is not fully objective and suitable. To diagnose periodontal diseases exactly, some biomarkers shown inflammation, tissue degradation and bone resorption, in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and saliva are known. We demonstrated that GCF levels of calprotectin, inflammation-related protein, and carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, bone metabolism-related protein, were associated with clinical condition of periodontal diseases, and suggested that these proteins may be useful biomarkers for periodontal diseases. Recently, determinations of genes and proteins by using microdevices are studied for diagnosis of some diseases. We detected calprotectin protein by chemiluminescent immunoassay on a microchip and showed the possibility of specific and quantitative detection of calprotectin in a very small amount of GCF. To determine plural markers in GCF by using microdevices contributes to develop accurate, objective diagnostic system of periodontal diseases.

  14. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Renal Function: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Stephen D.J.; Cook, F.A.B.; Dennis, Martin S.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The small vessel disease (SVD) that appears in the brain may be part of a multisystem disorder affecting other vascular beds such as the kidney and retina. Because renal failure is associated with both stroke and white matter hyperintensities we hypothesised that small vessel (lacunar) stroke would be more strongly associated with renal failure than cortical stroke. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish first if lacunar stroke was associated with the renal function, and second, if cerebral small vessel disease seen on the MRI of patients without stroke was more common in patients with renal failure. Methods We searched Medline and EMBASE for studies in adults with cerebral SVD (lacunar stroke or white matter hyper intensities (WMH) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)), in which renal function was assessed (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or proteinuria). We extracted data on SVD diagnosis, renal function, demographics and comorbidities. We performed two meta-analyses: first, we calculated the odds of renal impairment in lacunar (small vessel) ischaemic stroke compared to other ischaemic stroke subtypes (non-small vessel disease); and second, we calculated the odds of renal impairment in non-stroke individuals with WMH on MRI compared to individuals without WMH. We then performed a sensitivity analysis by excluding studies with certain characteristics and repeating the meta-analysis calculation. Results After screening 11,001 potentially suitable titles, we included 37 papers reporting 32 studies of 20,379 subjects: 15 of stroke patients and 17 of SVD features in non-stroke patients. To diagnose lacunar stroke, 13/15 of the studies used risk factor-based classification (none used diffusion-weighted MRI). 394/1,119 (35%) of patients with lacunar stroke had renal impairment compared with 1,443/4,217 (34%) of patients with non-lacunar stroke, OR 0.88, (95% CI 0.6-1.30). In individuals without stroke the

  15. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  16. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Che, Ruochen; Yuan, Yanggang; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2014-02-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has gained recognition as a contributing factor in many diseases. The kidney is a kind of organ with high energy demand, rich in mitochondria. As such, mitochondrial dysfunction in the kidney plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Despite the recognized importance mitochondria play in the pathogenesis of the diseases, there is limited understanding of various aspects of mitochondrial biology. This review examines the physiology and pathophysiology of mitochondria. It begins by discussing mitochondrial structure, mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitophagy, before turning to inherited mitochondrial cytopathies in kidneys (inherited or sporadic mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA mutations in genes that affect mitochondrial function). Glomerular diseases, tubular defects, and other renal diseases are then discussed. Next, acquired mitochondrial dysfunction in kidney diseases is discussed, emphasizing the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury, as their prevalence is increasing. Finally, it summarizes the possible beneficial effects of mitochondrial-targeted therapeutic agents for treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated kidney injury-genetic therapies, antioxidants, thiazolidinediones, sirtuins, and resveratrol-as mitochondrial-based drugs may offer potential treatments for renal diseases.

  18. The risk for end-stage renal disease is increased after burn.

    PubMed

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Koljonen, Virve; Finne, Patrik; Tukiainen, Erkki; Gissler, Mika

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) commonly complicates burn. Recently, AKI has been suggested to be causally related to chronic end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but controversial data also exist. Our aim was to study the risk of ESRD after burn in a nationwide analysis. All burn patients undergoing hospitalization between 1998 and 2011 were identified from the National Hospital Discharge Register, and the data were linked with the Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases, which includes all individuals receiving chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Finland. Altogether 41,179 adults were treated at hospitals for burns in Finland between 1998 and 2011. Of these, 86 had a diagnosis of AKI related to the burn. Forty-three burn survivors had ESRD and RRT initiated related to or after the burn. The overall risk for ESRD after burn was increased (standardized incidence ratio, SIR, 2.40, 95% CI 1.73-3.23) compared with the Finnish population. Standardized incidence ratio was 3.11 (95% CI 1.66-5.32) in women and 1.89 (95% CI 1.27-2.69) in men. Of these 43 patients, 38 had a specific non-burn-related diagnosis of ESRD identified in the registry, and ESRD was deemed unlikely to be directly related to the burn. In five patients, the diagnosis of ESRD was unknown cause of renal failure, and causality of the burn with ESRD was evaluated as plausible. In conclusion, a significantly increased risk of ESRD was recorded after a severe burn. Our results do not support increased incidence of ESRD solely as a consequence of AKI due to burn, but burn may increase the risk of ESRD in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Palliative dialysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Disha D

    2011-12-01

    Dialysis patients are often denied hospice benefits unless they forego dialysis treatments. However, many of those patients might benefit from as-needed dialysis treatments to palliate symptoms of uremia, fluid overload, etc. The current Medicare payment system precludes this "palliative dialysis" except in those few cases where the terminal diagnosis is unrelated to renal failure. As approximately three quarters of all US patients on dialysis have Medicare as their primary insurance, a of review of Medicare policy is suggested, with a goal of creating a new "palliative dialysis" category that would allow patients to receive treatments on a less regular schedule without affecting the quality statistics of the dialysis center.( 1 ).

  20. Diagnosis and management of Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Bhengu, L; Davidson, A; du Toit, P; Els, C; Gerntholtz, T; Govendrageloo, K; Henderson, B; Mubaiwa, L; Varughese, S

    2014-04-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is an autosomal-recessively inherited neuromuscular disease that, if not diagnosed and treated early, can be fatal. It can present from early infancy into adulthood. Due to the lack of acid alpha-glucosidase, there is progressive intracellular accumulation of glycogen. The severity of the disease is determined by age of onset, organ involvement including the degree of severity of muscle involvement, as well as rate of progression. PD is classified into two groups: infantile and late-onset, each having two subgroups. The need for two tests performed by separate methods (screening and confirmatory) is outlined. It is imperative to try to reduce the time to diagnosis and to recognise the possibilities of false-positive results. A multidisciplinary team approach to treatment of affected patients is optimum with, as team leader, a physician who has experience in managing this rare disorder. In this article, we present a brief overview of the disease and provide guidelines for diagnosis and management of this condition in South Africa.

  1. [A guide to diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno

    2005-11-15

    Despite the evolution of an increase of medical formation, only 50% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are diagnosed in France. It is pity, given the fact that the diagnosis of AD is relatively easy and can often be made without hospitalisation. The first stage of the medical inquiry is based on the clinical observation. It is established that the progression of the symptoms follows the progression of the brain lesions. A deficit in episodic memory is the earliest and most predominant cognitive change of AD. This is consistent with the precocious involvement of mesial temporal structures. This pattern, so-called "memory disorders of the hippocampal type," is highly suggestive of AD and markedly differs from that of other dementing illnesses. As the disease progresses and involves neocortical associative areas, patients demonstrate impairments in instrumental functions such as language, praxia, gnosia, and visuoconstructive functions. The second stage of the diagnosis is based on neuroimagery. MRI shows a bilateral atrophy of hippocampal formations even in the early stages of the disease. Standard biological parameters are normal. According to the context of occurrences of the disease or to the existence of atypical clinical or radiological changes, additional investigations can be proposed.

  2. [Diagnosis and treatment of Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; de la Fuente-Cortez, Beatriz; Molina-García, Avril; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Esmer-Sánchez, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare, progressive and often fatal neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. Among glycogen storage disorders, it is one of the most common. Its clinical manifestations can start at any moment of life, with a very variable symptomatology. In this article, we show an extended revision of the literature in regards to the main medical aspects of Pompe disease: etiology, psychopathology, epidemiology, clinical variants, pathological diagnosis, and enzyme replacement therapy. With this information, we created a diagnostic and therapeutic guide, which is addressed to specialists and to first-level physicians, in order to let them identify both the classic and the late forms of this disease. We describe as well the best, timely, multidisciplinary treatment in use. Also, we show some suggestions to the proper functioning of health institutions, and routes to diagnosis. We conclude that Pompe disease may be properly diagnosed and treated if health care professionals follow the internationally approved recommendations.

  3. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  4. Novel Methodology to Evaluate Renal Cysts in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyongtae T; Sun, Hongliang; Lee, June Goo; Bae, Kyungsoo; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vicente E; Grantham, Jared J; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Landsittel, Doug P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and assess a semi-automated method for segmenting and counting individual renal cysts from mid-slice MR images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) Materials and Methods A semi-automated method was developed to segment and count individual renal cysts from mid-slice MR images in 241 participants with ADPKD from the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of ADPKD (CRISP). For each subject, a mid-slice MR image was selected from each set of coronal T2-weighted MR images covering the entire kidney. The selected mid-slice image was processed with the semi-automated method to segment and count individual renal cysts. The number of cysts from the mid-slice image of each kidney was also measured by manual counting. The level of agreement between the semi-automated and manual cyst counts was compared using intra-class correlation (ICC) and a Bland-Altman plot. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented using the semi-automated method in all 241 cases. The number of cysts in each kidney measured with the semi-automated and manual counting methods correlated well (ICC=0.96 for the right or left kidney), with a small average difference (-0.52, with higher semi-automated counts, for the right and 0.13, with higher manual counts, for the left) in the semi-automated method. There was, however, substantial variation in a small number of subjects: 6 of 241 (2.5%) participants had a difference in the total cyst count of more than 15. Conclusion We have developed a semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts from mid-slice of MR images in ADPKD kidneys for a quantitative indicator of characterization and disease progression of ADPKD. PMID:24576800

  5. [Histology in diagnosis of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Papparella, S

    2004-06-01

    Many pathogenic organisms cause inflammatory lesions and microscopic findings are a useful diagnostic tool for the aetiological diagnosis. However, the histological lesions are limited in respect to many biological agents that can damage the tissues. The histologic hallmark of parasitic diseases is mostly granulomatous inflammation. It is characterized by a focal infiltration of macrophages and epithelioid cells. Many giant cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, fibroblasts and granulocytes can be found. Agents inducing granulomas include helminths and parasites that replicate intracellularly. Some special stains are utilized in histopathology, for example Giemsa's stain is useful to identify Leishmania. Using specific antibodies, immunohistochemical methods provide an aetiological diagnosis. Sometimes, tissue damage can be immuno-mediated depending on deposit of circulating immunocomplexes or T-lymphocytes involvement rather than by direct parasitic injury. Generally, the lesions which can be observed are respectively vasculitis and inflammatory reactions predominantly composed of mononuclear cells, as observed in many viral or bacterial diseases. In these cases, aetiological diagnosis is improved by in situ-PCR. For microscopic identification of parasites in tissues it is also important to be familiar with the kind of parasites most likely to be found in the examined tissue and in that particular host. Localization of parasites can induce hyperplastic-neoplastic lesions. Many parasites have been associated with the occurrence of specific types of neoplasms, but the mechanisms involved are still not well defined. Chronic inflammation and/or immune suppression seem to induce neoplastic proliferation.

  6. Molecular diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Baronciani, L; Goodeve, A; Peyvandi, F

    2017-03-01

    The role of molecular characterization in the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) is not essential if the patients have been extensively investigated using phenotypic analysis. On the other hand, if some of these phenotype assays are not available, the identification of the mutation causing the disease could be crucial for an accurate diagnosis. Nevertheless, there are several reasons for performing molecular analysis in patients phenotypically well characterized, e.g. to identify the mutation causing VWD can be useful for patients and their family members when prenatal diagnosis is required (type 3 or severe type 2). In this manuscript, we report the techniques used for the molecular characterization of suspected VWD patients. We describe the use of online von Willebrand factor database and online single nucleotide variation databases, the former to verify whether a candidate mutation has been previously identified in other VWD patients and the latter to ascertain whether a putative mutation has been reported earlier in healthy individuals. We listed the available in silico analysis tools, to determine the predicted pathogenicity of a sequence variant and to establish its possible negative effect on the normal splicing process. We also report the strategy that can be used to identify VWD type 2 patients' mutations in subjects who have been fully characterized using the phenotype assays.

  7. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Ao, A

    1996-12-01

    Research on diagnosis of inherited disease in human embryo before implantation was initiated to help those couples who would prefer to select embryos at this stage rather than during pregnancy. Following in vitro fertilization (IVF), one to two cells were removed from 3 day cleavage stage embryo and cells were analysed for genetic defects. Embryos diagnosed as unaffected were returned to the uterus and thus the resulting pregnancies were assured to be normal. First babies born after the preimplantation diagnosis were using DNA amplification of Y-linked sequences by PCR to avoid X-linked disease. Several pregnancies were obtained by identifying sex of embryos using dual fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with fluorochrome labelled DNA sequences specific for X- and Y-chromosomes to interphase nuclei. Development of single cell PCR for single gene defects led to diagnose several genetic disorders. Preimplantation diagnosis was successfully achieved for predominant delta 508 deletion causing cystic fibrosis, and pregnancies were also diagnosed for Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, Tay-Sachs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  8. Celiac disease: diagnosis, autoimmune mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gill, Brian M; Leffler, Daniel A

    2007-09-01

    Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten found in wheat and related grains. Once considered rare, celiac disease is now thought to affect more than one in 100 individuals, and is commonly associated with other autoimmune disorders. It predisposes patients to an increased risk of malignancy if left untreated. Celiac disease is HLA restricted as only HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 are able to bind deamidated gluten with sufficient affinity to trigger an immune response. Both cellular and humoral immune activation occur, leading to local tissue damage and antibody formation. These antibodies, primarily to tissue transglutaminase, are the basis for highly accurate serologic testing, although the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis remains small intestinal biopsy. Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a life-long gluten-free diet, although multiple novel therapeutic modalities are being studied. Although most individuals with celiac disease respond completely to gluten withdrawal, 10-20% have persistent symptoms at some point during their course and less than 1% develop refractory celiac disease, an entity of substantial morbidity.

  9. Diagnosis and management of Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Soumerai, Jacob D; Sohani, Aliyah R; Abramson, Jeremy S

    2014-10-01

    Castleman disease is an uncommon lymphoproliferative disorder characterized as either unicentric or multicentric. Unicentric Castleman disease (UCD) is localized and carries an excellent prognosis, whereas multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a systemic disease occurring most commonly in the setting of HIV infection and is associated with human herpesvirus 8. MCD has been associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, and the therapeutic landscape for its management continues to evolve. The available medical literature on UCD and MCD was reviewed. The clinical presentation and pathological diagnosis of Castleman disease was reviewed, along with associated disorders such as certain malignancies and autoimmune complications. Surgical resection remains the standard therapy for UCD, while systemic therapies are required for the management of MCD. Rituximab monotherapy is the mainstay of therapy; however, novel therapies targeting interleukin 6 may represent a treatment option in the near future. Antiviral strategies as well as single-agent and combination chemotherapy with glucocorticoids are established systemic therapies. The management of Castleman disease also requires careful attention to potential concomitant infections, malignancies, and associated syndromes. UCD and MCD constitute uncommon but well-defined clinicopathologic entities. Although UCD is typically well controlled with local therapy, MCD continues to pose formidable challenges in management. We address historical chemotherapy-based approaches to this disease as well as recently developed targeted therapies, including rituximab and siltuximab, that have improved the outcome for newly diagnosed patients. Ongoing research into the management of MCD is needed.

  10. Indium-111 white blood cell scan for infectious complications of polycystic renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, B.R.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Eary, J.F.; Simmons, M.C.; Nabi, H.A.; Nelp, W.B.

    1985-11-01

    This case report describes the localization of a unilateral renal abscess with ( In)oxine-labeled autologous leukocyte scanning in a febrile patient with polycystic renal disease, after other noninvasive imaging procedures failed to identify a source of infection. In polycystic renal disease, leukocyte scans have advantages over standard diagnostic modalities and are very helpful in planning appropriate therapy.

  11. Captopril-enhanced renal scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reusz, György Sandor; Kis, Eva; Cseprekál, Orsolya; Szabó, Attila Jozsef; Kis, Eva

    2010-02-01

    Hypertension in childhood is no longer a rare condition mainly secondary to renal, or renovascular diseases, as a growing proportion of children are obese and hypertensive, with the phenotype of metabolic syndrome. Thus, we need to reconsider our practice in the examination of the hypertensive child and redefine the place of non-invasive methods for screening of renovascular hypertension, and specifically, to evaluate the value of captopril-enhanced renal scintigraphy at the two ends of the palette: the obese child with hypertension and the severely hypertensive prepubertal child. Renal artery stenosis in children is mainly due to fibromuscular dysplasia and stenoses associated with syndromes involving single or multiple smaller branch vessels. This explains the low specificity and sensitivity of the color-Doppler ultrasound method and captopril renal scintigraphy. Even the more sophisticated computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) angiographic techniques are, at present, not sensitive enough to exclude stenoses of the small branches definitely. Thus, children in whom there is a strong suggestion of renovascular hypertension should undergo angiography with a view to endovascular treatment, as non-invasive imaging has no significant benefit and might lead to a delay in treatment. In the cases when the probability of renovascular disease is moderate a basic assessment of renal function and structure is sufficient. In the neonate, catheter-associated thromboembolic disease is among the most common causes hypertension. It should be controlled medically until the patient is old enough to undergo angiography and angioplasty successfully. Thus, in this age group, there is a place for functional imaging with renal sonography and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) renography to detect hemodynamically significant renovascular disease, with the limitations mentioned above. However, the rapid technical evolution of non-invasive methods

  12. Coexisting Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism and Severe Hypothyroidism in an End-Stage Renal Disease Patient on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Osman Malik, Yahya; Raza, Syed Mohsin; Arunselvan, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical syndrome of uremia is a bedside diagnosis which mimics a wide spectrum of other clinical disorders, most commonly thyroid disease. End-stage renal disease (ESRD), as a disorder, frequently alters thyroid hormone metabolism, and this is not significantly normalized by dialysis. Although the thyroid and parathyroid glands are considered independent organs, their anatomical juxtaposition in the neck, as well as sharing a common embryological origin, might play a role in some of the possible association between thyroid and parathyroid disease. It has been demonstrated in experimental animals that changes in the thyroid gland might lead to pathological changes in the parathyroids and vice versa. Case Presentation: An incidence of as high as 25% of hypothyroidism has been reported in patients with ESRD on dialysis. We report a patient with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis (MHDx) who has had a combination of profound tertiary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH) and severe hypothyroidism. Conclusions: Literature search revealed an increased prevalence of hypothyroidism with secondary HPTH from renal failure. Although there is increased prevalence of hypothyroid state in secondary HPTH from renal failure, the association appears much weaker in primary HPTH and again no conclusive pathological relation has been identified between the two endocrine glands. A closer look and perhaps long-term prospective studies are required in the future to determine this association. PMID:25883915

  13. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  14. Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Rapidly Growing Lung Nodules in an End-stage Renal Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Atsushi; Okada, Akira; Yoshida, Taiko; Itoyama, Satoshi; Nakai, Tatsuro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Takano, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. He required continuous dialysis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Subsequently, multiple nodules were discovered in both lungs for the first time, and Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the patient's sputum, blood, bilateral pleural fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, resulting in a diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis. This case represents an invaluable example of disseminated cryptococcosis with rapidly growing lung nodules in a dialysis patient, and illustrates that dialysis causes innate immune disorder and the reactivation of cryptococcosis. PMID:28154287

  15. Improvement of Erdheim-Chester disease-related renal failure after treatment with anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Graziani, Giorgio; Reggiani, Francesco; Buemi, Michele; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by infiltrates of lipid-laden CD68+/CD1a− histiocytes, affecting heart, lungs, central nervous system, and bones. Kidney and adjacent structures can also be affected, leading to renal failure in about 30% of cases. The diagnosis is challenging, and treatment is generally based on administration of interferon-alpha (IFNα), but preliminary results also showed the therapeutic efficacy of anakinra, an antagonist of the receptor of interleukin-1 (IL-1). We report the case of an elderly patient with ECD and severe involvement of the heart and kidneys who was successfully treated with anakinra. PMID:26877969

  16. Improvement of Erdheim-Chester disease-related renal failure after treatment with anakinra.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Graziani, Giorgio; Reggiani, Francesco; Buemi, Michele; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by infiltrates of lipid-laden CD68(+)/CD1a(-) histiocytes, affecting heart, lungs, central nervous system, and bones. Kidney and adjacent structures can also be affected, leading to renal failure in about 30% of cases. The diagnosis is challenging, and treatment is generally based on administration of interferon-alpha (IFNα), but preliminary results also showed the therapeutic efficacy of anakinra, an antagonist of the receptor of interleukin-1 (IL-1). We report the case of an elderly patient with ECD and severe involvement of the heart and kidneys who was successfully treated with anakinra.

  17. Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Rapidly Growing Lung Nodules in an End-stage Renal Disease Patient.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Atsushi; Okada, Akira; Yoshida, Taiko; Itoyama, Satoshi; Nakai, Tatsuro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Takano, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. He required continuous dialysis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Subsequently, multiple nodules were discovered in both lungs for the first time, and Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the patient's sputum, blood, bilateral pleural fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, resulting in a diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis. This case represents an invaluable example of disseminated cryptococcosis with rapidly growing lung nodules in a dialysis patient, and illustrates that dialysis causes innate immune disorder and the reactivation of cryptococcosis.

  18. Multimodality MRI Findings in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui Juan; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from a number of complex neurological complications including vascular damage and cognitive dysfunction. It is of great significance to detect the neurological complications and improve the prognosis of ESRD patients. Many new noninvasive MRI techniques have been steadily used for the diagnosis of occult central nervous system complications in ESRD patients. This gives an opportunity to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these neurological disorders. This paper is a review that presents the MRI findings of occult brain damage in ESRD patients, outlines the applications of advanced MRI techniques, and introduces a brief perspective in this study field. PMID:26064943

  19. Differences between women and men with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Coggins, C H; Breyer Lewis, J; Caggiula, A W; Castaldo, L S; Klahr, S; Wang, S R

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the participation of women and men in the protocols of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study, a multicenter prospective randomized clinical trial, and to assess gender differences in their renal outcomes. Of the 840 participants in the MDRD study, 332 (39.5%) were women who were assigned randomly to the dietary protein and blood pressure groups and followed for a median of 2.2 years. A subgroup analysis of the MDRD study database was carried out to compare women and men participants in recruitment, baseline characteristics, adherence to protocol requirements, safety and outcomes, and progression of renal disease and its response to dietary and blood pressure interventions. Adherence by women to the requirements of the protocol including diet, record keeping, office visits, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurements and urine collections was equivalent to that of men. Women had different renal diagnoses, less proteinuria and lower serum creatinine levels for given GFRs than men. When participants were grouped above and below age 52, the younger women had lower mean arterial pressure than did the men. Older women compared with younger had higher mean arterial pressure, body weight and body mass index, and total low density lipoprotein cholesterol. These differences were not seen between males of the same two age groups. During follow-up, the rate of GFR fall was slower in women, especially in the younger group. However, the association between gender and the rate of fall in GFR was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for differences in blood pressure, proteinuria and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. In analyses of the full cohort, there were no significant differences between women and men in the effects of the low protein or low blood pressure intervention in patients with either moderate (study A) or advanced (study B) renal disease. However, in subgroup analyses of patients

  20. [Crohn disease: diagnosis by graded compression ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Z; Makó, E; Dévai, T; Tulassay, Z

    1995-08-27

    Fifty-four patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel underwent ultrasound examination with graded compression. The pathologic sonographic findings were compared with the clinical, endoscopic and in 32 cases with the parallel performed CT and selective enterographic examinations. Of the 29 proven cases of Crohn's disease 26 (89.7%) had bowel wall thickening detectable with US. The change in the bowel wall structure correlated to the stage of the disease. The luminal narrowing, the mesenteric involvement, the enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the abscesses and fistulas were judged easily, but the length and the location of the bowel segment were estimated only approximately. The characteristic but nonspecific signs observed by ultrasound were found to be a useful adjunct to the endoscopic and roentgen examinations. The ultrasound with graded compression in our view is a well usable alternative method for both diagnosis and follow-up, informing about the transmural spread of the pathology.

  1. [Colonic diverticular disease: diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2012-02-12

    Colonic diverticular disease is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in the Western world, affecting approximately 50% of the population above the age of 70 years. Symptoms develop only in about one quarter of the affected individuals with complications in one-third of the symptomatic patients. Diagnosis is mostly confirmed by colonoscopy. Abdominal CT is the most sensitive for the diagnosis of complicated severe diverticulitis, while colonoscopy or in severe cases angiography may be performed in bleeding patients. Initial therapy of non-complicated symptomatic diverticulitis includes antibiotics and more recently non-absorbable antibiotics. In complicated cases should be treated with broad spectrum i.v. antibiotics, however surgery may became necessary in a minority of the cases. The proportion of patients needing acute surgical intervention has decreased in the last decades with the advancement of conservative management including medical therapy, endoscopy and imaging techniques and the indication of elective was also changed.

  2. End-stage renal disease in Indonesia: treatment development.

    PubMed

    Prodjosudjadi, Wiguno; Suhardjono, A

    2009-01-01

    The number of cases of chronic kidney disease is growing rapidly, especially in the developing world. At a certain level of renal function, progression of chronic kidney disease to endstage renal disease (ESRD) is inevitable. ESRD has become a major health problem because it is a devastating medical condition, and the cost of treatment is a huge economic burden. This article presents data collected from 13 nephrology centers in response to specifically designed questionnaires. These centers were divided into 7 groups on the basis of geographic location. Previous data had given the impression that the incidence and prevalence of ESRD had increased, and the results of this study support these previous data. Since a national registry of ESRD has just been developed for Indonesia and we can present only limited data in this study, the numbers in this article underestimate the true incidence and prevalence rates. Although hemodialysis facilities have been developed rapidly, further development is still required. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis as an alternative renal replacement therapy (RRT) is only now being introduced. Kidney transplantation programs expand very slowly. RRT still imposes a high cost of treatment for ESRD; therefore, these treatments are unaffordable for most patients. Recently, government health insurance has covered financially strained families requiring RRT. Since the cost of RRT for ESRD has significantly increased over time, the management approach should be shifted from treatment to prevention.

  3. Hypertension in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Skrzypczyk, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This review summarizes current data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of hypertension (HTN) in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Worldwide prevalence of ESRD ranges from 5.0 to 84.4 per million age-related population. HTN is present in 27-79% of children with ESRD, depending on the modality of renal replacement therapy and the exact definition of hypertension. Ambulatory BP monitoring has been recommended for the detection of HTN and evaluation of treatment effectiveness. HTN in dialyzed patients is mostly related to hypervolemia, sodium overload, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis, reduced vitamin D levels, and effects of microRNA. In children undergoing chronic dialysis therapy, important factors include optimization of renal replacement therapy and preservation of residual renal function, allowing reduction of volume- and sodium-overload, along with appropriate drug treatment, particularly with calcium channel blockers, RAAS inhibitors, and loop diuretics.

  4. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, George T

    2003-01-01

    The defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease is cognitive impairment, but commonly this impairment is accompanied by mood and behavioral symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, inappropriate behavior, sleep disturbance, psychosis, and agitation. The symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are not normative to the aging process. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in the majority of cases can be made with confidence through office-based clinical assessment and informant interview. Alzheimer's disease is the most common of the dementing disorders and is exponentially increasing in incidence, projected to affect 8.64 million people in the United States by the year 2047. At present, no treatment can prevent or cure Alzheimer's disease, and the fact that Alzheimer's affects a geriatric population makes treatment all the more challenging. Therapies that could delay onset of symptoms even briefly would have a major impact on public health. As the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease increases, researchers are examining the efficacy of treatment options beyond the realm of the established cholinesterase inhibitors.

  6. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. Objective To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. Method The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Results Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. Conclusion GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and

  7. Cucumber disease diagnosis using multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Li, Hongning; Shi, Junsheng; Yang, Weiping; Liao, Ningfang

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, multispectral imaging technique for plant diseases diagnosis is presented. Firstly, multispectral imaging system is designed. This system utilizes 15 narrow-band filters, a panchromatic band, a monochrome CCD camera, and standard illumination observing environment. The spectral reflectance and color of 8 Macbeth color patches are reproduced between 400nm and 700nm in the process. In addition, spectral reflectance angle and color difference is obtained through measurements and analysis of color patches using spectrometer and multispectral imaging system. The result shows that 16 narrow-bands multispectral imaging system realizes good accuracy in spectral reflectance and color reproduction. Secondly, a horticultural plant, cucumber' familiar disease are the researching objects. 210 multispectral samples are obtained by multispectral and are classified by BP artificial neural network. The classification accuracies of Sphaerotheca fuliginea, Corynespora cassiicola, Pseudoperonospora cubensis are 100%. Trichothecium roseum and Cladosporium cucumerinum are 96.67% and 90.00%. It is confirmed that the multispectral imaging system realizes good accuracy in the cucumber diseases diagnosis.

  8. Huntington's disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, S E; Mohr, E; Ilivitsky, V; Jones, B D

    1994-01-01

    This review of the clinical features of Huntington's disease incorporates recent developments in pathophysiology, preclinical diagnosis and treatment. Although the mechanism initiating and guiding the cell destruction in this illness is currently unknown, the excitatory neurotoxin and the energy metabolism models may provide a valuable direction for future research. Similarly, although the precise relation between the neuroanatomical damage in Huntington's disease and the functional disability is not clear, applications of recently developed neural connection models have implicated a number of important brain-behavior associations. Preclinical diagnostic procedures have evolved through successive iterations that have each contributed to increased reliability. New functional brain imaging techniques are sure to add to this promising domain in the future. Preclinical diagnosis has been stimulated by the recent isolation of the Huntington's gene which has also rekindled awareness of the importance of informed genetic counselling and the inherent ethical dilemmas in genetic testing. Treatment approaches to Huntington's disease have been confined to palliative care with secondary symptom management and psychotherapeutic support. Experimental therapeutic strategies for the illness itself have had a rather disappointing record to date. Further developments in NMDA antagonism and neural cell grafting may provide some hope for the future. PMID:7528535

  9. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed.

  10. [Management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy in 2013 in France].

    PubMed

    Tuppin, Philippe; Cuerq, Anne; Torre, Sylvie; Couchoud, Cécile; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy. Among the 51 million national health insurance general scheme beneficiaries (77% of the population), persons 18 years and older, starting dialysis or undergoing preemptive renal transplantation in 2013, were included in this study. Data were derived from the French national health insurance system (SNIIRAM). In this population of 6674 patients (median age: 68 years), 88% initiated renal replacement therapy by haemodialysis, 8% by peritoneal dialysis, and 4% by renal transplantation. During the year preceding initiation of dialysis, 76% of patients had been hospitalised with at least one diagnostic code for renal disease in 83% of cases, 16% had not received any reimbursements for serum creatinine assay and 32% had not seen a nephrologist; 87% were taking at least one antihypertensive drug (60% were taking at least a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor) and 30% were taking a combination of 4 or more classes of antihypertensive drugs. For patients initiating haemodialysis in a haemodialysis centre, 39% had undergone a procedure related to arteriovenous fistula and 10% had been admitted to an intensive care unit. This study, based on the available reimbursement data, shows that, despite frequent use of the health care system by this population, there is still room for improvement of screening and management of patients with end-stage renal disease and preparation for renal replacement therapy.

  11. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 1.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In diabetes, kidneys' morphological changes are non-specific at ultrasound (US) and they vary according to disease stage. In the earlier stages, kidneys are enlarged and diffusely hypoechoic due to hyperfiltration. Kidneys size decreases only in advanced stages whereas renal cortical echogenicity progressively increases due to glomerulosclerosis. Nephromegaly, as well as discrepancy between size and renal function, are typical features of diabetic nephropathy either in early or in advanced stages of the disease. Resistive indexes progressively increase together with serum creatinine levels and macro/microcirculation damage. Chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) is the third leading cause of chronic kidney disease and it represents the clinical evolution of a variety of primary or secondary glomerular diseases. Kidneys in CGN are gradually reduced in volume, but remain symmetric, easily recognizable in renal space until the disease's later stages. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Subclavian Artery Disease: Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tisa; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Ayah, Omar Abine; McCormick, Daniel; Goldberg, Sheldon

    2017-04-01

    The diagnosis of brachiocephalic disease is often overlooked. Symptoms include arm claudication and vertebrobasilar insufficiency. In patients who have had the use of the internal mammary artery for coronary bypass surgery, the development of symptoms of myocardial ischemia should alert the clinician to the possibility of subclavian artery stenosis. Also, in patients who have had axillofemoral bypass, lower-extremity claudication may occur. Recognition involves physical examination and accurate noninvasive testing. Endovascular therapy has proven to be effective in alleviating symptoms in properly selected patients.

  13. Renal and testicular agenesis in a patient with Darier's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, L Y; Wortsman, J; McConnachie, P

    1985-05-01

    Darier's disease is a familial disorder of the skin that has been associated with corneal, bone, pulmonary, and urogenital abnormalities. This report describes a novel urogenital anomaly, namely renal and testicular agenesis, in a patient with Darier's disease. Detailed study of the kindred demonstrated an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance for Darier's disease and also revealed the presence of autoimmune thyroiditis in several family members. Thyroid involvement ranged from isolated goiter to hypothyroidism. Tissue typing for HLA-A, B, C, and DR antigens did not reveal a specific haplotype common to all the carriers of the cutaneous or thyroid disorder. It is concluded that patients with Darier's disease should be carefully evaluated for the occurrence of systemic diseases, especially urogenital abnormalities and thyroid disorders.

  14. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  15. Value of comprehensive renal ultrasound in children with acute urinary tract infection for assessment of renal involvement: comparison with DMSA scintigraphy and final diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brader, Peter; Riccabona, Michael; Schwarz, Thomas; Seebacher, Ursula; Ring, Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of comprehensive renal ultrasound (US), i.e., combining greyscale US and amplitude-coded color Doppler sonography (aCDS), for assessment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in infants and children, compared to (1) (99m)Tc DMSA scintigraphy and (2) final diagnosis. Two hundred eighty-seven children with UTI underwent renal comprehensive US and DMSA scintigraphy. The results were compared with regard to their reliability to diagnose renal involvement, using (1) DMSA scintigraphy and (2) final diagnosis as the gold standard. Sixty-seven children clinically had renal involvement. Sensitivity increased from 84.1% using only aCDS to 92.1% for the combined US approach, using DMSA scintigraphy as the reference standard. When correlated with the final diagnosis, sensitivity for DMSA scintigraphy was 92.5%; sensitivity for comprehensive US was 94.0%. Our data demonstrate an increasing sensitivity using the combination of renal greyscale US supplemented by aCDS for differentiation of upper from lower UTI. Sensitivity for DMSA and comprehensive US was similar for both methods compared to the final diagnosis. Comprehensive US should gain a more important role in the imaging algorithm of children with acute UTI, thereby reducing the radiation burden.

  16. Diagnosis of ureteral obstruction in patients with compromised renal function: the role of noninvasive imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Shokeir, Ahmed A; El-Diasty, Tarek; Eassa, Waleed; Mosbah, Ahmed; El-Ghar, Mohamed Abou; Mansour, Osama; Dawaba, Mohamed; El-Kappany, Hamdy

    2004-06-01

    We compared the role of noncontrast computerized tomography (NCCT), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and combined abdominal radiography (KUB) and ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of the cause of ureteral obstruction in patients with compromised renal function. The study included 149 patients, of whom 110 had bilateral obstruction and 39 had obstruction of a solitary kidney. Therefore, the total number of renal units was 259. All patients had renal impairment with serum creatinine greater than 2.5 mg/dl. Besides conventional KUB and US all patients underwent NCCT and MRU. The gold standard for diagnosis of the cause of obstruction included retrograde or antegrade ureterogram, ureteroscopy and/or open surgery. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of NCCT, MRU, and combined KUB and US in the diagnosis of ureteral obstruction were calculated in comparison with the gold standard. The definitive cause of ureteral obstruction was calculous in 146 and noncalculous in 113 renal units, including ureteral stricture in 65, bladder or ureter in 43, extraurinary collection in 3 and retroperitoneal fibrosis in 2. The site of stone impaction was identified by NCCT in all 146 renal units (100% sensitivity), by MRU in 101 (69.2% sensitivity), and by combined KUB and US in 115 (78.7% sensitivity) with a difference of significant value in favor of NCCT (p <0.001). Ureteral strictures were identified by NCCT in 18 of the 65 cases (28%) and by MRU in 54 of 65 (83%). Bladder and ureteral tumors causing ureteral obstruction could be diagnosed in approximately half of the patients by NCCT (22 of 43) and in all except 1 by MRU (42 of 43). NCCT and MRU could identify all extraurinary causes of obstruction. Overall of the 113 kidneys with noncalculous obstruction the cause could be identified by MRU in 101 (89% sensitivity), by NCCT in 45 (40% sensitivity), and by combined KUB and US in only 20 (18% sensitivity) with a difference of significant value in favor of MRU (p <0

  17. Undetected gynaecological disorders in women with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, R; Regan, L

    1997-04-01

    Women with chronic renal disease (CRD) who are on dialysis or have a functioning renal transplant are typically stoical in their attitude towards other health problems. We undertook a prospective study of 100 women with CRD to assess the prevalence of gynaecological disorders in this group of patients. Assessment included the measurement of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin and oestradiol concentrations, cervical cytology and a pelvic ultrasound scan. We found that gynaecological problems are highly prevalent and frequently unrecognized. Of these women, 58% had a menstrual disorder, with uncontrolled menorrhagia being a significant problem when it aggravated the chronic anaemia of renal disease, and 35% were menopausal, including seven women under the age of 40 years. Menopausal symptoms were undertreated. We identified a 14-fold increase in premature ovarian failure secondary to CRD and the use of cyclophosphamide therapy. In all, 22% of the women were subfertile and 10% had an abnormal smear, with cervical dyskariosis being significantly increased because of long-term immunosuppression. Contraceptive advice had often been absent or inappropriate. We conclude that formal gynaecological review should be routinely available for women with CRD.

  18. Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banchs, Isabel; Casasnovas, Carlos; Albertí, Antonia; De Jorge, Laura; Povedano, Mónica; Montero, Jordi; Martínez-Matos, Juan Antonio; Volpini, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) is a genetically heterogeneous group of conditions that affect the peripheral nervous system. The disease is characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of peripheral nerves and exhibits a range of patterns of genetic transmission. In the majority of cases, CMT first appears in infancy, and its manifestations include clumsiness of gait, predominantly distal muscular atrophy of the limbs, and deformity of the feet in the form of foot drop. It can be classified according to the pattern of transmission (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X linked), according to electrophysiological findings (demyelinating or axonal), or according to the causative mutant gene. The classification of CMT is complex and undergoes constant revision as new genes and mutations are discovered. In this paper, we review the most efficient diagnostic algorithms for the molecular diagnosis of CMT, which are based on clinical and electrophysiological data. PMID:19826499

  19. Immunosensor for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio Aparecido Pupim; Colli, Walter; da Costa, Paulo Inácio; Yamanaka, Hideko

    2005-07-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi proteins from epimastigote membranes, herein referred as antigens, have been used for the construction of an amperometric immunosensor for serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease. The proteins used had a molecular mass ranging from 30 to 100 kDa. The gold electrode was treated with cysteamine and glutaraldehyde prior to antigen immobilization. Antibodies present in the serum of patients with Chagas' disease were captured by the immobilized antigens and the affinity interaction was monitored by chronoamperometry at a potential of -400 mV (versus Ag pseudo-reference electrode) using peroxidase-labeled IgG conjugate and hydrogen peroxide, iodide substrate. The incubation time to allow maximum antigen-antibody and antibody-peroxidase-labeled IgG interactions was 20 min with a reactivity threshold at -0.104 microA.

  20. Addison disease - diagnosis and initial management.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Susan; Siafarikas, Aris

    2010-11-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare disease caused by either primary adrenal failure (Addison disease) or by impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Steroid replacement therapy normalises quality of life, however, adherence can be problematic. This article provides information on adrenal insufficiency focusing on awareness of initial symptoms and on risk scenarios, emergency management and baseline investigations, complete investigations and long term management. Early recognition of adrenal insufficiency is essential to avoid associated morbidity and mortality. Initial diagnosis and decision to treat are based on history and physical examination. Appropriate management includes emergency resuscitation and steroid administration. Initial investigations can include sodium, potassium and blood glucose levels. However, complete investigations can be deferred. Specialist advice should be obtained and long term management includes a Team Care Arrangement. For patients, an emergency plan and emergency identification are essential.

  1. [Diagnosis and therapy of idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2006-05-15

    The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on a thorough clinical examination with demonstration of the presence of bradykinesia, as well as tremor, rigidity, postural instability and hyposmia. Symptomatic forms and atypical Parkinson syndrome should be ruled out. Nuclear medical analyses of the dopamine metabolism and the dopamine receptors are used only in exceptions to clarify difficult cases of differential diagnoses. For young patients, dopamine-agonists and, indeed, once again increasingly MAO-B inhibitors, such as rasagiline, are mainly used for therapy. Older patients und patients in advanced stages receive levodopa and a COMT inhibitor. As supplemental therapy, amantadine is given for dyskinesia and apathy and budipine is given for tremor-dominant type of Parkinson's disease. In advanced stages with motor fluctuations, apomorphine or Duodopa pumps or deep brain stimulation are employed.

  2. Automated system for periodontal disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalat, Salvador E.; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Monserrat, Carlos

    1997-04-01

    Evolution of periodontal disease is one of the most important data for the clinicians in order to achieve correct planning and treatment. Clinical measure of the periodontal sulcus depth is the most important datum to know the exact state of periodontal disease. These measures must be done periodically study bone resorption evolution around teeth. Time factor of resorption indicates aggressiveness of periodontitis. Manual probes are commonly used with direct reading. Mechanical probes give automatic signal but this method uses complicated and heavy probes that are only limited for University researchers. Probe position must be the same to have right diagnosis. Digital image analysis of periodontal probing provides practical, accurate and easy tool. Gum and plaque index could also be digitally measured with this method.

  3. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  4. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altissimi, Giancarlo; Turchetta, Rosaria; Rigante, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy. PMID:28168075

  5. Recent Advances in the Non-invasive Diagnosis of Renal Osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Moorthi, Ranjani N; Moe, Sharon M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is the term used to describe a constellation of biochemical abnormalities, bone disturbances that may lead to fractures, and extraskeletal calcification in soft tissues and arteries seen in CKD. This review focuses on the non-invasive diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy, the term used exclusively to define the bone pathology associated with CKD. Transiliac bone biopsy and histomorphometry with double-labeled tetracycline or its derivatives remains the gold standard for diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. However, histomorphometry provides a “window” into bone only at a single point in time, is invasive, and not practical to study continuous changes in bone morphology. Further, CKD is a risk factor for fractures, and the etiology is multi-factorial and not fully explained by histomorphometry findings alone. The propensity of a bone to fracture is determined by bone strength, which is affected by bone mass and bone quality; the latter is a term used to describe the structure and composition of bone. Bone quantity is traditionally assessed by Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) and CT based methods. Bone quality is more difficult to assess non- invasively, but newer techniques are emerging and described in this review. Ultimately, the optimal diagnostic strategy for renal osteodystrophy may be a combination of multiple imaging techniques and biomarkers that are specific to each gender and race in CKD with a goal of predicting fracture risk and optimizing therapy. PMID:23802194

  6. Hyaline vascular castleman disease involving renal parenchyma and a lymph node: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Hyun; Min, Soo Kee; Shin, Mi Kyung; Lee, Yong Seong; Lee, Young-Goo; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2012-02-01

    Castleman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative lesion that is predominantly found in the mediastinum. Retroperitoneal and pararenal localizations are very rare. We describe a 36-year-old man with a hyaline vascular type of Castleman disease involving renal parenchyma and a paraaortic lymph node. Most reported renal Castleman disease was plasma cell type with systemic symptoms. Herein, we report the first Korean case of the hyaline vascular type of Castleman disease involving the renal parenchyma and the paraaortic lymph node simultaneously.

  7. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease With Unilateral Symptoms in the Setting of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Kyle C; Stahl, Christine M; Zhang, Pengfei; Liang, John W; Marcuse, Lara V; Lublin, Fred

    2017-07-01

    Although it is not rare for magnetic resonance imaging findings in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to be asymmetric, unilateral clinical syndromes are uncommonly reported and may confound diagnosis. In addition, neurological paraneoplastic syndromes are not common in renal cell carcinoma, though there are cases reported, often without an offending antibody isolated. A 66-year-old man was admitted with 1 month of left-sided numbness and "loss of control" of the left arm. Examination revealed action-induced irregular jerking movements of the left arm. Mental status testing was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed patchy areas of restricted diffusion along the cerebral cortices. Screening computed tomographic scans revealed innumerable lung nodules compatible with metastases, as well as a renal mass consistent with renal cell carcinoma. Lumbar puncture was performed and cerebrospinal fluid was sent for paraneoplastic autoantibody evaluation and protein 14-3-3. Over the next week the patient developed dystonic posturing of the left arm, left leg jerking movements, a right arm action tremor, and cognitive impairment. Paraneoplastic autoantibodies were negative. Protein 14-3-3 was elevated and brain biopsy revealed spongiform encephalopathy with positive immunoblotting. The patient died about 2 months from symptom onset. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can present with entirely unilateral myoclonus and numbness, without specific complaints of cognitive impairment. Not every difficult or unclear neurological syndrome in a patient with metastatic cancer is a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  8. EARLY DIAGNOSIS IN POST RENAL TRANSPLANT OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS: A FRESH LOOK.

    PubMed

    Chopra, G S; Narula, A S; Reddy, P S; Bhardwaj, J R

    1999-04-01

    A total of 86 renal transplant patients who were transplanted with live related donor (LRD) and live unrelated donor (LURD) kidneys were studied for opportunistic infections. Immune diagnosis of Toxoplasma, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Herpes-simplex virus type II (HSV-2), Aspergillosis and Tuberculosis was carried out in these patients along with sputum examination, CSF studies and biopsy of lymphnode and other tissues in few cases. A high degree of Toxoplasma, CMV & HSV-2 positivity was seen in transplanted patients. However sensitivity of serological diagnosis of tuberculos was found to be low with standard criteria, which increased significantly when modified criteria were used. It is concluded that regular immunological monitoring should be carried out in transplanted patients so as to reach an early diagnosis and management of opportunistic infections.

  9. Assessment of renal pathology and dysfunction in children with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ramaswami, Uma; Najafian, Behzad; Schieppati, Arrigo; Mauer, Michael; Bichet, Daniel G

    2010-02-01

    Overt renal disease often first presents in male individuals with Fabry disease in early to middle adulthood, but proteinuria and reduced GFR may occur in adolescents and in young children. More recently, kidney biopsy data have shown early renal histologic changes in pediatric patients, and kidney dysfunction, primarily proteinuria, seems to be more common in girls. Renal investigations and their timing in children remain poorly defined. A consensus on renal investigations is necessary to understand the natural progression of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of treatments such as enzyme replacement therapies. This article addresses three main categories: Use of GFRs, measuring albuminuria, and renal biopsies in children.

  10. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  11. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  12. Prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer to prepare for renal transplantation in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Tillou, Xavier; Chahwan, Charles; Le Gal, Sophie; Bensadoun, Henri; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2014-11-06

    Surgical difficulties of renal transplantation related to prostate cancer (PC) treatment and the results of renal transplantation after radical prostatectomy are currently poorly known, as well as oncological follow-up before and after renal transplantation. We performed a retrospective study including all patients diagnosed with PC before renal transplantation in our department. Nineteen patients were included between August 2003 and December 2013. The mean age at diagnosis of PC was 61.7 years (range 51.4-71.1). PSA mean level at diagnosis was 8.5 ng/ml (range 4.8-20). Fourteen had a retro-pubic and 5 a laparoscopic prostatectomy. Three patients underwent radiotherapy for positive surgical margins or extra-capsular extension. Fourteen patients were transplanted. The mean time lapse between prostatectomy and kidney transplantation was 32.8 months (range 14-71). Seven recipients (50%) were transplanted less than 24 months after prostatectomy. Post-transplantation surgical complications were not significantly related to dissection difficulties (p=0.2). No recurrence of PC was observed after renal transplantation, with a mean follow-up of 38 months (range 6-77.9). Prostate cancer discovered before renal transplantation should be treated by radical prostatectomy to assess recurrence risk. If the PC is at low risk of recurrence, it seems possible to shorten the 2-year period of oncologic follow-up before transplantation called for in current recommendations.

  13. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  15. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  16. [Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and bone. From renal osteodystrophy to CKD-MBD: new disease entity].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2009-04-01

    New disease entity "CKD-MBD" was created by the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome) at the controversy conference in 2005. This entity accurately reflects a diversity in mineral and bone disorder associated with CKD. According to this new definition, renal osteodystrophy should be used to express only bone lesion associated with CKD.

  17. CUBN as a Novel Locus for End-Stage Renal Disease: Insights from Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8–9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys – graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  18. Imaging-Based Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Young-Hwan; Conklin, John; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Heyer, Christina M.; Chan, Winnie; Wang, Kairong; He, Ning; Rattansingh, Anand; Atri, Mostafa; Harris, Peter C.; Haider, Masoom A.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of conventional ultrasonography (US) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is currently limited by reduced diagnostic sensitivity, especially in at-risk subjects younger than 30 years of age. In this single-center prospective study, we compared the diagnostic performance of MRI with that of high-resolution (HR) US in 126 subjects ages 16–40 years born with a 50% risk of ADPKD who underwent both these renal imaging studies and comprehensive PKD1 and PKD2 mutation screening. Concurrently, 45 healthy control subjects without a family history of ADPKD completed the same imaging protocol. We analyzed 110 at-risk subjects whose disease status was unequivocally defined by molecular testing and 45 unaffected healthy control subjects. Using a total of >10 cysts as a test criterion in subjects younger than 30 years of age, we found that MRI provided both a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Comparison of our results from HR US with those from a previous study of conventional US using the test criterion of a total of three or more cysts found a higher diagnostic sensitivity (approximately 97% versus approximately 82%) with a slightly decreased specificity (approximately 98% versus 100%) in this study. Similar results were obtained in test subjects between the ages of 30 and 40 years old. These results suggest that MRI is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis of ADPKD. HR US has the potential to rival the diagnostic performance of MRI but is both center- and operator-dependent. PMID:25074509

  19. Renal cell carcinoma co-existent with other renal disease: clinico-pathological features in pre-dialysis patients and those receiving dialysis or renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Miguel, José Luis; Arrieta, Javier; Costero, Olga; Górriz, José Luis; Picazo, Mari-Luz; Fresno, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Patients on chronic dialysis are prone to developing acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may lead to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The risk factors for the development of RCC so far have not been determined in pre-dialysis patients with co-existent renal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinico-pathological features of RCC in pre-dialysis patients with associated renal diseases or in those undergoing chronic dialysis and renal transplantation. We studied 32 kidneys from 31 patients with RCC and associated renal diseases. Of those, 18 kidneys were from 17 patients not on renal replacement therapy (RRT) when diagnosed with RCC; 14 patients received dialysis or dialysis followed by renal transplantation. Several clinico-pathological features were analysed and compared between the two groups. Overall, there was a preponderance of males (75%); nephrosclerosis was the predominant co-existent disease (31%). The median intervals from renal disease to RCC in the dialysis and transplanted groups were significantly longer than in the pre-dialysis group (15.8+/-1.1 vs 2.4+/-0.7 years, P<0.0001). In contrast to pre-dialysis RCC, the dialysis and transplant RCC groups had greater frequency of ACKD (100 vs 28%, P<0.0001), papillary type RCC (43 vs 11%, P<0.05) and multifocal tumours (43 vs 5%, P<0.05). At the end of the study, 71% of dialysis and transplanted patients and 72% of pre-dialysis patients were alive. ACKD develops in dialysis patients, as it does in those with renal disease prior to RRT. The duration of renal disease, rather than the dialysis procedure itself, appears to be the main determinant of ACKD and RCC. The RCC occurring in patients with ACKD and prolonged RRT is more frequently of the papillary type and multifocal than the RCC occurring in patients with no or few acquired cysts and a short history of renal disease. Long-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups.

  20. Epidemiology of paediatric renal stone disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Coward, R; Peters, C; Duffy, P; Corry, D; Kellett, M; Choong, S; van't, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: The previous epidemiological study of paediatric nephrolithiasis in Britain was conducted more than 30 years ago. Aims: To examine the presenting features, predisposing factors, and treatment strategies used in paediatric stones presenting to a British centre over the past five years. Methods: A total of 121 children presented with a urinary tract renal stone, to one adult and one paediatric centre, over a five year period (1997–2001). All children were reviewed in a dedicated stone clinic and had a full infective and metabolic stone investigative work up. Treatment was assessed by retrospective hospital note review. Results: A metabolic abnormality was found in 44% of children, 30% were classified as infective, and 26% idiopathic. Bilateral stones on presentation occurred in 26% of the metabolic group compared to 12% in the infective/idiopathic group (odds ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.03 to 7.02). Coexisting urinary tract infection was common (49%) in the metabolic group. Surgically, minimally invasive techniques (lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and endoscopy) were used in 68% of patients. Conclusions: There has been a shift in the epidemiology of paediatric renal stone disease in the UK over the past 30 years. Underlying metabolic causes are now the most common but can be masked by coexisting urinary tract infection. Treatment has progressed, especially surgically, with sophisticated minimally invasive techniques now employed. All children with renal stones should have a metabolic screen. PMID:14612355

  1. Diagnosis and therapy of coronary artery disease: Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Nuclear cardiology; Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; Therapy of angina pectoris; Psychosocial aspects of coronary artery disease; Nonatherosclerotic coronary artery disease; and The epidemiology of coronary artery disease.

  2. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  3. [Fabry disease: clinic and enzymatic diagnosis of homozygous and heterozygous. New therapeutic prospects].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Olea, T

    2002-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide, the glycolipid substrate of this enzyme, leads to severe painful neuropathy with progressive renal, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular dysfunction and early death. Men are predominantly affected but many female carriers have similar clinical involvement, including increased risk of stroke. Physical stigmata, such as angiokeratomas in skin and mucous membranes and characteristic benign corneal abnormalities, facilitate identification of Fabry disease. The finding of a marked decreased activity of (alpha-galactosidase A in plasma, white blood cells or cultured skin fibroblasts confirms the diagnosis. Treatment thus far has been symptomatic only. Etiology-based therapies are being developed that include enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, and substrate deprivation. The recently completed double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of intravenous infusions of (alpha-galactosidase A in patients with Fabry disease demonstrated the safety and efficacy of this treatment. We report a family with Fabry disease composed of hemicygous and heterocygous. The propositus developed chronic renal failure and received a cadaver renal transplant, which remained with adequate renal function during 15 years.

  4. Sometimes when you hear hoof beats, it could be a zebra: consider the diagnosis of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Fabry disease is present in 4–5% of men with unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy or cryptogenic stroke. As enzyme replacement therapy is now more widely available, it is important to recognise the signs and symptoms of the disease and establish the diagnosis so that early treatment can be started before irreversible organ damage occurs. Case Presentation A previously fit and well 32-year-old Caucasian male presented with multisystem dysfunction including renal impairment. Although he had no suggestive symptoms, a diagnosis of Fabry disease was first established on a native renal biopsy. This was confirmed by enzymatic testing and subsequent genetic analysis that revealed a potentially new pathogenic variant. Conclusions This case highlights the importance both of Fabry disease as a differential diagnosis in patients with renal impairment in the context of multi-system disease and also of adequate tissue sampling for electron microscopy when performing native renal biopsies. PMID:22849389

  5. Naturally-occurring chronic renal disease in Australian cats: a prospective study of 184 cases.

    PubMed

    White, J D; Norris, J M; Baral, R M; Malik, R

    2006-06-01

    To describe cases of naturally occurring feline chronic renal disease (CRD) in a defined population of Sydney. Prospective case series. The inclusion criteria were the presence of a serum creatinine concentration above the reference range with either inadequately concentrated urine (urine specific gravity < or = 1.035), necropsy findings consistent with CRD, renal proteinuria or persistent azotaemia despite rehydration. Cats were excluded if a specific aetiology was identified ante or post mortem. Patients were divided into two categories (renal insufficiency or renal failure) on the basis of history, physical findings and serum creatinine concentration. The gender and age of cats with CRD was compared to an estimated Australian urban pet cat population. The breeds of cats with CRD were compared to the breeds of cats visiting the respective veterinary hospital where possible. Breed and gender comparisons were made using Fisher's exact tests. Age comparisons were made using Mann-Whitney U tests. The age at which cats were diagnosed with CRD was compared between veterinary hospitals using a Kruskal-Wallis test. One hundred and eighty-four (99 female; 85 male) cats fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Amongst cats with CRD, males (median 12 years) were significantly younger than females (median 15 years; p = 0.001). The overall proportion of male and female cats with CRD was similar to that of the reference urban cat population (p = 0.41), however, between the ages of 9 and 11 years, male cats with CRD were over-represented (p = 0.038). Patients diagnosed with renal insufficiency (123 cats; median age 15 years) were significantly older than patients diagnosed with renal failure (61 cats; median age 11 years; p = 0.0001). The age at diagnosis of cats with CRD differed significantly between veterinary hospitals (p = 0.002). Male cats with CRD were significantly younger than female cats with CRD. Younger cats were more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease

  6. Diagnosing and treating renal disease in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is mostly related to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), precipitated by either an acute disturbance of hemodynamics, or acute structural damage to the kidneys. The incidence of chronic renal failure is rising, due to increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, viral hepatitis, which can be associated with renal damage. AKI is defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dL in <48 hours or by 50% from baseline within the past 3 months without setting a threshold for the final serum creatinine. Stages 1, 2, and 3 of AKI are defined as 150%, 200% and 300% of baseline serum creatinine respectively, which allows for assessment of AKI progression. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min for >3 months. Treatment of AKI consists of removal of precipitating factors and replenishment of the intravascular volume using colloids such as albumin. Frequently, AKI can be reversed using these measures alone. Non-responders to removal of precipitating factors and volume challenge can receive vasoconstrictors such as terlipressin or norepinephrine together with albumin. Midodrine is inferior in efficacy as a vasoconstrictor when compared to terlipressin. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome with liver failure. Delay in receiving a liver transplant can result in non-recovery of renal function post transplant. Treatment of CKD in cirrhosis is unsatisfactory, mostly aimed at optimizing management of comorbid conditions, or treating the underlying refractory ascites in patients with type 2 hepatorenal syndrome.

  7. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning.

  8. Potential Role of Tc-99m DTPA Diuretic Renal Scan in the Diagnosis of Calyceal Diverticulum in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Shih, Bing-Fu; Shih, Shin-Lin; Tsai, Jeng-Daw

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of Technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Tc-99m DTPA) diuretic scan to diagnose calyceal diverticulum (CD). From January 2000 to June 2014, children with evidence of renal cystic lesions of undetermined diagnosis on ultrasound were enrolled. Computed tomography urography (CTU) and Tc-99m DTPA diuretic scan were performed to characterize the precise anatomy. The diagnosis of CD depended on visualization of a renal cystic lesion with filling of contrast material or radiotracer from the collecting system on CTU or diuretic renal scan. Children who had positive findings of CD on 1 or both imaging studies were selected and analyzed. Both CTU and Tc-99m DTPA diuretic renal scan were performed in 39 children. A total of 9 (23.1 %) children with CD were diagnosed. All 9 children had positive diagnosis of CD on diuretic renal scan. Only 6 (66.7%) children could be diagnosed by CTU, and CD was missed by CTU in 3 subjects. The differential renal functions in patients with CD were 46% to 55%. The time of radiotracer appearance in the CD ranged from the 8th to the 24th minute. Seven patients had persistent accumulation of radiotracer in their CD at the end of the study. Tc-99m DTPA diuretic renal scan seems to be more sensitive than CTU in diagnosing CD. The possible reasons of higher sensitivity are discussed. Additional advantages that Tc-99m DTPA diuretic renal scan provides include the following: continuous monitoring, less radiation doses, and information on renal function, making it an attractive alternative to CTU for diagnosis of CD. PMID:26091475

  9. 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning and excretory urography in diagnosis of renal scars in children

    SciTech Connect

    McLorie, G.A.; Aliabadi, H.; Churchill, B.M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L. )

    1989-09-01

    We compared the ability of excretory urography (without tomography) and 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning to detect renal scars in 32 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. These children did not have hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract obstruction. In all cases both studies were conducted within a 10-month period. The findings from both modalities were in agreement for 51 of the 64 renal units evaluated (80%). Evaluation of the excretory urogram indicated 6 cases of diffuse and 2 of focal scarring that were not detected by evaluation of the renal scan. The sensitivity of excre