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Sample records for renal disease diagnosis

  1. Preeclampsia or initial diagnosis of chronic renal disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, C; Kalmantis, K; Bozemberg, T; Ntziora, F; Ioakeimidis, A; Paschalinopoulos, D

    2008-01-01

    An unusual case of early nephrotic syndrome without hypertension which slightly resolved after delivery is documented. Renal biopsy was performed postpartum and the diagnosis was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis with moderate chronic renal changes. It is questioned whether the case was due to preeclampsia or was the initial diagnosis of chronic renal disease which was made during pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in such cases is briefly discussed (Tab. 2, Ref. 15). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  2. A Case of Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome Leading to the Diagnosis of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabani, Erasmia; Kouloukourgiotou, Theodora; Stylianou, Konstantinos; Pantzaki, Afroditi; Efstratiadis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian man referred at our department due to acute renal failure (ARF) complicating respiratory failure during hospitalization in a regional hospital. The patient was previously started on steroids due to the suspicion of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) in the context of Goodpasture syndrome. However, clinical and laboratory findings did not support this diagnosis; instead a careful evaluation limited differential diagnosis of the renal insult to acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) following respiratory infection. With lung function fully improved but renal function not recovering, a renal biopsy revealed AIN, a finding leading to further diagnostic testing and finally to the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease as a cause of this patient's pulmonary-renal syndrome. The management consisted of progressive tapering of oral steroids associated with full recovery of the patient's renal function. This is a rare case of Legionnaires' disease causing immune-mediated AIN and highlights the possibility of Legionella infection as a cause of pulmonary-renal syndrome. PMID:27999694

  3. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  4. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Giorgio; Calabria, Santo; Lai, Silvia; Moscaritolo, Eleonora; Nofroni, Italo; Ronga, Giuseppe; Rossi, Michele; Ventroni, Guido; Sardella, Daniela; Ferrannini, Michele; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Cianci, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238) or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224), and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS), were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and/or Selective Angiography (SA). An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA). Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis. PMID:12622875

  5. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  6. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  7. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  8. Renal diagnosis without renal biopsy. Nephritis and sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D; Shires, M; Davison, A M

    2001-06-01

    Two examples of hereditary nephropathy within the context of clinical syndromes are described. Emphasis is put on the ability to make a renal diagnosis without renal biopsy and the benefits of screening relatives once a diagnosis is achieved. A variant of Alport's syndrome with associated macrothrombocytic thrombocytopenia, known as Epstein's syndrome, is reported. In addition siblings with Alström's syndrome characterized by pigmentary retinal degeneration (causing blindness in early childhood), progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive renal failure are reported. Both cases had previously presented for non-renal pathology in advance of the onset of symptomatic renal failure and may have benefited from appropriate screening.

  9. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Frank; Leung, Nelson; Hutchison, Colin A; Touchard, Guy; Sethi, Sanjeev; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Picken, Maria M; Herrera, Guillermo A; Kastritis, Efstathios; Merlini, Giampaolo; Roussel, Murielle; Fervenza, Fernando C; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-04-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) regroups all renal disorders caused by a monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) secreted by a nonmalignant B-cell clone. By definition, patients with MGRS do not meet the criteria for overt multiple myeloma/B-cell proliferation, and the hematologic disorder is generally consistent with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, MGRS is associated with high morbidity due to the severity of renal and sometimes systemic lesions induced by the MIg. Early recognition is crucial, as suppression of MIg secretion by chemotherapy often improves outcomes. The spectrum of renal diseases in MGRS is wide, including old entities such as AL amyloidosis and newly described lesions, particularly proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal Ig deposits and C3 glomerulopathy with monoclonal gammopathy. Kidney biopsy is indicated in most cases to determine the exact lesion associated with MGRS and evaluate its severity. Diagnosis requires integration of morphologic alterations by light microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy, and in some cases by IF staining for Ig isotypes, immunoelectron microscopy, and proteomic analysis. Complete hematologic workup with serum and urine protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, and serum-free light-chain assay is required. This review addresses the pathologic and clinical features of MGRS lesions, indications of renal biopsy, and a proposed algorithm for the hematologic workup.

  10. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  11. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  12. Amphibian renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Amphibians by nature have an intimate connection with the aquatic environment at some stage of development and fight an osmotic battle due to the influx of water. Many amphibians have acquired a more terrestrial existence at later stages of development and consequently have physiologic adaptations to conserve moisture. Renal adaptations have allowed amphibians successfully to bridge the gap between aqueous and terrestrial habitats. The kidneys, skin,and, in many amphibian species, the urinary bladder play key roles in fluid homeostasis. Renal impairment may be responsible for the clinical manifestation of disease, morbidity, and mortality.

  13. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  14. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  15. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  16. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  17. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Sourianarayanane, Achuthan; Thandassery, Ragesh B

    2016-06-01

    The development of decompensation in patients with cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality. Renal function gradually deteriorates with significant hemodynamic changes associated with decompensated liver disease, but may also rapidly decrease in response to precipitating events. Newer definitions of renal dysfunction may result in early diagnosis, this along with the use of sensitive markers helps in accurate determination of renal function in cirrhosis. Although renal dysfunction progresses slowly in cirrhotic patients, it is associated with increased mortality. Prompt intervention with appropriate management reduces the risk of renal dysfunction, as well as improving survival and quality of life. Appropriate management may include the removal of precipitating causes and use of pharmacological agents supporting circulatory dysfunction. Outcomes following treatment of this condition remain a major concern, especially in patients who develop hepatorenal syndrome. Transplantation of the liver or kidney and liver may be the only option when other modalities of treatment fail. Early transplantation may benefit these patients.

  18. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

  19. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. The large spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Sheila; Pascual, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) among diabetic patients seems to be overestimated. Recent studies with renal biopsies show that the incidence of non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) among diabetic patients is higher than expected. Renal impairment of diabetic patients is frequently attributed to DN without meeting the KDOQI criteria or performing renal biopsy to exclude NDN. In this editorial, we update the spectrum of renal disease in diabetic patients and the impact on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

  1. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital renal malformations using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, K P; Merchant, R H; Gondhalekar, A; Lulla, C P; Mehta, A A; Mehta, K P

    1998-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine the accuracy of antenatal sonography for the detection of congenital renal malformations and to characterize the type of malformations, seen in a 3-year prospective study at a university-affiliated maternity hospital. Participants were 31,217 pregnant women, during the study period, and subjects were 65 fetuses in whom renal malformations were detected on antenatal ultrasound. Pelvic ultrasound scans were performed at least once between 20 and 37 weeks' gestation on all pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the hospital for the detection of renal malformations. Fetal urinary sampling, diversion procedures, or termination of pregnancy were carried out as required in those detected to have renal anomalies. Postnatal diagnosis was confirmed by sonography or autopsy. Diagnostic procedures and renal surgery were performed postnatally if indicated. Sixty-five fetuses (0.2 per cent) were diagnosed to have congenital renal malformation antenatally at a mean gestational age of 28.4 weeks. A dilated urinary system was seen in 39, cystic renal disease in 15, agenesis/hypoplasia in six, combined lesions in four, and a horseshoe kidney in one. Oligohydramnios was noted in 20 (31 per cent) pregnancies. Multiple congenital malformations associated with renal anomalies were detected in 12 pregnancies. Termination was carried out at 20 weeks in two pregnancies for lethal malformations; fetal urinary sampling was done in two fetuses with obstructed uropathy, and a vesicoamniotic shunt inserted in one. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed a dilated urinary system in 32, cystic renal dysplasia in 15, renal aplasia/hypoplasia in five, combined lesions in six, and a horseshoe and an ectopic kidney in one each. Five infants were found to be normal. There were seven stillbirths and seven neonatal deaths. Radionuclide scans showed obstruction in nine, decreased renal function in six, and absent renal functions in 10 infants. Micturating

  2. Ultrasound diagnosis of fetal renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tiran; Sairam, Shanthi; Kumarasiri, Shanya

    2014-04-01

    Development of the urogenital system in humans is a complex process; consequently, renal anomalies are among the most common congenital anomalies. The fetal urinary tract can be visualised ultrasonically from 11 weeks onwards, allowing recognition of megacystis at 11-14 weeks, which warrants comprehensive risk assessment of possible underlying chromosomal aneuploidy or obstructive uropathy. A mid-trimester anomaly scan enables detection of most renal anomalies with higher sensitivity. Bilateral renal agenesis can be confirmed ultrasonically, with empty renal fossae and absent bladder filling, along with severe oligohydramnios or anhydramnios. Dysplastic kidneys are recognised as they appear large, hyperechoic, and with or without cystic spaces, which occurs within the renal cortex. Presence of dilated ureters without obvious dilatation of the collecting system needs careful examination of the upper urinary tract to exclude duplex kidney system. Sonographically, it is also possible to differentiate between infantile type and adult type of polycystic kidney diseases, which are usually single gene disorders. Upper urinary tract dilatation is one of the most common abnormalities diagnosed prenatally. It is usually caused by transient urine flow impairment at the level of the pelvi-ureteric junction and vesico-ureteric junction, which improves with time in most cases. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction is mainly caused by posterior urethral valves and urethral atresia. Thick bladder walls and a dilated posterior urethra (keyhole sign) are suggestive of posterior urethral valves. Prenatal ultrasounds cannot be used confidently to assess renal function. Liquor volume and echogenicity of renal parenchyma, however, can be used as a guide to indirectly assess the underlying renal reserve. Renal tract anomalies may be isolated but can also be associated with other congenital anomalies. Therefore, a thorough examination of the other systems is mandatory to exclude possible

  3. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed.

  4. [Renal artery stenosis : atheromatous disease and fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    Renal artery stenosis may be due to atheromatous disease or renal fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). Management of both diseases requires treatment of hypertension usually observed in such patients; however, clinical presentation, mechanism and treatment of these 2 diseases are usually different. Renal FMD is now considered as a systemic disease, the cause of which may be genetic (although the exact cause is still elusive). Renal arteries are the most frequent localizations of FMD, but extra renal arteries may also be involved (usually carotid arteries). Risk factors of hypertension-induced renal FMD include estrogen treatment and smoking. Renal FMD are mostly found in young women and in children who present with recent severe and/or refractory symptomatic hypertension. Diagnosis is usually easy (Doppler, CT-scan), and treatment of renal FMD is angioplasty in most cases. Atheromatous renal artery stenosis is usually found in patients with other atheromatous disease (peripheral artery disease, carotid, coronary artery disease...). Clinical presentation include severe or refractory hypertension, recurrent flash pulmonary edema in a patient with hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction spontaneously or after medical treatment with converting-enzyme inhibition or angiotensin II blockade, hypertension in a patient (usually smoker or ex-smoker) with diffuse atheromatous vascular disease. Management of atheromatous renal artery disease is medical treatment in all patients (aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, control of arterial pressure); revascularization is required in some patients only since it rarely cures hypertension: the goal of revascularization is mostly renal function protection, which may be observed in selected patients. Revascularization must be decided by physicians or teams involved in the care of such patients. Patients with atheromatous renal artery disease are at very high renal and cardiovascular risk : aggressive management of

  5. [Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of renal diseases in HIV infected patients. Recommendations of the Spanish AIDS Study Group/National AIDS Plan].

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of opportunistic infections and tumours in HIV-infected patients has sharply declined in the HAART era. At the same time there has been a growing increase of other diseases not directly linked to immunodeficiency. Renal diseases are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In the general population, chronic renal failure has considerable multiorgan repercussions that have particular implications in patients with HIV infection. The detection of occult or subclinical chronic kidney disease is crucial since effective measures for delaying progression exist. Furthermore, the deterioration in glomerular filtration should prompt clinicians to adjust doses of some antiretroviral agents and other drugs used for treating associated comorbidities. Suppression of viral replication, strict control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, and avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs in certain patients are fundamental components of programs aimed to prevent renal damage and delaying progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV. Renal transplantation and dialysis have also special implications in HIV-infected patients. In this article, we summarise the updated clinical practice guidelines for the evaluation, management and prevention of renal diseases in HIV-infected patients from a panel of experts in HIV and nephrologists on behalf of the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan.

  6. [Difficult diagnosis in a case of hematuria (Berger's disease)].

    PubMed

    Cambié, M; D'Agrosa, F; Di Pietro, C; Dotti, G; Liotta, M; Merli, B; Olivieri, M; Tamburini, G; Gaboardi, F

    1986-01-01

    A seven years old boy presented with gross hematuria associated with clots and transitory renal insufficiency. The urinary sediment showed only monomorphic red blood cells. Subsequently urinary sediment completely modified: namely only dysmorphic red blood cells and hyaline granular casts were found and within a week renal function become normal. The clinical diagnosis of Berger's disease was possible only with renal biopsy.

  7. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  8. Asymptomatic inferior vena cava abnormalities in three children with end-stage renal disease: risk factors and screening guidelines for pretransplant diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S E; Hickman, R O; Tapper, D; Shaw, D W; Fouser, L S; McDonald, R A

    2000-02-01

    We report two children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) found to have inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis at the time of renal transplantation. The children suffered from renal diseases that included congenital hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension as part of their pathophysiology. Neither child had evidence of hypercoaguability or clinical symptoms of IVC thrombosis. Prior to transplantation, the renal replacement therapy consisted primarily of peritoneal dialysis. During their hospital courses, these children had central venous catheters placed for temporary hemodialysis, episodes of peritonitis and numerous abdominal surgeries. The medical literature to date has not identified a link between IVC thrombosis and portal hypertension, nor has an association between the patients' primary renal disease and IVC thrombosis been found. We also report the finding of asymptomatic IVC narrowing in a third patient with obstructive uropathy, colonic dysmotility and numerous abdominal surgeries. IVC narrowing was diagnosed by CT scan during his pretransplant evaluation. In this paper, we consider similarities between these three patients that may have predisposed each of them to asymptomatic IVC pathology, including large-bore central venous access as young children and/or recurrent scarring abdominal processes. A discussion regarding appropriate screening of the 'high-risk patient' for IVC pathology prior to kidney transplantation and surgical options for children with this rare complication are presented.

  9. Uric Acid and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The interrelationship between uric acid and renal disease is reviewed in a historical context. Four phases can be distinguished--the descriptions of uric acid stones and gravel in the eighteenth century, of chronically scarred kidneys containing urate crystals in the nineteenth, the appearance of the syndrome of acute urate nephropathy following tumour lysis in the mid twentieth century, and finally the realization that soluble urate affects both systemic and glomerular blood vessels, and may play a role in both hypertension and chronic renal damage.

  10. Application of radiation grafted media for lectin affinity separation and urease immobilization: A novel approach to tumor therapy and renal disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Schulte, D.; Daschek, W.

    1995-09-01

    Carriers modified by synergistic radiation grafting are used as affinity media for the separation of a lectin from a mistletoe extract. The grafted supports show distinctly superior properties when compared to conventional affinity media. The application of these carriers as urease immobilization support incorporated in a conductimetric bioreactor for urea analysis as potential diagnostic device in renal diseases is also described.

  11. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    HAMIDI MADANI, Ali; ENSHAEI, Ahmad; POURREZA, Farshid; ESMAEILI, Samaneh; HAMIDI MADANI, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  12. [Radionuclide diagnosis of the ureteral motor function and urodynamics in renal tuberculosis and other diseases of the urinary system].

    PubMed

    Savin, I B

    1994-01-01

    Radionuclide methods (a new technique of infusion dynamic ureteroscintigraphy and standard techniques of dynamic and static scintigraphy of the kidneys, radionuclide renography) were used to examine 134 patients with nephrophthisis, 61 patients with other urological diseases and 51 controls. It is shown that nephrophthisis brings urodynamic disorders and impairment of ureteral contractility. Three types of the contractile disorders are distinguished. A decline in motor function and urodynamic defects occurred also in other urological affections. Sensitive radionuclide techniques are thought valuable in examination of the urinary system and objective evaluation of urodynamic disorders.

  13. Diuretic use in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2011-12-20

    Diuretics are agents commonly used in diseases characterized by excess extracellular fluid, including chronic kidney disease, the nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis and heart failure. Multiple diuretic classes, including thiazide-type diuretics, loop diuretics and K(+)-sparing diuretics, are used to treat patients with these diseases, either individually or as combination therapies. An understanding of what determines a patient's response to a diuretic is a prerequisite to the correct use of these drugs. The response of patients with these diseases to diuretics, which is related to the dose, is best described by a sigmoid curve whose contour can become distorted by any of the several sodium-retaining states that are directly or indirectly associated with renal disease. Diuretic actions are of considerable importance to patients who have renal disease, as their effective use assists in extracellular fluid volume control, reducing excretion of protein in urine and lessening the risk of developing hyperkalemia. Diuretic-related adverse events that involve the uric acid, Na(+) and K(+) axes are not uncommon; therefore the clinician must be vigilant in looking for biochemical disturbances. As a result of diuretic-related adverse events, clinicians must be resourceful in the dose amount and frequency of dosing.

  14. Angiogenic factors and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Julie S; Young, Brett C; Rana, Sarosh

    2011-01-01

    Background. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in patients with underlying renal disease and proteinuria. Prior studies show that there is an angiogenic factor imbalance with elevated levels of antiangiogenic proteins soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and soluble endoglin (sEng) and reduced levels of the proangiogenic protein, placental growth factor (PlGF) in women with preeclampsia. These angiogenic biomarkers may be useful in distinguishing preeclampsia from other conditions of pregnancy, which may present with overlapping clinical characteristics. Cases. Case 1: A multiparous woman at 18 weeks gestation with nephrotic syndrome presented with hypertensive emergency and worsening renal insufficiency. She underwent induction of labor for severe preeclampsia. Her sFlt1 and sEng levels were at the 97 percentile while her PlGF level was undetectable (less than the 1st percentile). Case 2: A nulliparous woman with lupus nephritis at 22 weeks gestation presented with fetal demise and heart failure. Three weeks previously, the patient had developed thrombocytopenia and hypertensive urgency. She underwent dilation and evacuation. Her angiogenic profile was consistent with severe preeclampsia. Conclusion. Angiogenic factors may provide evidence to support a diagnosis of preeclampsia in patients with preexisting renal disease and proteinuria, conditions in which the classical definition of hypertension and proteinuria cannot be used.

  15. Impact of pregnancy on underlying renal disease.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves marked renal vasodilation and large increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Studies in rats reveal that the gestational renal vasodilation is achieved by parallel reductions in tone in afferent and efferent arterioles so GFR rises without a change in glomerular blood pressure. There is some evidence from animal studies that increased renal generation of nitric oxide (NO) may be involved. Although chronic renal vasodilation has been implicated in causing progression of renal disease in nonpregnant states by glomerular hypertension, there are no long-term deleterious effects of pregnancies on the kidney when maternal renal function is normal because glomerular blood pressure remains normal. When maternal renal function is compromised before conception, there are no long-term adverse effects on renal function in most types of renal disease, providing that the GFR is well maintained before conception. When serum creatinine exceeds approximately 1.4 mg/dL, pregnancy may accelerate the renal disease increases and when serum creatinine >2 mg/dL, the chances are greater than 1 in 3 that pregnancy will hasten the progression of the renal disease. The available animal studies suggest that glomerular hypertension does not occur despite diverse injuries. Thus, the mechanisms of the adverse interaction between pregnancy and underlying renal disease remain unknown.

  16. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease.

  17. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  18. [Atheroembolic renal disease: a diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Turina, Silvia; Venturelli, Chiara; Dallera, Nadia; Valerio, Francesca; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Faberi, Elena; Sottini, Laura; Kenou, Rosyane

    2008-01-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease is a part of a multisystem disease and can be defined as renal failure secondary to the occlusion of renal arterioles and glomerular capillaries with cholesterol crystal emboli deriving from the aorta and other major arteries. The kidney is usually involved because of the proximity of the renal arteries to abdominal aorta (where the erosion of atheromatous plaque is most likely to occur), and the high renal blood flow. Cholesterol crystal embolism can also occur in other visceral organs, as well as in the upper and lower extremities. Embolization may occur spontaneously or after angiographic and surgical procedures, and anticoagulation. Atheroembolic renal disease is an important yet underdiagnosed component of the spectrum of kidney diseases associated with atherosclerosis and remains an unexplored field of nephrology research.

  19. Spectrum of renal disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jessie; Dwyer, Karen M; Hill, Prue; See, Emily; Ekinci, Elif I; Jerums, George; MacIsaac, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    The spectrum of renal disease in patients with diabetes encompasses both diabetic kidney disease (including albuminuric and non-albuminuric phenotypes) and non-diabetic kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease can manifest as varying degrees of renal insufficiency and albuminuria, with heterogeneity in histology reported on renal biopsy. For patients with diabetes and proteinuria, the finding of non-diabetic kidney disease alone or superimposed on the changes of diabetic nephropathy is increasingly reported. It is important to identify non-diabetic kidney disease as some forms are treatable, sometimes leading to remission. Clinical indications for a heightened suspicion of non-diabetic kidney disease and hence consideration for renal biopsy in patients with diabetes and nephropathy include absence of diabetic retinopathy, short duration of diabetes, atypical chronology, presence of haematuria or other systemic disease, and the nephrotic syndrome.

  20. [Genetic kidney diseases: new perspectives on diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bouatou, Yassine; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Parvex, Paloma; De Seigneux, Sophie

    2016-02-24

    Suspected renal inherited disorders are regularly evaluated in nephrology consultations both in adults and children. A positive family history and/or a typical phenotype should lead to genetic investigations. A confirmatory diagnosis integrated in a multidisciplinary genetic counseling approach gives patient guidance for further pregnancy. It also allows physician to better stratify disease risk and indicates treatment in some cases. The time to diagnosis and costs have been dramatically reduced thanks to next generation sequencing in several cases of complex inherited nephrologic syndromes.

  1. Renal vascular disease in neurofibromatosis type 2: association or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Gardner, Kate R; Huson, Susan M; Stewart, Helen; Elston, John S; Howard, Emma L; Tullus, Kjell O; Pike, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) remains a challenging diagnosis in childhood where there may be no neurological involvement. A 12-month-old male in whom NF2 was suspected because of characteristic ophthalmological and cutaneous lesions is reported. Cranial MRI showed no tumours. A pathogenic mutation was identified on NF2 gene analysis. The child developed hypertension due to renal vascular disease. Although renal vascular disease is a recognized complication of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), it has not been reported in NF2.

  2. Diagnosis of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Eric; Oesch, Bruno; Raeber, Alex J

    2003-01-01

    Prion diseases are usually diagnosed clinically and confirmed by post-mortem histopathological examination of brain tissue. The only reliable molecular marker for prion diseases is PrP(Sc), the pathological conformer of the prion protein that accumulates in the central nervous system and, to a lesser extent, in lymphoreticular tissues. For BSE, several commercial diagnostic kits based on the post-mortem immunochemical detection of PrP(Sc) in brain tissue are now available. These rapid screening tests have been used in active surveillance of BSE and have greatly improved the detection of infected cattle before their entry into the human food chain. At present, no diagnostic test exists for the detection of prion diseases in live animals or humans. New diagnostic techniques aimed at increasing sensitivity and specificity of PrP(Sc) detection in body fluids and at identifying novel surrogate markers are under development. In this report, we review the classical diagnostic methods as well as present and future tools for the diagnosis of prion diseases.

  3. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not ...

  4. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Diagnosis If antibody tests and symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by obtaining tiny pieces of tissue from the upper small intestine to check for damage ...

  5. Multiple Renal and Splenic Lesions in Cat Scratch Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Matsunaga, Manaka; Kodama, Yuichi; Miyazono, Akinori; Seki, Shunji; Ikeda, Naohiro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-21

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an infectious disease caused by Bartonella henselae. Atypical clinical presentations of CSD include prolonged fever and multiple hepatosplenic lesions. Furthermore, multiple renal lesions are extremely rare in CSD. An 11-year-old Japanese girl presented at our hospital with a prolonged fever of unknown cause after being scratched and bitten by a kitten. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple small, round hypodense lesions in both kidneys and the spleen. Based on her history and the CT results, her diagnosis was CSD. The diagnosis was confirmed by serological tests, which indicated antibodies against B. henselae. After treatment with azithromycin, her fever immediately improved. Careful history taking and imaging are essential for the diagnosis of atypical CSD. In CT images, not only hepatosplenic lesions but also renal lesions are important features indicative of a diagnosis of atypical CSD. Subsequently, a diagnosis of CSD can be confirmed by specific serological tests. This is the first reported Japanese case of multiple renal and splenic lesions in a patient with CSD. Although difficult to diagnose, an early diagnosis atypical CSD and appropriate treatment are important to prevent complications and the need for invasive examinations.

  6. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  7. [Pregnancy in patients with underlying renal disease].

    PubMed

    Golshayan, D; Mathieu, C; Burnier, M

    2007-03-07

    Pregnancy has generally been regarded as very high risk in women with chronic renal insufficiency. In this review, we describe the physiologic changes in systemic and renal haemodynamics during pregnancy, as well as the nature and severity of possible maternal and foetal complications in the setting of underlying renal disease. The risks are proportional to the degree of functional renal impairment, the presence or not of proteinuria and/or arterial hypertension at the time of conception, and are related to the type of underlying nephropathy or systemic disease in the mother. Furthermore, if the renal disease has been diagnosed before pregnancy, a better planning of the moment of conception, as well as a tight follow-up, allow for a better maternal and obstetrical outcome.

  8. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  9. Analysis of renal diseases detected in renal biopsies of adult patients: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Salman; Drohlia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Salman, Beena; Ahmad, Aasim

    2017-01-01

    Renal biopsy is crucial while evaluating for the diagnosis of glomerular, vascular, tubulointerstitial, and genetic diseases. It gives vital information which helps in estimating the disease prognosis, progression, and management. This is the retrospective analysis of all adult patients aged above 18 years, who underwent percutaneous renal biopsy at The Kidney Center Post Graduate Training Institute, Karachi, over a duration of 18 years, i.e., January 1, 1996, to December 2013. Renal graft biopsies and those which were inadequate were excluded from analysis. Of the1962 biopsies performed, we included 1521 biopsies in our assessment. The mean age of the population was 38 ± 15.26 years (range 18-88 years). There were 920 (60.5%) males and 601 (39.5%) females. The most common clinical indication of kidney biopsy was nephrotic syndrome, i.e., 741 (45.7%), followed by chronic kidney disease, 253 (16.6%); acute renal failure, 184; (12.1%) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN), 124 (8.2%). Primary GN was found in the majority of the patients, 984 (64.7%), followed by secondary GN in 249 (16.4%), tubulointerstitial disease in 224 (14.7%), and vascular disease in 64 (4.2%). In primary GN, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common histopathological diagnosis in 297 (19.5%) patients, followed by MGN in 224 (14.7%), chronic GN in 98 (6.4%), crescentic GN in 93 (6.1%), minimal change disease in 87 (5.7%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in 58 (3.8%), and postinfection glomerulonephritis in 53 (3.5%) patients. This study shows that focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is the most common lesion in renal biopsy in the young age group followed by membranous nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy and chronic interstitial nephritis were dominant secondary pathological lesions in older age group, whereas lupus nephritis was the most common secondary disease in young age females.

  10. [Diagnosis of Hansen's disease].

    PubMed

    Yotsu, Rie Roselyne; Suzuki, Koichi; Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2011-02-01

    The Leprosy Mailing List (LML) is an e-mailing list open to whoever interested in the field from all over the world. It acts as a forum for exchanging information related to Hansen's disease. It was established in February 2001 in Italy, and the present moderator of the LML is Dr. Salvatore Noto. He and his colleague have recently introduced an atlas for diagnosing Hansen's disease which they brought together information and photos collected through the LML. The atlas is divided into three sections, (1) Introduction, (2) Cardinal signs, and (3) Diagnosis and the clinical spectrum of leprosy, and they are all accompanied with relevant photos. This time, Dr. Noto kindly permitted us to translate the atlas into Japanese to be published in the Japanese Journal of Leprosy and posted in the Japanese Leprosy Association homepage. This article includes the translation and some of the most informative photos. For more information, please refer to the homepage where you will find all photos in the atlas.

  11. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  12. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  13. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  14. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  15. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  16. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  17. Renal disease and hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Reis, Ines; Vais, Alina; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Banerjee, Anita

    2013-02-01

    Because women are becoming pregnant at a later age, hypertension is more commonly encountered in pregnancy. In addition, with increasing numbers of young women living with renal transplants and kidney disease, it is important for physicians to be aware of the effects of pregnancy on these diseases. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to assess and care for pregnant women with kidney disease. Pre-pregnancy counselling should be offered to all women with chronic kidney disease. A review of medication to avoid teratogenicity and optimise the disease prior to conception is the ideal. Pregnancy may be the first medical review for a young woman, who may present with a previously undiagnosed renal problem.

  18. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  19. Hypertensive pregnancy disorders and future renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steven; Craici, Iasmina

    2014-10-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect approximately 6 to 8 % of otherwise normal pregnancies. A growing body of evidence links these disorders with the future development of hypertension, coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Larger studies associating hypertensive pregnancy to future development of renal disease have been lacking until recently, with publication of several compelling studies in the last 5 years. In this review, we will focus on the recent evidence associating hypertensive pregnancy disorders with the future development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), as well as the development of microalbuminuria. We will also attempt to answer whether these renal risks are due to direct effects of hypertension during pregnancy, or whether they are due to shared environmental and genetic risk factors.

  20. Lupus nephritis and renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Germain, S; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2006-01-01

    Management of pregnant women with renal disease involves awareness of, and allowance for, physiological changes including decreased serum creatinine and increased proteinuria. For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), pregnancy increases likelihood of flare. These can occur at any stage, and are more difficult to diagnose, as symptoms overlap those of normal pregnancy. Renal involvement is no more common in pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria may be lupus flare but differential includes pre-eclampsia. In women with chronic renal disease, pregnancy may accelerate decline in renal function and worsen hypertension and proteinuria, with increased risk of maternal (eg, pre-eclampsia) and fetal (eg, IUGR, IUD) complications, strongly correlating with degree of renal impairment peri-conception. Pregnancy success rate varies from 20% to 95% depending on base-line creatinine. Best outcome is obtained if disease was quiescent for >6 months pre-conception. Women on dialysis or with renal transplants can achieve successful pregnancy but have higher maternal and fetal complication rates. Acute on chronic renal failure can develop secondary to complications such as HELLP and AFLP. Management needs to be by a multidisciplinary team involving physicians and obstetricians, ideally beginning with pre-pregnancy counselling. Treatment of flares includes corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, azothioprine, NSAIDs and MME Blood pressure is controlled with methyldopa, nifedipine or hydralazine.

  1. Managing progressive renal disease before dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To enhance awareness of issues affecting patients with chronic renal failure and to provide guidance for primary care practitioners managing such patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Randomized trials establish the efficacy of blood pressure control and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in slowing the progression of chronic renal disease. Some randomized trials and many prospective studies address management of anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and multidisciplinary predialysis care. The benefits of lipid lowering are suggested by randomized trials among patients without renal disease. MAIN MESSAGE: Progression of renal failure, particularly in patients with proteinuria, can be slowed by lowering blood pressure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are more beneficial than other antihypertensives in this situation. Partial correction of anemia with iron, erythropoietin, or androgens can improve quality of life and potentially prevent cardiac disease. Renal bone disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism can be prevented in part by early dietary phosphate restriction, use of calcium-containing phosphate binders, and activated vitamin D. Correction of acidosis could improve protein metabolism and bone and cardiovascular health. Treatment of hyperlipidemia might reduce cardiovascular disease. Early involvement of a nephrology-based multidisciplinary team has the potential to reduce morbidity and costs, enhance patients' knowledge of their condition, and prolong the period before dialysis is required. CONCLUSIONS: Care of patients with progressive renal failure is complex and requires attention to detail. Family doctors play a vital role in these efforts and should be involved in all aspects of care. PMID:10216796

  2. The diagnosis of bilateral primary renal paragangliomas in a cat.

    PubMed

    Friedlein, Ryan B; Carter, Alain J; Last, Robert D; Clift, Sarah

    2017-01-24

    A 9-year-old sterilised female domestic short-hair cat was referred with a history of vomiting and anorexia of 3 months' duration. Biochemistry, full-blood counts, thoracic radiographs, feline pancreatic-specific lipase, abdominal ultrasonography and feline immunodeficiency virus/feline leukaemia virus (FIV/FeLV) SNAP tests had been performed. Mild hypochloraemia and moderate hypokalaemia were evident on initial presentation. Abdominal ultrasonography initially revealed unilateral renal nodules on the left side. These were subjected to fine-needle aspiration and cytological evaluation. A neuroendocrine tumour was suspected, and biopsies via midline coeliotomy were taken to confirm the diagnosis. Initial histopathology diagnosed primary renal carcinomas or neuroendocrine neoplasia; however, the definitive diagnosis became renal paragangliomas after immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy were performed. The cat was regularly monitored with serum biochemistry parameters, blood pressure determinations, thoracic radiographs and subsequent abdominal ultrasonography. Biochemistry, radiography and blood pressures remained normal over a 24-week follow-up period, while subsequent ultrasonography revealed tumour progression in both number and size in both kidneys. Primary neuroendocrine tumours of the kidney are frequently incorrectly diagnosed as other renal tumours such as renal cell carcinoma, mesonephric tumours or undifferentiated carcinomas. This case report highlights the importance of additional testing, including immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy, to obtain a definitive diagnosis of paragangliomas.

  3. Preliminary report on digitalization of renal microangiograms used in analysing renal parenchymal diseases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Kaneko, M

    1983-01-01

    Glomerulography is a useful method for the angiographic diagnosis of various renal parenchymal diseases. A new system for digitalization of the glomerulogram has been developed using a high resolution television camera and a CT computer. We describe the fundamental procedures involved in the clinical application of digital glomerulography by applying this method to a renal microangiogram of a cow. This new method aids a clearer understanding of the detailed microvasculatures by providing better magnification and storage and allowing for further processing of the original analogue images. With a computer printout of any part of the glomerulogram also possible, an estimation of the glomerular counts and their distribution can now be given for any unit of cross-sectional area of the renal cortex.

  4. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  5. Pathways to renal biopsy and diagnosis among patients with ANCA small-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Caroline J.; Nachman, Patrick H.; Hu, Yichun; McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Jennette, J. Charles; Falk, Ronald J.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody small-vessel vasculitis (ANCA-SVV) is an autoimmune systemic process increasingly recognised since the advent of antibody testing for the disease. Prompt diagnosis and institution of immunosuppressive therapy has been shown to improve patient outcome. The goal of this study was to better understand how patients navigate the health care system from symptom presentation to biopsy diagnosis, and to study the effects of prompt versus delayed diagnosis. Methods Disease symptoms and number of physicians seen prior to renal biopsy were assessed for 127 ANCA-SVV patients. Direct, delayed, and quest pathways to diagnosis and treatment of vasculitis were defined for both patients and providers. Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests were used to evaluate continual measures and compare categorical variables across pathways. Results Among patients who sought direct care, physician delay in referral to a nephrologist was common (49/127, 71%, p=0.0023). Patients who delayed seeking care also experienced a delayed diagnosis 57% of the time (p=0.0023). Patients presenting with prodromal flu or upper respiratory involvement were more likely to have a delay/quest patient pathway (56% and 55%, respectively) than a direct patient pathway (44%, p=0.033 and 45%, p=0.019, respectively). There was a trend for patients with more severe loss of renal function to have a more direct referral to a nephrologist. Conclusion Delay in diagnosis of ANCA SVV may be due to lack of or non-specific symptoms, especially in patients who present with non-renal manifestations of disease. Better algorithms are needed to identify extra-renal manifestations, expedite diagnosis and improve patient outcomes. PMID:23343774

  6. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  7. 2,8-Dihydroxyadenine Nephropathy Identified as Cause of End-Stage Renal Disease After Renal Transplant.

    PubMed

    George, Smiley Annie; Al-Rushaidan, Sulaiman; Francis, Issam; Soonowala, Darius; Nampoory, M R Narayanan

    2016-07-22

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of uric acid metabolism that leads to formation and excretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine into urine. The low solubility of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine results in precipitation and formation of urinary crystals and renal stones. Patients with this disorder usually have recurrent nephrolithiasis and can develop nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation in the renal parenchyma. The disease is most often underdiagnosed and can recur in renal transplant, causing graft failure. Lack of specific clinical manifestations, chemical and radiologic features identical to those shown with uric acid stones, and lack of awareness among clinicians are among the causes for the underdiagnoses of this treatable disease. Allopurinol, a xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor, is the mainstay of treatment, supported by high fluid intake and dietary modifications. The possibility of adenine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency should be considered in all cases of urolithiasis in children, patients with recurrent urolithiasis, and patients with urolithiasis associated with renal failure of unknown cause, including patients with end-stage renal disease and renal transplant recipients. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female patient who had a late diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine nephropathy-induced end-stage renal disease, made on the native nephrectomy that accompanied the renal transplant, and who had a timely intervention that prevented recurrence in the graft.

  8. [Laboratory diagnosis of renal changes caused by occupational chemical factors].

    PubMed

    Hanke, J; Lutz, W

    1990-06-15

    The problem of early detection of the consequences of toxic action of chemical substances on the kidneys at the working place is becoming one of more important problems in the prophylaxis of renal diseases. The introduction of new sensitive diagnostic methods such as enzyme activity determination or low-molecular-weight proteins measurement in urine has made possible detection of renal damage in the reversible stage. As yet the observations demonstrate that workers exposed in their occupation to heavy metals (cadmium, lead, metalic mercury) and organic solvents should be subjected to special control for detection of renal changes.

  9. Pattern of renal diseases among elderly Egyptians patients with acute or chronic renal diseases in Ain Shams University and Nasser Institute Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Adel M; Mady, Gamal E; Ahmad, Ahmad A; el-Shar-Kawy, Magdy E; Aly, Ahmad R; Khalil, Hazem H M

    2005-12-01

    This study among elderly renal Egyptian patients (n=220) with only 20 of them were subjected to renal biopsy. Results showed: diabetic nephropathy in 28.2%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis 25.5%, UTI, cystitis and pyelonephritis in 6.8%, renal stones in 5.9%, obstructive uropathy in 7.6%, simple cysts in 4.5%, CRF of unknown origin in 13.1%, and others in 26.4%. DM and HTN were S related to kidney function tests and increase in elderly. Other cardiovascular risk factors and smoking are reported by previous workers to be HS related to renal diseases. Age was significantly related to GFR, BUN and Cr. but sex difference was not significantly related to renal diseases. Multiple myeloma, lupus nephritis, vasculitis and hepatitis B were all recorded in few numbers of elderly Egyptians. HCV was more common and more likely to cause renal diseases. Abdomino-pelvic ultrasound was confirmatory to clinical renal diseases diagnosis. Among patients (n=20) biopsies showed focal necrotizing GN in 20%, membranous nephropathy in 50% and renal amyloidosis in 30%. CTIN was associated in some cases due to NSAID intake. Analgesic nephropathy was a common problem that might lead to ARF in some cases especially in the elderly. Ultrasound results among the biopsy group were confirmatory to clinical diagnosis.

  10. Renal masses in children. An integrated imaging approach to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, B.J.; Gainey, M.A.; Faerber, E.N.; Capitanio, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    In view of the continuing technologic advancements in the development and availability of diagnostic imaging modalities, it is appropriate to assess periodically the currently accepted approaches to the evaluation of renal masses in children. The roles, advantages, and disadvantages of plain film, intravenous urography, ultrasonography, radionuclide scintigraphy, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the approach to the evaluation of renal masses in children are discussed. An integrated imaging approach that provides the most accurate and necessary information for diagnosis and treatment is recommended. 70 references.

  11. Epigenetics of Renal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Sylvia A.; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of epigenetics is indispensable to our understanding of gene regulation under normal and pathological states. This knowledge will help with designing better therapeutic approaches in regenerative tissue medicine. Epigenetics allows us to parse out the mechanisms by which transcriptional regulators gain access to specific gene loci thereby imprinting epigenetic information affecting chromatin function. This epigenetic memory forms the basis of cell lineage specification in multicellular organisms. Post-translational modifications to DNA and histones in the nucleosome core form characteristic epigenetic codes which are distinct for self-renewing and primed progenitor cell populations. Studies of chromatin modifiers and modifications in renal development and disease have been gaining momentum. Both congenital and adult renal diseases have a gene-environment component, which involves alterations to the epigenetic information imprinted during development. This epigenetic memory must be characterized to establish optimal treatment of both acute and chronic renal diseases. PMID:28018145

  12. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  13. [Value of the assay of 4 urinary enzyme activities in the diagnosis of the infectious or toxic (aminoglycosides) origin of a renal disease. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Roche, G; Brugerolle, B; Straczek, J; Bertrand, F; Hurault de Ligny, B; Gérard, A; Presles, O; Canton, P; Dureux, J B

    1983-12-01

    Occurrence of a renal failure in an infected patient may be referred to various causes: infection, renal toxicity of drugs (for instance aminoglycosides), shock . . . Determination of some urinary enzymatic activities might be helpful in unravelling the mechanism involved in such cases. Therefore a prospective study of the specificity of some urinary enzymatic activities was performed. The whole LDH activity, the LDH isoenzyme 5 (LDH 5), and two lysosomal enzymes, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and beta-glucuronidase (beta-GLU) were dosed systematically, in several groups of patients: I (n = 34): healthy control, with normal renal function; II (n = 24): renal impairment, without recent upper urinary-tract infection (UTI) or aminoglycoside treatment; III (n = 27): upper UTI without aminoglycoside treatment, IV (n = 22): patients treated with aminoglycosides (without upper UTI); V (n = 16): upper UTI treated with aminoglycosides. Results showed a rather good specificity of whole LDH and LDH 5 for infectious kidney damage, and of NAG for tubular injury due to aminoglycoside treatments. Values of urinary beta-glucuronidase varied over a wide range; they were little increased in group III, without a great discriminative value. No significant difference was noted between group I and group II, for any enzyme whatever.

  14. MicroRNA biomarkers in clinical renal disease: from diabetic nephropathy renal transplantation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Raj, Dominic; Townsend, Raymond; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a common health problem affecting 1 in 12 Americans. It is associated with elevated risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and high costs for the treatment of renal failure with dialysis or transplantation. Advances in CKD care are impeded by the lack of biomarkers for early diagnosis, assessment of the extent of tissue injury, estimation of disease progression, and evaluation of response to therapy. Such biomarkers should improve the performance of existing measures of renal functional impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) or kidney damage (proteinuria). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional repressors are gaining momentum as biomarkers in a number of disease areas. In this review, we examine the potential utility of miRNAs as promising biomarkers for renal disease. We explore the performance of miRNAs as biomarkers in two clinically important forms of CKD, diabetes and the nephropathy developing in kidney transplant recipients. Finally, we highlight the pitfalls and opportunities of miRNAs and provide a broad perspective for the future clinical development of miRNAs as biomarkers in CKD beyond the current gold standards of eGFR and albuminuria.

  15. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  16. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  17. Transplant renal artery stenosis: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Kayler, Liise K; Zand, Martin S; Muttana, Renu; Chernyak, Victoria; DeBoccardo, Graciela O

    2015-02-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a well-recognized vascular complication after kidney transplant. It occurs most frequently in the first 6 months after kidney transplant, and is one of the major causes of graft loss and premature death in transplant recipients. Renal hypoperfusion occurring in TRAS results in activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; patients usually present with worsening or refractory hypertension, fluid retention and often allograft dysfunction. Flash pulmonary edema can develop in patients with critical bilateral renal artery stenosis or renal artery stenosis in a solitary kidney, and this unique clinical entity has been named Pickering Syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of TRAS can prevent allograft damage and systemic sequelae. Duplex sonography is the most commonly used screening tool, whereas angiography provides the definitive diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement can be performed during angiography if a lesion is identified, and it is generally the first-line therapy for TRAS. However, there is no randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty compared with medical therapy alone or surgical intervention.

  18. Addressing cardiovascular disease in patients with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Errol D; Washington, David O

    2002-01-01

    It is well-established that patients with renal disease are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death. Despite better understanding of CVD in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and more rigid guidelines addressing the major risk factors for CVD in this population, CVD continues to be the number one cause of death in patients with ESRD. Moreover, higher rates of CVD are seen in patients with moderate, and even mild, renal dysfunction and in patients with albuminuria (micro and macroscopic). Few studies with CVD endpoints have included patients with renal disease. There is sufficient evidence to support appropriate blood pressure reduction as having a beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease (especially for patients with diabetes). Data supporting the benefit of modification of other CVD risk factors is not as strong, but current recommendations do stress aggressive control of lipids, smoking cessation, and maintenance of adequate nutritional status. Inclusion of patients with renal disease in studies with CVD endpoints is necessary. Until then, it is generally recommended that CVD risk stratification and modification strategies be applied to this high-risk population.

  19. Children and End-State Renal Disease (ERSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I'm outside the U.S. Children & End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) How to tell if your child ... Social Security card CMS Form 2728 ("End-Stage Renal Disease Medical Evidence Report Medicare Entitlement and/or ...

  20. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  1. Mayo Clinic/Renal Pathology Society Consensus Report on Pathologic Classification, Diagnosis, and Reporting of GN.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Haas, Mark; Markowitz, Glen S; D'Agati, Vivette D; Rennke, Helmut G; Jennette, J Charles; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Alpers, Charles E; Chang, Anthony; Cornell, Lynn D; Cosio, Fernando G; Fogo, Agnes B; Glassock, Richard J; Hariharan, Sundaram; Kambham, Neeraja; Lager, Donna J; Leung, Nelson; Mengel, Michael; Nath, Karl A; Roberts, Ian S; Rovin, Brad H; Seshan, Surya V; Smith, Richard J H; Walker, Patrick D; Winearls, Christopher G; Appel, Gerald B; Alexander, Mariam P; Cattran, Daniel C; Casado, Carmen Avila; Cook, H Terence; De Vriese, An S; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Racusen, Lorraine C; Ronco, Pierre; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2016-05-01

    Renal pathologists and nephrologists met on February 20, 2015 to establish an etiology/pathogenesis-based system for classification and diagnosis of GN, with a major aim of standardizing the kidney biopsy report of GN. On the basis of etiology/pathogenesis, GN is classified into the following five pathogenic types, each with specific disease entities: immune-complex GN, pauci-immune GN, antiglomerular basement membrane GN, monoclonal Ig GN, and C3 glomerulopathy. The pathogenesis-based classification forms the basis of the kidney biopsy report. To standardize the report, the diagnosis consists of a primary diagnosis and a secondary diagnosis. The primary diagnosis should include the disease entity/pathogenic type (if disease entity is not known) followed in order by pattern of injury (mixed patterns may be present); score/grade/class for disease entities, such as IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and ANCA GN; and additional features as detailed herein. A pattern diagnosis as the sole primary diagnosis is not recommended. Secondary diagnoses should be reported separately and include coexisting lesions that do not form the primary diagnosis. Guidelines for the report format, light microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, and ancillary studies are also provided. In summary, this consensus report emphasizes a pathogenesis-based classification of GN and provides guidelines for the standardized reporting of GN.

  2. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant.

  3. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  4. Disease, diagnosis or syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2011-04-01

    The advance of medical semantics is, in general, towards causation. As knowledge increases, the common consequence is the re-definition of disease. This starts with symptoms then a disorder of structure or function, abnormalities of images, genetics or biochemistry, the ultimate aim being a specific aetiological mechanism which replaces broader descriptions. But medical terminology of diseases, diagnoses and syndromes is inherently imprecise. Careless nomenclature causes confused dialogue and communication. Symptoms of uncertain cause are commonly lumped together and given a new 'diagnostic' label which also may confuse and produce false concepts that stultify further thought and research. Such medicalisation of non-specific aggregations of symptoms should be avoided. The defining characteristics of diseases and diagnoses should be validated and agreed. The pragmatic diagnoses of 'symptom of unknown cause' or 'non-disease' are preferable to falsely labelling patients with obscure or non-existent diseases. "I tried to unveil the stillness of existence through a counteracting murmur of words, and, above all, I confused things with their names: that is belief." Jean-Paul Sartre (The Words, 1964).

  5. [BK virus nephropathy after renal transplantation. Diagnosis and prognosis by real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Echavarría, Marcela; Basilotta, Natalia; Aguiar, Ana; Davalos, Mario; Ricarte, Carmen; Iotti, Alejandro; Carballal, Guadalupe

    2007-01-01

    BK virus nephropathy may lead to kidney transplant failure. BK infection and acute rejection are clinically undistinguishable, therefore diagnosis of these entities is critical to establish the correct treatment. The new molecular methods using PCR and real time PCR have significantly contributed to the rapid and sensitive diagnosis of BK virus. Furthermore, viral load determination in-plasma has significantly been associated with BK virus nephropathy. Definite diagnosis of nephropathy requires renal biopsy, although due to the multifocal nature of the disease sensitivity may be less than 100%. BK detection in blood and urine by PCR has contributed to the diagnosis of nephropathy in a more standardized and less invasive way. Recently, quantification of BK virus in plasma has been used for the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. In the present study, we describe the validation of a real time PCR method for BK virus detection in plasma and urine and its application for diagnosis and monitoring in a renal transplant patient with nephropathy.

  6. Antioxidants in the prevention of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wardle, E N

    1999-11-01

    In view of the role of oxidative processes in inflicting damage that leads to glomerulosclerosis and renal medullary interstitial fibrosis, more attention could be paid to the use of antioxidant food constituents and the usage of drugs with recognized antioxidant potential. In any case atherosclerosis is an important component of chronic renal diseases. There is a wide choice of foods and drugs that could confer benefit. Supplementation with vitamins E and C, use of soy protein diets and drinking green tea could be sufficient to confer remarkable improvements.

  7. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following...

  8. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following...

  9. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  10. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  11. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  12. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  13. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following...

  14. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  15. Hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, J D; Filip, D J; Watts, J C

    1975-05-01

    The syndrome of hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease was manifest in at least eight members in three generations of a family. They had a lifelong history of bleeding, usually as epistaxis, bilateral sensorineural deafness starting in late childhood or the teenage years, and persistent proteinuria with varying degrees of renal dysfunction. Two members died at a young age, one from central nervous system hemorrhage, the other from chronic renal failure. Splenectomy and steroid therapy have been of transient benefit. There was dominant inheritance of the syndrome. Hematologic studies showed thrombocytopenia, large platelets, and megakaryocytic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. In contrast to a previous report, our studies showed that affected members had normal in-vitro platelet function and normal ultrastructural platelet morphology. At autopsy, histologic changes in the kidney of one affected family member were indistinguishable from those reported in classic hereditary nephritis with nerve deafness (Alport's syndrome).

  16. [Treatment of bone disease in chronic kidney disease and in renal transplant recipients under K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Tadahiko; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi; Akiba, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    The National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) provides evidence based clinical practice guidelines developed for all phases of kidney disease and related complications, from diagnosis to monitoring and management. Bone disease sets in during the early stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Bone disease is observed in almost patients with chronic renal failure and after renal transplantation. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease in patients with chronic renal failure is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turn over bone disease, and osteomalasia. Ninety to one hundred percent of kidney transplant patients have histological evidence of osteodystrophy and osteopenia (reduction of bone mass) following renal transplantation. Furthermore, osteoporosis is also appeared in many renal transplant recipients. After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but bone mineral density (BMD) often worsens. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and carefully effective therapies might be reduced the morbidity associated with these common problems.

  17. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  18. Crossed fused renal ectopia: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Gupta, Arun K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Crossed fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital malformation, which is reported to be usually asymptomatic but may have varied presentations. This survey was conducted to study the clinical profile and the challenges posed in the management of this entity. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 6 patients diagnosed to have crossed fused renal ectopia during 1997-2010. The diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in one patient. In one patient it was detected on antenatal ultrasonography and in the other 4 patients it was detected during investigations for abdominal pain, abdominal mass, anorectal malformation and urinary tract infection. Results: The left moiety was crossed and fused with the right moiety in 4 cases. Ultrasonography was found to be a good screening investigation with useful diagnostic contributions from CT scans, radionuclide scintigraphy and magnetic resonance urography. Micturating cystourethrography revealed presence of VUR in 4 cases, 3 of whom have undergone ureteric reimplantation. Two patients required pyeloplasty for pelviureteric junction obstruction; in one of these patients the upper ureter was entrapped in the isthmus. In one patient, a non-functioning moiety resulted in nephrectomy. All children were asymptomatic at last follow-up with stable renal functions. Conclusions: Crossed fused renal ectopia was detected in most patients during investigation for other problems. It was found more commonly in boys. The left moiety was crossed to the right in the majority of cases. Associated urological problems were found in most cases and required the appropriate surgical management. PMID:23599575

  19. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part II: specific underlying renal conditions.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The obstetric outcome in women with kidney disease has improved in recent years due to continuous progress in obstetrics and neonatology, as well as better medical management of hypertension and renal disease. However, every pregnancy in these women remains a high-risk pregnancy. When considering the interaction between renal disease and pregnancy, maternal outcomes are related to the initial level of renal dysfunction more than to the specific underlying disease. With regards to fetal outcomes, though, a distinction may exist between renal dysfunction resulting from primary renal disease and that in which renal involvement is part of a systemic disease. In part II of this review, some specific causes of renal failure affecting pregnancy are considered.

  20. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  1. Celiac disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pelkowski, Timothy D; Viera, Anthony J

    2014-01-15

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. It is triggered by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Gluten is a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley, which are staples in many American diets. Celiac disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, which leads to atrophy of the small intestinal villi and subsequent malabsorption. The condition may develop at any age. Intestinal manifestations include diarrhea and weight loss. Common extraintestinal manifestations include iron deficiency anemia, decreased bone mineral density, and neuropathy. Most cases of celiac disease are diagnosed in persons with extraintestinal manifestations. The presence of dermatitis herpetiformis is pathognomonic for celiac disease. Diagnosis is supported by a positive tissue transglutaminase serologic test but, in general, should be confirmed by a small bowel biopsy showing the characteristic histology associated with celiac disease. The presence of human leukocyte antigen alleles DQ2, DQ8, or both is essential for the development of celiac disease, and can be a useful genetic test in select instances. Treatment of celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Dietary education should focus on identifying hidden sources of gluten, planning balanced meals, reading labels, food shopping, dining out, and dining during travel. About 5% of patients with celiac disease are refractory to a gluten-free diet. These patients should be referred to a gastroenterologist for reconsideration of the diagnosis or for aggressive treatment of refractory celiac disease, which may involve corticosteroids and immunomodulators.

  2. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  3. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  4. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed.

  5. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  7. [Laser microdissection and mass spectrometry based proteomics in the diagnosis of kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Li, Mingxi; Wen, Yubing; Li, Xuemei; Sun, Jian; Sun, Wei

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, laser microdissection followed by mass spectrometry (LMD/MS) has been successfully applied to the proteomic studies of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) renal tissues. This new technique improves the diagnosis of kidney diseases and has a better potential for future clinical application. The review focuses on the use of this methodology for exploring the mechanisms, diagnosis and classification of kidney diseases including renal amyloidosis and membrane proliferative glomerulonephritis.

  8. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  9. Renal tubular acidosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis of the gradient or classic type, thought to be due to a disorder of the distal tubule, has been found to occur in 32% of 117 patients with chronic liver disease. Whilst the cause of this disorder is probably multifactorial, immunological mechanisms are considered to play a major role. The presence of this disorder might well be a cause, rather than the result of, the various electrolyte abnormalities seen in patients with chronic liver disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 6 PMID:1234340

  10. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  11. Diagnosis of acute renal failure in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Choker, G; Gouyon, J B

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to improve the definition of acute renal failure (ARF) in very preterm infants. Twenty-eight newborn infants with gestational age < or =32 weeks were prospectively studied in the first 5 days of life and made up a control group as they did not present risk factors for vasomotor renal insufficiency. Renal insufficiency was defined as an increase in daily serum creatinine concentration above the 99th interval limit obtained in this control group, i.e., 43 micromol/l on day 1 and/or 21 micromol/l on day 2 and/or 14 micromol/l/day on day 3 and/or 22 micromol/l/day on day 4. According to this definition, 20 very preterm infants with ARF were identified. As compared with the control group, the ARF group showed more prolonged oliguric episodes, lower diuresis, insufficient weight loss (in spite of a reduction in water intake) and also more episodes with natremia <130 mEq/l (35 vs. 0%; p <0.05) and/or kalemia >6 mEq/l (40 vs. 11%; p <0.05). Therefore, assessment of daily changes in serum creatinine concentration in very preterm infants allows the diagnosis of clinically significant reduction in glomerular filtration rate.

  12. [The bilateral renal lymphoma: an incurable disease? Case report].

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marcello; Montinaro, A M; D'Ambrosio, E; Di Renzo, N; Ambrosino, C; Lefons, M; Pati, C; Sozzo, E

    2014-01-01

    The bilateral primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare disease with a high mortality rate (75% within the first year). We report the case of a fifty-three years old women observed in January 2011 for renal colic. Ultrasonography showed hypoechoic lobular formations in the kidney. Blood tests showed: creatinine 1.8 mg/dl, urea 75 mg/dl , Creatinine Clerance 35 ml/m, hemoglobinemia 11 g/dl, with blood cells 8.500/mcL, Albumin 2.8 g/dl, Beta -2 micro - 27.3/mL. Proteinuria was 0.3 g/24 hours. The CT scan showed kidneys with larger dimensions and multiple hypodense areas infiltrating the renal parenchyma with contrast-enhanced low in which kidneys had lesions similar to "leopard skin". The CT scan showed no enlarged lymph nodes. Renal biopsy showed: renal parenchyma largely occupied by infiltration of lymphoid elements, small and medium-sized, densely packed with compression of the tubular structures . Immunofluorescence for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, C1q, fibrinogen, kappa and lambda were negative. The bone marrow biopsy excluded lymphomatous infiltration. The histological diagnosis was "non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma"; the clinical diagnosis was LRBP. The patient was treated by 6 cycles of R-CHOP-21 protocol (rituximab - endoxan, adriblastina , vincristine, prendnisone), the latter of which practiced in August 2011. The pt is currently in follow-up hematology and nephrology . The first TAC control , in October 2011, showed a complete regression of the lesions infiltrating . This finding was confirmed by two other CT scan performed in February and October 2012. The last blood tests of February 2013 showed : creatinine 1.1 mg / dl , Urea 40 mg/dl, proteinuria absent. Currently, the pt is asymptomatic and is being treated by low dose of ACE inhibitor. The bilateral PRL is considered a severe disease with one-year mortality of 75% . The successful outcome of the case described can be attributed to haematological therapy and to the early diagnosis.

  13. Pregnancy in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle; Hercz, Adam Engel; Keunen, Johannes; Chan, Christopher; Pierratos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The ovulatory menstrual cycle is known to be affected on multiple levels in women with advanced renal disease. Menstrual irregularities, sexual dysfunction, and infertility worsen in parallel with the renal disease. Pregnancy in women with ESRD on dialysis is therefore uncommon. Furthermore, when pregnancy does occur, it can prove hazardous to both mother and baby owing to a multitude of potential complications including accelerated hypertension and preeclampsia, poor fetal growth, anemia, and polyhydramnios. Data are emerging, however, to suggest that pregnancy while on intensified renal replacement regimens may result in better pregnancy outcomes, and emerging trends include the decreased rate of therapeutic abortions probably reflecting a change in counseling practices over time. Nevertheless, a pregnant woman on intensive dialysis requires meticulous follow-up by a dedicated team including nephrology, obstetrics, and a full multidisciplinary staff. In this article, we will address fertility issues in young women with ESRD, review pregnancy outcomes in women on both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and provide suggestions for the management of the pregnant women on intensive hemodialysis.

  14. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  15. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-03-22

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD.

  16. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  17. Expression of histone methyltransferases as novel biomarkers for renal cell tumor diagnosis and prognostication

    PubMed Central

    Pires-Luís, Ana Sílvia; Vieira-Coimbra, Márcia; Vieira, Filipa Quintela; Costa-Pinheiro, Pedro; Silva-Santos, Rui; Dias, Paula C; Antunes, Luís; Lobo, Francisco; Oliveira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Céline S; Costa, Bruno M; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell tumors (RCTs) are the most lethal of the common urological cancers. The widespread use of imaging entailed an increased detection of small renal masses, emphasizing the need for accurate distinction between benign and malignant RCTs, which is critical for adequate therapeutic management. Histone methylation has been implicated in renal tumorigenesis, but its potential clinical value as RCT biomarker remains mostly unexplored. Hence, the main goal of this study was to identify differentially expressed histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs) that might prove useful for RCT diagnosis and prognostication, emphasizing the discrimination between oncocytoma (a benign tumor) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), especially the chromophobe subtype (chRCC). We found that the expression levels of 3 genes—SMYD2, SETD3, and NO66—was significantly altered in a set of RCTs, which was further validated in a large independent cohort. Higher expression levels were found in RCTs compared to normal renal tissues (RNTs) and in chRCCs comparatively to oncocytomas. SMYD2 and SETD3 mRNA levels correlated with protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry. SMYD2 transcript levels discriminated RCTs from RNT, with 82.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity [area under curve (AUC) = 0.959], and distinguished chRCCs from oncocytomas, with 71.0% sensitivity and 73.3% specificity (AUC = 0.784). Low expression levels of SMYD2, SETD3, and NO66 were significantly associated with shorter disease-specific and disease-free survival, especially in patients with non-organ confined tumors. We conclude that expression of selected HMTs and HDMs might constitute novel biomarkers to assist in RCT diagnosis and assessment of tumor aggressiveness. PMID:26488939

  18. Ammonium chloride poisoning in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Donald L.; Knight, Allan

    1974-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a long history of renal stone disease and urinary tract infection presented to the emergency room with exhaustion and air hunger. Laboratory data confirmed profound metabolic acidosis. Unduly large quantities of bicarbonate and potassium were required for correction of the deficits. She had been taking 6 g daily of ammonium chloride as a urine-acidifying agent for a period of six months in addition to agents directed against urinary tract infection. The combination of impaired renal function and effective hydrogen ion loading resulted in profound systemic acidosis. The metabolic derangements associated with the administration of ammonium chloride and its use as a therapeutic agent are discussed. PMID:4850503

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  20. Value of electron microscopy in the diagnosis of glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym Louzir; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Moussa, Fatma Ben; Zekri, Semy; Maiz, Hédi Ben

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the contribution of electron microscopy to the final diagnosis of glomerulopathies, the authors established a prospective study during the first semester of 2006. A total of 52 kidney biopsies were performed with 3 samples for light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. Among these renal biopsies, only 20 were examined with electron microscopy because the diagnosis made on the basis of conventional methods had remained unclear or doubtful. In 18 cases, electron microscopy was undertaken for the investigation of primary kidney disease. The 2 remaining cases were transplant biopsies. In this series of 20 patients, there were 3 children with an average age of 9 years and 17 adults with an average age of 35.5 years. Fifteen patients (75%) were nephrotic. The study revealed that electron microscopy was essential for diagnosis in 8 cases (40%) and was helpful in 12 cases (60%). In conclusion, the results showed that the ultrastructural study provides essential or helpful information in many cases of glomerular diseases, and therefore electron microscopy should be considered an important tool of diagnostic renal pathology. As was recommended, it is important to reserve renal tissue for ultrastructural study unless electron microscopy can be routinely used in all biopsies. Thus, this technique could be performed wherever a renal biopsy has to be ultrastructurally evaluated.

  1. In vivo bone aluminum measurements in patients with renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Contamination of the dialysis solution with trace amounts of aluminum and long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders have led to increased body burden of aluminum in patients with end-stage renal disease. A significant clinical problem associated with aluminum-overload is the early diagnosis of aluminum-induced dialysis dementia and osteomalacic osteodystrophy. There are few, if any, blood or urine indices that provide an early monitor of this bone disease, especially in the asymptomatic patient. Although a bone biopsy is usually the basis for the final clinical diagnosis, this procedure is not recommended for routine monitoring of patients. The present technique demonstrates the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum levels in patients with renal failure. The interference normally present from activation of bone phosphorus is eliminated by using a thermal/epithermal neutron beam. For the clinical management of the patients, the Al/Ca ratio for the hand may be more useful than an absolute measurement of the total body or skeletal aluminum burden. The relationship between the increased serum Al levels following disferrioxamine infusion and the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum using the Al/Ca ratio are currently under investigation. The neutron activation procedure presented in this pilot study is a promising new technique with an immediate clinical application. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction.The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant.This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients.

  3. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and follow-up of a case of branchio-oto-renal syndrome displays renal growth impairment after the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Emma; Mazza, Vincenzo; Lugli, Licia; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Percesepe, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Branchio-oto-renal syndrome combines branchial arch defects, hearing impairment and renal malformations or hypoplasia. Due to the high phenotypic variability, prenatal diagnosis has a limited prognostic value in mutation-positive cases. We report the first branchio-oto-renal syndrome molecular prenatal diagnosis and ultrasonographic follow-up, showing a normal renal growth until the 24th week of pregnancy, a growth deceleration during the third trimester and a renal volume recovery during the first months of life.

  5. [ADPKD: predictors of Renal Disease progression].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Dallera, Nadia; Saletti, Arianna; Terlizzi, Vincenzo; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Factors predicting rapid progression of kidney disease in ADPKD can be divided into genetic (non-modifiable) and clinical (modifiable) risk factors. Patients harbouring PKD1 mutations, in particular if truncating, have a more severe form of ADPKD. Clinical risk factors include decrease in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow at a young age; high total kidney volume; hypertension and urological complications <35 years; albuminuria/proteinuria. The renal disease is also more severe in males and in subjects with family history of ESRD <55 years. In recent years, two models for predicting progression in ADPKD have been published: the Mayo model, based on height-adjusted TKV, age and eGFR, and the Brest model, based on PKD gene mutation type, gender, and early onset of hypertension and urological complications. With the emergence of new disease-modifying therapies, prediction tools are essential. However, the high variability in ADPKD makes the predicting models difficult to apply on an individual patient basis. Thus, the above-mentioned predicting models should be viewed as complimentary to clinical evaluation and follow-up. In the future, an individual risk score linking genetic, imaging and clinical data might prove the most accurate way of predicting long-term outcome.

  6. Renal diseases as targets of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett; Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    A number of renal pathologies exist that have seen little or no improvement in treatment methods over the past 20 years. These pathologies include acute and chronic kidney diseases as well as posttransplant kidney survival and host rejection. A novel approach to treatment methodology may provide new insight to further progress our understanding of the disease and overall patient outcome. Recent advances in human genomics and gene delivery systems have opened the door to possible cures through the direct modulation of cellular genes. These techniques of gene therapy have not been extensively applied to renal pathologies, but clinical trials on other organ systems and kidney research in animal models hold promise. Techniques have employed viral and nonviral vectors to deliver gene modulating compounds directly into the cell. These vectors have the capability to replace defective alleles, express novel genes, or suppress the expression of pathogenic genes in a wide variety of kidney cell types. Focus has also been placed on ex vivo modification of kidney tissue to promote allograft survival and limit the resulting immune response to the transplanted organ. This could prove a valuable alternative to current immunosuppressive drugs and their deleterious effects on patients. While continued research and clinical trials are needed to identify a robust system of gene delivery, gene therapy techniques have great potential to treat kidney disease at the cellular level and improve patient quality of life.

  7. Analysis of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Noninvasive Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis of Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Flavio Antonio de Oliveira; Pinto, Ibraim M. F.; Amodeo, Celso; Smanio, Paola E. P.; Kambara, Antonio M.; Petisco, Ana Claudia G.; Moreira, Samuel M.; Paiva, Ricardo Calil; Lopes, Hugo Belotti; Sousa, Amanda G. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and atherosclerosis are related to renovascular hypertension in elderly individuals. Regardless of comorbidities, renal artery stenosis is itself an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective To define the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of noninvasive imaging tests used in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Methods In a group of 61 patients recruited, 122 arteries were analized, thus permitting the definition of sensitivity, specificity, and the relative contribution of each imaging study performed (Doppler, scintigraphy and computed tomographic angiography in comparison to renal arteriography). Results The mean age was 65.43 years (standard deviation: 8.7). Of the variables related to the study population that were compared to arteriography, two correlated with renal artery stenosis, renal dysfunction and triglycerides. The median glomerular filtration rate was 52.8 mL/min/m2. Doppler showed sensitivity of 82.90%, specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 66.70%. For tomography, sensitivity was 66.70%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 87.50% and negative predictive value 55.20%. With these findings, we could identify the imaging tests that best detected stenosis. Conclusion Tomography and Doppler showed good quality and efficacy in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, with Doppler having the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast medium for the assessment of a disease that is common in diabetics and is associated with renal dysfunction and severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24061685

  8. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  9. Calciphylaxis in pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imam, Abubakr A; Mattoo, Tej K; Kapur, Gaurav; Bloom, David A; Valentini, Rudolph P

    2005-12-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare, but life-threatening complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that has been reported mostly in adult patients. The exact etiology is unknown, but the disease is commonly associated with a high calcium-phosphorus product and elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). We herein review the published reports on calciphylaxis in ESRD patients less than 18 years old and report the case of a patient with severe calciphylaxis who presented with lower extremity pain, muscle tenderness and difficulty in walking. The serum PTH was low, and the calcium-phosphorus product was normal. The diagnosis of calciphylaxis was confirmed by a muscle biopsy. Treatment with low calcium peritoneal dialysate and substitution of calcium-based phosphorus binders with sevelamer (Renagel) was unsuccessful. The patient's clinical condition progressed to extensive soft tissue calcification and ulcerating skin lesions. Nine months after the onset of symptoms, the patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest.

  10. Adiponectin and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Anastasia; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Spyridaki, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipokine with significant anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties, which is generally associated with a beneficial cardiometabolic profile. Paradoxically, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by markedly increased plasma ADPN levels and increased cardiovascular risk. In spite of the cardioprotective properties attributed to adiponectin, cardiovascular complications remain the main cause of mortality in the ESRD population. Furthermore, these patients have enhanced chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and persistent protein-energy wasting. Studies of the impact of ADPN on clinical outcomes among ESRD patients have so far yielded contradictory results. This review article summarizes the current knowledge on ADPN functions and explores the role of ADPN in ESRD patients, with specific focus on inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and wasting.

  11. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature.

  12. Applications of urinary proteomics in renal disease research using animal models.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of renal disease are essential tools in research on kidney disease and have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis. Use of animal models minimises inter-individual differences, allows specific pathological changes to be examined, and facilitates collection of tissue samples. Thus, mechanistic research and identification of biomarkers are possible. Various animal models manifesting specific pathological lesions can be used to investigate acute or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urine, a terminal metabolic product, is produced via glomerular filtration, reabsorption, and excretion in the tubular and collecting ducts, reflecting the functions of glomeruli or tubular tissue stimulated in various ways or subject to disease. Almost 70 % of urinary proteins originate from the kidney (the other 30 % come from plasma), and urinary sampling is important to noninvasively detect renal disease. Proteomics is powerful when used to screen urine components. Increasingly, urine proteomics is used to explore the pathogenesis of kidney disease in animals and to identify novel biomarkers of renal disease. In this section, we will introduce the field of urinary proteomics as applied in different models of animal renal disease and the valuable role played by proteomics in noninvasive diagnosis and rational treatment of human renal disease.

  13. Computer Aided Diagnosis of Acute Gynaecologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fengling

    1982-01-01

    In this article, the application of electronic computers for diagnosis of ten common gynaecologic diseases is discussed. Verification by 1038 cases shows that the discussed method of diagnosis has an accuracy of 95.57%.

  14. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  15. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-04-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation ( r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease ( r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients.

  16. Penile Calciphylaxis in End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Luca; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, better described as “Calcific uremic arteriolopathy” (CUA), involves about 1–4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety. PMID:23841013

  17. Penile calciphylaxis in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Vincenzo; Di Lullo, Luca; Gorini, Antonio; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, better described as "Calcific uremic arteriolopathy" (CUA), involves about 1-4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety.

  18. Pericardial disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Masud H; Espinosa, Raul E; Nishimura, Rick A; Sinak, Lawrence J; Hayes, Sharonne N; Melduni, Rowlens M; Oh, Jae K

    2010-06-01

    Pericardial diseases can present clinically as acute pericarditis, pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, and constrictive pericarditis. Patients can subsequently develop chronic or recurrent pericarditis. Structural abnormalities including congenitally absent pericardium and pericardial cysts are usually asymptomatic and are uncommon. Clinicians are often faced with several diagnostic and management questions relating to the various pericardial syndromes: What are the diagnostic criteria for the vast array of pericardial diseases? Which diagnostic tools should be used? Who requires hospitalization and who can be treated as an outpatient? Which medical management strategies have the best evidence base? When should corticosteroids be used? When should surgical pericardiectomy be considered? To identify relevant literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE using the keywords diagnosis, treatment, management, acute pericarditis, relapsing or recurrent pericarditis, pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. Studies were selected on the basis of clinical relevance and the impact on clinical practice. This review represents the currently available evidence and the experiences from the pericardial clinic at our institution to help guide the clinician in answering difficult diagnostic and management questions on pericardial diseases.

  19. [Contribution of genetics to knowledge and management of hereditary kidney diseases progressing to renal failure].

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Gubler, M C; Feingold, J

    2001-10-01

    Genes of most of the hereditary renal diseases progressing to renal insufficiency are now identified. In the first part of this paper we describe their multi-faceted genetics. Genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated in many of these diseases, such as Alport's syndrome and nephronophtisis. In some of them an allelic heterogeneity is present as in the X-linked form of Alport's syndrome (more than 300 different mutations have been described along the COL4A5 gene). Besides these classical mendelian diseases, mendelian subentities have been isolated within common diseases such as cortico-resistant nephrosis. Many diseases also demonstrate a variability of their phenotype resulting from allelic and/or genetic heterogeneity, or from modifier genes. In the second part of the paper we discuss the consequences of this explosion of knowledge with respect to epidemiology, genetic diagnosis, prenatal diagnosis and treatment.

  20. [The spectrum of cystic kidney disease in adulthood: differential diagnosis and complications].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Costero, O

    2003-01-01

    Simple renal cysts are the most common renal masses, accounting for roughly 65 to 70% of cases. They most often occur in patients over the age of 50 as determined from post-mortem examination or renal ultrasonography. The major concern with simple renal cysts is differentiating them from more serious disorders, such as polycystic kidney disease and solid masses such as a renal carcinoma or abscess. Renal arteriovenous malformations may present with ultrasound picture mimicking simple parapelvic cyst. Ultrasound, doppler ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively. Arteriography may be useful to characterise vascular lesion. We report here the spectrum of cystic kidney disease in adulthood in a group of patient with different disorders. The differential diagnosis, complications and associated process are discussed.

  1. Review of genitourinary tuberculosis with focus on end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Neiberg A; Vasconcelos, Carol C; Filgueira, Pedro Henrique O; Kretzmann, Meissa; Sindeaux, Ticiano A S; Feitosa Neto, Beni; Silva Junior, Geraldo B; Daher, Elizabeth F

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious disease. Recent studies indicate that genitourinary TB is the third most common form of extra-pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of renal TB can be hypothesized in a non-specific bacterial cystitis associated with a therapeutic failure or a urinalysis with a persistent leukocyturia in the absence of bacteriuria. We report on the case of a 33-year-old man who presented on admission end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to renal TB and a past history of pulmonary TB with important radiologic findings. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings despite all cultures being negative. Empiric treatment with tuberculostatic drugs was started and the patient became stable. He was discharged with no symptom, but without renal function recovery. He is on maintenance hemodialysis three times a week. TB is an important cause of kidney disease and can lead to irreversible renal function loss.

  2. Treatment of osteoporosis in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul D

    2005-03-01

    As glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines from age-related bone loss or disease that specifically induces a decline in GFR, there are a number of metabolic bone conditions that may accompany the decline in GFR. These metabolic bone conditions span a spectrum from mild-to-severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to the development of additional heterogeneous forms of bone diseases each with its distinctly quantitative bone histomorphometric characteristics. Osteoporosis can also develop in patients with CKD and ESRD for many reasons beyond age-related bone loss and postmenopausal bone loss. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with severe CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not as easy to do as it is in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)--neither fragility fractures nor The World Health Organization bone mineral density criteria can be used to diagnose osteoporosis in this population since all forms of renal bone disease may fracture or have low "T scores". The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with CKD/ESRD must be done by first the exclusion of the other forms of renal osteodystrophy, by biochemical profiling or by double tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy; and the finding of low trabecular bone volume. In such patients, preliminary data would suggest that oral bisphosphonates seem to be safe and effective down to GFR levels of 15 mL/min. In patients with stage 5 CKD who are fracturing because of osteoporosis or who are on chronic glucocorticoids, reducing the oral bisphosphonate dosage to half of its usual prescribed dosing for PMO seems reasonable from known bisphosphonate pharmacokinetics, though we do need better scientific data to fully understand bisphosphonate usage in this population.

  3. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient.

  4. Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Donita L.

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin and to define the mechanisms which predispose to nephrotoxicity in subclinical renal disease. Subtotally nephrectomized beagle dogs were used as a model for human beings with compromised renal function secondary to a reduced number of functional nephrons. Using ultrastructural morphometry, light microscopy and clinical chemistry data, the model was defined and the nephrotoxic responses of intact dogs administered recommended doses of drug were compared to the response of subtotally nephrectomized dogs administered reduced doses based on each animal's clearance of drug. Lysosomal and mitochondrial morphometric changes suggested mechanisms for increased sensitivity. To determine if increased sensitivity in this model was dependent on altered serum concentrations, variable rate infusions based on individual pharmacokinetic disposition of drug were administered using computer-driven infusion pumps. Identical serum concentration-time profiles were achieved in normal dogs and subtotally nephrectomized dogs, however, toxicity was significantly greater in nephrectomized dogs. The difference in the nephrotoxic response was characterized by administering supratherapeutic doses of drug to dogs. Nephrectomized dogs given a recommended dose of gentamicin became oliguric during the second week of treatment and increasingly uremic after withdrawal of drug. In contrast, intact dogs administered 2 times the recommended dose of gentamicin become only slightly polyuric during week 4 of treatment. The need to individualize dosage regimens based on drug clearance and not serum creatinine nor creatinine clearance alone was substantiated by describing the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin in spontaneously occurring disease states. Four individualized dosage regimens with differing predicted efficacy were then administered to nephrectomized dogs to determine their relative nephrotoxic

  5. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  6. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  7. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis presenting with preserved renal function in patients with underlying multisystem autoimmune disease: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Anisha; Randone, Olga; Tam, Frederick W. K.; Tarzi, Ruth M.; Levy, Jeremy B.; Griffith, Megan; Lightstone, Liz; Cook, H. Terence; Cairns, Tom; Pusey, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Necrotizing and crescentic GN usually presents with rapidly declining renal function, often in association with multisystem autoimmune disease, with a poor outcome if left untreated. We aimed to describe the features of patients who have presented with these histopathological findings but minimal disturbance of renal function. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review (1995–2011) of all adult patients with native renal biopsy–proven necrotizing or crescentic GN and normal serum creatinine (<120 μmol/l) at our centre. Results. Thirty-eight patients were identified. The median creatinine at presentation was 84 μmol/l and the median proportion of glomeruli affected by necrosis or crescents was 32%. Clinicopathological diagnoses were ANCA-associated GN (74%), LN (18%), anti-GBM disease (5%) and HScP (3%). Only 18% of cases had pre-existing diagnoses of underlying multisystem autoimmune disease, although the majority (89%) had extra-renal manifestations accompanying the renal diagnosis. All patients received immunosuppression and most had good long-term renal outcomes (median duration of follow-up 50 months), although two progressed to end-stage renal disease within 3 years. We estimate that renal biopsy had an important influence on treatment decisions in 82% of cases. Conclusion. Necrotizing and crescentic GN may present in patients with no or only minor disturbance of renal function. This often occurs in patients with underlying systemic autoimmune disease; early referral for biopsy may affect management and improve long-term outcomes in these cases. PMID:25431483

  8. [Light chain deposition disease as a cause of renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wohl, P; Chadimová, M; Englis, M; Táborský, P; Rossmann, P; Matl, I

    1998-11-30

    The objective of the paper is to draw attention to a rare cause of rapidly progressing renal failure which developed in the course of four months as a result of light chain deposition disease. The authors submit two case-histories of the disease assessed by renal biopsy after previous clinical and laboratory suspicion of monoclonal gammapathy. In one patient in the sternal punctate plasmacytoma was diagnosed and in the second case it was not possible to detect any type of monoclonal gammapathy or another possible cause of disease. Renal failure was in both cases irreversible and both patients were enlisted in regular haemodialyzation treatment.

  9. [Pathophysiology and diagnosis of cardio-renal syndrome: actual picture and future prospectives].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; De Pascalis, Antonio; Marinelli, Annibale; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Malaguti, Moreno; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Rivera, Rodolfo; Gorini, Antonio; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) indicates how close the relationship is between heart and kidney during failure of these organs. At present, the classification of the syndrome includes five types of CRS: types I and II which are strictly related to initial heart failure (both acute and chronic), types III and IV which include initial kidney failure, and type V which includes several systemic diseases. Many pathophysiological pathways have been described illustrating how heart and kidney disease are involved in clinical conditions. The diagnosis of CRS is based on both blood tests and ultrasound imaging. Several biomarkers indicating levels of heart and kidney function have emerged over the last few decades which can be used to predict kidney failure in patients with acute or chronic heart disease. Kidney injury biomarkers have also to be tested, especially those indicating glomerular and tubular damage. Renal ultrasound and trans-thoracic echocardiography can provide further information on heart and kidney failure in patients with cardio-renal syndrome at any stage.

  10. Ureteritis Cystica: Important Consideration in the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Fernández, B.; Díaz-Alférez, FJ.; Herrero-Polo, M.; Martín-Izquierdo, M.; Silva-Abuín, JM.; Lorenzo-Gómez, MF.

    2012-01-01

    Ureteritis cystica is an uncommon cause of acute renal pain. The aetiology remains unclear and the diagnosis may be difficult to establish. We report the case of a 29 year old woman with a history of repeated urinary tract infections presenting with acute renal colic in the absence of lithiasis. We review the diagnostic tools available to make the diagnosis and the recent pertinent literature. PMID:22474406

  11. Assessment of renal vascular resistance and blood pressure in dogs and cats with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Novellas, R; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Espada, Y

    2010-05-15

    This study investigated the possible relationships between renal resistive index (RI) or pulsatility index (PI) and systolic blood pressure and biochemical and haematological parameters in dogs and cats with renal disease. The study included 50 dogs and 20 cats with renal disease. RI and PI were significantly higher in both dogs and cats with renal disease than in 27 healthy dogs and 10 healthy cats. In dogs, a significant negative correlation was found between RI and red blood cell count, and a positive correlation was found between PI and serum creatinine. In cats, a positive correlation was found between RI and serum urea, between PI and serum creatinine, and between PI and serum urea. No relationship could be found between either RI or PI and systolic blood pressure.

  12. Neurological Manifestations of Renal Diseases in Children in Qazvin/ Iran

    PubMed Central

    DALIRANI, Reza; MAHYAR, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; AHMADI, Ghazaleh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Renal diseases are one of the most common causes of referrals and admissions of children, hence it is important to know their neurological presentations. This study aimed to determine neurological presentations of renal diseases in children. Material & Methods A total of 634 children with renal diseases, admitted to Qazvin Pediatric Hospital, Qazvin, central Iran from 2011 to 2013 were studied. Neurological presentations of patients were established and the results were analyzed using statistical tests. Results Neurological presentations were found in 18 (2.8%) out of 634 patients, of whom 15 had febrile seizures, two thromboembolism, and one encephalopathy. Among patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), 2.6% had febrile seizures, 11.1% of those with glomerulonephritis had encephalopathy, and 3.7% of those with nephrotic syndrome had cerebral thromboembolism. Conclusion Results showed neurological presentations in 2.8% of children with renal diseases, and febrile seizure as the most common presentation. PMID:27375752

  13. 74 FR 49921 - Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2009-09-29

    ... Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System; Town Hall Meeting on End-Stage Renal Disease... & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 410, 413 and 414 RIN 0938-AP57 Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease...) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1,...

  14. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  15. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  16. Emphysematous renal tract disease due to Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2004-06-01

    Emphysematous renal tract disease (ERTD) is a rare necrotizing infection of renal parenchyma and/or urinary tract caused by gas producing organisms. A case of acute emphysematous renal tract disease (ERTD) (emphysematous pyelonephritis along with emphysematous cystitis) caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in a non-diabetic patient, who did not apparently have any risk factor for fungal infection, is presented. Patient had refused for any surgical intervention. He was treated successfully with liposomal amphotericin B and 5-flucytosin and achieved complete recovery. Various causes of ERTD and available therapeutic options are discussed.

  17. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  18. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS.

  19. [Genetics and nosological classification of renal cystic diseases].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Sottini, Laura; Dallera, Nadia; Capistrano, Mariano; Foini, Paolo; Scolari, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Renal cystic diseases are the major group of inherited renal disorders in humans and a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Dominant and recessive polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD and ARPKD, respectively) account for most of the clinical conditions. However, nephronophthisis (NPHP), medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD), and dominant glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) still have a relevant clinical impact, particularly in children. The discovery that the proteins that are defective in ADPKD and ARPKD localize to the primary cilium and the recognition of the role of this organelle in cystogenesis have led to the term ''ciliopathies''. In the last decade, the list of ciliopathies has continued to grow. Analysis of the protein products of the nine NPHP genes (NPHP 1-9) evinced a strong relation between ciliary function and pathogenesis of NPHP. The oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD) type I, characterized by congenital malformations and cystic kidney disease, was found to result from mutations in the OFD1 gene, which encodes a protein located to the primary cilium. Parallel to these advances, mutations in UMOD, the gene encoding uromodulin, were identified in pedigrees with MCKD2, familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy, and autosomal dominant GCKD. In all these disorders, uromodulin was found to be accumulating in intracellular aggregates, suggesting a common pathogenesis. Taken together, these findings suggest the need for the separation of renal cystic diseases due to UMOD mutations (uromodulin-associated diseases) from renal cystic diseases related to mutation of genes encoding for proteins expressed in the primary cilium (ciliopathies).

  20. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide‑containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases.

  1. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  2. Scleroderma renal crisis in a case of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Vij, Mukul; Agrawal, Vinita; Jain, Manoj

    2014-07-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is an overlap syndrome first defined in 1972 by Sharp et al. In this original study, the portrait emerged of a connective tissue disorder sharing features of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) and polymyositis. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is an extremely infrequent but serious complication that can occur in MCTD. The histologic picture of SRC is that of a thrombotic micro-angiopathic process. Renal biopsy plays an important role in confirming the clinical diagnosis, excluding overlapping/superimposed diseases that might lead to acute renal failure in MCTD patients, helping to predict the clinical outcome and optimizing patient management. We herewith report a rare case of SRC in a patient with MCTD and review the relevant literature.

  3. Microbiological diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary disease is by far the most frequent disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). To diagnose NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD), patients should have symptoms and radiologic signs suggestive of NTM-PD, and cultures of multiple respiratory tract samples must grow the same NTM species. Thus, the microbiological laboratory has a central role in the diagnosis of NTM-PD. This review summarizes currently available data on techniques involved in the microbiological diagnosis of NTM-PD, and aims to provide a framework for optimal microbiological diagnosis.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of Dent disease in 10 Chinese boys

    PubMed Central

    He, Guohua; Zhang, Hongwen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Xiao, Huijie; Yao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Dent disease is a rare X-linked recessive proximal tubular disorder that affects mostly male patients in childhood or early adult life. Dent disease is clinically characterized by the presence of low molecular weight proteinuria (LMWP), hypercalciuria, medullary nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and progressive renal failure. The clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of Dent disease were examined in 10 Chinese boys. All 10 childhood cases of Dent disease in China presented with tubular proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. The ratio of α1-microglobulinuria to microalbuminuria, if close to or above 1, can be used as a diagnostic criterion for tubuloproteinuria. Lotensin was ineffective at treating proteinuria while dihydrochlorothiazide reduced urine calcium excretion. PMID:28357180

  5. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: from diagnosis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, P.; Carmichael, A.

    1999-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension represents a form of correctable hypertension and preventable renal failure. Such patients need to be identified early so that specific therapy can be instigated. Patient identification requires a high index of suspicion in patients with certain clinical features. Subsequent non-invasive imaging may result in angiography which is required for diagnostic purposes and for planning intervention. Correctable therapy takes one of two forms, namely percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty, with or without stenting, or surgical revascularisation, together with modification of underlying risk factors.


Keywords: atherosclerosis; renal artery stenosis; hypertension PMID:10616685

  6. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  7. [Histopathological differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Fociani, P; Carsana, L; Zerbi, P; Ferri, A; Sampietro, G M; Vago, G

    2003-01-01

    In front of the suspicious diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the pathologist must have adequate and complete clinical, anamnestic, instrumental informations and, if possible, the previous histopathologic examinations. This is necessary because: the diagnosis of IBD is made with exclusion criteria, different pathologic entities may have similar macroscopic and microscopic findings and the characteristic lesions are often present in little number. The authors consider in this paper the problem of the differential diagnosis of IBD.

  8. [Methods of microbiological diagnosis in periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Stîngu, Cătilina Suzana; Turcu, Tatiana; Dimitriu, St

    2004-01-01

    Microbiological findings together with clinical and radiological diagnosis are essential for rationale use of antibiotics in periodontal disease. Methods used for microbiological diagnosis are: microscopy, cultivation, gas liquid chromatography, PCR, immuno-assays (ELISA, immunofluorescence), FISH. Each of them has some advantages and disadvantages related to cost, accessibility, sensitivity, duration. The most used today are cultivation and PCR techniques.

  9. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  10. [Diagnosis and management of chronic renal failure in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Segalen, Isabelle; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in the elderly is rising due to the ageing of the general population. Its management, and notably nephroprotective therapies, must be adapted to the elderly person who is often frail and with multiple pathologies. The decision to start extra-renal purification does not depend on the patient's chronological age but on their physiological age and requires dialogue between the patient and their family, the geriatrician and the nephrologist.

  11. Wnt and planar cell polarity signaling in cystic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Goggolidou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases can cause end stage renal disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. They may arise early or later in life, are characterized by a spectrum of symptoms and can be caused by diverse genetic defects. The primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle that can serve as a signaling antenna, has been demonstrated to have a significant role in ensuring correct kidney development and function. In the kidney, one of the signaling pathways that requires the cilium for normal development is Wnt signaling. In this review, the roles of primary cilia in relation to canonical and non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling in cystic renal disease are described. The evidence of the associations between cilia, Wnt signaling and cystic renal disease is discussed and the significance of planar cell polarity-related mechanisms in cystic kidney disease is presented. Although defective Wnt signaling is not the only cause of renal disease, research is increasingly highlighting its importance, encouraging the development of Wnt-associated diagnostic and prognostic tools for cystic renal disease.

  12. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  13. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014-2016 West ...

  14. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  15. Genetic spectrum of Saudi Arabian patients with antenatal cystic kidney disease and ciliopathy phenotypes using a targeted renal gene panel

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; Kurdi, Wesam; Alsahan, Nada; Alabdullah, Zainab; Abudraz, Rania; Tulbah, Maha; Alnemer, Maha; Khan, Rubina; Al-Jurayb, Haya; Alahmed, Ahmed; Tahir, Asma I; Khalil, Dania; Edwards, Noel; Al Abdulaziz, Basma; Binhumaid, Faisal S; Majid, Salma; Faquih, Tariq; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Altassan, Nada; Monies, Dorota; Meyer, Brian; Sayer, John A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited cystic kidney disorders are a common cause of end-stage renal disease. Over 50 ciliopathy genes, which encode proteins that influence the structure and function of the primary cilia, are implicated in cystic kidney disease. Methods To define the phenotype and genotype of cystic kidney disease in fetuses and neonates, we correlated antenatal ultrasound examination and postnatal renal ultrasound examination with targeted exon sequencing, using a renal gene panel. A cohort of 44 families in whom antenatal renal ultrasound scanning findings in affected cases included bilateral cystic kidney disease, echogenic kidneys or enlarged kidneys was investigated. Results In this cohort, disease phenotypes were severe with 36 cases of stillbirth or perinatal death. Extra renal malformations, including encephalocele, polydactyly and heart malformations, consistent with ciliopathy phenotypes, were frequently detected. Renal gene panel testing identified causative mutations in 21 out of 34 families (62%), where patient and parental DNA was available. In the remaining 10 families, where only parental DNA was available, 7 inferred causative mutations were found. Together, mutations were found in 12 different genes with a total of 13 novel pathogenic variants, including an inferred novel variant in NEK8. Mutations in CC2D2A were the most common cause of an antenatal cystic kidney disease and a suspected ciliopathy in our cohort. Conclusions In families with ciliopathy phenotypes, mutational analysis using a targeted renal gene panel allows a rapid molecular diagnosis and provides important information for patients, parents and their physicians. PMID:26862157

  16. Molecular Diagnosis of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Caused by Puumala Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Nina; Hagström, Åsa; Lundahl, Malin; Nilsson, Elin; Juremalm, Mikael; Larsson, Inger; Alm, Erik; Bucht, Göran; Ahlm, Clas

    2016-01-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS; also called hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome [HCPS]) in the Americas. Puumala virus (PUUV) is the most common causative agent of HFRS in Europe. Current routine diagnostic methods are based on serological analyses and can yield inconclusive results. Hantavirus-infected patients are viremic during the early phase of disease; therefore, detection of viral RNA genomes can be a valuable complement to existing serological methods. However, the high genomic sequence diversity of PUUV has hampered the development of molecular diagnostics, and currently no real-time reverse transcription-quantitative (RT)-PCR assay is available for routine diagnosis of HFRS. Here, we present a novel PUUV RT-PCR assay. The assay was validated for routine diagnosis of HFRS on samples collected in Sweden during the winter season from 2013 to 2014. The assay allowed detection of PUUV RNA in 98.7% of confirmed clinical HFRS samples collected within 8 days after symptomatic onset. In summary, this study shows that real-time RT-PCR can be a reliable alternative to serological tests during the early phase of HFRS. PMID:26962084

  17. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Small Renal Tumors: Trends in Renal Cancer Diagnosis and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Railton, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common malignancy causing significant mortality. In recent years abdominal imaging, often for alternate symptomatology, has led the trend toward the detection and confirmation of smaller renal tumors. This has permitted the greater use of localized and nephron-sparing techniques including partial nephrectomy and image-guided ablation. This article aims to review the current role of image-guided biopsy and ablation in the management of small renal tumors. The natural history of renal cell carcinoma, the role of renal biopsy, the principles and procedural considerations of thermal energy ablation, and the oncological outcomes of these minimally invasive treatments are discussed and illustrated with cases from the authors' institution. Image-guided ablation, in particular, has changed the treatment paradigm and, by virtue of its increasingly evident efficacy and low morbidity, now favors the treatment of smaller tumors in patients previously unfit for surgery.

  18. Biopsy-proven renal disease in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A histopathologic review.

    PubMed

    Onwubuya, I M; Adelusola, K A; Sabageh, D; Ezike, K N; Olaofe, O O

    2016-01-01

    Although various patterns of renal diseases have been reported from different renal biopsy registries worldwide, data from Nigeria remain scanty. A 10-year retrospective review of renal biopsies was conducted in our tertiary health care facility. All cases were reclassified based on their light microscopic features after the application of standard histochemical stains. A total of 165 cases were reviewed with a male:female ratio of 1.8:1 and a mean age of 15.4 ± 12.0 years. About 69.7% of the cases were below the age of 16 years, while only 2.4% were older than 50 years. The most common indications for biopsy were nephrotic syndrome (72.1%) and acute renal failure of unknown etiology (11.5%). Overall, glomerulonephritis (80%) was the most common histologic category and occurred only in individuals younger than 50 years old. Minimal change disease (22.9%) and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (21.9%) were the most common varieties in children, while membranous glomerulonephritis (30.6%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (27.8%) were the commonest among the adult population. The initial histologic diagnosis was revised in 18 cases while a diagnosis was arrived at in seven cases initially adjudged as inadequate for assessment. This study showed that renal biopsy was predominantly performed in children and adolescents. Although glomerulonephritis was the predominant disease, the predominant histologic patterns varied with the patient age. Despite the scarcity of advanced diagnostic tools in resource-poor environments, routine use of histochemical stains is helpful in the evaluation of renal biopsies.

  19. Experimental models of renal disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rebecca C

    2010-11-26

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death among patients with end stage renal failure. Animal models have played a crucial role in teasing apart the complex pathological processes involved. This review discusses the principles of using animal models, the history of their use in the study of renal hypertension, the controversies arising from experimental models of non-hypertensive uraemic cardiomyopathy and the lessons learned from these models, and highlights important areas of future research in this field, including de novo cardiomyopathy secondary to renal transplantation.

  20. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  1. Raynaud's disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hodges, H

    1995-04-01

    Raynaud's disease is a common vasospastic disorder affecting the digits of both hands. Women are most commonly affected. This disorder occurs in two forms: Raynaud's disease and Raynaud's phenomenon. Raynaud's phenomenon is associated with a secondary etiology, most commonly scleroderma. Symptoms may precede the onset of connective tissue disease by a number of years. The pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, recommendations for referral, and treatment of Raynaud's disease are presented. A protocol for use by the nurse practitioner in the primary care setting is provided.

  2. Heck's disease: diagnosis and susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lindsey K; Hinshaw, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, or Heck's disease, is an uncommon proliferation of oral mucosa that presents primarily in Native Central and South American populations. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. In the majority of cases, human papilloma virus 13 or 32 is detected. Factors that determine disease susceptibility are unclear, but genetics, and having the human lymphocytic antigen-DR4 (DRB1*0404) allele in particular, are thought to play a major role in disease vulnerability. We report another case of focal epithelial hyperplasia, hypothesize on disease susceptibility, and review the current understanding of this uncommon disorder.

  3. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease: an unrecognized feature of nephropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krolewski, Andrzej S; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter; Warram, James H

    2017-03-30

    A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority, progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from -72 to -3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid progression as rate of eGFR declines > 5 ml/min/year, a value exceeded by 80% of patients in Joslin's type 1 diabetes ESRD cohort. The extraordinary range of slopes within the rapid progression category prompted us to partition it into "very fast," "fast" and "moderate" decline. We showed, for the first time, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk and comment on the need for effective therapeutic interventions. Whether the initiating mechanism of fast renal decline affects glomerulus, tubule, interstitium or vasculature is unknown. Since no animal model mimics progressive renal decline, studies in humans are needed. Prospective studies searching for markers predictive of the rate of renal decline yield findings that may make detection of fast decliners feasible. Identifying such patients will be the foundation for developing effective individualized methods to prevent or delay onset of ESRD in diabetes.

  4. Emotional trauma associated with renal disease and natural disasters.

    PubMed

    McClellan, M J

    2001-10-01

    Emotional trauma frequently follows any disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, accidents, war, bombings, and life-threatening disease. One such disease is end stage renal disease (ESRD), an irreversible, progressive loss of renal function (Lancaster, 1995). Since this is a "do or die" situation, it requires artificial methods of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplant, which require learned coping skills. Emotional trauma may occur pre or post-disaster and may include flashbacks when events trigger suppressed memories or unresolved emotions. Aftercare of disasters requires dedicated professionals to guide patients toward essential lifelines.

  5. Renal disease pathophysiology and treatment: contributions from the rat

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Bryan R.; Menzies, Robert I.; Denby, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rat has classically been the species of choice for pharmacological studies and disease modeling, providing a source of high-quality physiological data on cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology over many decades. Recent developments in genome engineering now allow us to capitalize on the wealth of knowledge acquired over the last century. Here, we review rat models of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and acute and chronic kidney disease. These models have made important contributions to our understanding of renal diseases and have revealed key genes, such as Ace and P2rx7, involved in renal pathogenic processes. By targeting these genes of interest, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the etiology of renal pathologies, with the promised potential of slowing disease progression or even reversing the damage caused. Some, but not all, of these target genes have proved to be of clinical relevance. However, it is now possible to generate more sophisticated and appropriate disease models in the rat, which can recapitulate key aspects of human renal pathology. These advances will ultimately be used to identify new treatments and therapeutic targets of much greater clinical relevance. PMID:27935823

  6. Hypogonadism and testosterone replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common problem in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and renal transplant population. It has widespread systemic effects and has been linked with mortality in dialysis patients and at the time of renal transplant. The etiology is likely multifactorial and most patients are afflicted by various comorbidities that can contribute to hypogonadism. Clinical manifestations are mostly nonspecific. We review the approach to the diagnosis of hypogonadism, focusing on both laboratory values and clinical signs and symptoms. We review treatment with testosterone replacement in this population and highlight various studies that tend to have small sample sizes. Though these studies provide insight into testosterone replacement, the need for larger studies is emphasized to better understand the effects and safety of therapy. PMID:28078220

  7. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  8. Diagnosis and Updates in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Sarah; Leffler, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It can result in intraintestinal and extraintestinal manifestations of disease including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, osteoporosis, or lymphoma. Diagnosis of celiac disease is made through initial serologic testing and then confirmed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. Generally celiac disease is a benign disorder with a good prognosis in those who adhere to a gluten-free diet. However, in refractory disease, complications may develop that warrant additional testing with more advanced radiologic and endoscopic methods. This article reviews the current strategy to diagnose celiac disease and the newer modalities to assess for associated complications.

  9. Cytologic diagnosis of diseases of hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Garner, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on neoplastic diseases because they may be the most frequent disease processes in captive hedgehogs according to the literature and authors' case files and the most common cases submitted for cytologic diagnosis in these species, particularly the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

  10. Pneumococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of antibiotics may also slow or reverse drug-resistant pneumococcal infections. Related Pages Global Pneumococcal Vaccination World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  11. Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mantzavinosa, Vasileios; Alexiou, Athanasios; Greig, Nigel H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2017-02-03

    The dramatic increase in the population with dementia expected in the next decades is accompanied by the establishment of novel and innovated methods that will offer accurate and efficient detection of the disease in its early stages. While Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, by the time is typically diagnosed substantial neuronal loss and neuropathological lesions can damaged many brain regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the main risk factors that affect and increase Alzheimer's disease progression over time even in cases with no significant memory impairment present. Several potential markers are discussed such as oxidative stress, metal ions, vascular disorders, protein dysfunctions and alterations in the mitochondrial populations. A multiparametric model of Alzheimer's biomarkers is presented according to the latest classification of the disease.

  12. [Guidelines of diagnosis for peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jae Gyu; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seol, Sang Young

    2009-11-01

    Peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent diseases in gastrointestinal field. Recently, evolution was made for pathophysiology of peptic ulcer from "no acid, no ulcer" to Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is estimated about 10% in Korea, and has declined due to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Peptic ulcer has the cycle of exacerbation and improvement in the clinical course, and has not occasionally any clinical symptom. Helicobacter pylori eradication has made the marked reduction of relapse of peptic ulcer disease. Although nationwide endoscopic screening has enabled accurate diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, general guideline for diagnosis of peptic ulcer has not made in Korea. Herein, we propose a guideline for the diagnosis of peptic ulcer according to domestic, international clinical studies, and experts opinions with level of evidence and grade of recommendation.

  13. Saliva in the diagnosis of diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Zi; Cheng, Xing-Qun; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhang, Ping; Yi, Ping; Xu, Xin; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Saliva is secreted from the salivary glands and has multiple functions, including mouth cleaning and protection, antibacterial effects and digestion. With the rapid advancement in salivaomics, saliva is well recognized as a pool of biological markers. Saliva, as a non-invasive and safe source, could be a substitute for blood in the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. This review summarizes the latest advancements in saliva-related studies and addresses the potential value of saliva in the early diagnosis of oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease, as well as cancer, diabetes and other systemic disorders. Saliva biomarkers range from changes in the biochemical indices of DNA, RNA and proteins to the diversification of microbiota structures. This study integrates data reported in the recent literature and discusses the clinical significance and prospects for the application of saliva in the early diagnosis of diseases, translational medicine and precision medicine. PMID:27585820

  14. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease: the prototype of the hepato-renal fibrocystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe, typically early onset form of renal cystic disease. The care of ARPKD patients has traditionally been the purview of pediatric nephrologists for management of systemic hypertension and progressive renal insufficiency. However, the disease has multisystem manifestations and a comprehensive care strategy frequently requires a multidisciplinary team. In severely affected infants, the diagnosis often is first suspected by obstetricians when enlarged, echogenic kidneys and oligohydramnios are detected on prenatal ultrasounds. Neonatologists are central to the care of these infants, who may have respiratory compromise due to pulmonary hypoplasia and massively enlarged kidneys. Among neonatal survivors, a subset of ARPKD patients has clinically significant congenital hepatic fibrosis, which can lead to portal hypertension, requiring close monitoring by pediatric hepatologists. Surgical consultation may be sought to access pre-emptive nephrectomy to relieve mass effect, placement of dialysis access, surgical shunting procedures, and kidney and/or liver transplantation. Recent data suggest that children with ARPKD may be at risk of neurocognitive dysfunction, and may require neuropsychological referral. In addition to these morbidities, families of patients with ARPKD face decisions regarding genetic testing of affected children, testing of asymptomatic siblings, or consideration of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for future pregnancies. These issues require the input of genetic counselors, geneticists, and reproductive endocrinologists. As a result, the management of ARPKD requires the involvement of multiple subspecialists, as well as the general pediatrician, in a complex care network. In this review, we discuss the genetics of this disorder and provide an overview of the associated pathobiology; outline the spectrum of clinical manifestations of ARPKD and the management of organ-specific complications

  15. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  16. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  17. Health delivery system for renal disease care in bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ur Rashid, Harun

    2004-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the densely populated countries, a nation of 128 million people, 75% of whom lives in rural areas and the annual per capita gross national product (GNP) is US$ 380.00. The health care budget is 1.2% of GNP and the priority areas are population control, provision of clean drinking water and eradication of communicable diseases. The country has a small number of nephrologists and renal care is available in large cities only. The causes of renal diseases include glomerulonephritis, diabetes, hypertension, nephrolithiasis, obstructive uropathy and interstitial nephropathy. The incidence of end-stage renal disease is not known, but would be much higher than in developed countries because of high incidence of infection and environmental pollution. The treatment of ESRD has low priority in Bangladesh because of the government health policy and high cost of treatment. As a result, less than 10% of ESRD patients are able to maintain dialysis in private hospitals and governmental dialysis centers that are already overcrowded. The vast majority of patients who are started on dialysis die or stop treatment within the first three months. Renal transplantation is not as expensive as dialysis and is less costly in the university hospital than in private hospitals. Cyclosporine is usually replaced by azathioprine after six months of transplantation. Although organ act law is effective since 1998, cadaveric transplant has not picked up due to lack of infrastructure, facility and orientation regarding cadaveric transplantation. Preventive measures of renal disease can not be overemphasized.

  18. End-stage renal disease in Tunisian infants: Etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, M; Boussetta, A; Abidi, K; Hammi, Y; Zarrouk, C; Gargah, T

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) in infants has particular features in terms of etiologies and therapeutic modalities. The aim of our study is to describe the etiologies and the ESRD outcomes among Tunisian infants. This retrospective study was conducted over 15 years (from January 1998 to December 31, 2013) in the Pediatric Department at Charles Nicolle Hospital. In total, 157 pediatric patients had ESRD. The mean incidence was 4.25 million children. The study involved 24 infants; the sex ratio was equal to 2. The mean age at diagnosis of ESRD was 8 months (range, 1-21 months). Growth retardation was noticed in 14 patients. The main causes were Congenital Anomalies of the Kidneys and Urinary Tract (9 infants) and hereditary renal disease (9 infants). All patients were treated with peritoneal dialysis; 16 infants presented peritonitis. Mortality rate was about 28%. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular diseases and infections.

  19. Sonographic diagnosis of Obstructed Hemivagina and Ipsilateral Renal Anomaly Syndrome: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA) syndrome is a rare urogenital anomaly. Patients typically present at puberty, shortly after menarche with increasing pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea and pelvic mass. There may be a known history of unilateral renal agenesis. Diagnosis can usually be established by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Resection of the vaginal septum is the treatment of choice. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms, prevent complications and preserve fertility. We present two cases of OHVIRA syndrome diagnosed by ultrasound to promote recognition of this rare but important condition. PMID:28191231

  20. Soluble biglycan as a biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Louise Tzung-Harn; Nastase, Madalina-Viviana; Zeng-Brouwers, Jinyang; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Chronic renal inflammation is often associated with a progressive accumulation of various extracellular matrix constituents, including several members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) gene family. It is becoming increasingly evident that the matrix-unbound SLRPs strongly regulate the progression of inflammation and fibrosis. Soluble SLRPs are generated either via partial proteolytic processing of collagenous matrices or by de novo synthesis evoked by stress or injury. Liberated SLRPs can then bind to and activate Toll-like receptors, thus modulating downstream inflammatory signaling. Preclinical animal models and human studies have recently identified soluble biglycan as a key initiator and regulator of various inflammatory renal diseases. Biglycan, generated by activated macrophages, can enter the circulation and its elevated levels in plasma and renal parenchyma correlate with unfavorable renal function and outcome. In this review, we will focus on the critical role of soluble biglycan in inflammatory signaling in various renal disorders. Moreover, we will provide new data implicating proinflammatory effects of soluble decorin in unilateral ureteral obstruction. Finally, we will critically evaluate the potential application of soluble biglycan vis-à-vis other SLRPs (decorin, lumican and fibromodulin) as a promising target and novel biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases. PMID:25091702

  1. A novel LMX1B mutation in a family with end-stage renal disease of 'unknown cause'.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Noel; Rice, Sarah J; Raman, Shreya; Hynes, Ann Marie; Srivastava, Shalabh; Moore, Iain; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Xu, Yaobo; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thwaites, David T; Gale, Daniel P; Sayer, John A

    2015-02-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) presenting in a familial autosomal dominant pattern points to an underlying monogenic cause. Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that may lead to ESRD caused by mutations in the transcription factor LMX1B. Renal-limited forms of this disease, termed nail-patella-like renal disease (NPLRD), and LMX1B nephropathy have recently been described. We report a large family, from the North East of England, with seven affected members with varying phenotypes of renal disease, ranging from ESRD at 28 years of age to microscopic haematuria and proteinuria and relatively preserved renal function. In this family, there were no extra-renal manifestations to suggest NPS. Genome-wide linkage studies and inheritance by descent (IBD) suggested disease loci on Chromosome 1 and 9. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis identified a novel sequence variant (p.R249Q) in the LMX1B gene in each of the three samples submitted, which was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The variant segregated with the disease in all affected individuals. In silico modelling revealed that R249 is putatively located in close proximity to the DNA phosphoskeleton, supporting a role for this residue in the interaction between the LMX1B homeodomain and its target DNA. WES and analysis of potential target genes, including CD2AP, NPHS2, COL4A3, COL4A4 and COL4A5, did not reveal any co-inherited pathogenic variants. In conclusion, we confirm a novel LMX1B mutation in a large family with an autosomal dominant pattern of nephropathy. This report confirms that LMX1B mutations may cause a glomerulopathy without extra-renal manifestations. A molecular genetic diagnosis of LMX1B nephropathy thus provides a definitive diagnosis, prevents the need for renal biopsies and allows at risk family members to be screened.

  2. [Legionnaires' disease with acute renal failure caused by Legionella pneumophilla serogroup 4].

    PubMed

    Hase, Isano; Chibana, Kazuyuki; Ohara, Tetsuya; Takizawa, Hidenori; Furihata, Tomoe; Yamada, Issei; Fukushima, Yasutugu; Ishii, Yoshiki; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Michio; Saitou, Atsushi

    2005-11-01

    A 77-year-old man who had fever and chest pain was admitted to a neighboring hospital on a diagnosis of pneumonia. Chest X-ray film finding deteriorated despite treatment with 2 g cefotaxime per day. Because of accompanying acute renal failure, he was transferred to our hospital. Hemodialysis with intravenous administration of erythromycin and meropenem resulted in recovery from acute renal failure, and his general condition improved. Because of liver dysfunction, erythromycin was changed to pazufloxacin. Although he was negative for Legionella urinary antigen determined with a rapid assay kit, Binax NOW, his serum titer for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was elevated. Finally, a diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 4 was established.

  3. Diagnosis of enteric disease in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Van Metre, D C; Tyler, J W; Stehman, S M

    2000-03-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in small ruminants requires integration of information obtained in the signalment, history, physical or necropsy examination, and ancillary diagnostic tests. The purpose of this article is to provide the practitioner with a review of the clinical features of several common gastrointestinal diseases of sheep and goats. Rumen acidosis, enterotoxemia, gastrointestinal parasitism, neonatal diarrhea, and salmonellosis are discussed, and where appropriate, reviews of the pathophysiology, prevention, and control of these diseases are cited for further reading.

  4. [Kimura's disease. Demonstration of the disease and its differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kawada, A

    1976-07-01

    From several own cases and case-reports from the literature the clinical and histopathological picture of Kimura's disease and its etiopathogenesis are reported. The recently reported "subcutaneous angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia" of Wells and Whimsper corresponds to the solitary or localized variant of Kimura's disease. The differential diagnosis of recently described analogous diseases is considered.

  5. Biologics for the treatment of autoimmune renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Stephen R; Gan, Poh-Yi; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-04-01

    Biological therapeutics (biologics) that target autoimmune responses and inflammatory injury pathways have a marked beneficial impact on the management of many chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and ankylosing spondylitis. Accumulating data suggest that a growing number of renal diseases result from autoimmune injury - including lupus nephritis, IgA nephropathy, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis, autoimmune (formerly idiopathic) membranous nephropathy, anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis, and C3 nephropathy - and one can speculate that biologics might also be applicable to these diseases. As many autoimmune renal diseases are relatively uncommon, with long natural histories and diverse outcomes, clinical trials that aim to validate potentially useful biologics are difficult to design and/or perform. Some excellent consortia are undertaking cohort studies and clinical trials, but more multicentre international collaborations are needed to advance the introduction of new biologics to patients with autoimmune renal disorders. This Review discusses the key molecules that direct injurious inflammation and the biologics that are available to modulate them. The opportunities and challenges for the introduction of relevant biologics into treatment protocols for autoimmune renal diseases are also discussed.

  6. Sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans in the progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Masola, Valentina; Zaza, Gianluigi; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Experimental data in cell cultures and animal models suggest that sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans are potentially effective drugs to treat chronic kidney diseases and prevent progression to renal failure. However, no conclusive evidence support the use of them in human renal disease. In acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, only few studies have been performed. Sulodexide has been more intensely investigated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) where the body of data supports its effectiveness as an antialbuminuric agent in early stages. Unfortunately, there is no study in DN patients on the effect of sulodexide on clinical end points.

  7. Laboratory diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J C; Flood, V H

    2015-05-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is considered the most common inherited bleeding disorder and may also be the most difficult to diagnose. Clinical symptoms of VWD include predominantly mild mucosal bleeding; surgical bleeding may occur with specific challenges and joint bleeding can occur in the most severe forms. A family history either of diagnosed VWD or of bleeding symptoms is typically present. Laboratory diagnosis requires a series of assays of von Willebrand factor (VWF) quantity and function, and factor VIII activity, with no single straightforward diagnostic test available to either confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Newer assays of VWF function are becoming more available and useful in determining the laboratory diagnosis of VWD.

  8. [Diagnosis of occupational chronic pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Maestrelli, P; Guarnieri, G

    2010-01-01

    Occupational risk factors may induce chronic nonmalignant respiratory diseases such as pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Diagnosis is well codified by international guidelines for most of these occupational diseases except for COPD. The study of occupational COPD is complicated by several issues. In fact, COPD is a multifactorial disease and has a long latency between exposure to causative agents and the occurrence of disease. The main confounding factor is smoking. The quantitative estimation of cigarette smoked is easier and more accurate than that of occupational exposure. The diagnosis of COPD is based on the presence of chronic airflow limitation at spirometry; moreover, an accelerated decline in respiratory function may be observed in the longitudinal evaluation of workers. The retrospective assignment of occupational aetiology of COPD remains difficult in individual cases, especially with a significant history of smoking.

  9. Review article: The diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Abdulkarim, A S; Murray, J A

    2003-04-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with small intestinal injury that results in the malabsorption of different nutrients. The damaging factor is gluten present in wheat, barley and rye. The diagnosis relies on the clinical picture of the patient, serological markers for coeliac disease, characteristic findings of small intestinal biopsy and, eventually, clinical improvement on a gluten-free diet. Our strategies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease have changed dramatically within the last 10 years. The advent of serological markers with high sensitivity and specificity is changing our understanding of the disease and its prevalence. Treatment includes a life-long gluten-free diet to prevent the recurrence of symptoms and other potential consequences. Most coeliac disease remains under-diagnosed; the utilization of more accurate serological tests and a greater awareness of its many presentations will aid its identification.

  10. [RARE DISEASES DTC: DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND CARE].

    PubMed

    Mendlovic, Joseph; Barash, Hila; Yardeni, Hadar; Banet-Levi, Yonit; Yonath, Hagith; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2016-04-01

    Rare diseases are chronic, progressive genetic disorders, which affect around 6-8% of the general population, mainly children. Therefore, in Israel approximately 500,000 people are probably affected by a rare disease. In this article, we review some of the issues pertaining to rare diseases, such as the need for accurate diagnosis which is necessary not only for specific care and treatment but also for informed family planning. In addition, we review the impact of the activities of patients' organizations on the awareness of rare diseases and their involvement in the creation of the Orphan Drug Act, which was the leading point on the way to drug development worldwide. During the last few years networks for reaching leading specialists' opinions on the way to proper diagnosis were created. Thereafter, the next generation genetic technologies, such as exome sequencing, have been a revolution in terms of options and hope for patients with rare undiagnosed diseases. Patients with rare diseases and their families are a challenge to the health care system, not only in terms of diagnosis and therapy, but also in terms of special needs. In addition, deciphering molecular pathways of rare diseases might be the key for understanding molecular events involved in common disorders. We emphasize the duty to ensure appropriate capacity and equal access to follow-up and clinical management of patients with rare diseases in Israel.

  11. Independent Role of Underlying Kidney Disease on Renal Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease under Nephrology Care.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Garofalo, Carlo; Pacilio, Mario; Liberti, Maria Elena; Sagliocca, Adelia; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Primary kidney disease is suggested to affect renal prognosis of CKD patients; however, whether nephrology care modifies this association is unknown. We studied patients with CKD stage I-IV treated in a renal clinic and with established diagnosis of CKD cause to evaluate whether the risk of renal event (composite of end-stage renal disease and eGFR decline ≥ 40%) linked to the specific diagnosis is modified by the achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of therapeutic goals for hypertension (BP ≤ 130/80 mmHg in patients with proteinuria ≥ 1 50 mg/24h and/or diabetes and ≤ 140/90 in those with proteinuria <150 mg/24h and without diabetes) anemia (hemoglobin, Hb ≥ 11 g/dL), and proteinuria (≤ 0.5 g/24h). Survival analysis started after first year of nephrology care. We studied 729 patients (age 64 ± 15 y; males 59.1%; diabetes 34.7%; cardiovascular disease (CVD) 44.9%; hypertensive nephropathy, HTN 53.8%; glomerulonephritis, GN 17.3%; diabetic nephropathy, DN 15.9%; tubule-interstitial nephropathy, TIN 9.5%; polycystic kidney disease, PKD 3.6%). During first year of Nephrology care, therapy was overall intensified in most patients and prevalence of main therapeutic goals generally improved. During subsequent follow up (median 3.3 years, IQR 1.9-5.1), 163 renal events occurred. Cox analysis disclosed a higher risk for PKD (Hazard Ratio 5.46, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.28-10.6) and DN (1.28,2.99-3.05), versus HTN (reference), independently of age, gender, CVD, BMI, eGFR or CKD stage, use of RAS inhibitors and achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of each of the three main therapeutic goals. No interaction was found on the risk of CKD progression between diagnostic categories and month-12 eGFR (P=0.737), as with control of BP (P=0.374), Hb (P=0.248) or proteinuria (P=0.590). Therefore, in CKD patients under nephrology care, diagnosis of kidney disease should be considered in conjunction with the main risk

  12. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease.

  13. Venlafaxine-associated serotonin syndrome causing severe rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in a patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Abeynaike, Lakshan; Wickramarathne, Thanushi

    2010-10-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease, on dopaminergic therapy, was admitted with confusion and agitation, diaphoresis, and hyperkinesia after the commencement of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine 2 weeks prior for depression. He was found to have severe rhabdomyolysis and developed acute renal failure. The most likely diagnosis was serotonin syndrome induced by venlafaxine, although neuroleptic malignant syndrome was also considered. The differential diagnosis, atypical features in this presentation, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Meniere's disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, A; Vlastarakos, P V; Maragoudakis, P; Candiloros, D; Nikolopoulos, T P

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere's disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere's disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere's disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere's disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems.

  16. A Case of Primary Aldosteronism with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun Hee; Park, Kyung Jun; Kim, Sun Young

    2006-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to chronic renal failure with a 10-year history of hypertension. We found polycystic kidney disease, pulmonary tuberculosis and an aldosterone-producing adrenocortical mass. At this time, her serum potassium level and blood pressure were within the normal range. She refused hemodialysis and then was hospitalized because of uremic encephalopathy. On admission, her serum potassium level was normal without treatment and plasma aldosterone concentration highly elevated. She received hemodialysis, and thereafter hypokalemia developed. We then administered spironolactone, whereupon serum potassium level returned to the normal range. In this case, we thought that normokalemia was balanced hypokalemia of primary aldosteronism with hyperkalemia of chronic renal failure, and that hypokalemia developed after hemodialysis was due to an imbalanced primary aldosteronism with end stage renal disease. PMID:24459492

  17. Renal progenitors: Roles in kidney disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Brooke E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is a devastating condition that affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence is predicted to significantly increase. The kidney is a complex organ encompassing many diverse cell types organized in a elaborate tissue architecture, making regeneration a challenging feat. In recent years, there has been a surge in the field of stem cell research to develop regenerative therapies for various organ systems. Here, we review some recent progressions in characterizing the role of renal progenitors in development, regeneration, and kidney disease in mammals. We also discuss how the zebrafish provides a unique experimental animal model that can provide a greater molecular and genetic understanding of renal progenitors, which may contribute to the development of potential regenerative therapies for human renal afflictions. PMID:27928463

  18. Salt restriction inhibits renal growth and stabilizes injury in rats with established renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, L D; Benstein, J A; Tolbert, E; Feiner, H D

    1996-03-01

    Salt restriction inhibits renal growth and stabilizes injury in rats with established renal disease. Male Munich-Wistar rats that underwent right nephrectomy and segmental infarction of two thirds of the left kidney were fed standard chow for 4 wk and then randomly assigned to ingest standard or low-salt chow for an additional 4 wk. Four wk after ablation, rats had systemic hypertension, proteinuria, and glomerular sclerosis. The prevalence of sclerosis, protein excretion rate, and glomerular volume increased between the fourth and eighth week in rats that were fed standard chow, however, in rats that were fed low-salt chow, the increase in glomerular volume and development of further glomerular sclerosis was prevented whereas the protein excretion rate actually declined. Micropuncture studies performed 8 wk after ablation revealed that the glomerular hydraulic pressure was elevated in remnant kidneys and was not affected by salt restriction. This study demonstrates that dietary salt restriction can prevent further glomerular injury and reduce proteinuria even when instituted in rats with established renal disease. These findings are also consistent with the hypothesis that glomerular hypertrophy promotes injury in this model of hypertension and progressive renal disease.

  19. [Predementia Alzheimer's disease. Benefits of early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Viloria, Aurora

    2011-10-01

    Given population aging and the rise in the number of persons with Alzheimer's disease, measures that aim not only to delay but also to prevent the development of this disease are increasingly required. Advances in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease support the need for a review of current clinical standards for mild cognitive impairment and provide new goals in the early treatment of this disease. The current diagnostic process should be refocussed toward the pathological substrate of this disease rather than symptoms in order to initiate therapeutic measures as soon as possible without waiting for clinical manifestations to appear. Such an approach is essential in patients with greater cognitive reserve, in whom the lesions are usually more severe at diagnosis and treatment is less effective. To identify disease-modifying therapies to delay the onset of the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in cognitively intact persons at high risk, biomarkers for this disease must be validated. A single biomarker is unlikely to provide the required diagnostic accuracy and therefore a multimodal approach, incorporating biochemical, neuropathological and anatomical and metabolic neuroimaging methods, should be employed. To optimize the results of drugs under investigation, a combination of biomarkers should be used to select appropriate participants in the earliest phases of the disease, and disease progression should be followed-up. Early diagnosis might clarify essential questions in the care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, such as the possibility of distinguishing among various subtypes, thus encouraging the development of optimal treatments for each. The ultimate goal is to develop disease-modifying treatments that could be initiated early, while patients are asymptomatic or only minimally symptomatic, to maintain their quality of life.

  20. Diagnosis and management of kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Saguil, Aaron; Fargo, Matthew; Grogan, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, systemic vasculitis that predominantly affects patients younger than five years. It represents the most prominent cause of acquired coronary artery disease in childhood. In the United States, 19 per 100,000 children younger than five years are hospitalized with Kawasaki disease annually. According to U.S. and Japanese guidelines, Kawasaki disease is a clinical diagnosis. Classic (typical) Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on the presence of a fever lasting five or more days, accompanied by four out of five findings: bilateral conjunctival injection, oral changes such as cracked and erythematous lips and strawberry tongue, cervical lymphadenopathy, extremity changes such as erythema or palm and sole desquamation, and polymorphous rash. Incomplete (atypical) Kawasaki disease occurs in persons with fever lasting five or more days and with two or three of these findings. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice to screen for coronary aneurysms, although other techniques are being evaluated for diagnosis and management. Treatment for acute disease is intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin. If there is no response to treatment, patients are given a second dose of intravenous immunoglobulin with or without corticosteroids or other adjunctive treatments. The presence and severity of coronary aneurysms and obstruction at diagnosis determine treatment options and the need, periodicity, and intensity of long-term cardiovascular monitoring for potential atherosclerosis.

  1. Renal neuroendocrine tumour and synchronous pancreas metastasis: histopathological diagnosis using prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Keishi; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Yoshio; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-11-01

    A woman aged 56 years developed 2 synchronous tumours: one, 1.2 cm in diameter at the head of the pancreas; and the other, 4.0 cm in diameter, at the left side of her horseshoe kidney. Preoperative differential diagnosis of these hypovascular lesions included pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) with renal metastasis, PDC with renal angiomyolipoma, renal cell carcinoma with pancreatic metastasis or PDC and renal cell carcinoma. Following pancreaticoduodenectomy and left nephrectomy, both specimens were diagnosed as grade 2 neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Immunohistochemistry revealed that both were positive for prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), which is specific to hindgut-derived NET, including renal NET. Accordingly, the renal tumour was diagnosed as the primary lesion, and the pancreatic tumour as a metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a renal NET with a synchronous pancreas metastasis. Immunohistochemical staining for PAP was a useful diagnostic marker for synchronous NETs in the kidney and pancreas.

  2. Bone disease in patients with long-term renal transplantation and normal renal function.

    PubMed

    Carlini, R G; Rojas, E; Weisinger, J R; Lopez, M; Martinis, R; Arminio, A; Bellorin-Font, E

    2000-07-01

    Renal osteodystrophy may persist during the early years after renal transplantation. However, information on bone status after a successful long-term renal transplantation is limited. We examined biochemical parameters, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone histomorphometry in 25 asymptomatic men with normal renal function after 7.5 +/- 5.7 years of a renal transplantation. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels and urinary calcium level and cyclic andenosine monophosphate excretion were within normal range in all patients. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level was elevated in 11 subjects (133.6 +/- 78 pg/mL) and normal in the other 14 subjects (47.9 +/- 13.6 pg/mL). Mean BMD at the lumbar spine and femoral neck was low in the entire group. However, it progressively increased as time after transplantation increased, approaching normal values after 10 years. Bone histomorphometric analysis showed bone resorption, osteoid volume, and osteoid surface greater than normal range in the majority of patients. Bone formation rate and mineralization surface were low, and mineralization time was delayed in most patients. These lesions were more severe in patients after 3 to 4 years of transplantation but improved with time and approached normal values after a period of 10 years. PTH values did not correlate with bone histological characteristics or BMD. These results show that the bone alterations observed after long-term renal transplantation consist of a mixed bone disease in which features of high bone turnover coexist with altered bone formation and delayed mineralization. These findings may result from the combined effect of preexisting bone disease and immunosuppressive therapy.

  3. Distribution of hypertension and renal disease in Oregon.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, W E; Knudsen, J C; Porter, G A

    1975-01-01

    Expecting to find agreement between the geographic distribution of hypertension and renal disease, we developed regional mortality rates for 1950-72 and prevalence rates for a Selective Service cohort born in 1939-41 and examined during 1957-69. For this purpose the State's counties were grouped into eight geographically homogeneous regions. The general decline in hypertension mortality was most pronounced in Portland, Oregon's major urban center. However, the decline halted during 1968-72 in the southern Cascade region which has become an area of relatively higher risk within the State. During these 23 years nephritis mortality fell, kidney infection mortality was stable, and both syndromes showed peak mortality in other, different regions of the State. The geographic pattern of hypertension prevalence among the draftee cohort resembled the 1963-67 hypertension mortality pattern, but more recent morbidity data are needed to confirm the southern Cascade region's recent change to a high-risk area. Of 529 draftees with diagnosed hypertension, only 35 percent of the cases were previously known, only 7 percent has had any previous treatment, and only 7 percent were associated with known renal conditions. Among 521 registrants with a history of renal disorders, the prevalence of hypertension was increased for all categories of renal disease but was significantly high only for those with a history of glomerulonephritis. To date in Oregon we have found no evidence that renal disorders are major determinants of hypertension morbidity or mortality. PMID:803695

  4. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part I: general principles.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to improve the basis upon which advice on pregnancy is given to women with renal disease and to address issues of obstetric management by drawing upon the accumulated world experience. To ensure the proper rapport between the respect for patient's autonomy and the ethical principle of beneficence, the review attempts to impart up-to-date, evidence-based information on the predictable outcomes and hazards of pregnancy in women with chronic renal disease. The physiology of pregnancy from the perspective of the affected kidney will be discussed as well as the principal predictors of maternal and fetal outcomes and general recommendations of management. The available evidence supports the implication that the degree of renal function impairment is the major determinant for pregnancy outcome. In addition, the presence of hypertension further compounds the risks. On the contrary, the degree of proteinuria does not demonstrate a linear correlation with obstetric outcomes. Management and outcome of pregnancies occurring in women on dialysis and after renal transplant are also discussed. Although the outcome of pregnancies under chronic dialysis has markedly improved in the past decade, the chances of achieving a viable pregnancy are much higher after transplantation. But even in renal transplant recipients, the rate of maternal and fetal complications remains high, in addition to concerns regarding possible adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs on the developing embryo and fetus.

  5. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; P<0.05). This association was more pronounced among younger patients and those with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  6. Determinants of delayed diagnosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Breen, David P; Evans, Jonathan R; Farrell, Krista; Brayne, Carol; Barker, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    The early and accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the first step towards optimal patient management. The aim of this study was to investigate the major determinants of delayed diagnosis in PD. We recruited a population-representative cohort of 239 newly-diagnosed PD patients who underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Non-parametric methods were used to define the factors associated with diagnostic delay. The median time from motor symptom onset to primary care physician (PCP) presentation was considerably longer than the time from PCP presentation to PD diagnosis (11 vs. 1 months). Male sex and presenting motor phenotype were independently associated with delayed PCP presentation on Cox regression analysis. Patients presenting with gait disturbance experienced the longest delay, whilst those presenting with tremor had the shortest. In summary, male sex and presenting motor phenotype are key determinants of delayed diagnosis in PD.

  7. Disordered sleep and noncompliance in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, P L; Gavin, C; Miller, G; Mendelson, W B; Wernli, I; Neugarten, J

    1997-01-01

    Sleep disorders are relatively common in patients with end-stage renal disease, but the diagnosis may be difficult to establish because of the similarity of uremic symptoms to those of the sleep apnea syndrome. After excluding anatomic and metabolic disorders associated with excessive sleepiness and disordered breathing in sleep and after ensuring that the patient is receiving adequate dialysis, the sleep disorder should be diagnosed using polysomnography. Continuous positive pressure airway breathing is an effective treatment for hemodialysis patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but the use of this machinery requires patient compliance, as does the delivery of an adequate amount of dialysis. The difficulties adjusting to end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis can be multiplied by the coexistence of a sleep disorder that requires some ventilatory assistance at night; the case presented in this article characterizes precisely that circumstance.

  8. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  9. Acute renal failure: definitions, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Wang, Wei; Poole, Brian; Mitra, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF), characterized by sudden loss of the ability of the kidneys to excrete wastes, concentrate urine, conserve electrolytes, and maintain fluid balance, is a frequent clinical problem, particularly in the intensive care unit, where it is associated with a mortality of between 50% and 80%. In this review, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARF are discussed, including the vascular, tubular, and inflammatory perturbations. The clinical evaluation of ARF and implications for potential future therapies to decrease the high mortality are described. PMID:15232604

  10. Legionnaire's Disease and Acute Renal Failure: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Boucree, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    A case report is presented of a young man admitted to a general hospital with leukocytosis, elevated temperature, right lower lobe infiltrate, and confusion. A diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, and Legionnaire's disease was made. The patient subsequently had a respiratory arrest and died on the 29th hospital day. This triad is currently an enigma in the field of internal medicine. The diagnosis of each entity is elusive, and in many cases must be made by the astute clinician. Diagnostic features along with early intervention measures and their expected outcomes are discussed. Recognition of the interrelationship of these diseases, risk factors, and vague clinical presentations might allow further prospective intervention methods and diagnostic procedures to be undertaken to avoid the fatal consequences seen in this disease triad. PMID:3074172

  11. Diagnosis of rare inherited glyoxalate metabolic disorders through in-situ analysis of renal stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Grohe, B.; Hoppe, B.; Beck, B. B.; Tessadri, R.

    2012-04-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias type I - III constitute rare autosomal-recessive inherited disorders of the human glyoxylate metabolism. By mechanisms that are ill understood progressive nephrocalcinosis and recurrent urolithiasis (kidney stone formation) often starting in early childhood, along with their secondary complications results in loss of nephron mass which progresses to end-stage renal failure over time. In the most frequent form, end-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the rule and combined liver/kidney transplantation respectively pre-emptive liver transplantation are the only causative treatment today. Hence, this contributes significantly to healthcare costs and early diagnosis is extremely important for a positive outcome for the patient. We are developing a stone-based diagnostic method by in-detail multi-methods investigation of the crystalline moiety in concert with urine and stone proteomics. Stone analysis will allow faster analysis at low-impact for the patients in the early stages of the disease. First results from combined spectroscopic (Raman, FTIR)and geochemical micro-analyses (Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation ICP-MS) are presented here that show significant differences between stones from hyperoxaluria patients and those formed by patients without this disorder (idiopathic stones). Major differences exist in chemistry as well as in morphology and phase composition of the stones. Ca/P ratios and Mg contents differentiate between oxalate-stones from hyperoxaluria patients and idiopathic stones. Results show that also within the different subtypes of primary hyperoxaluria significant differences can be found in stone composition. These imply differences in stone formation which could be exploited for new therapeutic pathways. Furthermore, the results provide important feedback for suspected but yet unconfirmed cases of primary hyperoxaluria when used in concert with the genetic methods routinely applied.

  12. Association of smoking with phenotype at diagnosis and vascular interventions in patients with renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Savard, Sébastien; Azarine, Arshid; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Azizi, Michel; Plouin, Pierre-François; Steichen, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) remains unclear, but tobacco use is thought to be involved. This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate smoking first as a risk factor for renal artery FMD diagnosis and second as a modifier of the clinical and radiological phenotype of this disease. We retrieved 337 adult patients diagnosed with FMD in a referral center for hypertension management, who were first individually matched to controls with essential hypertension for sex, age, systolic blood pressure, number of antihypertensive drugs, and year of visit. Smoking status and other relevant data were collected at first visit. The proportion of current smokers was higher for patients with FMD than for the controls (30% and 18%, respectively, P<0.001; odds ratio, 2.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.9]). Second, characteristics of FMD were compared between current smokers and other patients. Among patients with multifocal FMD, current smokers experienced an earlier diagnosis of hypertension (36 versus 42 years, respectively; P<0.001) and FMD (43 versus 51 years; P<0.001) than other patients, and a greater likelihood of renal artery interventions (57% versus 31%; P<0.001) and of kidney asymmetry (21% versus 4%; P=0.001). In conclusion, current smoking is associated with a higher likelihood of renal artery FMD diagnosis. Rather than a higher incidence of FMD, this may reflect a more aggressive course in smokers, who have earlier hypertension leading to increased and earlier recognition of the disease. Smoking cessation should be strongly encouraged in patients with FMD.

  13. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Rajendrakumar; Nairy, Dhananjaya Matapadi

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the rare autosomal recessive disorders that affect multiple organs of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. We present a case of BBS with features of hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient had end stage renal disease and managed with dialysis. This case also exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases. PMID:27853335

  14. Imbalance in sex hormone levels exacerbates diabetic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Wells, Corinne C; Garman, Joseph H; Asico, Laureano; Escano, Crisanto S; Maric, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Studies suggest that the presence of testosterone exacerbates, whereas the absence of testosterone attenuates, the development of nondiabetic renal disease. However, the effects of the absence of testosterone in diabetic renal disease have not been studied. The study was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nondiabetic, streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and streptozotocin-induced castrated rats (n=10 to 11 per group) for 14 weeks. Diabetes was associated with the following increases: 3.2-fold in urine albumin excretion, 6.3-fold in glomerulosclerosis, 6.0-fold in tubulointerstitial fibrosis, 1.6-fold in collagen type I, 1.2-fold in collagen type IV, 1.3-fold in transforming growth factor-beta protein expression, and 32.7-fold in CD68-positive cell abundance. Diabetes was also associated with a 1.3-fold decrease in matrix metalloproteinase protein expression and activity. Castration further exacerbated all of these parameters. Diabetes was also associated with a 4.7-fold decrease in plasma testosterone, 2.9-fold increase in estradiol, and 2.1-fold decrease in plasma progesterone levels. Castration further decreased plasma testosterone levels but had no additional effects on plasma estradiol and progesterone. These data suggest that diabetes is associated with abnormal sex hormone levels that correlate with the progression of diabetic renal disease. Most importantly, our results suggest an important role for sex hormones in the pathophysiology of diabetic renal complications.

  15. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of orbital inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Sibley, Cailin H; Harrington, Christina A; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Orbital inflammatory diseases include thyroid eye disease (TED), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), sarcoidosis, and nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI). Histopathological diagnosis usually relies on the clinical context and is not always definitive. Gene expression profiling provides diagnostic and therapeutic information in several malignancies, but its role in evaluating nonmalignant disease is relatively untested. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling could provide diagnostic information for NSOI. We collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies from 10 institutions and 83 subjects including 25 with thyroid eye disease, 25 nonspecific orbital inflammation, 20 healthy controls, 6 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 7 with sarcoidosis. Tissues were divided into discovery and validation sets. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. A random forest statistical algorithm based on data from 39 probe sets identified controls, GPA, or TED with an average accuracy of 76% (p=0.02). Random forest analysis indicated that 52% of tissues from patients with nonspecific inflammation were consistent with a diagnosis of GPA. Molecular diagnosis by gene expression profiling will augment clinical data and histopathology in differentiating forms of orbital inflammatory disease.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  18. Diagnosis of periodontal diseases: reaction paper.

    PubMed

    Novak, M J

    1991-12-01

    With the recent description of 12 different forms and sub-forms of periodontitis by the World Workshop in Clinical Periodontics (1989), increased emphasis has been placed on diagnosis. Dr. Ranney's review addressed the specificity and sensitivity of current diagnostic tests with respect to their ability to differentiate between health and disease and between the individual disease states. Although considerable microbiologic and immunologic data have been accumulated in the past decade, very little of this information has proved to be sufficiently sensitive to be of use in differential diagnosis. Clinical measurements provide us with an insensitive, retrospective analysis of what has already occurred but allow us to diagnose disease based on its natural history. Measures of attachment levels, by use of conventional probes, are only sufficiently sensitive indicators of periodontitis when as much as 20-30% of attachment has already been lost. Current technological improvements in probing measurements and radiographic assessment may increase sensitivity in this area. Future improvements in diagnostic techniques will occur with the advent of sensitive biochemical analyses of gingival crevicular fluid. These assays will provide a more objective analysis of inflammation and, in time, will provide sufficient sensitivity to allow for differentiation between and among the various forms of periodontal disease. Future directions in diagnosis will focus on the identification of disease-susceptible individuals and the prediction of future periodontal breakdown.

  19. Exploring Symmetry to Assist Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illán, I. A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; López, M.; Padilla, P.; Chaves, R.; Segovia, F.; Puntonet, C. G.

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioral impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is commonly used to guide the clinician's diagnosis. The essential left-right symmetry of human brains is shown to play a key role in coding and recognition. In the present work we explore the implications of this symmetry in AD diagnosis, showing that recognition may be enhanced when considering this latent symmetry.

  20. Delirium in Parkinson’s Disease: A Cocktail Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mental disturbances have been described in patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Of these, the common conditions are delirium and psychosis. Delirium has been attributed to change of environment, especially hospital stay and infections; while psychosis is due to drugs like dopamine agonists. This is a case of a 75-year-old male, on levodopa therapy for PD, who presented with delirium and ended up with a cocktail diagnosis: Cryptococcal meningitis, Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (HE), Urinary tract infection with acute renal failure, Uremic encephalopathy and Levodopa induced psychosis. This case report, therefore, highlights the need to look for other causes of delirium in a patient with PD who is on levodopa therapy. PMID:28208916

  1. Imaging in the diagnosis of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A disease is considered rare if it affects no more than 5 in 10,000 people. More than six thousand rare diseases have been detected so far and they affect 6-8% of the population which equals 2.3-3 million people in Poland. Some of the rare diseases are already diagnosed in utero, e.g. skeletal dysplasias on ultrasonography or central nervous system diseases on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many cases are finally diagnosed after radiologist's suggestion in a radiological report. Although diagnostic imaging cannot be considered as a basis for diagnosis of most of rare diseases, these studies represent an important element in the diagnostic chain. The complicated and long process of diagnosis may be significantly shortened by suggestions of the radiologist, based on the observation of these elements of radiological appearance of the lesions that are characteristic for a particular group of diseases, or even for a particular disease entity. However, the absolute condition for success is the close clinical-radiological cooperation, with clinicians providing the radiologists with their knowledge of patient's history, clinical manifestations, and the results of other investigations.

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Thad; Tadkod, Altaf; Hepburn, Iryna; Schade, Robert R

    2013-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (hepatic steatosis). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is characterized by steatosis, liver cell injury, and inflammation. The mechanism of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is unknown but involves the development of insulin resistance, steatosis, inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with physical inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Screening is not recommended in the general population. The diagnosis is usually made after an incidental discovery of unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels or when steatosis is noted on imaging (e.g., ultrasonography). Patients are often asymptomatic and the physical examination is often unremarkable. No single laboratory test is diagnostic, but tests of liver function, tests for metabolic syndrome, and tests to exclude other causes of abnormal liver enzyme levels are routinely performed. Imaging studies, such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, can assess hepatic fat, measure liver and spleen size, and exclude other diseases. Liver biopsy remains the criterion standard for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Noninvasive tests are available and may reduce the need for liver biopsy. A healthy diet, weight loss, and exercise are first-line therapeutic measures to reduce insulin resistance. There is insufficient evidence to support bariatric surgery, metformin, thiazolidinediones, bile acids, or antioxidant supplements for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The long-term prognosis is not associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, cancer, or liver disease.

  3. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  4. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  5. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  6. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  7. End stage renal disease in minorities.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, I. A.; Hosten, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    It is projected that the proportion of black Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans entering the ESRD program will continue to increase. Despite the increase in the average age of the ESRD population, the minorities entering the ESRD program are much younger. The major risk factors of ESRD--hypertension, diabetes, and glomerulonephritis--are affecting these minorities at a higher rate and in varying combinations. High prevalence and severity of hypertension followed by diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors in blacks, especially black women. Heroin and HIV nephropathies, tied to the epidemic of illicit drug abuse, have a major impact on young black men. The high prevalence of diabetes and the epidemic of glomerulonephritis in certain tribes are the major risk factors in American Indians. Hypertension and diabetes are the risk factors for the rapidly increasing Asian American population, especially for the elderly segment of this population. Diabetes predominates as the risk factor for the rapidly growing Hispanic American population, a group that needs to be identified separately within the ESRD program. Diabetes and hypertension are treatable, and adequate control can prevent progression of renal failure. However, with minority groups, it is difficult to fully implement the measures necessary to achieve this control. Outreach programs are necessary not only to provide medical treatment but to include instruction in socioeconomic and educational strategies. Programs that will seek out these patients and treat them should also educate them about their diet, about the detrimental effects of alcohol and smoking, and about the danger of substance abuse. Ultimately, these programs may be much cheaper than supporting a rapidly increasing ESRD program. PMID:1920501

  8. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  9. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Renal Function: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Stephen D.J.; Cook, F.A.B.; Dennis, Martin S.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The small vessel disease (SVD) that appears in the brain may be part of a multisystem disorder affecting other vascular beds such as the kidney and retina. Because renal failure is associated with both stroke and white matter hyperintensities we hypothesised that small vessel (lacunar) stroke would be more strongly associated with renal failure than cortical stroke. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish first if lacunar stroke was associated with the renal function, and second, if cerebral small vessel disease seen on the MRI of patients without stroke was more common in patients with renal failure. Methods We searched Medline and EMBASE for studies in adults with cerebral SVD (lacunar stroke or white matter hyper intensities (WMH) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)), in which renal function was assessed (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or proteinuria). We extracted data on SVD diagnosis, renal function, demographics and comorbidities. We performed two meta-analyses: first, we calculated the odds of renal impairment in lacunar (small vessel) ischaemic stroke compared to other ischaemic stroke subtypes (non-small vessel disease); and second, we calculated the odds of renal impairment in non-stroke individuals with WMH on MRI compared to individuals without WMH. We then performed a sensitivity analysis by excluding studies with certain characteristics and repeating the meta-analysis calculation. Results After screening 11,001 potentially suitable titles, we included 37 papers reporting 32 studies of 20,379 subjects: 15 of stroke patients and 17 of SVD features in non-stroke patients. To diagnose lacunar stroke, 13/15 of the studies used risk factor-based classification (none used diffusion-weighted MRI). 394/1,119 (35%) of patients with lacunar stroke had renal impairment compared with 1,443/4,217 (34%) of patients with non-lacunar stroke, OR 0.88, (95% CI 0.6-1.30). In individuals without stroke the

  10. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  11. System for renal movement elimination and renal diagnosis supported by vague knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jens; Hiltner, Jens; Fathi, Madjid; Reusch, Bernd; Stattaus, Joerg; Hacklaender, Thomas

    2000-06-01

    For the analysis of renal function, sequences of 90 magnet resonance images of the abdominal region showing both kidneys are taken in intervals of two seconds after a contrast medium was applied. Respiration of the patients during the acquisition of the images leads to organ movements throughout the series. These displacements are corrected by using an extended cepstral technique. To minimize registration errors caused by inhomogeneous movements of organs and tissues during respiration, the cepstrum-relevant part of the images is limited to small regions of interest around both kidneys. Even organ movements of sub-pixel range can be detected. After correction, the kidneys are the same position throughout the sequence. The regions of interest marked in one image are projected to all other images. To archive diagnostic results, dynamic contrast medium evaluations for different tissues of the kidneys are computed with signal-intensity-time graphs. Using a-priori knowledge about parameters of the SIT-graph for a whole kidney and about organ shape and structure, pixels of the kidney-segment are divided into the three classes renal cortex, medulla and pelvis. As a result, precise graphs can be computed for each tissue. The evaluation of the system is in progress, time save is more than one hour per patient.

  12. Accurate diagnosis of renal transplant rejection by indium-111 platelet imaging despite postoperative cyclosporin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Adams, M.B.; Kauffman, H.M.; Trembath, L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Tisdale, P.L.; Rao, S.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T.

    1988-08-01

    Previous reports indicate that In-111 platelet scintigraphy (IPS) is a reliable test for the early diagnosis of acute post-operative renal transplant rejection (TR). However, the recent introduction of cyclosporin for post-transplantation immunosuppression requires that the diagnostic efficacy of IPS once again be established. Therefore, a prospective IPS study of 73 post-operative renal transplant recipients was conducted. Fourty-nine patients received cyclosporin and 24 patients did not receive this drug. Between these two patient groups, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic sensitivities (0.86 vs 0.80) and specificities (0.93 vs 0.84) with which TR was identified. We conclude that during the first two weeks following renal transplantation the cyclosporin treatment regimen used at our institution does not limit the reliability of IPS as a test for TR.

  13. Case for diagnosis. Riga-Fede disease.

    PubMed

    Calistru, Ana Maria; Lisboa, Carmen; Bettencourt, Herberto; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    Riga-Fede disease is a rare, benign disorder characterized by reactive ulceration of the oral mucosa associated with repetitive dental traumatism. It was first described in children with neurologic disorders and is very rare in adults. This case report describes the occurrence of a large ulcer of the tongue, resembling squamous cell carcinoma, in an adult with hemiparesis. The lesion cleared after neurologic recovery. This case highlights the importance of considering this disorder in the differential diagnosis of oral mucosal ulcerations.

  14. Palliative dialysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Disha D

    2011-12-01

    Dialysis patients are often denied hospice benefits unless they forego dialysis treatments. However, many of those patients might benefit from as-needed dialysis treatments to palliate symptoms of uremia, fluid overload, etc. The current Medicare payment system precludes this "palliative dialysis" except in those few cases where the terminal diagnosis is unrelated to renal failure. As approximately three quarters of all US patients on dialysis have Medicare as their primary insurance, a of review of Medicare policy is suggested, with a goal of creating a new "palliative dialysis" category that would allow patients to receive treatments on a less regular schedule without affecting the quality statistics of the dialysis center.( 1 ).

  15. [Part V. Laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jofré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martín V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-10-01

    In this fifth part of Guidelines for Chagas disease, diagnostic techniques for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans are reviewed, the interpretation of laboratory results and an algorithm for laboratory diagnosis in immunocompetent hosts are presented. Chagas disease may be diagnosed by three kinds of techniques: direct, which allow detect the presence of the parasite in different kind of samples; indirect, based on the search of immune specific response against T. cruzi antigens and molecular, which detect parasite genetic material. Direct techniques are utilized mainly in acute phase of disease, as the parasite is present in blood of infected host. These techniques do not require be confirmed by other methods. For chronic undetermined phase and for symptomatic phase it is recommended to use indirect techniques; generally, immunoassay techniques (ELISA) that detect IgG antibodies directed against T. cruzi antigens are performed. As false positive results are possible, a positive or undetermined result must be confirmed by at least another technique (indirect immunofluorescence or indirect hemmaglutination). In Chile, confirmation of infection is performed by the Instituto de Salud Pública National Reference Laboratory or at surrogate centers. Molecular methods may be used to make the diagnosis in acute or chronic phase of infection, with more accuracy in the acute phase, and it is mainly recommended to diagnose vertical transmission of T. cruzi as early diagnosis of congenital infection increases the possibility to cure the sibling and besides it is a good marker to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment.

  16. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Y; Sieradzan, K

    1995-01-01

    Since the introduction of levodopa therapy for idiopathic Parkinson's disease over 20 years ago, there has been an awakening of research interest in this chronic neuro-degenerative disorder. This paper describes current understanding of the role of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and problems associated with both diagnosis and management. It briefly outlines both pharmacological and non-pharmacological options for treatment. Despite an increasing armoury of available treatments, the optimum management for this condition remains controversial. PMID:7619574

  17. Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Rapidly Growing Lung Nodules in an End-stage Renal Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Atsushi; Okada, Akira; Yoshida, Taiko; Itoyama, Satoshi; Nakai, Tatsuro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Takano, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. He required continuous dialysis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Subsequently, multiple nodules were discovered in both lungs for the first time, and Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the patient's sputum, blood, bilateral pleural fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, resulting in a diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis. This case represents an invaluable example of disseminated cryptococcosis with rapidly growing lung nodules in a dialysis patient, and illustrates that dialysis causes innate immune disorder and the reactivation of cryptococcosis. PMID:28154287

  18. Improvement of Erdheim-Chester disease-related renal failure after treatment with anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Graziani, Giorgio; Reggiani, Francesco; Buemi, Michele; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by infiltrates of lipid-laden CD68+/CD1a− histiocytes, affecting heart, lungs, central nervous system, and bones. Kidney and adjacent structures can also be affected, leading to renal failure in about 30% of cases. The diagnosis is challenging, and treatment is generally based on administration of interferon-alpha (IFNα), but preliminary results also showed the therapeutic efficacy of anakinra, an antagonist of the receptor of interleukin-1 (IL-1). We report the case of an elderly patient with ECD and severe involvement of the heart and kidneys who was successfully treated with anakinra. PMID:26877969

  19. Improvement of Erdheim-Chester disease-related renal failure after treatment with anakinra.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Graziani, Giorgio; Reggiani, Francesco; Buemi, Michele; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by infiltrates of lipid-laden CD68(+)/CD1a(-) histiocytes, affecting heart, lungs, central nervous system, and bones. Kidney and adjacent structures can also be affected, leading to renal failure in about 30% of cases. The diagnosis is challenging, and treatment is generally based on administration of interferon-alpha (IFNα), but preliminary results also showed the therapeutic efficacy of anakinra, an antagonist of the receptor of interleukin-1 (IL-1). We report the case of an elderly patient with ECD and severe involvement of the heart and kidneys who was successfully treated with anakinra.

  20. Diagnosis and management of polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gevers, Tom J G; Drenth, Joost P H

    2013-02-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is arbitrarily defined as a liver that contains >20 cysts. The condition is associated with two genetically distinct diseases: as a primary phenotype in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and as an extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Processes involved in hepatic cystogenesis include ductal plate malformation with concomitant abnormal fluid secretion, altered cell-matrix interaction and cholangiocyte hyperproliferation. PLD is usually a benign disease, but can cause debilitating abdominal symptoms in some patients. The main risk factors for growth of liver cysts are female sex, exogenous oestrogen use and multiple pregnancies. Ultrasonography is very useful for achieving a correct diagnosis of a polycystic liver and to differentiate between ADPKD and PCLD. Current radiological and surgical therapies for symptomatic patients include aspiration-sclerotherapy, fenestration, segmental hepatic resection and liver transplantation. Medical therapies that interact with regulatory mechanisms controlling expansion and growth of liver cysts are under investigation. Somatostatin analogues are promising; several clinical trials have shown that these drugs can reduce the volume of polycystic livers. The purpose of this Review is to provide an update on the diagnosis and management of PLD with a focus on literature published in the past 4 years.

  1. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Compartir On this Page Diagnosis Treatment Complications Diagnosis Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease is usually diagnosed with one ...

  2. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and staging of renal and perirenal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Demas, B E; Williams, R D; McNamara, M T; Hedgcock, M W; Amparo, E G; Tanagho, E A

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-one adult patients underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after CT scans had demonstrated findings consistent with renal cell carcinoma. MR images were interpreted prospectively and independently of the CT findings. Because the CT scanning was performed at multiple institutions by many examiners, this study was not a direct comparison of CT versus MR. The preoperative diagnoses and staging of the neoplasms, as judged by MR, were compared with those obtained at laparotomy (n = 28), autopsy (n = 1), or biopsy (n = 2). Correct preoperative diagnoses were rendered in 31 patients (100%) on the basis of MR findings. The anatomic staging of 27 renal cell carcinomas was correctly performed by MR in 26 patients (86%). When compared with results of previous studies of the value of CT in the diagnosis and staging of renal neoplasms, MR appears to have several advantages in determination of the origin of the mass; the evaluation of vascular patency; the detection of perihilar lymph node metastases; and the evaluation of direct tumor invasion of adjacent organs. MR is sensitive in determining the extent of tumor thrombus and in evaluating invasion of the inferior vena caval wall. MR should assume an important role in the diagnosis and staging of renal neoplasms.

  4. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  5. Diagnosis of Periodontal Diseases by Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Jun-Ichi; Hino, Mami; Bando, Mika; Hiroshima, Yuka

    Many middle aged and old persons take periodontal diseases that mainly cause teeth loss and result in some systemic diseases. The prevention of periodontal diseases is very important for oral and systemic health, but the present diagnostic examination is not fully objective and suitable. To diagnose periodontal diseases exactly, some biomarkers shown inflammation, tissue degradation and bone resorption, in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and saliva are known. We demonstrated that GCF levels of calprotectin, inflammation-related protein, and carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, bone metabolism-related protein, were associated with clinical condition of periodontal diseases, and suggested that these proteins may be useful biomarkers for periodontal diseases. Recently, determinations of genes and proteins by using microdevices are studied for diagnosis of some diseases. We detected calprotectin protein by chemiluminescent immunoassay on a microchip and showed the possibility of specific and quantitative detection of calprotectin in a very small amount of GCF. To determine plural markers in GCF by using microdevices contributes to develop accurate, objective diagnostic system of periodontal diseases.

  6. Alzheimer's disease: early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chu, L W

    2012-06-01

    With ageing of populations, the worldwide population of persons with dementia will reach over 81 million by 2040, of which the most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, methods to diagnose it, and treatment. Magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and Pittsburgh compound B and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain can facilitate an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in its early stage, and diagnose the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease. At present, only symptomatic but not disease-modifying drug treatments are available. Donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine are the currently approved cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease. Overall, cholinesterase inhibitors show beneficial effects on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Memantine is another symptomatic treatment for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients. It has a small beneficial effect on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Vitamin E has antioxidant properties, and may be used in some Alzheimer's disease patients without vascular risk factors. Concurrent non-pharmacological and psychosocial management of patients and their caregivers have a very important role. Disease-modifying therapies are still under development, whilst immunotherapy may be a viable option in the near future.

  7. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed.

  8. Hypertension in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Skrzypczyk, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This review summarizes current data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of hypertension (HTN) in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Worldwide prevalence of ESRD ranges from 5.0 to 84.4 per million age-related population. HTN is present in 27-79% of children with ESRD, depending on the modality of renal replacement therapy and the exact definition of hypertension. Ambulatory BP monitoring has been recommended for the detection of HTN and evaluation of treatment effectiveness. HTN in dialyzed patients is mostly related to hypervolemia, sodium overload, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis, reduced vitamin D levels, and effects of microRNA. In children undergoing chronic dialysis therapy, important factors include optimization of renal replacement therapy and preservation of residual renal function, allowing reduction of volume- and sodium-overload, along with appropriate drug treatment, particularly with calcium channel blockers, RAAS inhibitors, and loop diuretics.

  9. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy.

  10. [Diagnosis and treatment of Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; de la Fuente-Cortez, Beatriz; Molina-García, Avril; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Esmer-Sánchez, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare, progressive and often fatal neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. Among glycogen storage disorders, it is one of the most common. Its clinical manifestations can start at any moment of life, with a very variable symptomatology. In this article, we show an extended revision of the literature in regards to the main medical aspects of Pompe disease: etiology, psychopathology, epidemiology, clinical variants, pathological diagnosis, and enzyme replacement therapy. With this information, we created a diagnostic and therapeutic guide, which is addressed to specialists and to first-level physicians, in order to let them identify both the classic and the late forms of this disease. We describe as well the best, timely, multidisciplinary treatment in use. Also, we show some suggestions to the proper functioning of health institutions, and routes to diagnosis. We conclude that Pompe disease may be properly diagnosed and treated if health care professionals follow the internationally approved recommendations.

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Ao, A

    1996-12-01

    Research on diagnosis of inherited disease in human embryo before implantation was initiated to help those couples who would prefer to select embryos at this stage rather than during pregnancy. Following in vitro fertilization (IVF), one to two cells were removed from 3 day cleavage stage embryo and cells were analysed for genetic defects. Embryos diagnosed as unaffected were returned to the uterus and thus the resulting pregnancies were assured to be normal. First babies born after the preimplantation diagnosis were using DNA amplification of Y-linked sequences by PCR to avoid X-linked disease. Several pregnancies were obtained by identifying sex of embryos using dual fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with fluorochrome labelled DNA sequences specific for X- and Y-chromosomes to interphase nuclei. Development of single cell PCR for single gene defects led to diagnose several genetic disorders. Preimplantation diagnosis was successfully achieved for predominant delta 508 deletion causing cystic fibrosis, and pregnancies were also diagnosed for Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, Tay-Sachs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  12. Molecular diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Baronciani, L; Goodeve, A; Peyvandi, F

    2017-03-01

    The role of molecular characterization in the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) is not essential if the patients have been extensively investigated using phenotypic analysis. On the other hand, if some of these phenotype assays are not available, the identification of the mutation causing the disease could be crucial for an accurate diagnosis. Nevertheless, there are several reasons for performing molecular analysis in patients phenotypically well characterized, e.g. to identify the mutation causing VWD can be useful for patients and their family members when prenatal diagnosis is required (type 3 or severe type 2). In this manuscript, we report the techniques used for the molecular characterization of suspected VWD patients. We describe the use of online von Willebrand factor database and online single nucleotide variation databases, the former to verify whether a candidate mutation has been previously identified in other VWD patients and the latter to ascertain whether a putative mutation has been reported earlier in healthy individuals. We listed the available in silico analysis tools, to determine the predicted pathogenicity of a sequence variant and to establish its possible negative effect on the normal splicing process. We also report the strategy that can be used to identify VWD type 2 patients' mutations in subjects who have been fully characterized using the phenotype assays.

  13. [Management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy in 2013 in France].

    PubMed

    Tuppin, Philippe; Cuerq, Anne; Torre, Sylvie; Couchoud, Cécile; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy. Among the 51 million national health insurance general scheme beneficiaries (77% of the population), persons 18 years and older, starting dialysis or undergoing preemptive renal transplantation in 2013, were included in this study. Data were derived from the French national health insurance system (SNIIRAM). In this population of 6674 patients (median age: 68 years), 88% initiated renal replacement therapy by haemodialysis, 8% by peritoneal dialysis, and 4% by renal transplantation. During the year preceding initiation of dialysis, 76% of patients had been hospitalised with at least one diagnostic code for renal disease in 83% of cases, 16% had not received any reimbursements for serum creatinine assay and 32% had not seen a nephrologist; 87% were taking at least one antihypertensive drug (60% were taking at least a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor) and 30% were taking a combination of 4 or more classes of antihypertensive drugs. For patients initiating haemodialysis in a haemodialysis centre, 39% had undergone a procedure related to arteriovenous fistula and 10% had been admitted to an intensive care unit. This study, based on the available reimbursement data, shows that, despite frequent use of the health care system by this population, there is still room for improvement of screening and management of patients with end-stage renal disease and preparation for renal replacement therapy.

  14. Captopril-enhanced renal scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reusz, György Sandor; Kis, Eva; Cseprekál, Orsolya; Szabó, Attila Jozsef; Kis, Eva

    2010-02-01

    Hypertension in childhood is no longer a rare condition mainly secondary to renal, or renovascular diseases, as a growing proportion of children are obese and hypertensive, with the phenotype of metabolic syndrome. Thus, we need to reconsider our practice in the examination of the hypertensive child and redefine the place of non-invasive methods for screening of renovascular hypertension, and specifically, to evaluate the value of captopril-enhanced renal scintigraphy at the two ends of the palette: the obese child with hypertension and the severely hypertensive prepubertal child. Renal artery stenosis in children is mainly due to fibromuscular dysplasia and stenoses associated with syndromes involving single or multiple smaller branch vessels. This explains the low specificity and sensitivity of the color-Doppler ultrasound method and captopril renal scintigraphy. Even the more sophisticated computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) angiographic techniques are, at present, not sensitive enough to exclude stenoses of the small branches definitely. Thus, children in whom there is a strong suggestion of renovascular hypertension should undergo angiography with a view to endovascular treatment, as non-invasive imaging has no significant benefit and might lead to a delay in treatment. In the cases when the probability of renovascular disease is moderate a basic assessment of renal function and structure is sufficient. In the neonate, catheter-associated thromboembolic disease is among the most common causes hypertension. It should be controlled medically until the patient is old enough to undergo angiography and angioplasty successfully. Thus, in this age group, there is a place for functional imaging with renal sonography and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) renography to detect hemodynamically significant renovascular disease, with the limitations mentioned above. However, the rapid technical evolution of non-invasive methods

  15. [Crohn disease: diagnosis by graded compression ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Z; Makó, E; Dévai, T; Tulassay, Z

    1995-08-27

    Fifty-four patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel underwent ultrasound examination with graded compression. The pathologic sonographic findings were compared with the clinical, endoscopic and in 32 cases with the parallel performed CT and selective enterographic examinations. Of the 29 proven cases of Crohn's disease 26 (89.7%) had bowel wall thickening detectable with US. The change in the bowel wall structure correlated to the stage of the disease. The luminal narrowing, the mesenteric involvement, the enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the abscesses and fistulas were judged easily, but the length and the location of the bowel segment were estimated only approximately. The characteristic but nonspecific signs observed by ultrasound were found to be a useful adjunct to the endoscopic and roentgen examinations. The ultrasound with graded compression in our view is a well usable alternative method for both diagnosis and follow-up, informing about the transmural spread of the pathology.

  16. Renal and testicular agenesis in a patient with Darier's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, L Y; Wortsman, J; McConnachie, P

    1985-05-01

    Darier's disease is a familial disorder of the skin that has been associated with corneal, bone, pulmonary, and urogenital abnormalities. This report describes a novel urogenital anomaly, namely renal and testicular agenesis, in a patient with Darier's disease. Detailed study of the kindred demonstrated an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance for Darier's disease and also revealed the presence of autoimmune thyroiditis in several family members. Thyroid involvement ranged from isolated goiter to hypothyroidism. Tissue typing for HLA-A, B, C, and DR antigens did not reveal a specific haplotype common to all the carriers of the cutaneous or thyroid disorder. It is concluded that patients with Darier's disease should be carefully evaluated for the occurrence of systemic diseases, especially urogenital abnormalities and thyroid disorders.

  17. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  18. [Colonic diverticular disease: diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2012-02-12

    Colonic diverticular disease is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in the Western world, affecting approximately 50% of the population above the age of 70 years. Symptoms develop only in about one quarter of the affected individuals with complications in one-third of the symptomatic patients. Diagnosis is mostly confirmed by colonoscopy. Abdominal CT is the most sensitive for the diagnosis of complicated severe diverticulitis, while colonoscopy or in severe cases angiography may be performed in bleeding patients. Initial therapy of non-complicated symptomatic diverticulitis includes antibiotics and more recently non-absorbable antibiotics. In complicated cases should be treated with broad spectrum i.v. antibiotics, however surgery may became necessary in a minority of the cases. The proportion of patients needing acute surgical intervention has decreased in the last decades with the advancement of conservative management including medical therapy, endoscopy and imaging techniques and the indication of elective was also changed.

  19. Undetected gynaecological disorders in women with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, R; Regan, L

    1997-04-01

    Women with chronic renal disease (CRD) who are on dialysis or have a functioning renal transplant are typically stoical in their attitude towards other health problems. We undertook a prospective study of 100 women with CRD to assess the prevalence of gynaecological disorders in this group of patients. Assessment included the measurement of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin and oestradiol concentrations, cervical cytology and a pelvic ultrasound scan. We found that gynaecological problems are highly prevalent and frequently unrecognized. Of these women, 58% had a menstrual disorder, with uncontrolled menorrhagia being a significant problem when it aggravated the chronic anaemia of renal disease, and 35% were menopausal, including seven women under the age of 40 years. Menopausal symptoms were undertreated. We identified a 14-fold increase in premature ovarian failure secondary to CRD and the use of cyclophosphamide therapy. In all, 22% of the women were subfertile and 10% had an abnormal smear, with cervical dyskariosis being significantly increased because of long-term immunosuppression. Contraceptive advice had often been absent or inappropriate. We conclude that formal gynaecological review should be routinely available for women with CRD.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, George T

    2003-01-01

    The defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease is cognitive impairment, but commonly this impairment is accompanied by mood and behavioral symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, inappropriate behavior, sleep disturbance, psychosis, and agitation. The symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are not normative to the aging process. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in the majority of cases can be made with confidence through office-based clinical assessment and informant interview. Alzheimer's disease is the most common of the dementing disorders and is exponentially increasing in incidence, projected to affect 8.64 million people in the United States by the year 2047. At present, no treatment can prevent or cure Alzheimer's disease, and the fact that Alzheimer's affects a geriatric population makes treatment all the more challenging. Therapies that could delay onset of symptoms even briefly would have a major impact on public health. As the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease increases, researchers are examining the efficacy of treatment options beyond the realm of the established cholinesterase inhibitors.

  1. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. Objective To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. Method The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Results Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. Conclusion GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and

  2. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  3. Huntington's disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, S E; Mohr, E; Ilivitsky, V; Jones, B D

    1994-01-01

    This review of the clinical features of Huntington's disease incorporates recent developments in pathophysiology, preclinical diagnosis and treatment. Although the mechanism initiating and guiding the cell destruction in this illness is currently unknown, the excitatory neurotoxin and the energy metabolism models may provide a valuable direction for future research. Similarly, although the precise relation between the neuroanatomical damage in Huntington's disease and the functional disability is not clear, applications of recently developed neural connection models have implicated a number of important brain-behavior associations. Preclinical diagnostic procedures have evolved through successive iterations that have each contributed to increased reliability. New functional brain imaging techniques are sure to add to this promising domain in the future. Preclinical diagnosis has been stimulated by the recent isolation of the Huntington's gene which has also rekindled awareness of the importance of informed genetic counselling and the inherent ethical dilemmas in genetic testing. Treatment approaches to Huntington's disease have been confined to palliative care with secondary symptom management and psychotherapeutic support. Experimental therapeutic strategies for the illness itself have had a rather disappointing record to date. Further developments in NMDA antagonism and neural cell grafting may provide some hope for the future. PMID:7528535

  4. Cucumber disease diagnosis using multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Li, Hongning; Shi, Junsheng; Yang, Weiping; Liao, Ningfang

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, multispectral imaging technique for plant diseases diagnosis is presented. Firstly, multispectral imaging system is designed. This system utilizes 15 narrow-band filters, a panchromatic band, a monochrome CCD camera, and standard illumination observing environment. The spectral reflectance and color of 8 Macbeth color patches are reproduced between 400nm and 700nm in the process. In addition, spectral reflectance angle and color difference is obtained through measurements and analysis of color patches using spectrometer and multispectral imaging system. The result shows that 16 narrow-bands multispectral imaging system realizes good accuracy in spectral reflectance and color reproduction. Secondly, a horticultural plant, cucumber' familiar disease are the researching objects. 210 multispectral samples are obtained by multispectral and are classified by BP artificial neural network. The classification accuracies of Sphaerotheca fuliginea, Corynespora cassiicola, Pseudoperonospora cubensis are 100%. Trichothecium roseum and Cladosporium cucumerinum are 96.67% and 90.00%. It is confirmed that the multispectral imaging system realizes good accuracy in the cucumber diseases diagnosis.

  5. Assessment of renal pathology and dysfunction in children with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ramaswami, Uma; Najafian, Behzad; Schieppati, Arrigo; Mauer, Michael; Bichet, Daniel G

    2010-02-01

    Overt renal disease often first presents in male individuals with Fabry disease in early to middle adulthood, but proteinuria and reduced GFR may occur in adolescents and in young children. More recently, kidney biopsy data have shown early renal histologic changes in pediatric patients, and kidney dysfunction, primarily proteinuria, seems to be more common in girls. Renal investigations and their timing in children remain poorly defined. A consensus on renal investigations is necessary to understand the natural progression of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of treatments such as enzyme replacement therapies. This article addresses three main categories: Use of GFRs, measuring albuminuria, and renal biopsies in children.

  6. Value of comprehensive renal ultrasound in children with acute urinary tract infection for assessment of renal involvement: comparison with DMSA scintigraphy and final diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brader, Peter; Riccabona, Michael; Schwarz, Thomas; Seebacher, Ursula; Ring, Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of comprehensive renal ultrasound (US), i.e., combining greyscale US and amplitude-coded color Doppler sonography (aCDS), for assessment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in infants and children, compared to (1) (99m)Tc DMSA scintigraphy and (2) final diagnosis. Two hundred eighty-seven children with UTI underwent renal comprehensive US and DMSA scintigraphy. The results were compared with regard to their reliability to diagnose renal involvement, using (1) DMSA scintigraphy and (2) final diagnosis as the gold standard. Sixty-seven children clinically had renal involvement. Sensitivity increased from 84.1% using only aCDS to 92.1% for the combined US approach, using DMSA scintigraphy as the reference standard. When correlated with the final diagnosis, sensitivity for DMSA scintigraphy was 92.5%; sensitivity for comprehensive US was 94.0%. Our data demonstrate an increasing sensitivity using the combination of renal greyscale US supplemented by aCDS for differentiation of upper from lower UTI. Sensitivity for DMSA and comprehensive US was similar for both methods compared to the final diagnosis. Comprehensive US should gain a more important role in the imaging algorithm of children with acute UTI, thereby reducing the radiation burden.

  7. Subclavian Artery Disease: Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tisa; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Ayah, Omar Abine; McCormick, Daniel; Goldberg, Sheldon

    2017-04-01

    The diagnosis of brachiocephalic disease is often overlooked. Symptoms include arm claudication and vertebrobasilar insufficiency. In patients who have had the use of the internal mammary artery for coronary bypass surgery, the development of symptoms of myocardial ischemia should alert the clinician to the possibility of subclavian artery stenosis. Also, in patients who have had axillofemoral bypass, lower-extremity claudication may occur. Recognition involves physical examination and accurate noninvasive testing. Endovascular therapy has proven to be effective in alleviating symptoms in properly selected patients.

  8. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  9. Automated system for periodontal disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalat, Salvador E.; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Monserrat, Carlos

    1997-04-01

    Evolution of periodontal disease is one of the most important data for the clinicians in order to achieve correct planning and treatment. Clinical measure of the periodontal sulcus depth is the most important datum to know the exact state of periodontal disease. These measures must be done periodically study bone resorption evolution around teeth. Time factor of resorption indicates aggressiveness of periodontitis. Manual probes are commonly used with direct reading. Mechanical probes give automatic signal but this method uses complicated and heavy probes that are only limited for University researchers. Probe position must be the same to have right diagnosis. Digital image analysis of periodontal probing provides practical, accurate and easy tool. Gum and plaque index could also be digitally measured with this method.

  10. Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banchs, Isabel; Casasnovas, Carlos; Albertí, Antonia; De Jorge, Laura; Povedano, Mónica; Montero, Jordi; Martínez-Matos, Juan Antonio; Volpini, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) is a genetically heterogeneous group of conditions that affect the peripheral nervous system. The disease is characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of peripheral nerves and exhibits a range of patterns of genetic transmission. In the majority of cases, CMT first appears in infancy, and its manifestations include clumsiness of gait, predominantly distal muscular atrophy of the limbs, and deformity of the feet in the form of foot drop. It can be classified according to the pattern of transmission (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X linked), according to electrophysiological findings (demyelinating or axonal), or according to the causative mutant gene. The classification of CMT is complex and undergoes constant revision as new genes and mutations are discovered. In this paper, we review the most efficient diagnostic algorithms for the molecular diagnosis of CMT, which are based on clinical and electrophysiological data. PMID:19826499

  11. Immunosensor for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio Aparecido Pupim; Colli, Walter; da Costa, Paulo Inácio; Yamanaka, Hideko

    2005-07-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi proteins from epimastigote membranes, herein referred as antigens, have been used for the construction of an amperometric immunosensor for serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease. The proteins used had a molecular mass ranging from 30 to 100 kDa. The gold electrode was treated with cysteamine and glutaraldehyde prior to antigen immobilization. Antibodies present in the serum of patients with Chagas' disease were captured by the immobilized antigens and the affinity interaction was monitored by chronoamperometry at a potential of -400 mV (versus Ag pseudo-reference electrode) using peroxidase-labeled IgG conjugate and hydrogen peroxide, iodide substrate. The incubation time to allow maximum antigen-antibody and antibody-peroxidase-labeled IgG interactions was 20 min with a reactivity threshold at -0.104 microA.

  12. CUBN as a Novel Locus for End-Stage Renal Disease: Insights from Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8–9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys – graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  13. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altissimi, Giancarlo; Turchetta, Rosaria; Rigante, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy. PMID:28168075

  14. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  15. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  16. Epidemiology of paediatric renal stone disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Coward, R; Peters, C; Duffy, P; Corry, D; Kellett, M; Choong, S; van't, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: The previous epidemiological study of paediatric nephrolithiasis in Britain was conducted more than 30 years ago. Aims: To examine the presenting features, predisposing factors, and treatment strategies used in paediatric stones presenting to a British centre over the past five years. Methods: A total of 121 children presented with a urinary tract renal stone, to one adult and one paediatric centre, over a five year period (1997–2001). All children were reviewed in a dedicated stone clinic and had a full infective and metabolic stone investigative work up. Treatment was assessed by retrospective hospital note review. Results: A metabolic abnormality was found in 44% of children, 30% were classified as infective, and 26% idiopathic. Bilateral stones on presentation occurred in 26% of the metabolic group compared to 12% in the infective/idiopathic group (odds ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.03 to 7.02). Coexisting urinary tract infection was common (49%) in the metabolic group. Surgically, minimally invasive techniques (lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and endoscopy) were used in 68% of patients. Conclusions: There has been a shift in the epidemiology of paediatric renal stone disease in the UK over the past 30 years. Underlying metabolic causes are now the most common but can be masked by coexisting urinary tract infection. Treatment has progressed, especially surgically, with sophisticated minimally invasive techniques now employed. All children with renal stones should have a metabolic screen. PMID:14612355

  17. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  18. The End-Stage Renal Disease Program: Basis for the Army Organ Transplant Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-19

    NO.NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) THE END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE PROGRAM: BASIS FOR THE ARMY ORGAN TRANSPLANT PROGRAM 12. PERSONAL...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE BEST AVAILABLE COPY 8 9 BEST AvAILABLE COPY THE END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE PROGRAM: BASIS FOR THE ARMY ORGAN...Conditions Which Prompted the Study . .... . . . . . 4 Literature Review--End-Stage Renal Disease Program . 4 Technological Aspects .............. . 4

  19. Diagnosing and treating renal disease in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is mostly related to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), precipitated by either an acute disturbance of hemodynamics, or acute structural damage to the kidneys. The incidence of chronic renal failure is rising, due to increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, viral hepatitis, which can be associated with renal damage. AKI is defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dL in <48 hours or by 50% from baseline within the past 3 months without setting a threshold for the final serum creatinine. Stages 1, 2, and 3 of AKI are defined as 150%, 200% and 300% of baseline serum creatinine respectively, which allows for assessment of AKI progression. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min for >3 months. Treatment of AKI consists of removal of precipitating factors and replenishment of the intravascular volume using colloids such as albumin. Frequently, AKI can be reversed using these measures alone. Non-responders to removal of precipitating factors and volume challenge can receive vasoconstrictors such as terlipressin or norepinephrine together with albumin. Midodrine is inferior in efficacy as a vasoconstrictor when compared to terlipressin. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome with liver failure. Delay in receiving a liver transplant can result in non-recovery of renal function post transplant. Treatment of CKD in cirrhosis is unsatisfactory, mostly aimed at optimizing management of comorbid conditions, or treating the underlying refractory ascites in patients with type 2 hepatorenal syndrome.

  20. Diagnosis and therapy of coronary artery disease: Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Nuclear cardiology; Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; Therapy of angina pectoris; Psychosocial aspects of coronary artery disease; Nonatherosclerotic coronary artery disease; and The epidemiology of coronary artery disease.

  1. Renal acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in the evaluation of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Alan, Bircan; Göya, Cemil; Aktan, Adem; Alan, Sait

    2017-02-01

    Background Renal insufficiency may occur in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) is a method for quantifying tissue elasticity, which could be used as an additional diagnostic test for renal insufficiency and provide an additional contribution to the determination of CAD. Purpose To evaluate ARFI elastography with shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements in the diagnosis of mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) in CAD patients, and to analyze the relationship between the severity of CAD assessed by the Gensini scoring system and kidney stiffness. Material and Methods The study included 76 CAD patients and 79 healthy volunteers. SWV was measured for each kidney in the both groups. The CAD group was divided into two subgroups based on Gensini score: mild CAD and severe CAD. SWV values of the CAD patients were compared to those of the healthy volunteers; values of subgroups were also compared with each other. Results The patient group had significantly lower renal mean SWV values than those of the healthy group (1.87 ± 0.58 vs. 2.34 ± 0.38, P < 0.01). The SWV value decreased as the eGFR level decreased. Mean SWV values for kidneys of the patients with severe CAD were lower than those of the mild CAD patients (1.64 ± 0.39 vs. 2.42 ± 0.60, P < 0.01). Conclusion renal mean SWV values of CAD patients decreased in proportion to the reduction in eGFR, and the SWV values decreased as the severity of CAD increased. ARFI elastography is a novel technique for diagnosing CKD and defining illness severity in CAD patients.

  2. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  3. [Fabry disease: clinic and enzymatic diagnosis of homozygous and heterozygous. New therapeutic prospects].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Olea, T

    2002-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide, the glycolipid substrate of this enzyme, leads to severe painful neuropathy with progressive renal, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular dysfunction and early death. Men are predominantly affected but many female carriers have similar clinical involvement, including increased risk of stroke. Physical stigmata, such as angiokeratomas in skin and mucous membranes and characteristic benign corneal abnormalities, facilitate identification of Fabry disease. The finding of a marked decreased activity of (alpha-galactosidase A in plasma, white blood cells or cultured skin fibroblasts confirms the diagnosis. Treatment thus far has been symptomatic only. Etiology-based therapies are being developed that include enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, and substrate deprivation. The recently completed double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of intravenous infusions of (alpha-galactosidase A in patients with Fabry disease demonstrated the safety and efficacy of this treatment. We report a family with Fabry disease composed of hemicygous and heterocygous. The propositus developed chronic renal failure and received a cadaver renal transplant, which remained with adequate renal function during 15 years.

  4. Pregnancy tests with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Brenda G; Gouzd, Valerie A; Atallah, Joseph N

    2008-12-01

    Tests to ascertain pregnancy status are often obtained during preoperative evaluation, especially when there is a history of uncertain pregnancy or suggestion of current pregnancy. A serum pregnancy test, a beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG) level, was preoperatively obtained from a woman of childbearing age with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with an unreliable history of irregular menstruation coupled with unprotected sexual activity. The beta-HCG was elevated in the range indicating pregnancy. Further work-up showed that this hormonal elevation was secondary to ESRD without pregnancy.

  5. Phosphorus management in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Finn, William F

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is an important public health problem, with an increasing number of patients worldwide. One important outcome of renal failure is disordered mineral metabolism, most notably involving calcium and phosphorus balance. Of importance is that increased serum phosphorus levels are associated with increased mortality rates. Despite dietary restrictions, patients receiving dialysis invariably experience hyperphosphatemia and require treatment with phosphate binders. Existing phosphate binders are effective in reducing serum phosphorus levels, but are associated with a number of important disadvantages. Lanthanum carbonate, a new noncalcium, nonaluminum phosphate binder, represents a promising treatment for hyperphosphatemia.

  6. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  7. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  8. Automated Peritoneal Dialysis is Suitable for Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Ren, Hong; Xie, Jingyuan; Huang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    A female patient with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) was treated with automated peritoneal dialysis when she reached end-stage renal disease. The patient has been doing very well on automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) for almost 6 years without peritonitis or abdominal hernias. Intra-abdominal pressures are lower in the supine position than in an erect or sitting position. Larger volumes of dialysate are better tolerated while the patient is supine, as during nocturnal APD. Therefore, APD is an option of the renal replacement therapy for patients with PKD.

  9. Transient Hypocalcemia in a Dialysis Patient With Paget’s disease and Presumed Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Kenneth R.; Mo, Jay; Czerwinskyj, Chrystina; Mathew, Roy O.

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with end-stage renal disease was hospitalized because of radicular pain and weakness in the left arm and hand. Sonography and computed tomography had recently shown a large right renal mass. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vertebral metastases with epidural extension, and radiotherapy was directed to the spine and kidney. Hypocalcemia was first noted on the fourth hospital day. A second computed tomography scan showed bleeding into and around the kidney, and arterial embolization was required to halt the bleeding. Hypocalcemia persisted for at least 27 days at values between 6.0 and 7.7 mg/dL and was consistently associated with ionized calcium concentrations less than or equal to 4.44 mg/dL. After an unrevealing search for a recognized cause, we attributed hypocalcemia to persistent sequestration of calcium in the right retroperitoneum. Exogenous supplementation eventually restored the concentration to normal. In the absence of renal and intestinal loss, hypocalcemia reflects abnormal flux of calcium from the extracellular compartment into tissue. Our patient’s repository appears to have been a necrotic and hemorrhagic cancer. Tumor-induced sequestration of calcium should be included in the differential diagnosis of hypocalcemia. PMID:27081654

  10. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Secondary Hyperparathyroidism: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that significant associations exist between oral disease and diseases involving non-oral tissues. Occasionally, the roles may be reversed and the oral cavity can be severely affected by systemic disease originating in another part of the body. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrinopathy that occurs as a consequence of chronic azotemic kidney disease. Renal osteodystrophy, the most dramatic clinical consequence of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is uncommon, but can result in demineralization of maxillofacial bones, loosening of teeth, and pathological jaw fractures. The purpose of this report is to update the current understanding of the pathophysiology of this endocrine disease and to compare the oral manifestations of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in humans and companion animals. A 50-year review of the veterinary literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation of renal osteodystrophy in dogs, and to determine what clinical consequences of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism have been reported in domestic cats.

  11. Potential Role of Tc-99m DTPA Diuretic Renal Scan in the Diagnosis of Calyceal Diverticulum in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Shih, Bing-Fu; Shih, Shin-Lin; Tsai, Jeng-Daw

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of Technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Tc-99m DTPA) diuretic scan to diagnose calyceal diverticulum (CD). From January 2000 to June 2014, children with evidence of renal cystic lesions of undetermined diagnosis on ultrasound were enrolled. Computed tomography urography (CTU) and Tc-99m DTPA diuretic scan were performed to characterize the precise anatomy. The diagnosis of CD depended on visualization of a renal cystic lesion with filling of contrast material or radiotracer from the collecting system on CTU or diuretic renal scan. Children who had positive findings of CD on 1 or both imaging studies were selected and analyzed. Both CTU and Tc-99m DTPA diuretic renal scan were performed in 39 children. A total of 9 (23.1 %) children with CD were diagnosed. All 9 children had positive diagnosis of CD on diuretic renal scan. Only 6 (66.7%) children could be diagnosed by CTU, and CD was missed by CTU in 3 subjects. The differential renal functions in patients with CD were 46% to 55%. The time of radiotracer appearance in the CD ranged from the 8th to the 24th minute. Seven patients had persistent accumulation of radiotracer in their CD at the end of the study. Tc-99m DTPA diuretic renal scan seems to be more sensitive than CTU in diagnosing CD. The possible reasons of higher sensitivity are discussed. Additional advantages that Tc-99m DTPA diuretic renal scan provides include the following: continuous monitoring, less radiation doses, and information on renal function, making it an attractive alternative to CTU for diagnosis of CD. PMID:26091475

  12. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning.

  13. 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning and excretory urography in diagnosis of renal scars in children

    SciTech Connect

    McLorie, G.A.; Aliabadi, H.; Churchill, B.M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L. )

    1989-09-01

    We compared the ability of excretory urography (without tomography) and 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning to detect renal scars in 32 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. These children did not have hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract obstruction. In all cases both studies were conducted within a 10-month period. The findings from both modalities were in agreement for 51 of the 64 renal units evaluated (80%). Evaluation of the excretory urogram indicated 6 cases of diffuse and 2 of focal scarring that were not detected by evaluation of the renal scan. The sensitivity of excretory urography to detect renal scars was 84% and the specificity was 83%. The 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scan showed 5 cases of focal renal scarring not detected by excretory urography. The sensitivity of the renal scan to detect renal scars was 77% and the specificity was 75%. We conclude that neither study alone could effectively replace the other for the detection of renal scars, and recommend that both be included in the initial evaluation and followup of patients with renal scars.

  14. Diagnosis and classification of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Menconi, Francesca; Marcocci, Claudio; Marinò, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disorder involving the thyroid gland, typically characterized by the presence of circulating autoantibodies that bind to and stimulate the thyroid hormone receptor (TSHR), resulting in hyperthyroidism and goiter. Organs other than the thyroid can also be affected, leading to the extrathyroidal manifestations of GD, namely Graves' ophthalmopathy, which is observed in ~50% of patients, and Graves' dermopathy and acropachy, which are quite rare. Presumably, the extrathyroidal manifestations of GD are due to autoimmunity against antigens common to the thyroid and other affected organs. Although its exact etiology remains to be completely understood, GD is believed to result from a complex interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Clinically, GD is characterized by the manifestations of thyrotoxicosis as well as by its extrathyroidal features when present, the latter making the diagnosis almost unmistakable. In the absence of ophthalmopathy, the diagnosis is generally based on the association of hyperthyroidism and usually diffuse goiter confirmed with serum anti-TSHR autoantibodies (TRAbs). Hyperthyroidism is generally treated with anti-thyroid drugs, but a common long term treatment strategy in patients relapsing after a course of anti-thyroid drugs (60-70%), implies the use of radioactive iodine or surgery.

  15. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection by indium-111-labeled platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1986-08-01

    A prospective evaluation of /sup 111/In-labeled platelet scintigraphy (IPS) for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection (TR) was undertaken. The results of IPS were compared with in vitro biochemical tests, the clinical finding of graft tenderness, and combined (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA and (/sup 131/I)orthoiodohippurate scintigraphy. With a sensitivity of 0.93 and a specificity of 0.95, IPS provided otherwise unavailable diagnostic information. Furthermore, postoperative IPS was a good predictor of long-term allograft survival.

  16. Calcium Apatite Deposition Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Calcium apatite deposition disease (CADD) is a common entity characterized by deposition of calcium apatite crystals within and around connective tissues, usually in a periarticular location. CADD most frequently involves the rotator cuff. However, it can theoretically occur in almost any location in the musculoskeletal system, and many different locations of CADD have been described. When CADD presents in an unexpected location it can pose a diagnostic challenge, particularly when associated with pain or swelling, and can be confused with other pathologic processes, such as infection or malignancy. However, CADD has typical imaging characteristics that usually allows for a correct diagnosis to be made without additional imaging or laboratory workup, even when presenting in unusual locations. This is a review of the common and uncommon presentations of CADD in the appendicular and axial skeleton as well as an updated review of pathophysiology of CADD and current treatments. PMID:28042481

  17. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lavleen; Singh, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0-3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature.

  18. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lavleen; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0–3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature. PMID:26361799

  19. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    improves renal function and structure in other models of renal failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol...cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal. 305:F1804- F1812 6. Mason SB...successful long-term kidney cell engraftment and renal regeneration in diabetic nephropathy and also cell auto-transplants (9). We used adult

  20. Silicosis and renal disease: insights from a case of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    RICCÒ, Matteo; THAI, Elena; CELLA, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A 68-yr-old male, smoker, is admitted for proteinuria (2,800 mg/24 h) and reduced renal function (serum creatinine 2 mg/dl, GFR 35 ml/min). Renter, he started working 20-yr-old as a sandstone cave miner. Despite the high levels of silica dusts, he reported no mandatory use of airways protection devices during the first 25 yr of activity. No clinical or radiological signs of silicosis or pneumoconiosis where reported until the year of retirement (1997). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (91 mm/h) and C reactive protein (35 mg/l) suggested a pro-inflammatory status. High serum IgA was found (465 mg/dl). A renal biopsy identified glomerular sclerosis with IgA deposition, signs of diffuse vasculitis and tubular atrophia suggesting a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Chest X-Rays showed emphysema and diffuse nodularity suggesting diagnosis of silicosis. Chest tomography was also positive for mild signs of silicosis with silicotic nodules and without honeycombing. IgA nephropathy is the most common type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. Several clues suggest a genetic or acquired abnormality of immune system as a trigger of the increased production of IgA. In our case report, simultaneous kidney and pulmonary disease could suggest same triggers (e.g. exposure to virus, bacteria or environmental agents) inducing IgA synthesis and pulmonary immune system activation. PMID:26423329

  1. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  2. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  3. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thu H.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. PMID:26251351

  4. Therapeutic Apheresis in Immunologic Renal and Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bambauer, Rolf; Latza, Reinhard; Burgard, Daniel; Schiel, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    Since the mid 1970s, when membrane modules became available, plasma separation techniques have gained in importance especially in the past few years. The advantages of this method are a complete separation of the corpuscular components from the plasma and due to increased blood flow rate and higher efficacy. Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a poor prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis (TA) in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 40 years. The updated information on immunology and molecular biology of different immunologic diseases are discussed in relation to the rationale for apheresis therapy and its place in combination with other modern treatments. The different diseases can be treated by various apheresis methods such as therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) with substitution solution, or with online plasma or blood purification using adsorption columns, which contain biological or non-biological agents. Here, the authors provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that TA can be a supportive therapy in systemic autoimmune diseases such as renal and neurological disorders. For the immunological diseases that can be treated with TA, the guidelines of the German Working Group of Clinical Nephrology and of the Apheresis Committee of the American Society for Apheresis are cited.

  5. Therapeutic camping for children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Warady, B A

    1994-06-01

    Therapeutic camping experiences for children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have proliferated in the United States and abroad. This report is based on the results of a survey designed to accumulate data on the development and implementation of 20 such camps. Children attending camp ranged in age from 1 year to 19 years. Single disease-specific camps were most common, while camps for children with a variety of chronic illnesses, including ESRD, and mainstream camps were also conducted. Facilities were available for hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, but not automated peritoneal dialysis, in the majority of surveyed camps. Dialysis nurses, pediatric nephrologists, dietitians and social workers were the medical personnel that most frequently participated in the camps. On average, 32 dialysis/transplant patient campers (range 6-100) attended camp for a 1-week session. Therapeutic camping experiences for children with ESRD are extremely successful and attempts to increase the availability of similar camps should be encouraged.

  6. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r(2) 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r(2) 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r(2) 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  7. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r2 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r2 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r2 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  8. Differences in the treatment of male and female patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Florakas, C; Wilson, R; Toffelmire, E; Godwin, M; Morton, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a difference in the allocation of types of dialysis to male and female patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Canada. PATIENTS: All patients registered with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) whose treatment began between 1981 and 1991. Data were obtained for 19,732 patients, of whom 18,010 had sufficiently complete data and were being treated with either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis 3 months after the diagnosis of ESRD. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis according to sex. RESULTS: Significantly more male (58.1%) than female (50.8%) patients were receiving hemodialysis 3 months after diagnosis (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis to control for the possible confounding effects of age, province of treatment, diagnosis, concurrent illness and year of diagnosis did not explain the difference. CONCLUSIONS: In Canada from 1981 to 1991 male patients were more likely than female patients to receive hemodialysis for the treatment of ESRD. Additional research is needed to explain this finding. PMID:7954176

  9. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  10. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-06

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs.

  11. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease. PMID:26097778

  12. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease.

  13. Obesity end stage renal disease and survival in an elderly cohort with cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is highly prevalent in African-Americans and is associated with increased risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. It is not known if the effect of obesity is similar among Blacks and whites. The aim of this study is to examine racial differences in the association of obesity with E...

  14. [Bacteriological diagnosis of renal tuberculosis: an experience at the regional tuberculosis laboratory in Córdoba Province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Berta, Mariana; Sturm, Gabriela; Juri, Leticia; Cosiansi, Maria C; Barzón, Silvia; Barnes, Ana I; Rojo, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Given the incidence of renal tuberculosis in patients suffering of pulmonary tuberculosis, we seek to study both the frequency of this association in diagnosed cases of renal tuberculosis and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species that were identified (period 1997-2009), observing its incidence by sex, demonstrating the importance of serial culture of urine samples and evaluating the convenience of using solid and liquid media. The analysis of urine samples from 383 patients indicated renal tuberculosis in 24 cases; in most cases, (95.8 %) Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species prevailed, whereas the presence of Mycobacterium bovis accounted for 4.2 % of the cases. The association of pulmonary and renal tuberculosis was found in 6 cases. The isolation of Mycobacterium bovis indicates the importance of including Stonebrink medium along with Lowenstein- Jensen medium. The liquid medium made no significant contribution to the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis, but indeed, cultivating serial samples increases sensitivity.

  15. [Contribution of endoscopic ultrasound to the diagnosis of pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma. Apropos of two cases].

    PubMed

    Repiso, Alejandro; Gómez-Rodríguez, Rafael; Aso, Sonsoles; Domper, Francisco; Buendía, Encarnación; González de Frutos, Concepción; Pérez-Grueso, María José; Rodríguez-Merlo, Rufo; Carrobles, José María

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic metastases represent 2% of pancreatic tumors. The neoplasms most frequently metastasizing to the pancreas are breast, lung, melanoma and kidney tumors. We present the cases of two patients with pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma diagnosed 4 and 8 years after the diagnosis and surgical treatment of the primary renal tumor. In both patients, endoscopic ultrasound was useful in the detection and characterization of these pancreatic lesions and allowed fine-needle aspiration for cytological study to be performed.

  16. Novel α-Galactosidase A Mutation (K391E) in a Young Woman With Severe Cardiac and Renal Manifestations of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakakuri, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Shunichi; Utsumi, Kouichi; Shimizu, Wataru; Yasutake, Masahiro

    2016-09-28

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to α-galactosidase A deficiency, is associated with dysfunction of various cell types and results in a systemic vasculopathy. We describe a 29-year-old woman with Fabry disease presenting with severe cardiac and renal manifestations. Gene analysis demonstrated a novel mutation (K391E) in the GLA gene. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was started with agalsidase-β after confirming the diagnosis of Fabry disease, resulting in normalization of LV systolic function and improvement of renal function. As early therapy is crucial for preventing life-threatening sequelae, clinicians should consider Fabry disease in young patients presenting with cardiac and renal disease without any likely causes.

  17. Cardiac complications of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Burke, S W; Solomon, A J

    2000-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients receiving dialysis. This is attributed in part to the shared risk factors of cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. The risk factors for coronary artery disease include the classic cardiac risk factors of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking. Also in this population, hyperparathyroidism, hypoalbuminemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, elevated levels of apolipoprotein (a), and the type of dialysis membrane may play a role. Management begins with risk factor modification and medical therapy including aspirin, beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and lipid-lowering agents. Revascularization is often important, and coronary artery bypass grafting appears to be preferable to percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. This is especially true for those with multivessel disease, impaired left ventricular function, severe symptoms, or ischemia. Congestive heart failure is another common problem in dialysis patients. The management includes correction of underlying abnormalities, optimal dialysis, and medical therapy. Data obtained from the general population indicate obvious benefits from ACE inhibitors and beta blockers, and these agents would be considered the therapies of choice. Erythropoetin is also an essential component of therapy, but the ideal hemoglobin concentration has yet to be determined. Peritoneal dialysis may be helpful in severe cases of heart failure. Pericarditis is seen in less than 10% of dialysis patients and is best diagnosed by clinical examination and echocardiography. Intensive dialysis is often the best initial therapy. Pericardiocentesis is reserved for the setting of pericardial tamponade, but a pericardial window is more definitive.

  18. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  19. Role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system in the progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Urushihara, Maki; Kagami, Shoji

    2016-07-05

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has many well-documented pathophysiologic functions in both blood pressure regulation and renal disease development. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the major bioactive product of the RAS. It induces inflammation, renal cell growth, mitogenesis, apoptosis, migration, and differentiation. In addition, Ang II regulates the gene expression of bioactive substances and activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways that are involved in renal damage. Activation of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor pathway results in the production of proinflammatory mediators, intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species, cell proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which in turn facilities renal injury. Involvement of angiotensinogen (AGT) in intrarenal RAS activation and development of renal disease has previously been reported. Moreover, studies have demonstrated that the urinary excretion rates of AGT provide a specific index of the intrarenal RAS status. Enhanced intrarenal AGT levels have been observed in experimental models of renal disease, supporting the concept that AGT plays an important role in the development and progression of renal disease. In this review, we focus on the role of intrarenal RAS activation in the pathophysiology of renal disease. Additionally, we explored the potential of urinary AGT as a novel biomarker of intrarenal RAS status in renal disease.

  20. Ultrasonographic imaging for structural characterization of renal affections and diagnosis of associated chronic renal failure in 10 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Adarsh; Varshney, A C

    2011-01-01

    The present study comprises of 10 dogs of either sex with primary indication of azotaemia. All the dogs were subjected to detailed clinical, haematobiochemical, urinalysis, and microbiological examination along with radiographical and ultrasonographical examination. Based on the ultrasonographic structural abnormalities, the different renal affections associated with CRF in majority of dogs were diagnosed. The different affections included "end-stage" kidneys (n = 4), hydronephrosis (n = 1), renomegaly (n = 1), nephritis (n = 1), nephrolithiasis (n = 1), nephrocalcinosis (n = 1), and renal cyst (n = 1). The significant ultrasonographic features in these affections included small kidneys with loss of corticomedullary demarcation ("end-stage" kidneys); increased cortical echogenicity (nephritis); dilation of the renal pelvis, separation of the central renal sinus with anechoic space, atrophy of renal medulla, (hydronephrosis); enlarged kidneys with increased overall echogenicity of renal cortex (renomegaly and associated nephritis); hyperechoic-mineralized structure with shadowing (nephrolithiasis); diffuse, small, multiple hyperechoic structures in the renal parenchyma with distal acoustic shadowing (nephrocalcinosis); small spherical intercortical anechoic structures fluid (renal cysts). In the present study, ultrasound proved to be a quick, convenient, and sensitive modality in detecting alterations in renal size and parenchymal architecture. All the dogs so diagnosed with CRF were rendered conservative medical treatment to control clinical signs of uraemia; maintain adequate fluid, electrolyte, and acid/base balance; provide adequate nutrition; minimize progression of renal failure.

  1. Mestizos with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Develop Renal Disease Early while Antimalarials Retard its Appearance: Data from a Latin American Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Burgos, Paula I.; Hachuel, Leticia; Boggio, Gabriela; Wojdyla, Daniel; Nieto, Romina; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Catoggio, Luis J.; Guibert-Toledano, Marlene; Sarano, Judith; Massardo, Loreto; Vásquez, Gloria M.; Iglesias-Gamarra, Antonio; Lavras Costallat, Lilian T.; Da Silva, Nilzio A.; Alfaro, José L.; Abadi, Isaac; Segami, María I.; Huerta, Guillermo; Cardiel, Mario H.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the predictors of time-to-lupus renal disease in Latin American patients. Methods SLE patients (n=1480) from GLADEL’s (Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio de Lupus) longitudinal inception cohort were studied. Endpoint was ACR renal criterion development after SLE diagnosis (prevalent cases excluded). Renal disease predictors were examined by univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Antimalarials were considered time-dependent in alternative analyses. Results Of the entire cohort, 265 patients (17.9%) developed renal disease after entering the cohort. Of them, 88 (33.2%) developed persistent proteinuria, 44 (16.6%) cellular casts and 133 (50.2%) both; 233 patients (87.9%) were women; mean (± SD) age at diagnosis was 28.0 (11.9) years; 12.8% were African-Latin Americans, 52.5% Mestizos, 34.7% Caucasians (p=0.0016). Mestizo ethnicity (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.19–2.17), hypertension (HR 3.99, 95% CI 3.02–5.26) and SLEDAI at diagnosis (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) were associated with a shorter time-to-renal disease occurrence; antimalarial use (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.43–0.77), older age at onset (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85–0.95, for every 5 years) and photosensitivity (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.56–0.98) were associated with a longer time. Alternative model results were consistent with the antimalarial protective effect (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.50–0.99). Conclusions Our data strongly support the fact that Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing renal disease early while antimalarials seem to delay the appearance of this SLE manifestation. These data have important implications for the treatment of these patients regardless of their geographic location. PMID:23857989

  2. 77 FR 34047 - Medicare Program; Proposal Evaluation Criteria and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... procedures we will use to evaluate an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organization's capabilities to perform, and actual performance of, the duties and functions under the ESRD Network Statement of Work...

  3. Care of the Patient with Renal Disease: Peritoneal Dialysis and Transplants, Nursing 321A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulburd, Kimberly

    A description is provided of a course, "Care of the Patient with Renal Disease," offered at the community college level to prepare licensed registered nurses to care for patients with renal disease, including instruction in performing the treatments of peritoneal dialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The first…

  4. Thrombotic Microangiopathy in Inverted Formin 2-Mediated Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rachel C; Ring, Troels; Xu, Yaobo; Wong, Edwin K S; Flossmann, Oliver; Roberts, Ian S D; Ahmed, Saeed; Wetherall, Michael; Salkus, Giedrius; Brocklebank, Vicky; Fester, Julian; Strain, Lisa; Wilson, Valerie; Wood, Katrina M; Marchbank, Kevin J; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Goodship, Timothy H J; Kavanagh, David

    2017-04-01

    The demonstration of impaired C regulation in the thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) resulted in the successful introduction of the C inhibitor eculizumab into clinical practice. C abnormalities account for approximately 50% of aHUS cases; however, mutations in the non-C gene diacylglycerol kinase-ε have been described recently in individuals not responsive to eculizumab. We report here a family in which the proposita presented with aHUS but did not respond to eculizumab. Her mother had previously presented with a post-renal transplant TMA. Both the proposita and her mother also had Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the inverted formin 2 gene (INF2) in the mutational hotspot for FSGS. Subsequent analysis of the Newcastle aHUS cohort identified another family with a functionally-significant mutation in INF2 In this family, renal transplantation was associated with post-transplant TMA. All individuals with INF2 mutations presenting with a TMA also had aHUS risk haplotypes, potentially accounting for the genetic pleiotropy. Identifying individuals with TMAs who may not respond to eculizumab will avoid prolonged exposure of such individuals to the infectious complications of terminal pathway C blockade.

  5. Improvement of adynamic bone disease after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, K A; Jorgetti, V; Pereira, R C; Reis, L M dos; Pereira, L M; Corrêa, P H S; Borelli, A; Ianhez, L E; Moysés, R M A; David-Neto, E

    2006-01-01

    Low bone remodeling and relatively low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels characterize adynamic bone disease (ABD). The impact of renal transplantation (RT) on the course of ABD is unknown. We studied prospectively 13 patients with biopsy-proven ABD after RT. Bone histomorphometry and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed in the 1st and 12th months after RT. Serum PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and osteocalcin were measured regularly throughout the study. Serum PTH levels were slightly elevated at transplantation, normalized at the end of the third month and remained stable thereafter. Bone biopsies performed in the first month after RT revealed low bone turnover in all patients, with positive bone aluminum staining in 5. In the 12th month, second biopsies were performed on 12 patients. Bone histomorphometric dynamic parameters improved in 9 and were completely normalized in 6, whereas no bone mineralization was detected in 3 of these 12 patients. At 12 months post-RT, no bone aluminum was detected in any patient. We also found a decrease in lumbar BMD and an increase in femoral BMD. Patients suffering from ABD, even those with a reduction in PTH levels, may present partial or complete recovery of bone turnover after successful renal transplantation. However, it is not possible to positively identify the mechanisms responsible for the improvement. Identifying these mechanisms should lead to a better understanding of the physiopathology of ABD and to the development of more effective treatments.

  6. Chromogranin A Polymorphisms Are Associated With Hypertensive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Rany M.; Cadman, Peter E.; Chen, Yuqing; Rao, Fangwen; Wen, Gen; Hamilton, Bruce A.; Rana, Brinda K.; Smith, Douglas W.; Stridsberg, Mats; Ward, Harry J.; Mahata, Manjula; Mahata, Sushi K.; Bowden, Donald W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Freedman, Barry I.; Schork, Nicholas J.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    Chromogranin A is released together with epinephrine and norepinephrine from catecholaminergic cells. Specific endopeptidases cleave chromogranin A into biologically active peptide fragments, including catestatin, which inhibits catecholamine release. Previous studies have suggested that a deficit in this sympathetic “braking” system might be an early event in the pathogenesis of human hypertension. Whether chromogranin A (CHGA) polymorphisms predict end-organ complications of hypertension, such as end-stage renal disease, is unknown. Among blacks, we studied common genetic variants spanning the CHGA locus in 2 independent case-control studies of hypertensive ESRD. Two haplotypes were significantly more frequent among subjects with hypertensive ESRD: 1) in the promoter (5′) region, G-462A→T-415C→C-89A, haplotype ATC (adjusted odds ratio = 2.65; P = 0.037), and 2) at the 3′-end, C11825T (3′-UTR, C+87T)→G12602C, haplotype TC (adjusted odds ratio = 2.73, P = 0.0196). Circulating levels of catestatin were lower among those with hypertensive ESRD than controls, an unexpected finding given that peptide levels are usually elevated in ESRD because of reduced renal elimination. We found that the 3′-UTR + 87T variant decreased reporter gene expression, providing a possible mechanistic explanation for diminished catestatin. In summary, common variants in chromogranin A associate with the risk of hypertensive ESRD in blacks. PMID:18235090

  7. The risk of renal disease is increased in lambda myeloma with bone marrow amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Montgomery, Scott; Befekadu, Rahel; Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a rare deposition disease and is present in 10–15% of patients with myeloma (MM). In contrast to symptomatic AL in MM, presence of bone marrow (BM) amyloid deposits (AD) in MM is not connected to kidney damage. Renal AD but not BM-AD occur mostly in MM with lambda paraprotein (lambda MM). Methods We investigated amyloid presence in BM clots taken at diagnosis in 84 patients with symptomatic MM and compared disease characteristics in MM with kappa paraprotein (kappa MM)/lambda MM with and without BM-AD. Results Lambda MM with BM-AD was compared with kappa MM without BM-AD, kappa MM with BM-AD, and lambda MM without BM-AD: lambda MM with BM-AD patients had a significantly higher mean creatinine level (4.23 mg/dL vs 1.69, 1.14, and 1.28 mg/dL, respectively) and a higher proportion presented with severe kidney failure (6/11 [55%] vs 6/32 [19%], 1/22 [5%], and 3/19 [16%], respectively). Proteinuria was more common in lambda MM with BM-AD patients compared with kappa MM without BM-AD patients (8/11 [73%] vs 5/32 [16%], respectively). Conclusion Kidney damage was more common in lambda MM with BM-AD indicating presence of renal AD. PMID:28293126

  8. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with severe renal impairment associated with multisystem IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Rafael Coimbra Ferreira; Friderichs, Maurício; Fior, Bárbara Rayanne; Schaefer, Pedro Guilherme; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Silva, Dirceu Reis da; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Seligman, Renato; Veronese, Francisco Veríssimo

    2016-01-01

    The IgG4-related disease has a wide clinical spectrum where multiple organs can be affected, and the diagnosis depends on typical histopathological findings and an elevated IgG4 expression in plasma cells in the affected tissue. We describe the clinical presentation and evolution of a patient with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, severe kidney failure and systemic manifestations such as lymphadenomegaly and chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis was confirmed by the clinical picture and kidney and lymph node histopathology, in which immunohistochemistry of the lymphoid tissue showed policlonality and increased expression of IgG4, with a IgG4/total IgG ratio > 80%. The patient was treated with prednisone at a dose of 60 mg/day, followed by mycophenolate mofetil, and showed clinical and renal function improvement at 6 months of follow-up. The high index of suspicion of IgG4-related disease with multisystem involvement and the early treatment of this condition are essential to improve the prognosis of affected patients. Resumo A doença relacionada à IgG4 tem um espectro clínico amplo em que múltiplos órgãos podem ser afetados, e o diagnóstico depende de achados histopatológicos típicos e elevada expressão de IgG4 em plasmócitos no tecido afetado. Descrevemos o quadro clínico e a evolução de um paciente com nefrite túbulo-intersticial aguda, insuficiência renal grave e manifestações sistêmicas como linfoadenomegalias e pancreatite crônica. O diagnóstico foi confirmado pelas características clínicas e pela histopatologia renal e de linfonodo, na qual a imunohistoquímica mostrou tecido linfoide com policlonalidade e expressão aumentada de IgG4, com uma relação IgG4/IgG total > 80%. O paciente foi tratado com prednisona na dose de 60 mg/dia, seguido de micofenolato mofetil, e apresentou melhora clínica e da função renal depois de 6 meses de tratamento. O alto índice de suspeição da doença relacionada ao IgG4 com comprometimento multissist

  9. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... by testing with at least two different serologic tests. Related Links For more information about laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease, see the DPDx Web site: Chagas disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Diagnostic Procedures: Blood ...

  10. Diagnosis of pancreatic disease in feline platynosomosis.

    PubMed

    Köster, Liza S; Shell, Linda; Ketzis, Jennifer; Rajeev, Sreekumari; Illanes, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Platynosomum species are cat-specific parasitic trematodes that parasitize the biliary ducts and gall bladder. Due to the common connection to the major duodenal papilla of the pancreas and common bile ducts in addition to the periductal proximity of the pancreas, it is possible that platynosomosis could cause pancreatitis. The objective of this study was to determine whether platynosomosis, a commonly diagnosed parasitic disease in cats on St Kitts, has any association with pancreatic disease. Methods To investigate this possibility, the pancreas of free-roaming cats with naturally acquired platynosomosis were evaluated via ultrasound, serum concentrations of feline pancreatic lipase (fPL), cobalamin, folate and feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity (fTLI) and histopathology. Twenty free-roaming, young adult, feral cats, positive for feline immunodeficiency virus, and diagnosed with Platynosomum species infection via fecal analysis were recruited. The liver, biliary system and pancreas were evaluated via ultrasonography during a short duration anesthesia. Serum concentrations of fPL, fTLI, folate and cobalamin were measured. Sections of the right limb, left limb and body of the pancreas were evaluated histopathologically using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. Results None of the cats had sufficient criteria to fulfill the ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis. One cat had an elevated fPL concentration in the range consistent with pancreatitis. Four cats had cobalamin deficiencies and 11 had abnormal folate concentration. The fTLI concentration was equivocal for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in one cat. With a single exception, histopathology changes, when present (n = 12), were mild, non-specific and predominantly characterized by lymphocytic infiltrates and fibrosis. The exception was a cat that presented a chronic interstitial and eosinophilic pancreatitis of slightly increased severity, likely the result of platynosomosis

  11. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  12. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters.

  13. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol. Renal in press) and in PKD (figure 1). 6    Figure 3...with SAA1 positive cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal, in press 6...survival and kidney function in diverse models of renal 5    Figure 2. The power of cytotherapy: When compared to no cell (C) groups, treatment of

  14. Renal scintigraphy following angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension (captopril scintigraphy)

    SciTech Connect

    Sfakianakis, G.N. )

    1989-09-01

    This article describes the pathophysiology and primary causes of renovascular hypertension (RVH). No historical or physical finding is specific in the diagnosis of RVH, although onset of hypertension before the age of 30 years may suggest the possible presence of RVH. The physiology of the kidney is described along with the biochemistry of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The main thrust of the article is nuclear medicine techniques useful in the diagnosis of this disease. Several diagnositic methods are described but captopril scintigraphy is presented as a method that may give more optimal results in the diagnosis of RVH.

  15. MicroRNAs in kidney diseases: new promising biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schena, F P; Serino, G; Sallustio, F

    2014-04-01

    A series of microRNAs (miRNAs) have a critical role in many cellular and physiological activities such as cell cycle, growth, proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. miRNAs are also important in the maintenance of renal homeostasis and kidney diseases. In vitro and in vivo animal models have shown a critical role of miRNAs in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and in the progression of renal fibrosis. Specific miRNAs in renal tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are up and downregulated in different kidney diseases. They represent new potential biomarkers for diagnosis and targeted therapy. In addition, urinary miRNAs may be considered non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring the progression of renal damage. The activity of miRNAs can be modified by different approaches such as the use of antisense oligonucleotide inhibitors (antagomirs), tandem miRNA-binding site repeats manufactured by Decoy or Sponge technologies and miRNA mimics. The use of miRNA blockers or antagonists as therapeutic agents is very attractive but new information will be necessary considering their role in other systems.

  16. Renal Expression of FGF23 in Progressive Renal Disease of Diabetes and the Effect of Ace Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Corna, Daniela; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Gaspari, Flavio; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone mainly produced by bone that acts in the kidney through FGF receptors and Klotho. Here we investigated whether the kidney was an additional source of FGF23 during renal disease using a model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of FGF23 and Klotho was assessed in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and control lean rats at 2, 4, 6, 8 months of age. To evaluate whether the renoprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor in this model was associated with changes in FGF23 and Klotho, ZDF rats received ramipril from 4, when proteinuric, to 8 months of age. FGF23 mRNA was not detectable in the kidney of lean rats, nor of ZDF rats at 2 months of age. FGF23 became measurable in the kidney of diabetic rats at 4 months and significantly increased thereafter. FGF23 protein localized in proximal and distal tubules. Renal Klotho mRNA and protein decreased during time in ZDF rats. As renal disease progressed, serum phosphate levels increased in parallel with decline of fractional phosphorus excretion. Ramipril limited proteinuria and renal injury, attenuated renal FGF23 upregulation and ameliorated Klotho expression. Ramipril normalized serum phosphate levels and tended to increase fractional phosphorus excretion. These data indicate that during progressive renal disease the kidney is a site of FGF23 production which is limited by ACE inhibition. Interfering pharmacologically with the delicate balance of FGF23 and phosphorus in diabetes may have implications in clinics. PMID:23967103

  17. Racial influence in renal stone disease: a Saskatchewan story.

    PubMed

    Pylypchuk, G; Unger, D; Wiser, L; O'Reilly, K; Weckworth, P

    1995-07-01

    Data was obtained from two separate governement sources in an effort to review the prevalence of kidney stone disease in the province of Saskatchewan for the years 1983-1988 inclusive. The data revealed a statistally significant difference in prevalence rate among different ethnic groups within the population. Aboriginal people were found to have a prevalence rate approximately one-third that of the nonaboriginal (non-native) population. A renal stone episode prevalence of 0.858 per 1000 population compared to 0.222 per 1000 population in aboriginal people (p.<.001). The reasons for this difference could not be retrospectively associated with geographical variation. A discussion of other possible causes in association is offered, but it is felt that, in the end, more research into this area is required.

  18. Coping strategies utilized by adolescents with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Snethen, Julia A; Broome, Marion E; Kelber, Sheryl; Warady, Bradley A

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents with end stage renal disease (ESRD) require life-long treatment. The purpose of this descriptive investigation was to identify coping strategies that adolescents with ESRD use to manage their chronic illness. Participants for this investigation were 35 adolescents, 13-18 years of age, with ESRD. The A-COPE survey instrument was used in a clinical and camp setting to measure the coping strategies used by adolescents with ESRD. Analyses revealed that adolescents with ESRD utilized a variety of coping strategies to manage the stresses of living with their chronic condition. Personal characteristics of gender, transplant status, age, and religious views were significantly related to the coping strategies the adolescents reported using.

  19. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance with light-chain deposition disease diagnosed postrenal transplant: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Singh, Geetika; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Patients with light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) frequently do not meet criteria for myeloma. In such cases, despite low tumor burden, the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins cause renal damage, are responsible for post-transplant recurrence, and are rightly categorized as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) requiring chemotherapy. A 65-year male with uncharacterized nodular glomerulopathy presented with proteinuria 3 years postrenal transplant. His allograft biopsies were diagnostic of light-chain deposition disease (likely recurrent), and in the absence of myeloma, he was labeled as MGRS. Based on the limited literature available, he was treated with bortezomib which resulted in normalization of serum-free light-chain ratios and resolution of proteinuria. He, however, later succumbed to complications of chemotherapy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties in LCDD, the importance of an accurate pretransplant diagnosis, and treatment of the malignant clone, in the absence of which post-transplant management of recurrence is challenging with poor outcomes.

  20. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Delmée, M

    2001-08-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is based on culture and toxin detection in fecal specimens. Culture is performed on a commercially available selective media. C. difficile colony morphology is typical when viewed under a dissecting microscope. Definitive identification is best obtained by gas liquid chromatography. Culture is very sensitive but, when used alone without toxin testing, it leads to low specificity and misdiagnosis of CDAD when high rates of asymptomatic carriage exist. Toxin detection by a tissue culture cytotoxin assay followed by neutralisation with specific antiserum is often considered the standard. However, this approach lacks sensitivity and has not detected up to 30% of patients with confirmed CDAD. Multiple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been introduced by various manufacturers for the detection of toxin A alone or for both toxins A and B. Some of these are designed to give results in less than 1 h. Comparative studies of EIA kits reported that the sensitivity and specificity are slightly lower than cytotoxin assays. Toxigenic culture tests C. difficile isolates for toxin production: colonies isolated on selective media are tested for in-vitro toxin production either by a cytotoxicity assay or by direct EIA. It has higher sensitivity than the cytotoxicity assay and equivalent specificity. In the routine laboratory, culture and toxin detection should be performed on every specimen and, in culture-positive and fecal toxin-negative cases, toxigenic cultures should be performed on isolated colonies.

  1. Polycystic kidney disease and cancer after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Calvet, James P; Yu, Alan S L; Lynch, Charles F; Wang, Connie J; Kasiske, Bertram L; Engels, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common form of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), is a disorder with characteristics of neoplasia. However, it is not known whether renal transplant recipients with PKD have an increased risk of cancer. Data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, which contains information on all solid organ transplant recipients in the United States, were linked to 15 population-based cancer registries in the United States. For PKD recipients, we compared overall cancer risk with that in the general population. We also compared cancer incidence in PKD versus non-PKD renal transplant recipients using Poisson regression, and we determined incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, dialysis duration, and time since transplantation. The study included 10,166 kidney recipients with PKD and 107,339 without PKD. Cancer incidence in PKD recipients was 1233.6 per 100,000 person-years, 48% higher than expected in the general population (standardized incidence ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 1.60), whereas cancer incidence in non-PKD recipients was 1119.1 per 100,000 person-years. The unadjusted incidence was higher in PKD than in non-PKD recipients (IRR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20). However, PKD recipients were older (median age at transplantation, 51 years versus 45 years for non-PKD recipients), and after multivariable adjustment, cancer incidence was lower in PKD recipients than in others (IRR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91). The reason for the lower cancer risk in PKD recipients is not known but may relate to biologic characteristics of ADPKD or to cancer risk behaviors associated with ADPKD.

  2. Sevelamer therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Storms, Lara E; Chicella, Michael F; Dice, James E

    2006-03-01

    Sevelamer, a non-calcium-containing, non-aluminum-containing phosphate binder, is frequently prescribed for treatment in adults with hyperphosphatemia secondary to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, published information regarding sevelamer use in children younger than 11 years is lacking. We report the use of sevelamer as a phosphate binder in a 19-month-old girl with ESRD who was receiving calcium carbonate 1250 mg 3 times/day for hyperphosphatemia. The patient's initial serum phosphorus concentration was 8.6 mg/dl, and the calcium-phosphorus product was 75 mg(2)/dl(2). This was well above the level that places patients at risk for complications such as joint, vessel, and soft-tissue calcification. An aluminum-containing phosphate binder was not an option given the patient's renal disease and the concern for neurotoxicity. Sevelamer was considered, but a MEDLINE search revealed no pediatric dosing information. An initial dosage of 100 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours was administered, as extrapolated from adult data, and then titrated to 130 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours based on the patient's response. The child's dietary phosphorus intake remained constant throughout her hospital stay. During sevelamer therapy, her serum phosphorus concentration dropped as low as 5.2 mg/dl; at discharge it was 6.5 mg/dl, with a corresponding calcium-phosphorus product in the upper 50s. No adverse effects associated with sevelamer were observed. In the dosages we used, sevelamer resulted in an acceptable calcium-phosphorus product and returned the patient's serum phosphorus concentration to near normal. Sevelamer appears to be a viable option as a phosphate binder in children with ESRD.

  3. Valuing Lives: The Policy Debate on Patient Care Financing for Victims of End-Stage Renal Disease,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    In Public Law 92-603, the Social Security Amendments of 1972, Medicare health insurance coverage for end-stage renal disease was effectively extended... disease . A substantial number of potential end-stage renal disease patients, approximately 60 percent of the total, however, could not qualify for...Act and included those who were medically determined to have chronic renal disease and to require hemodialysis or renal transplantation. What is the

  4. [HNF1B-related disease: paradigm of a developmental gene and unexpected recognition of a new renal disease].

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Dominique; Faguer, Stanislas; Bandin, Flavio; Guigonis, Vincent; Chassaing, Nicolas; Decramer, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    HNF1B encodes for a transcription factor involved in the early development of the kidney, pancreas, liver and genital tract. Mutations in HNF1B are dominantly inherited and consist of whole-gene deletion, or small mutation. De novo mutation occurs in half of tested kindreds. HNF1B-related disease combines renal and non-renal manifestations. Renal involvement is heterogeneous and may escape early recognition. During fetal life and childhood, it mostly consists of hyperechogenic kidneys or bilateral renal cystic hypodysplasia. The adult phenotype encompasses tubulointerstitial profile at presentation and slowly progressive renal decline (-2 ml/min/year). Renal involvement includes renal cysts (mostly few cortical cysts), a solitary kidney, pelvi-caliceal abnormalities, hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia related to tubular leak, and more rarely, Fanconi syndrome and chromophobe renal carcinoma. The latter warrants ultrasound screening. Extrarenal phenotype consists of diabetes mellitus (MODY-5), exocrine pancreas failure and pancreas atrophy; fluctuation liver tests abnormalities; diverse genital tract abnormalities in females or infertility in males; and mild mental retardation in rare individuals. Phenotype heterogeneity within families is striking. Individuals progressing to end-stage renal disease are eligible for kidney transplantation (or combined pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic individuals). While HNF1B disease was still unknown one decade ago, it has emerged as the second most prevalent dominantly inherited kidney disease. Data available pave the way for early recognition and improved specific management, including genetic counselling.

  5. Latent learning in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Butler, Laurie T; Harris, John P; Vaux, Emma C

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive functions such as attention and memory are known to be impaired in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), but the sites of the neural changes underlying these impairments are uncertain. Patients and controls took part in a latent learning task, which had previously shown a dissociation between patients with Parkinson's disease and those with medial temporal damage. ESRD patients (n=24) and age and education-matched controls (n=24) were randomly assigned to either an exposed or unexposed condition. In Phase 1 of the task, participants learned that a cue (word) on the back of a schematic head predicted that the subsequently seen face would be smiling. For the exposed (but not unexposed) condition, an additional (irrelevant) colour cue was shown during presentation. In Phase 2, a different association, between colour and facial expression, was learned. Instructions were the same for each phase: participants had to predict whether the subsequently viewed face was going to be happy or sad. No difference in error rate between the groups was found in Phase 1, suggesting that patients and controls learned at a similar rate. However, in Phase 2, a significant interaction was found between group and condition, with exposed controls performing significantly worse than unexposed (therefore demonstrating learned irrelevance). In contrast, exposed patients made a similar number of errors to unexposed in Phase 2. The pattern of results in ESRD was different from that previously found in Parkinson's disease, suggesting a different neural origin.

  6. Transforming Growth Factor Beta, Bioenergetics and Mitochondria in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gabriella, Casalena; Ilse, Daehn; Erwin, Bottinger

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β ) family is comprised of over 30 family members that are structurally related secreted dimeric cytokines, including TGF-β, activins, and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs)/growth and differentiation factors (GDFs). TGF-β are pluripotent regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and adhesion of many different cell types. TGF-β pathways are highly evolutionarily conserved and control embryogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue homeostasis in invertebrates and vertebrates. Aberrations in TGF-β activity and signaling underlie a broad spectrum of developmental disorders and major pathologies in humans, including cancer, fibrosis and autoimmune diseases. Recent observations indicate an emerging role for TGF-β in regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress responses characteristic of chronic degenerative diseases and ageing. Conversely, energy and metabolic sensory pathways cross-regulate mediators of TGF-β signaling. Here we review TGF-β and regulation of bioenergetic and mitochondrial functions, including energy and oxidant metabolism and apoptotic cell death, as well as their emerging relevance in renal biology and disease. PMID:22835461

  7. Future of the Renal Biopsy: Time to Change the Conventional Modality Using Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khosroshahi, Hamid Tayebi; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shakeri Bavil, Abolhassan

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, imaging guided renal biopsy is used to provide diagnoses in most types of primary and secondary renal diseases. It has been claimed that renal biopsy can provide a link between diagnosis of renal disease and its pathological conditions. However, sometimes there is a considerable mismatch between patient renal outcome and pathological findings in renal biopsy. This is the time to address some new diagnostic methods to resolve the insufficiency of conventional percutaneous guided renal biopsy. Nanotechnology is still in its infancy in renal imaging; however, it seems that it is the next step in renal biopsy, providing solutions to the limitations of conventional modalities. PMID:28316612

  8. The role of dietary phosphorus restriction in the conservative management of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barsotti, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2005-01-01

    Evidence exists that phosphate retention plays a major role in causing secondary hyperparathyroidism, cardiovascular morbidity, and loss of residual renal function in chronic renal disease patients, and that a subtle elevation in serum phosphate occurs at early stages in the course of renal insufficiency. The implementation of a low-phosphorus, low-protein dietary regimen plays a special role in the conservative management of chronic renal disease patients, for the prevention and correction of secondary hyperparathyroidism and for the renal and cardiovascular protection. However, the success and safety of dietary phosphate restriction largely depends on good compliance with dietary recommendations, which must represent a major goal to be regularly pursued in the clinical practice. To this aim, it is crucial that dietitians expert in renal nutrition give education and personalized dietary advice, with the aim of enhancing the patient's adherence to nutritional prescriptions.

  9. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  10. The diagnosis of Marburg disease is course-dependent.

    PubMed

    Walid, M Sami; Sanoufa, Mazen

    2010-03-02

    Marburg Disease, the fulminant form of multiple sclerosis, is a rare disease that typically kills within a year. We had a 38-year-old African American male who presented with right footdrop and was pathologically diagnosed with Marburg Disease. The patient recovered clinically after surgery and stayed stable for more than a year. The diagnosis of Marburg Disease was thus degraded.

  11. Crohn disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mazal, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Crohn disease (often seen in the literature as "Crohn's disease"), an autoimmune disease with debilitating gastrointestinal and extragastrointestinal manifestations, is on the rise in the United States and Europe. This article discusses the disease process, clinical presentation, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for Crohn disease. Statistics regarding disease prevalence and epidemiology also are reported.

  12. Progressive renal disease despite immunosuppressive therapy in a patient with Wegener s granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Klein, I; Vervoort, G; Steenbergen, E; Wetzels, J

    2008-03-01

    We present a patient with Morbus Wegener and crescentic glomerulonephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone resulted in the disappearance of signs and symptoms of systemic inflammation. However, renal function deteriorated. Renal biopsy showed evidence of continuing capillary necrosis. Renal function improved with added plasmapheresis treatment. This case report illustrates that in patients with vasculitis necrotizing glomerulonephritis may remain active despite immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of extrarenal disease activity.

  13. Successful pregnancy outcome among women with end-stage renal disease requiring haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Arora, Nalini; Mahajan, Kirti; Jana, Narayan; Maiti, Tapan Kumar; Mandal, Debasmita; Pandey, Rajendra

    2009-04-01

    Pregnancy is rare in women with end-stage renal disease, and perinatal outcome remains suboptimal because of prematurity and foetal growth restriction. Successful obstetrical outcome in two women presented with chronic renal failure requiring serial haemodialysis and multiple blood transfusions during pregnancy is reported. Both women had vaginal delivery of low birth weight neonates--2100 g and 1540 g at 33 and 37 weeks' gestations respectively. With specialised neonatal care, both neonates survived, and the mothers were counselled for renal replacement therapy.

  14. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  15. Spectroscopy techniques for human disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Moreno, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Modern medicine would benefit from the pursuit of new, more specific and easier to implement diagnosis tools. In recent years, Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy have proven to be successful diagnostic techniques for a wide range of diseases including atherosclerosis, kidney stones, bone diseases, diabetes, and a wide collection of neoplasms. Optical spectroscopy has several advantages over more traditional diagnostic methods (i.e., histopathology, quantitative PCR, etc.) such as faster data analysis, nonspecific sample preparation, nonspecific labels/reagents/antibodies usage requirements, and immediate on-site implementation. In the present work, label-free in vitro fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been used to differentiate between blood cells of patients affected with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and those of healthy subjects. The SERS technique has also been applied to hemoglobin variants as well as to serum obtained from patients affected with chronic heart failure who positively or negatively responded to the seasonal influenza vaccine. We found that spectral ratios of the background fluorescence intensity that accompanies the SERS spectra of granulocytes serve as excellent markers for the presence of MPNs. In addition, we also found expression dysregulation of two hypoxia induced factor regulated genes, which correlates with our results obtained by SERS spectroscopy assay in MPN patients and supports the presence of the Warburg effect in MPNs. We hypothesize that SERS measures metabolic change in granulocytes through two possible mechanisms: (i) Changes in dielectric properties of the environment surrounding the silver-cell interface; and (ii) changes in flavin adenine dinucleotide concentrations, which in turn changes the relative contribution of the autofluorescence to the emission spectrum. These hypotheses are supported by SERS measurement of 2-deoxy

  16. Image-based retrieval system and computer-aided diagnosis system for renal cortical scintigraphy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumcuoğlu, Erkan; Nar, Fatih; Uğur, Omer; Bozkurt, M. Fani; Aslan, Mehmet

    2008-03-01

    Cortical renal (kidney) scintigraphy images are 2D images (256x256) acquired in three projection angles (posterior, right-posterior-oblique and left-posterior-oblique). These images are used by nuclear medicine specialists to examine the functional morphology of kidney parenchyma. The main visual features examined in reading the images are: size, location, shape and activity distribution (pixel intensity distribution within the boundary of each kidney). Among the above features, activity distribution (in finding scars if any) was found to have the least interobserver reproducibility. Therefore, in this study, we developed an image-based retrieval (IBR) and a computer-based diagnosis (CAD) system, focused on this feature in particular. The developed IBR and CAD algorithms start with automatic segmentation, boundary and landmark detection. Then, shape and activity distribution features are computed. Activity distribution feature is obtained using the acquired image and image set statistics of the normal patients. Active Shape Model (ASM) technique is used for more accurate kidney segmentation. In the training step of ASM, normal patient images are used. Retrieval performance is evaluated by calculating precision and recall. CAD performance is evaluated by specificity and sensitivity. To our knowledge, this paper is the first IBR or CAD system reported in the literature on renal cortical scintigraphy images.

  17. End-stage renal disease in Brazil: epidemiology, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marília Bahiense; Romão, João Egídio; Zatz, Roberto

    2005-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest and most populous nations in the world, ranking among the 5 largest economies in the Americas and among the 15 largest economies in the world. However, Brazil is still plagued by social problems such as the persistence of poverty and immense deficiencies in its health system. Currently, there are approximately 390 patients on chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT) per million population, about one third the US prevalence, which suggests that end-stage renal disease is either underdiagnosed or undertreated. The epidemiology of renal disease in the small remaining native Brazilian population is largely unknown. However, it is likely that the prevalence of renal disease is low among at least 2 tribes: the Yanomamis in northern Brazil and the Xingu Indians in central Brazil. Sodium intake is very low, physical activity is intense, and the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease is negligible among these people, which stresses the potential pathogenic importance of so-called civilized habits. There is currently no conclusive evidence that African descendants or any other Brazilian ethnic minorities are especially vulnerable to renal disease. Access to RRT in Brazil is universal. However, because both the end-stage renal disease population and operational RRT costs are steadily increasing, the system may face severe limitations in the near future. Much effort is needed to limit the prevalence of renal disease, to detain or retard the progression of chronic nephropathies, and to ensure that high-quality RRT will remain available to all those who need it.

  18. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Renal Failure Complicating a Systemic Genetic Disease: Diagnostic Dilemma. Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Leila; Renoux, Marion; Radoï, Loredana

    2015-11-01

    Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, owing mainly to secondary hyperparathyroidism complicating this disease. However, any systemic disease responsible for kidney failure can produce oral manifestations, which can be misdiagnosed. This report describes the case of a 40-year-old male patient referred for oral assessment before kidney and liver transplantation. He had primary hyperoxaluria complicated by end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Panoramic radiography indicated not only external root resorption, but also maxillary and mandibular radiolucencies consistent with brown tumors. Unexpectedly, histologic study of the bone biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of jaws oxalosis. Primary hyperoxaluria is a systemic genetic disease. The affected genes are involved in glyoxylate metabolism and their deficiency results in overproduction of oxalates. Inability of the kidney to excrete oxalates leads to deposition of these crystals in almost all tissues (oxalosis) and to multiple-organ failure. Several oral findings have been described in patients with oxalosis, such as periodontal disease and root resorptions, but radiolucencies in the jaws have rarely been described. This case report is of particular interest because of the unusual location of oxalate crystal deposition in the jaws, which could be misdiagnosed in a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  19. Trace elements in sera from patients with renal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Sera, Kouichiro; Sato, Michirou

    1999-04-01

    In hemodialysis (HD) patients, an accumulation of trace elements such as aluminum, copper, silicon and vanadium has been reported. Aluminum-caused encephalopathy and aluminum-related bone diseases are important trace element-related complications. Using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) we determined concentrations of aluminum, silicon, copper, zinc, selenium and bromine in sera of 29 patients with HD, 14 nondialysis patients with renal disease (RD) and 27 normal controls. The concentration of serum silicon of the patients with HD was 107.4 ± 61.3 μmol/l, which is markedly higher than that of normal controls (48.3 ± 25.8 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The serum concentrations of zinc and bromine in patients with HD were 11.9 ± 1.7 and 21.3 ± 3.0 μmol/l, respectively. Both were markedly lower than those of normal controls (15.6 ± 2.6, 69.2 ± 8.3 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The concentrations of aluminium and bromine in the serum of patients with RD were 171.9 ± 64.3 and 81.9 ± 11.6 μmol/l, which were markedly higher than those of normal controls ( p < 0.0001, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the concentration of copper and selenium among three groups.

  20. Stereopsis in end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Harris, John P; Butler, Laurie T; Vaux, Emma C

    2017-03-15

    We investigated an effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the visual system by measuring the ability of 21 patients to perceive depth in the random dot stereograms and circles of the Randot Test. To control for other factors which might influence performance on the tests of stereopsis, patients were compared with healthy controls matched for age, years of education, IQ, and general cognitive ability. Vernier acuity (thought to reflect mainly central processing) and Landolt acuity (more sensitive to retinal and optical abnormalities) were also measured, but the study did not include a formal ophthalmological examination. All controls could perceive depth in random dot stereograms, whereas 9/21 patients could not. Patients who could perceive depth had worse stereoacuity than did their matched controls. The patient group as a whole had worse Vernier and Landolt acuities than the controls. The stereoblind patient subgroup had similar Vernier acuity to the stereoscopic subgroup, but worse Landolt acuity, and was more likely to have peripheral vascular disease. We conclude that ESRD had affected structures both within the eye, and within the visual brain. However, the similarity of Vernier acuity and difference of Landolt acuity in the stereoblind and stereoscopic patient subgroups suggest that the differences in stereoscopic ability arise from abnormalities in the eyes rather than in the brain.

  1. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G; Kher, V; Saxena, S; Jayakumar, M; Chafekar, D; Pargaonkar, P; Shetty, M; Reddy, Y N V; Reddy, Y N V

    2012-05-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients.

  2. Perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma in patients with dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kaori; Ito, Fumio; Nakazawa, Hayakazu

    2012-06-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to analyze the perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma in patients with dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease and (ii) to reveal perioperative management problems that are unique to these patients. Between June 2004 and June 2011, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed in 39 patients who had renal cell carcinoma and dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease. The operative outcomes of these patients were compared with the operative outcomes of 104 non-end-stage renal disease patients with sporadic renal cell carcinoma who underwent laparoscopic radical nephrectomy during the same period. Laparoscopic surgery was completed in thirty-eight end-stage renal disease patients. One patient was converted to open surgery because of an intraoperative injury to the inferior vena cava. This patient was excluded from the analysis. The mean operative time was 240 min; blood loss, 157 mL; and postoperative hospital stay, 9.6 days. Postoperative complications were observed in six patients, as follows: retroperitoneal hematoma and abscess in one patient, thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in three patients, pneumonia in one patient, and gastrointestinal bleeding in one patient. Eleven patients required blood transfusions. There was no significant difference between the end-stage renal disease patients and the non-end-stage renal disease patients in the mean operative time or the amount of blood loss. In conclusion, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is feasible for dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease patients, as well as for non-end-stage renal disease patients; however, end-stage renal disease patients may have a higher probability of experiencing non-life-threatening complications.

  3. Extracellular vesicles: structure, function, and potential clinical uses in renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Borges, F.T.; Reis, L.A.; Schor, N.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the role of extracellular vesicles in various diseases including cancer has been increasing. Extracellular vesicles include microvesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, and argosomes, and are classified by size, content, synthesis, and function. Currently, the best characterized are exosomes and microvesicles. Exosomes are small vesicles (40-100 nm) involved in intercellular communication regardless of the distance between them. They are found in various biological fluids such as plasma, serum, and breast milk, and are formed from multivesicular bodies through the inward budding of the endosome membrane. Microvesicles are 100-1000 nm vesicles released from the cell by the outward budding of the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles is very broad, with applications including a route of drug delivery and as biomarkers for diagnosis. Extracellular vesicles extracted from stem cells may be used for treatment of many diseases including kidney diseases. This review highlights mechanisms of synthesis and function, and the potential uses of well-characterized extracellular vesicles, mainly exosomes, with a special focus on renal functions and diseases. PMID:24141609

  4. A new risk score model to predict the presence of significant coronary artery disease in renal transplant candidates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal transplant candidates are at high risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). We sought to develop a new risk score model to determine the pre-test probability of the occurrence of significant CAD in renal transplant candidates. Methods A total of 1,060 renal transplant candidates underwent a comprehensive cardiovascular risk evaluation. Patients considered at high risk of CAD (age ≥50 years, with either diabetes mellitus (DM) or cardiovascular disease (CVD)), or having noninvasive testing suggestive of CAD were referred for coronary angiography (n = 524). Significant CAD was defined by the presence of luminal stenosis ≥70%. A binary logistic regression model was built, and the resulting logistic regression coefficient B for each variable was multiplied by 10 and rounded to the next whole number. For each patient, a corresponding risk score was calculated and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed. Results The final equation for the model was risk score = (age × 0.4) + (DM × 9) + (CVD × 14) and for the probability of CAD (%) = (risk score × 2) – 23. The corresponding ROC for the accuracy of the diagnosis of CAD was 0.75 (P <0.0001) in the developmental model. Conclusions We developed a simple clinical risk score to determine the pre-test probability of significant CAD in renal transplant candidates. This model may help those directly involved in the care of patients with end-stage renal disease being considered for transplantation in an attempt to reduce the rate of cardiovascular events that presently hampers the long-term prognosis of such patients. PMID:24176034

  5. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  6. Associations between proteinuria, systemic hypertension and glomerular filtration rate in dogs with renal and non-renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wehner, A; Hartmann, K; Hirschberger, J

    2008-02-02

    Proteinuria and systemic hypertension are well recognised risk factors in chronic renal failure (CRF). They are consequences of renal disease but also lead to a further loss of functional kidney tissue. The objectives of this study were to investigate the associations between proteinuria, systemic hypertension and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in dogs with naturally occurring renal and non-renal diseases, and to determine whether proteinuria and hypertension were associated with shorter survival times in dogs with CRF. Measurements of exogenous creatinine plasma clearance (ECPC), urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC), and Doppler sonographic measurements of systolic blood pressure (SBP) were made in 60 dogs with various diseases. There was a weak but significant inverse correlation between UPC and ECPC, a significant inverse correlation between SBP and ECPC and a weak but significant positive correlation between UPC and SBP. Some of the dogs with CRF were proteinuric and almost all were hypertensive. Neoplasia was commonly associated with proteinuria in the dogs with a normal ECPC. CRF was the most common cause leading to hypertension. In the dogs with CRF, hypertension and marked proteinuria were associated with significantly shorter survival times.

  7. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  8. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  9. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  10. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  11. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  12. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  13. Adrenal diseases during pregnancy: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Mnif, Mouna F; Charfi, Nadia; Kacem, Faten H; Naceur, Basma B; Mnif, Fatma; Dammak, Mohamed; Rekik, Nabila; Abid, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    : Adrenal diseases--including disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia--are relatively rare in pregnancy, but a timely diagnosis and proper treatment are critical because these disorders can cause maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Making the diagnosis of adrenal disorders in pregnancy is challenging as symptoms associated with pregnancy are also seen in adrenal diseases. In addition, pregnancy is marked by several endocrine changes, including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The aim of this article was to review the pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various adrenal disorders during pregnancy.

  14. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yaqub, Sonia; Kashif, Waqar; Hussain, Syed Ather

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetics worldwide, yet most patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are not formally evaluated with a renal biopsy. The diagnosis is almost always based on clinical grounds. A wide spectrum of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) is reported to occur in patients with type-2 diabetes. It has been estimated that up to one-third of all diabetic patients who present with proteinuria are suffering from NDRD. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the prevalence and etiology of NDRD in patients with type-2 diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with type-2 diabetes who underwent kidney biopsy on clinical suspicion of NDRD (absence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy; short duration of diabetes, i.e. less than five years) from January 2003 through December 2007 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Based on the biopsy findings, patients were grouped as Group-I, isolated NDRD; Group-II, NDRD with underlying DN; and Group-III, isolated DN. Of 68 patients studied, 75% were males and the mean age was 56 years. The mean duration of diabetes was nine years. Group-I included 34 patients (52%), Group-II included 11 patients (17%) and Group-III included 23 patients (31%). Among the Group-I patients, the mean age was 56 years (41-77 years). The most common NDRDs were acute interstitial nephritis (32%), diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (17%); membranous nephropathy (12%) and crescentic glomerulonephritis (12%). Among Group-II, the mean age was 60 years (46-71 years), and the most common lesion was interstitial nephritis superimposed on underlying DN (63% cases). Among Group-III, the mean age was 53 years (42- 80 years). The mean proteinuria was 5, 6.3 and 7.3 g/24 h of urine collection in Groups I, II and III, respectively (P = NS). The mean duration of diabetes was 7.3, 11.7 and 10.7 years in Groups I, II and III, respectively. The duration of diabetes

  15. Renal artery stenosis and hypertension after abdominal irradiation for Hodgkin disease. Successful treatment with nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Salvi, S.; Green, D.M.; Brecher, M.L.; Magoos, I.; Gamboa, L.N.; Fisher, J.E.; Baliah, T.; Afshani, E.

    1983-06-01

    Hypertension secondary to stenosis of the left renal artery developed in a thirteen-year-old male six years after completion of inverted Y irradiation (3,600 rad) for abdominal Hodgkin disease. Surgical treatment with nephrectomy resulted in control of the hypertension without the use of antihypertensive agents. We review the literature for this unusual complication of abdominal irradiation, and recommend that a 99mTc-DMSA renal scan, selective renal vein sampling for renin determinations, and renal arteriography be performed on any patient in whom hypertension develops following abdominal irradiation in childhood.

  16. Prevalence of renal and hepatobiliary disease, laboratory abnormalities, and potentially toxic medication exposures among persons with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mapel, Douglas W; Marton, Jenõ P

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of renal and hepatic disease, related laboratory abnormalities, and potentially hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic medication use in a population-based cohort of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods This was a retrospective case-control cohort analysis of COPD patients enrolled in one regional health system for at least 12 months during a 36-month study period (n = 2284). Each COPD patient was matched by age and gender to up to three persons not diagnosed with COPD (n = 5959). Results The mean age for cases and controls was 70.3 years, and 52.5% were women. The COPD cohort had significantly higher prevalences (cases/100) of acute, chronic, and unspecified renal failure as compared with controls (1.40 versus 0.59, 2.89 versus 0.79, and 1.09 versus 0.44, respectively). Among the cases, 31.3% had at least one renal or urinary tract diagnosis during the study period, as compared with 21.1% of controls. COPD cases also had more gallbladder disease (2.76 versus 1.63) and pancreatic disease (1.40 versus 0.60), but not hepatic disease. COPD patients were more likely to have at least one serum creatinine level (5.1 versus 2.1) or liver aspartate aminotransferase level (4.5 versus 2.7) that was more than twice the upper limit of normal. COPD patients had prescription fills for an average of 17.6 potentially nephrotoxic and 27.4 hepatotoxic drugs during the study period, as compared with 13.6 and 19.9 for the controls (P value for all comparisons < 0.01). Conclusion COPD patients have a substantially increased prevalence of renal, gallbladder, and pancreatic diseases, as well as abnormal renal and hepatic laboratory values, but not diagnosed liver disease. COPD patients are also more likely to be prescribed medications with potentially toxic renal or hepatic side effects. PMID:23515180

  17. [Hirschsprung's disease: the immunohistochemistry as ancillary method for the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Menchaca-Cervantes, Celestina; Rodríguez-Velasco, Alicia; Ramón-García, Guillermo; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: the confirmatory diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease is made by histopathological study. However, this procedure is limited with only hematoxylin and eosin staining, especially in biopsies of premature babies or when non-expert pathologists make the evaluation. The immunohistochemistry from ganglia cell calretinin has been used to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to show the benefits of this antibody in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease in biopsy specimens. Methods: we evaluated patients with histopathological diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease made by hematoxylin and eosin staining. We determined if there was enough paraffin block for immunohistochemistry with two markers: calretinin and neurofilaments. Three controls of autopsy of children under 3 years of age with other diagnosis were included. Results: of a total of 48 cases with histopathological diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease only 13 had adequate tissue for immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis in nine cases. In the other four cases there were initial misdiagnosis due to evidence of calretinin (ganglion cells) and, thus, Hirschsprung's disease was discarded. Conclusions: the use of immunohistochemistry allows confirming the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease and reduce the risk of a false-positive result with only hematoxylin and eosin staining.

  18. Diffuse FDG renal uptake in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Szyszko, Teresa; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Nunan, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    In patients presenting with acute renal failure and known/suspected lymphoma, the diagnosis of diffuse renal involvement is important, as there is potential for rapid resolution with chemotherapy. Although FDG is excreted through the kidneys and focal renal disease may be difficult to identify, diffuse renal FDG is more easily recognized and is always abnormal. We report a patient presenting with acute renal failure and suspected lymphoma. F-18 FDG PET/CT study demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake in bilaterally enlarged kidneys. Following 1 cycle of chemotherapy, the renal function normalized. An interim F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrated normal size and FDG uptake within both kidneys.

  19. Dementia in 2014. Towards early diagnosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-02-01

    Improved neuroimaging and molecular markers of Alzheimer disease (AD) have aided diagnosis of AD in the very early stages, and have facilitated differential diagnosis between AD and other neurodegenerative disorders with dementia. The finding that some older individuals can show amyloid-β pathology while remaining cognitively intact raises important questions regarding prevention strategies.

  20. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  1. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  2. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  3. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  4. Fertility preservation in patients receiving cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Radha; Miller, Steven D; Meyers, Kevin E; Ginsberg, Jill P

    2015-07-01

    Cyclophosphamide continues to have an important role in the treatment of renal disease, including nephrotic syndrome and lupus nephritis, despite known complications of gonadotoxicity and potential infertility in both male and female patients. It is important that the physician recommending this therapy mitigates the effect of the drug on fertility by adhering to recommendations on dosing limits and offering fertility-preserving strategies. In addition to well-established methods, such as sperm banking and embryo cryopreservation, advances in reproductive technology have yielded strategies such as oocyte cryopreservation, resulting in more fertility-preserving options for the pediatric patient. Despite these advances, there continues to be a significant barrier to referral and access to sperm banks and fertility specialists. These issues are further complicated by ethical issues associated with the treatment of pediatric patients. In this review we explore the development of recommended dosing limits and include a discussion of the available fertility-preserving methods, strategies for increasing access to fertility specialists, and the ethical considerations facing the pediatric healthcare provider.

  5. Fertility and contraception in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Holley, J L

    1998-01-01

    The hormonal aberrations that occur with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are presented in this review in relation to fertility and conception among women on dialysis. The imbalance in gonadotropin production in dialysis-dependent men and women is characterized by elevations in luteinizing hormone (LH). In women dialysis patients, the normal estradiol-stimulated LH surge does not occur, resulting in anovulation. In men dialysis patients spermatogenesis is impaired, and low testosterone levels cause elevated LH. Infertility in those with ESRD is a culmination of many factors, including impotence and loss of libido, anovulation, and an altered hormonal milieu. Despite these inhibitors of conception, women on dialysis can conceive; pregnancy has been reported in 1% to 7% of women on dialysis in survey studies. The influence of dialysis mode (hemodialysis v peritoneal dialysis), recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), and dialysis adequacy on the likelihood of conception among patients of either sex on dialysis is unknown. Reduced sexual activity and interest has consistently been reported in the ESRD population. The reasons for this are complex and likely involve the effects of comorbid illnesses, overall health status, body image factors, and hormonal alterations. Nephrologists rarely discuss conception and contraception with their women dialysis patients. Greater attention to these issues is needed.

  6. Ghrelin and obestatin levels in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Aygen, B; Dogukan, A; Dursun, F E; Aydin, S; Kilic, N; Sahpaz, F; Celiker, H

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition is fairly common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, persistent lack of appetite being a major symptom. Ghrelin and obestatin are two hormones that are involved in appetite and energy homeostasis. The present study examined ghrelin and obestatin levels in 24 ESRD patients undergoing haemodialysis and 24 age-matched healthy controls. Serum and saliva ghrelin and obestatin levels in the ESRD patients were significantly higher compared with controls, while saliva ghrelin and obestatin levels in all study participants were significantly higher than serum levels. Saliva ghrelin correlated with serum ghrelin and saliva obestatin correlated with serum obestatin in all study participants, although there was no correlation between ghrelin and obestatin levels. In conclusion, the results suggest that the kidneys may have a role in the metabolism and/or clearance of obestatin, as they do for ghrelin. Further studies are needed to determine if elevated levels of these hormones in ESRD patients contribute to the malnutrition that is common in these patients.

  7. Satellite hemodialysis services for patients with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Organ, Kathy; MacDonald, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    More than 40,000 Canadians are living with end stage renal disease and approximately 22,400 of those are currently being treated with hemodialysis (The Kidney Foundation of Canada, 2013). Long distance travel to access hemodialysis services can be a serious burden for patients, and travelling more than 60 minutes can mean a 20% greater risk for death, as compared with those who travel 15 minutes or less (Moist et al., 2008). Satellite hemodialysis units are seen as one solution to this problem. This study assessed the impact of services provided by one satellite hemodialysis unit on patients' satisfaction, access to care and quality of life using a qualitative interview research design. Seven patients were interviewed and three themes emerged including the burden of long distance travel before satellite services (safety, time and cost), satisfaction with satellite services (pleasant environment and continuity of care), and improved quality of life. This study showed that a satellite hemodialysis unit improved access to services and enhanced the quality of life of those patients who participated in the study.

  8. Lower Extremity Revascularization in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas W; Dansey, Kirsten; Hamdan, Allen D

    2016-11-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who present with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have become an increasingly common and complex treatment problem for vascular surgeons. Dialysis patients have high short-term mortality rates regardless of whether revascularization is pursued. ESRD patients with CLI can be managed with: local wound care, endovascular or surgical revascularization, or amputation. Some patients may heal small foot wounds with local wound care alone, even if distal perfusion is marginal, as long as any infectious process has been controlled. Surgical revascularization has a mortality rate of 5-10% but has a high chance of limb salvage. However, overall 5-year survival may be as low as 28%. Endovascular therapy also carries a high perioperative mortality risk in this population with similar limb salvage rates. Amputation is indicated in patients with advanced stage CLI, as described by the Society for Vascular Surgery's Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) system. Statistical models predict that endovascular or surgical revascularization strategies are less costly and more functionally beneficial to patients than primary amputation alone. Decisions on how to manage ESRD patients with CLI are complex but revascularization can often result in limb salvage, despite limited overall survival. Dialysis patients with good life expectancy and good quality conduit may benefit most from surgical bypass.

  9. Rates and causes of end-stage renal disease in Navajo Indians, 1971-1985.

    PubMed

    Megill, D M; Hoy, W E; Woodruff, S D

    1988-08-01

    The rates of end-stage renal disease are much increased in American Indians, but no longitudinal study of its rates and causes has been undertaken in any tribe. This 15-year study of rates and causes of treated end-stage renal disease in the Navajo, the largest Indian tribe, supplies an important model on which to base projections and plan interventions. Treated end-stage renal disease in Navajos has increased to an age-adjusted incidence 4 times that in whites in the United States. Diabetic nephropathy accounted for 50% of all new cases in 1985, with an incidence 9.6 times that in US whites, and was due entirely to type II disease. Glomerulonephritis caused end-stage renal disease in Navajos at a rate at least 1.8 times that in US whites and afflicted a much younger population. The predominant form was mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with an immune complex deposition. Renal disease of unknown etiology, which probably includes much silent glomerulonephritis, accounted for 20% of all new cases. The aggregate Navajo population with end-stage renal disease was 9 years younger than its US counterpart. These observations reflect the genesis of the epidemic of diabetic nephropathy afflicting many tribes. Urgent measures are needed to contain this. In addition, the etiology and control of mesangiopathic, immune-complex glomerulonephritis of unusual severity, a previously unrecognized problem, need to be addressed.

  10. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Piñol, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Teixidó, Ivan; Cruz, Joaquim; Comas, Jorge; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient’s symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80%) and sensitivity (≥99%), and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers. PMID:27547534

  11. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rui; Piñol, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Teixidó, Ivan; Cruz, Joaquim; Comas, Jorge; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert; Solsona, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient's symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80%) and sensitivity (≥99%), and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers.

  12. Sleep Disorders and Cardio-Renal Disease: Implications for Minority Populations

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Judith; Salifu, Moro O.; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem that is reaching pandemic proportion. Currently two thirds of the American population is either overweight or obese and worldwide, 39% of the population is overweight and 13% are considered obese [1,2]. This rapid rise in obesity is associated with increased in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), hypertension (HTN), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the major killer of adults in the USA. Parallel to this epidemic is the rapid rise of sleep disorders such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). These disorders lead to increased morbidity and mortality and generally go undiagnosed and undertreated, particularly among minority groups. Accumulating evidence indicates common pathophysiologic background underlying all of these related disorders. Among these include: increased inflammation, increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia and hypercoagulability. We discuss the rising epidemic of sleep disorders and its interrelationship with DM2, HTN, CVD and renal disease highlighting the racial disparity in diagnosis and treatment of these disorders that disproportionately affects minority populations. We also discuss the various treatment modalities and the cutting edge developments in this field. PMID:27478683

  13. [Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Andreia Gomes; Gago, Miguel Fernandes; Garrett, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    In current medical practice, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease remains essentially clinical. This practice determines that the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is done in an already advanced neuropathological stage of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the validity of cerebrospinal fluid protein biological markers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The a-synuclein and DJ-1 proteins, due to their role in the hereditary Parkinson's disease, have been the most widely studied cerebrospinal biomarkers. Nevertheless, they have had divergent results mostly owing to different processing, identification and control of laboratory techniques. The new proteomic techniques, directed to the detection of multiple undifferentiated proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (eg. ceruloplasmin, chromogranin B, apoH), are promising. The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is imperious as it is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes extensive morbidity. Most of current scientific research in Parkinson's disease is focused on the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. Thus, the definition of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is highly relevant.

  14. Successful pregnancy in an end-stage renal disease patient on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Inal, Salih; Reis, Kadriye Altok; Armağan, Berkan; Oneç, Küşrad; Biri, Aydan

    2012-01-01

    Among women with chronic kidney disease, successful pregnancy with a surviving infant is rather rare. Although these pregnancies carry higher risk, with the possibility of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, they can be managed with close monitoring and intense renal replacement therapy. Given the hemodynamic advantages of peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis in pregnancy, peritoneal dialysis therapy is thought to be a favorable renal replacement option in pregnant patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Rapidly Progressive Renal Dysfunction in Two Elderly Patients with Renal Enlargement and Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease-like Acute Tubulointerstitial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Shinya; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Takeda, Tetsuro; Ueda, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD) is a hereditary disease associated with bilateral medullary polycysts and interstitial fibrosis. MCKD is typically associated with slowly progressive renal dysfunction. We herein report two rare elderly cases with enlarged kidneys and rapidly progressive renal dysfunction without myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA), PR3-ANCA, or anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies. Renal biopsies revealed extensive tubular dilatation and atrophy with interstitial fibrosis consistent with MCKD. Both patients began hemodialysis therapy a few months later. Our cases suggest a MCKD subgroup among elderly patients with an undefined genetic background, rapidly progressive renal dysfunction, and enlarged kidneys. PMID:27746439

  16. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery.

    PubMed

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì', Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well.

  17. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  18. Octreotide reduces hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) received octreotide for 12 months, and this was associated with a 6.3% reduction in liver volume, an 8% reduction in total kidney volume and stabilization of renal function. There was also a reduction of cyst size in fibrocystic disease of breast. These data suggest that the cyst fluid accumulation in different organs from patients with ADPKD is a dynamic process which can be reversed by octreotide. This is the first report of a case of simultaneous reduction in hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume with preservation of renal function in a patient with ADPKD receiving octreotide.

  19. [Survey of acupuncture and moxibustion for clinical treatment of renal diseases].

    PubMed

    Wan, Rong-Jun; Li, Yue-Hong

    2009-04-01

    In order to understand survey of medication combined with acupuncture and moxibustion for clinical treatment of renal diseases, clinical application and the mechanisms of acupuncture and moxibustion for treatment of renal diseases were summarized by electric retrieval of literature from 1982 to 2007. It is indicated that acupuncture and moxibustion can increase human immunity, reduce urinary protein, improve renal function, antagonize the side-effects of glucocorticoid hormones, etc. and medication combined with acup-moxibustion has the advantages of convenience, lower cost, safety, no adverse effects, etc.

  20. Scintigraphic imaging in renal infections.

    PubMed

    Rossleigh, M A

    2009-02-01

    The scintigraphic imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of renal infections is renal cortical scintigraphy utilizing [(99m)Tc]dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). This technique is able to demonstrate upper tract involvement with infection and to assess for the presence of renal cortical scarring following a urinary tract infection (UTI). There are recent publications advocating its use to determine which patients need to proceed to further investigation with cystography. It is also being utilized in the evaluation of different treatment regimes used in patients with UTI. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and leukocyte scanning have only a minor role in the diagnosis of renal infection. Their main application is in the diagnosis of renal cyst infections in patients with polycystic renal disease.

  1. Value of the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c for diagnosis of early renal injury in pediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tong; Tian, Lijun; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Zhenru; Tian, Xiuying; Sun, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the combined application of measuring cystatin C (Cys-C) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels for early renal injury in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 130 children with type 2 diabetes admitted to our hospital from May 2013 to July 2015 were selected. Patients were divided according to whether there was complication of renal injury. In group A (n=65), the patients had renal injury and in group B (n=65), the patients did not have renal injury. The levels of Cys-C and HbA1c in the two groups were examined. The results showed that the levels of Cys-C and HbA1c of patients in group A were significantly higher than those in group B (P<0.05), and the positive rate of the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c in group A was 92.3%, and was higher than that of the individual examinations of either Cys-C or HbA1c (P<0.05). The Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis was applied to group B and showed that Cys-C was positively correlated with HbA1c (r=0.842, P<0.05). From analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curves, the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c surpassed the individual examinations of Cys-C or HbA1c in sensitivity and specificity (P<0.05). In conclusion, the positive detection rate of early renal injury was significantly increased by the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes, which is beneficial for early identification and diagnosis of this diseases and is worthy of clinical application.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue are not affected by renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E J; de Klein, Annelies; Douben, Hannie; Korevaar, Sander S; Mensah, Fane K F; Dor, Frank J M F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are a potential therapeutic agent in renal disease and kidney transplantation. Autologous cell use in kidney transplantation is preferred to avoid anti-HLA reactivity; however, the influence of renal disease on mesenchymal stem cells is unknown. To investigate the feasibility of autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease, we isolated these cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy controls and patients with renal disease and compared them phenotypically and functionally. The mesenchymal stem cells from both groups showed similar morphology and differentiation capacity, and were both over 90% positive for CD73, CD105, and CD166, and negative for CD31 and CD45. They demonstrated comparable population doubling times, rates of apoptosis, and were both capable of inhibiting allo-antigen- and anti-CD3/CD28-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation. In response to immune activation they both increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. These mesenchymal stem cells were genetically stable after extensive expansion and, importantly, were not affected by uremic serum. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells of patients with renal disease have similar characteristics and functionality as those from healthy controls. Hence, our results indicate the feasibility of their use in autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease.

  3. Effect of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, V E; Wilson, D M; Burnett, J C; Johnson, C M; Offord, K P

    1991-10-01

    We compared the tubular transport of sodium and the erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity in hypertensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in normotensive control subjects. In addition, we assessed the effects of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion in hypertensive patients with ADPKD to provide information on mechanisms responsible for the increased renal vascular resistance and filtration fraction and the adjustment of the pressure-natriuresis relationship during saline expansion, observed in patients with ADPKD, hypertension, and preserved renal function. In comparison with normotensive control subjects, the hypertensive patients with ADPKD had lower renal plasma flows, higher renal vascular resistances and filtration fractions, and similar proximal and distal fractional reabsorptions of sodium. The administration of enalapril resulted in significant increases in the renal plasma flow and significant reductions in mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and filtration fraction, but the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Despite the significant reduction in mean arterial pressure during inhibition of converting enzyme, the distal fractional reabsorption of sodium decreased while the total fractional excretion of sodium remained unchanged or increased slightly. No significant differences were detected between the normotensive control subjects and the hypertensive patients with ADPKD in erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration, or atrial natriuretic factor. These results suggest that the renal renin-angiotensin system plays a central role in the alterations in renal hemodynamics and sodium management associated with the development of hypertension in ADPKD.

  4. Quiz. Correct answer to the quiz. Check your diagnosis. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Keva; Liu, Kai-Wen; Chang, I-Wei

    2015-06-01

    We incidentally observed a case of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma of an 81-year-old woman, presenting with intermittent left flank pain. It is a recently described rare renal parenchymal tumor.

  5. [Carcinoembryonic antigen as a marker of proliferative diseases of the lymphatic system in patients with chronic renal failure--case report].

    PubMed

    Janas, Marzena; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Mazur, Stanisław

    2014-10-01

    In patients with CKD, anaemia mainly develops due to a decreased renal synthesis of erythropoietin. The anaemia, both normochromic and normocytic, becomes more severe as the glomerular filtration rate progressively decreases. Tumor markers are used to detect or monitor proliferative diseases. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is usually produced in the gastrointestinal tract, but its production is terminated before birth. The main application of this indicator is to monitor the treatment and the presence of metastases of colorectal cancer. We present a case of 86-year-old woman who was diagnosed with renal anaemia in stage 4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD), treated by periodic blood transfusions. This paper presents the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of anemia with complex and different than renal origin anemia in patients with CKD. Patients require the detailed haematological diagnosis. Pointed out the usefulness of CEA in the diagnosis of lymphoma with co-existing renal failure. The use of erythropoietin in doses of nephrology allowed to avoid further blood transfusion.

  6. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment.

  7. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  8. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; de Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  9. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke; Jennum, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. Objective To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3 years before a hospital contact leading to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Methods Retrospective morbidity data from Danish National Patient Registry records (1997–2007) of 10,490 adult patients with a secondary care diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were compared with 42,505 control cases. Results Parkinson's disease was associated with significantly higher morbidity rates associated with conditions in the following categories: mental and psychiatric, nervous system, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, genitourinary, abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, injury, poisoning and certain other external causes, and other factors influencing health status and contact with health services. It was negatively associated with neoplasm, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases. Conclusions Patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease present significant differences in morbidities early on, following, and prior to, their diagnosis, compared with healthy controls. PMID:24944873

  10. Extra-renal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): considerations for routine screening and management.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Dahl, Neera K

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic disease, marked by progressive increase of bilateral renal cysts, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and often leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Apart from renal cysts, patients often have extra-renal disease, involving the liver, heart and vasculature. Other less common but equally important extra-renal manifestations of ADPKD include diverticular disease, hernias, male infertility and pain. Extra-renal disease burden is often asymptomatic, but may result in increased morbidity and mortality. If the disease burden is significant, screening may prove beneficial. We review the rationale for current screening recommendations and propose some guidelines for screening and management of ADPKD patients.

  11. End Stage Renal Disease as a Potential Risk Factor for Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Ni; Yang, Te-Cheng; Lin, Jian-Teng; Lian, Ie-Bin

    2015-11-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has been reported to be an important risk factor for systemic vascular disease. Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is closely related with cardiovascular diseases; however, its association with ESRD had not been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate whether ESRD is a risk factor for RVO, including central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). This population-based study is based on the longitudinal data from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5344 patients with diagnosis of ESRD on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis during the period from January 1996 to December 2011. For each ESRD patient, we selected 20 non-ESRD patients matched on age and sex. Each ESRD patient and his/her controls were followed from the initiation of renal dialysis until either the diagnosis of RVO or censorship. Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare the hazard of RVO between cohorts. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) adjusted by the comorbidities of RVO including diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, hypercholesteremia, and hypertriglyceridemia. After stratifying by DM status, the statistics were applied again to examine the associations among the DM cohort and non-DM cohort.The 16-year RVO cumulative incidence for ESRD cohort was 2-fold to the non-ESRD (1.01% vs 0.46%). After matching with age, sex, hypertension, and hypercholesteremia, the adjusted HR was 1.46 (95% confidence interval = 1.07-2.01, P value = 0.018). By further excluding patients with DM, the adjusted HR escalated to 2.43 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-3.83, P < 0.001). In contrast, there was no significant risk of ESRD on RVO in the DM patients (HR = 1.03). We conclude that among the non-DM patients, ESRD cases had significantly higher RVO rate than the non-ESRD, which indicates that ESRD maybe a potential risk factor for the development of RVO in

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Heim, Beatrice; Krismer, Florian; De Marzi, Roberto; Seppi, Klaus

    2017-04-04

    The differential diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is considered one of the most challenging in neurology and error rates in the clinical diagnosis can be high even at specialized centres. Despite several limitations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has undoubtedly enhanced the diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative parkinsonism over the last three decades. This review aims to summarize research findings regarding the value of the different MRI techniques, including advanced sequences at high- and ultra-high-field MRI and modern image analysis algorithms, in the diagnostic work-up of Parkinson's disease. This includes not only the exclusion of alternative diagnoses for Parkinson's disease such as symptomatic parkinsonism and atypical parkinsonism, but also the diagnosis of early, new onset, and even prodromal Parkinson's disease.

  13. Computer assisted diagnosis in renal nuclear medicine: rationale, methodology and interpretative criteria for diuretic renography

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew T; Garcia, Ernest V

    2014-01-01

    The goal of artificial intelligence, expert systems, decision support systems and computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) in imaging is the development and implementation of software to assist in the detection and evaluation of abnormalities, to alert physicians to cognitive biases, to reduce intra and inter-observer variability and to facilitate the interpretation of studies at a faster rate and with a higher level of accuracy. These developments are needed to meet the challenges resulting from a rapid increase in the volume of diagnostic imaging studies coupled with a concurrent increase in the number and complexity of images in each patient data. The convergence of an expanding knowledge base and escalating time constraints increases the likelihood of physician errors. Errors are even more likely when physicians interpret low volume studies such as 99mTc-MAG3 diuretic scans where imagers may have had limited training or experience. Decision support systems include neural networks, case-based reasoning, expert systems and statistical systems. iRENEX (renal expert) is an expert system for diuretic renography that uses a set of rules obtained from human experts to analyze a knowledge base of both clinical parameters and quantitative parameters derived from the renogram. Initial studies have shown that the interpretations provided by iRENEX are comparable to the interpretations of a panel of experts. iRENEX provides immediate patient specific feedback at the time of scan interpretation, can be queried to provide the reasons for its conclusions and can be used as an educational tool to teach trainees to better interpret renal scans. iRENEX also has the capacity to populate a structured reporting module and generate a clear and concise impression based on the elements contained in the report; adherence to the procedural and data entry components of the structured reporting module assures and documents procedural competency. Finally, although the focus is CAD applied to

  14. Extracellular vesicles in diagnosis and therapy of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Qisheng; Liu, Yutao; Dong, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are endogenously produced, membrane-bound vesicles that contain various molecules. Depending on their size and origins, EVs are classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes. A fundamental function of EVs is to mediate intercellular communication. In kidneys, recent research has begun to suggest a role of EVs, especially exosomes, in cell-cell communication by transferring proteins, mRNAs, and microRNAs to recipient cells as nanovectors. EVs may mediate the cross talk between various cell types within kidneys for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. They may also mediate the cross talk between kidneys and other organs under physiological and pathological conditions. EVs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases, including renal fibrosis, end-stage renal disease, glomerular diseases, and diabetic nephropathy. The release of EVs with specific molecular contents into urine and plasma may be useful biomarkers for kidney disease. In addition, EVs produced by cultured cells may have therapeutic effects for these diseases. However, the role of EVs in kidney diseases is largely unclear, and the mechanism underlying EV production and secretion remains elusive. In this review, we introduce the basics of EVs and then analyze the present information about the involvement, diagnostic value, and therapeutic potential of EVs in major kidney diseases.

  15. Diagnostic pathways for exclusion and diagnosis of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Walter; Ehrich, Jochen H H; Guder, Walter G; Keller, Frieder; Scherberich, Jürgen E

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine together with the Society of Nephrology founded a working group with the aim to develop diagnostic pathways for the detection and differentiation of renal diseases. Based on existing recommendations, these pathways may be structured to be a basis for implementation into hospital and laboratory information systems. The present paper describes the contents of these pathways regarding glomerular filtration rate, hematuria, leukocyturia and proteinuria.

  16. Diagnosis and management of bullous disease.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Maria Yadira; Mattox, Adam R

    2013-05-01

    As the population ages, the prevalence of bullous skin diseases will escalate. Efficient management depends on timely recognition by the physician and reduces the morbidity associated with the disease course. This article outlines the common bullous dermatoses affecting older adults and provides tips for a streamlined approach to workup and treatment.

  17. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... see if a patient’s pneumonia is caused by Legionella : Urine ... disease requires treatment with antibiotics (medicines that kill bacteria ...

  18. Mini-review: emerging roles of microRNAs in the pathophysiology of renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Kirti; Kato, Mitsuo; Natarajan, Rama

    2016-01-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenously produced short noncoding regulatory RNAs that can repress gene expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms. They can therefore influence both normal and pathological conditions in diverse biological systems. Several miRNAs have been detected in kidneys, where they have been found to be crucial for renal development and normal physiological functions as well as significant contributors to the pathogenesis of renal disorders such as diabetic nephropathy, acute kidney injury, lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and others, due to their effects on key genes involved in these disease processes. miRNAs have also emerged as novel biomarkers in these renal disorders. Due to increasing evidence of their actions in various kidney segments, in this mini-review we discuss the functional significance of altered miRNA expression during the development of renal pathologies and highlight emerging miRNA-based therapeutics and diagnostic strategies for early detection and treatment of kidney diseases.

  19. Early renal failure as a cardiovascular disease: Focus on lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic state.

    PubMed

    Catena, Cristiana; Colussi, GianLuca; Nait, Francesca; Pezzutto, Francesca; Martinis, Flavia; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2015-07-06

    Patients with renal failure are at increased risk of cardiovascular events even at the earliest stages of disease. In addition to many classic cardiovascular risk factors, many conditions that are commonly identified as emerging risk factors might contribute to occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Changes in circulating levels of many of these emerging risk factors have been demonstrated in patients with early stages of renal failure caused by different types of renal disease and have been associated with detection of cardiovascular complications. However, for most of these factors evidence of benefits of correction on cardiovascular outcome is missing. In this article, we comment on the role of lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic factors as potential contributors to cardiovascular events in patients with early renal failure.

  20. Mini-review: emerging roles of microRNAs in the pathophysiology of renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Kirti; Kato, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenously produced short noncoding regulatory RNAs that can repress gene expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms. They can therefore influence both normal and pathological conditions in diverse biological systems. Several miRNAs have been detected in kidneys, where they have been found to be crucial for renal development and normal physiological functions as well as significant contributors to the pathogenesis of renal disorders such as diabetic nephropathy, acute kidney injury, lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and others, due to their effects on key genes involved in these disease processes. miRNAs have also emerged as novel biomarkers in these renal disorders. Due to increasing evidence of their actions in various kidney segments, in this mini-review we discuss the functional significance of altered miRNA expression during the development of renal pathologies and highlight emerging miRNA-based therapeutics and diagnostic strategies for early detection and treatment of kidney diseases. PMID:26538441

  1. [Peptic ulcer disease etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bak-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy; Płaneta-Małecka, Izabela

    2004-01-01

    Authors in this article present etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children and adults. Increased gastric acid output, Helicobacter pylori, NSAIDs and stress are the basic risk factors in peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori infection is a widely known risk factor in peptic ulcer disease and influences diagnostic and treatment procedures. Primary ulcer disease concerns mainly duodenum and is accompanied by H. pylori infection. Gastroscopy and Helicobacter tests are the only reliable procedures to diagnose peptic ulcer disease. Nowadays the most important aim in peptic ulcer treatment is the H. pylori eradication. Therapy with two antibiotics and a protein pomp inhibitor eradicates the bacteria, treats the ulceration and lowers the number of ulcer recurrence. In non-infected H. pylori ulcers or in a long-term treatment protein pomp inhibitors and H2-inhibitors are effective as well in gastroprotective therapy.

  2. [Hypertransaminasemia: indication for the diagnosis of celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Ramos Plá, M; Julve Pardo, R; Primo Vera, J; Fernández Chinchilla, J; Gómez Belda, A B; García Ferrer, L

    1999-12-01

    A high percentage of diagnosed cases of coeliac disease are oligosymptompatic. Various atypical manifestations such as hypertransaminasemia may guide diagnosis when the disease is suspected. We present two cases of coeliac disease, which were diagnosed on the basis of hypertransaminasemia of unknown origin. One of the patients lacked the gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of disease. We also retrospectively review (January 1990-December 1998) all the cases of coeliac disease diagnosed in our center in order to establish the frequency of liver enzyme alterations in patients with coeliac disease and their evolution on a gluten-free diet. The importance of sprue suspicion in guiding diagnosis in patients with cryptogenic hypertransaminasemia is highlighted as is the need to rule out underlying liver disease in coeliac patients with persistent hypertransaminasemia after withdrawing gluten from the diet.

  3. Diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Thad; Jarvis, Kathryn; Patel, Jigneshkumar

    2011-12-15

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the gastrointestinal tract at any point from the mouth to the rectum. Patients may experience diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, weight loss, abdominal masses, and anemia. Extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn's disease include osteoporosis, inflammatory arthropathies, scleritis, nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, and erythema nodosum. Acute phase reactants, such as C-reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, are often increased with inflammation and may correlate with disease activity. Levels of vitamin B12, folate, albumin, prealbumin, and vitamin D can help assess nutritional status. Colonoscopy with ileoscopy, capsule endoscopy, computed tomography enterography, and small bowel follow-through are often used to diagnose Crohn's disease. Ultrasonography, computed axial tomography, scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging can assess for extraintestinal manifestations or complications (e.g., abscess, perforation). Mesalamine products are often used for the medical management of mild to moderate colonic Crohn's disease. Antibiotics (e.g., metronidazole, fluoroquinolones) are often used for treatment. Patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease are treated with corticosteroids, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (e.g., infliximab, adalimumab). Severe disease may require emergent hospitalization and a multidisciplinary approach with a family physician, gastroenterologist, and surgeon.

  4. Renal infarction: CT diagnosis and correlation between CT findings and etiologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.S.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; Cochran, S.T.; London, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    The CT scans and the clinical records of 12 patients who had renal infarction were reviewed. The renal infarcts were classified as either focal or global. The CT findings were correlated with the etiologies of renal infarction. Embolism was the most common cause of renal infarcts that were multifocal with involvement of both kidneys. Trauma caused a unilateral global type of infract. A case of sickle cell anemia presented with multiple ''slit-like'' focal infarcts and enlarged kidneys. Forty-seven per cent of infarcts demonstrated the cortical rim sign, 11% were acapsular fluid collection, and 6% had an abnormally thickened renal fascia.

  5. Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.

    1987-06-05

    Recombinant DNA procedures have now been applied to the problem of the identification of molecular defects in man that account for heritable diseases, somatic mutations associated with neoplasia, and acquired infectious disease. Thus, recombinant DNA technology has rapidly expanded the ability to diagnose disease. Substantial advances in the simplification of procedures for diagnostic purposes have been made, and the informed physician has gained in diagnostic accuracy as a consequence of these developments. The wide application of recombinant DNA diagnostics will depend on simplicity, speed of results, and cost containment. 66 references, 7 figures.

  6. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities.

  7. A century for progress in the diagnosis of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Michael L

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of Wilson disease has evolved from the original description of a neurological syndrome by Wilson and other contemporaries at the turn of the 20th century to where we recognize that there is a spectrum of clinical liver and neuropsychiatric disease diagnosed by a combination of clinical and biochemical tests and more recently by molecular genetic analysis. The history of the evolution of the findings that help us establish a diagnosis of Wilson disease are presented in the following brief summary of a century of progress toward this end.

  8. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  9. Proteomics and glomerulonephritis: A complementary approach in renal pathology for the identification of chronic kidney disease related markers.

    PubMed

    L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Smith, Andrew; Chinello, Clizia; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most common origins of chronic kidney disease and its careful evaluation is crucial for prognostic and therapeutic purposes, with the renal biopsy still playing a central role for the diagnosis. However, due to its invasiveness, it is not devoid of complications and many investigations have focused on identifying biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases using less-invasive and easy-to-collect samples, such as urine and blood. In this context, proteomics has played a crucial role in determining the molecular changes related to disease progression and early pathological glomerular modifications. Here, we report a review of selected literature for each GN, based on selected works published in the last 10 years, showing how these approaches have generated clinically relevant findings in the study of glomerulonephritis. We also describe several proteomic strategies, highlighting their technical advantages and limitations, future perspectives for proteomic applications in the study of GNs, and their possible application in routine practice.

  10. Problem Oriented Differential Diagnosis of Tropical Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    also provided primary care to the local population who were already infected with a variety of tropical diseases. Many biowarfare agents are exotic or... agents of warfare. 1 This manual was written by a primary care physician for primary care physicians to solve a dilema. We are faced with evaluating the...and by presenting signs and symptoms. The tropical medicine texbooks arrange tropical diseases by infectious agent . The indexes of these texts do not

  11. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  12. Acute renal graft-versus-host disease in a murine model of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Peter M; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Schmid, Karin; Birner, Christoph; Schach, Christian; Maier, Lars S; Holler, Ernst; Endemann, Dierk H

    2017-03-23

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a very common complication after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and associated with poor prognosis. Generally kidneys are assumed to be no direct target of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and renal impairment is often attributed to several other factors occurring in the early phase after BMT. Our study aimed to prove the existence of renal GvHD in a fully MHC-mismatched model of BALB/c mice conditioned and transplanted according to two different intensity protocols. Syngeneically transplanted and untreated animals served as controls. 4 weeks after transplantation, allogeneic animals developed acute GvHD that was more pronounced in the high-intensity protocol (HIP) group than in the low-intensity protocol (LIP) group. Urea and creatinine as classic serum markers of renal function could not verify renal impairment 4 weeks after BMT. Creatinine levels were even reduced as a result of catabolic metabolism and loss of muscle mass due to acute GvHD. Proteinuria, albuminuria, and urinary N-acetyl-beta-Dglucosaminidase (NAG) levels were measured as additional renal markers before and after transplantation. Albuminuria and NAG were only significantly increased after allogeneic transplantation, correlating with disease severity between HIP and LIP animals. Histological investigations of the kidneys showed renal infiltration of T-cells and macrophages with endarteriitis, interstitial nephritis, tubulitis, and glomerulitis. T-cells consisted of CD4+, CD8+, and FoxP3+ cells. Renal expression analysis of allogeneic animals showed increases in indoleamine-2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), different cytokines (TNFα, IFN-γ, IL-1α, IL2, IL-6, and IL-10), and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1), resembling findings from other tissues in acute GvHD. In summary, our study supports the entity of renal GvHD with histological features suggestive of cell-mediated renal injury. Albuminuria and urinary NAG levels may serve as early markers of renal

  13. A Renal Variant of Fabry Disease Diagnosed by the Presence of Urinary Mulberry Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimohata, Homare; Ogawa, Yujiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A. This disease is classified into two types, namely a classical and variant type. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old man who showed a renal variant of Fabry disease and was diagnosed at an early stage by the presence of mulberry cells. He had no history of general symptoms except for proteinuria. The presence of mulberry cells caused us to suspect Fabry disease and he was thereafter diagnosed to have a renal variant of Fabry disease based on the findings of a renal biopsy, a mutation analysis and a low level of α-galactosidase A activity. PMID:27904112

  14. [Assessment of renal function in elderly after eighty years: Cockroft and Gault or Modification of diet in renal disease equation?].

    PubMed

    Andro, M; Estivin, S; Comps, E; Gentric, A

    2011-11-01

    Assessment of renal function is essential in the management of hospitalised patients, particularly in geriatric practice. Impairment of renal function is common in the elderly, aged of 80 years and over, and should be taken into account before prescribing drugs eliminated through the kidneys or performing investigations requiring iodine injection. Renal failure is also a predictor of mortality. In clinical practice, creatinine-based equations are recommended to assess kidney function. The most widely used equations are the Cockroft and Gault (CG) and the simplified Modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formulas. The former estimates the clearance of creatinine in millilitres per minute, the latter estimates the glomerular filtration rate in millilitres per minute per 1.73 m(2). In 2002, the French high authority for health recommended the use of the CG formula, but no recommendation was given for the elderly. In the literature, no study has compared CG and MDRD formulas with a reference method in this very old population. In the octogenarians, two studies have compared these formulas with the creatinine clearance calculated on the basis of a 24-hour urine collection and four studies have compared the formulas head to head. All these studies showed that the results obtained with the MDRD formula are higher from 10 to 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) than the results obtained with the CG formula. Studies simulating drug prescription showed that the use of the MDRD formula would lead to a risk of drug over dosage in 20 to 36% of the elderly. Also, two studies have suggested that only creatinine clearance measured by the CG formula is a predictor of mortality in the very old population. In conclusion, in the octogenarian, none of these two formulas is ideal. However, based on the results of studies targeted to this elderly population, the best solution seems to be the use of the CG formula expecting new methods of evaluation of renal function.

  15. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  16. Difficulties in Celiac Disease Diagnosis in Children - A case report.

    PubMed

    Samasca, Gabriel; Bruchental, Manuela; Butnariu, Angela; Pirvan, Alexandru; Andreica, Mariana; Cristea, Victor; Dejica, Doru

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease in a patient with lactose intolerance has special importance having implications for the treatment of both diseases. The authors present the case of a 2 years old girl, first diagnosed with enterocolitis, but her clinical evolution revealed a complex situation: both celiac disease and secondary lactose intolerance. We present the case as a special situation in clinical pediatric practice that must be taken into account more often.

  17. A Comparative Study of Sonographic Grading of Renal Parenchymal Changes and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) using Modified Diet in Renal Disease Formula

    PubMed Central

    Shivalli, Siddharudha; Pai, B.H. Santhosh; Acharya, Koteshwara Devadasa; Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandra; Srikanth, Vivek; Reddy, Vishwanath; Haris, Arafat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The sonographic findings are of help in evaluating the nephrological diseases. Glomerular filtration rate is another parameter for assessing the reserved renal function and an indicator of prognosis. In clinical practice GFR estimation (eGFR) is done by using a mathematical formula. In our study, we compared the sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR calculated using Modified Diet in Renal Diseases formula based on serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity. Aim To evaluate the relevance of sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes in assessing the severity of the renal disease and comparing it to the eGFR calculated using MDRD formula based on the age, gender and serum creatinine value of the patient. Materials and Methods The adult patients with suspected kidney disease referred for sonography of abdomen were our study participants. As per our study design following strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, patients were selected as study participants and for each of the patient’s renal parenchymal status, serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity were documented. Results A total of 70 patients were our study participants, out of which 67.1% were males and 32.9% were females. Our study showed a linear correlation between sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR. Conclusion We conclude that by evaluating the kidneys with sonography and calculating eGFR using MDRD formula the renal status will be more accurately interpreted. PMID:27042555

  18. [The use of nails to diagnosis diseases].

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert

    2014-11-01

    For those interested in nails, a fairly good knowledge of the anatomy of the nail unit is indispensable. But nothing will replace a careful, clinical examination of the nail apparatus. The shape of the nail, surface abnormalities and coloration, with or without a magnifying glass, may well provide a medical diagnosis not only in dermatology but also for medicine in general. Pits on the surface of the nail plate may be enough to diagnose psoriasis on a limited area of scalp dandruff. Even partial detachment of the nail apparatus might lead to the suspicion of psoriatic arthritis. A triangular lunula is associated with the absence of patellas. Finally, no pulmonary examination of a smoker is complete without looking for clubbing. It is high time to pay tribute to the nail.

  19. Protein restriction and malnutrition in renal disease: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Maroni, B J

    1997-01-01

    The protein and energy requirements of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients are similar to normal subjects and evidence indicates that both nephrotic and nonnephrotic CRF patients can activate normal homeostatic responses allowing them to achieve a neutral nitrogen balance when dietary protein intake is restricted. The benefits of low-protein (and phosphorus) diets (LPDs) include the amelioration of uremia symptoms and some of its metabolic complications and possibly a slowing of the rate of progression of renal failure. When LPDs are prescribed, patients should be monitored to assess dietary compliance and to ensure nutritional adequacy. Recent evidence that the protein intake of patients with progressive CRF decreases when they consume unrestricted diets should not be interpreted as an argument against the use of LPDs. Rather, it is a persuasive argument to restrict dietary protein intake in order to minimize complications of renal failure while maintaining nutritional status.

  20. Crossed Renal Ectopia and Aorto-Occlusive Disease: A Management Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Eugene; Campbell, Ian; Choong, Andrew MTL; Dunglison, Nigel; Aziz, Maged

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of a patient with aortoiliac occlusive disease on the background of type A crossed renal ectopia, for whom open surgical intervention was required. Aortic exposure in patients with concomitant crossed renal ectopia can present technical challenges to the vascular surgeon. The knowledge of variations in the ectopic renal blood supply is of paramount importance when performing surgery to treat this condition and affects the choice of surgical exposure. We present and discuss the operative details of our patient and outline an approach to this subset of patients. PMID:26509134

  1. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease.

    PubMed

    Bellows, J

    1993-08-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats.

  2. Encephalopathy in infants and children with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, C M; Polinsky, M S; Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Grover, W D

    1981-10-01

    The examination of five pediatric patients with encephalopathy secondary to chronic renal failure has indicated a stereotyped sequence of neurologic signs and symptoms including ataxia, loss of motor abilities, myoclonus, seizures, dementia, and bulbar dysfunction. Both the patients with CNS dysfunction and a control group selected for a similar degree of renal failure had increased levels of serum phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone. Serial EEGs in the affected group revealed progressive slowing and an increase in paroxysmal features. No specific neuropathologic findings were noted in one patient.

  3. [Autosomal-recessive renal cystic disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis: clinico-anatomic case].

    PubMed

    Rostol'tsev, K V; Burenkov, R A; Kuz'micheva, I A

    2012-01-01

    Clinico-anatomic observation of autosomal-recessive renal cystic disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis at two fetuses from the same family was done. Mutation of His3124Tyr in 58 exon of PKHD1 gene in heterozygous state was found out. The same pathomorphological changes in the epithelium of cystic renal tubules and bile ducts of the liver were noted. We suggest that the autopsy research of fetuses with congenital abnormalities, detected after prenatal ultrasonic screening, has high diagnostic importance.

  4. The primary care practitioner and the diagnosis of occupational diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rather than a clinical diagnosis, in occupational medicine the critical point is the etiological diagnosis. The first is useful for the therapy, the latter for preventive, epidemiological, regulatory, and insurance measures. Discussion As with causality criteria which are employed in population studies, the answering of four easy questions allows a Primary Care Practitioner to establish a causal link between the work activities and a potential disease that a specific patient may present. After determining the clinical diagnosis and the actual pathology of an occupational disease, the identity, duration, and intensity of the exposure have to be detected for establishing a close-causal effect. The judgment on the occupational origin of the disease requires an integrated approach using multiple sources of information, and goes beyond the clinical diagnosis. This may require consultation with a specialist in occupational medicine. Summary It is important that the Primary Care Practitioner takes an accurate medical history since this may be the only chance a patient has to have their occupational disease recognised and properly detected/identified. Proper identification of the causative nature of such diseases is important for establishing preventive measures in eliminating and controlling future cases against exposure, epidemiological reporting and studies (particularly in identifying the rates of disease), regulatory reporting requirements and insurance compensation. PMID:20618928

  5. Salivaomics - A promising future in early diagnosis of dental diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva plays an important role in the health of the oral cavity and of the body as a whole. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging field in the diagnosis of oral and systemic diseases. Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional, and metabolic variations. The collection of saliva samples is noninvasive, safe, and inexpensive. Traditional clinical criteria are insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Salivaomics includes five diagnostic alphabets proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, metabolic compounds, and microbes offering substantial advantages because disease states may be accompanied by detectable changes. Salivaomics, the future of saliva-based techniques for early diagnosis of dental diseases, is promising and may offer a robust alternative for clinicians to use in the near future to make clinical decisions. PMID:24688554

  6. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  7. [Acute renal failure secondary to hepatic veno-occlusive disease in a bone marrow transplant patient].

    PubMed

    Borrego, F J; Viedma, G; Pérez del Barrio, P; Gil, J M; de Santis-Scoccia, C; Ramírez Huerta, J M; Alcalá, A; Pérez Bañasco, V

    2003-01-01

    Acute renal failure following bone marrow transplantation is a frequent complication with an incidence ranging 15-30% and with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Numerous potential etiologies can be implicated as chemotherapy regimen, use of nephrotoxic antibiotics, sepsis-induced damage, cyclosporine toxicity and other especific pathologies as graft-v-host disease or veno-occlusive disease of the liver. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and developed and acute renal failure secondary to a fatal veno-occlusive disease of the liver. Incidence, potential predisposing factors, outcome and possibilities of treatment are reviewed.

  8. Impact of feline AIM on the susceptibility of cats to renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Hiramoto, Emiri; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Iwai, Satomi; Takai, Ryosuke; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Mori, Nobuko; Okada, Yuki; Takeda, Naoki; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Arai, Toshiro; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure is one of the most important social problems for its incurability and high costs for patients’ health care. Through clarification of the underlying mechanism for the high susceptibility of cats to renal disease, we here demonstrates that the effective dissociation of serum AIM protein from IgM is necessary for the recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). In cats, the AIM-IgM binding affinity is 1000-fold higher than that in mice, which is caused by the unique positively-charged amino-acid cluster present in feline AIM. Hence, feline AIM does not dissociate from IgM during AKI, abolishing its translocation into urine. This results in inefficient clearance of lumen-obstructing necrotic cell debris at proximal tubules, thereby impairing AKI recovery. Accordingly, mice whose AIM is replaced by feline AIM exhibit higher mortality by AKI than in wild-type mice. Recombinant AIM administration into the mice improves their renal function and survival. As insufficient recovery from AKI predisposes patients to chronic, end-stage renal disease, feline AIM may be involved crucially in the high mortality of cats due to renal disease. Our findings could be the basis of the development of novel AKI therapies targeting AIM-IgM dissociation, and may support renal function in cats and prolong their lives. PMID:27731392

  9. Renal hypertension and cardiovascular disorder in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antić, Amira; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Renal hypertension is one of the earliest and the most prevalent complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Among renal patients, hypertension is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. For casual blood pressure measurement, the best method is auscultatory, while for ambulatory blood pressure measurement, oscillometric method is the most commonly used. Both casual and ambulatory blood pressure measurement provide more powerful means of diagnosing hypertension. Masked hypertension is a condition in which casual blood pressure is normal but ambulatory blood pressure is elevated. The risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is higher with masked hypertension as compared to the controls. Children and adolescents with CKD are at high risk of cardiovascular disease that has been established as the leading cause of death in patients with end stage renal disease. Left ventricular hypertrophy remains the most thoroughly documented form of end-organ damage caused by hypertension in children and adolescents with CKD. Based on clear evidence on the correlation between blood pressure and cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and renal function, renal hypertension must be aggressively treated. Target blood pressure for patients with renal hypertension should be at low normal values: < 75 percentile for patients without proteinuria and <50 percentile for patients with proteinuria. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists are considered the first choice pharmacological option in hypertensive CKD 2-4 patients while the management of volume overload is the most important in dialysis patients. Successful transplantation can eliminate or significantly improve uremia-related cardiovascular risk factors and increase predicted life expectancy.

  10. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment...

  11. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment...

  12. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles. Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P < 0.001). Normotensive ADPKD patients from the 2nd tertile renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile. Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk

  13. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown.Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles.Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P < 0.001). Normotensive ADPKD patients from the 2nd tertile renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile.Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk than healthy

  14. Microscopic features for initial diagnosis and disease activity evaluation in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, Aude; Geboes, Karel; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by 2 major entities: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). In clinical practice, separation of UC and CD has been based on a variety of clinical features, symptoms, endoscopic and radiological, gross and microscopic characteristics. The microscopic diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease is based on a combination of 2 types of lesions: architectural abnormalities and inflammatory features. However, microscopic distinction between these 2 entities can be difficult and often results in an interim diagnosis of "indeterminate colitis." Recommendations are made to encourage pathologists to give an indication of the activity of the disease: in UC, biopsies are used to discriminate between quiescent disease, inactive disease, and different grades of activity; in CD, evaluation of disease activity is limited and inactivity in the biopsy may not reflect inactivity in the patient. The aim of this review was to summarize microscopic features of inflammatory bowel disease for initial diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity in both CD and UC.

  15. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  16. Hypertension, End-Stage Renal Disease and Rehabilitation: A Look at Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Ackah, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the important relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and hypertension for African Americans; and considers issues associated with ESRD and the subsequent need for kidney transplants, including organ availability. Individual and societal implications of these diseases are discussed. (SLD)

  17. 78 FR 8535 - Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Disease Care Model Announcement AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION... the testing of the Comprehensive End- Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Care Model, a new initiative from the... Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), was created to develop and test innovative health...

  18. Chip-Based Sensors for Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhichao

    Nucleic acid analysis is one of the most important disease diagnostic approaches in medical practice, and has been commonly used in cancer biomarker detection, bacterial speciation and many other fields in laboratory. Currently, the application of powerful research methods for genetic analysis, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and gene expression profiling using fluorescence microarrays, are not widely used in hospitals and extended-care units due to high-cost, long detection times, and extensive sample preparation. Bioassays, especially chip-based electrochemical sensors, may be suitable for the next generation of rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection tools. Herein, we report three different microelectrode platforms with capabilities enabled by nano- and microtechnology: nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs), nanostructured microelectrodes (NMEs), and hierarchical nanostructured microelectrodes (HNMEs), all of which are able to directly detect unpurified RNA in clinical samples without enzymatic amplification. Biomarkers that are cancer and infectious disease relevant to clinical medicine were chosen to be the targets. Markers were successfully detected with clinically-relevant sensitivity. Using peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as probes and an electrocatalytic reporter system, NEEs were able to detect prostate cancer-related gene fusions in tumor tissue samples with 100 ng of RNA. The development of NMEs improved the sensitivity of the assay further to 10 aM of DNA target, and multiplexed detection of RNA sequences of different prostate cancer-related gene fusion types was achieved on the chip-based NMEs platform. An HNMEs chip integrated with a bacterial lysis device was able to detect as few as 25 cfu bacteria in 30 minutes and monitor the detection in real time. Bacterial detection could also be performed in neat urine samples. The development of these versatile clinical diagnostic tools could be extended to the detection of various

  19. Oncology of Reptiles: Diseases, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Christman, Jane; Devau, Michael; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Hoppes, Sharman; Rech, Raquel; Russell, Karen E; Heatley, J Jill

    2017-01-01

    Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented.

  20. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  1. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  2. Optical diagnosis of a metabolic disease: cystinosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinotti, Elisa; Perrot, Jean Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Espinasse, Marine; Ouerdane, Youcef; Boukenter, Aziz; Thuret, Gilles; Gain, Philippe; Campolmi, Nelly; Douchet, Catherine; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is a rare autosomal recessive storage disease characterized by the lysosomal accumulation of cystine crystals throughout the body, particularly in blood cells, the cornea, skin, kidneys, the central nervous system, and the muscles. The skin and the cornea are the most accessible sites to explore, and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (IVCM) helps identify crystals in both but does not provide any information to help define their composition. Raman spectroscopy (RS) allows cystine to be easily recognized thanks to its characteristic signature with a band at 499 cm-1. Two dermatology confocal microscopes were used to visualize crystals in both the skin and the ocular surface of a cystinosis patient, and an ex vivo Raman examination of a skin biopsy and of the cornea was performed and removed during a corneal graft to confirm the cystine composition of the crystals. Recently, RS has been performed in vivo and coupled with IVCM. In the future, it is suggested that crystals in NC and other deposits in storage diseases could be identified with this noninvasive in vivo technique that combines IVCM to recognize the deposits and RS to confirm their chemical nature.

  3. Moyamoya Disease: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease characterized by progressive stenosis at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Although its etiology remains unknown, recent genetic studies identified RNF213 in the 17q25-ter region as an important susceptibility gene of MMD among East Asian populations. Possibly because of genetic differences, MMD is relatively common in people living in East Asian countries such as Korea and Japan, compared to those in the Western Hemisphere. The prevalence of MMD appears to be slightly lower among Chinese, compared to Koreans or Japanese. There are two peaks of incidence with different clinical presentations, at around 10 years and 30-40 years. The peak appears to occur later in women than men. In children, ischemic symptoms, especially transient ischemic attacks, are predominant. Intellectual decline, seizures, and involuntary movements are also more common in this age group. In contrast, adult patients present with intracranial hemorrhage more often than pediatric patients. In patients with MMD, intracerebral hemorrhage is more often accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage than in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. These different age peaks and different clinical presentations in each age group are also observed in MMD patients in the USA. Catheter angiography is the diagnostic method of choice. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomographic angiography are noninvasive diagnostic methods. High-resolution vessel wall MR imaging also helps diagnose MMD by revealing concentric vessel wall narrowing with basal collaterals. PMID:26846755

  4. Long-term course and mechanisms of progression of renal disease in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Horatio A

    2005-08-01

    In the classic form of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with toxins of gram-negative enterobacteria, mortality in the acute stage has been lower than 5% since 1978 (data from the Nephrology Committee, Argentine Society of Pediatrics). Children usually die because of severe involvement of the central nervous system, intestine, or myocardium and its complications, or because of intercurrent infection. Treatment in this phase is supportive, and efforts should be put into prevention of infection by Shiga-like toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Of the 95% who survive, approximately one third is at risk for having chronic sequelae. Motor, sensory, or intellectual deficits, intestinal strictures, myocardial infarctions, or diabetes are infrequent. The more-frequent chronic renal lesion is characterized by the hyperfunction of nephrons remaining after the acute necrotizing lesion, which leads to progressive scarring, and not by persistence or recurrence of the microangiopathic process. Three courses of progression to end-stage renal failure have been described. Children with most severe forms do not recover from acute renal failure and enter directly into a dialysis and transplantation program. A second group recovers renal function partially, with persistent proteinuria and frequently hypertension; progression to end-stage renal failure occurs in 2 to 5 years. The third group may recover normal serum creatinine and creatinine clearance, with persistent proteinuria. They are at risk of progressing to chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease after more than 5 years, and sometimes as late as 20 years, after the acute disease. Treatment should aim at preventing the mechanisms associated with progressive renal scarring. Transplantation is indicated in this form of hemolytic uremic syndrome, because there is little, if any, risk of recurrence, and the prognosis is similar to that of transplantation for other diseases.

  5. Iniquities in the access to renal transplant for patients with end-stage chronic renal disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Elaine Leandro; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; César, Cibele Comini; Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Acúrcio, Francisco de Assis; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this present study is to analyze individual and contextual factors associated with access to renal transplant in Brazil. An observational, prospective and non-concurrent study was carried out, based on data from the National Database on renal replacement therapies in Brazil. Patients undergoing dialysis between 01/Jan/2000 and 31/Dec/2000 were included and monitored up to the point of transplant, death or until the end of the study period. Variables that were analyzed included: individual variables (age, sex, region of residence, primary renal disease, hospitalizations); and context variables concerning both the dialysis unit (level of complexity, juridical nature, hemodialysis machines and location) and the city (geographic region, location and HDI). Proportional hazard models were adjusted with hierarchical entry to identify factors associated with the risk of transplant. The results point to differentials in access according to socio-demographic, clinical, geographic and social factors, indicating that the organ allocation system has not eliminated avoidable disparities for those who compete for an organ in the nationwide waiting list.

  6. Upcoming biomarkers for the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Pavithra; Agarwal, Arnav; Chawla, Karan; Tofighi, Taraneh; Mondal, Tapas K

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a major cause of acquired heart disease among children and increases the risk of myocardial infarction. While the biochemical basis of the disease is unclear, the evidence suggests interplay between a microbial infection and a genetic predisposition in the development of the disease. Diagnosis of KD based on clinical observation is not completely reliable and is problematic due to the time-sensitive nature of the disease. Hence, identification of inflammatory, proteomic, and genetic biomarkers may assist in earlier and more effective diagnosis and treatment. This review of observational studies and clinical trials analyzes biomarkers in recent research that may be used to establish a gold standard test for KD diagnosis. 65 articles in the literature are assessed to investigate these new biomarkers in addition to biomarkers presently in use. ESR≥40mm/h, leukocyte count ≥16∗10(9)/L and increased WBC count are together suggestive of the presence of KD. Among proteomic biomarkers, elevated NT-proBNP and differing levels of several other proteomic biomarkers such as iNOS in monocytes and neutrophils have been observed in KD patients. Genetic polymorphisms of six HLA class I genes have also been linked with the disease, alongside MICA alleles A4 and A5.1. The results suggest that NT-proBNP is currently a very promising biomarker for future investigation; further research is warranted to allow for accurate and early detection of the disease using this biomarker.

  7. Risk factors for renal scarring in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sevgi; Ertan, Pelin; Ozkayin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of renal scarring among patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and the possible risk factor(s), we studied 90 children (60 girls and 30 boys) with VUR followed in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit at the Ege University Hospital from 1998 to 2003. All the patients were assessed for VUR grade by voiding cystoureterography and for presence of renal scarring by (99 m) technetium dimercapto-succinic acid scintigraphy. All infants with VUR were given low-dose prophylactic antibiotics and followed-up until resolution of the reflux. Grade of reflux and number of urinary tract infection (UTI) episodes (≥3) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for renal scarring (P <0.05). However, gender, familial history and laterality of the disease were not found to be statistically significant risk factors (P >0.05). Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference of frequency of renal scarring among the different age groups (P >0.05). We conclude that recurrences of UTI and VUR severity are significant risk factors for renal scarring in children with VUR. Therefore, identification of VUR at an early age may offer the opportunity to prevent episodes of UTI and possible formation of renal scars that may result in end-stage renal failure.

  8. A possible mechanism for the progression of chronic renal disease and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Re, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as various forms of chronic renal disease and systolic congestive heart failure, are among the most common progressive degenerative disorders encountered in medicine. Each disease follows a nearly relentless course, albeit at varying rates, driven by progressive cell dysfunction and drop-out. The neurologic diseases are characterized by the progressive spread of disease-causing proteins (prion-like proteins) from cell to cell. Recent evidence indicates that cell autonomous renin angiotensin systems operate in heart and kidney, and it is known that functional intracrine proteins can also spread between cells. This then suggests that certain progressive degenerative cardiovascular disorders such as forms of chronic renal insufficiency and systolic congestive heart failure result from dysfunctional renin angiotensin system intracrine action spreading in kidney or myocardium.

  9. Computer-aided periodontal disease diagnosis using computer vision.

    PubMed

    Juan, M C; Alcañiz, M; Monserrat, C; Grau, V; Knoll, C

    1999-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are the major cause of tooth loss. The study of the evolution of these diseases is crucial to achieve adequate planning and treatment. Depth probing is essential to know the periodontal disease stage. In this paper we present a new system for Computer-Aided Periodontal Disease Diagnosis using computer vision. The system automates the depth probing and incorporates a colour camera fitted together with a plastic probe that automatically and exactly obtains the depth probing measure. The system has been tested by several periodontists and with 125 teeth of different patients. The differences between the values taken by the system and two periodontists have not been significant.

  10. Risk Factors for Severe Renal Disease in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sparks, Kathryn; Best, Sunayna; Borrows, Sarah; Hoskins, Bethan; Sabir, Ataf; Barrett, Timothy; Williams, Denise; Mohammed, Shehla; Goldsmith, David; Milford, David V; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Beales, Philip L

    2017-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive, multisystem disease characterized by retinal dystrophy, renal malformation, obesity, intellectual disability, polydactyly, and hypogonadism. Nineteen disease-causing genes (BBS1-19) have been identified, of which mutations in BBS1 are most common in North America and Europe. A hallmark of the disease, renal malformation is heterogeneous and is a cause of morbidity and mortality through the development of CKD. We studied the prevalence and severity of CKD in 350 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-related renal disease attending the United Kingdom national Bardet-Biedl syndrome clinics to further elucidate the phenotype and identify risk indicators of CKD. Overall, 31% of children and 42% of adults had CKD; 6% of children and 8% of adults had stage 4-5 CKD. In children, renal disease was often detected within the first year of life. Analysis of the most commonly mutated disease-associated genes revealed that, compared with two truncating mutations, two missense mutations associated with less severe CKD in adults. Moreover, compared with mutations in BBS10, mutations in BBS1 associated with less severe CKD or lack of CKD in adults. Finally, 51% of patients with available ultrasounds had structural renal abnormalities, and 35% of adults were hypertensive. The presence of structural abnormalities or antihypertensive medication also correlated statistically with stage 3b-5 CKD. This study describes the largest reported cohort of patients with renal disease in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and identifies risk factors to be considered in genetic counseling.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of cystic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghoon; Lee, Eun Joo

    2017-01-01

    Cystic lung disease (CLD) is a group of lung disorders characterized by the presence of multiple cysts, defined as air-filled lucencies or low-attenuating areas, bordered by a thin wall (usually < 2 mm). The recognition of CLDs has increased with the widespread use of computed tomography. This article addresses the mechanisms of cyst formation and the diagnostic approaches to CLDs. A number of assessment methods that can be used to confirm CLDs are discussed, including high-resolution computed tomography, pathologic approaches, and genetic/ serologic markers, together with treatment modalities, including new therapeutic drugs currently being evaluated. The CLDs covered by this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis, and amyloidosis. PMID:28264540

  12. Association-rule-based tuberculosis disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, T.; Natarajan, S.; Murthy, K. N. B.

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually spreads through the air and attacks low immune bodies such as patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This work focuses on finding close association rules, a promising technique in Data Mining, within TB data. The proposed method first normalizes of raw data from medical records which includes categorical, nominal and continuous attributes and then determines Association Rules from the normalized data with different support and confidence. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with TB obtained from a state hospital. The rules determined describes close association between one symptom to another; as an example, likelihood that an occurrence of sputum is closely associated with blood cough and HIV.

  13. Failure of renal dopamine response to salt loading in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casson, I F; Lee, M R; Brownjohn, A M; Parsons, F M; Davison, A M; Will, E J; Clayden, A D

    1983-01-01

    Eight patients with chronic glomerulonephritis and five age-matched normal volunteers were given additional sodium chloride by mouth under conditions of metabolic balance. Whereas in the normal volunteers plasma renin activity was suppressed and urinary excretion of free dopamine increased, in the patients dopamine was not mobilised and plasma renin activity was not completely suppressed. Abnormal retention of sodium and water in glomerulonephritis may be due partly to a failure to mobilise dopamine in the kidney. Specific renal dopamine agonists may be natriuretic and hypotensive in chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:6402127

  14. IgA nephropathy factors that predict and accelerate progression to end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Guo, Feng-Ling; Zhou, Jin; Zhao, Ya-Juan

    2014-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is a slowly progressing disease that leads to end-stage renal disease in 50 % of the patients within 25 years of the disease. However, several factors are associated with the accelerated progression of this disease causing early development of end-stage disease. Persistent proteinuria or hematuria, poorly controlled hypertension, elevated serum creatinine and prevalent glomerulosclerosis are some of the risk factors that expedite the deteriorative effects of IgAN. Thus, the progression of the disease can be delayed if the associated risk factors are handled and addressed in the nick of time.

  15. Alzheimer’s Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment Across the Spectrum of Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Neugroschl, Judith; Wang, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease exists along a spectrum, from early memory changes to functional dependence and death. Using a case illustration, we review the evaluation and diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer’s disease at each stage, including the management of both cognitive and behavioral/psychiatric aspects of the disease and end-stage and end-of-life care. PMID:21748748

  16. Diagnosis of Whipple's disease using molecular biology techniques.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ángel; Ojeda, Evelia; Muñagorri, Ana I; Gaminde, Eduardo; Bujanda, Luis; Larzabal, Mikel; Gil, Inés

    2011-04-01

    The diagnosis of Whipple's disease (WD) is based on the existence of clinical signs and symptoms compatible with the disease and in the presence of PAS-positive diastase-resistant granules in the macrophages of the small intestine. If there is suspicion of the disease but no histological findings or only isolated extraintestinal manifestations, species-specific PCR using different sequences of the T. whippleii genome from different tissue types and biological fluids is recommended.This study reports two cases: the first patient had diarrhea and the disease was suspected after an endoscopic examination of the ileum, while the second patient had multi-systemic manifestations,particularly abdominal, thoracic, and peripheral lymphadenopathies. In both cases, the diagnosis was confirmed using molecular biology techniques to samples from the small intestine or from a retroperineal lymph node, respectively.

  17. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Differentiation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Lee, Kang-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have significantly increased in recent decades in Korea. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and intestinal Behcet’s disease (BD), which should be differentiated from Crohn’s disease (CD), are more frequent in Korea than in the West. Thus, the accurate diagnosis of these inflammatory diseases is problematic in Korea and clinicians should fully understand their clinical and endoscopic characteristics. Ulcerative colitis mostly presents with rectal inflammation and continuous lesions, while CD presents with discontinuous inflammatory lesions and frequently involves the ileocecal area. Involvement of fewer than four segments, a patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, and scars or pseudopolyps are more frequently seen in ITB than in CD. A few ulcers with discrete margins are a typical endoscopic finding of intestinal BD. However, the differential diagnosis is difficult in many clinical situations because typical endoscopic findings are not always observed. Therefore, clinicians should also consider symptoms and laboratory, pathological, and radiological findings, in addition to endoscopic findings. PMID:27484813

  18. Etiology of End-Stage Renal Disease and Arterial Stiffness among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoul, Balsam; Korjian, Serge; El Alam, Andrew; Samad, Salam; Dahdah, Georges; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Prior studies have demonstrated that conventional and emerging CV risk factors are associated with worsening arterial stiffness among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. The present cross-sectional study evaluates the association between the etiology of ESRD and arterial stiffness among a cohort of hemodialysis patients. Methods. Etiology of ESRD was identified from patients' medical records and classified as either vascular renal disease, diabetic nephropathy, nondiabetic glomerulopathy, tubular interstitial nephropathy, hereditary nephropathy, or ESRD of unconfirmed etiology. Results. A total of 82 subjects were enrolled. cfPWV was independently associated with the composite of either diabetic nephropathy or vascular renal disease (p = 0.022), pulse pressure (p = 0.001), and a history of CV events (p = 0.025), but not history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus alone. The median cfPWVs in diabetic nephropathy and vascular renal disease were comparable and significantly higher than median cfPWVs in other etiologies of ESRD. Conclusion. The study suggests that the etiology of ESRD is independently associated with arterial stiffness among hemodialysis patients. Furthermore, arterial stiffness was higher among patients who developed renal sequelae of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension as compared with those who have a history of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension alone. PMID:28299320

  19. Role of ubiquitin-like protein FAT10 in epithelial apoptosis in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael J; Wosnitzer, Matthew S; Ross, Michael D; Granelli, Benedetta; Gusella, G Luca; Husain, Mohammad; Kaufman, Lewis; Vasievich, Matthew; D'Agati, Vivette D; Wilson, Patricia D; Klotman, Mary E; Klotman, Paul E

    2006-04-01

    Dysregulated apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) is an important component of the pathogenesis of several renal diseases, including HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), the most common cause of chronic kidney failure in HIV-infected patients. In HIVAN, RTEC become infected by HIV-1 in a focal distribution, and HIV-1 infection has been shown to induce apoptosis in vitro. In microarray studies that used a novel renal tubular epithelial cell line from a patient with HIVAN, it was found that the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10 is one of the most upregulated genes in HIV-infected cells. Previously, FAT10 was shown to induce apoptosis in murine fibroblasts. The expression of FAT10 in HIVAN and the ability of FAT10 to induce apoptosis in human RTEC therefore were studied. This study revealed that FAT10 expression is induced after infection of RTEC by HIV-1 and that expression of FAT10 induces apoptosis in RTEC in vitro. Moreover, it was found that inhibition of endogenous FAT10 expression abrogated HIV-induced apoptosis of RTEC. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated increased FAT10 expression in a murine model of HIVAN, in HIVAN biopsy samples, and in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, another renal disease that is characterized by cystic tubular enlargement and epithelial apoptosis. These results suggest a novel role for FAT10 in epithelial apoptosis, which is an important component of the pathogenesis of many renal diseases.

  20. SORCS1 contributes to the development of renal disease in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jozef; O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Sarkis, Allison B.; Prisco, Sasha Z.; Xu, Haiyan; Fox, Caroline S.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Broeckel, Ulrich; Arnett, Donna K.; Moreno, Carol; Provoost, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    Many lines of evidence demonstrate that genetic variability contributes to chronic kidney disease susceptibility in humans as well as rodent models. Little progress has been made in discovering causal kidney disease genes in humans mainly due to genetic complexity. Here, we use a minimal congenic mapping strategy in the FHH (fawn hooded hypertensive) rat to identify Sorcs1 as a novel renal disease candidate gene. We investigated the hypothesis that genetic variation in Sorcs1 influences renal disease susceptibility in both rat and human. Sorcs1 is expressed in the kidney, and knocking out this gene in a rat strain with a sensitized genome background produced increased proteinuria. In vitro knockdown of Sorcs1 in proximal tubule cells impaired protein trafficking, suggesting a mechanism for the observed proteinuria in the FHH rat. Since Sorcs1 influences renal function in the rat, we went on to test this gene in humans. We identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in SORCS1 and renal function in large cohorts of European and African ancestry. The experimental data from the rat combined with association results from different ethnic groups indicates a role for SORCS1 in maintaining proper renal function. PMID:23780848